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Sample records for proliferation motility survival

  1. Automated measurement of cell motility and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goff Julie

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Time-lapse microscopic imaging provides a powerful approach for following changes in cell phenotype over time. Visible responses of whole cells can yield insight into functional changes that underlie physiological processes in health and disease. For example, features of cell motility accompany molecular changes that are central to the immune response, to carcinogenesis and metastasis, to wound healing and tissue regeneration, and to the myriad developmental processes that generate an organism. Previously reported image processing methods for motility analysis required custom viewing devices and manual interactions that may introduce bias, that slow throughput, and that constrain the scope of experiments in terms of the number of treatment variables, time period of observation, replication and statistical options. Here we describe a fully automated system in which images are acquired 24/7 from 384 well plates and are automatically processed to yield high-content motility and morphological data. Results We have applied this technology to study the effects of different extracellular matrix compounds on human osteoblast-like cell lines to explore functional changes that may underlie processes involved in bone formation and maintenance. We show dose-response and kinetic data for induction of increased motility by laminin and collagen type I without significant effects on growth rate. Differential motility response was evident within 4 hours of plating cells; long-term responses differed depending upon cell type and surface coating. Average velocities were increased approximately 0.1 um/min by ten-fold increases in laminin coating concentration in some cases. Comparison with manual tracking demonstrated the accuracy of the automated method and highlighted the comparative imprecision of human tracking for analysis of cell motility data. Quality statistics are reported that associate with stage noise, interference by non

  2. Profilin-1 overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells is associated with alterations in proteomics biomarkers of cell proliferation, survival, and motility as revealed by global proteomics analyses.

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    Coumans, Joëlle V F; Gau, David; Poljak, Anne; Wasinger, Valerie; Roy, Partha; Moens, Pierre D J

    2014-12-01

    Despite early screening programs and new therapeutic strategies, metastatic breast cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death in women in industrialized countries and regions. There is a need for novel biomarkers of susceptibility, progression, and therapeutic response. Global analyses or systems science approaches with omics technologies offer concrete ways forward in biomarker discovery for breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that expression of profilin-1 (PFN1), a ubiquitously expressed actin-binding protein, is downregulated in invasive and metastatic breast cancer. It has also been reported that PFN1 overexpression can suppress tumorigenic ability and motility/invasiveness of breast cancer cells. To obtain insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of how elevating PFN1 level induces these phenotypic changes in breast cancer cells, we investigated the alteration in global protein expression profiles of breast cancer cells upon stable overexpression of PFN1 by a combination of three different proteome analysis methods (2-DE, iTRAQ, label-free). Using MDA-MB-231 as a model breast cancer cell line, we provide evidence that PFN1 overexpression is associated with alterations in the expression of proteins that have been functionally linked to cell proliferation (FKPB1A, HDGF, MIF, PRDX1, TXNRD1, LGALS1, STMN1, LASP1, S100A11, S100A6), survival (HSPE1, HSPB1, HSPD1, HSPA5 and PPIA, YWHAZ, CFL1, NME1) and motility (CFL1, CORO1B, PFN2, PLS3, FLNA, FLNB, NME2, ARHGDIB). In view of the pleotropic effects of PFN1 overexpression in breast cancer cells as suggested by these new findings, we propose that PFN1-induced phenotypic changes in cancer cells involve multiple mechanisms. Our data reported here might also offer innovative strategies for identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets and companion diagnostics for persons with, or susceptibility to, breast cancer.

  3. Novel roles of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 and the Na+,HCO3 - cotransporter NBCn1 in cell survival, proliferation and motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Gitte Ehrenreich

    and cell motility. The molecular mechanisms contributing to altered pHi regulation in cancer cells are incomplete understood. Overexpression of ErbB2 is common in breast cancer and the expression of an N-terminally truncated, constitutively active ErbB2 receptor (ΔNErbB2) is associated with increased....... Pharmacological inhibition of NHE1 enhances cisdiamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin) induced cell death, especially in ΔNErbB2 expressing cells. In Paper III we show that upon cisplatin treatment, expression of ΔNErbB2 results in increased caspase-9 and -7 cleavage, which is further augmented by specific...... inhibition of NHE1. Moreover, NBCN1, yet not NHE1, is lost from the plasma membrane upon cisplatin treatment, and this may explain why inhibition of NHE1 sensitizes the cells to cisplatin-induced cell death. In Paper II we show that in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, the expression levels of NBCn1 and NHE1...

  4. A Mathematical Model Quantifies Proliferation and Motility Effects of TGF-β on Cancer Cells

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    Shizhen Emily Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor (TGF-β is known to have properties of both a tumour suppressor and a tumour promoter. While it inhibits cell proliferation, it also increases cell motility and decreases cell–cell adhesion. Coupling mathematical modelling and experiments, we investigate the growth and motility of oncogene-expressing human mammary epithelial cells under exposure to TGF-β. We use a version of the well-known Fisher–Kolmogorov equation, and prescribe a procedure for its parametrisation. We quantify the simultaneous effects of TGF-β to increase the tendency of individual cells and cell clusters to move randomly and to decrease overall population growth. We demonstrate that in experiments with TGF-β treated cells in vitro, TGF-β increases cell motility by a factor of 2 and decreases cell proliferation by a factor of 1/2 in comparison with untreated cells.

  5. Suppressive effects of 3-bromopyruvate on the proliferation and the motility of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

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    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The compound 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) is an analogue of pyruvate, which is the final product of glycolysis that enters the citric acid cycle. The present study aimed to investigate the suppressive effects of 3BP on the proliferation and motility of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. HLF and PLC/PRF/5 cells were cultured with 3BP and subjected to an MTS assay. Apoptosis was analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Cell motility was analyzed using a scratch assay. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to determine the expression levels of cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)9. Proliferation of both cell lines was significantly suppressed by 3BP at 100 µM (P<0.05). The expression level of cyclin D1 was decreased after 3BP treatment at 100 µM in both cell lines (P<0.05). Pyknotic nuclei were observed in the cells cultured with 3BP at 100 µM. These results revealed that 3BP suppressed cell proliferation, decreased the expression of cyclin D1, and induced apoptosis in HCC cells. 3BP significantly suppressed motility in both cell lines (P<0.05). The expression level of MMP9 was significantly decreased (P<0.05). 3BP suppressed the proliferation and motility of HCC cells by decreasing the expression of cyclin D1 and MMP9.

  6. Silibinin inhibits fibronectin induced motility, invasiveness and survival in human prostate carcinoma PC3 cells via targeting integrin signaling

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    Deep, Gagan [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Kumar, Rahul; Jain, Anil K. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Agarwal, Chapla [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Agarwal, Rajesh, E-mail: Rajesh.agarwal@ucdenver.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Silibinin inhibits fibronectin-induce motile morphology in PC3 cells. • Silibinin inhibits fibronectin-induced migration and invasion in PC3 cells. • Silibinin targets fibronectin-induced integrins and downstream signaling molecule. - Abstract: Prostate cancer (PCA) is the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Preventing or inhibiting metastasis-related events through non-toxic agents could be a useful approach for lowering high mortality among PCA patients. We have earlier reported that natural flavonoid silibinin possesses strong anti-metastatic efficacy against PCA however, mechanism/s of its action still remains largely unknown. One of the major events during metastasis is the replacement of cell–cell interaction with integrins-based cell–matrix interaction that controls motility, invasiveness and survival of cancer cells. Accordingly, here we examined silibinin effect on advanced human PCA PC3 cells’ interaction with extracellular matrix component fibronectin. Silibinin (50–200 μM) treatment significantly decreased the fibronectin (5 μg/ml)-induced motile morphology via targeting actin cytoskeleton organization in PC3 cells. Silibinin also decreased the fibronectin-induced cell proliferation and motility but significantly increased cell death in PC3 cells. Silibinin also inhibited the PC3 cells invasiveness in Transwell invasion assays with fibronectin or cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) serving as chemoattractant. Importantly, PC3-luc cells cultured on fibronectin showed rapid dissemination and localized in lungs following tail vein injection in athymic male nude mice; however, in silibinin-treated PC3-luc cells, dissemination and lung localization was largely compromised. Molecular analyses revealed that silibinin treatment modulated the fibronectin-induced expression of integrins (α5, αV, β1 and β3), actin-remodeling (FAK, Src, GTPases, ARP2 and cortactin), apoptosis (cPARP and

  7. Silibinin inhibits fibronectin induced motility, invasiveness and survival in human prostate carcinoma PC3 cells via targeting integrin signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep, Gagan; Kumar, Rahul; Jain, Anil K.; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Silibinin inhibits fibronectin-induce motile morphology in PC3 cells. • Silibinin inhibits fibronectin-induced migration and invasion in PC3 cells. • Silibinin targets fibronectin-induced integrins and downstream signaling molecule. - Abstract: Prostate cancer (PCA) is the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Preventing or inhibiting metastasis-related events through non-toxic agents could be a useful approach for lowering high mortality among PCA patients. We have earlier reported that natural flavonoid silibinin possesses strong anti-metastatic efficacy against PCA however, mechanism/s of its action still remains largely unknown. One of the major events during metastasis is the replacement of cell–cell interaction with integrins-based cell–matrix interaction that controls motility, invasiveness and survival of cancer cells. Accordingly, here we examined silibinin effect on advanced human PCA PC3 cells’ interaction with extracellular matrix component fibronectin. Silibinin (50–200 μM) treatment significantly decreased the fibronectin (5 μg/ml)-induced motile morphology via targeting actin cytoskeleton organization in PC3 cells. Silibinin also decreased the fibronectin-induced cell proliferation and motility but significantly increased cell death in PC3 cells. Silibinin also inhibited the PC3 cells invasiveness in Transwell invasion assays with fibronectin or cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) serving as chemoattractant. Importantly, PC3-luc cells cultured on fibronectin showed rapid dissemination and localized in lungs following tail vein injection in athymic male nude mice; however, in silibinin-treated PC3-luc cells, dissemination and lung localization was largely compromised. Molecular analyses revealed that silibinin treatment modulated the fibronectin-induced expression of integrins (α5, αV, β1 and β3), actin-remodeling (FAK, Src, GTPases, ARP2 and cortactin), apoptosis (cPARP and

  8. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin αvβ3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-01-01

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin αvβ3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin αvβ3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with β1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin αvβ3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin αvβ3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin αvβ3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin αvβ3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  9. Pancreatic cancer circulating tumour cells express a cell motility gene signature that predicts survival after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeant, Gregory; Eijsden, Rudy van; Roskams, Tania; Van Duppen, Victor; Topal, Baki

    2012-01-01

    Most cancer deaths are caused by metastases, resulting from circulating tumor cells (CTC) that detach from the primary cancer and survive in distant organs. The aim of the present study was to develop a CTC gene signature and to assess its prognostic relevance after surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Negative depletion fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) was developed and validated with spiking experiments using cancer cell lines in whole human blood samples. This FACS-based method was used to enrich for CTC from the blood of 10 patients who underwent surgery for PDAC. Total RNA was isolated from 4 subgroup samples, i.e. CTC, haematological cells (G), original tumour (T), and non-tumoural pancreatic control tissue (P). After RNA quality control, samples of 6 patients were eligible for further analysis. Whole genome microarray analysis was performed after double linear amplification of RNA. ‘Ingenuity Pathway Analysis’ software and AmiGO were used for functional data analyses. A CTC gene signature was developed and validated with the nCounter system on expression data of 78 primary PDAC using Cox regression analysis for disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Using stringent statistical analysis, we retained 8,152 genes to compare expression profiles of CTC vs. other subgroups, and found 1,059 genes to be differentially expressed. The pathway with the highest expression ratio in CTC was p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling, known to be involved in cancer cell migration. In the p38 MAPK pathway, TGF-β1, cPLA2, and MAX were significantly upregulated. In addition, 9 other genes associated with both p38 MAPK signaling and cell motility were overexpressed in CTC. High co-expression of TGF-β1 and our cell motility panel (≥ 4 out of 9 genes for DFS and ≥ 6 out of 9 genes for OS) in primary PDAC was identified as an independent predictor of DFS (p=0.041, HR (95% CI) = 1.885 (1.025 – 3.559)) and OS (p=0.047, HR

  10. Progranulin modulates cholangiocarcinoma cell proliferation, apoptosis, and motility via the PI3K/pAkt pathway

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    Daya M

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Minerva Daya,1–3 Watcharin Loilome,1,3 Anchalee Techasen,3,4 Malinee Thanee,3 Prakasit Sa-Ngiamwibool,4,5 Attapol Titapun,5,6 Puangrat Yongvanit,3 Nisana Namwat1,31Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Santo Tomas, Sampaloc, Manila, Philippines; 3Cholangiocarcinoma Research Institute, 4Faculty of Associated Medical Science, 5Department of Pathology, 6Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand Abstract: Progranulin (PGRN is a growth factor normally expressed in rapidly cycling epithelial cells for growth, differentiation, and motility. Several studies have shown the association of PGRN overexpression with the progression of numerous malignancies, including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA. However, the underlying mechanisms on how PGRN modulates CCA cell proliferation and motility is not clear. In this study, we investigated the prognostic significance of PGRN expression in human CCA tissue and the mechanisms of PGRN modulation of CCA cell proliferation and motility. We found that CCA tissues with high PGRN expression were correlated with poor prognosis and likelihood of metastasis. PGRN knockdown KKU-100 and KKU-213 cells demonstrated a reduced rate of proliferation and colony formation and decreased levels of phosphatidyl inositol-3-kinase (PI3K and phosphorylated Akt (pAkt proteins. Accumulation of cells at the G1 phase was observed and was accompanied by a reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 protein levels. Knockdown cells also induced apoptosis by increasing the Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio. Increased cell apoptosis was confirmed by annexin V-FITC/PI staining. Moreover, suppression of PGRN reduced CCA cell migration and invasion in vitro. Investigating the biomarkers in epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT revealed a decrease in the expression of vimentin, snail, and metalloproteinase-9. In

  11. HDAC inhibitors: modulating leukocyte differentiation, survival, proliferation and inflammation.

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    Sweet, Matthew J; Shakespear, Melanie R; Kamal, Nabilah A; Fairlie, David P

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors in cancer models were first linked to their ability to cause growth arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells. It is now clear that these agents also have pleiotropic effects on angiogenesis and the immune system, and some of these properties are likely to contribute to their anti-cancer activities. It is also emerging that inhibitors of specific HDACs affect the differentiation, survival and/or proliferation of distinct immune cell populations. This is true for innate immune cells such as macrophages, as well as cells of the acquired immune system, for example, T-regulatory cells. These effects may contribute to therapeutic profiles in some autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disease models. Here, we review our current understanding of how classical HDACs (HDACs 1-11) and their inhibitors impact on differentiation, survival and proliferation of distinct leukocyte populations, as well as the likely relevance of these effects to autoimmune and inflammatory disease processes. The ability of HDAC inhibitors to modulate leukocyte survival may have implications for the rationale of developing selective inhibitors as anti-inflammatory drugs.

  12. Upregulation of LYAR induces neuroblastoma cell proliferation and survival.

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    Sun, Yuting; Atmadibrata, Bernard; Yu, Denise; Wong, Matthew; Liu, Bing; Ho, Nicholas; Ling, Dora; Tee, Andrew E; Wang, Jenny; Mungrue, Imran N; Liu, Pei Y; Liu, Tao

    2017-09-01

    The N-Myc oncoprotein induces neuroblastoma by regulating gene transcription and consequently causing cell proliferation. Paradoxically, N-Myc is well known to induce apoptosis by upregulating pro-apoptosis genes, and it is not clear how N-Myc overexpressing neuroblastoma cells escape N-Myc-mediated apoptosis. The nuclear zinc finger protein LYAR has recently been shown to modulate gene expression by forming a protein complex with the protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5. Here we showed that N-Myc upregulated LYAR gene expression by binding to its gene promoter. Genome-wide differential gene expression studies revealed that knocking down LYAR considerably upregulated the expression of oxidative stress genes including CHAC1, which depletes intracellular glutathione and induces oxidative stress. Although knocking down LYAR expression with siRNAs induced oxidative stress, neuroblastoma cell growth inhibition and apoptosis, co-treatment with the glutathione supplement N-acetyl-l-cysteine or co-transfection with CHAC1 siRNAs blocked the effect of LYAR siRNAs. Importantly, high levels of LYAR gene expression in human neuroblastoma tissues predicted poor event-free and overall survival in neuroblastoma patients, independent of the best current markers for poor prognosis. Taken together, our data suggest that LYAR induces proliferation and promotes survival of neuroblastoma cells by repressing the expression of oxidative stress genes such as CHAC1 and suppressing oxidative stress, and identify LYAR as a novel co-factor in N-Myc oncogenesis.

  13. Energy Utilization for Survival and Fertilization-Parsimonious Quiescent Sperm Turn Extravagant on Motility Activation in Rat.

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    Kumar, Lokesh; Yadav, Santosh K; Kushwaha, Bhavana; Pandey, Aastha; Sharma, Vikas; Verma, Vikas; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Rajender, Singh; Sharma, Vishnu L; Gupta, Gopal

    2016-04-01

    Quiescent sperm survive in cauda epididymis for long periods of time under extreme crowding conditions and with a very limited energy substrate, while after ejaculation, motile sperm live for a much shorter period with an unlimited energy resource and without crowding. Thus, the energy metabolism in relation to the energy requirement of the two may be quite different. A simple physiological technique was evolved to collect viable quiescent sperm from rat cauda epididymis to compare its energy metabolism with motile sperm. Quiescent sperm exhibited 40%-60% higher activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes I-IV and ATP synthase in comparison to motile sperm and accumulated Ca(2+) in the midpiece mitochondria to enhance oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). In contrast, motile sperm displayed up to 75% higher activities of key glycolytic enzymes and secreted more than two times the lactate than quiescent sperm. Quiescent sperm phosphorylated AMPK and MAPK-p38, while motile sperm phosphorylated AKT and MAPK/ERK. Glycolytic inhibitor iodoacetamide prevented motility activation of quiescent rat sperm and inhibited conception in rabbits more effectively than OxPhos uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. Apparently, quiescent sperm employ the most energy efficient OxPhos to survive for extended periods of time under extreme conditions of nutrition and crowding. However, on motility initiation, sperm switch predominantly to glycolysis to cater to their high- and quick-energy requirement of much shorter periods. This study also presents a proof of concept for targeting sperm energy metabolism for contraception. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  14. Heterogeneity in Fibroblast Proliferation and Survival in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

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    David Michael Habiel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is the most common form of interstitial lung disease characterized by the persistence of activated myofibroblasts resulting in excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins and profound tissue remodeling. Myofibroblasts have been shown to arise from interstitial fibroblasts, epithelial to mesenchymal transition of type II alveolar epithelial cells, and the differentiation of recruited fibrocytes. There are many mechanisms that are utilized by these cells for survival, proliferation and persistent activation including up-regulation of cytokines (i.e. Interlukin 6 (IL-6, cytokine receptors (i.e. Interlukin 6 Receptor 1 (IL-6R1, Glycoprotein 130 (gp130 and C-C Chemokine Receptor type 7 (CCR7 and innate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs; i.e. Toll Like Receptor 9 (TLR9. In this review, we will discuss the role of the cytokines IL-6 and CCL21, their receptors and the pattern recognition receptor (PRR, TLR9, in fibroblast recruitment, activation, survival and differentiation into myofibroblasts in IPF.

  15. [Cynomorium songaricum improves sperm count and motility and serum testosterone level and promotes proliferation of undifferentiated spermatogonia in oligoasthenospermia rats].

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    Cao, Yi-Juan; Li, Zhen-Bei; Qi, Yu-Juan; Liu, Ying; Gu, Juan; Hu, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Wen-da; Hao, Lin; Hou, Jian-Quan; Han, Cong-Hui

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the effects of cynomorium songaricum (CS) decoction on the testis weight, serum testosterone level, and sperm parameters of rats with oligoasthenospermia (OAS), explore its action mechanism of improving the proliferation of undifferentiated spermatogonial cells, and provide some experimental and theoretical evidence for the development of new Chinese drugs for OAS. Thirty 8-week-old male SD rats were randomly divided into five groups of equal number: blank control, model control, high-dose CS, medium-dose CS, and low-dose CS. OAS models were established by intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide and, a month later, treated intragastrically with normal saline or CS at 2, 1, and 0.5 g per kg of the body weight per day, all for 4 weeks. Then, the testes of the animals were harvested to obtain the testicular weight, sperm concentration and motility, and the level of serum testosterone (T), detect the expressions of the transcription factor 1 (Oct4), Thy-1 cell surface antigen (Thy1), promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF), KIT proto-oncogene receptor tyrosine kinase (C-kit) and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in the testis tissue of the rats in the low-dose CS group by real-time PCR. The testis weights in the blank control, model control, high-dose CS, medium-dose CS, and low-dose CS groups were (1.52±0.06), (1.55±0.06), (1.43±0.30), (1.35±0.40) and (1.34±0.04) g, respectively, not significantly different in the blank and model controls from those in the CS groups (P>0.05). The visual field sperm count per 10 HP was significantly increased in the high-, medium-, and low-dose CS groups (202±20, 196±5 and 216±25) as compared with the blank and model controls (200±15 and 134±30) (P0.05). The visual field sperm motility per 10 HP was markedly increased in the blank control ([52.1±5.5]%), model control ([38.1±2.5]%), high-dose CS ([59.1±9.5]%), medium-dose CS ([58.7±9.5]%), and low-dose CS ([49.6±1.0

  16. Irradiation effects of ultraviolet rays on Leptospira cells. Loss of motility, survive ability, and damages of cell structures

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    Maeda, Hidezo (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-12-01

    The irradiation effects of ultraviolets rays (UV) on leptospira cells were investigated. Four serovar strains of Genus Leptospira ; L. copenhageni, L. canicola, L. biflexa and L. illini were used. A sterilization lamp (Toshiba-GL-15) was lighted at intervals of 90mm on the sample fluid for several minutes. Loss of motility, survival growth and morphological damages were recognized under several conditions. The medium conditions were important, that is, the Korthof's medium was less effective than phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The irradiation time was also important, that is, L. canicola cells in PBS lost their motility and survive ability within 300sec. of irradiation, however, much more time, such as 1.200sec. was necessary in Korthof's medium. This phenomenon may be depended upon defensibility of albumin in the latter. Among the strains, L. biflexa cells showed the highest resistance in loss of motility and survive ability, and other three strains were inferior. The remarkable efects of cellular structures were also seen in the materials with 30 min. of irradiation, in both immediate time or after 24h incubation. The damages observed after 24th of irradiation were much more drastic than those of immediate time. No effect could be seen on the cells suspended in the Korthof's medium irradiated for 24h. Regarding morphological effect, there appeared relaxation of helical body, spherical body and semighost as the immediate changes. Structural damages were recognized as the collapse of cell body, such as scattering of capsule, release of axial flagella, loss or change of cytoplasmic density and break down of wall membrane complex. These phenomena were regarded as the indirect effects of UV-irradiation and autolysis in a post-mortem change.

  17. TIG3 - AN IMPORTANT REGULATOR OF KERATINOCYTE PROLIFERATION AND SURVIVAL

    OpenAIRE

    Scharadin, Tiffany M.; Eckert, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Tazarotene induced gene 3 (TIG3) is a tumor suppressor protein. In normal human epidermis, TIG3 is present in the differentiated, suprabasal layers and regulates terminal differentiation. TIG3 level is reduced in hyperproliferative diseases, including psoriasis and skin cancer, suggesting that loss of TIG3 is associated with enhanced cell proliferation. Moreover, transient expression of TIG3 leads to terminal differentiation in normal keratinocytes and apoptosis in skin cancer cells. In both ...

  18. EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells by potentiating IGF-1 secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Er-Wen; Xue, Sheng-Jiang; Li, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Suo-Wen; Cheng, Jian-Ding; Zheng, Jin-Xiang; Shi, He; Lv, Guo-Li; Li, Zhi-Gang; Li, Yue; Liu, Chang-Hui; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Hong; Li, Jie; Liu, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Levels of EEN expression paralleled with the rate of cell proliferation. • EEN was involved in the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. • EEN regulated the activity of IGF-1-Akt/mTOR pathway. • EEN regulated proliferation and survival of MM cells by enhancing IGF-1 secretion. - Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of multiple myeloma are not well defined. EEN is an endocytosis-regulating molecule. Here we report that EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, by regulating IGF-1 secretion. In the present study, we observed that EEN expression paralleled with cell proliferation, EEN accelerated cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) pathway, and delayed cell apoptosis via Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistically, we found that EEN was indispensable for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion and the activation of protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt-mTOR) pathway. Exogenous IGF-1 overcame the phenotype of EEN depletion, while IGF-1 neutralization overcame that of EEN over-expression. Collectively, these data suggest that EEN may play a pivotal role in excessive cell proliferation and insufficient cell apoptosis of bone marrow plasma cells in multiple myeloma. Therefore, EEN may represent a potential diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for multiple myeloma

  19. EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells by potentiating IGF-1 secretion

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    Huang, Er-Wen [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China); Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xue, Sheng-Jiang [Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiao-Yan [Department of Pharmacy, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Suo-Wen [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Cheng, Jian-Ding; Zheng, Jin-Xiang [Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Shi, He; Lv, Guo-Li; Li, Zhi-Gang; Li, Yue; Liu, Chang-Hui; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Hong [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jie, E-mail: mdlijie@sina.com [Department of Anaesthesiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Chao, E-mail: liuchaogaj@21cn.com [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Levels of EEN expression paralleled with the rate of cell proliferation. • EEN was involved in the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. • EEN regulated the activity of IGF-1-Akt/mTOR pathway. • EEN regulated proliferation and survival of MM cells by enhancing IGF-1 secretion. - Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of multiple myeloma are not well defined. EEN is an endocytosis-regulating molecule. Here we report that EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, by regulating IGF-1 secretion. In the present study, we observed that EEN expression paralleled with cell proliferation, EEN accelerated cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) pathway, and delayed cell apoptosis via Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistically, we found that EEN was indispensable for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion and the activation of protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt-mTOR) pathway. Exogenous IGF-1 overcame the phenotype of EEN depletion, while IGF-1 neutralization overcame that of EEN over-expression. Collectively, these data suggest that EEN may play a pivotal role in excessive cell proliferation and insufficient cell apoptosis of bone marrow plasma cells in multiple myeloma. Therefore, EEN may represent a potential diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for multiple myeloma.

  20. Collagen Promotes Higher Adhesion, Survival and Proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

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    Chinnapaka Somaiah

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC can differentiate into several cell types and are desirable candidates for cell therapy and tissue engineering. However, due to poor cell survival, proliferation and differentiation in the patient, the therapy outcomes have not been satisfactory. Although several studies have been done to understand the conditions that promote proliferation, differentiation and migration of MSC in vitro and in vivo, still there is no clear understanding on the effect of non-cellular bio molecules. Of the many factors that influence the cell behavior, the immediate cell microenvironment plays a major role. In this context, we studied the effect of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in controlling cell survival, proliferation, migration and directed MSC differentiation. We found that collagen promoted cell proliferation, cell survival under stress and promoted high cell adhesion to the cell culture surface. Increased osteogenic differentiation accompanied by high active RHOA (Ras homology gene family member A levels was exhibited by MSC cultured on collagen. In conclusion, our study shows that collagen will be a suitable matrix for large scale production of MSC with high survival rate and to obtain high osteogenic differentiation for therapy.

  1. Inhibition of human lung cancer cell proliferation and survival by wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Compounds of plant origin and food components have attracted scientific attention for use as agents for cancer prevention and treatment. Wine contains polyphenols that were shown to have anti-cancer and other health benefits. The survival pathways of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), and the tumor suppressor p53 are key modulators of cancer cell growth and survival. In this study, we examined the effects of wine on proliferation and survival of human Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and its effects on signaling events. Methods Human NSCLC adenocarcinoma A549 and H1299 cells were used. Cell proliferation was assessed by thymidine incorporation. Clonogenic assays were used to assess cell survival. Immunoblotting was used to examine total and phosphorylated levels of Akt, Erk and p53. Results In A549 cells red wine inhibited cell proliferation and reduced clonogenic survival at doses as low as 0.02%. Red wine significantly reduced basal and EGF-stimulated Akt and Erk phosphorylation while it increased the levels of total and phosphorylated p53 (Ser15). Control experiments indicated that the anti-proliferative effects of wine were not mediated by the associated contents of ethanol or the polyphenol resveratrol and were independent of glucose transport into cancer cells. White wine also inhibited clonogenic survival, albeit at a higher doses (0.5-2%), and reduced Akt phosphorylation. The effects of both red and white wine on Akt phosphorylation were also verified in H1299 cells. Conclusions Red wine inhibits proliferation of lung cancer cells and blocks clonogenic survival at low concentrations. This is associated with inhibition of basal and EGF-stimulated Akt and Erk signals and enhancement of total and phosphorylated levels of p53. White wine mediates similar effects albeit at higher concentrations. Our data suggest that wine may have considerable anti-tumour and chemoprevention properties in lung cancer and deserves further

  2. Interaction of osteoblast-like cells with serum and fibronectin: effects on cell motility and proliferation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuk, A.

    1986-01-01

    Osteoblast migration and proliferation are believed to occur during bone remodelling, in particular after osteoclastic bone resorption and prior to osteoblastic bone formation. In order to study migration and proliferation in vitro, the model of Alessandri et al. (1983) was modified. The model entailed seeding osteoblast-like cells into wells cut in agar and quantifying migration and proliferation peripheral to the well. Cell morphology also was described. The data indicated that on growth surfaces enriched with varying concentrations of fetal calf serum (FSC), the quantification of migration and proliferation was related both to percent cell attachment and to FCS-concentration. Because few osteoblast-like cells incorporated ( 3 H-TdR), it was concluded that the appearance of cells peripheral to the well was due to migration, and not to proliferation. Cell morphology and myosin distribution and organization indicated that osteoblast-like cells at the periphery of the cell culture (i.e. leading edge) may have been directionally migrating whereas cells behind the leading edge may have been engaged in non-directional migration. The migration, proliferation, and morphology of osteoblast-like cells cultured on fibronectin (FN) enriched growth surfaces also was examined. The quantification of migration and proliferation was related to the FN-concentration applied to the growth surface. Because few osteoblast-like cells incorporated 3 H-TdR and cell morphology indicated migration, it was concluded that osteoblast-like cells on FN-enriched growth surfaces are specialized, in part, for migration

  3. Brucella spp. of amphibians comprise genomically diverse motile strains competent for replication in macrophages and survival in mammalian hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dahouk, Sascha; Köhler, Stephan; Occhialini, Alessandra; Jiménez de Bagüés, María Pilar; Hammerl, Jens Andre; Eisenberg, Tobias; Vergnaud, Gilles; Cloeckaert, Axel; Zygmunt, Michel S.; Whatmore, Adrian M.; Melzer, Falk; Drees, Kevin P.; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Wattam, Alice R.; Scholz, Holger C.

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-one small Gram-negative motile coccobacilli were isolated from 15 systemically diseased African bullfrogs (Pyxicephalus edulis), and were initially identified as Ochrobactrum anthropi by standard microbiological identification systems. Phylogenetic reconstructions using combined molecular analyses and comparative whole genome analysis of the most diverse of the bullfrog strains verified affiliation with the genus Brucella and placed the isolates in a cluster containing B. inopinata and the other non-classical Brucella species but also revealed significant genetic differences within the group. Four representative but molecularly and phenotypically diverse strains were used for in vitro and in vivo infection experiments. All readily multiplied in macrophage-like murine J774-cells, and their overall intramacrophagic growth rate was comparable to that of B. inopinata BO1 and slightly higher than that of B. microti CCM 4915. In the BALB/c murine model of infection these strains replicated in both spleen and liver, but were less efficient than B. suis 1330. Some strains survived in the mammalian host for up to 12 weeks. The heterogeneity of these novel strains hampers a single species description but their phenotypic and genetic features suggest that they represent an evolutionary link between a soil-associated ancestor and the mammalian host-adapted pathogenic Brucella species. PMID:28300153

  4. Interplay of differential cell mechanical properties, motility, and proliferation in emergent collective behavior of cell co-cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Leo; Kolbman, Dan; Wu, Mingming; Ma, Minglin; Das, Moumita

    The biophysics of cell co-cultures, i.e. binary systems of cell populations, is of great interest in many biological processes including formation of embryos, and tumor progression. During these processes, different types of cells with different physical properties are mixed with each other, with important consequences for cell-cell interaction, aggregation, and migration. The role of the differences in their physical properties in their collective behavior remains poorly understood. Furthermore, until recently most theoretical studies of collective cell migration have focused on two dimensional systems. Under physiological conditions, however, cells often have to navigate three dimensional and confined micro-environments. We study a confined, three-dimensional binary system of interacting, active, and deformable particles with different physical properties such as deformability, motility, adhesion, and division rates using Langevin Dynamics simulations. Our findings may provide insights into how the differences in and interplay between cell mechanical properties, division, and motility influence emergent collective behavior such as cell aggregation and segregation experimentally observed in co-cultures of breast cancer cells and healthy breast epithelial cells. This work was partially supported by a Cottrell College Science Award.

  5. Blockade of Aquaporin 1 Inhibits Proliferation, Motility, and Metastatic Potential of Mesothelioma In Vitro but not in an In Vivo Model

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    Sonja Klebe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Malignant mesothelioma (MM is an aggressive tumor of the serosal membranes, mostly the pleura. It is related to asbestos exposure and has a poor prognosis. MM has a long latency period, and incidence is predicted to remain stable or increase until 2020. Currently, no biomarkers for a specific targeted therapy are available. Previously, we observed that expression of aquaporin 1 (AQP1 was an indicator of prognosis in two independent cohorts. Here we determine whether AQP1 inhibition has therapeutic potential in the treatment of MM. Methods. Functional studies were performed with H226 cells and primary MM cells harvested from pleural effusions. AQP1 expression and mesothelial phenotype was determined by immunohistochemistry. AQP1 function was inhibited by a pharmacological blocker (AqB050 or AQP1-specific siRNA. Cell proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent cell growth were assessed. A nude mouse heterotopic xenograft model of MM was utilised for the in vivo studies. Results. Inhibition of AQP1 significantly decreases cell proliferation, metastatic potential, and motility without inducing nonspecific cytotoxicity or increasing apoptosis. In vivo blockade of AQP1 had no biologically significant effect on growth of established tumours. Conclusions. Targeted blockade of AQP1 restricts MM growth and migration in vitro. Further work is warranted to fully evaluate treatment potential in vivo.

  6. Deregulated GSK3β activity in colorectal cancer: Its association with tumor cell survival and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakoori, Abbas; Ougolkov, Andrei; Yu Zhiwei; Zhang Bin; Modarressi, Mohammad H.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Mai, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Minamoto, Toshinari

    2005-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) reportedly has opposing roles, repressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling on the one hand but maintaining cell survival and proliferation through the NF-κB pathway on the other. The present investigation was undertaken to clarify the roles of GSK3β in human cancer. In colon cancer cell lines and colorectal cancer patients, levels of GSK3β expression and amounts of its active form were higher in tumor cells than in their normal counterparts; these findings were independent of nuclear accumulation of β-catenin oncoprotein in the tumor cells. Inhibition of GSK3β activity by phosphorylation was defective in colorectal cancers but preserved in non-neoplastic cells and tissues. Strikingly, inhibition of GSK3β activity by chemical inhibitors and its expression by RNA interference targeting GSK3β induced apoptosis and attenuated proliferation of colon cancer cells in vitro. Our findings demonstrate an unrecognized role of GSK3β in tumor cell survival and proliferation other than its predicted role as a tumor suppressor, and warrant proposing this kinase as a potential therapeutic target in colorectal cancer

  7. Androgen receptor signaling is required for androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cell proliferation and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Wanda V

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgens and androgen receptors (AR regulate normal prostate development and growth. They also are involved in pathological development of prostatic diseases, including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer (PCa. Antiandrogen therapy for PCa, in conjunction with chemical or surgical castration, offers initial positive responses and leads to massive prostate cell death. However, cancer cells later appear as androgen-independent PCa. To investigate the role of AR in prostate cell proliferation and survival, we introduced a vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA. This siRNA targeted 5'-untranslated region of AR mRNA for extended suppression of AR expression in androgen-sensitive human prostate LNCaP cells. Results The siRNA design successfully suppressed endogenous AR expression, as revealed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining in LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells did not proliferate in the absence of AR and underwent apoptosis, based on elevated phospho-Histone H2B expression and higher number of apoptotic body as compared to control cells. Conclusion We demonstrated that AR is vital for prostate cell proliferation and survival in this androgen-sensitive prostate cell line. These results further strengthen the hypothesis that AR can be a therapeutic target for treating androgen-sensitive stages of PCa. Unlike antiandorgens, however, siRNA targeting AR provides a direct inactivation of AR function through the suppression of AR protein expression.

  8. Dissociation of Survival, Proliferation, and State Control in Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, David J H F; Hammond, Colin A; Miller, Paul H; Rabu, Gabrielle M; Beer, Philip A; Ricicova, Marketa; Lecault, Véronique; Da Costa, Daniel; VanInsberghe, Michael; Cheung, Alice M; Pellacani, Davide; Piret, James; Hansen, Carl; Eaves, Connie J

    2017-01-10

    The role of growth factors (GFs) in controlling the biology of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remains limited by a lack of information concerning the individual and combined effects of GFs directly on the survival, Mitogenesis, and regenerative activity of highly purified human HSCs. We show that the initial input HSC activity of such a purified starting population of human cord blood cells can be fully maintained over a 21-day period in serum-free medium containing five GFs alone. HSC survival was partially supported by any one of these GFs, but none were essential, and different combinations of GFs variably stimulated HSC proliferation. However, serial transplantability was not detectably compromised by many conditions that reduced human HSC proliferation and/or survival. These results demonstrate the dissociated control of these three human HSC bio-responses, and set the stage for future improvements in strategies to modify and expand human HSCs ex vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A naringenin–tamoxifen combination impairs cell proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatkevich, Talia; Ramos, Joseph; Santos-Sanchez, Idalys; Patel, Yashomati M., E-mail: ympatel@uncg.edu

    2014-10-01

    Since over 60% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive (ER+), many therapies have targeted the ER. The ER is activated by both estrogen binding and phosphorylation. While anti-estrogen therapies, such as tamoxifen (Tam) have been successful they do not target the growth factor promoting phosphorylation of the ER. Other proliferation pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, (PI3K) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are activated in breast cancer cells and are associated with poor prognosis. Thus targeting multiple cellular proliferation and survival pathways at the onset of treatment is critical for the development of more effective therapies. The grapefruit flavanone naringenin (Nar) is an inhibitor of both the PI3K and MAPK pathways. Previous studies examining either Nar or Tam used charcoal-stripped serum which removed estrogen as well as other factors. We wanted to use serum containing medium in order to retain all the potential inducers of cell proliferation so as not to exclude any targets of Nar. Here we show that a Nar–Tam combination is more effective than either Tam alone or Nar alone in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We demonstrate that a Nar–Tam combination impaired cellular proliferation and viability to a greater extent than either component alone in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the use of a Nar–Tam combination requires lower concentrations of both compounds to achieve the same effects on proliferation and viability. Nar may function by inhibiting both PI3K and MAPK pathways as well as localizing ERα to the cytoplasm in MCF-7 cells. Our results demonstrate that a Nar–Tam combination induces apoptosis and impairs proliferation signaling to a greater extent than either compound alone. These studies provide critical information for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis in breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Nar–Tam impairs cell viability more effectively than

  10. A naringenin–tamoxifen combination impairs cell proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatkevich, Talia; Ramos, Joseph; Santos-Sanchez, Idalys; Patel, Yashomati M.

    2014-01-01

    Since over 60% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive (ER+), many therapies have targeted the ER. The ER is activated by both estrogen binding and phosphorylation. While anti-estrogen therapies, such as tamoxifen (Tam) have been successful they do not target the growth factor promoting phosphorylation of the ER. Other proliferation pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, (PI3K) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are activated in breast cancer cells and are associated with poor prognosis. Thus targeting multiple cellular proliferation and survival pathways at the onset of treatment is critical for the development of more effective therapies. The grapefruit flavanone naringenin (Nar) is an inhibitor of both the PI3K and MAPK pathways. Previous studies examining either Nar or Tam used charcoal-stripped serum which removed estrogen as well as other factors. We wanted to use serum containing medium in order to retain all the potential inducers of cell proliferation so as not to exclude any targets of Nar. Here we show that a Nar–Tam combination is more effective than either Tam alone or Nar alone in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We demonstrate that a Nar–Tam combination impaired cellular proliferation and viability to a greater extent than either component alone in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the use of a Nar–Tam combination requires lower concentrations of both compounds to achieve the same effects on proliferation and viability. Nar may function by inhibiting both PI3K and MAPK pathways as well as localizing ERα to the cytoplasm in MCF-7 cells. Our results demonstrate that a Nar–Tam combination induces apoptosis and impairs proliferation signaling to a greater extent than either compound alone. These studies provide critical information for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis in breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Nar–Tam impairs cell viability more effectively than

  11. MANF Is Indispensable for the Proliferation and Survival of Pancreatic β Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lindahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available All forms of diabetes mellitus (DM are characterized by the loss of functional pancreatic β cell mass, leading to insufficient insulin secretion. Thus, identification of novel approaches to protect and restore β cells is essential for the development of DM therapies. Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER-stress-inducible protein, but its physiological role in mammals has remained obscure. We generated MANF-deficient mice that strikingly develop severe diabetes due to progressive postnatal reduction of β cell mass, caused by decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Additionally, we show that lack of MANF in vivo in mouse leads to chronic unfolded protein response (UPR activation in pancreatic islets. Importantly, MANF protein enhanced β cell proliferation in vitro and overexpression of MANF in the pancreas of diabetic mice enhanced β cell regeneration. We demonstrate that MANF specifically promotes β cell proliferation and survival, thereby constituting a therapeutic candidate for β cell protection and regeneration.

  12. Roles of TRPM8 Ion Channels in Cancer: Proliferation, Survival, and Invasion

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    Nelson S. Yee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to provide a critical review of the transient receptor potential melastatin-subfamily member 8 (TRPM8 in cancers, with an emphasis on its roles in cellular proliferation, survival, and invasion. The TRPM8 ion channels regulate Ca²⁺ homeostasis and function as a cellular sensor and transducer of cold temperature. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that TRPM8 is aberrantly expressed in a variety of malignant solid tumors. Clinicopathological analysis has shown that over-expression of TRPM8 correlates with tumor progression. Experimental data have revealed important roles of TRPM8 channels in cancer cells proliferation, survival, and invasion, which appear to be dependent on the cancer type. Recent reports have begun to reveal the signaling mechanisms that mediate the biological roles of TRPM8 in tumor growth and metastasis. Determining the mechanistic roles of TRPM8 in cancer is expected to elucidate the impact of thermal and chemical stimuli on the formation and progression of neoplasms. Translational research and clinical investigation of TRPM8 in malignant diseases will help exploit these ion channels as molecular biomarkers and therapeutic targets for developing precision cancer medicine.

  13. TAM receptors support neural stem cell survival, proliferation and neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Rui; Meng, Lingbin; Jiang, Xin; Cvm, Naresh Kumar; Ding, Jixiang; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2014-01-01

    Tyro3, Axl and Mertk (TAM) receptor tyrosine kinases play multiple functional roles by either providing intrinsic trophic support for cell growth or regulating the expression of target genes that are important in the homeostatic regulation of immune responses. TAM receptors have been shown to regulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis by negatively regulation of glial cell activation in central nervous system (CNS). In the present study, we further demonstrated that all three TAM receptors were expressed by cultured primary neural stem cells (NSCs) and played a direct growth trophic role in NSCs proliferation, neuronal differentiation and survival. The cultured primary NSCs lacking TAM receptors exhibited slower growth, reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis as shown by decreased BrdU incorporation and increased TUNEL labeling, than those from the WT NSCs. In addition, the neuronal differentiation and maturation of the mutant NSCs were impeded, as characterized by less neuronal differentiation (β-tubulin III+) and neurite outgrowth than their WT counterparts. To elucidate the underlying mechanism that the TAM receptors play on the differentiating NSCs, we examined the expression profile of neurotrophins and their receptors by real-time qPCR on the total RNAs from hippocampus and primary NSCs; and found that the TKO NSC showed a significant reduction in the expression of both nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), but accompanied by compensational increases in the expression of the TrkA, TrkB, TrkC and p75 receptors. These results suggest that TAM receptors support NSCs survival, proliferation and differentiation by regulating expression of neurotrophins, especially the NGF.

  14. A high ratio of apoptosis to proliferation correlates with improved survival after radiotherapy for cervical adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, Mary T.; Cooper, Rachel A.; West, Catharine M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study was made of the role of apoptosis in determining radiotherapy outcome in 39 adenocarcinoma of the cervix. A comparison was also made of the detection of apoptosis by morphology and the TdT dUtp nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Methods and Materials: The level of apoptosis was assessed in paraffin-embedded sections by cell morphology, the TUNEL assay, and a combination of the two. A total of 2,000 cells were counted per section, to obtain apoptotic (AI) and mitotic (MI) indices. Results: Patients with a high AI had a higher survival rate than those with a low AI, however, the difference was not significant. Using a ratio of apoptosis to proliferation indices, patients with an AI:MI > median had significantly better survival than those with AI:MI < median. This was true where the AI was quantified by morphology alone (p = 0.030) or in combination with the TUNEL assay (p = 0.008). Where the AI was quantified by a combination of morphology and TUNEL, the 5-year survival rates for women with AI:MI greater or less than the median were 81% and 25%, respectively. Conclusion: A high ratio of AI:MI in adenocarcinoma of the cervix indicates a good prognosis. A combination of the TUNEL assay and morphology provided the best discrimination between outcome groups

  15. Chronic treatment with AMPA receptor potentiator Org 26576 increases neuronal cell proliferation and survival in adult rodent hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaowei W; Li, Xiao-Yuan; Banasr, Mounira; Koo, Ja Wook; Shahid, Mohammed; Henry, Brian; Duman, Ronald S

    2009-10-01

    Currently available antidepressants upregulate hippocampal neurogenesis and prefrontal gliogenesis after chronic administration, which could block or reverse the effects of stress. Allosteric alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor potentiators (ARPs), which have novel targets compared to current antidepressants, have been shown to have antidepressant properties in neurogenic and behavioral models. This study analyzed the effect of the ARP Org 26576 on the proliferation, survival, and differentiation of neurons and glia in the hippocampus and prelimbic cortex of adult rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received acute (single day) or chronic (21 day) twice-daily intraperitoneal injections of Org 26576 (1-10 mg/kg). Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry was conducted 24 h or 28 days after the last drug injection for the analysis of cell proliferation or survival, respectively. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis was used to determine the phenotype of surviving cells. Acute administration of Org 26576 did not increase neuronal cell proliferation. However, chronic administration of Org 26576 increased progenitor cell proliferation in dentate gyrus (approximately 40%) and in prelimbic cortex (approximately 35%) at the 10-mg/kg dosage. Cells born in response to chronic Org 26576 in dentate gyrus exhibited increased rates of survival (approximately 30%) with the majority of surviving cells expressing a neuronal phenotype. Findings suggest that Org 26576 may have antidepressant properties, which may be attributed, in part, to upregulation of hippocampal neurogenesis and prelimbic cell proliferation.

  16. Targeted inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase impairs cell proliferation, survival, and invasion in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Gao, Jun-Yi; Chen, Hua; Du, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Xue-Qun; Gao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the world, and its metastasis and drug resistance are challenging for its effective treatment. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the targeting of PI3K in colon cancer cells HT-29 and HCT-116 in vitro. In HT-29 and HCT-116 cells, BEZ235, a dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR, and shRNAtarget to PI3KCA were used to inhibit PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. The inhibition efficiency of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. Cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis were evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8, Transwell, and flow cytometry assays. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins (cleavage caspase 3, Bcl-2, Bax, and Bim) were also detected. We found that in HT-29 and HCT-116 cells, the treatment of BEZ235 (1 μM) and PI3KCA knockdown inhibited the activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and significantly suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of HT-29 and HCT-116 cells. In addition, we confirmed that knockdown of BEZ235 and PI3KCA induced cell apoptosis through the upregulated levels of cleavage caspase 3 and Bax and downregulated expression of Bcl-2 and Bim. Our results indicated that targeted inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway impaired cell proliferation, survival, and invasion in human colon cancer.

  17. High MRPS23 expression contributes to hepatocellular carcinoma proliferation and indicates poor survival outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Meng; Wang, Jianlin; Huang, Qike; Zhao, Ge; Xia, Congcong; Shang, Runze; Zhang, Zhuochao; Bian, Zhenyuan; Yang, Xishegn; Tao, Kaishan

    2017-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most prevalent neoplasms and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 is encoded by a nuclear gene and participates in mitochondrial protein translation. Mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 overexpression has been found in many types of cancer. In this study, we explored mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 expression in primary hepatocellular carcinoma tissues compared with matched adjacent non-tumoral liver tissues using mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 messenger RNA and protein levels collected from public databases and clinical samples. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze the relationship between mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 and various clinicopathological features. The results indicated that mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 was significantly overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma. High mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 expression was correlated with the tumor size and tumor-metastasis-node stage. Moreover, patients with high mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 expression levels presented poorer survival rates. Mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 was an independent prognostic factor for survival, especially at the early stage of hepatocellular carcinoma. In addition, the downregulation of mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 decreased the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, we verified for the first time that mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 expression was upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma. High mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 levels can predict poor clinical outcomes in hepatocellular carcinoma, and this protein plays a key role in tumor proliferation. Therefore, mitochondrial ribosomal protein S23 may be a potential therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  18. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarzija, Ivana [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Beard, Peter, E-mail: peter.beard@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  19. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarzija, Ivana; Beard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. ► Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. ► Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. ► Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  20. MiR-371-5p facilitates pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and decreases patient survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De He

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs play a critical role in tumorigenesis, either as a tumor suppressor or as an oncogenic miRNA, depending on different tumor types. To date, scientists have obtained a substantial amount of knowledge with regard to miRNAs in pancreatic cancer. However, the expression and function of miR-371-5p in pancreatic cancer has not been clearly elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of miR-371-5p in pancreatic cancer and its association with the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer.The expression of miR-371-5p was examined in pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma (PDAC and their adjacent normal pancreatic tissues (ANPT or in pancreatic cancer cell lines by qRT-PCR. The association of miR-371-5p expression with overall survival was determined. The proliferation and apoptosis of SW-1990 and Panc-1 cells, transfected with miR-371-5p mimics or inhibitor, were assessed using MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The tumorigenicity was evaluated via mice xenograft experiments. miR-371-5p promoter interactions were analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP. Protein expression was analyzed by Western blot.The expression level of miR-371-5p was dramatically upregulated in clinical PDAC tissues compared with ANPT. Patients with high miR-371-5p expression had a significantly shorter survival than those with low miR-371-5p expression. The in vitro and in vivo assays showed that overexpression of miR-371-5p resulted in cell proliferation and increased tumor growth, which was associated with inhibitor of growth 1 (ING1 downregulation. Interestingly, we also found that ING1, in turn, inhibited expression of miR-371-5p in the promoter region.our study demonstrates a novel ING1-miR-371-5p regulatory feedback loop, which may have a critical role in PDAC. Thus miR-371-5p can prove to be a novel prognostic factor and therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  1. Epigenetic inactivation of TWIST2 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia modulates proliferation, cell survival and chemosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thathia, Shabnam H.; Ferguson, Stuart; Gautrey, Hannah E.; van Otterdijk, Sanne D.; Hili, Michela; Rand, Vikki; Moorman, Anthony V.; Meyer, Stefan; Brown, Robert; Strathdee, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Background Altered regulation of many transcription factors has been shown to be important in the development of leukemia. TWIST2 modulates the activity of a number of important transcription factors and is known to be a regulator of hematopoietic differentiation. Here, we investigated the significance of epigenetic regulation of TWIST2 in the control of cell growth and survival and in response to cytotoxic agents in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design and Methods TWIST2 promoter methylation status was assessed quantitatively, by combined bisulfite and restriction analysis (COBRA) and pyrosequencing assays, in multiple types of leukemia and TWIST2 expression was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis. The functional role of TWIST2 in cell proliferation, survival and response to chemotherapy was assessed in transient and stable expression systems. Results We found that TWIST2 was inactivated in more than 50% of cases of childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia through promoter hypermethylation and that this epigenetic regulation was especially prevalent in RUNX1-ETV6-driven cases. Re-expression of TWIST2 in cell lines resulted in a dramatic reduction in cell growth and induction of apoptosis in the Reh cell line. Furthermore, re-expression of TWIST2 resulted in increased sensitivity to the chemotherapeutic agents etoposide, daunorubicin and dexamethasone and TWIST2 hypermethylation was almost invariably found in relapsed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (91% of samples hypermethylated). Conclusions This study suggests a dual role for epigenetic inactivation of TWIST2 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, initially through altering cell growth and survival properties and subsequently by increasing resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:22058208

  2. Targeted inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase impairs cell proliferation, survival, and invasion in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fei Yang,1,* Jun-Yi Gao,2,* Hua Chen,1 Zhen-Hua Du,1 Xue-Qun Zhang,3 Wei Gao4 1Department of Pathology, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, 2Department of Clinical Medicine, Weifang Medical College, Weifang, 3Graduate School, Taishan Medical University, Xintai, 4Department of Oncology, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the world, and its metastasis and drug resistance are challenging for its effective treatment. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the targeting of PI3K in colon cancer cells HT-29 and HCT-116 in vitro. Methods: In HT-29 and HCT-116 cells, BEZ235, a dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR, and shRNAtarget to PI3KCA were used to inhibit PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. The inhibition efficiency of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. Cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis were evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8, Transwell, and flow cytometry assays. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins (cleavage caspase 3, Bcl-2, Bax, and Bim were also detected. Results: We found that in HT-29 and HCT-116 cells, the treatment of BEZ235 (1 µM and PI3KCA knockdown inhibited the activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and significantly suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of HT-29 and HCT-116 cells. In addition, we confirmed that knockdown of BEZ235 and PI3KCA induced cell apoptosis through the upregulated levels of cleavage caspase 3 and Bax and downregulated expression of Bcl-2 and Bim. Conclusion: Our results indicated that targeted inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway impaired cell proliferation, survival, and invasion in human colon cancer. Keywords: human colon cancer, PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, BEZ235, PI3KCA knockdown

  3. microRNA-10b Is Overexpressed and Critical for Cell Survival and Proliferation in Medulloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Pal

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the effects of miRNA-10b on medulloblastoma proliferation through transcriptional induction of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2. Using a cancer specific miRNA-array, high expression of miRNA-10b in medulloblastoma cell lines compared to a normal cerebellar control was shown, and this was confirmed with real time PCR (RT-PCR. Two medulloblastoma cell lines (DAOY and UW228 were transiently transfected with control miRNA, miRNA-10b inhibitor or miRNA-10b mimic and subjected to RT-PCR, MTT, apoptosis, clonogenic assay and western blot analysis. Transfection of miRNA-10b inhibitor induced a significant down-regulation of miRNA-10b expression, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis, while miRNA-10b mimic exerted an opposite effect. Inhibition of miRNA-10b abrogated the colony-forming capability of medulloblastoma cells, and markedly down-regulated the expression of BCL2. Down-regulation of BCL2 by antisense oligonucleotides or siRNA also significantly down-regulated miRNA-10b, suggesting that BCL2 is a major mediator of the effects of miRNA-10b. ABT-737 and ABT-199, potent inhibitors of BCL2, downregulated the expression of miRNA-10b and increased apoptosis. Analysis of miRNA-10b levels in 13 primary medulloblastoma samples revealed that the 2 patients with the highest levels of miRNA-10b had multiple recurrences (4.5 and died within 8 years of diagnosis, compared with the 11 patients with low levels of miRNA-10b who had a mean of 1.2 recurrences and nearly 40% long-term survival. The data presented here indicate that miRNA-10b may act as an oncomir in medulloblastoma tumorigenesis, and reveal a previously unreported mechanism with Bcl-2 as a mediator of the effects of miRNA-10b upon medulloblastoma cell survival.

  4. Effects of protein kinase C activators and staurosporine on protein kinase activity, cell survival, and proliferation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straarup, EM; Schousboe, P; Hansen, HQ

    1997-01-01

    Autocrine factors prevent cell death in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, a unicellular eukaryote, in a chemically defined medium. At certain growth conditions these factors are released at a sufficient concentration by > 500 cells ml-1 to support cell survival and proliferation. The protein...

  5. Influence of abiotic factors on bacterial proliferation and anoxic survival of the sea mussel Mytilus edulis L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babarro, J.M.F.; De Zwaan, A.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of several abiotic factors (salinity, temperature and pH) on bacterial proliferation and survival time of the sea mussel Mytilus edulis L. were studied under anoxic incubations. In addition, the presence in the incubation media of ammonium and the volatile fatty acids propionate and

  6. Id1 expression promotes peripheral CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and survival upon TCR activation without co-stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chen; Jin, Rong [Department of Immunology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Wang, Hong-Cheng [Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Tang, Hui; Liu, Yuan-Feng; Qian, Xiao-Ping; Sun, Xiu-Yuan; Ge, Qing [Department of Immunology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Sun, Xiao-Hong, E-mail: sunx@omrf.org [Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Zhang, Yu, E-mail: zhangyu007@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Id1 expression enables naïve T cell proliferation without anti-CD28 co-stimulation. •Id1 expression facilitates T cells survival when stimulated with anti-CD3. •Elevation of IL-2 production by Id1 contributes increased proliferation and survival. •Id1 potentiates NF-κB activation by anti-CD3 stimulation. -- Abstract: Although the role of E proteins in the thymocyte development is well documented, much less is known about their function in peripheral T cells. Here we demonstrated that CD4 promoter-driven transgenic expression of Id1, a naturally occurring dominant-negative inhibitor of E proteins, can substitute for the co-stimulatory signal delivered by CD28 to facilitate the proliferation and survival of naïve CD4{sup +} cells upon anti-CD3 stimulation. We next discovered that IL-2 production and NF-κB activity after anti-CD3 stimulation were significantly elevated in Id1-expressing cells, which may be, at least in part, responsible for the augmentation of their proliferation and survival. Taken together, results from this study suggest an important role of E and Id proteins in peripheral T cell activation. The ability of Id proteins to by-pass co-stimulatory signals to enable T cell activation has significant implications in regulating T cell immunity.

  7. TRIM8 downregulation in glioma affects cell proliferation and it is associated with patients survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micale, Lucia; Fusco, Carmela; Fontana, Andrea; Barbano, Raffaela; Augello, Bartolomeo; De Nittis, Pasquelena; Copetti, Massimiliano; Pellico, Maria Teresa; Mandriani, Barbara; Cocciadiferro, Dario; Parrella, Paola; Fazio, Vito Michele; Dimitri, Lucia Maria Cecilia; D’Angelo, Vincenzo; Novielli, Chiara; Larizza, Lidia; Daga, Antonio; Merla, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Human gliomas are a heterogeneous group of primary malignant brain tumors whose molecular pathogenesis is not yet solved. In this regard, a major research effort has been directed at identifying novel specific glioma-associated genes. Here, we investigated the effect of TRIM8 gene in glioma. TRIM8 transcriptional level was profiled in our own glioma cases collection by qPCR and confirmed in the independent TCGA glioma cohort. The association between TRIM8 expression and Overall Survival and Progression-free Survival in TCGA cohort was determined by using uni-multivariable Cox regression analysis. The effect of TRIM8 on patient glioma cell proliferation was evaluated by performing MTT and clonogenic assays. The mechanisms causing the reduction of TRIM8 expression were explored by using qPCR and in vitro assays. We showed that TRIM8 expression correlates with unfavorable clinical outcome in glioma patients. We found that a restored TRIM8 expression induced a significant reduction of clonogenic potential in U87MG and patient’s glioblastoma cells. Finally we provide experimental evidences showing that miR-17 directly targets the 3′ UTR of TRIM8 and post-transcriptionally represses the expression of TRIM8. Our study provides evidences that TRIM8 may participate in the carcinogenesis and progression of glioma and that the transcriptional repression of TRIM8 might have potential value for predicting poor prognosis in glioma patients. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1449-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  8. A simple and accurate rule-based modeling framework for simulation of autocrine/paracrine stimulation of glioblastoma cell motility and proliferation by L1CAM in 2-D culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccavale, Justin; Fiumara, David; Stapf, Michael; Sweitzer, Liedeke; Anderson, Hannah J; Gorky, Jonathan; Dhurjati, Prasad; Galileo, Deni S

    2017-12-11

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a devastating brain cancer for which there is no known cure. Its malignancy is due to rapid cell division along with high motility and invasiveness of cells into the brain tissue. Simple 2-dimensional laboratory assays (e.g., a scratch assay) commonly are used to measure the effects of various experimental perturbations, such as treatment with chemical inhibitors. Several mathematical models have been developed to aid the understanding of the motile behavior and proliferation of GBM cells. However, many are mathematically complicated, look at multiple interdependent phenomena, and/or use modeling software not freely available to the research community. These attributes make the adoption of models and simulations of even simple 2-dimensional cell behavior an uncommon practice by cancer cell biologists. Herein, we developed an accurate, yet simple, rule-based modeling framework to describe the in vitro behavior of GBM cells that are stimulated by the L1CAM protein using freely available NetLogo software. In our model L1CAM is released by cells to act through two cell surface receptors and a point of signaling convergence to increase cell motility and proliferation. A simple graphical interface is provided so that changes can be made easily to several parameters controlling cell behavior, and behavior of the cells is viewed both pictorially and with dedicated graphs. We fully describe the hierarchical rule-based modeling framework, show simulation results under several settings, describe the accuracy compared to experimental data, and discuss the potential usefulness for predicting future experimental outcomes and for use as a teaching tool for cell biology students. It is concluded that this simple modeling framework and its simulations accurately reflect much of the GBM cell motility behavior observed experimentally in vitro in the laboratory. Our framework can be modified easily to suit the needs of investigators interested in other

  9. Effects of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase on PANC-1 cells proliferation, metastatic potential and survival under metabolic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Wang, Yong-Tao; Chen, Pan; Li, Yu-Hua; Chen, Yi-Xin; Zeng, Hang; Yu, Ai-Ming; Huang, Min; Bi, Hui-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) has been reported in pancreatic cancer. However, the role of NNMT in pancreatic cancer development remains elusive. Therefore, the present study was to investigate the impact of NNMT on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, metastatic potential and survival under metabolic stress. Pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 was transfected with NNMT expression plasmid or small interfering RNA of NNMT to overexpress or knockdown intracellular NNMT expression, respectively. Rate of cell proliferation was monitored. Transwell migration and matrigel invasion assays were conducted to assess cell migration and invasion capacity. Resistance to glucose deprivation, sensitivity to glycolytic inhibition, mitochondrial inhibtion and resistance to rapamycin were examined to evaluate cell survival under metabolic stress. NNMT silencing markedly reduced cell proliferation, whereas NNMT overexpression promoted cell growth moderately. Knocking down NNMT also significantly suppressed the migration and invasion capacities of PANC-1 cells. Conversely, NNMT upregulation enhanced cell migration and invasion capacities. In addition, NNMT knockdown cells were much less resistant to glucose deprivation and rapamycin as well as glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose whereas NNMT-expressing cells showed opposite effects although the effects were not so striking. These data sugguest that NNMT plays an important role in PANC-1 cell proliferation, metastatic potential and survival under metabolic stress. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Effects of Nicotinamide N-Methyltransferase on PANC-1 Cells Proliferation, Metastatic Potential and Survival Under Metabolic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aberrant expression of Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT has been reported in pancreatic cancer. However, the role of NNMT in pancreatic cancer development remains elusive. Therefore, the present study was to investigate the impact of NNMT on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, metastatic potential and survival under metabolic stress. Methods: Pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 was transfected with NNMT expression plasmid or small interfering RNA of NNMT to overexpress or knockdown intracellular NNMT expression, respectively. Rate of cell proliferation was monitored. Transwell migration and matrigel invasion assays were conducted to assess cell migration and invasion capacity. Resistance to glucose deprivation, sensitivity to glycolytic inhibition, mitochondrial inhibtion and resistance to rapamycin were examined to evaluate cell survival under metabolic stress. Results: NNMT silencing markedly reduced cell proliferation, whereas NNMT overexpression promoted cell growth moderately. Knocking down NNMT also significantly suppressed the migration and invasion capacities of PANC-1 cells. Conversely, NNMT upregulation enhanced cell migration and invasion capacities. In addition, NNMT knockdown cells were much less resistant to glucose deprivation and rapamycin as well as glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose whereas NNMT-expressing cells showed opposite effects although the effects were not so striking. Conclusions: These data sugguest that NNMT plays an important role in PANC-1 cell proliferation, metastatic potential and survival under metabolic stress.

  11. Igf-I regulates pheochromocytoma cell proliferation and survival in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, María Celia; Venara, Marcela; Nowicki, Susana; Chemes, Héctor E; Barontini, Marta; Pennisi, Patricia A

    2012-08-01

    IGFs are involved in malignant transformation and growth of several tissues, including the adrenal medulla. The present study was designed to evaluate the impact of IGF-I on pheochromocytoma development. We used a murine pheochromocytoma (MPC) cell line (MPC4/30) and an animal model with a reduction of 75% in circulating IGF-I levels [liver-IGF-I-deficient (LID) mice] to perform studies in vitro and in vivo. We found that, in culture, IGF-I stimulation increases proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth, whereas it inhibits apoptosis of MPC cells. When injected to control and to LID mice, MPC cells grow and form tumors with features of pheochromocytoma. Six weeks after cell inoculation, all control mice developed sc tumors. In contrast, in 73% of LID mice, tumor development was delayed to 7-12 wk, and the remaining 27% did not develop tumors up to 12 wk after inoculation. LID mice harboring MPC cells and treated with recombinant human IGF-I (LID+) developed tumors as controls. Tumors developed in control, LID, and LID+ mice had similar histology and were similarly positive for IGF-I receptor expression. The apoptotic index was higher in tumors from LID mice compared with those from control mice, whereas vascular density was decreased. In summary, our work demonstrates that IGF-I has a critical role in maintaining tumor phenotype and survival of already transformed pheochromocytoma cells and is required for the initial establishment of these tumors, providing encouragement to carry on research studies to address the IGF-I/IGF-I receptor system as a target of therapeutic strategies for pheochromocytoma treatment in the future.

  12. Diacylglycerol kinase α mediates 17-β-estradiol-induced proliferation, motility, and anchorage-independent growth of Hec-1A endometrial cancer cell line through the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPR30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Sampietro, Sara; Chianale, Federica; Porporato, Paolo E; Gaggianesi, Miriam; Gregnanin, Ilaria; Rainero, Elena; Ferrara, Michele; Perego, Beatrice; Riboni, Francesca; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Graziani, Andrea; Surico, Nicola

    2011-12-01

    Increased levels of endogenous and/or exogenous estrogens are one of the well known risk factors of endometrial cancer. Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) are a family of enzymes which phosphorylate diacylglycerol (DAG) to produce phosphatidic acid (PA), thus turning off and on DAG-mediated and PA-mediated signaling pathways, respectively. DGK α activity is stimulated by growth factors and oncogenes and is required for chemotactic, proliferative, and angiogenic signaling in vitro. Herein, using either specific siRNAs or the pharmacological inhibitor R59949, we demonstrate that DGK α activity is required for 17-β-estradiol (E2)-induced proliferation, motility, and anchorage-independent growth of Hec-1A endometrial cancer cell line. Impairment of DGK α activity also influences basal cell proliferation and growth in soft agar of Hec-1A, while it has no effects on basal cell motility. Moreover, we show that DGK α activity induced by E2, as well as its observed effects, are mediated by the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPR30 (GPER). These findings suggest that DGK α may be a potential target in endometrial cancer therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The rho GTPase Rac1 is required for proliferation and survival of progenitors in the developing forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leone, Dino P; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Brakebusch, Cord

    2010-01-01

    family member, Cdc42, affects the polarity and proliferation of radial glial cells in the VZ. Here, we show that another family member, Rac1, is required for the normal proliferation and differentiation of SVZ progenitors and for survival of both VZ and SVZ progenitors. A forebrain-specific loss of Rac1...... leads to an SVZ-specific reduction in proliferation, a concomitant increase in cell cycle exit, and premature differentiation. In Rac1 mutants, the SVZ and VZ can no longer be delineated, but rather fuse to become a single compact zone of intermingled cells. Cyclin D2 expression, which is normally...... expressed by both VZ and SVZ progenitors, is reduced in Rac1 mutants, suggesting that the mutant cells differentiate precociously. Rac1-deficient mice can still generate SVZ-derived upper layer neurons, indicating that Rac1 is not required for the acquisition of upper layer neuronal fates, but instead...

  14. Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell motility is a fascinating example of cell behavior which is fundamentally important to a number of biological and pathological processes. It is based on a complex self-organized mechano-chemical machine consisting of cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. In general, the cytoskeleton is responsible for the movement of the entire cell and for movements within the cell. The main challenge in the field of cell motility is to develop a complete physical description on how and why cells move. For this purpose new ways of modeling the properties of biological cells have to be found. This long term goal can only be achieved if new experimental techniques are developed to extract physical information from these living systems and if theoretical models are found which bridge the gap between molecular and mesoscopic length scales. Cell Motility gives an authoritative overview of the fundamental biological facts, theoretical models, and current experimental developments in this fascinating area.

  15. Variations of motility and survival with storage time at 4°C of epididymal spermatozoa Ouled-Djellal breed rams in Eastern Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safsaf, B; Belkadi, S; Belkacem, L; Mamache, B; Tlidjane, M

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate some reproduction performances in Ouled-Djellal rams. This study involved genital organs removed after slaughter from 54 rams at the municipal slaughterhouse of Batna (East Algeria). The measurements of survival and mobility of epididymal sperm followed at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h after collection, revealed significant (p0.001) according to time. Thus, concerning the sperm motility the values were 91.00±2.40%, 89.20±2.40%, 77.00±6.20% and 62.60±1.20% at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Indeed, in live sperm, the viability rates were 82.15±1.48%, 77.67±1.74%, 66.56±1.95% and 52.30±1.46% at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. This study revealed that epididymal spermatozoa stored at 04°C for 72 h kept their mobility and vitality at nearly a half of their the original parameters.

  16. Variations of motility and survival with storage time at 4°C of epididymal spermatozoa Ouled-Djellal breed rams in Eastern Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Safsaf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate some reproduction performances in Ouled-Djellal rams. Materials and Methods: This study involved genital organs removed after slaughter from 54 rams at the municipal slaughterhouse of Batna (East Algeria. Results: The measurements of survival and mobility of epididymal sperm followed at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h after collection, revealed significant (p0.001 according to time. Thus, concerning the sperm motility the values were 91.00±2.40%, 89.20±2.40%, 77.00±6.20% and 62.60±1.20% at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Indeed, in live sperm, the viability rates were 82.15±1.48%, 77.67±1.74%, 66.56±1.95% and 52.30±1.46 at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Conclusion: This study revealed that epididymal spermatozoa stored at 04°C for 72 h kept their mobility and vitality at nearly a half of their the original parameters.

  17. Proliferation and clonal survival of human lung cancer cells treated with fractionated irradiation in combination with paclitaxel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijn, Johannes van; Berg, Jaap van den; Meijer, Otto W.M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to determine the effects of a continuous exposure to paclitaxel (taxol) in combination with fractionated irradiation on cell proliferation and survival. Methods and Materials: Human lung carcinoma cells (SW1573) were given a daily treatment with 3 Gy of x-rays during 5 days in the continuous presence of 5 nM taxol. The surviving fraction and the total number of cells were determined every 24 h before and immediately after irradiation. Results: Irradiation with 5 x 3 Gy and 5 nM taxol cause approximately the same inhibition of cell proliferation. In combination these treatments have an additional effect and the cell population increases no further after the first 24 h. Whereas the cells become more resistant to taxol after the first 24 h with a minimum survival of 42%, taxol progressively reduces the population of surviving cells in combination with x-rays when the number of fractions increases, up to 25-fold relative to irradiation alone. The enhancement effect of 5 nM taxol is likely to be attributed to an inhibition of the repopulation during fractionated irradiation and not to an increased radiosensitivity. Only after treatment with 10 or 100 nM taxol for 24 h, which is attended with a high cytotoxicity, is moderate radiosensitization observed. Conclusion: Taxol, continuously present at a low concentration with little cytotoxicity, causes a progressive reduction of the surviving cell population in combination with fractionated irradiation, mainly by an inhibition of the repopulation of surviving cells between the dose fractions

  18. Microtubule-severing ATPase spastin in glioblastoma: increased expression in human glioblastoma cell lines and inverse roles in cell motility and proliferation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráberová, Eduarda; Vinopal, Stanislav; Morfini, G.; Liu, P. S.; Sládková, Vladimíra; Sulimenko, Tetyana; Burns, M.R.; Solowska, J.; Kulandaivel, K.; De Chadarévian, J.P.; Legido, A.; Mork, S.J.; Janáček, Jiří; Baas, P.; Dráber, Pavel; Katsetos, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 9 (2011), s. 811-826 ISSN 0022-3069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/10/1701; GA ČR GA204/09/1777; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA AV ČR KAN200520701; GA MŠk LC545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : spastin * glioblastoma * cell motility Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.258, year: 2011

  19. RELM-β promotes human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation via FAK-stimulated surviving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chunlong; Li, Xiaohui; Luo, Qiong; Yang, Hui; Li, Lun; Zhou, Qiong; Li, Yue; Tang, Hao; Wu, Lifu

    2017-01-01

    Resistin-like molecule-β (RELM-β), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and survivin may be involved in the proliferation of cultured human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPAMSCs), which is involved in pulmonary hypertension. HPAMSCs were treated with human recombinant RELM-β (rhRELM-β). siRNAs against FAK and survivin were transfected into cultured HPASMCs. Expression of FAK and survivin were examined by RT-PCR and western blot. Immunofluorescence was used to localize FAK. Flow cytometry was used to examine cell cycle distribution and cell death. Compared to the control group, all rhRELM-β-treated groups demonstrated significant increases in the expression of FAK and survivin (P<0.05). rhRELM-β significantly increased the proportion of HPASMCs in the S phase and decreased the proportion in G0/G1. FAK siRNA down-regulated survivin expression while survivin siRNA did not affect FAK expression. FAK siRNA effectively inhibited FAK and survivin expression in RELM-β-treated HPASMCs and partially suppressed cell proliferation. RELM-β promoted HPASMC proliferation and upregulated FAK and survivin expression. In conclusion, results suggested that FAK is upstream of survivin in the signaling pathway mediating cell proliferation. FAK seems to be important in RELM-β-induced HPASMC proliferation, partially by upregulating survivin expression. - Highlights: • rhRELM-β increased the expression of FAK and survivin. • rhRELM-β increased the proportion of HPASMCs in the S phase. • FAK is upstream of survivin in the signaling pathway mediating cell proliferation. • FAK is important in RELM-β-induced HPASMC proliferation, partly via survivin.

  20. RELM-β promotes human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation via FAK-stimulated surviving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chunlong, E-mail: lclmd@sina.com; Li, Xiaohui; Luo, Qiong; Yang, Hui; Li, Lun; Zhou, Qiong; Li, Yue; Tang, Hao; Wu, Lifu

    2017-02-01

    Resistin-like molecule-β (RELM-β), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and survivin may be involved in the proliferation of cultured human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPAMSCs), which is involved in pulmonary hypertension. HPAMSCs were treated with human recombinant RELM-β (rhRELM-β). siRNAs against FAK and survivin were transfected into cultured HPASMCs. Expression of FAK and survivin were examined by RT-PCR and western blot. Immunofluorescence was used to localize FAK. Flow cytometry was used to examine cell cycle distribution and cell death. Compared to the control group, all rhRELM-β-treated groups demonstrated significant increases in the expression of FAK and survivin (P<0.05). rhRELM-β significantly increased the proportion of HPASMCs in the S phase and decreased the proportion in G0/G1. FAK siRNA down-regulated survivin expression while survivin siRNA did not affect FAK expression. FAK siRNA effectively inhibited FAK and survivin expression in RELM-β-treated HPASMCs and partially suppressed cell proliferation. RELM-β promoted HPASMC proliferation and upregulated FAK and survivin expression. In conclusion, results suggested that FAK is upstream of survivin in the signaling pathway mediating cell proliferation. FAK seems to be important in RELM-β-induced HPASMC proliferation, partially by upregulating survivin expression. - Highlights: • rhRELM-β increased the expression of FAK and survivin. • rhRELM-β increased the proportion of HPASMCs in the S phase. • FAK is upstream of survivin in the signaling pathway mediating cell proliferation. • FAK is important in RELM-β-induced HPASMC proliferation, partly via survivin.

  1. Diurnal variations in proliferation and crypt survival suggest a small target cell population in mouse colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbin, J.; Hamilton, E.

    1986-01-01

    Male C57BLasup(t) mice of two ages, 3-5 months (young) and 14-15 months (old) were given 11 or 15Gy whole body irradiation at different times through the day. The mice were killed after 4.5 days and the number of surviving crypts per circumference of jejunum, ileum, transverse colon and descending colon were scored. These results show crypt survival in the small and large intestine of 15-month-old mice. In the ileum the maximum crypt survival was found at 04.00 h and the minimum at 08.00 h. In the jejunum and both regions of the colon the maximum crypt survival occurred at 16.00 h. The nadir of crypt survival after 15 Gy was at 04.00 h in the jejunum and at 20.00 and 24.00 h in the transverse and descending colon, respectively. In young mice, crypt survival levels were similar to those found in old animals except at 04.00 h. when survival in the jejunum and ileum fell to 0.0004+-0.0002 and 0.0007+-0.0004, respectively. The lowest crypt survival in the colon of young mice also occurred at 04.00 h and in all four tissues the greatest number of crypts survived irradiation at 24.00 h. (author)

  2. IL-6-induced Bcl6 variant 2 supports IL-6-dependent myeloma cell proliferation and survival through STAT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuyama, Naohiro; Danjoh, Inaho; Otsuyama, Ken-ichiro; Obata, Masanori; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Ohta, Tsutomu; Ishikawa, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    IL-6 is a growth and survival factor for myeloma cells, although the mechanism by which it induces myeloma cell proliferation through gene expression is largely unknown. Microarray analysis showed that some B-cell lymphoma-associated oncogenes such as Bcl6, which is absent in normal plasma cells, were upregulated by IL-6 in IL-6-dependent myeloma cell lines. We found that Bcl6 variant 2 was upregulated by STAT3. ChIP assay and EMSA showed that STAT3 bound to the upstream region of variant 2 DNA. Expression of p53, a direct target gene of Bcl6, was downregulated in the IL-6-stimulated cells, and this process was impaired by an HDAC inhibitor. Bcl6 was knocked down by introducing small hairpin RNA, resulting in decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to a DNA damaging agent. Thus, STAT3-inducible Bcl6 variant 2 appears to generate an important IL-6 signal that supports proliferation and survival of IL-6-dependent myeloma cells

  3. Histone demethylase JMJD2B is required for tumor cell proliferation and survival and is overexpressed in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhao, Li; Zang, Wen; Liu, Zhifang; Chen, Long; Liu, Tiantian; Xu, Dawei; Jia, Jihui

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► JMJD2B is required for cell proliferation and in vivo tumorigenesis. ► JMJD2B depletion induces apoptosis and/or cell cycle arrest. ► JMJD2B depletion activates DNA damage response and enhances p53 stabilization. ► JMJD2B is overexpressed in human primary gastric cancer. -- Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Jumonji domain containing 2B (JMJD2B) is a newly identified histone demethylase that regulates chromatin structure or gene expression by removing methyl residues from trimethylated lysine 9 on histone H3. Recent observations have shown oncogenic activity of JMJD2B. We explored the functional role of JMJD2B in cancer cell proliferation, survival and tumorigenesis, and determined its expression profile in gastric cancer. Knocking down JMJD2B expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in gastric and other cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation and/or induced apoptosis and elevated the expression of p53 and p21 CIP1 proteins. The enhanced p53 expression resulted from activation of the DNA damage response pathway. JMJD2B knockdown markedly suppressed xenograft tumor growth in vivo in mice. Moreover, JMJD2B expression was increased in primary gastric-cancer tissues of humans. Thus, JMJD2B is required for sustained proliferation and survival of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, and its aberrant expression may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer.

  4. Histone demethylase JMJD2B is required for tumor cell proliferation and survival and is overexpressed in gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhao, Li; Zang, Wen; Liu, Zhifang; Chen, Long; Liu, Tiantian [Department of Microbiology/Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Xu, Dawei, E-mail: Dawei.Xu@ki.se [Department of Microbiology/Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Jia, Jihui, E-mail: jiajihui@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Microbiology/Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JMJD2B is required for cell proliferation and in vivo tumorigenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JMJD2B depletion induces apoptosis and/or cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JMJD2B depletion activates DNA damage response and enhances p53 stabilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JMJD2B is overexpressed in human primary gastric cancer. -- Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Jumonji domain containing 2B (JMJD2B) is a newly identified histone demethylase that regulates chromatin structure or gene expression by removing methyl residues from trimethylated lysine 9 on histone H3. Recent observations have shown oncogenic activity of JMJD2B. We explored the functional role of JMJD2B in cancer cell proliferation, survival and tumorigenesis, and determined its expression profile in gastric cancer. Knocking down JMJD2B expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in gastric and other cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation and/or induced apoptosis and elevated the expression of p53 and p21{sup CIP1} proteins. The enhanced p53 expression resulted from activation of the DNA damage response pathway. JMJD2B knockdown markedly suppressed xenograft tumor growth in vivo in mice. Moreover, JMJD2B expression was increased in primary gastric-cancer tissues of humans. Thus, JMJD2B is required for sustained proliferation and survival of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, and its aberrant expression may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer.

  5. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) promotes lung fibroblast proliferation, survival and differentiation to myofibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Cao, Jian; Pulkoski-Gross, Ashleigh; Zucker, Stanley; Foda, Hussein D

    2016-02-17

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressively fatal disease. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) is a glycosylated transmembrane protein that induces the expression of some matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) in neighboring stromal cells through direct epithelial-stromal interactions. EMMPRIN is highly expressed in type II alveolar epithelial cells at the edges of the fibrotic areas in IPF lung sections. However, the exact role of EMMPRIN in IPF is unknown. To determine if EMMPRIN contributes to lung fibroblast proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, and differentiation to myofibroblasts, normal Human lung fibroblasts (NHLF) transiently transfected with either EMMPRIN/GFP or GFP were treated with TGF- β1 from 0 to 10 ng/ml for 48 h and examined for cell proliferation (thymidine incorporation), apoptosis (FACS analysis and Cell Death Detection ELISA assay), cell migration (Modified Boyden chamber) and differentiation to myofibroblasts using Western blot for α-smooth actin of cell lysates. The effect of EMMPRIN inhibition on NHLF proliferation, apoptosis, migration and differentiation to myofibroblasts after TGF- β1 treatment was examined using EMMPRIN blocking antibody. We examined the mechanism by which EMMPRIN induces its effects on fibroblasts by studying the β-catenin/canonical Wnt signaling pathway using Wnt luciferase reporter assays and Western blot for total and phosphorylated β-catenin. Human lung fibroblasts overexpressing EMMPRIN had a significant increase in cell proliferation and migration compared to control fibroblasts. Furthermore, EMMPRIN promoted lung fibroblasts resistance to apoptosis. Lung fibroblasts overexpressing EMMPRIN showed a significantly increased expression of α- smooth muscle actin, a marker of differentiation to myofibroblasts compared to control cells. TGF-β1 increased the expression of EMMPRIN in lung fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. Attenuation of EMMPRIN expression with the use of an

  6. Regulation of survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis of tumor cells through modulation of inflammatory pathways by nutraceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Subash C.; Kim, Ji Hye; Prasad, Sahdeo

    2010-01-01

    Almost 25 centuries ago, Hippocrates, the father of medicine, proclaimed “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” Exploring the association between diet and health continues today. For example, we now know that as many as 35% of all cancers can be prevented by dietary changes. Carcinogenesis is a multistep process involving the transformation, survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis of the tumor and may take up to 30 years. The pathways associated with this process have been linked to chronic inflammation, a major mediator of tumor progression. The human body consists of about 13 trillion cells, almost all of which are turned over within 100 days, indicating that 70,000 cells undergo apoptosis every minute. Thus, apoptosis/cell death is a normal physiological process, and it is rare that a lack of apoptosis kills the patient. Almost 90% of all deaths due to cancer are linked to metastasis of the tumor. How our diet can prevent cancer is the focus of this review. Specifically, we will discuss how nutraceuticals, such as allicin, apigenin, berberine, butein, caffeic acid, capsaicin, catechin gallate, celastrol, curcumin, epigallocatechin gallate, fisetin, flavopiridol, gambogic acid, genistein, plumbagin, quercetin, resveratrol, sanguinarine, silibinin, sulforaphane, taxol, γ-tocotrienol, and zerumbone, derived from spices, legumes, fruits, nuts, and vegetables, can modulate inflammatory pathways and thus affect the survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis of the tumor. Various cell signaling pathways that are modulated by these agents will also be discussed. PMID:20737283

  7. Effects of recombinant human epidermal growth factor on the proliferation and radiation survival of human fibroblast cell lines in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Sook; Kang, Ki Mun; Na, Jae Boem; Chai, Gyu Young; Lee, Sang Wook

    2006-01-01

    To explore the effect of recombinant human EGF on the proliferation and survival of human fibroblast cell lines following irradiation. Fibroblast was originated human skin and primary cultured. The trypan blue stain assay and MTT assay were used to study the proliferative effects of EGF on human fibroblast cell lines in vitro. An incubation of fibroblasts with rhEGF for 24 hours immediately after irradiation was counted everyday. Cell cycle distributions were analyzed by FACS analysis. Number of fibroblast was significant more increased rhEGF (1.0 nM, 10 nM, 100 nM, 1,000 nM) treated cell than control after 8 Gy irradiation. Most effective dose of rhEGF was at 160 nM. These survival differences were maintained at 1 week later. Proportion of S phase was significantly increased on rhEGF treated cells. rhEGF cause increased fibroblast proliferation following irradiation. We expect that rhEGF was effective for radiation induced wound healing

  8. Bmi1 overexpression in the cerebellar granule cell lineage of mice affects cell proliferation and survival without initiating medulloblastoma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourinaz Behesti

    2013-01-01

    BMI1 is a potent inducer of neural stem cell self-renewal and neural progenitor cell proliferation during development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It is overexpressed in numerous human cancers – including medulloblastomas, in which its functional role is unclear. We generated transgenic mouse lines with targeted overexpression of Bmi1 in the cerebellar granule cell lineage, a cell type that has been shown to act as a cell of origin for medulloblastomas. Overexpression of Bmi1 in granule cell progenitors (GCPs led to a decrease in cerebellar size due to decreased GCP proliferation and repression of the expression of cyclin genes, whereas Bmi1 overexpression in postmitotic granule cells improved cell survival in response to stress by altering the expression of genes in the mitochondrial cell death pathway and of Myc and Lef-1. Although no medulloblastomas developed in ageing cohorts of transgenic mice, crosses with Trp53−/− mice resulted in a low incidence of medulloblastoma formation. Furthermore, analysis of a large collection of primary human medulloblastomas revealed that tumours with a BMI1high TP53low molecular profile are significantly enriched in Group 4 human medulloblastomas. Our data suggest that different levels and timing of Bmi1 overexpression yield distinct cellular outcomes within the same cellular lineage. Importantly, Bmi1 overexpression at the GCP stage does not induce tumour formation, suggesting that BMI1 overexpression in GCP-derived human medulloblastomas probably occurs during later stages of oncogenesis and might serve to enhance tumour cell survival.

  9. Overexpression of FABP3 inhibits human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell proliferation but enhances their survival in hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Suna; Zhou, Yifu; Andreyev, Oleg; Hoyt, Robert F.; Singh, Avneesh; Hunt, Timothy; Horvath, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Studying the proliferative ability of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in hypoxic conditions can help us achieve the effective regeneration of ischemic injured myocardium. Cardiac-type fatty acid binding protein (FABP3) is a specific biomarker of muscle and heart tissue injury. This protein is purported to be involved in early myocardial development, adult myocardial tissue repair and responsible for the modulation of cell growth and proliferation. We have investigated the role of FABP3 in human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells under ischemic conditions. MSCs from 12 donors were cultured either in standard normoxic or modified hypoxic conditions, and the differential expression of FABP3 was tested by quantitative RT PCR and western blot. We also established stable FABP3 expression in MSCs and searched for variation in cellular proliferation and differentiation bioprocesses affected by hypoxic conditions. We identified: (1) the FABP3 differential expression pattern in the MSCs under hypoxic conditions; (2) over-expression of FABP3 inhibited the growth and proliferation of the MSCs; however, improved their survival in low oxygen environments; (3) the cell growth factors and positive cell cycle regulation genes, such as PCNA, APC, CCNB1, CCNB2 and CDC6 were all down-regulated; while the key negative cell cycle regulation genes TP53, BRCA1, CASP3 and CDKN1A were significantly up-regulated in the cells with FABP3 overexpression. Our data suggested that FABP3 was up-regulated under hypoxia; also negatively regulated the cell metabolic process and the mitotic cell cycle. Overexpression of FABP3 inhibited cell growth and proliferation via negative regulation of the cell cycle and down-regulation of cell growth factors, but enhances cell survival in hypoxic or ischemic conditions. - Highlights: • FABP3 expression pattern was studied in 12 human hypoxic-MSCs. • FABP3 mRNA and proteins are upregulated in the MSCs under hypoxic conditions.

  10. Prostaglandin receptor EP3 regulates cell proliferation and migration with impact on survival of endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junyan; Trillsch, Fabian; Mayr, Doris; Kuhn, Christina; Rahmeh, Martina; Hofmann, Simone; Vogel, Marianne; Mahner, Sven; Jeschke, Udo; von Schönfeldt, Viktoria

    2018-01-02

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor 3 (EP3) regulates tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in numerous cancers. The role of EP3 as a prognostic biomarker in endometrial cancer remains unclear. The primary aim of this study was to analyze the prognostic significance of EP3 expression in endometrial cancer. We analyzed the EP3 expression of 140 endometrial carcinoma patients by immunohistochemistry. RL95-2 endometrial cancer cell line was chosen from four endometrial cancer cell lines (RL95-2, Ishikawa, HEC-1-A, and HEC-1-B) according to EP3 expression level. Treated with PGE2 and EP3 antagonist, RL95-2 cells were investigated by MTT, BrdU, and wound healing assay for functional assessment of EP3. EP3 staining differed significantly according to WHO tumor grading in both whole cohort (p = 0.01) and the subgroup of endometrioid carcinoma (p = 0.01). Patients with high EP3 expression in their respective tumors had impaired progression-free survival as well as overall survival in both cohorts above. EP3 expression in the overall cohort was identified as an independent prognostic marker for progression-free survival (HR 1.014, 95%CI 1.003-1.024, p = 0.01) when adjusted for age, stage, grading, and recurrence. Treatment with EP3 antagonists induced upregulation of estrogen receptor β and decreased activity of Ras and led to attenuated proliferation and migration of RL95-2 cells. EP3 seems to play a crucial role in endometrial cancer progression. In the context of limited systemic treatment options for endometrial cancer, this explorative analysis identifies EP3 as a potential target for diagnostic workup and therapy.

  11. KL-6, a human MUC1 mucin, promotes proliferation and survival of lung fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshimo, Shinichiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Hattori, Noboru; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Hirasawa, Yutaka; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2005-01-01

    The serum level of KL-6, a MUC1 mucin, is a clinically useful marker for various interstitial lung diseases. Previous studies demonstrated that KL-6 promotes chemotaxis of human fibroblasts. However, the pathophysiological role of KL-6 remains poorly understood. Here, we further investigate the functional aspects of KL-6 in proliferation and apoptosis of lung fibroblasts. KL-6 accelerated the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of all human lung fibroblasts examined. An anti-KL-6 monoclonal antibody counteracted both of these effects induced by KL-6 on human lung fibroblasts. The pro-fibroproliferative and anti-apoptotic effects of KL-6 are greater than and additive to those of the maximum effective concentrations of platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and transforming growth factor-β. These findings indicate that increased levels of KL-6 in the epithelial lining fluid may stimulate fibrotic processes in interstitial lung diseases and raise the possibility of applying an anti-KL-6 antibody to treat interstitial lung diseases

  12. Macrophages improve survival, proliferation and migration of engrafted myogenic precursor cells into MDX skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-François Lesault

    Full Text Available Transplantation of muscle precursor cells is of therapeutic interest for focal skeletal muscular diseases. However, major limitations of cell transplantation are the poor survival, expansion and migration of the injected cells. The massive and early death of transplanted myoblasts is not fully understood although several mechanisms have been suggested. Various attempts have been made to improve their survival or migration. Taking into account that muscle regeneration is associated with the presence of macrophages, which are helpful in repairing the muscle by both cleansing the debris and deliver trophic cues to myoblasts in a sequential way, we attempted in the present work to improve myoblast transplantation by coinjecting macrophages. The present data showed that in the 5 days following the transplantation, macrophages efficiently improved: i myoblast survival by limiting their massive death, ii myoblast expansion within the tissue and iii myoblast migration in the dystrophic muscle. This was confirmed by in vitro analyses showing that macrophages stimulated myoblast adhesion and migration. As a result, myoblast contribution to regenerating host myofibres was increased by macrophages one month after transplantation. Altogether, these data demonstrate that macrophages are beneficial during the early steps of myoblast transplantation into skeletal muscle, showing that coinjecting these stromal cells may be used as a helper to improve the efficiency of parenchymal cell engraftment.

  13. Plasma Rich in Growth Factors Induces Cell Proliferation, Migration, Differentiation, and Cell Survival of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado-López, Maravillas; Griffeth, Richard J; Meseguer-Ripolles, Jose; Cugat, Ramón; García, Montserrat; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a promising therapeutic alternative for tissue repair in various clinical applications. However, restrictive cell survival, differential tissue integration, and undirected cell differentiation after transplantation in a hostile microenvironment are complications that require refinement. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) from platelet-rich plasma favors human and canine ASC survival, proliferation, and delaying human ASC senescence and autophagocytosis in comparison with serum-containing cultures. In addition, canine and human-derived ASCs efficiently differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, or chondrocytes in the presence of PRGF. PRGF treatment induces phosphorylation of AKT preventing ASC death induced by lethal concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Indeed, AKT inhibition abolished the PRGF apoptosis prevention in ASC exposed to 100  μ M of hydrogen peroxide. Here, we show that canine ASCs respond to PRGF stimulus similarly to the human cells regarding cell survival and differentiation postulating the use of dogs as a suitable translational model. Overall, PRGF would be employed as a serum substitute for mesenchymal stem cell amplification to improve cell differentiation and as a preconditioning agent to prevent oxidative cell death.

  14. Plasma Rich in Growth Factors Induces Cell Proliferation, Migration, Differentiation, and Cell Survival of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maravillas Mellado-López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs are a promising therapeutic alternative for tissue repair in various clinical applications. However, restrictive cell survival, differential tissue integration, and undirected cell differentiation after transplantation in a hostile microenvironment are complications that require refinement. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF from platelet-rich plasma favors human and canine ASC survival, proliferation, and delaying human ASC senescence and autophagocytosis in comparison with serum-containing cultures. In addition, canine and human-derived ASCs efficiently differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, or chondrocytes in the presence of PRGF. PRGF treatment induces phosphorylation of AKT preventing ASC death induced by lethal concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Indeed, AKT inhibition abolished the PRGF apoptosis prevention in ASC exposed to 100 μM of hydrogen peroxide. Here, we show that canine ASCs respond to PRGF stimulus similarly to the human cells regarding cell survival and differentiation postulating the use of dogs as a suitable translational model. Overall, PRGF would be employed as a serum substitute for mesenchymal stem cell amplification to improve cell differentiation and as a preconditioning agent to prevent oxidative cell death.

  15. Intratumoral heterogeneity of 18F-FLT uptake predicts proliferation and survival in patients with newly diagnosed gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitamura, Katsuya; Yamamoto, Yuka; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Norikane, Takashi; Miyake, Keisuke; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Yukito

    2017-01-01

    The nucleoside analog 3'-deoxy-3'- 18 F-fluorothymidine (FLT) has been investigated for evaluating tumor proliferating activity in brain tumors. We evaluated FLT uptake heterogeneity using textural features from the histogram analysis in patients with newly diagnosed gliomas and examined correlation of the results with proliferative activity and patient prognosis, in comparison with the conventional PET parameters. FLT PET was investigated in 37 patients with newly diagnosed gliomas. The conventional parameters [tumor-to-contralateral normal brain tissue (T/N) ratio and metabolic tumor volume (MTV)] and textural parameters (standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and uniformity) were derived from FLT PET images. Linear regression analysis was used to compare PET parameters and the proliferative activity as indicated by the Ki-67 index. The associations between parameters and overall survival (OS) were tested by Cox regression analysis. Median OS was 662 days. For the conventional parameters, linear regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between T/N ratio and Ki-67 index (p = 0.02) and MTV and Ki-67 index (p = 0.02). Among textural parameters, linear regression analysis indicated a significant correlation for kurtosis (p = 0.003), entropy (p < 0.001), and uniformity (p < 0.001) as compared to Ki-67 index, exceeding those of the conventional parameters. The results of univariate analysis suggested that skewness and kurtosis were associated with OS (p = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). Mean survival for patients with skewness values less than 0.65 was 1462 days, compared with 917 days for those with values greater than 0.65 (p = 0.02). Mean survival for patients with kurtosis values less than 6.16 was 1616 days, compared with 882 days for those with values greater than 6.16 (p = 0.006). Based on the results of this preliminary study in a small patient population, textural features reflecting heterogeneity on FLT PET images seem to be

  16. Cadmium induces Wnt signaling to upregulate proliferation and survival genes in sub-confluent kidney proximal tubule cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolff Natascha A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The class 1 carcinogen cadmium (Cd2+ disrupts the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex of epithelial adherens junctions (AJs and causes renal cancer. Deregulation of E-cadherin adhesion and changes in Wnt/β-catenin signaling are known to contribute to carcinogenesis. Results We investigated Wnt signaling after Cd2+-induced E-cadherin disruption in sub-confluent cultured kidney proximal tubule cells (PTC. Cd2+ (25 μM, 3-9 h caused nuclear translocation of β-catenin and triggered a Wnt response measured by TOPflash reporter assays. Cd2+ reduced the interaction of β-catenin with AJ components (E-cadherin, α-catenin and increased binding to the transcription factor TCF4 of the Wnt pathway, which was upregulated and translocated to the nucleus. While Wnt target genes (c-Myc, cyclin D1 and ABCB1 were up-regulated by Cd2+, electromobility shift assays showed increased TCF4 binding to cyclin D1 and ABCB1 promoter sequences with Cd2+. Overexpression of wild-type and mutant TCF4 confirmed Cd2+-induced Wnt signaling. Wnt signaling elicited by Cd2+ was not observed in confluent non-proliferating cells, which showed increased E-cadherin expression. Overexpression of E-cadherin reduced Wnt signaling, PTC proliferation and Cd2+ toxicity. Cd2+ also induced reactive oxygen species dependent expression of the pro-apoptotic ER stress marker and Wnt suppressor CHOP/GADD153 which, however, did not abolish Wnt response and cell viability. Conclusions Cd2+ induces Wnt signaling in PTC. Hence, Cd2+ may facilitate carcinogenesis of PTC by promoting Wnt pathway-mediated proliferation and survival of pre-neoplastic cells.

  17. Krüppel-like factor 5 is essential for proliferation and survival of mouse intestinal epithelial stem cells

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    Mandayam O. Nandan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5 is a pro-proliferative transcription factor that is expressed in dividing epithelial cells of the intestinal crypt. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5 has been identified as a stem cell marker in both small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. To determine whether KLF5 regulates proliferation of intestinal stem cells, we investigated the effects of Klf5 deletion specifically from the intestinal stem cells in adult mice. Mice with inducible intestinal stem cell-specific deletion of Klf5 (Lgr5-Klf5fl/fl were injected with tamoxifen for 5 consecutive days to induce Lgr5-driven Cre expression. Intestinal and colonic tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry at various time points up to 112 days following start of tamoxifen treatment. Klf5 is co-localized in the crypt-based columnar (CBC cells that express Lgr5. By 11 days following the start of tamoxifen treatment, Lgr5-positive crypts from which Klf5 was deleted exhibited a loss of proliferation that was accompanied by an increase in apoptosis. Beginning at 14 days following the start of tamoxifen treatment, both Klf5 expression and proliferation were re-established in the transit-amplifying epithelial cells but not in the Lgr5-positive CBC cells. By 112 days post-treatment, up to 90% of the Lgr5-positive cells from which Klf5 was deleted were lost from the intestinal crypts. These results indicate a critical role for KLF5 in the survival and maintenance of intestinal stem cells.

  18. Proliferation kinetics and survival of mammal cells after treatment with radiation of various ionization densities and with hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlag, H.

    1977-01-01

    Survival and proliferation kinetics of chinese hamster cells after Co-γ-, π - -meson irradiation, hyperthermia (40 - 43 0 C), and a combination of Co-γ irradiation and hyperthermia were studied in this paper. After γ-irradiation, exponential-phase and stationary-phase cells showed equal survival rates for equal doses. Cytofluorometric analysis showed that there was a dose-dependent delay in the synthesis phase with subsequent cell blocking in the G 2 +M phase. After irradiation with π - mesons, there is a dose-dependent accumulation in the G 2 +M phase, with a RBE of 2.2. The different response of S-phase cells to radiations of different LET may be explained with the inactivation kinetics typical of each type of radiation. The effectiveness of hyperthermal treatment depends on the stage of growth of the cells. A temperature of 40 0 C does not induce cell killing, not even after prolonged exposure. After 7 hours' exposure to 41 0 C, on the other hand, 80% of the cells are killed after blocking in G 2 +M. Exposure to 42 0 C for 1-2 h induces a synchronisation effect which is induced by a block in S and G 2 +M. After exposure to 42 0 C for 4 h, however, the cells blocked in S are killed in this phase. Combination of Co-γ radiation leads to increased cells killing and also to sensitization, especially of cells in the exponential growth stage. The proliferation kinetics effects of this combined treatment are the same as after pion irradiation. (orig.) [de

  19. Serratia marcescens Is Able to Survive and Proliferate in Autophagic-Like Vacuoles inside Non-Phagocytic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, María Isabel; García Véscovi, Eleonora

    2011-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic human pathogen that represents a growing problem for public health, particularly in hospitalized or immunocompromised patients. However, little is known about factors and mechanisms that contribute to S. marcescens pathogenesis within its host. In this work, we explore the invasion process of this opportunistic pathogen to epithelial cells. We demonstrate that once internalized, Serratia is able not only to persist but also to multiply inside a large membrane-bound compartment. This structure displays autophagic-like features, acquiring LC3 and Rab7, markers described to be recruited throughout the progression of antibacterial autophagy. The majority of the autophagic-like vacuoles in which Serratia resides and proliferates are non-acidic and have no degradative properties, indicating that the bacteria are capable to either delay or prevent fusion with lysosomal compartments, altering the expected progression of autophagosome maturation. In addition, our results demonstrate that Serratia triggers a non-canonical autophagic process before internalization. These findings reveal that S. marcescens is able to manipulate the autophagic traffic, generating a suitable niche for survival and proliferation inside the host cell. PMID:21901159

  20. The Role of Heme and Reactive Oxygen Species in Proliferation and Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Paes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle comprehending two distinct hosts and a series of morphological and functional transformations. Hemoglobin degradation inside the insect vector releases high amounts of heme, and this molecule is known to exert a number of physiological functions. Moreover, the absence of its complete biosynthetic pathway in T. cruzi indicates heme as an essential molecule for this trypanosomatid survival. Within the hosts, T. cruzi has to cope with sudden environmental changes especially in the redox status and heme is able to increase the basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS which can be also produced as byproducts of the parasite aerobic metabolism. In this regard, ROS sensing is likely to be an important mechanism for the adaptation and interaction of these organisms with their hosts. In this paper we discuss the main features of heme and ROS susceptibility in T. cruzi biology.

  1. Protein kinase C-delta inactivation inhibits the proliferation and survival of cancer stem cells in culture and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhihong; Forman, Lora W; Williams, Robert M; Faller, Douglas V

    2014-01-01

    A subpopulation of tumor cells with distinct stem-like properties (cancer stem-like cells, CSCs) may be responsible for tumor initiation, invasive growth, and possibly dissemination to distant organ sites. CSCs exhibit a spectrum of biological, biochemical, and molecular features that are consistent with a stem-like phenotype, including growth as non-adherent spheres (clonogenic potential), ability to form a new tumor in xenograft assays, unlimited self-renewal, and the capacity for multipotency and lineage-specific differentiation. PKCδ is a novel class serine/threonine kinase of the PKC family, and functions in a number of cellular activities including cell proliferation, survival or apoptosis. PKCδ has previously been validated as a synthetic lethal target in cancer cells of multiple types with aberrant activation of Ras signaling, using both genetic (shRNA and dominant-negative PKCδ mutants) and small molecule inhibitors. In contrast, PKCδ is not required for the proliferation or survival of normal cells, suggesting the potential tumor-specificity of a PKCδ-targeted approach. shRNA knockdown was used validate PKCδ as a target in primary cancer stem cell lines and stem-like cells derived from human tumor cell lines, including breast, pancreatic, prostate and melanoma tumor cells. Novel and potent small molecule PKCδ inhibitors were employed in assays monitoring apoptosis, proliferation and clonogenic capacity of these cancer stem-like populations. Significant differences among data sets were determined using two-tailed Student’s t tests or ANOVA. We demonstrate that CSC-like populations derived from multiple types of human primary tumors, from human cancer cell lines, and from transformed human cells, require PKCδ activity and are susceptible to agents which deplete PKCδ protein or activity. Inhibition of PKCδ by specific genetic strategies (shRNA) or by novel small molecule inhibitors is growth inhibitory and cytotoxic to multiple types of human

  2. Effect of gamma irradiation on proliferation and survival of Sf9 cells: radioresistance in a Lepidopteran insect cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, R.K.; Lovell, K.V.; Reynolds, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    Sf9 cells of Spodoptera frugiperda, when exposed to gamma-irradiation from a 60 Co source, were found markedly less sensitive to ionising radiation than mammalian cells in terms of both growth kinetics and survival. Following irradiation at 1.2 Gy S -1 there was a dose-dependent delay in Sf9 cell proliferation and plateau cell density was reduced. These effects were dependent on dose rate too. In the range 0.3 - 1.2 Gy s -1 , growth was delayed longer and reached a lower plateau with increasing dose rate. Exposure to radiation caused a decrease in adherence of cells to the substrate, and an increase in number of enlarged ('giant') cells. Analysis of colony formation after irradiation at 1.2 Gy s -1 gave a survival curve of conventional shape but with a very large D o value of 24 Gy. Extrapolation number (N) was 2.9, a value within the normal range for mammalian cells. At 0.12 Gy s -1 N had a similar value of 3.2, but D o was higher (30 Gy) than at the higher dose rate. This study indicates that the relative insensitivity of lepidoptera insects may be attributed to some extent to the intrinsic properties of their constituent cells. (author)

  3. LIGHT (TNFSF14 Increases the Survival and Proliferation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

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    Sook-Kyoung Heo

    Full Text Available LIGHT (HVEM-L, TNFSF14, or CD258, an entity homologous to lymphotoxins, with inducible nature and the ability to compete with herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D for herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM/tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related 2, is a member of the TNF superfamily. It is expressed as a homotrimer on activated T cells and dendritic cells (DCs, and has three receptors: HVEM, LT-β receptor (LTβR, and decoy receptor 3 (DcR3. So far, three receptors with distinct cellular expression patterns are known to interact with LIGHT. Follicular DCs and stromal cells bind LIGHT through LTβR. We monitored the effects of LIGHT on human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. At first, we checked the negative and positive differentiation markers of BM-MSCs. And we confirmed the quality of MSCs by staining cells undergoing adipogenesis (Oil Red O staining, chondrogenesis (Alcian blue staining, and osteogenesis (Alizarin red staining. After rhLIGHT treatment, we monitored the count, viability, and proliferation of cells and cell cycle distribution. PDGF and TGFβ production by rhLIGHT was examined by ELISA, and the underlying biological mechanisms were studied by immunoblotting by rhLIGHT treatment. LTβR was constitutively expressed on the surface of human BM-MSCs. Cell number and viability increased after rhLIGHT treatment. BM-MSC proliferation was induced by an increase in the S/G2/M phase. The expression of not only diverse cyclins such as cyclin B1, D1, D3, and E, but also CDK1 and CDK2, increased, while that of p27 decreased, after rhLIGHT treatment. RhLIGHT-induced PDGF and TGFβ production mediated by STAT3 and Smad3 activation accelerated BM-MSC proliferation. Thus, LIGHT and LTβR interaction increases the survival and proliferation of human BM-MSCs, and therefore, LIGHT might play an important role in stem cell therapy.

  4. Proliferation and survival molecules implicated in the inhibition of BRAF pathway in thyroid cancer cells harbouring different genetic mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preto, Ana; Soares, Paula; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Gonçalves, Joana; Rebocho, Ana P; Figueiredo, Joana; Meireles, Ana M; Rocha, Ana S; Vasconcelos, Helena M; Seca, Hugo; Seruca, Raquel

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid carcinomas show a high prevalence of mutations in the oncogene BRAF which are inversely associated with RAS or RET/PTC oncogenic activation. The possibility of using inhibitors on the BRAF pathway as became an interesting therapeutic approach. In thyroid cancer cells the target molecules, implicated on the cellular effects, mediated by inhibition of BRAF are not well established. In order to fill this lack of knowledge we studied the proliferation and survival pathways and associated molecules induced by BRAF inhibition in thyroid carcinoma cell lines harbouring distinct genetic backgrounds. Suppression of BRAF pathway in thyroid cancer cell lines (8505C, TPC1 and C643) was achieved using RNA interference (RNAi) for BRAF and the kinase inhibitor, sorafenib. Proliferation analysis was performed by BrdU incorporation and apoptosis was accessed by TUNEL assay. Levels of protein expression were analysed by western-blot. Both BRAF RNAi and sorafenib inhibited proliferation in all the cell lines independently of the genetic background, mostly in cells with BRAF V600E mutation. In BRAF V600E mutated cells inhibition of BRAF pathway lead to a decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 levels and an increase in p27 Kip1 . Specific inhibition of BRAF by RNAi in cells with BRAF V600E mutation had no effect on apoptosis. In the case of sorafenib treatment, cells harbouring BRAF V600E mutation showed increase levels of apoptosis due to a balance of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2. Our results in thyroid cancer cells, namely those harbouring BRAF V600E mutation showed that BRAF signalling pathway provides important proliferation signals. We have shown that in thyroid cancer cells sorafenib induces apoptosis by affecting Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 in BRAF V600E mutated cells which was independent of BRAF. These results suggest that sorafenib may prove useful in the treatment of thyroid carcinomas, particularly those refractory to conventional treatment and

  5. EMMPRIN Expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas: Correlation with Tumor Proliferation and Patient Survival

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    Luís Silva Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to explore the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN expression in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC, and its relation with the proliferative tumor status of OSCC. We examined EMMPRIN and Ki-67 proteins expression by immunohistochemistry in 74 cases with OSCC. Statistical analysis was conducted to examine their clinicopathological and prognostic significance in OSCC. EMMPRIN membrane expression was observed in all cases, with both membrane and cytoplasmic tumor expression in 61 cases (82.4%. EMMPRIN overexpression was observed in 56 cases (75.7%. Moderately or poorly differentiated tumors showed EMMPRIN overexpression more frequently than well-differentiated tumors (P=0.002. Overexpression of EMMPRIN was correlated with high Ki-67 expression (P=0.004. In the multivariate analysis, EMMPRIN overexpression reveals an adverse independent prognostic value for cancer-specific survival (CSS (P=0.034. Our results reveal that EMMPRIN protein is overexpressed in more than two-thirds of OSCC cases, especially in high proliferative and less differentiated tumors. The independent value of EMMPRIN overexpression in CSS suggests that this protein could be used as an important biological prognostic marker for patients with OSCC. Moreover, the high expression of EMMPRIN makes it a possible therapeutic target in OSCC patients.

  6. EMMPRIN expression in oral squamous cell carcinomas: correlation with tumor proliferation and patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Luís Silva; Delgado, Maria Leonor; Ricardo, Sara; Garcez, Fernanda; do Amaral, Barbas; Pacheco, José Júlio; Lopes, Carlos; Bousbaa, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to explore the clinicopathological and prognostic significance of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) expression in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC), and its relation with the proliferative tumor status of OSCC. We examined EMMPRIN and Ki-67 proteins expression by immunohistochemistry in 74 cases with OSCC. Statistical analysis was conducted to examine their clinicopathological and prognostic significance in OSCC. EMMPRIN membrane expression was observed in all cases, with both membrane and cytoplasmic tumor expression in 61 cases (82.4%). EMMPRIN overexpression was observed in 56 cases (75.7%). Moderately or poorly differentiated tumors showed EMMPRIN overexpression more frequently than well-differentiated tumors (P = 0.002). Overexpression of EMMPRIN was correlated with high Ki-67 expression (P = 0.004). In the multivariate analysis, EMMPRIN overexpression reveals an adverse independent prognostic value for cancer-specific survival (CSS) (P = 0.034). Our results reveal that EMMPRIN protein is overexpressed in more than two-thirds of OSCC cases, especially in high proliferative and less differentiated tumors. The independent value of EMMPRIN overexpression in CSS suggests that this protein could be used as an important biological prognostic marker for patients with OSCC. Moreover, the high expression of EMMPRIN makes it a possible therapeutic target in OSCC patients.

  7. Culture of normal human blood cells in diffusion chamber systems. I. Granulocyte survival and proliferation. [X radiation, mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikkappa, G.; Carsten, A.L.; Chanana, A.D.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1978-01-01

    Blood cells from four normal volunteers were cultured in diffusion chambers (DC), made of Millipore (MDC) or Nuclepore (NDC) filters, in the peritoneal cavities of whole body X-irradiated (700 rad) mice. The total nucleated cell recovery from the two types of DC over 18 days indicates that the cells in DC persist and proliferate. The mature neutrophilic cells, metamyelocytes (M/sub 5/) + band forms (M/sub 6/) + segmented forms (M/sub 7/), survived with T/sup 1///sub 2/ of 29 and 34 h in MDC and NDC, respectively. The reduction of the cells in the DC was surmised to be due to degeneration and death of the M/sub 7/. The /sup 3/H-diisopropylfluorophosphate (/sup 3/HDFP) labeled M/sub /sub 6/+/sub 7// survival in MDC was slightly shorter than that of unlabeled cells, which may be explained on the basis of the loss of /sup 3/HDFP (5.1%/day) from the cells. The eosinophils survived with an average T/sup 1///sub 2/ of 7.2 days (range 4.8 to 9.6), and the results were comparable in both types of DC. Formation of myeloblasts, promyelocytes, and neutrophilic, eosinophilic and basophilic myelocytes, occasional megakaryocytes and rare normoblasts in DC indicated that the normal human blood contains progenitors (pluripotent and/or committed stem cells) of hemopoietic cells. The neutrophilic cell recovery pattern was similar from both types of DC, but the total number recovered was always greater from NDC than from MDC.

  8. Oncogenic functions of the cancer-testis antigen SSX on the proliferation, survival, and signaling pathways of cancer cells.

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    Padraig D'Arcy

    Full Text Available SSX is a transcription factor with elusive oncogenic functions expressed in a variety of human tumors of epithelial and mesenchymal origin. It has raised substantial interest as a target for cancer therapy since it elicits humoral responses and displays restricted expression to cancer, spermatogonia and mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we investigated the oncogenic properties of SSX by employing a RNA interference to knock-down the endogenous expression of SSX in melanoma and osteosarcoma cell lines. Depletion of SSX expression resulted in reduced proliferation with cells accumulating in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. We found that the growth promoting and survival properties of SSX are mediated in part though modulation of MAPK/Erk and Wnt signaling pathways, since SSX silencing inhibited Erk-mediated signaling and transcription of cMYC and Akt-1. We also found that SSX forms a transient complex with β-catenin at the G1-S phase boundary resulting in the altered expression of β-catenin target genes such as E-cadherin, snail-2 and vimentin, involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Importantly the silencing of SSX expression in in vivo significantly impaired the growth of melanoma tumor xenografts. Tumor biopsies from SSX silenced tumors displayed reduced cyclin A staining, indicative of low proliferation and predominantly cycloplasmic β-catenin compared to SSX expressing tumors. The present study demonstrates a previously unknown function of SSX, that as an oncogene and as a tumor target for the development of novel anti-cancer drugs.

  9. Piperlongumine inhibits the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines irrespective of glucocorticoid resistance

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    Han, Seong-Su, E-mail: seong-su-han@uiowa.edu [Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Han, Sangwoo [Health and Human Physiology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kamberos, Natalie L. [Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • PL inhibits the proliferation of B-ALL cell lines irrespective of GC-resistance. • PL selectively kills B-ALL cells by increasing ROS, but not normal counterpart. • PL does not sensitize majority of B-ALL cells to DEX. • PL represses the network of constitutively activated TFs and modulates their target genes. • PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for GC-resistant B-ALL. - Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), a pepper plant alkaloid from Piper longum, has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. PL selectively kills both solid and hematologic cancer cells, but not normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the effect of PL on the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), including glucocorticoid (GC)-resistant B-ALL. Regardless of GC-resistance, PL inhibited the proliferation of all B-ALL cell lines, but not normal B cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis via elevation of ROS. Interestingly, PL did not sensitize most of B-ALL cell lines to dexamethasone (DEX). Only UoC-B1 exhibited a weak synergistic effect between PL and DEX. All B-ALL cell lines tested exhibited constitutive activation of multiple transcription factors (TFs), including AP-1, MYC, NF-κB, SP1, STAT1, STAT3, STAT6 and YY1. Treatment of the B-ALL cells with PL significantly downregulated these TFs and modulated their target genes. While activation of AURKB, BIRC5, E2F1, and MYB mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by PL, but SOX4 and XBP levels were increased by PL. Intriguingly, PL also increased the expression of p21 in B-ALL cells through a p53-independent mechanism. Given that these TFs and their target genes play critical roles in a variety of hematological malignancies, our findings provide a strong preclinical rationale for considering PL as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including B-ALL and GC-resistant B-ALL.

  10. Piperlongumine inhibits the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines irrespective of glucocorticoid resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seong-Su; Han, Sangwoo; Kamberos, Natalie L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PL inhibits the proliferation of B-ALL cell lines irrespective of GC-resistance. • PL selectively kills B-ALL cells by increasing ROS, but not normal counterpart. • PL does not sensitize majority of B-ALL cells to DEX. • PL represses the network of constitutively activated TFs and modulates their target genes. • PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for GC-resistant B-ALL. - Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), a pepper plant alkaloid from Piper longum, has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. PL selectively kills both solid and hematologic cancer cells, but not normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the effect of PL on the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), including glucocorticoid (GC)-resistant B-ALL. Regardless of GC-resistance, PL inhibited the proliferation of all B-ALL cell lines, but not normal B cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis via elevation of ROS. Interestingly, PL did not sensitize most of B-ALL cell lines to dexamethasone (DEX). Only UoC-B1 exhibited a weak synergistic effect between PL and DEX. All B-ALL cell lines tested exhibited constitutive activation of multiple transcription factors (TFs), including AP-1, MYC, NF-κB, SP1, STAT1, STAT3, STAT6 and YY1. Treatment of the B-ALL cells with PL significantly downregulated these TFs and modulated their target genes. While activation of AURKB, BIRC5, E2F1, and MYB mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by PL, but SOX4 and XBP levels were increased by PL. Intriguingly, PL also increased the expression of p21 in B-ALL cells through a p53-independent mechanism. Given that these TFs and their target genes play critical roles in a variety of hematological malignancies, our findings provide a strong preclinical rationale for considering PL as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including B-ALL and GC-resistant B-ALL

  11. NF-κB2 mutation targets survival, proliferation and differentiation pathways in the pathogenesis of plasma cell tumors

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    McCarthy Brian A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal NF-κB2 activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells. However, a causal role for aberrant NF-κB2 signaling in the development of plasma cell tumors has not been established. Also unclear is the molecular mechanism that drives the tumorigenic process. We investigated these questions by using a transgenic mouse model with lymphocyte-targeted expression of p80HT, a lymphoma-associated NF-κB2 mutant, and human multiple myeloma cell lines. Methods We conducted a detailed histopathological characterization of lymphomas developed in p80HT transgenic mice and microarray gene expression profiling of p80HT B cells with the goal of identifying genes that drive plasma cell tumor development. We further verified the significance of our findings in human multiple myeloma cell lines. Results Approximately 40% of p80HT mice showed elevated levels of monoclonal immunoglobulin (M-protein in the serum and developed plasma cell tumors. Some of these mice displayed key features of human multiple myeloma with accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow, osteolytic bone lesions and/or diffuse osteoporosis. Gene expression profiling of B cells from M-protein-positive p80HT mice revealed aberrant expression of genes known to be important in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, including cyclin D1, cyclin D2, Blimp1, survivin, IL-10 and IL-15. In vitro assays demonstrated a critical role of Stat3, a key downstream component of IL-10 signaling, in the survival of human multiple myeloma cells. Conclusions These findings provide a mouse model for human multiple myeloma with aberrant NF-κB2 activation and suggest a molecular mechanism for NF-κB2 signaling in the pathogenesis of plasma cell tumors by coordinated regulation of plasma cell generation, proliferation and survival.

  12. The BTK Inhibitor Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) Blocks Hairy Cell Leukaemia Survival, Proliferation and BCR Signalling: A New Therapeutic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivina, Mariela; Kreitman, Robert J.; Arons, Evgeny; Ravandi, Farhad; Burger, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    B cell receptor (BCR) signalling plays a critical role in the progression of several B-cell malignancies, but its role in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is ambiguous. Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key player in BCR signalling, migration and adhesion, can be targeted with ibrutinib, a selective, irreversible BTK inhibitor. We analysed BTK expression and function in HCL and analysed the effects of ibrutinib on HCL cells. We demonstrated uniform BTK protein expression in HCL cells. Ibrutinib significantly inhibited HCL proliferation and cell cycle progression. Accordingly, ibrutinib also reduced HCL cell survival after BCR triggering with anti-immunoglobulins (A, G, and M) and abrogated the activation of kinases downstream of the BCR (PI3K and MAPK). Ibrutinib also inhibited BCR-dependent secretion of the chemokines CCL3 and CCL4 by HCL cells. Interestingly, ibrutinib inhibited CXCL12-induced signalling, a key pathway for bone marrow homing. Collectively, our data support the clinical development of ibrutinib in patients with HCL. PMID:24697238

  13. Distinct Stromal Cell Factor Combinations Can Separately Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Survival, Proliferation, and Self-Renewal

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    Stefan Wohrer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are identified by their ability to sustain prolonged blood cell production in vivo, although recent evidence suggests that durable self-renewal (DSR is shared by HSC subtypes with distinct self-perpetuating differentiation programs. Net expansions of DSR-HSCs occur in vivo, but molecularly defined conditions that support similar responses in vitro are lacking. We hypothesized that this might require a combination of factors that differentially promote HSC viability, proliferation, and self-renewal. We now demonstrate that HSC survival and maintenance of DSR potential are variably supported by different Steel factor (SF-containing cocktails with similar HSC-mitogenic activities. In addition, stromal cells produce other factors, including nerve growth factor and collagen 1, that can antagonize the apoptosis of initially quiescent adult HSCs and, in combination with SF and interleukin-11, produce >15-fold net expansions of DSR-HSCs ex vivo within 7 days. These findings point to the molecular basis of HSC control and expansion.

  14. Pathophysiological hypoxia affects the redox state and IL-2 signalling of human CD4+ T cells and concomitantly impairs survival and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Timo; Tran, Cam Loan; Schellmann, Saskia; Hahne, Martin; Strehl, Cindy; Hoff, Paula; Radbruch, Andreas; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Inflamed areas are characterized by infiltration of immune cells, local hypoxia and alterations of cellular redox states. We investigated the impact of hypoxia on survival, proliferation, cytokine secretion, intracellular energy and redox state of human CD4(+) T cells. We found that pathophysiological hypoxia (<2% O2 ) significantly decreased CD4(+) T-cell survival after mitogenic stimulation. This effect was not due to an increased caspase-3/7-mediated apoptosis or adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) consumption/depletion. However, the ability of stimulated T cells to proliferate was reduced under hypoxic conditions, despite increased expression of CD25. Pathophysiological hypoxia was also found to modify intracellular ROS (iROS) levels in stimulated T cells over time as compared with levels found in normoxia. Physiological hypoxia (5% O2 ) did not decrease CD4(+) T-cell survival and proliferation or modify iROS levels as compared with normoxia. We conclude that pathophysiological hypoxia affects T-cell proliferation and viability via disturbed IL-2R signalling downstream of STAT5a phosphorylation, but not as a result of impaired cellular energy homeostasis. We suggest iROS links early events in T-cell stimulation to the inhibition of the lymphoproliferative response under pathophysiological hypoxic conditions. The level of iROS may therefore act as a mediator of immune functions leading to down-regulation of long-term T-cell activity in inflamed tissues. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. The Spalt transcription factors regulate cell proliferation, survival and epithelial integrity downstream of the Decapentaplegic signalling pathway

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    María F. Organista

    2012-10-01

    The expression of the spalt genes is regulated by the Decapentaplegic signalling pathway in the Drosophila wing. These genes participate in the patterning of the longitudinal wing veins by regulating the expression of vein-specific genes, and in the establishment of cellular affinities in the central region of the wing blade epithelium. The Spalt proteins act as transcription factors, most likely regulating gene expression by repression, but the identity of their target genes in the wing is still unknown. As a preliminary step to unravel the genetic hierarchy controlled by the Spalt proteins, we have analysed their requirements during wing development, and addressed to what extent they mediate all the functions of the Decapentaplegic pathway in this developmental system. We identify additional functions for Spalt in cell division, survival, and maintenance of epithelial integrity. Thus, Spalt activity is required to promote cell proliferation, acting in the G2/M transition of the cell cycle. The contribution of Spalt to cell division is limited to the central region of the wing blade, as they do not mediate the extra growth triggered by Decapentaplegic signalling in the peripheral regions of the wing disc. In addition, Spalt function is required to maintain cell viability in cells exposed to high levels of Decapentaplegic signalling. This aspect of Spalt function is related to the repression of JNK signalling in the spalt domain of expression. Finally, we further characterise the requirements of Spalt to maintain epithelial integrity by regulating cellular affinities between cells located in the central wing region. Our results indicate that Spalt function mediates most of the requirements identified for Decapentaplegic signalling, contributing to establish the cellular qualities that differentiate central versus peripheral territories in the wing blade.

  16. Motility Disorders in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurko, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Gastrointestinal motility disorders in the pediatric population are common and can range from benign processes to more serious disorders. Performing and interpreting motility evaluations in children present unique challenges. There are primary motility disorders but abnormal motility may be secondary due to other disease processes. Diagnostic studies include radiographic scintigraphic and manometry studies. Although recent advances in the genetics, biology, and technical aspects are having an important impact and have allowed for a better understanding of the pathophysiology and therapy for gastrointestinal motility disorders in children, further research is needed to be done to have better understanding of the pathophysiology and for better therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of low dose rate γ-rays on cell proliferation and survival in exponentially growing and plateau phase cultures of normal rat kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, A.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of 60 Co γ-rays on cell clonogenicity and cell proliferation were examined in NRK cells in exponential and plateau growth phases during and after irradiation at various dose rates. The typical dese rate effect for the survival responses was observed between acute irradiation and continuous irradiation at dose rates of 9.6-44 rads/h. Similar dose rate effect for the perturbation of the proliferation was observed in exponentially growing cells during irradiation. Some differences were found in survival when the cells were exposed to γ-rays at 9.6 rads/h or at 13.7 rads/h. The survival curves of exponential phase cells irradiated at these dose rates showed a shape different from that observed in plateau phase cells. Namely, a steady state of survival appeared around an accumulated dose of 1000 rads (dose-rate of 9.6 rads/h) and an accumulated dose of 1500 rads (dose-rate of 13.7 rads/h) in the exponential phase cells, while such a steady state of survival was not detected in plateau phase cells after similar conditions of irradiation. Moreover, the extrapolation number of the survival curve was much larger at the lower dose rate in exponential phase cells, in contrast to a value of the unity oberved in plateau phase cells, The radiosensitivity of plateau phase cells was somewhat lower compared to exponential phase cells over the range of accumulated doses at the dose rates used. These differences in cellular responses to the radiation between the two phases could be explained by changes in cell proliferation, the redistribution of the cell cycle compartments and the repair capacity of cellular damage during irradiation. (author)

  18. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Wen; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsu-Jan; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR), which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA-) induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus.

  19. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsiang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR, which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA- induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus

  20. Pi3kcb links Hippo-YAP and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways to promote cardiomyocyte proliferation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Pingzhu; von Gise, Alexander; Gu, Fei; Ma, Qing; Chen, Jinghai; Guo, Haidong; van Gorp, Pim R R; Wang, Da-Zhi; Pu, William T

    2015-01-02

    Yes-associated protein (YAP), the nuclear effector of Hippo signaling, regulates cellular growth and survival in multiple organs, including the heart, by interacting with TEA (transcriptional enhancer activator)-domain sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. Recent studies showed that YAP stimulates cardiomyocyte proliferation and survival. However, the direct transcriptional targets through which YAP exerts its effects are poorly defined. To identify direct YAP targets that mediate its mitogenic and antiapoptotic effects in the heart. We identified direct YAP targets by combining differential gene expression analysis in YAP gain- and loss-of-function with genome-wide identification of YAP-bound loci using chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing. This screen identified Pik3cb, encoding p110β, a catalytic subunit of phosphoinositol-3-kinase, as a candidate YAP effector that promotes cardiomyocyte proliferation and survival. YAP and TEA-domain occupied a conserved enhancer within the first intron of Pik3cb, and this enhancer drove YAP-dependent reporter gene expression. Yap gain- and loss-of-function studies indicated that YAP is necessary and sufficient to activate the phosphoinositol-3-kinase-Akt pathway. Like Yap, Pik3cb gain-of-function stimulated cardiomyocyte proliferation, and Pik3cb knockdown dampened YAP mitogenic activity. Reciprocally, impaired heart function in Yap loss-of-function was significantly rescued by adeno-associated virus-mediated Pik3cb expression. Pik3cb is a crucial direct target of YAP, through which the YAP activates phosphoinositol-3-kinase-AKT pathway and regulates cardiomyocyte proliferation and survival. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Role of the amygdala in antidepressant effects on hippocampal cell proliferation and survival and on depression-like behavior in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Castro

    Full Text Available The stimulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by antidepressants has been associated with multiple molecular pathways, but the potential influence exerted by other brain areas has received much less attention. The basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA, a region involved in anxiety and a site of action of antidepressants, has been implicated in both basal and stress-induced changes in neural plasticity in the dentate gyrus. We investigated here whether the BLA modulates the effects of the SSRI antidepressant fluoxetine on hippocampal cell proliferation and survival in relation to a behavioral index of depression-like behavior (forced swim test. We used a lesion approach targeting the BLA along with a chronic treatment with fluoxetine, and monitored basal anxiety levels given the important role of this behavioral trait in the progress of depression. Chronic fluoxetine treatment had a positive effect on hippocampal cell survival only when the BLA was lesioned. Anxiety was related to hippocampal cell survival in opposite ways in sham- and BLA-lesioned animals (i.e., negatively in sham- and positively in BLA-lesioned animals. Both BLA lesions and low anxiety were critical factors to enable a negative relationship between cell proliferation and depression-like behavior. Therefore, our study highlights a role for the amygdala on fluoxetine-stimulated cell survival and on the establishment of a link between cell proliferation and depression-like behavior. It also reveals an important modulatory role for anxiety on cell proliferation involving both BLA-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Our findings underscore the amygdala as a potential target to modulate antidepressants' action in hippocampal neurogenesis and in their link to depression-like behaviors.

  2. RhoE interferes with Rb inactivation and regulates the proliferation and survival of the U87 human glioblastoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poch, Enric; Minambres, Rebeca; Mocholi, Enric; Ivorra, Carmen; Perez-Arago, Amparo; Guerri, Consuelo; Perez-Roger, Ignacio; Guasch, Rosa M.

    2007-01-01

    Rho GTPases are important regulators of actin cytoskeleton, but they are also involved in cell proliferation, transformation and oncogenesis. One of this proteins, RhoE, inhibits cell proliferation, however the mechanism that regulates this effect remains poorly understood. Therefore, we undertook the present study to determine the role of RhoE in the regulation of cell proliferation. For this purpose we generated an adenovirus system to overexpress RhoE in U87 glioblastoma cells. Our results show that RhoE disrupts actin cytoskeleton organization and inhibits U87 glioblastoma cell proliferation. Importantly, RhoE expressing cells show a reduction in Rb phosphorylation and in cyclin D1 expression. Furthermore, RhoE inhibits ERK activation following serum stimulation of quiescent cells. Based in these findings, we propose that RhoE inhibits ERK activation, thereby decreasing cyclin D1 expression and leading to a reduction in Rb inactivation, and that this mechanism is involved in the RhoE-induced cell growth inhibition. Moreover, we also demonstrate that RhoE induces apoptosis in U87 cells and also in colon carcinoma and melanoma cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and survival, and suggest that this protein may be considered as an oncosupressor since it is capable to induce apoptosis in several tumor cell lines

  3. TRANSGENIC GDNF POSITIVELY INFLUENCES PROLIFERATION, DIFFERENTIATION, MATURATION AND SURVIVAL OF MOTOR NEURONS PRODUCED FROM MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Édgar Cortés

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESC are pluripotent and thus can differentiate into every cell type present in the body. Directed differentiation into motor neurons has been described for pluripotent cells. Although neurotrophic factors promote neuronal survival, their role in neuronal commitment is elusive. Here, we developed double-transgenic lines of mouse ESC that constitutively produce Glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF and also contain a GFP reporter, driven by HB9, which is expressed only by postmitotic motor neurons. After lentiviral transduction, ESC lines integrated and expressed the human GDNF gene without altering pluripotency markers before differentiation. Further, GDNF-ESC showed significantly higher spontaneous release of this neurotrophin to the medium, when compared to controls. To study motor neuron induction, control and GDNF cell lines were grown as embryoid bodies and stimulated with retinoic acid and Sonic Hedgehog. In GDNF-overexpressing cells, a significant increase of proliferative Olig2+ precursors, which are specified as spinal motor neurons, was found. Accordingly, GDNF increases the yield of cells with the pan motor neuronal markers HB9, monitored by GFP expression, and Isl1. At terminal differentiation, almost all differentiated neurons express phenotypic markers of motor neurons in GDNF cultures, with lower proportions in control cells. To test if the effects of GDNF were present at early differentiation stages, exogenous recombinant human GDNF was added to control ESC, also resulting in enhanced motor neuron differentiation. This effect was abolished by the co-addition of neutralizing anti-GDNF antibodies, strongly suggesting that differentiating ESC are responsive to GDNF. Using the HB9::GFP reporter, motor neurons were selected for electrophysiological recordings. Motor neurons differentiated from GDNF-ESC, compared to control motor neurons, showed greater electrophysiological maturation, characterized by

  4. Specific blockade by CD54 and MHC II of CD40-mediated signaling for B cell proliferation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyle, I S; Hollmann, C A; Crispe, I N

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of B lymphocyte proliferation is critical to maintenance of self-tolerance, and intercellular interactions are likely to signal such regulation. Here, we show that coligation of either the adhesion molecule ICAM-1/CD54 or MHC II with CD40 inhibited cell cycle progression and promoted...... these effects. Addition of BCR or IL-4 signals did not overcome the effect of ICAM-1 or MHC II on CD40-induced proliferation. FasL expression was not detected in B cell populations. These results show that MHC II and ICAM-1 specifically modulate CD40-mediated signaling, so inhibiting proliferation...

  5. High motility reduces grazing mortality of planktonic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matz, Carsten; Jurgens, K.

    2005-01-01

    We tested the impact of bacterial swimming speed on the survival of planktonic bacteria in the presence of protozoan grazers. Grazing experiments with three common bacterivorous nanoflagellates revealed low clearance rates for highly motile bacteria. High-resolution video microscopy demonstrated...... size revealed highest grazing losses for moderately motile bacteria with a cell size between 0.2 and 0.4 mum(3). Grazing mortality was lowest for cells of >0.5 mum(3) and small, highly motile bacteria. Survival efficiencies of >95% for the ultramicrobacterial isolate CP-1 (less than or equal to0.1 mum......(3), >50 mum s(-1)) illustrated the combined protective action of small cell size and high motility. Our findings suggest that motility has an important adaptive function in the survival of planktonic bacteria during protozoan grazing....

  6. Esophageal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannig, C.; Rummeny, E.; Wuttge-Hannig, A.

    2007-01-01

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.) [de

  7. Benzoxathiol derivative BOT-4-one suppresses L540 lymphoma cell survival and proliferation via inhibition of JAK3/STAT3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Hak; Min, Yun Sook; Choi, Jung Sook; Baeg, Gyeong Hun; Kim, Young Soo; Shin, Jong Wook; Kim, Tae Yoon; Ye, Sang Kyu

    2011-05-31

    Persistently activated JAK/STAT3 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in various human cancers including major carcinomas and hematologic tumors, and is implicated in cancer cell survival and proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of JAK/STAT3 signaling may be a clinical application in cancer therapy. Here, we report that 2-cyclohexylimino-6-methyl-6,7-dihydro-5H-benzo [1,3]oxathiol-4-one (BOT-4-one), a small molecule inhibitor of JAK/STAT3 signaling, induces apoptosis through inhibition of STAT3 activation. BOT-4-one suppressed cytokine (upd)-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of STAT92E, the sole Drosophila STAT homolog. Consequently, BOT-4-one significantly inhibited STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation and expression of STAT3 downstream target gene SOCS3 in various human cancer cell lines, and its effect was more potent in JAK3-activated Hodgkin's lymphoma cell line than in JAK2-activated breast cancer and prostate cancer cell lines. In addition, BOT-4-one-treated Hodgkin's lymphoma cells showed decreased cell survival and proliferation by inducing apoptosis through down-regulation of STAT3 downstream target anti-apoptotic gene expression. These results suggest that BOT-4-one is a novel small molecule inhibitor of JAK3/STAT3 signaling and may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of human cancers harboring aberrant JAK3/STAT3 signaling, specifically Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  8. Cell cycles and proliferation patterns in Haematococcus pluvialis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhui; Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Litao

    2017-09-01

    Most studies on Haematococcus pluvialis have been focused on cell growth and astaxanthin accumulation; far less attention has been paid to cell cycles and proliferation patterns. The purpose of this study was to clarify cell cycles and proliferation patterns in H. pluvialis microscopically using a camera and video recorder system. The complicated life history of H. pluvialis can be divided into two stages: the motile stage and the non-motile stage. All the cells can be classified into forms as follows: motile cell, nonmotile cell, zoospore and aplanospore. The main cell proliferation, both in the motile phase and non-motile phase in H. pluvialis, is by asexual reproduction. Under normal growth conditions, a motile cell usually produces two, sometimes four, and exceptionally eight zoospores. Under unfavorable conditions, the motile cell loses its flagella and transforms into a non-motile cell, and the non-motile cell usually produces 2, 4 or 8 aplanospores, and occasionally 20-32 aplanospores, which further develop into non-motile cells. Under suitable conditions, the non-motile cell is also able to release zoospores. The larger non-motile cells produce more than 16 zoospores, and the smaller ones produce 4 or 8 zoospores. Vegetative reproduction is by direct cell division in the motile phase and by occasional cell budding in the non-motile phase. There is, as yet, no convincing direct evidence for sexual reproduction.

  9. Association of Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P Receptor-1 Pathway with Cell Proliferation and Survival in Canine Hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, A M; Graef, A J; LeVine, D N; Cohen, I R; Modiano, J F; Kim, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a key biolipid signaling molecule that regulates cell growth and survival, but it has not been studied in tumors from dogs. S1P/S1P1 signaling will contribute to the progression of hemangiosarcoma (HSA). Thirteen spontaneous HSA tissues, 9 HSA cell lines, 8 nonmalignant tissues, including 6 splenic hematomas and 2 livers with vacuolar degeneration, and 1 endothelial cell line derived from a dog with splenic hematoma were used. This was a retrospective case series and in vitro study. Samples were obtained as part of medically necessary diagnostic procedures. Microarray, qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblotting were performed to examine S1P1 expression. S1P concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. S1P signaling was evaluated by intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization; proliferation and survival were evaluated using the MTS assay and Annexin V staining. Canine HSA cells expressed higher levels of S1P1 mRNA than nonmalignant endothelial cells. S1P1 protein was present in HSA tissues and cell lines. HSA cells appeared to produce low levels of S1P, but they selectively consumed S1P from the culture media. Exogenous S1P induced an increase in intracellular calcium as well as increased proliferation and viability of HSA cells. Prolonged treatment with FTY720, an inhibitor of S1P1 , decreased S1P1 protein expression and induced apoptosis of HSA cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling pathway functions to maintain HSA cell viability and proliferation. The data suggest that S1P1 or the S1P pathway in general could be targets for therapeutic intervention for dogs with HSA. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. A new step toward the artificial ovary: survival and proliferation of isolated murine follicles after autologous transplantation in a fibrin scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyckx, Valérie; Dolmans, Marie-Madeleine; Vanacker, Julie; Legat, Camille; Fortuño Moya, Cristina; Donnez, Jacques; Amorim, Christiani Andrade

    2014-04-01

    To create an artificial ovary to provide an alternative way of restoring fertility in patients who cannot benefit from transplantation of cryopreserved ovarian tissue due to the threat of reintroducing malignant cells. In vivo experimental study. Gynecology research unit in a university hospital. Six-week-old female NMRI mice. Autografting of isolated preantral follicles and ovarian cells (OCs) encapsulated in two fibrin matrices containing low concentrations of fibrinogen (F; mg/mL) and thrombin (T; IU/mL): F12.5/T1 and F25/T4. Follicular density and development, OC survival and proliferation, inflammatory response, and vascularization. After 1 week, the follicle recovery rate ranged from 30.8% (F25/T4) to 31.8% (F12.5/T1). With both fibrin formulations, all follicles were found to be alive or minimally damaged, as demonstrated by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and at the growing stage (primary, secondary, and antral follicles), confirmed by Ki67 immunostaining. Isolated OCs also survived and proliferated after grafting, as evidenced by <1% apoptotic cells and a high proportion of Ki67-positive cells. Vessels were found in both fibrin formulations, and the global vascular surface area varied from 1.35% (F25/T4) to 1.88% (F12.5/T1). Numerous CD45-positive cells were also observed in both F25/T4 and F12.5/T1 combinations. The present study is the first to show survival and growth of isolated murine ovarian follicles 1 week after autotransplantation of isolated OCs in a fibrin scaffold. The results indicate that fibrin is a promising candidate as a matrix for the construction of an artificial ovary. Xenotransplantation of isolated human follicles and OCs is the necessary next step to validate these findings. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The pan phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor SAR245409 (voxtalisib/XL765) blocks survival, adhesion and proliferation of primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, R; Ter Burg, J; van Bochove, G G W; de Rooij, M F M; Kuil, A; Jansen, M H; Kuijpers, T W; Baars, J W; Virone-Oddos, A; Spaargaren, M; Egile, C; van Oers, M H J; Eldering, E; Kersten, M J; Kater, A P

    2016-02-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are critical components of the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway and have an important role in the pathobiology of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Inhibitors of PI3Kδ block BCR-mediated cross-talk between CLL cells and the lymph node microenvironment and provide significant clinical benefit to CLL patients. However, the PI3Kδ inhibitors applied thus far have limited direct impact on leukemia cell survival and thus are unlikely to eradicate the disease. The use of inhibitors of multiple isoforms of PI3K might lead to deeper remissions. Here we demonstrate that the pan-PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor SAR245409 (voxtalisib/XL765) was more pro-apoptotic to CLL cells--irrespective of their ATM/p53 status--than PI3Kα or PI3Kδ isoform selective inhibitors. Furthermore, SAR245409 blocked CLL survival, adhesion and proliferation. Moreover, SAR245409 was a more potent inhibitor of T-cell-mediated production of cytokines, which support CLL survival. Taken together, our in vitro data provide a rationale for the evaluation of a pan-PI3K inhibitor in CLL patients.

  12. MYC through miR-17-92 Suppresses Specific Target Genes to Maintain Survival, Autonomous Proliferation, and a Neoplastic State

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yulin; Choi, Peter  S.; Casey, Stephanie  C.; Dill, David  L.; Felsher, Dean  W.

    2014-01-01

    The MYC oncogene regulates gene expression through multiple mechanisms, and its overexpression culminates in tumorigenesis. MYC inactivation reverses turmorigenesis through the loss of distinguishing features of cancer, including autonomous proliferation and survival. Here we report that MYC via miR-17-92 maintains a neoplastic state through the suppression of chromatin regulatory genes Sin3b, Hbp1, Suv420h1, and Btg1, as well as the apoptosis regulator Bim. The enforced expression of miR-17-92 prevents MYC suppression from inducing proliferative arrest, senescence, and apoptosis and abrogates sustained tumor regression. Knockdown of the five miR-17-92 target genes blocks senescence and apoptosis while it modestly delays proliferative arrest, thus partially recapitulating miR-17-92 function. We conclude that MYC, via miR-17-92, maintains a neoplastic state by suppressing specific target genes.

  13. MYC through miR-17-92 Suppresses Specific Target Genes to Maintain Survival, Autonomous Proliferation, and a Neoplastic State

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yulin

    2014-08-01

    The MYC oncogene regulates gene expression through multiple mechanisms, and its overexpression culminates in tumorigenesis. MYC inactivation reverses turmorigenesis through the loss of distinguishing features of cancer, including autonomous proliferation and survival. Here we report that MYC via miR-17-92 maintains a neoplastic state through the suppression of chromatin regulatory genes Sin3b, Hbp1, Suv420h1, and Btg1, as well as the apoptosis regulator Bim. The enforced expression of miR-17-92 prevents MYC suppression from inducing proliferative arrest, senescence, and apoptosis and abrogates sustained tumor regression. Knockdown of the five miR-17-92 target genes blocks senescence and apoptosis while it modestly delays proliferative arrest, thus partially recapitulating miR-17-92 function. We conclude that MYC, via miR-17-92, maintains a neoplastic state by suppressing specific target genes.

  14. Effects of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP triple knockdown on prostate cancer cell susceptibility to apoptosis, cell survival and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowling Catherine

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manipulating apoptotic resistance represents an important strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory prostate cancer. We hypothesised that the Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP Proteins may be mediating this resistance and knockdown of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP would increase sensitivity to apoptosis. Methods cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP where knocked down either individually or in combination using siRNA in androgen independent prostate cancer PC-3 cells as confirmed by real-time PCR and western blotting. Cells were then treated with TRAIL, Etoposide, or Tunicamycin, and apoptosis assessed by PI DNA staining. Apoptosis was confirmed with Annexin V labelling and measurement of PARP cleavage, and was inhibited using the pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD.fmk. Clonogenic assays and assessment of ID-1 expression by western blotting were used to measure recovery and proliferation. Results PC-3 are resistant to TRAIL induced apoptosis and have elevated expression of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP. Combined knockdown sensitised PC-3 to TRAIL induced apoptosis, but not to Etoposide or Tunicmycin, with corresponding increases in caspase activity and PARP cleavage which was inhibited by ZVAD.fmk. Triple knock down decreased proliferation which was confirmed by decreased ID-1 expression. Conclusion Simultaneous knock down of the IAPs not only sensitised the PC-3 to TRAIL but also inhibited their proliferation rates and clonogenic survival. The inability to alter sensitivity to other triggers of apoptosis suggests that this effect is specific for death receptor pathways and knock down might facilitate immune-surveillance mechanisms to counter cancer progression and, in combination with therapeutic approaches using TRAIL, could represent an important treatment strategy.

  15. Effects of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP triple knockdown on prostate cancer cell susceptibility to apoptosis, cell survival and proliferation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manipulating apoptotic resistance represents an important strategy for the treatment of hormone refractory prostate cancer. We hypothesised that the Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) Proteins may be mediating this resistance and knockdown of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP would increase sensitivity to apoptosis. METHODS: cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP where knocked down either individually or in combination using siRNA in androgen independent prostate cancer PC-3 cells as confirmed by real-time PCR and western blotting. Cells were then treated with TRAIL, Etoposide, or Tunicamycin, and apoptosis assessed by PI DNA staining. Apoptosis was confirmed with Annexin V labelling and measurement of PARP cleavage, and was inhibited using the pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD.fmk. Clonogenic assays and assessment of ID-1 expression by western blotting were used to measure recovery and proliferation. RESULTS: PC-3 are resistant to TRAIL induced apoptosis and have elevated expression of cIAP-1, cIAP-2 and XIAP. Combined knockdown sensitised PC-3 to TRAIL induced apoptosis, but not to Etoposide or Tunicmycin, with corresponding increases in caspase activity and PARP cleavage which was inhibited by ZVAD.fmk. Triple knock down decreased proliferation which was confirmed by decreased ID-1 expression. CONCLUSION: Simultaneous knock down of the IAPs not only sensitised the PC-3 to TRAIL but also inhibited their proliferation rates and clonogenic survival. The inability to alter sensitivity to other triggers of apoptosis suggests that this effect is specific for death receptor pathways and knock down might facilitate immune-surveillance mechanisms to counter cancer progression and, in combination with therapeutic approaches using TRAIL, could represent an important treatment strategy.

  16. Behavioural Effects of Adult Vitamin D Deficiency in BALB/c Mice Are not Associated with Proliferation or Survival of Neurons in the Adult Hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie J Groves

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that up to one third of adults have insufficient levels of vitamin D and there is an association between low vitamin D concentrations and adverse brain outcomes, such as depression. Vitamin D has been shown to be involved in processes associated with neurogenesis during development. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that adult vitamin D (AVD deficiency in BALB/c mice was associated with (a adult hippocampal neurogenesis at baseline, b following 6 weeks of voluntary wheel running and (c a depressive-like phenotype on the forced swim test (FST, which may be linked to alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis. We assessed proliferation and survival of adult born hippocampal neurons by counting the number of cells positive for Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX, and incorporation of 5-Bromo-2'-Deoxyuridine (BrdU within newly born mature neurons using immunohistochemistry. There were no significant effects of diet on number of Ki67+, DCX+ or BrdU+ cells in the dentate gyrus. All mice showed significantly increased number of Ki67+ cells and BrdU incorporation, and decreased immobility time in the FST, after voluntary wheel running. A significant correlation was found in control mice between immobility time in the FST and level of hippocampal neurogenesis, however, no such correlation was found for AVD-deficient mice. We conclude that AVD deficiency was not associated with impaired proliferation or survival of adult born neurons in BALB/c mice and that the impact on rodent behaviour may not be due to altered neurogenesis per se, but to altered function of new hippocampal neurons or processes independent of adult neurogenesis.

  17. Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) stimulates myogenic cell proliferation, differentiation and survival via the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornasio, Reut; Riederer, Ingo; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent; Uni, Zehava; Halevy, Orna

    2009-05-01

    Beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), a leucine catabolite, has been shown to prevent exercise-induced protein degradation and muscle damage. We hypothesized that HMB would directly regulate muscle-cell proliferation and differentiation and would attenuate apoptosis, the latter presumably underlying satellite-cell depletion during muscle degradation or atrophy. Adding various concentrations of HMB to serum-starved myoblasts induced cell proliferation and MyoD expression as well as the phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK. HMB induced differentiation-specific markers, increased IGF-I mRNA levels and accelerated cell fusion. Its inhibition of serum-starvation- or staurosporine-induced apoptosis was reflected by less apoptotic cells, reduced BAX expression and increased levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-X. Annexin V staining and flow cytometry analysis showed reduced staurosporine-induced apoptosis in human myoblasts in response to HMB. HMB enhanced the association of the p85 subunit of PI3K with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. HMB elevated Akt phosphorylation on Thr308 and Ser473 and this was inhibited by Wortmannin, suggesting that HMB acts via Class I PI3K. Blocking of the PI3K/Akt pathway with specific inhibitors revealed its requirement in mediating the promotive effects of HMB on muscle cell differentiation and fusion. These direct effects of HMB on myoblast differentiation and survival resembling those of IGF-I, at least in culture, suggest its positive influence in preventing muscle wasting.

  18. TGF-β1 activates the canonical NF-κB signaling to promote cell survival and proliferation in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhen-Yu [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, No. 58 Zhongshan 2nd Road, Guangzhou 510080, Guangdong Province (China); Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, No.250 Changgang East Road, Guangzhou 510260, Guangdong Province (China); Zhong, Zhi-Gang; Qiu, Meng-Yao; Zhong, Yu-Hua [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, No. 58 Zhongshan 2nd Road, Guangzhou 510080, Guangdong Province (China); Zhang, Wei-Xi, E-mail: weixizhang@qq.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, No. 58 Zhongshan 2nd Road, Guangzhou 510080, Guangdong Province (China)

    2016-03-18

    Activated fibroblasts continue to proliferate at injury sites, leading to progressive muscular fibrosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). TGF-β1 is a dominant profibrotic mediator thought to play a critical role in muscle fibrosis; however, the implicated mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we showed that TGF-β1 increased the resistance to apoptosis and stimulated cell cycle progression in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts under serum deprivation conditions in vitro. TGF-β1 treatment activated the canonical NF-κB pathway; and we found that pharmacological inhibition of IKKβ with IMD-0354 and RelA gene knockdown with siRNA attenuated these effects of TGF-β1 on dystrophic muscle fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that TGF-β1 prevents apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts through the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. - Highlights: • TGF-β1 promotes survival and proliferation in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts. • TGF-β1 activated the canonical NF-κB pathway in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts. • Canonical NF-κB pathway mediates these effects of TGF-β1.

  19. TGF-β1 activates the canonical NF-κB signaling to promote cell survival and proliferation in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Zhen-Yu; Zhong, Zhi-Gang; Qiu, Meng-Yao; Zhong, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Activated fibroblasts continue to proliferate at injury sites, leading to progressive muscular fibrosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). TGF-β1 is a dominant profibrotic mediator thought to play a critical role in muscle fibrosis; however, the implicated mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we showed that TGF-β1 increased the resistance to apoptosis and stimulated cell cycle progression in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts under serum deprivation conditions in vitro. TGF-β1 treatment activated the canonical NF-κB pathway; and we found that pharmacological inhibition of IKKβ with IMD-0354 and RelA gene knockdown with siRNA attenuated these effects of TGF-β1 on dystrophic muscle fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that TGF-β1 prevents apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts through the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. - Highlights: • TGF-β1 promotes survival and proliferation in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts. • TGF-β1 activated the canonical NF-κB pathway in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts. • Canonical NF-κB pathway mediates these effects of TGF-β1.

  20. NCAM regulates cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna

    2002-01-01

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells...... independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment...... to a fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine...

  1. Flagellar motility confers epiphytic fitness advantages upon Pseudomonas syringae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefele, D.M.; Lindow, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    The role of flagellar motility in determining the epiphytic fitness of an ice-nucleation-active strain of Pseudomonas syringae was examined. The loss of flagellar motility reduced the epiphytic fitness of a normally motile P. syringae strain as measured by its growth, survival, and competitive ability on bean leaf surfaces. Equal population sizes of motile parental or nonmotile mutant P. syringae strains were maintained on bean plants for at least 5 days following the inoculation of fully expanded primary leaves. However, when bean seedlings were inoculated before the primary leaves had expanded and bacterial populations on these leaves were quantified at full expansion, the population size of the nonmotile derivative strain reached only 0.9% that of either the motile parental or revertant strain. When fully expanded bean primary leaves were coinoculated with equal numbers of motile and nonmotile cells, the population size of a nonmotile derivative strain was one-third of that of the motile parental or revertant strain after 8 days. Motile and nonmotile cells were exposed in vitro and on plants to UV radiation and desiccating conditions. The motile and nonmotile strains exhibited equal resistance to both stresses in vitro. However, the population size of a nonmotile strain on leaves was less than 20% that of a motile revertant strain when sampled immediately after UV irradiation. Epiphytic populations of both motile and nonmotile P. syringae declined under desiccating conditions on plants, and after 8 days, the population size of a nonmotile strain was less than one-third that of the motile parental or revertant strain

  2. TRIM29 Overexpression Promotes Proliferation and Survival of Bladder Cancer Cells through NF-κB Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shu-Tao; Liu, Sheng-Ye; Wu, Bin

    2016-10-01

    TRIM29 overexpression has been reported in several human malignancies and showed correlation with cancer cell malignancy. The aim of the current study is to examine its clinical significance and biological roles in human bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. A total of 102 cases of bladder cancer tissues were examined for TRIM29 expression by immunohistochemistry. siRNA and plasmid transfection were performed in 5637 and BIU-87 cell lines. Cell Counting Kit-8, flow cytometry, western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction were performed to examine its biological roles and mechanism in bladder cancer cells. We found that TRIM29 overexpression showed correlation with invading depth (p=0.0087). Knockdown of TRIM29 expression in bladder cancer cell line 5637 inhibited cell growth rate and cell cycle transition while its overexpression in BIU-87 cells accelerated cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. TRIM29 overexpression also inhibited cell apoptosis induced by cisplatin. In addition, we demonstrated that TRIM29 depletion decreased while its overexpression led to upregulated expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and Bcl-2. We also showed that TRIM29 knockdown inhibited protein kinase C (PKC) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling while its overexpression stimulated the PKC and NF-κB pathways. BAY 11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor) partly attenuated the effect of TRIM29 on expression of cyclin and Bcl-2. Treatment with PKC inhibitor staurosporine resulted in ameliorated TRIM29 induced activation of NF-κB. The current study demonstrated that TRIM29 upregulates cyclin and Bcl family proteins level to facilitate malignant cell growth and inhibit drug-induced apoptosis in bladder cancer, possibly through PKC-NF-κB signaling pathways.

  3. RB1CC1 activates RB1 pathway and inhibits proliferation and cologenic survival in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokuhiro Chano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1 (RB1CC1, also known as FIP200 plays a role in the enhancement of the RB1 pathway through the direct binding to a GC-rich region 201bp upstream (from the initiation ATG of the RB1 promoter. Here, we identified hSNF5 and p53 as the binding partners of RB1CC1 by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assays. Interaction between these molecules and the RB1 pathway was analyzed by the assays of chromatin immunoprecipitation, luciferase-reporter, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot. The tumor growth suppression by RB1CC1 was evaluated by flow cytometry or by a cell growth assay. The nuclear RB1CC1 complex involving hSNF5 and/or p53 activated transcription of RB1, p16 and p21, and suppressed tumor cell growth. Furthermore, nuclear RB1CC1 expression significantly correlated with those of RB1 and p16 in breast cancer tissue in vivo, and the Ki-67 proliferation index was dependent on p53 as well as RB1CC1. The present study indicates that RB1CC1 together with hSNF5 and/or p53 enhances the RB1 pathway through transcriptional activation of RB1, p16 and p21. Evaluation of RB1CC1 expression combined with RB1 and p53 status is expected to provide useful information in clinical practice and future therapeutic strategies in breast cancer.

  4. Cell motility assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, Angela; Jones, Gareth E

    2008-10-01

    This report summarises practical aspects to measuring cell motility in culture. The methods described here were discussed at a 1-day European Tissue Culture Society (ETCS-UK) workshop organised by John Masters and Gareth E Jones that was held at University College London on 19th April 2007.

  5. Sphincter of Oddi motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P; Ebbehøj, N

    1996-01-01

    Gastroenterology. RESULTS: The SO is a zone with an elevated basal pressure with superimposed phasic contractions. It acts mainly as a resistor in the regulation of bile flow. Neurohormonal regulation influences the motility pattern. The contractions are under the control of slow waves. Clinical subgroups show...

  6. Small intestinal motility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, André J. P. M.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In the past year, many studies were published in which new and relevant information on small intestinal motility in humans and laboratory animals was obtained. RECENT FINDINGS: Although the reported findings are heterogeneous, some themes appear to be particularly interesting and

  7. Proliferating fibroblasts and HeLa cells co-cultured in vitro reciprocally influence growth patterns, protein expression, chromatin features and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delinasios, John G; Angeli, Flora; Koumakis, George; Kumar, Shant; Kang, Wen-Hui; Sica, Gigliola; Iacopino, Fortunata; Lama, Gina; Lamprecht, Sergio; Sigal-Batikoff, Ina; Tsangaris, George T; Farfarelos, Christos D; Farfarelos, Maria C; Vairaktaris, Eleftherios; Vassiliou, Stavros; Delinasios, George J

    2015-04-01

    if fibroblast proliferation is blocked by contact inhibition of growth at confluency, or by omitting replacement of the nutrient medium. The present observations show that: (a) interaction between proliferating fibroblasts and HeLa cells in vitro drastically influences each other's protein expression, growth pattern, chromatin features and survival; (b) these functions depend on the fibroblast/HeLa ratio, cell topology (cell-cell contact and the architectural pattern developed during co-culture) and frequent medium change, as prerequisites for fibroblast proliferation; (c) this co-culture model is useful in the study of the complex processes within the tumour microenvironment, as well as the in vitro reproduction and display of several phenomena conventionally seen in tumour cytological sections, such as desmoplasia, apoptosis, nuclear abnormalities; and (d) overgrown fibroblasts adhering to the boundaries of HeLa colonies produce and secrete lipid droplets. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. The bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib (PCI-32765) blocks hairy cell leukaemia survival, proliferation and B cell receptor signalling: a new therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivina, Mariela; Kreitman, Robert J; Arons, Evgeny; Ravandi, Farhad; Burger, Jan A

    2014-07-01

    B cell receptor (BCR) signalling plays a critical role in the progression of several B-cell malignancies, but its role in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is ambiguous. Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key player in BCR signalling, as well as B cell migration and adhesion, can be targeted with ibrutinib, a selective, irreversible BTK inhibitor. We analysed BTK expression and function in HCL and analysed the effects of ibrutinib on HCL cells. We demonstrated uniform BTK protein expression in HCL cells. Ibrutinib significantly inhibited HCL proliferation and cell cycle progression. Accordingly, ibrutinib also reduced HCL cell survival after BCR triggering with anti-immunoglobulins and abrogated the activation of kinases downstream of the BCR (PI3K and MAPK). Ibrutinib also inhibited BCR-dependent secretion of the chemokines CCL3 and CCL4 by HCL cells. Interestingly, ibrutinib inhibited also CXCL12-induced signalling, a key pathway for bone marrow homing. Collectively, our data support the clinical development of ibrutinib in patients with HCL. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Microcapsules engineered to support mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) survival and proliferation enable long-term retention of MSCs in infarcted myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocki, Anna; Beyer, Sebastian; Dewavrin, Jean-Yves; Goralczyk, Anna; Wang, Yingting; Peh, Priscilla; Ng, Michael; Moonshi, Shehzahdi S; Vuddagiri, Susmitha; Raghunath, Michael; Martinez, Eliana C; Bhakoo, Kishore K

    2015-06-01

    The limited efficacy of cardiac cell-based therapy is thought to be due to poor cell retention within the myocardium. Hence, there is an urgent need for biomaterials that aid in long-term cell retention. This study describes the development of injectable microcapsules for the delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the infarcted cardiac wall. These microcapsules comprise of low concentrations of agarose supplemented with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins collagen and fibrin. Dextran sulfate, a negatively charged polycarbohydrate, was added to mimic glycosaminoglycans in the ECM. Cell viability assays showed that a combination of all components is necessary to support long-term survival and proliferation of MSCs within microcapsules. Following intramyocardial transplantation, microcapsules degraded slowly in vivo and did not induce a fibrotic foreign body response. Pre-labeling of encapsulated MSCs with iron oxide nanoparticles allowed continued cell-tracking by MRI over several weeks following transplantation into infarcted myocardium. In contrast, MSCs injected as cell suspension were only detectable for two days post transplantation by MRI. Histological analysis confirmed integration of transplanted cells at the infarct site. Therefore, microcapsules proved to be suitable for stem cell delivery into the infarcted myocardium and can overcome current limitations of poor cell retention in cardiac cell-based therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α improves motor performance and survival in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Alice

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that affects spinal cord and cortical motor neurons. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to motor neuron death in ALS. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator-1α (PGC-1α is a principal regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Results In this study, we examined whether PGC-1α plays a protective role in ALS by using a double transgenic mouse model where PGC-1α is over-expressed in an SOD1 transgenic mouse (TgSOD1-G93A/PGC-1α. Our results indicate that PGC-1α significantly improves motor function and survival of SOD1-G93A mice. The behavioral improvements were accompanied by reduced blood glucose level and by protection of motor neuron loss, restoration of mitochondrial electron transport chain activities and inhibition of stress signaling in the spinal cord. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that PGC-1α plays a beneficial role in a mouse model of ALS, suggesting that PGC-1α may be a potential therapeutic target for ALS therapy.

  11. Cellular mechanics and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  12. The growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonist JV-1-36 inhibits proliferation and survival of human ectopic endometriotic stromal cells (ESCs) and the T HESC cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Marta; Grande, Cristina; Scarlatti, Francesca; Deltetto, Francesco; Delpiano, Elena; Camanni, Marco; Ghigo, Ezio; Granata, Riccarda

    2010-08-01

    To determine the effect of the GHRH antagonist JV-1-36 on proliferation and survival of primary ectopic human endometriotic stromal cells (ESCs) and the T HESC cell line. Prospective laboratory study. University hospital. 22 women with endometriosis (aged 34.8+/-5.7 years) undergoing therapeutic laparoscopy. Eutopic (n=10) and ectopic (n=22) endometrial tissues were collected from women who underwent therapeutic laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis (stage III/IV). Expression of GHRH, GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) and GHRH-R splice variant (SV) 1 mRNA was determined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The ESC proliferation was assessed by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation, cell survival by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Trypan blue assay. The T HESC survival was evaluated by MTT, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels by ELISA, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation by Western blot, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-2 mRNA by real-time PCR. The ESCs and T HESCs, but not normal endometrial tissues, expressed GHRH-R mRNA; SV1 mRNA was determined in normal endometrial tissues, ESCs, and T HESCs; GHRH mRNAwas found in T HESCs; JV-1-36 inhibited ESC proliferation and ESC and T HESC survival. In T HESCs, JV-1-36 reduced cAMP production and ERK1/2 phosphorylation but had no effect on IGF-2 mRNA expression. The GHRH antagonist JV-1-36 inhibits endometriotic cell proliferation and survival, suggesting that GHRH antagonist may represent promising tools for treatment of endometriosis. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. FBXW7/hCDC4 controls glioma cell proliferation in vitro and is a prognostic marker for survival in glioblastoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagedorn Martin

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the quest for novel molecular mediators of glioma progression, we studied the regulation of FBXW7 (hCDC4/hAGO/SEL10, its association with survival of patients with glioblastoma and its potential role as a tumor suppressor gene in glioma cells. The F-box protein Fbxw7 is a component of SCFFbxw7, a Skp1-Cul1-F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that tags specific proteins for proteasome degradation. FBXW7 is mutated in several human cancers and functions as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in mice. Any of the identified targets, Cyclin E, c-Myc, c-Jun, Notch1/4 and Aurora-A may have oncogenic properties when accumulated in tumors with FBXW7 loss. Results We tested the expression of FBXW7 in human glioma biopsies by quantitative PCR and compared the transcript levels of grade IV glioma (glioblastoma, G-IV with those of grade II tumors (G-II. In more than 80% G-IV, expression of FBXW7 was significantly reduced. In addition, levels of FBXW7 were correlated with survival indicating a possible implication in tumor aggressiveness. Locus 4q31.3 which carries FBXW7 was investigated by in situ hybridization on biopsy touchprints. This excluded allelic loss as the principal cause for low expression of FBXW7 in G-IV tumors. Two targets of Fbxw7, Aurora-A and Notch4 were preferentially immunodetected in G-IV biopsies. Next, we investigated the effects of FBXW7 misregulation in glioma cells. U87 cells overexpressing nuclear isoforms of Fbxw7 lose the expression of the proliferation markers PCNA and Ki-67, and get counterselected in vitro. This observation fits well with the hypothesis that Fbxw7 functions as a tumor suppressor in astroglial cells. Finally, FBXW7 knockdown in U87 cells leads to defects in mitosis that may promote aneuploidy in progressing glioma. Conclusion Our results show that FBXW7 expression is a prognostic marker for patients with glioblastoma. We suggest that loss of FBXW7 plays an important role in glioma

  14. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Mediastinal Tumors Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Pleural Diseases Mesothelioma Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Overview The esophagus (ĕ-sof´ah-gus) is the hollow, muscular tube that moves food and liquid from your mouth to your stomach. If the ...

  15. Functional proteomic analysis reveals the involvement of KIAA1199 in breast cancer growth, motility and invasiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; Huang, Xin; Peng, Hong; Fu, Kai; Li, Yan; Singh, Rakesh K; Ding, Shi-Jian; Hou, Jinxuan; Liu, Miao; Varney, Michelle L; Hassan, Hesham; Dong, Jixin; Geng, Liying; Wang, Jing; Yu, Fang

    2014-01-01

    KIAA1199 is a recently identified novel gene that is up-regulated in human cancer with poor survival. Our proteomic study on signaling polarity in chemotactic cells revealed KIAA1199 as a novel protein target that may be involved in cellular chemotaxis and motility. In the present study, we examined the functional significance of KIAA1199 expression in breast cancer growth, motility and invasiveness. We validated the previous microarray observation by tissue microarray immunohistochemistry using a TMA slide containing 12 breast tumor tissue cores and 12 corresponding normal tissues. We performed the shRNA-mediated knockdown of KIAA1199 in MDA-MB-231 and HS578T cells to study the role of this protein in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis in vitro. We studied the effects of KIAA1199 knockdown in vivo in two groups of mice (n = 5). We carried out the SILAC LC-MS/MS based proteomic studies on the involvement of KIAA1199 in breast cancer. KIAA1199 mRNA and protein was significantly overexpressed in breast tumor specimens and cell lines as compared with non-neoplastic breast tissues from large-scale microarray and studies of breast cancer cell lines and tumors. To gain deeper insights into the novel role of KIAA1199 in breast cancer, we modulated KIAA1199 expression using shRNA-mediated knockdown in two breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and HS578T), expressing higher levels of KIAA1199. The KIAA1199 knockdown cells showed reduced motility and cell proliferation in vitro. Moreover, when the knockdown cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of female athymic nude mice, there was a significant decrease in tumor incidence and growth. In addition, quantitative proteomic analysis revealed that knockdown of KIAA1199 in breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells affected a broad range of cellular functions including apoptosis, metabolism and cell motility. Our findings indicate that KIAA1199 may play an important role in breast tumor growth and invasiveness, and that it

  16. HES6 enhances the motility of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickramasinghe, Caroline M [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Domaschenz, Renae [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); Gene Regulation and Chromatin Group, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, Hammersmith Campus, Du Cane Road, London W12 ONN (United Kingdom); Amagase, Yoko [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); Department of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Doshisha Women' s College of Liberal Arts, Kodo, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0395 (Japan); Williamson, Daniel [Molecular Cytogenetics, The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Northern Institute for Cancer Research, Paul O' Gorman Building, Medical School, Newcastle University, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Missiaglia, Edoardo; Shipley, Janet [Molecular Cytogenetics, The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Murai, Kasumi [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); Jones, Philip H, E-mail: phj20@cam.ac.uk [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital Cambridge, CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-01

    Absract: HES6, a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors, plays multiple roles in myogenesis. It is a direct target of the myogenic transcription factor MyoD and has been shown to regulate the formation of the myotome in development, myoblast cell cycle exit and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton during terminal differentiation. Here we investigate the expression and function of HES6 in rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft tissue tumor which expresses myogenic genes but fails to differentiate into muscle. We show that HES6 is expressed at high levels in the subset of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas expressing PAX/FOXO1 fusion genes (ARMSp). Knockdown of HES6 mRNA in the ARMSp cell line RH30 reduces proliferation and cell motility. This phenotype is rescued by expression of mouse Hes6 which is insensitive to HES6 siRNA. Furthermore, expression microarray analysis indicates that the HES6 knockdown is associated with a decrease in the levels of Transgelin, (TAGLN), a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of TAGLN decreases cell motility, whilst TAGLN overexpression rescues the motility defect resulting from HES6 knockdown. These findings indicate HES6 contributes to the pathogenesis of ARMSp by enhancing both proliferation and cell motility.

  17. RON kinase isoforms demonstrate variable cell motility in normal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Alissa; Rajput, Ashwani; Wan, Guanghua

    2016-09-01

    Aberrant RON (Recepteur d'Origine Nantais) tyrosine kinase activation causes the epithelial cell to evade normal growth pathways, resulting in unregulated cell proliferation, increased cell motility and decreased apoptosis. Wildtype (wt) RON has been shown to play a role in metastasis of epithelial malignancies. It presents an important potential therapeutic target for colorectal, breast, gastric and pancreatic cancer. Little is known about functional differences amongst RON isoforms RON155, RON160 and RON165. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of various RON kinase isoforms on cell motility. Cell lines with stable expression of wtRON were generated by inserting the coding region of RON in pTagRFP (tagged red fluorescence protein plasmid). The expression constructs of RON variants (RON155, RON160 and RON165) were generated by creating a mutagenesis-based wtRON-pTag RFP plasmid and stably transfected into HEK 293 cells. The wound closure scratch assay was used to investigate the effect on cell migratory capacity of wild type RON and its variants. RON transfected cells demonstrated increased cell motility compared to HEK293 control cells. RON165 cell motility was significantly increased compared to RON160 (mean percentage of wound covered 37.37% vs. 32.40%; p = 0.03). RON tyrosine kinase isoforms have variable cell motility. This may reflect a difference in the behavior of malignant epithelial cells and their capacity for metastasis.

  18. Rac and Rho GTPases in cancer cell motility control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parri Matteo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases represent a family of small GTP-binding proteins involved in cell cytoskeleton organization, migration, transcription, and proliferation. A common theme of these processes is a dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton which has now emerged as a major switch control mainly carried out by Rho and Rac GTPase subfamilies, playing an acknowledged role in adaptation of cell motility to the microenvironment. Cells exhibit three distinct modes of migration when invading the 3 D environment. Collective motility leads to movement of cohorts of cells which maintain the adherens junctions and move by photolytic degradation of matrix barriers. Single cell mesenchymal-type movement is characterized by an elongated cellular shape and again requires extracellular proteolysis and integrin engagement. In addition it depends on Rac1-mediated cell polarization and lamellipodia formation. Conversely, in amoeboid movement cells have a rounded morphology, the movement is independent from proteases but requires high Rho GTPase to drive elevated levels of actomyosin contractility. These two modes of cell movement are interconvertible and several moving cells, including tumor cells, show an high degree of plasticity in motility styles shifting ad hoc between mesenchymal or amoeboid movements. This review will focus on the role of Rac and Rho small GTPases in cell motility and in the complex relationship driving the reciprocal control between Rac and Rho granting for the opportunistic motile behaviour of aggressive cancer cells. In addition we analyse the role of these GTPases in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination.

  19. Colonic motility and enema spreading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.G.; Wood, E.; Clark, A.G.; Reynolds, J.R.; Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham

    1986-01-01

    Radiolabelled enema solution was administered to eight healthy subjects, both in fasted and fed states. Enema spreading was monitored over a 4-h period using gamma scintigraphy and colonic motility was recorded simultaneously using a pressure sensitive radiotelemetry capsule. The rate and extent of enema dispersion were unaffected by eating. Spreading could be correlated with colonic motility and was inhibited by aboral propulsion of the colonic contents. (orig.)

  20. Motility, Force Generation, and Energy Consumption of Unicellular Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstetter, Axel; Pfohl, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Motility is a key factor for pathogenicity of unicellular parasites, enabling them to infiltrate and evade host cells, and perform several of their life-cycle events. State-of-the-art methods of motility analysis rely on a combination of optical tweezers with high-resolution microscopy and microfluidics. With this technology, propulsion forces, energies, and power generation can be determined so as to shed light on the motion mechanisms, chemotactic behavior, and specific survival strategies of unicellular parasites. With these new tools in hand, we can elucidate the mechanisms of motility and force generation of unicellular parasites, and identify ways to manipulate and eventually inhibit them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cigarette smoke extract promotes human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and survival through ERK1/2- and NF-κB-dependent pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Qing-Wen; Edvinsson, Lars; Xu, Cang-Bao

    2010-01-01

    and necrosis were found in serum-starved HASMCs. DSPs decreased cell death and increased B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 expression. Blocking phosphorylation of ERK1/2 or NF-κB attenuated DSP-induced cell death inhibition. Cigarette smoke particles stimulate HASMC proliferation and inhibit cell death...

  2. Motility of electric cable bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner

    2016-01-01

    Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces...... with a highly variable speed of 0.50.3 ms1 (meanstandard deviation) and time between reversals of 155108 s. They frequently moved forward in loops, and formation of twisted loops revealed helical rotation of the filaments. Cable bacteria responded to chemical gradients in their environment, and around the oxic......-anoxic interface, they curled and piled up, with straight parts connecting back to the source of sulfide. Thus, it appears that motility serves the cable bacteria in establishing and keeping optimal connections between their distant electron donor and acceptors in a dynamic sediment environment....

  3. Stochastic models of cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradinaru, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Cell motility and migration are central to the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms, and errors during this process can lead to major diseases. Consequently, the mechanisms and phenomenology of cell motility are currently under intense study. In recent years, a new...... interdisciplinary field focusing on the study of biological processes at the nanoscale level, with a range of technological applications in medicine and biological research, has emerged. The work presented in this thesis is at the interface of cell biology, image processing, and stochastic modeling. The stochastic...... models introduced here are based on persistent random motion, which I apply to real-life studies of cell motility on flat and nanostructured surfaces. These models aim to predict the time-dependent position of cell centroids in a stochastic manner, and conversely determine directly from experimental...

  4. The Cooperative Effect of Genistein and Protein Hydrolysates on the Proliferation and Survival of Osteoblastic Cells (hFOB 1.19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chum salmon skin gelatin, de-isoflavoned soy protein, and casein were hydrolyzed at two degrees of hydrolysis. Genistein, the prepared hydrolysates, and genistein-hydrolysate combinations were assessed for their proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects on human osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19 to clarify potential cooperative effects between genistein and these hydrolysates in these two activities. Genistein at 2.5 μg/L demonstrated the highest proliferative activity, while the higher dose of genistein inhibited cell growth. All hydrolysates promoted osteoblast proliferation by increasing cell viability to 102.9%–131.1%. Regarding etoposide- or NaF-induced osteoblast apoptosis, these hydrolysates at 0.05 g/L showed both preventive and therapeutic effects against apoptosis. In the mode of apoptotic prevention, the hydrolysates decreased apoptotic cells from 32.9% to 15.2%–23.7% (etoposide treatment or from 23.6% to 14.3%–19.6% (NaF treatment. In the mode of apoptotic rescue, the hydrolysates lessened the extent of apoptotic cells from 15.9% to 13.0%–15.3% (etoposide treatment or from 13.3% to 10.9%–12.7% (NaF treatment. Gelatin hydrolysates showed the highest activities among all hydrolysates in all cases. All investigated combinations (especially the genistein-gelatin hydrolysate combination had stronger proliferation, apoptotic prevention, and rescue than genistein itself or their counterpart hydrolysates alone, suggesting that genistein cooperated with these hydrolysates, rendering greater activities in osteoblast proliferation and anti-apoptosis.

  5. UVB-induced nuclear translocation of TC-PTP by AKT/14-3-3σ axis inhibits keratinocyte survival and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mihwa; Morales, Liza D; Baek, Minwoo; Slaga, Thomas J; DiGiovanni, John; Kim, Dae Joon

    2017-10-31

    Understanding protein subcellular localization is important to determining the functional role of specific proteins. T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) contains bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSI and NLSII) in its C-terminus. We previously have demonstrated that the nuclear form of TC-PTP (TC45) is mainly localized to the cytoplasm in keratinocytes and it is translocated to the nucleus following UVB irradiation. Here, we report that TC45 is translocated by an AKT/14-3-3σ-mediated mechanism in response to UVB exposure, resulting in increased apoptosis and decreased keratinocyte proliferation. We demonstrate that UVB irradiation increased phosphorylation of AKT and induced nuclear translocation of 14-3-3σ and TC45. However, inhibition of AKT blocked nuclear translocation of TC45 and 14-3-3σ. Site-directed mutagenesis of 14-3-3σ binding sites within TC45 showed that a substitution at Threonine 179 (TC45/T179A) effectively blocked UVB-induced nuclear translocation of ectopic TC45 due to the disruption of the direct binding between TC45 and 14-3-3σ. Overexpression of TC45/T179A in keratinocytes resulted in a decrease of UVB-induced apoptosis which corresponded to an increase in nuclear phosphorylated STAT3, and cell proliferation was higher in TC45/T179A-overexpressing keratinocytes compared to control keratinocytes following UVB irradiation. Furthermore, deletion of TC45 NLSII blocked its UVB-induced nuclear translocation, indicating that both T179 and NLSII are required. Taken together, our findings suggest that AKT and 14-3-3σ cooperatively regulate TC45 nuclear translocation in a critical step of an early protective mechanism against UVB exposure that signals the deactivation of STAT3 in order to promote keratinocyte cell death and inhibit keratinocyte proliferation.

  6. Social motility in african trypanosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oberholzer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are devastating human and animal pathogens that cause significant human mortality and limit economic development in sub-Saharan Africa. Studies of trypanosome biology generally consider these protozoan parasites as individual cells in suspension cultures or in animal models of infection. Here we report that the procyclic form of the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei engages in social behavior when cultivated on semisolid agarose surfaces. This behavior is characterized by trypanosomes assembling into multicellular communities that engage in polarized migrations across the agarose surface and cooperate to divert their movements in response to external signals. These cooperative movements are flagellum-mediated, since they do not occur in trypanin knockdown parasites that lack normal flagellum motility. We term this behavior social motility based on features shared with social motility and other types of surface-induced social behavior in bacteria. Social motility represents a novel and unexpected aspect of trypanosome biology and offers new paradigms for considering host-parasite interactions.

  7. Curriculum for neurogastroenterology and motility training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyawali, C P; Savarino, E; Lazarescu, A

    2018-01-01

    Although neurogastroenterology and motility (NGM) disorders are some of the most frequent disorders encountered by practicing gastroenterologists, a structured competency-based training curriculum developed by NGM experts is lacking. The American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society (ANMS) ...

  8. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A H; Iorio, N; Schey, R

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus and is a potential cause of dysphagia and food impaction, most commonly affecting young men. Esophageal manometry findings vary from normal motility to aperistalsis, simultaneous contractions, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus or hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter (LES). It remains unclear whether esophageal dysmotility plays a significant role in the clinical symptoms of EoE. Our aim is to review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and effect of treatment on esophageal dysmotility in EoE. A literature search utilizing the PubMed database was performed using keywords: eosinophilic esophagitis, esophageal dysmotility, motility, manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagogram, endoscopic ultrasound, and dysphagia. Fifteen studies, totaling 387 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis were identified as keeping in accordance with the aim of this study and included in this review. The occurrence of abnormal esophageal manometry was reported to be between 4 and 87% among patients with EoE. Esophageal motility studies have shown reduced distensibility, abnormal peristalsis, and hypotonicity of the LES in patients with EoE, which may also mimic other esophageal motility disorders such as achalasia or nutcracker esophagus. Studies have shown conflicting results regarding the presence of esophageal dysmotility and symptoms with some reports suggesting a higher rate of food impaction, while others report no correlation between motor function and dysphagia. Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on

  9. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Hsiang Liu; Yi-Wen Lin; Nou-Ying Tang; Hsu-Jan Liu; Ching-Liang Hsieh

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR), which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA-) induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treat...

  10. Multifaceted role of galectin-3 on human glioblastoma cell motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debray, Charles; Vereecken, Pierre; Belot, Nathalie; Teillard, Peggy; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pochet, Roland

    2004-01-01

    Astrocytic tumors' aggressiveness results from an imbalance between cell proliferation and cell death favoring growth, but also from the propensity of tumor cells to detach from the primary tumor site, migrate, and invade the surrounding parenchyma. Astrocytic tumor progression is known to be associated with an increased expression of galectin-3. We investigated in cell culture how galectin-3 expression affects astrocytoma cell motility. Galectin-3 deficient cells were obtained by stable transfection of the U373 glioblastoma cell line with a specific expression antisense plasmid. Cultured galectin-3 deficient glioblastoma cells showed increased motility potential on laminin and modifications in the cytoskeleton reorganization. In addition, c-DNA microarrays and quantitative immunofluorescence analysis showed that galectin-3 deficient U373 cells have an increased expression of integrins-α6 and -β1, proteins known to be implicated in the regulation of cell adhesion

  11. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G.

    2017-01-01

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esoph...

  12. FANCD2 functions as a critical factor downstream of MiTF to maintain the proliferation and survival of melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourseguin, Julie; Bonet, Caroline; Renaud, Emilie; Pandiani, Charlotte; Boncompagni, Marina; Giuliano, Sandy; Pawlikowska, Patrycja; Karmous-Benailly, Houda; Ballotti, Robert; Rosselli, Filippo; Bertolotto, Corine

    2016-11-09

    Proteins involved in genetic stability maintenance and safeguarding DNA replication act not only against cancer initiation but could also play a major role in sustaining cancer progression. Here, we report that the FANC pathway is highly expressed in metastatic melanoma harboring the oncogenic microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MiTF). We show that MiTF downregulation in melanoma cells lowers the expression of several FANC genes and proteins. Moreover, we observe that, similarly to the consequence of MiTF downregulation, FANC pathway silencing alters proliferation, migration and senescence of human melanoma cells. We demonstrate that the FANC pathway acts downstream MiTF and establish the existence of an epistatic relationship between MiTF and the FANC pathway. Our findings point to a central role of the FANC pathway in cellular and chromosomal resistance to both DNA damage and targeted therapies in melanoma cells. Thus, the FANC pathway is a promising new therapeutic target in melanoma treatment.

  13. Asynchrony in the growth and motility responses to environmental changes by individual bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umehara, Senkei; Hattori, Akihiro; Inoue, Ippei; Yasuda, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    Knowing how individual cells respond to environmental changes helps one understand phenotypic diversity in a bacterial cell population, so we simultaneously monitored the growth and motility of isolated motile Escherichia coli cells over several generations by using a method called on-chip single-cell cultivation. Starved cells quickly stopped growing but remained motile for several hours before gradually becoming immotile. When nutrients were restored the cells soon resumed their growth and proliferation but remained immotile for up to six generations. A flagella visualization assay suggested that deflagellation underlies the observed loss of motility. This set of results demonstrates that single-cell transgenerational study under well-characterized environmental conditions can provide information that will help us understand distinct functions within individual cells

  14. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2017-06-30

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus, absent contractility) and minor disorders of peristalsis (ineffective esophageal motility, fragmented peristalsis). The aim of this study was to review the current diagnosis and management of esophageal motility disorders other than achalasia.

  15. Measuring Borrelia burgdorferi Motility and Chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Li, Chunhao

    2018-01-01

    Swimming plate, cell motion tracking, and capillary tube assays are very useful tools to quantitatively measure bacterial motility and chemotaxis. These methods were modified and applied to study Borrelia burgdorferi motility and chemotaxis. By using these methods, numerous motility and chemotaxis mutants have been characterized and several chemoattractants were identified. With the assistance of these tools, the role of motility and chemotaxis in the pathogenicity of B. burgdorferi has been established. In addition, these tools also facilitate the study of motility and chemotaxis in other spirochetes.

  16. Physical models of cell motility

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book surveys the most recent advances in physics-inspired cell movement models. This synergetic, cross-disciplinary effort to increase the fidelity of computational algorithms will lead to a better understanding of the complex biomechanics of cell movement, and stimulate progress in research on related active matter systems, from suspensions of bacteria and synthetic swimmers to cell tissues and cytoskeleton.Cell motility and collective motion are among the most important themes in biology and statistical physics of out-of-equilibrium systems, and crucial for morphogenesis, wound healing, and immune response in eukaryotic organisms. It is also relevant for the development of effective treatment strategies for diseases such as cancer, and for the design of bioactive surfaces for cell sorting and manipulation. Substrate-based cell motility is, however, a very complex process as regulatory pathways and physical force generation mechanisms are intertwined. To understand the interplay between adhesion, force ...

  17. [Motility disorders of the esophagus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, E; Rougemont, A-L; Furlano, R I; Schneider, J F; Mayr, J; Haecker, F-M; Beier, K; Schneider, J; Weber, P; Berberich, T; Cathomas, G; Meier-Ruge, W A

    2013-03-01

    Motility disorders of the esophagus comprise a heterogeneous spectrum of diseases. Primary malformations of the esophagus are now amenable to improved surgical and gastroenterological therapies; however, they often lead to persistent long-term esophageal dysmotility. Achalasia originates from impaired relaxation of the gastroesophageal sphincter apparatus. Systemic diseases may give rise to secondary disorders of esophageal motility. A number of visceral neuromuscular disorders show an esophageal manifestation but aganglionosis rarely extends into the esophagus. The growing group of myopathies includes metabolic and mitochondrial disorders with increasing levels of genetic characterization and incipient emergence of therapeutic strategies. Esophagitis with an infectious etiology causes severe dysmotility particularly in immunocompromised patients. Immunologically mediated inflammatory processes involving the esophagus are increasingly better understood. Finally, rare tumors and tumor-like lesions may impair esophageal motor function.

  18. Stem cell survival is severely compromised by the thymidineanalog EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine), an alternative to BrdU for proliferation assays and stem cell tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Skovrind, Ida; Christensen, Marlene Louise

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has opened up the possibility of treating numerous degenerating diseases. However, we are still merely at the stage of identifying appropriate sources of stem cells and exploring their full differentiation potential. Thus, tracking the stem cells upon in vivo engraftment...... and during in vitro co-culture is very important and is an area of research embracing many pitfalls. 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), a rather new thymidine analog incorporated into DNA, has recently been suggested to be a novel highly valid alternative to other dyes for labeling of stem cells and subsequent...... tracing of their proliferation and differentiation ability. However, our results herein do not at any stage support this recommendation, since EdU severely reduces the viability of stem cells. Accordingly, we found that transplanted EdU-labeled stem cells hardly survive upon in vivo transplantation...

  19. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Weiss

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on patients with EoE.

  20. Expression of p89c-Mybex9b, an alternatively spliced form of c-Myb, is required for proliferation and survival of p210BCR/ABL-expressing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzotti, G; Mariani, S A; Corradini, F; Bussolari, R; Cesi, V; Vergalli, J; Ferrari-Amorotti, G; Fragliasso, V; Soliera, A R; Cattelani, S; Raschellà, G; Holyoake, T L; Calabretta, B

    2012-01-01

    The c-Myb gene encodes the p75 c-Myb isoform and less-abundant proteins generated by alternatively spliced transcripts. Among these, the best known is p c-Mybex9b , which contains 121 additional amino acids between exon 9 and 10, in a domain involved in protein–protein interactions and negative regulation. In hematopoietic cells, expression of p c-Mybex9b accounts for 10–15% of total c-Myb; these levels may be biologically relevant because modest changes in c-Myb expression affects proliferation and survival of leukemic cells and lineage choice and frequency of normal hematopoietic progenitors. In this study, we assessed biochemical activities of p c-Mybex9b and the consequences of perturbing its expression in K562 and primary chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitor cells. Compared with p75 c-Myb , p c-Mybex9b is more stable and more effective in transactivating Myb-regulated promoters. Ectopic expression of p c-Mybex9b enhanced proliferation and colony formation and reduced imatinib (IM) sensitivity of K562 cells; conversely, specific downregulation of p c-Mybex9b reduced proliferation and colony formation, enhanced IM sensitivity of K562 cells and markedly suppressed colony formation of CML CD34 + cells, without affecting the levels of p75 c-Myb . Together, these studies indicate that expression of the low-abundance p c-Mybex9b isoform has an important role for the overall biological effects of c-Myb in BCR/ABL-transformed cells

  1. Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and PI3K/Akt Signaling Suppresses Cell Proliferation and Survival through Regulation of Stat3 Activation in Human Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bito, T.; Sumita, N.; Ashida, M.; Budiyanto, A.; Ueda, M.; Ichihashi, M.; Nishigori, C.; Tokura, Y.; Bito, T.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the important role of Stat3 activation in a number of human tumors from the viewpoint of its oncogenic and anti apoptotic activity. In this study, we examined the role and related signaling molecules of Stat3 in the carcinogenesis of human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In 35 human cutaneous SCC samples, 86% showed overexpression of phosphorylated (p)-Stat3, and most of those simultaneously over expressed p-EGFR or p-Akt. Constitutive activation of EGFR and Stat3 was observed in three SCC cell lines and four of five SCC tissues. AG1478, an inhibitor of the EGFR, down regulated Stat3 activation in HSC-1 human SCC cells. AG1478 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of HSC-1 cells but did not inhibit the growth of normal human epidermal keratinocytes that did not show Stat3 activation. Furthermore, a PI3K inhibitor also suppressed Stat3 activation in HSC-1 cells to some degree. Combined treatment with the PI3K inhibitor and AG1478 strongly suppressed Stat3 activity and dramatically induced apoptosis of HSC-1 cells. These data suggest that Stat3 activation through EGFR and/or PI3K/Akt activation plays a critical role in the proliferation and survival of human cutaneous SCC.

  2. The novel mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor INK-128 suppresses survival and proliferation of primary and transformed human pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, Hai-zhou; Weng, Xiao-chuan; Pan, Hong-ming; Pan, Qin; Sun, Peng; Liu, Li-li; Chen, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • INK-128 inhibits the survival and growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. • INK-128 blocks mTORC1/2 activation simultaneously in pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 down-regulates cyclin D1 and causes pancreatic cancer cell cycle arrest. • INK-128 significantly increases sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. - Abstract: Pancreatic cancer has one of worst prognosis among all human malignancies around the world, the development of novel and more efficient anti-cancer agents against this disease is urgent. In the current study, we tested the potential effect of INK-128, a novel mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrated that INK-128 concentration- and time-dependently inhibited the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer cells (both primary cells and transformed cells). INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Further, INK-128 dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and Akt at Ser 473 in pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, it downregulated cyclin D1 expression and caused cell cycle arrest. Finally, we found that a low concentration of INK-128 significantly increased the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Together, our in vitro results suggest that INK-128 might be further investigated as a novel anti-cancer agent or chemo-adjuvant for pancreatic cancer treatment

  3. The novel mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor INK-128 suppresses survival and proliferation of primary and transformed human pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Hai-zhou [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Weng, Xiao-chuan [Department of Anesthesiology, Hangzhou Xia-sha Hospital, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Pan, Hong-ming; Pan, Qin [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Sun, Peng [Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Liu, Li-li [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Chen, Bin, E-mail: chenbinhangzhou126@126.com [Department of Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery, First People’s Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou 310006 (China)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • INK-128 inhibits the survival and growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. • INK-128 blocks mTORC1/2 activation simultaneously in pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 down-regulates cyclin D1 and causes pancreatic cancer cell cycle arrest. • INK-128 significantly increases sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. - Abstract: Pancreatic cancer has one of worst prognosis among all human malignancies around the world, the development of novel and more efficient anti-cancer agents against this disease is urgent. In the current study, we tested the potential effect of INK-128, a novel mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrated that INK-128 concentration- and time-dependently inhibited the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer cells (both primary cells and transformed cells). INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Further, INK-128 dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and Akt at Ser 473 in pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, it downregulated cyclin D1 expression and caused cell cycle arrest. Finally, we found that a low concentration of INK-128 significantly increased the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Together, our in vitro results suggest that INK-128 might be further investigated as a novel anti-cancer agent or chemo-adjuvant for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  4. Translational Upregulation of an Individual p21Cip1 Transcript Variant by GCN2 Regulates Cell Proliferation and Survival under Nutrient Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey L Lehman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple transcripts encode for the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1. These transcripts produce identical proteins but differ in their 5' untranslated regions (UTRs. Although several stresses that induce p21 have been characterized, the mechanisms regulating the individual transcript variants and their functional significance are unknown. Here we demonstrate through (35S labeling, luciferase reporter assays, and polysome transcript profiling that activation of the Integrated Stress Response (ISR kinase GCN2 selectively upregulates the translation of a p21 transcript variant containing 5' upstream open reading frames (uORFs through phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2α. Mutational analysis reveals that the uORFs suppress translation under basal conditions, but promote translation under stress. Functionally, ablation of p21 ameliorates G1/S arrest and reduces cell survival in response to GCN2 activation. These findings uncover a novel mechanism of p21 post-transcriptional regulation, offer functional significance for the existence of multiple p21 transcripts, and support a key role for GCN2 in regulating the cell cycle under stress.

  5. Gastric Cancer Cell Proliferation and Survival Is Enabled by a Cyclophilin B/STAT3/miR-520d-5p Signaling Feedback Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Guo, Hanqing; Zhao, Xiaodi; Jin, Jiang; Zhang, Lifeng; Li, Hong; Lu, Yuanyuan; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Daiming

    2017-03-01

    Molecular links between inflammation and cancer remain obscure despite their great pathogenic significance. The JAK2/STAT3 pathway activated by IL6 and other proinflammatory cytokines has garnered attention as a pivotal link in cancer pathogenesis, but the basis for its activation in cancer cells is not understood. Here we report that an IL6-triggered feedback loop involving STAT3-mediated suppression of miR-520d-5p and upregulation of its downstream target cyclophilin B (CypB) regulate the growth and survival of gastric cancer cells. In clinical specimens of gastric cancer, we documented increased expression of CypB and activation of STAT3. Mechanistic investigations identified miR-520d-5p as a regulator of CypB mRNA levels. This signaling axis regulated gastric cancer growth by modulating phosphorylation of STAT3. Furthermore, miR-520d-5p was identified as a direct STAT3 target and IL6-mediated inhibition of miR-520d-5p relied upon STAT3 activity. Our findings define a positive feedback loop that drives gastric carcinogenesis as influenced by H. pylori infections that involve proinflammatory IL6 stimulation. Cancer Res; 77(5); 1227-40. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Mitochondrial PKA mediates sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Rashel; Breitbart, Haim

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria are the major source of ATP to power sperm motility. Phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins has been proposed as a major regulatory mechanism for mitochondrial bioenergetics. Sperm motility was measured by a computer-assisted analyzer, protein detection by western blotting, membrane potential by tetramethylrhodamine, cellular ATP by luciferase assay and localization of PKA by immuno-electron microscopy. Bicarbonate is essential for the creation of mitochondrial electro-chemical gradient, ATP synthesis and sperm motility. Bicarbonate stimulates PKA-dependent phosphorylation of two 60kDa proteins identified as Tektin and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase. This phosphorylation was inhibited by respiration inhibition and phosphorylation could be restored by glucose in the presence of bicarbonate. However, this effect of glucose cannot be seen when the mitochondrial ATP/ADP exchanger was inhibited indicating that glycolytic-produced ATP is transported into the mitochondria and allows PKA-dependent protein phosphorylation inside the mitochondria. Bicarbonate activates mitochondrial soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) which catalyzes cAMP production leading to the activation of mitochondrial PKA. Glucose can overcome the lack of ATP in the absence of bicarbonate but it cannot affect the mitochondrial sAC/PKA system, therefore the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the 60kDa proteins does not occur in the absence of bicarbonate. Production of CO2 in Krebs cycle, which is converted to bicarbonate is essential for sAC/PKA activation leading to mitochondrial membrane potential creation and ATP synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastrointestinal motility disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Jae Gol [College of Medicine, Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-02-01

    Current scintigraphic tests of gastrointestinal motor function provides relevant pathophysiologic information, but their clinical utility is controversial. Many scintigraphic methods are developed to investigate gastrointestinal motility from oral cavity to colon. These are esophageal transit scintigraphy, oropharyngeal transit study, gastric emptying test, small bowel transit time measurement, colon transit study and gastroesopahgeal reflux scintigraphy. Scintigraphy of gastrointestinal tract is the most physiologic and noninvasive method to evaluate gastrointestinal motility disorders. Stomach emptying test is regarded as a gold standard in motility study. Gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy also has a certain role in assessment of drug effect to GI motility and changes after theraphy of motility disorders. Scintigraphy provides noninvasive and quantitative assessment of physiological transit throughout the gastrointestinal tract, and it is extremely useful for diagnosing gastrointestinal motor dysfunction. This article reviews the current procedures, indications, significance and guidelines for gastrointestinal motility measurements by scintigraphy.

  8. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastrointestinal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Jae Gol

    2001-01-01

    Current scintigraphic tests of gastrointestinal motor function provides relevant pathophysiologic information, but their clinical utility is controversial. Many scintigraphic methods are developed to investigate gastrointestinal motility from oral cavity to colon. These are esophageal transit scintigraphy, oropharyngeal transit study, gastric emptying test, small bowel transit time measurement, colon transit study and gastroesopahgeal reflux scintigraphy. Scintigraphy of gastrointestinal tract is the most physiologic and noninvasive method to evaluate gastrointestinal motility disorders. Stomach emptying test is regarded as a gold standard in motility study. Gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy also has a certain role in assessment of drug effect to GI motility and changes after theraphy of motility disorders. Scintigraphy provides noninvasive and quantitative assessment of physiological transit throughout the gastrointestinal tract, and it is extremely useful for diagnosing gastrointestinal motor dysfunction. This article reviews the current procedures, indications, significance and guidelines for gastrointestinal motility measurements by scintigraphy

  9. Uncertainties in Nuclear Proliferation Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chul Min; Yim, Man-Sung; Park, Hyeon Seok

    2015-01-01

    There have been various efforts in the research community to understand the determinants of nuclear proliferation and develop quantitative tools to predict nuclear proliferation events. Such systematic approaches have shown the possibility to provide warning for the international community to prevent nuclear proliferation activities. However, there are still large debates for the robustness of the actual effect of determinants and projection results. Some studies have shown that several factors can cause uncertainties in previous quantitative nuclear proliferation modeling works. This paper analyzes the uncertainties in the past approaches and suggests future works in the view of proliferation history, analysis methods, and variable selection. The research community still lacks the knowledge for the source of uncertainty in current models. Fundamental problems in modeling will remain even other advanced modeling method is developed. Before starting to develop fancy model based on the time dependent proliferation determinants' hypothesis, using graph theory, etc., it is important to analyze the uncertainty of current model to solve the fundamental problems of nuclear proliferation modeling. The uncertainty from different proliferation history coding is small. Serious problems are from limited analysis methods and correlation among the variables. Problems in regression analysis and survival analysis cause huge uncertainties when using the same dataset, which decreases the robustness of the result. Inaccurate variables for nuclear proliferation also increase the uncertainty. To overcome these problems, further quantitative research should focus on analyzing the knowledge suggested on the qualitative nuclear proliferation studies

  10. Coordination of glioblastoma cell motility by PKCι

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin R Mitchell

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, in part because of its highly invasive nature. The tumor suppressor PTEN is frequently mutated in glioblastoma and is known to contribute to the invasive phenotype. However the downstream events that promote invasion are not fully understood. PTEN loss leads to activation of the atypical protein kinase C, PKCι. We have previously shown that PKCι is required for glioblastoma cell invasion, primarily by enhancing cell motility. Here we have used time-lapse videomicroscopy to more precisely define the role of PKCι in glioblastoma. Results Glioblastoma cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically were unable to coordinate the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod. Instead, some cells generated multiple small, short-lived protrusions while others generated a diffuse leading edge that formed around the entire circumference of the cell. Confocal microscopy showed that this behavior was associated with altered behavior of the cytoskeletal protein Lgl, which is known to be inactivated by PKCι phosphorylation. Lgl in control cells localized to the lamellipod leading edge and did not associate with its binding partner non-muscle myosin II, consistent with it being in an inactive state. In PKCι-depleted cells, Lgl was concentrated at multiple sites at the periphery of the cell and remained in association with non-muscle myosin II. Videomicroscopy also identified a novel role for PKCι in the cell cycle. Cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically entered mitosis normally, but showed marked delays in completing mitosis. Conclusions PKCι promotes glioblastoma motility by coordinating the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod and has a role in remodeling the cytoskeleton at the lamellipod leading edge, promoting the dissociation of Lgl from non-muscle myosin II. In addition PKCι is required

  11. Does Hypothyroidism Affect Gastrointestinal Motility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Yaylali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastrointestinal motility and serum thyroid hormone levels are closely related. Our aim was to analyze whether there is a disorder in esophagogastric motor functions as a result of hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods. The study group included 30 females (mean age ± SE 45.17 ± 2.07 years with primary hypothyroidism and 10 healthy females (mean age ± SE 39.40 ± 3.95 years. All cases underwent esophagogastric endoscopy and scintigraphy. For esophageal scintigraphy, dynamic imaging of esophagus motility protocol, and for gastric emptying scintigraphy, anterior static gastric images were acquired. Results. The mean esophageal transit time (52.56 ± 4.07 sec for patients; 24.30 ± 5.88 sec for controls; P=.02 and gastric emptying time (49.06 ± 4.29 min for the hypothyroid group; 30.4 ± 4.74 min for the control group; P=.01 were markedly increased in cases of hypothyroidism. Conclusion. Hypothyroidism prominently reduces esophageal and gastric motor activity and can cause gastrointestinal dysfunction.

  12. STAT3 Regulates Proliferation and Survival of CD8+ T Cells: Enhances Effector Responses to HSV-1 Infection, and Inhibits IL-10+ Regulatory CD8+ T Cells in Autoimmune Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Rong Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available STAT3 regulates CD4+ T cell survival and differentiation. However, its effects on CD8+ T cells are not well understood. Here, we show that in comparison to WT CD8+ T cells, STAT3-deficient CD8+ T cells exhibit a preactivated memory-like phenotype, produce more IL-2, proliferate faster, and are more sensitive to activation-induced cell death (AICD. The enhanced proliferation and sensitivity to AICD correlated with downregulation of class-O forkhead transcription factors (FoxO1, FoxO3A, , , Bcl-2, OX-40, and upregulation of FasL, Bax, and Bad. We examined whether STAT3-deficient CD8+ T cells can mount effective response during herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 infection and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU. Compared to WT mice, HSV-1-infected STAT3-deficient mice (STAT3KO produced less IFN- and virus-specific KLRG-1+ CD8+ T cells. STAT3KO mice are also resistant to EAU and produced less IL-17-producing Tc17 cells. Resistance of STAT3KO to EAU correlated with marked expansion of IL-10-producing regulatory CD8+ T cells (CD8-Treg implicated in recovery from autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Thus, increases of IL-6-induced STAT3 activation observed during inflammation may inhibit expansion of CD8-Tregs, thereby impeding recovery from uveitis. These results suggest that STAT3 is a potential therapeutic target for upregulating CD8+ T cell-mediated responses to viruses and suggest the successful therapeutic targeting of STAT3 as treatment for uveitis, derived, in part, from promoting CD8-Treg expansion.

  13. Proliferation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carchon, R.

    1998-09-01

    The report gives an overview of different aspects related to safeguards of fissile materials. Existing treaties including the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and the Tlatelolco and the Rarotonga Treaties are discussed. An overview of safeguards systems for the control of fissile materials as well as the role of various authorities is given. An overall overview of proliferation risks, the physical protection of fissile materials and the trade in fissile materials is given. Finally, the status in problem countries and de facto nuclear weapon states is discussed

  14. Asian motility studies in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Oh Young

    2010-04-01

    Altered motility remains one of the important pathophysiologic factors in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who commonly complain of abdominal pain and stool changes such as diarrhea and constipation. The prevalence of IBS has increased among Asian populations these days. Gastrointestinal (GI) physiology may vary between Asian and Western populations because of differences in diets, socio-cultural backgrounds, and genetic factors. The characteristics and differences of GI dysmotility in Asian IBS patients were reviewed. MEDLINE search work was performed including following terms, 'IBS,' 'motility,' 'transit time,' 'esophageal motility,' 'gastric motility,' 'small intestinal motility,' 'colonic motility,' 'anorectal function,' and 'gallbladder motility' and over 100 articles were categorized under 'esophagus,' 'stomach,' 'small intestine,' 'colon,' 'anorectum,' 'gallbladder,' 'transit,' 'motor pattern,' and 'effect of stressors.' Delayed gastric emptying, slow tansit in constipation predominant IBS patients, rapid transit in diarrhea predominant IBS patients, accelerated motility responses to various stressors such as meals, mental stress, or corticotrophin releasing hormones, and altered rectal compliance and altered rectal accomodation were reported in many Asian studies regarding IBS. Many conflicting results were found among these studies and there are still controversies to conclude these as unique features of Asian IBS patients. Multinational and multicenter studies are needed to be performed vigorously in order to elaborate characteristics as well as differences of altered motililty in Asian patients with IBS.

  15. Reconfigurable engineered motile semiconductor microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohiri, Ugonna; Shields, C Wyatt; Han, Koohee; Tyler, Talmage; Velev, Orlin D; Jokerst, Nan

    2018-05-03

    Locally energized particles form the basis for emerging classes of active matter. The design of active particles has led to their controlled locomotion and assembly. The next generation of particles should demonstrate robust control over their active assembly, disassembly, and reconfiguration. Here we introduce a class of semiconductor microparticles that can be comprehensively designed (in size, shape, electric polarizability, and patterned coatings) using standard microfabrication tools. These custom silicon particles draw energy from external electric fields to actively propel, while interacting hydrodynamically, and sequentially assemble and disassemble on demand. We show that a number of electrokinetic effects, such as dielectrophoresis, induced charge electrophoresis, and diode propulsion, can selectively power the microparticle motions and interactions. The ability to achieve on-demand locomotion, tractable fluid flows, synchronized motility, and reversible assembly using engineered silicon microparticles may enable advanced applications that include remotely powered microsensors, artificial muscles, reconfigurable neural networks and computational systems.

  16. Scintigraphic assessment of gastrointestinal motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2014-01-01

    intestinal and colonic transit. This article reviews current imaging techniques, methods for data processing and principles for evaluating results when scintigraphy is used to assess gastrointestinal motility. Furthermore, clinical indications for performing scintigraphy are reviewed.......Gastrointestinal transit reflects overall gastrointestinal motor activity and is regulated by a complex interplay between neural and hormonal stimuli. Thus, transit measurements provide a measure of the combined effects of gastrointestinal muscular activity and feedback from the gut and brain....... Dysmotility in the different major segments of the gastrointestinal tract may give rise to similar symptoms; hence, localizing transit abnormalities to a specific segment is a valuable element of diagnostic evaluation. Scintigraphy is an effective noninvasive tool to assess gastric emptying as well as small...

  17. Effect of enhanced UV-B radiation on motile microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeder, D.P.

    1985-02-01

    The effect of slightly increased UV-B radiation was studied in four taxonomically very different microorganisms: the gliding prokaryotic cyanobacterium, Phormidium, the unicellular green alga Cosmarium, the flagellate Euglena and the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. UV-B doses which can be expected as a result of a slight decrease of the protective ozone layer in the stratosphere, do not kill or damage the microorganisms visibly. However, such UV-B doses impair the development, motility and photoorientation of these organisms. Due to the inhibition of these physiological important parameters the organisms cannot respond adequately to the changing factors in their environment, which prevents the survival of the populations. (orig.) [de

  18. The Clustered, Regularly Interspaced, Short Palindromic Repeats-associated Endonuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9)-created MDM2 T309G Mutation Enhances Vitreous-induced Expression of MDM2 and Proliferation and Survival of Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yajian; Ma, Gaoen; Huang, Xionggao; D'Amore, Patricia A; Zhang, Feng; Lei, Hetian

    2016-07-29

    The G309 allele of SNPs in the mouse double minute (MDM2) promoter locus is associated with a higher risk of cancer and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), but whether SNP G309 contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR is to date unknown. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas) 9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) can be harnessed to manipulate a single or multiple nucleotides in mammalian cells. Here we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using dual adeno-associated virus-derived vectors to target the MDM2 genomic locus together with a homologous repair template for creating the mutation of MDM2 T309G in human primary retinal pigment epithelial (hPRPE) cells whose genotype is MDM2 T309T. The next-generation sequencing results indicated that there was 42.51% MDM2 G309 in the edited hPRPE cells using adeno-associated viral CRISPR/Cas9. Our data showed that vitreous induced an increase in MDM2 and subsequent attenuation of p53 expression in MDM2 T309G hPRPE cells. Furthermore, our experimental results demonstrated that MDM2 T309G in hPRPE cells enhanced vitreous-induced cell proliferation and survival, suggesting that this SNP contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Whole-Body Exposure to 28Si-Radiation Dose-Dependently Disrupts Dentate Gyrus Neurogenesis and Proliferation in the Short Term and New Neuron Survival and Contextual Fear Conditioning in the Long Term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whoolery, Cody W; Walker, Angela K; Richardson, Devon R; Lucero, Melanie J; Reynolds, Ryan P; Beddow, David H; Clark, K Lyles; Shih, Hung-Ying; LeBlanc, Junie A; Cole, Mara G; Amaral, Wellington Z; Mukherjee, Shibani; Zhang, Shichuan; Ahn, Francisca; Bulin, Sarah E; DeCarolis, Nathan A; Rivera, Phillip D; Chen, Benjamin P C; Yun, Sanghee; Eisch, Amelia J

    2017-11-01

    Astronauts traveling to Mars will be exposed to chronic low doses of galactic cosmic space radiation, which contains highly charged, high-energy (HZE) particles. 56 Fe-HZE-particle exposure decreases hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenesis and disrupts hippocampal function in young adult rodents, raising the possibility of impaired astronaut cognition and risk of mission failure. However, far less is known about how exposure to other HZE particles, such as 28 Si, influences hippocampal neurogenesis and function. To compare the influence of 28 Si exposure on indices of neurogenesis and hippocampal function with previous studies on 56 Fe exposure, 9-week-old C57BL/6J and Nestin-GFP mice (NGFP; made and maintained for 10 or more generations on a C57BL/6J background) received whole-body 28 Si-particle-radiation exposure (0, 0.2 and 1 Gy, 300 MeV/n, LET 67 KeV/μ, dose rate 1 Gy/min). For neurogenesis assessment, the NGFP mice were injected with the mitotic marker BrdU at 22 h postirradiation and brains were examined for indices of hippocampal proliferation and neurogenesis, including Ki67 + , BrdU + , BrdU + NeuN + and DCX + cell numbers at short- and long-term time points (24 h and 3 months postirradiation, respectively). In the short-term group, stereology revealed fewer Ki67 + , BrdU + and DCX + cells in 1-Gy-irradiated group relative to nonirradiated control mice, fewer Ki67 + and DCX + cells in 0.2 Gy group relative to control group and fewer BrdU + and DCX + cells in 1 Gy group relative to 0.2 Gy group. In contrast to the clearly observed radiation-induced, dose-dependent reductions in the short-term group across all markers, only a few neurogenesis indices were changed in the long-term irradiated groups. Notably, there were fewer surviving BrdU + cells in the 1 Gy group relative to 0- and 0.2-Gy-irradiated mice in the long-term group. When the short- and long-term groups were analyzed by sex, exposure to radiation had a similar effect on neurogenesis indices

  20. Relation between motility, accelerated aging and gene expression in selected Drosophila strains under hypergravity conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serrano, P.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Javier Medina, F.; Herranz, R.

    2013-01-01

    Motility and aging in Drosophila have proven to be highly modified under altered gravity conditions (both in space and ground simulation facilities). In order to find out how closely connected they are, five strains with altered geotactic response or survival rates were selected and exposed to an

  1. Nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, S.

    1978-01-01

    The terms and reactions to President Carter's nuclear policy, culminating in the 1978 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act, are reviewed and analyzed. The new law increases restrictions on nuclear exports, encourages continued use of light water reactors in preference to plutonium-fueled reactors, and emphasizes technical solutions to proliferation problems. Critics of the law point out that it will hurt U.S. trade unfairly, that other countries do not have as many fuel options as the U.S. has, and that nuclear sales have as many political and economic as technical solutions. Compromise areas include new international safety guidelines, the possibility of an international nuclear fuel bank, and a willingness to consider each case on its merits. 21 references

  2. The effect of cations on sperm motility performance and fertilizing ability of silver carp Hypophtalmychtis molitrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khara H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of saline solution containing cations (Na+, K+, Ca+2, Mg+2 on sperm motility performance (duration of sperm motility and percentage of motile spermatozoa and fertilizing capacity of sperm (fertilization rate, hatching rate, larvae length during hatching, larvae length during active feeding and survival rate in silver carp. The results suggested that solutions containing ions did not improve the duration of sperm motility. The same was observed for the percentage of motile spermatozoa. Fertilization rate influenced by solutions containing Ca+2, and other ions could not affect this parameter. The results showed that hatching rate was higher in solutions containing 99 mEq/L NaCl, 2 mEq/L MgCl2 and 2, 4 mEq/L CaCl2 respectively. Also, survival rate was higher in the solution containing 2 mEq/L MgCl2 and 36 mg/dL KCl respectively.With regard to the obtained results, it was concluded that using appropriate activation medium can improve quality of fish sperm and subsequently increases artificial reproduction performance.

  3. Barriers to bacterial motility on unsaturated surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of the spatial organization and spatial dynamics of microbial populations in soil at a scale close to that of the microorganisms is scarce. While passive dispersal via water ow or soil biota is probably a major dispersal route, it is reasonable to consider that active dispersal also...... and their isogenic mutants unable to express various type of motility we aimed to quantify the physical limits of bacterial motility. Our results demonstrate how hydration controls bacterial motility under unsaturated conditions. They can form the base of improved biodegradation models that include microbial...

  4. Plankton motility patterns and encounter rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    measure of run length to reaction distance determines whether the underlying encounter is ballistic or diffusive. Since ballistic interactions are intrinsically more efficient than diffusive, we predict that organisms will display motility with long correlation run lengths compared to their reaction...... distances to their prey, but short compared to the reaction distances of their predators. We show motility data for planktonic organisms ranging from bacteria to copepods that support this prediction. We also present simple ballistic and diffusive motility models for estimating encounter rates, which lead...

  5. Physiology of Normal Esophageal Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Raj K; Chaudhury, Arun

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus consists of two different parts. In humans, the cervical esophagus is composed of striated muscles and the thoracic esophagus is composed of phasic smooth muscles. The striated muscle esophagus is innervated by the lower motor neurons and peristalsis in this segment is due to sequential activation of the motor neurons in the nucleus ambiguus. Both primary and secondary peristaltic contractions are centrally mediated. The smooth muscle of esophagus is phasic in nature and is innervated by intramural inhibitory (nitric oxide releasing) and excitatory (acetylcholine releasing) neurons that receive inputs from separate sets of preganglionic neurons located in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus. The primary peristalsis in this segment involves both central and peripheral mechanisms. The primary peristalsis consist of inhibition (called deglutitive inhibition) followed by excitation. The secondary peristalsis is entirely due to peripheral mechanisms and also involves inhibition followed by excitation. The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is characterized by tonic muscle that is different from the muscle of the esophageal body. The LES, like the esophageal body smooth muscle, is also innervated by the inhibitory and excitatory neurons. The LES maintains tonic closure due to its myogenic property. The LES tone is modulated by the inhibitory and the excitatory nerves. Inhibitory nerves mediate LES relaxation and the excitatory nerves mediate reflex contraction or rebound contraction of the LES. Clinical disorders of esophageal motility can be classified on the basis of disorders of the inhibitory and excitatory innervations and the smooth muscles. PMID:18364578

  6. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Gaffney, E.A.; Gadê lha, H.; Smith, D.J.; Blake, J.R.; Kirkman-Brown, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian

  7. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Gaffney, E.A.

    2011-01-21

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  8. Relation Between Motility, Accelerated Aging and Gene Expression in Selected Drosophila Strains under Hypergravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Paloma; van Loon, Jack J. W. A.; Medina, F. Javier; Herranz, Raúl

    2013-02-01

    Motility and aging in Drosophila have proven to be highly modified under altered gravity conditions (both in space and ground simulation facilities). In order to find out how closely connected they are, five strains with altered geotactic response or survival rates were selected and exposed to an altered gravity environment of 2 g. By analysing the different motile and behavioural patterns and the median survival rates, we show that altered gravity leads to changes in motility, which will have a negative impact on the flies' survival. Previous results show a differential gene expression between sessile samples and adults and confirm that environmentally-conditioned behavioural patterns constrain flies' gene expression and life span. Therefore, hypergravity is considered an environmental stress factor and strains that do not respond to this new environment experience an increment in motility, which is the major cause for the observed increased mortality also under microgravity conditions. The neutral-geotaxis selected strain (strain M) showed the most severe phenotype, unable to respond to variations in the gravitational field. Alternatively, the opposite phenotype was observed in positive-geotaxis and long-life selected flies (strains B and L, respectively), suggesting that these populations are less sensitive to alterations in the gravitational load. We conclude that the behavioural response has a greater contribution to aging than the modified energy consumption in altered gravity environments.

  9. Thalidomide increases human keratinocyte migration and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasca, M R; O'Toole, E A; Palicharla, P; West, D P; Woodley, D T

    1999-11-01

    Thalidomide is reported to have therapeutic utility in the treatment of pyoderma gangrenosum, Behçet's disease, aphthous ulcers, and skin wounds. We investigated the effect of thalidomide on human keratinocyte proliferation and migration, two early and critical events in the re-epithelialization of skin wounds. Thalidomide at concentrations less than 1 microM did not affect keratinocyte viability. Using a thymidine incorporation assay, we found that thalidomide, at therapeutic concentrations, induced more than a 2. 5-fold increase in the proliferative potential of the cells. Keratinocyte migration was assessed by two independent motility assays: a colloidal gold assay and an in vitro scratch assay. At optimal concentrations, thalidomide increased keratinocyte migration on a collagen matrix more than 2-fold in the colloidal gold assay and more than 3-fold in the scratch assay over control. Although pro-migratory, thalidomide did not alter the level of metalloproteinase-9 secreted into culture medium. Thalidomide did, however, induce a 2-4-fold increase in keratinocyte-derived interleukin-8, a pro-migratory cellular autocrine factor. Human keratinocyte migration and proliferation are essential for re-epithelialization of skin wounds. Interleukin-8 increases human keratinocyte migration and proliferation and is chemotactic for keratinocytes. Therefore, thalidomide may modulate keratinocyte proliferation and motility by a chemokine-dependent pathway.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Preventing proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathjens, G.

    1983-01-01

    Challenging the argument that nuclear proliferation may be stabilizing, the author cites the Israeli attack on Iraq as evidence that emergent nuclear states may be moved to attack their adversaries.The larger the number of decision makers who can unleash nuclear weapons, the greater the liklihood of their use. Several reasons are cited for nations to seek nuclear capability: the accelerated spread of technology, the deterioration in US-Soviet relations and strength relative to their nations, the high cost of conventional weapons, and a loss of confidence in the international safeguards system. The imposition of constraints, such as a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, on nuclear trade and technology transfer are likely to have a high cost. The US position on this issue is likely to be determined by the balance of power with the Soviet Union. 5 references

  12. O-GlcNAcylation affects β-catenin and E-cadherin expression, cell motility and tumorigenicity of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harosh-Davidovich, Shani Ben; Khalaila, Isam

    2018-03-01

    O-GlcNAcylation, the addition of β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) moiety to Ser/Thr residues, is a sensor of the cell metabolic state. Cancer diseases such as colon, lung and breast cancer, possess deregulated O-GlcNAcylation. Studies during the last decade revealed that O-GlcNAcylation is implicated in cancer tumorigenesis and proliferation. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and cadherin-mediated adhesion are also implicated in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key cellular process in invasion and cancer metastasis. Often, deregulation of the Wnt pathway is caused by altered phosphorylation of its components. Specifically, phosphorylation of Ser or Thr residues of β-catenin affects its location and interaction with E-cadherin, thus facilitating cell-cell adhesion. Consistent with previous studies, the current study indicates that β-catenin is O-GlcNAcylated. To test the effect of O-GlcNAcylation on cell motility and how O-GlcNAcylation might affect β-catenin and E-cadherin functions, the enzyme machinery of O-GlcNAcylation was modulated either with chemical inhibitors or by gene silencing. When O-GlcNAcase (OGA) was inhibited, a global elevation of protein O-GlcNAcylation and increase in the expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin were noted. Concomitantly with enhanced O-GlcNAcylation, β-catenin transcriptional activity were elevated. Additionally, fibroblast cell motility was enhanced. Stable silenced cell lines with adenoviral OGA or adenoviral O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) were established. Consistent with the results obtained by OGA chemical inhibition by TMG, OGT-silencing led to a significant reduction in β-catenin level. In vivo, murine orthotropic colorectal cancer model indicates that elevated O-GlcNAcylation leads to increased mortality rate, tumor and metastasis development. However, reduction in O-GlcNAcylation promoted survival that could be attributed to attenuated tumor and metastasis development. The results described herein provide

  13. The effect of the freezing curve type on bull spermatozoa motility after thawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Doležalová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the effect of selected freezing curves on spermatozoa survivability after thawing, defined by its motility. The ejaculates of nine selected sires of the same age, breed, and frequency of collecting, bred under the same breeding conditions including handling, stabling, feeding system and feeding ratio composition, were repeatedly collected and evaluated. Sperm samples of each sire were diluted using only one extender and divided into four parts. Selected four freezing curves – the standard, commercially recommended three-phase curve; a two-phase curve; a slow three-phase curve; and a fast three-phase curve, differing in the course of temperature vs time, were applied. The percentage rate of progressive motile spermatozoa above head was determined immediately after thawing, and after 30, 60, 90, and 120 min of the thermodynamic test (TDT. Moreover, average spermatozoa motility (AMOT and spermatozoa motility decrease (MODE throughout the entire TDT were evaluated. Insemination doses frozen using the simpler two-phase curve demonstrated the highest motility values (+2.97% to +10.37%; P < 0.05–0.01 immediately after thawing and during the entire TDT. Concurrently, the highest AMOT (+4.37% to +8.82%; P < 0.01 was determined. The highest spermatozoa motility values were detected after thawing doses frozen by the two-phase freezing curve in eight out of nine sires. Simultaneously, a significant effect of sire individuality was clearly confirmed. Inter-sire differences of spermatozoa motility during TDT as well as AMOT and MODE were significant (P < 0.01. The findings describing both factors of interaction indicate the necessity of individual cryopreservation of the ejaculate to increase its fertilization capability after thawing.

  14. Thermo-Regulation of Genes Mediating Motility and Plant Interactions in Pseudomonas syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockett, Kevin L.; Burch, Adrien Y.; Lindow, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is an important phyllosphere colonist that utilizes flagellum-mediated motility both as a means to explore leaf surfaces, as well as to invade into leaf interiors, where it survives as a pathogen. We found that multiple forms of flagellum-mediated motility are thermo-suppressed, including swarming and swimming motility. Suppression of swarming motility occurs between 28° and 30°C, which coincides with the optimal growth temperature of P. syringae. Both fliC (encoding flagellin) and syfA (encoding a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase involved in syringafactin biosynthesis) were suppressed with increasing temperature. RNA-seq revealed 1440 genes of the P. syringae genome are temperature sensitive in expression. Genes involved in polysaccharide synthesis and regulation, phage and IS elements, type VI secretion, chemosensing and chemotaxis, translation, flagellar synthesis and motility, and phytotoxin synthesis and transport were generally repressed at 30°C, while genes involved in transcriptional regulation, quaternary ammonium compound metabolism and transport, chaperone/heat shock proteins, and hypothetical genes were generally induced at 30°C. Deletion of flgM, a key regulator in the transition from class III to class IV gene expression, led to elevated and constitutive expression of fliC regardless of temperature, but did not affect thermo-regulation of syfA. This work highlights the importance of temperature in the biology of P. syringae, as many genes encoding traits important for plant-microbe interactions were thermo-regulated. PMID:23527276

  15. Knockdown of Ran GTPase expression inhibits the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chenyi; Qiu, Jian; Wang, Yingying; He, Zhixian; Wang, Hua; Wang, Qingqing; Huang, Yeqing; Zhu, Lianxin; Shi, Feng; Chen, Yingying; Xiong, Shiyao; Xu, Zhen; Ni, Qichao

    2018-05-03

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer‑associated mortality in women worldwide. Strong evidence has suggested that Ran, which is a small GTP binding protein involved in the transport of RNA and protein across the nucleus, may be a key cellular protein involved in the metastatic progression of cancer. The present study investigated Ran gene expression in breast cancer tissue samples obtained from 140 patients who had undergone surgical resection for breast cancer. Western blot analysis of Ran in breast cancer tissues and paired adjacent normal tissues showed that expression of Ran was significantly increased in breast cancer tissues. Immunohistochemistry analyses conducted on formalin‑fixed paraffin‑embedded breast cancer tissue sections revealed that Ran expression was associated with tumor histological grade, nerve invasion and metastasis, vascular metastasis and Ki‑67 expression (a marker of cell proliferation). Kaplan‑Meier survival analysis showed that increased Ran expression in patients with breast cancer was positively associated with a poor survival prognosis. Furthermore, in vitro experiments demonstrated that highly migratory MDA‑MB‑231 cancer cells treated with Ran‑si‑RNA (si‑Ran), which knocked down expression of Ran, exhibited decreased motility in trans‑well migration and wound healing assays. Cell cycle analysis of Ran knocked down MDA‑MB‑231 cells implicated Ran in cell cycle arrest and the inhibition of proliferation. Furthermore, a starvation and re‑feeding (CCK‑8) assay was performed, which indicated that Ran regulated breast cancer cell proliferation. Taken together, the results provide strong in vitro evidence of the involvement of Ran in the progression of breast cancer and suggest that it could have high potential as a therapeutic target and/or marker of disease.

  16. Transverse loop colostomy and colonic motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciani, F; Ringressi, M N; Maltinti, G; Bechi, P

    2014-11-01

    The motility of the defunctionalized colon, distal to transverse loop colostomy, has never been studied "in vivo." The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of transverse loop colostomy on colonic motility. Thirteen patients were examined before stoma closure by means of clinical evaluation and colonic manometry; we studied both the right and distal colon in both fasting and fed patients in order to detect motor activity. Quantitative and qualitative manometric analyses showed that the diverted colon had motor activity even if no regular colonic motor pattern was observed. The spreading of aboral propagated contractions (PCs) was sometimes recorded from the right colon to the distal colon. The response of the proximal and distal colon to a standard meal, when compared to fasting values, increased more than 40 and 35 %, respectively. Stool and gas ejections from the colostomy were never related to a particular type of colonic motility: Motor quiescence such as PCs was chaotically related to stool escape. In conclusion, motility of the defunctionalized colon is preserved in patients with transverse loop colostomy.

  17. Flagellar Motility of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ballesteros-Rodea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of American trypanosomiasis. Despite the importance of motility in the parasite life cycle, little is known about T. cruzi motility, and there is no quantitative description of its flagellar beating. Using video microscopy and quantitative vectorial analysis of epimastigote trajectories, we find a forward parasite motility defined by tip-to-base symmetrical flagellar beats. This motion is occasionally interrupted by base-to-tip highly asymmetric beats, which represent the ciliary beat of trypanosomatid flagella. The switch between flagellar and ciliary beating facilitates the parasite's reorientation, which produces a large variability of movement and trajectories that results in different distance ranges traveled by the cells. An analysis of the distance, speed, and rotational angle indicates that epimastigote movement is not completely random, and the phenomenon is highly dependent on the parasite behavior and is characterized by directed and tumbling parasite motion as well as their combination, resulting in the alternation of rectilinear and intricate motility paths.

  18. Esophageal motility disorders; Motilitaetsstoerungen des Oesophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannig, C.; Rummeny, E. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Muenchen (Germany); Wuttge-Hannig, A. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.) [German] Zum Verstaendnis der Motilitaet des Oesophagus sind muskulaere Architektur und Verteilung der quergestreiften und glatten Muskelfasern von Bedeutung. Die Physiologie des Oesophagus wird in soweit kurz dargestellt, als sie fuer das Verstaendnis von peristaltischen Stoerungen notwendig ist. Neben der Erfassung rein morphologischer Kriterien ist bei der Untersuchung der Speiseroehre eine diagnostische Bewertung der Motilitaet erforderlich. Es stehen uns heute strahlungsarme dynamische Aufzeichnungsverfahren (digitale dynamische Aufzeichnung, Videofluoroskopie) mit Bildsequenzen von 4-30 Bildern/s zur Verfuegung. Die Kombination einer funktionellen Methode zur Darstellung der Morphologie und der

  19. Chicago Classification of Esophageal Motility Disorders: Lessons Learned

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O. A.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) is increasingly performed worldwide, to study esophageal motility. The Chicago classification is subsequently applied to interpret the manometric findings and facilitate a diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders. This review will discuss new insights regarding the

  20. Regional gastrointestinal contractility parameters using the wireless motility capsule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, A D; Wegeberg, A-M L; Brock, B

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The wireless motility capsule concurrently measures temperature, pH and pressure as it traverses the gastrointestinal tract. AIMS: To describe normative values for motility/contractility parameters across age, gender and testing centres. METHODS: Healthy participants underwent...

  1. Engineering bacterial motility towards hydrogen-peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgile, Chelsea; Hauk, Pricila; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Shang, Wu; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2018-01-01

    Synthetic biologists construct innovative genetic/biological systems to treat environmental, energy, and health problems. Many systems employ rewired cells for non-native product synthesis, while a few have employed the rewired cells as 'smart' devices with programmable function. Building on the latter, we developed a genetic construct to control and direct bacterial motility towards hydrogen peroxide, one of the body's immune response signaling molecules. A motivation for this work is the creation of cells that can target and autonomously treat disease, the latter signaled by hydrogen peroxide release. Bacteria naturally move towards a variety of molecular cues (e.g., nutrients) in the process of chemotaxis. In this work, we engineered bacteria to recognize and move towards hydrogen peroxide, a non-native chemoattractant and potential toxin. Our system exploits oxyRS, the native oxidative stress regulon of E. coli. We first demonstrated H2O2-mediated upregulation motility regulator, CheZ. Using transwell assays, we showed a two-fold increase in net motility towards H2O2. Then, using a 2D cell tracking system, we quantified bacterial motility descriptors including velocity, % running (of tumble/run motions), and a dynamic net directionality towards the molecular cue. In CheZ mutants, we found that increased H2O2 concentration (0-200 μM) and induction time resulted in increased running speeds, ultimately reaching the native E. coli wild-type speed of ~22 μm/s with a ~45-65% ratio of running to tumbling. Finally, using a microfluidic device with stable H2O2 gradients, we characterized responses and the potential for "programmed" directionality towards H2O2 in quiescent fluids. Overall, the synthetic biology framework and tracking analysis in this work will provide a framework for investigating controlled motility of E. coli and other 'smart' probiotics for signal-directed treatment.

  2. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintu Patra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher's equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase-a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics.

  3. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2016-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher's equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase-a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics.

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of swarm motility phenotype of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant defective in periplasmic glucan synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movement of food-borne pathogens on moist surfaces enables them to migrate towards more favorable niches and facilitate their survival for extended periods of time. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants defective in OPG synthesis are unable to exhibit motility on moist surfaces (swarming) ...

  5. Self-organization of engineered epithelial tubules by differential cellular motility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Hidetoshi; Gjorevski, Nikolce; Inman, Jamie L; Bissell, Mina J; Nelson, Celeste M

    2009-02-04

    Patterning of developing tissues arises from a number of mechanisms, including cell shape change, cell proliferation, and cell sorting from differential cohesion or tension. Here, we reveal that differences in cell motility can also lead to cell sorting within tissues. Using mosaic engineered mammary epithelial tubules, we found that cells sorted depending on their expression level of the membrane-anchored collagenase matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14. These rearrangements were independent of the catalytic activity of MMP14 but absolutely required the hemopexin domain. We describe a signaling cascade downstream of MMP14 through Rho kinase that allows cells to sort within the model tissues. Cell speed and persistence time were enhanced by MMP14 expression, but only the latter motility parameter was required for sorting. These results indicate that differential directional persistence can give rise to patterns within model developing tissues.

  6. Relationship of Total Motile Sperm Count and Percentage Motile Sperm to Successful Pregnancy Rates Following Intrauterine Insemination

    OpenAIRE

    Pasqualotto, Eleonora B.; Daitch, James A.; Hendin, Benjamin N.; Falcone, Tommaso; Thomas, Anthony J.; Nelson, David R.; Agarwal, Ashok

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:This study sought (i) to investigate the relationship between postwash total motile sperm count and postwash percentage motile sperm in predicting successful intrauterine insemination and (ii) to determine the minimal postwash total motile sperm count required to achieve pregnancy with intrauterine insemination.

  7. Symbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.

    1991-01-01

    Ongoing work to test the hypothesis of the origin of eukaryotic cell organelles by microbial symbioses is discussed. Because of the widespread acceptance of the serial endosymbiotic theory (SET) of the origin of plastids and mitochondria, the idea of the symbiotic origin of the centrioles and axonemes for spirochete bacteria motility symbiosis was tested. Intracellular microtubular systems are purported to derive from symbiotic associations between ancestral eukaryotic cells and motile bacteria. Four lines of approach to this problem are being pursued: (1) cloning the gene of a tubulin-like protein discovered in Spirocheata bajacaliforniesis; (2) seeking axoneme proteins in spirochets by antibody cross-reaction; (3) attempting to cultivate larger, free-living spirochetes; and (4) studying in detail spirochetes (e.g., Cristispira) symbiotic with marine animals. Other aspects of the investigation are presented.

  8. New advances in gastrointestinal motility research

    CERN Document Server

    Pullan, A; Farrugia, G

    2013-01-01

    Research into gastrointestinal motility has received renewed interest in part due to recent advances in the techniques for measuring the structure and function of gastrointestinal cells, tissue and organs. The integration of this wealth of data into biophysically based computation models can aid in interpretation of experimental and clinical measurements and the refinement of measurement techniques. The contents of this book span multiple scales - from cell, tissue, organ, to whole body and is divided into four broad sections covering: i) gastrointestinal cellular activity and tissue structure; (ii) techniques for measuring, analyzing and visualizing high-resolution extra-cellular recordings; (iii) methods for sensing gastroelectrical activity using non-invasive bio-electro-magnetic fields and for modulating the underlying gastric electrical activity, and finally; (iv) methods for assessing manometric and videographic motility patterns and the application of these data for predicting the flow and mixing behav...

  9. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  10. Asian Motility Studies in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Oh Young

    2010-01-01

    Altered motility remains one of the important pathophysiologic factors in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who commonly complain of abdominal pain and stool changes such as diarrhea and constipation. The prevalence of IBS has increased among Asian populations these days. Gastrointestinal (GI) physiology may vary between Asian and Western populations because of differences in diets, socio-cultural backgrounds, and genetic factors. The characteristics and differences of GI dysmotili...

  11. Surface Topography Hinders Bacterial Surface Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yow-Ren; Weeks, Eric R; Ducker, William A

    2018-03-21

    We demonstrate that the surface motility of the bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is hindered by a crystalline hemispherical topography with wavelength in the range of 2-8 μm. The motility was determined by the analysis of time-lapse microscopy images of cells in a flowing growth medium maintained at 37 °C. The net displacement of bacteria over 5 min is much lower on surfaces containing 2-8 μm hemispheres than on flat topography, but displacement on the 1 μm hemispheres is not lower. That is, there is a threshold between 1 and 2 μm for response to the topography. Cells on the 4 μm hemispheres were more likely to travel parallel to the local crystal axis than in other directions. Cells on the 8 μm topography were less likely to travel across the crowns of the hemispheres and were also more likely to make 30°-50° turns than on flat surfaces. These results show that surface topography can act as a significant barrier to surface motility and may therefore hinder surface exploration by bacteria. Because surface exploration can be a part of the process whereby bacteria form colonies and seek nutrients, these results help to elucidate the mechanism by which surface topography hinders biofilm formation.

  12. Effect of total laryngectomy on esophageal motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, J.B.; Fisher, S.R.; Meyers, W.C.; Christian, K.C.; Postlethwait, R.W.; Jones, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Total laryngectomy for cancer can result in dysphagia and altered esophageal motility. Manometric changes in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and in proximal and distal esophageal function have been reported. However, most studies have failed to take into account radiation therapy and appropriate controls. We selected ten male patients (54.3 +/- 1.9 yr) for longitudinal manometric evaluation prior to laryngectomy then at two weeks and again six months later. No patient received preoperative radiation therapy, had a previous history of esophageal surgery, or developed a postoperative wound infection or fistula. Seven of ten patients had positive nodes and received 6,000-6,600 rads postoperative radiation therapy. Preoperatively 4 of 10 patients complained of dysphagia which did not significantly change following surgery and radiation. Two of three patients who did not complain of dysphagia preoperatively and received radiation postoperatively developed dysphagia. No patient without dysphagia preoperatively who received no radiation therapy developed symptoms. Our studies show that laryngectomy causes alterations in the UES resting and peak pressures but not in the proximal or distal esophagus, or the lower esophageal sphincter. These data also imply radiation therapy may be associated with progressive alterations in motility and symptomatology. Further study regarding the effects of radiation on esophageal motility and function are urged

  13. Motility versus fluctuations in mixtures of self-motile and passive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Denis F; Panchenko, Alexander; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Fried, Eliot

    2014-12-07

    Many biological systems consist of self-motile and passive agents both of which contribute to overall functionality. However, little is known about the properties of such mixtures. Here we formulate a model for mixtures of self-motile and passive agents and show that the model gives rise to three different dynamical phases: a disordered mesoturbulent phase, a polar flocking phase, and a vortical phase characterized by large-scale counter rotating vortices. We use numerical simulations to construct a phase diagram and compare the statistical properties of the different phases with observed features of self-motile bacterial suspensions. Our findings afford specific insights regarding the interaction of microorganisms and passive particles and provide novel strategic guidance for efficient technological realizations of artificial active matter.

  14. Overexpression of CD97 confers an invasive phenotype in glioblastoma cells and is associated with decreased survival of glioblastoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Safaee

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of invasion in glioblastoma (GBM relate to differential expression of proteins conferring increased motility and penetration of the extracellular matrix. CD97 is a member of the epidermal growth factor seven-span transmembrane family of adhesion G-protein coupled receptors. These proteins facilitate mobility of leukocytes into tissue. In this study we show that CD97 is expressed in glioma, has functional effects on invasion, and is associated with poor overall survival. Glioma cell lines and low passage primary cultures were analyzed. Functional significance was assessed by transient knockdown using siRNA targeting CD97 or a non-target control sequence. Invasion was assessed 48 hours after siRNA-mediated knockdown using a Matrigel-coated invasion chamber. Migration was quantified using a scratch assay over 12 hours. Proliferation was measured 24 and 48 hours after confirmed protein knockdown. GBM cell lines and primary cultures were found to express CD97. Knockdown of CD97 decreased invasion and migration in GBM cell lines, with no difference in proliferation. Gene-expression based Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed using The Cancer Genome Atlas, demonstrating an inverse relationship between CD97 expression and survival. GBMs expressing high levels of CD97 were associated with decreased survival compared to those with low CD97 (p = 0.007. CD97 promotes invasion and migration in GBM, but has no effect on tumor proliferation. This phenotype may explain the discrepancy in survival between high and low CD97-expressing tumors. This data provides impetus for further studies to determine its viability as a therapeutic target in the treatment of GBM.

  15. Role of calmodulin and calcineurin in regulating flagellar motility and wave polarity in Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Aakash Gautam; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2017-11-01

    We have previously reported the involvement of cyclic AMP in regulating flagellar waveforms in Leishmania. Here, we investigated the roles of calcium, calmodulin, and calcineurin in flagellar motility regulation in L. donovani. Using high-speed videomicroscopy, we show that calcium-independent calmodulin and calcineurin activity is necessary for motility in Leishmania. Inhibition of calmodulin and calcineurin induced ciliary beats interrupting flagellar beating in both live (in vivo) and ATP-reactivated (in vitro) parasites. Our results indicate that signaling mediated by calmodulin and calcineurin operates antagonistically to cAMP signaling in regulating the waveforms of Leishmania flagellum. These two pathways are possibly involved in maintaining the balance between the two waveforms, essential for responding to environmental cues, survival, and infectivity.

  16. PHA665752, a small-molecule inhibitor of c-Met, inhibits hepatocyte growth factor-stimulated migration and proliferation of c-Met-positive neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosswell, Hal E; Dasgupta, Anindya; Alvarado, Carlos S; Watt, Tanya; Christensen, James G; De, Pradip; Durden, Donald L; Findley, Harry W

    2009-01-01

    c-Met is a tyrosine kinase receptor for hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), and both c-Met and its ligand are expressed in a variety of tissues. C-Met/HGF/SF signaling is essential for normal embryogenesis, organogenesis, and tissue regeneration. Abnormal c-Met/HGF/SF signaling has been demonstrated in different tumors and linked to aggressive and metastatic tumor phenotypes. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated inhibition of c-Met/HGF/SF signaling by the small-molecule inhibitor PHA665752. This study investigated c-Met and HGF expression in two neuroblastoma (NBL) cell lines and tumor tissue from patients with NBL, as well as the effects of PHA665752 on growth and motility of NBL cell lines. The effect of the tumor suppressor protein PTEN on migration and proliferation of tumor cells treated with PHA665752 was also evaluated. Expression of c-Met and HGF in NBL cell lines SH-EP and SH-SY5Y and primary tumor tissue was assessed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. The effect of PHA665752 on c-Met/HGF signaling involved in NBL cell proliferation and migration was evaluated in c-Met-positive cells and c-Met-transfected cells. The transwell chemotaxis assay and the MTT assay were used to measure migration and proliferation/cell-survival of tumor cells, respectively. The PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone was used to assess the effect of PTEN on PHA665752-induced inhibition of NBL cell proliferation/cell-survival and migration High c-Met expression was detected in SH-EP cells and primary tumors from patients with advanced-stage disease. C-Met/HGF signaling induced both migration and proliferation of SH-EP cells. Migration and proliferation/cell-survival were inhibited by PHA665752 in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that induced overexpression of PTEN following treatment with rosiglitazone significantly enhanced the inhibitory effect of PHA665752 on NBL-cell migration and proliferation. c-Met is highly expressed in most tumors from

  17. Contact- and Protein Transfer-Dependent Stimulation of Assembly of the Gliding Motility Machinery in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Jakobczak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria engage in contact-dependent activities to coordinate cellular activities that aid their survival. Cells of Myxococcus xanthus move over surfaces by means of type IV pili and gliding motility. Upon direct contact, cells physically exchange outer membrane (OM lipoproteins, and this transfer can rescue motility in mutants lacking lipoproteins required for motility. The mechanism of gliding motility and its stimulation by transferred OM lipoproteins remain poorly characterized. We investigated the function of CglC, GltB, GltA and GltC, all of which are required for gliding. We demonstrate that CglC is an OM lipoprotein, GltB and GltA are integral OM β-barrel proteins, and GltC is a soluble periplasmic protein. GltB and GltA are mutually stabilizing, and both are required to stabilize GltC, whereas CglC accumulate independently of GltB, GltA and GltC. Consistently, purified GltB, GltA and GltC proteins interact in all pair-wise combinations. Using active fluorescently-tagged fusion proteins, we demonstrate that GltB, GltA and GltC are integral components of the gliding motility complex. Incorporation of GltB and GltA into this complex depends on CglC and GltC as well as on the cytoplasmic AglZ protein and the inner membrane protein AglQ, both of which are components of the gliding motility complex. Conversely, incorporation of AglZ and AglQ into the gliding motility complex depends on CglC, GltB, GltA and GltC. Remarkably, physical transfer of the OM lipoprotein CglC to a ΔcglC recipient stimulates assembly of the gliding motility complex in the recipient likely by facilitating the OM integration of GltB and GltA. These data provide evidence that the gliding motility complex in M. xanthus includes OM proteins and suggest that this complex extends from the cytoplasm across the cell envelope to the OM. These data add assembly of gliding motility complexes in M. xanthus to the growing list of contact-dependent activities in bacteria.

  18. The threat of proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palme, Olof.

    1986-01-01

    The paper on the threat of proliferation, is a keynote speech delivered to the Colloquium on Nuclear War, Nuclear Proliferation and their Consequences, Geneva, 1985. Topics discussed in the address include: nuclear weapons, nuclear war, terrorists, Non-Proliferation Treaty, nuclear disarmament, and leadership in world affairs. (UK)

  19. Effects of radiation upon gastrointestinal motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary F Otterson

    2007-01-01

    Whether due to therapeutic or belligerent exposure, the gastrointestinal effects of irradiation produce symptoms dreaded by a majority of the population. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramping are hallmarks of the prodromal phase of radiation sickness, occurring hours to days following radiation exposure. The prodromal phase is distinct from acute radiation sickness in that the absorptive, secretory and anatomic changes associated with radiation damage are not easily identifiable. It is during this phase of radiation sickness that gastrointestinal motility significantly changes. In addition, there is evidence that motor activity of the gut contributes to some of the acute and chronic effects of radiation.

  20. Fibroblasts Cultured on Nanowires Exhibit Low Motility, Impaired Cell Division, and DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, H.; Købler, Carsten; Mølhave, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    beam milling and scanning electron microscopy, highly curved but intact nuclear membranes are observed, showing no direct contact between the nanowires and the DNA. The nanowires possibly induce cellular stress and high respiration rates, which trigger the formation of ROS, which in turn results in DNA......Nanowires are commonly used as tools for interfacing living cells, acting as biomolecule-delivery vectors or electrodes. It is generally assumed that the small size of the nanowires ensures a minimal cellular perturbation, yet the effects of nanowires on cell migration and proliferation remain...... largely unknown. Fibroblast behaviour on vertical nanowire arrays is investigated, and it is shown that cell motility and proliferation rate are reduced on nanowires. Fibroblasts cultured on long nanowires exhibit failed cell division, DNA damage, increased ROS content and respiration. Using focused ion...

  1. CCN5 modulates the antiproliferative effect of heparin and regulates cell motility in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellot John J

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC hyperplasia plays an important role in both chronic and acute vascular pathologies including atherosclerosis and restenosis. Considerable work has focused on the mechanisms regulating VSMC proliferation and motility. Earlier work in our lab revealed a novel growth arrest-specific (gas gene induced in VSMC exposed to the antiproliferative agent heparin. This gene is a member of the CCN family and has been given the name CCN5. The objective of the present study is to elucidate the function of CCN5 protein and to explore its mechanism of action in VSMC. Results Using RNA interference (RNAi, we first demonstrate that CCN5 is required for the antiproliferative effect of heparin in VSMC. We also use this gene knockdown approach to show that CCN5 is an important negative regulator of motility. To explore the mechanism of action of CCN5 on VSMC motility, we use RNAi to demonstrate that knock down of CCN5 up regulates expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, an important stimulator of motility in VSMC. In addition, forced expression of CCN5 via adenovirus results in reduced MMP-2 activity, this also corroborates the gene knock down results. Finally, we show that loss of CCN5 expression in VSMC causes changes in VSMC morphology and cytoskeletal organization, including a reduction in the amount and macromolecular assembly of smooth muscle cell α-actin. Conclusions This work provides important new insights into the regulation of smooth muscle cell proliferation and motility by CCN5 and may aid the development of therapies for vascular diseases.

  2. Aging and intestinal motility: a review of factors that affect intestinal motility in the aged.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, Denis

    2012-02-03

    Normal aging is associated with significant changes in the function of most organs and tissues. In this regard, the gastrointestinal tract is no exception. The purpose of this review is to detail the important age-related changes in motor function of the various parts of the gastrointestinal tract and to highlight some of the important motility changes that may occur, either in relation to common age-related disorders, or as a result of certain drugs commonly prescribed in the aged. A major confounding factor in the interpretation of motor phenomena throughout the gastrointestinal tract in this age group is the frequent coexistence of neurological, endocrinological and other disease states, which may be independently associated with dysmotility. Overall, current data are insufficient to implicate normal aging as a cause of dysmotility in the elderly. Normal aging is associated with various changes in gastrointestinal motility, but the clinical significance of such changes remains unclear. More important is the impact of various age-related diseases on gastrointestinal motility in the elderly: for example, long-standing diabetes mellitus may reduce gastric emptying in up to 50% of patients; depression significantly prolongs whole-gut transit time; hypothyroidism may prolong oro-caecal transit time; and chronic renal failure is associated with impaired gastric emptying. In addition, various, frequently used drugs in the elderly cause disordered gastrointestinal motility. These drugs include anticholinergics, especially antidepressants with an anticholinergic effect, opioid analgesics and calcium antagonists.

  3. Podoplanin promotes progression of malignant pleural mesothelioma by regulating motility and focus formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Shinji; Fukuda, Koji; Yamada, Tadaaki; Arai, Sachiko; Takagi, Satoshi; Ishii, Genichiro; Ochiai, Atsushi; Iwakiri, Shotaro; Itoi, Kazumi; Uehara, Hisanori; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Fujita, Naoya; Yano, Seiji

    2017-04-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is characterized by dissemination and aggressive growth in the thoracic cavity. Podoplanin (PDPN) is an established diagnostic marker for MPM, but the function of PDPN in MPM is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the pathogenetic function of PDPN in MPM. Forty-seven of 52 tumors (90%) from Japanese patients with MPM and 3/6 (50%) MPM cell lines tested positive for PDPN. Knocking down PDPN in PDPN-high expressing MPM cells resulted in decreased cell motility. In contrast, overexpression of PDPN in PDPN-low expressing MPM cells enhanced cell motility. PDPN stimulated motility was mediated by activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Moreover, knocking down PDPN with short hairpin (sh) RNA in PDPN-high expressing MPM cells resulted in decreased development of a thoracic tumor in mice with severe combined immune deficiency (SCID). In sharp contrast, transfection of PDPN in PDPN-low expressing MPM cells resulted in an increase in the number of Ki-67-positive proliferating tumor cells and it promoted progression of a thoracic tumor in SCID mice. Interestingly, PDPN promoted focus formation in vitro, and a low level of E-cadherin expression and YAP1 activation was observed in PDPN-high MPM tumors. These findings indicate that PDPN is a diagnostic marker as well as a pathogenetic regulator that promotes MPM progression by increasing cell motility and inducing focus formation. Therefore, PDPN might be a pathogenetic determinant of MPM dissemination and aggressive growth and may thus be an ideal therapeutic target. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  4. Active motility in bimodular bacterial aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yu; Liu, Bin

    2017-11-01

    Dispersal capability is essential for microorganisms to achieve long-distance translocation, thus crucial for their abundance in various environments. In general, active dispersals are attributed to the movements of self-powered planktonic cells, while sessile cells that live a colonial life often disperse passively through flow entrainments. Here, we report another means of active dispersal employed by aggregates of sessile cells. The spherical rosette colonies of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus are aggregates of sessile stalked cells, of which a small proportion undergo cell division, grow active flagella and effect whole-rosette motility. We show that these rosettes actively disperse both in bulk water and near the solid-liquid interface. In particular, the proximity of a self-powered rosette to the solid surface promotes a rolling movement, leading to its persistent transportation along the solid boundary. The active dispersal of these rosettes demonstrated a novel mode of colonial transportation that is based on the division of labor between sessile and motile cells. The authors thank the support of National Science Foundation CREST: Center for Cellular and Biomolecular Machines at UC Merced (NSF-HRD-1547848).

  5. Fissile material proliferation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The proliferation risk of a facility depends on the material attractiveness, level of safeguards, and physical protection applied to the material in conjunction with an assessment of the impact of the socioeconomic circumstances and threat environment. Proliferation risk is a complementary extension of proliferation resistance. The authors believe a better determination of nuclear proliferation can be achieved by establishing the proliferation risk for facilities that contain nuclear material. Developing a method that incorporates the socioeconomic circumstances and threat environment inherent to each country enables a global proliferation assessment. To effectively reduce the nuclear danger, a broadly based set of criteria is needed that provides the capability to relatively assess a wide range of nuclear related sites and facilities in different countries and still ensure a global decrease in proliferation risk for fissile material (plutonium and highly enriched uranium)

  6. Overexpression of CXCR4 on human CD34+ progenitors increases their proliferation, migration, and NOD/SCID repopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Joy; Byk, Tamara; Jansson-Sjostrand, Lottie; Petit, Isabelle; Shivtiel, Shoham; Nagler, Arnon; Hardan, Izhar; Deutsch, Varda; Gazit, Zulma; Gazit, Dan; Karlsson, Stefan; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2004-04-15

    A major limitation to clinical stem cell-mediated gene therapy protocols is the low levels of engraftment by transduced progenitors. We report that CXCR4 overexpression on human CD34+ progenitors using a lentiviral gene transfer technique helped navigate these cells to the murine bone marrow and spleen in response to stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) signaling. Cells overexpressing CXCR4 exhibited significant increases in SDF-1-mediated chemotaxis and actin polymerization compared with control cells. A major advantage of CXCR4 overexpression was demonstrated by the ability of transduced CD34+ cells to respond to lower, physiologic levels of SDF-1 when compared to control cells, leading to improved SDF-1-induced migration and proliferation/survival, and finally resulting in significantly higher levels of in vivo repopulation of nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice including primitive CD34+/CD38(-/low) cells. Importantly, no cellular transformation was observed following transduction with the CXCR4 vector. Unexpectedly, we documented lack of receptor internalization in response to high levels of SDF-1, which can also contribute to increased migration and proliferation by the transduced CD34+ cells. Our results suggest CXCR4 overexpression for improved definitive human stem cell motility, retention, and multilineage repopulation, which could be beneficial for in vivo navigation and expansion of hematopoietic progenitors.

  7. Overexpression of HepaCAM inhibits cell viability and motility through suppressing nucleus translocation of androgen receptor and ERK signaling in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuedong; Wang, Yin; Du, Hongfei; Fan, Yanru; Yang, Xue; Wang, Xiaorong; Wu, Xiaohou; Luo, Chunli

    2014-07-01

    HepaCAM is suppressed in a variety of human cancers, and involved in cell adhesion, growth, migration, invasion, and survival. However, the expression and function of HepaCAM in prostate cancer are still unknown. HepaCAM expression has been detected by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry staining in prostate cell lines RWPE-1, LNCap, DU145, PC3, and in 75 human prostate tissue specimens, respectively. Meanwhile, the cell proliferation ability was detected by WST-8 assay. The role of HepaCAM in prostate cancer cell migration and invasion was examined by wound healing and transwell assay. And flow cytometry was used to observe the apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. Then we detected changes of Androgen Receptor translocation and ERK signaling using immunofluorescence staining and western blot after overexpression of HepaCAM. The HepaCAM expression was significantly down-regulated in prostate cancer tissues and undetected in prostate cancer cells. However, the low HepaCAM expression was not statistically associated with clinicopathological characteristics of prostate cancer. Overexpression of HepaCAM in prostate cancer cells decreased the cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and induced the cell apoptosis. Meanwhile, HepaCAM prevented the androgen receptor translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and down-regulated the MAPK/ERK signaling. Our results suggested that HepaCAM acted as a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer. HepaCAM inhibited cell viability and motility which might be through suppressing the nuclear translocation of Androgen Receptor and down-regulating the ERK signaling. Therefore, it was indicated that HepaCAM may be a potential therapeutic target for prostate cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. In vitro studies of ante-mortem proliferation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, W.H.; Withers, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    Using K562 human erythroblastoid cells, it was concluded that dose fractionation has no discrepant effect on the ante-mortem proliferation kinetics of doomed cells as opposed to clonogenic cell survival and that effects on ante-mortem proliferation kinetics cannot be solely responsible for the differences in fractionation response between early and late responding tissues. (UK)

  9. Modelling survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight

    2016-01-01

    The General Unified Threshold model for Survival (GUTS) integrates previously published toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models and estimates survival with explicitly defined assumptions. Importantly, GUTS accounts for time-variable exposure to the stressor. We performed three studies to test...

  10. Survival analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badwe, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The primary endpoint in the majority of the studies has been either disease recurrence or death. This kind of analysis requires a special method since all patients in the study experience the endpoint. The standard method for estimating such survival distribution is Kaplan Meier method. The survival function is defined as the proportion of individuals who survive beyond certain time. Multi-variate comparison for survival has been carried out with Cox's proportional hazard model

  11. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  12. ROS accumulation and IGF-IR inhibition contribute to fenofibrate/PPARα -mediated inhibition of Glioma cell motility in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Valle Luis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastomas are characterized by rapid cell growth, aggressive CNS infiltration, and are resistant to all known anticancer regimens. Recent studies indicate that fibrates and statins possess anticancer potential. Fenofibrate is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα that can switch energy metabolism from glycolysis to fatty acid β-oxidation, and has low systemic toxicity. Fenofibrate also attenuates IGF-I-mediated cellular responses, which could be relevant in the process of glioblastoma cell dispersal. Methods The effects of fenofibrate on Glioma cell motility, IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR signaling, PPARα activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS metabolism, mitochondrial potential, and ATP production were analyzed in human glioma cell lines. Results Fenofibrate treatment attenuated IGF-I signaling responses and repressed cell motility of LN-229 and T98G Glioma cell lines. In the absence of fenofibrate, specific inhibition of the IGF-IR had only modest effects on Glioma cell motility. Further experiments revealed that PPARα-dependent accumulation of ROS is a strong contributing factor in Glioma cell lines responses to fenofibrate. The ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, restored cell motility, improved mitochondrial potential, and increased ATP levels in fenofibrate treated Glioma cell lines. Conclusions Our results indicate that although fenofibrate-mediated inhibition of the IGF-IR may not be sufficient in counteracting Glioma cell dispersal, PPARα-dependent metabolic switch and the resulting ROS accumulation strongly contribute to the inhibition of these devastating brain tumor cells.

  13. Cell motility as persistent random motion: Theories from experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmeczi, D.; Mosler, S.; Hagedorn, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental time series for trajectories of motile cells may contain so much information that a systematic analysis will yield cell-type- specific motility models. Here we demonstrate how, using human keratinocytes and fibroblasts as examples. The two resulting models reflect the cells' differen...

  14. The management of motility disorders in critical illness | Retief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastric motility disorders in the intensive care unit (ICU) are a reality leading to many complications including inadequate EN delivery. Care should be taken to understand what type of gastric motility disorder is present and therapy should be prescribed early to prevent worsening of clinical outcomes.

  15. Detection and genomic characterization of motility in Lactobacillus curvatus: confirmation of motility in a species outside the Lactobacillus salivarius clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, Fabien J; Lynch, Shónagh M; Harris, Hugh M B; McCann, Angela; Lynch, Denise B; Neville, B Anne; Irisawa, Tomohiro; Okada, Sanae; Endo, Akihito; O'Toole, Paul W

    2015-02-01

    Lactobacillus is the largest genus within the lactic acid bacteria (LAB), with almost 180 species currently identified. Motility has been reported for at least 13 Lactobacillus species, all belonging to the Lactobacillus salivarius clade. Motility in lactobacilli is poorly characterized. It probably confers competitive advantages, such as superior nutrient acquisition and niche colonization, but it could also play an important role in innate immune system activation through flagellin–Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) interaction. We now report strong evidence of motility in a species outside the L. salivarius clade, Lactobacillus curvatus (strain NRIC0822). The motility of L. curvatus NRIC 0822 was revealed by phase-contrast microscopy and soft-agar motility assays. Strain NRIC 0822 was motile at temperatures between 15 °C and 37 °C, with a range of different carbohydrates, and under varying atmospheric conditions. We sequenced the L. curvatus NRIC 0822 genome, which revealed that the motility genes are organized in a single operon and that the products are very similar (>98.5% amino acid similarity over >11,000 amino acids) to those encoded by the motility operon of Lactobacillus acidipiscis KCTC 13900 (shown for the first time to be motile also). Moreover, the presence of a large number of mobile genetic elements within and flanking the motility operon of L. curvatus suggests recent horizontal transfer between members of two distinct Lactobacillus clades: L. acidipiscis in the L. salivarius clade and L. curvatus inthe L. sakei clade. This study provides novel phenotypic, genetic, and phylogenetic insights into flagellum-mediated motility in lactobacilli.

  16. Mechanics model for actin-based motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  17. Complex regulatory network encompassing the Csr, c-di-GMP and motility systems of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Edwards, Adrianne N; Ahmad, Irfan; Romeo, Tony; Römling, Ute; Melefors, Ojar

    2010-02-01

    Bacterial survival depends on the ability to switch between sessile and motile lifestyles in response to changing environmental conditions. In many species, this switch is governed by (3'-5')-cyclic-diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), a signalling molecule, which is metabolized by proteins containing GGDEF and/or EAL domains. Salmonella Typhimurium contains 20 such proteins. Here, we show that the RNA-binding protein CsrA regulates the expression of eight genes encoding GGDEF, GGDEF-EAL and EAL domain proteins. CsrA bound directly to the mRNA leaders of five of these genes, suggesting that it may regulate these genes post-transcriptionally. The c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase STM3611, which reciprocally controls flagella function and production of biofilm matrix components, was regulated by CsrA binding to the mRNA, but was also indirectly regulated by CsrA through the FlhDC/FliA flagella cascade and STM1344. STM1344 is an unconventional (c-di-GMP-inactive) EAL domain protein, recently identified as a negative regulator of flagella gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that CsrA directly downregulates expression of STM1344, which in turn regulates STM3611 through fliA and thus reciprocally controls motility and biofilm factors. Altogether, our data reveal that the concerted and complex regulation of several genes encoding GGDEF/EAL domain proteins allows CsrA to control the motility-sessility switch in S. Typhimurium at multiple levels.

  18. The Effect of Different Foam Concentrations on Sperm Motility in Japanese Quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avishek Biswas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the effect of foam extract on sperm motility in the male Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica. Adult male quails (<12 weeks of heavy body weight strain were housed in individual cages and divided into 5 groups according to the size of their cloacal glands. The data indicated that the size of the cloacal gland was positively correlated with the frequency of foam secretion and total foam production. One gram of freshly collected clean foam was mixed with 1.0 mL of normal saline and homogenized for 10 minutes. After centrifugation at 35 000 rpm, the supernatant was used as 100% foam extract. The extract was diluted to 1:40, 1:20, 1:10, and 1:4 with normal saline to produce 2.5, 5.0, 10, and 25% foam extracts, respectively. 5% foam extract enhanced sperm survival at room temperature (30°–35°C for 2 to 3 hrs, whereas higher concentrations (10% and above suppressed sperm motility. From this study, it may be concluded that foam secretion and quantity of foam are directly proportional to the size of the cloacal gland and that the foam enhances and prolongs sperm motility, in vitro at an optimum concentration of 5%.

  19. Proliferation: myth or reality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This article analyzes the proliferation approach, its technical condition and political motivation, and the share between the myth (political deception, assumptions and extrapolations) and the reality of proliferation. Its appreciation is complicated by the irrational behaviour of some political actors and by the significant loss of the non-use taboo. The control of technologies is an important element for proliferation slowing down but an efficient and autonomous intelligence system remains indispensable. (J.S.)

  20. Thyroxin Is Useful to Improve Sperm Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendeluk Gabriela Ruth

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the non-genomic action of thyroxin on sperm kinetic and its probable use to improve sperm recovery after applying an en- richment method like “swim-up” in comparison with the available one, pentoxifylline. Materials and Methods This is an experimental study. A total of 50 patients were re- cruited, followed by infertility consultation. Conventional sperm assays were performed according to World Health Organization criteria-2010 (WHO-2010. A Computer Aided Semen Analysis System was employed to assess kinetic parameters and concentrations. Number of the motile sperm recovered after preparation technique was calculated. Results Addition of T4 (0.002 µg/ml to semen samples increased hypermotility at 20 minutes (control: 14.18 ± 5.1% vs. 17.66 ± 8.88%, P<0.03, data expressed as mean ± SD and remained unchanged after 40 minutes. Significant differences were found in the motile sperm recovered after swim-up (control: 8.93×106 ± 9.52× 06vs. 17.20×106 ± 21.16×106, P<0.03, achieving all of the tested samples a desirable threshold value for artificial insemination outcome, while adding pentoxifylline increased the number of recovered sperm after swim-up in 60% of the studied cases. No synergism between two treatments could be determined. Conclusion We propose a new physiological tool to artificially improve insemination. The discussion opens windows to investigate unknown pathways involved in sperm ca- pacitation and gives innovative arguments to better understand infertility mechanisms.

  1. Motility of copepod nauplii and implications for food encounter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titelman, Josefin; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    (Centropages typicus, Calanus helgolandicus, Temora longicornis, Acartia tonsa, Eurytemora affinis and Euterpina acutifrons). Behaviors of individual nauphi were divided into sequences of sinking, swimming and jumping events. Motility behavior is both stage- and species-specific in terms of appearance......Velocity differences drive all encounter processes. Therefore, knowledge of both prey and predator motility are essential in order to understand feeding behavior and predict food acquisition rates. Here, we describe and quantify the motility behavior of young and old naupliar stages of 6 copepods...... of tracks, speeds, durations and frequencies of events as well as time budgets. Motility mode often changes drastically during naupliar ontogeny. Crudely, nauplii can be divided into those moving with a jump-sink type of motility of various frequencies (1 min(-1) to 3 s(-1)) and those swimming...

  2. Mitochondrial respiratory efficiency is positively correlated with human sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Provenzano, Sara Pinto; Coppola, Lamberto; Zara, Vincenzo

    2012-04-01

    To correlate sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency with variations in sperm motility and with sperm morphologic anomalies. Sperm mitochondrial respiratory activity was evaluated with a polarographic assay of oxygen consumption carried out in hypotonically-treated sperm cells. A possible relationship among sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency, sperm motility, and morphologic anomalies was investigated. Mitochondrial respiratory efficiency was positively correlated with sperm motility and negatively correlated with the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. Moreover, midpiece defects impaired mitochondrial functionality. Our data indicate that an increase in sperm motility requires a parallel increase in mitochondrial respiratory capacity, thereby supporting the fundamental role played by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in sperm motility of normozoospermic subjects. These results are of physiopathological relevance because they suggest that disturbances of sperm mitochondrial function and of energy production could be responsible for asthenozoospermia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. miR-22 regulates cell invasion, migration and proliferation in vitro through inhibiting CD147 expression in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Kaifeng; Huang, Zixian; Huang, Zhiquan; He, Zhichao; You, Siping

    2016-06-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is the most common type of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in China, and its survival rate remains unsatisfactory. miR-22 has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many human cancers, and high expression of CD147 occurs in many tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression and function of miR-22 in TSCC and its relationship with the expression of CD147. TCA8113 cells were transiently transfected with a miR-22 mimic/inhibitor. Subsequently, a validation with Real-time RT-PCR was performed to analyze the miR-22 expression level, and a CCK-8 proliferation assay and transwell migration and invasion assays were carried out. Cotransfections using As-miR-22/si-CD147 mRNA or a miR-22/CD147 overexpression vector were applied, and we investigated the biological effects on cotranscribed TCA8113 cells. qRT-PCR confirmed that miR-22 or As-miR-22 were successfully transfected into TCA8113 cells. Suppressing miR-22 resulted in a promotion of cell proliferation and motility and an up-regulation of CD147 in TCA8113 cells in vitro. In contrast, increasing miR-22 inhibited cell proliferation and motility and down-regulated CD147. Furthermore, the reduction or overexpression of CD147 can reverse the promoting or suppressive effects of miR-22, respectively. The down-expression of miR-22 can regulate cell growth and motility in TSCC cells, which indicates that miR-22 acts as a tumor suppressor in TSCC. Additionally, CD147 is subsequently up-regulated when miR-22 inhibited. Taken together, the findings of this research defined a novel relationship between the down-regulation of miR-22 and the up-regulation of CD147 and demonstrated that CD147 is a downstream factor of miR-22. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Director's series on proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, K.C.; Price, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    This is an occasional publication of essays on the topics of nuclear, chemical, biological, and missile proliferation. The views represented are those of the author's. Essay topics include: Nuclear Proliferation: Myth and Reality; Problems of Enforcing Compliance with Arms Control Agreements; The Unreliability of the Russian Officer Corps: Reluctant Domestic Warriors; and Russia's Nuclear Legacy

  5. Proliferation Networks and Financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruselle, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose practical solutions aimed at completing and strengthening the existing arrangement for the control of nuclear proliferation through a control of financial as well as material or immaterial flows. In a first part, the author proposes a systemic analysis of networks of suppliers and demanders. He notably evokes the Khan's network and the Iraqi acquisition network during the 1993-2001 period. He also proposes a modelling of proliferation networks (supplier networks and acquisition networks) and of their interactions. In a second part, the author examines possible means and policies aimed at neutralising proliferation networks: organisation, adaptation and improvement of intelligence tools in front of proliferation networks, and means, limitations and perspectives of network neutralisation. He also briefly addresses the possibility of military action to contain proliferation flows

  6. Exploratory Research on Latent Esophageal Motility Disorders in Dysphagia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Shinpei; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Inoue, Yousuke; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Ozaki, Haruhiko; Ota, Kazuhiro; Harada, Satoshi; Edogawa, Shoko; Kojima, Yuichi; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Fukuchi, Takumi; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution manometry (HRM) has been applied to assess esophageal motility disorders. However, the frequency and types of motility disorders in patients with dysphagia, which are frequently seen in clinical practice, are not clear. We evaluated latent esophageal motility disorders associated with dysphagia. The study included patients without erosive esophageal mucosal damage and with dysphagia symptoms refractory to at least 8 weeks of standard-dose proton pump inhibitors. After enrolment, HRM was used to evaluate for esophageal motility disorder based on the Chicago classification. Esophageal motility disorder was found in 58 of 100 patients and was classified based on the causes: achalasia (13%), esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (16%), distal esophageal spasms (3%), weak peristalsis (14%), frequently failed peristalsis (5%), and hypertensive peristalsis (7%). Primary esophageal motility disorder was found in approximately 50% of cases in dysphagia patients. Therefore, esophageal motility disorder is not an uncommon condition and should be sought for in order to elucidate precisely the cause of dysphagia. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schima, W.; Pokieser, P.; Schober, E.

    1995-01-01

    Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and the lower esophageal sphincter has gained increased attention in recent years. Videofluoroscopic investigation of esophageal motor function is superior to static film radiography, as repeated analysis of the videotaped recordings is possible. With emphasis on radiological techniques, normal esophagel physiology and motility and a variety of esophageal motor disorders are discussed in this review paper. Radiological evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux and reflux esophagitis is described. Clinical and radiological findings in esophageal motility disorders and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the radiological efficacy compared to that of manometry and pH-metry are discussed. (orig.) [de

  8. The Chicago classification of motility disorders: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Sabine; Gyawali, C Prakash; Xiao, Yinglian; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    The Chicago Classification defines esophageal motility disorders in high resolution manometry. This is based on individual scoring of 10 swallows performed in supine position. Disorders of esophago-gastric junction (EGJ) outflow obstruction are defined by a median integrated relaxation pressure above the limit of normal and divided into 3 achalasia subtypes and EGJ outflow obstruction. Major motility disorders (aperistalsis, distal esophageal spasm, and hypercontractile esophagus) are patterns not encountered in controls in the context of normal EGJ relaxation. Finally with the latest version of the Chicago Classification, only two minor motor disorders are considered: ineffective esophageal motility and fragmented peristalsis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bacterial motility in the sea and its ecological implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Riemann, Lasse; Azam, F.

    2001-01-01

    the coast of La Jolla, California, as well as a mesocosm study to examine bacterial motility and its relationship to environmental variables. Dark-field microscopy revealed periods of sustained low (fall and winter, ...). Bacteria in natural seawater did not swim constantly nor at constant speeds; over 40% swam algae, bacteria...... swimming. Our results show that a variable fraction of marine bacteria is able to respond to loci of organic matter, e.g. organic particles and algae, and that motility underlies dynamic patterns of ecological relationships (symbiosis, competition, parasitism) between bacteria and algae. Since motility may...

  10. Stimulating Neoblast-Like Cell Proliferation in Juvenile Fasciola hepatica Supports Growth and Progression towards the Adult Phenotype In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Paul; McVeigh, Paul; Rathinasamy, Vignesh; Toet, Hayley; McCammick, Erin; O'Connor, Anna; Marks, Nikki J; Mousley, Angela; Brennan, Gerard P; Halton, David W; Spithill, Terry W; Maule, Aaron G

    2016-09-01

    Fascioliasis (or fasciolosis) is a socioeconomically important parasitic disease caused by liver flukes of the genus Fasciola. Flukicide resistance has exposed the need for new drugs and/or a vaccine for liver fluke control. A rapidly improving 'molecular toolbox' for liver fluke encompasses quality genomic/transcriptomic datasets and an RNA interference platform that facilitates functional genomics approaches to drug/vaccine target validation. The exploitation of these resources is undermined by the absence of effective culture/maintenance systems that would support in vitro studies on juvenile fluke development/biology. Here we report markedly improved in vitro maintenance methods for Fasciola hepatica that achieved 65% survival of juvenile fluke after 6 months in standard cell culture medium supplemented with 50% chicken serum. We discovered that this long-term maintenance was dependent upon fluke growth, which was supported by increased proliferation of cells resembling the "neoblast" stem cells described in other flatworms. Growth led to dramatic morphological changes in juveniles, including the development of the digestive tract, reproductive organs and the tegument, towards more adult-like forms. The inhibition of DNA synthesis prevented neoblast-like cell proliferation and inhibited growth/development. Supporting our assertion that we have triggered the development of juveniles towards adult-like fluke, mass spectrometric analyses showed that growing fluke have an excretory/secretory protein profile that is distinct from that of newly-excysted juveniles and more closely resembles that of ex vivo immature and adult fluke. Further, in vitro maintained fluke displayed a transition in their movement from the probing behaviour associated with migrating stage worms to a slower wave-like motility seen in adults. Our ability to stimulate neoblast-like cell proliferation and growth in F. hepatica underpins the first simple platform for their long-term in vitro study

  11. Stimulating Neoblast-Like Cell Proliferation in Juvenile Fasciola hepatica Supports Growth and Progression towards the Adult Phenotype In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinasamy, Vignesh; Toet, Hayley; McCammick, Erin; O’Connor, Anna; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela; Brennan, Gerard P.; Halton, David W.; Spithill, Terry W.; Maule, Aaron G.

    2016-01-01

    Fascioliasis (or fasciolosis) is a socioeconomically important parasitic disease caused by liver flukes of the genus Fasciola. Flukicide resistance has exposed the need for new drugs and/or a vaccine for liver fluke control. A rapidly improving ‘molecular toolbox’ for liver fluke encompasses quality genomic/transcriptomic datasets and an RNA interference platform that facilitates functional genomics approaches to drug/vaccine target validation. The exploitation of these resources is undermined by the absence of effective culture/maintenance systems that would support in vitro studies on juvenile fluke development/biology. Here we report markedly improved in vitro maintenance methods for Fasciola hepatica that achieved 65% survival of juvenile fluke after 6 months in standard cell culture medium supplemented with 50% chicken serum. We discovered that this long-term maintenance was dependent upon fluke growth, which was supported by increased proliferation of cells resembling the “neoblast” stem cells described in other flatworms. Growth led to dramatic morphological changes in juveniles, including the development of the digestive tract, reproductive organs and the tegument, towards more adult-like forms. The inhibition of DNA synthesis prevented neoblast-like cell proliferation and inhibited growth/development. Supporting our assertion that we have triggered the development of juveniles towards adult-like fluke, mass spectrometric analyses showed that growing fluke have an excretory/secretory protein profile that is distinct from that of newly-excysted juveniles and more closely resembles that of ex vivo immature and adult fluke. Further, in vitro maintained fluke displayed a transition in their movement from the probing behaviour associated with migrating stage worms to a slower wave-like motility seen in adults. Our ability to stimulate neoblast-like cell proliferation and growth in F. hepatica underpins the first simple platform for their long-term in

  12. Stimulating Neoblast-Like Cell Proliferation in Juvenile Fasciola hepatica Supports Growth and Progression towards the Adult Phenotype In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul McCusker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fascioliasis (or fasciolosis is a socioeconomically important parasitic disease caused by liver flukes of the genus Fasciola. Flukicide resistance has exposed the need for new drugs and/or a vaccine for liver fluke control. A rapidly improving 'molecular toolbox' for liver fluke encompasses quality genomic/transcriptomic datasets and an RNA interference platform that facilitates functional genomics approaches to drug/vaccine target validation. The exploitation of these resources is undermined by the absence of effective culture/maintenance systems that would support in vitro studies on juvenile fluke development/biology. Here we report markedly improved in vitro maintenance methods for Fasciola hepatica that achieved 65% survival of juvenile fluke after 6 months in standard cell culture medium supplemented with 50% chicken serum. We discovered that this long-term maintenance was dependent upon fluke growth, which was supported by increased proliferation of cells resembling the "neoblast" stem cells described in other flatworms. Growth led to dramatic morphological changes in juveniles, including the development of the digestive tract, reproductive organs and the tegument, towards more adult-like forms. The inhibition of DNA synthesis prevented neoblast-like cell proliferation and inhibited growth/development. Supporting our assertion that we have triggered the development of juveniles towards adult-like fluke, mass spectrometric analyses showed that growing fluke have an excretory/secretory protein profile that is distinct from that of newly-excysted juveniles and more closely resembles that of ex vivo immature and adult fluke. Further, in vitro maintained fluke displayed a transition in their movement from the probing behaviour associated with migrating stage worms to a slower wave-like motility seen in adults. Our ability to stimulate neoblast-like cell proliferation and growth in F. hepatica underpins the first simple platform for their long

  13. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta1 on cell motility, collagen gel contraction, myofibroblastic differentiation, and extracellular matrix expression of human adipose-derived stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakudo, Natsuko; Kushida, Satoshi; Suzuki, Kenji; Ogura, Tsunetaka; Notodihardjo, Priscilla Valentin; Hara, Tomoya; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2012-12-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are adult pluripotent stem cells, and their usefulness in plastic surgery has garnered attention in recent years. Although, there have been expectations that ASCs might function in wound repair and regeneration, no studies to date have examined the role of ASCs in the mechanism that promotes wound-healing. Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) is a strong candidate cytokine for the triggering of mesenchymal stem cell migration, construction of extracellular matrices, and differentiation of ASCs into myofibroblasts. Cell proliferation, motility, and differentiation, as well as extracellular matrix production, play an important role in wound-healing. We have evaluated the capacity of ASCs to proliferate and their potential to differentiate into phenotypic myofibroblasts, as well as their cell motility and collagen gel contraction ability, when cultured with TGF-β1. Cell motility was analyzed using a wound-healing assay. ASCs that differentiated into myofibroblasts expressed the gene for alpha-smooth muscle actin, and its protein expression was detected immunohistochemically. The extracellular matrix expression in ASCs was evaluated using real-time RT-PCR. Based on the results, we conclude that human ASCs have the potential for cell motility, extracellular matrix gene expression, gel contraction, and differentiation into myofibroblasts and, therefore, may play an important role in the wound-healing process.

  14. Condensed images for evaluating gastric motility patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsch, K.; Schroettle, W.; Kirsch, C.-M. (Munich Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-04-01

    A condensed imaging technique was applied to gastric emptying studies to investigate (a) whether different types of motility disorders may be distinguished by characteristic image patterns and (b) whether the findings obtained provide additional information compared to standard quantitative measurements. Condensed images and quantitative data of gastric emptying were evaluated in 75 consecutive patients with normal function and various disorders such as peptic ulcer, postvagotomy, pyloric obstruction, dumping syndrome, gastoparesis etc. Condensed images were generated from a gastric region of interest. They display the distribution and behaviour of a radioactive test meal in a space-time matrix, whose horizontal and vertical dimensions are temporal and spatial, respectively. As shown in a series of representative examples condensed images disclose a variety of well-defined image patterns reflecting different pathophysiological mechanisms. This qualitative characterization of gastric emptying patterns provided in 34 of the 75 patients (45%) important new information compared to quantitative data. The application of condensed imaging techniques to gastric emptying studies (complementary to quantitative measurements) may, therefore, enhance the diagnostic value of scintigraphic techniques. (author).

  15. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastric emptying and motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, R.

    2003-01-01

    The stomach consists of two functionally distinct parts. The fundus and upper corpus mainly serve as a reservoir and exert primarily a tonic activity, which presses ingesta towards the antrum and duodenum. The phasic contractility of the lower corpus and antrum cause mechanical breakdown and mixing of the food particels. A complex regulation of these mechanisms provides a regular gastric emptying. Various disorders such as diabetes mellitus, mixed connective tissue diseases, gastritis, tumors, dyspeptic disorders but also drugs and gastric surgery may influence or impair gastric function and may cause typical symptoms such as upper abdominal discomfort, bloating, nausea and vomiting. However, the interpretation of gastrointestinal symptoms often is difficult. Radionuclide studies of gastric emptying and motility are the most physiologic tools available for studying gastric motor function. Gastric scintigraphy is non-invasive, uses physiologic meal and is quantitative. Emptying curves generated from the gastric ROI offer information whether a disorder is accompanied by a regular, fast or slow gastric emptying. Data on gastric contractions (amplitude and frequency) provide additional information to results obtained by conventional emptying studies. Depending on the underlying disorder, gastric emptying and peristalsis showed both corresponding and discrepant findings. Therefore, both parameters should be routinely assessed to further improve characterisation of gastric dysfunction by scintigraphy. (orig.) [de

  16. Automated studies of radiation-induced changes in 3T3 cell motility and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurston, G.; Palcic, B.

    1985-01-01

    The most common endpoint in radiobiological studies is cell survival, as measured by colony forming ability. There is substantial experimental evidence that cell survival is related to the amount of radiation damage to the DNA. Radiation induces other changes in cell behaviour and morphology that may not be due to DNA damage alone. For example, low doses of radiation (<100 rads) were found to alter the ''phagokinetic tracks'' of moving 3T3 cells. They reported abnormal cell motility as demonstrated by a more random pattern of motion. 3T3 cells were also noted to show changes in morphology after exposure to x-rays. The fibroblast adhesion routine is disrupted by low doses of radiation (cell settling, microspike extension, lamellipodia flow, then cell spreading). An automated microscope system, DMIPS, is being used to automatically track 3T3 cells as they move and to correlate their movement with their morphology. An effort is being made to quantitate, for a large number of cells, the changes in 3T3 cell motility induced by radiation. The DMIPS procedure is compared to the gold dust technique

  17. Non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, I.T.

    1981-01-01

    Proliferation is a problem that can only be solved when the political problems which lead countries to contemplate, the possession of nuclear weapons are solved; in the meantime it can only be managed. Non-proliferation policy has to deal both with the political and the technical aspects of proliferation. It must seek to buy time by addressing the reasons why nations feel the political need to construct nuclear weapons, as well as delaying the moment when such nations feel capable of doing so. The subject is examined and proposals made. (author)

  18. Getting serious about proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leventhal, P.

    1984-01-01

    The US needs to give a higher priority to nuclear non-proliferation, but Reagan's policies assume that proliferation is inevitable and that it is more important to be a reliable supplier than to cause trade frictions by trading only with those nations which sign the non-proliferation treaty (NPT). This undercuts US leadership and the intent of the agreement. Several bills now before Congress could help to restore US leadership by tightening export restrictions and the use of plutonium from the US

  19. Olive phenolics as c-Met inhibitors: (--Oleocanthal attenuates cell proliferation, invasiveness, and tumor growth in breast cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R Akl

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF/c-Met signaling axis upregulates diverse tumor cell functions, including cell proliferation, survival, scattering and motility, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. (--Oleocanthal is a naturally occurring secoiridoid from extra-virgin olive oil, which showed antiproliferative and antimigratory activity against different cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to characterize the intracellular mechanisms involved in mediating the anticancer effects of (--oleocanthal treatment and the potential involvement of c-Met receptor signaling components in breast cancer. Results showed that (--oleocanthal inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and BT-474 while similar treatment doses were found to have no effect on normal human MCF10A cell growth. In addition, (--oleocanthal treatment caused a dose-dependent inhibition of HGF-induced cell migration, invasion and G1/S cell cycle progression in breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, (--oleocanthal treatment effects were found to be mediated via inhibition of HGF-induced c-Met activation and its downstream mitogenic signaling pathways. This growth inhibitory effect is associated with blockade of EMT and reduction in cellular motility. Further results from in vivo studies showed that (--oleocanthal treatment suppressed tumor cell growth in an orthotopic model of breast cancer in athymic nude mice. Collectively, the findings of this study suggest that (--oleocanthal is a promising dietary supplement lead with potential for therapeutic use to control malignancies with aberrant c-Met activity.

  20. Keratinocyte Motility Is Affected by UVA Radiation—A Comparison between Normal and Dysplastic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Niculiţe

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available UVA radiation induces multiple and complex changes in the skin, affecting epidermal cell behavior. This study reports the effects of UVA exposure on normal (HaCaT and dysplastic (DOK keratinocytes. The adherence, spreading and proliferation were investigated by time-lapse measurement of cell layer impedance on different matrix proteins. Prior to UVA exposure, the time required for adherence and spreading did not differ significantly for HaCaT and DOK cells, while spreading areas were larger for HaCaT cells. Under UVA exposure, HaCaT and DOK cells behavior differed in terms of movement and proliferation. The cells’ ability to cover the denuded surface and individual cell trajectories were recorded by time-lapse videomicroscopy, during wound healing experiments. Dysplastic keratinocytes showed more sensitivity to UVA, exhibiting transient deficiencies in directionality of movement and a delay in re-coating the denuded area. The actin cytoskeleton displayed a cortical organization immediately after irradiation, in both cell lines, similar to mock-irradiated cells. Post-irradiation, DOK cells displayed a better organization of stress fibers, persistent filopodia, and new, stronger focal contacts. In conclusion, after UVA exposure HaCaT and DOK cells showed a different behavior in terms of adherence, spreading, motility, proliferation, and actin cytoskeleton dynamics, with the dyplastic keratinocytes being more sensitive.

  1. Differential effects on cell motility, embryonic stem cell self-renewal and senescence by diverse Src kinase family inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamm, Christoffer, E-mail: christoffer.tamm@imbim.uu.se; Galito, Sara Pijuan, E-mail: sara.pijuan@imbim.uu.se; Anneren, Cecilia, E-mail: cecilia.anneren@imbim.uu.se

    2012-02-15

    The Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (SFKs) has been shown to play an intricate role in embryonic stem (ES) cell maintenance. In the present study we have focused on the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the vastly different effects induced by various commonly used SFK inhibitors. We show that several diverse cell types, including fibroblasts completely lacking SFKs, cannot undergo mitosis in response to SU6656 and that this is caused by an unselective inhibition of Aurora kinases. In contrast, PP2 and PD173952 block motility immediately upon exposure and forces cells to grow in dense colonies. The subsequent halt in proliferation of fibroblast and epithelial cells in the center of the colonies approximately 24 h post-treatment appears to be caused by cell-to-cell contact inhibition rather than a direct effect of SFK kinase inhibition. Interestingly, in addition to generating more homogenous and dense ES cell cultures, without any diverse effect on proliferation, PP2 and PD173652 also promote ES cell self-renewal by reducing the small amount of spontaneous differentiation typically observed under standard ES cell culture conditions. These effects could not be mirrored by the use of Gleevec, a potent inhibitor of c-Abl and PDGFR kinases that are also inhibited by PP2. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitor SU6656 induces senescence in mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SU6656 inhibits mitosis in a SFK-independent manner via cross-selectivity for Aurora kinases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitor PP2 impairs cell motility in various cell lines, including mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ensuing impeded motility, PP2 inhibits proliferation of various cells lines except for mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitors PP2 and PD173952 impede spontaneous differentiation in standard mouse ES culture maintenance.

  2. Differential effects on cell motility, embryonic stem cell self-renewal and senescence by diverse Src kinase family inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamm, Christoffer; Galitó, Sara Pijuan; Annerén, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    The Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (SFKs) has been shown to play an intricate role in embryonic stem (ES) cell maintenance. In the present study we have focused on the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the vastly different effects induced by various commonly used SFK inhibitors. We show that several diverse cell types, including fibroblasts completely lacking SFKs, cannot undergo mitosis in response to SU6656 and that this is caused by an unselective inhibition of Aurora kinases. In contrast, PP2 and PD173952 block motility immediately upon exposure and forces cells to grow in dense colonies. The subsequent halt in proliferation of fibroblast and epithelial cells in the center of the colonies approximately 24 h post-treatment appears to be caused by cell-to-cell contact inhibition rather than a direct effect of SFK kinase inhibition. Interestingly, in addition to generating more homogenous and dense ES cell cultures, without any diverse effect on proliferation, PP2 and PD173652 also promote ES cell self-renewal by reducing the small amount of spontaneous differentiation typically observed under standard ES cell culture conditions. These effects could not be mirrored by the use of Gleevec, a potent inhibitor of c-Abl and PDGFR kinases that are also inhibited by PP2. -- Highlights: ► SFK inhibitor SU6656 induces senescence in mouse ES cells. ► SU6656 inhibits mitosis in a SFK-independent manner via cross-selectivity for Aurora kinases. ► SFK inhibitor PP2 impairs cell motility in various cell lines, including mouse ES cells. ► Ensuing impeded motility, PP2 inhibits proliferation of various cells lines except for mouse ES cells. ► SFK inhibitors PP2 and PD173952 impede spontaneous differentiation in standard mouse ES culture maintenance.

  3. Sperm motility of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, R K; Kaurova, S A; Uteshev, V K; Shishova, N V; McGinnity, D; Figiel, C R; Mansour, N; Agney, D; Wu, M; Gakhova, E N; Dzyuba, B; Cosson, J

    2015-01-01

    We review the phylogeny, sperm competition, morphology, physiology, and fertilization environments of the sperm of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians. Increased sperm competition in both fish and anurans generally increases sperm numbers, sperm length, and energy reserves. The difference between the internal osmolarity and iconicity of sperm cells and those of the aquatic medium control the activation, longevity, and velocity of sperm motility. Hypo-osmolarity of the aquatic medium activates the motility of freshwater fish and amphibian sperm and hyperosmolarity activates the motility of marine fish sperm. The average longevity of the motility of marine fish sperm (~550 seconds) was significantly (P amphibian sperm in general and anurans reversion from internal to external fertilization. Our findings provide a greater understanding of the reproductive biology of externally fertilizing fish and amphibians, and a biological foundation for the further development of reproduction technologies for their sustainable management.

  4. Appearance and dynamics of rumen motility in newborn calves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostov, Y.; Aleksandrova, V.

    2010-01-01

    The appearance and dynamics of rumen motility in newborn calves were studied by means of radiotelemetry. Rumen contractions were registered right after birth. Their amplitude was growing gradually and that was observed best in the first month after birth

  5. Nuclear proliferation and terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This section of the book, Part III, has two chapters (9 and 10). Chapter 9, Nuclear Power and Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, is disucssed under these subjects: nuclear nonproliferation: origins and status; requirements for nuclear weapons manufacture; current nuclear programs and proliferation capabilities; encouraging decisions to forego weapons; arms control; safeguards; attitudes and expectations. Chapter 10, Nuclear Terrorism, discusses these areas: theft of nuclear materials; attacks on nuclear reactors; responding to nuclear terrorism; security and civil liberties

  6. An automatic system to study sperm motility and energetics

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, LZ; Nascimento, JM; Chandsawangbhuwana, C; Botvinick, EL; Berns, MW

    2008-01-01

    An integrated robotic laser and microscope system has been developed to automatically analyze individual sperm motility and energetics. The custom-designed optical system directs near-infrared laser light into an inverted microscope to create a single-point 3-D gradient laser trap at the focal spot of the microscope objective. A two-level computer structure is described that quantifies the sperm motility (in terms of swimming speed and swimming force) and energetics (measuring mid-piece membr...

  7. Neural network for automatic analysis of motility data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Kruse-Andersen, S; Kolberg, Jens Godsk

    1994-01-01

    comparable. However, the neural network recognized pressure peaks clearly generated by muscular activity that had escaped detection by the conventional program. In conclusion, we believe that neurocomputing has potential advantages for automatic analysis of gastrointestinal motility data.......Continuous recording of intraluminal pressures for extended periods of time is currently regarded as a valuable method for detection of esophageal motor abnormalities. A subsequent automatic analysis of the resulting motility data relies on strict mathematical criteria for recognition of pressure...

  8. Cell cycle-dependent Rho GTPase activity dynamically regulates cancer cell motility and invasion in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Shinji; Kamioka, Yuji; Mimori, Koshi; Naito, Yoko; Ishii, Taeko; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nishida, Naohiro; Maeda, Sakae; Naito, Atsushi; Kikuta, Junichi; Nishikawa, Keizo; Nishimura, Junichi; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Ikeda, Masataka; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Ishii, Hideshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Kikuchi, Akira; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism behind the spatiotemporal control of cancer cell dynamics and its possible association with cell proliferation has not been well established. By exploiting the intravital imaging technique, we found that cancer cell motility and invasive properties were closely associated with the cell cycle. In vivo inoculation of human colon cancer cells bearing fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) demonstrated an unexpected phenomenon: S/G2/M cells were more motile and invasive than G1 cells. Microarray analyses showed that Arhgap11a, an uncharacterized Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP), was expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. Expression of ARHGAP11A in cancer cells suppressed RhoA-dependent mechanisms, such as stress fiber formation and focal adhesion, which made the cells more prone to migrate. We also demonstrated that RhoA suppression by ARHGAP11A induced augmentation of relative Rac1 activity, leading to an increase in the invasive properties. RNAi-based inhibition of Arhgap11a reduced the invasion and in vivo expansion of cancers. Additionally, analysis of human specimens showed the significant up-regulation of Arhgap11a in colon cancers, which was correlated with clinical invasion status. The present study suggests that ARHGAP11A, a cell cycle-dependent RhoGAP, is a critical regulator of cancer cell mobility and is thus a promising therapeutic target in invasive cancers.

  9. Cell cycle-dependent Rho GTPase activity dynamically regulates cancer cell motility and invasion in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Kagawa

    Full Text Available The mechanism behind the spatiotemporal control of cancer cell dynamics and its possible association with cell proliferation has not been well established. By exploiting the intravital imaging technique, we found that cancer cell motility and invasive properties were closely associated with the cell cycle. In vivo inoculation of human colon cancer cells bearing fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci demonstrated an unexpected phenomenon: S/G2/M cells were more motile and invasive than G1 cells. Microarray analyses showed that Arhgap11a, an uncharacterized Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP, was expressed in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. Expression of ARHGAP11A in cancer cells suppressed RhoA-dependent mechanisms, such as stress fiber formation and focal adhesion, which made the cells more prone to migrate. We also demonstrated that RhoA suppression by ARHGAP11A induced augmentation of relative Rac1 activity, leading to an increase in the invasive properties. RNAi-based inhibition of Arhgap11a reduced the invasion and in vivo expansion of cancers. Additionally, analysis of human specimens showed the significant up-regulation of Arhgap11a in colon cancers, which was correlated with clinical invasion status. The present study suggests that ARHGAP11A, a cell cycle-dependent RhoGAP, is a critical regulator of cancer cell mobility and is thus a promising therapeutic target in invasive cancers.

  10. Microfabricated ratchet structures for concentrating and patterning motile bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Yub; Lee, Eun Se; Lee, Ho Jae; Lee, Se Yeon; Lee, Sung Kuk; Kim, Taesung

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel microfabricated concentrator for Escherichia coli that can be a stand-alone and self-contained microfluidic device because it utilizes the motility of cells. First of all, we characterize the motility of E. coli cells and various ratcheting structures that can guide cells to move in a desired direction in straight and circular channels. Then, we combine these ratcheting microstructures with the intrinsic tendency of cells to swim on the right side in microchannels to enhance the concentration rates up to 180 fold until the concentrators are fully filled with cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cells can be positioned and concentrated with a constant spacing distance on a surface, allowing spatial patterning of motile cells. These results can be applied to biosorption or biosensor devices that are powered by motile cells because they can be highly concentrated without any external mechanical and electrical energy sources. Hence, we believe that the concentrator design holds considerable potential to be applied for concentrating and patterning other motile microbes and providing a versatile structure for motility study of bacterial cells.

  11. Evaluation of Esophageal Motility Utilizing the Functional Lumen Imaging Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Dustin A; Kahrilas, Peter J; Lin, Zhiyue; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Listernick, Zoe; Ritter, Katherine; Tye, Michael; Ponds, Fraukje A; Wong, Ian; Pandolfino, John E

    2016-12-01

    Esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility and distension-mediated peristalsis can be assessed with the functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) during a sedated upper endoscopy. We aimed to describe esophageal motility assessment using FLIP topography in patients presenting with dysphagia. In all, 145 patients (aged 18-85 years, 54% female) with dysphagia that completed upper endoscopy with a 16-cm FLIP assembly and high-resolution manometry (HRM) were included. HRM was analyzed according to the Chicago Classification of esophageal motility disorders; major esophageal motility disorders were considered "abnormal". FLIP studies were analyzed using a customized program to calculate the EGJ-distensibility index (DI) and generate FLIP topography plots to identify esophageal contractility patterns. FLIP topography was considered "abnormal" if EGJ-DI was esophageal motility and 29 normal motility. In all, 17 (50%) had abnormal FLIP topography including 13 (37%) with abnormal EGJ-DI. FLIP topography provides a well-tolerated method for esophageal motility assessment (especially to identify achalasia) at the time of upper endoscopy. FLIP topography findings that are discordant with HRM may indicate otherwise undetected abnormalities of esophageal function, thus FLIP provides an alternative and complementary method to HRM for evaluation of non-obstructive dysphagia.

  12. Automatic Bowel Motility Evaluation Technique for Noncontact Sound Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryunosuke Sato

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Information on bowel motility can be obtained via magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs and X-ray imaging. However, these approaches require expensive medical instruments and are unsuitable for frequent monitoring. Bowel sounds (BS can be conveniently obtained using electronic stethoscopes and have recently been employed for the evaluation of bowel motility. More recently, our group proposed a novel method to evaluate bowel motility on the basis of BS acquired using a noncontact microphone. However, the method required manually detecting BS in the sound recordings, and manual segmentation is inconvenient and time consuming. To address this issue, herein, we propose a new method to automatically evaluate bowel motility for noncontact sound recordings. Using simulations for the sound recordings obtained from 20 human participants, we showed that the proposed method achieves an accuracy of approximately 90% in automatic bowel sound detection when acoustic feature power-normalized cepstral coefficients are used as inputs to artificial neural networks. Furthermore, we showed that bowel motility can be evaluated based on the three acoustic features in the time domain extracted by our method: BS per minute, signal-to-noise ratio, and sound-to-sound interval. The proposed method has the potential to contribute towards the development of noncontact evaluation methods for bowel motility.

  13. [Application study of human sperm motility bioassay in IVF laboratory quality control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xia; Pomeroy, Kimball O; Mattox, John H

    2006-07-01

    To investigate the sensitivity of human sperm survival bioassay to using known concentrations of potential toxin of formalin and to elevate the application value of human sperm motility assay as a quality control method in detecting the components used in IVF program. Fresh semen was obtained from healthy males at andrology laboratory by masturbation. Sperm was processed on a gradient column of isolate medium and PBS medium. In experiment 1, the medium with 0.25%, 0.75% concentration of formalin and control medium were added to the Falcon culture tubes containing HTF medium with or without 0.3% bovine albumin serum and with or without light mineral oil. In experiment 2, in 3 types of culture tubes containing HTF medium with or without 0.3% bovine albumin serum and with or without light mineral oil, the sperm was exposed to each culture tube and cultured for 24 and 48 hrs at room temperature, and the motile sperms were counted under the microscope. The average sperm motility index in the HTF medium with 0.25% formalin at 24 hrs was 0.594 +/- 0.331, significantly higher than in the HTF medium with 0.75% formalin (0.450 +/- 0.284) (P average sperm survival indexes were 0.683 +/- 0.334 and 0.527 +/- 0.345, respectively, higher than without bovine albumin serum and light mineral oil (0.394 +/- 0.311 and 0.424 +/- 0.311). The average sperm index of 7 ml tissue culture tube made in Denmark was 0.677 +/- 0.335, higher than the other two types of culture tubes made in the USA (0.551 +/- 0.317 and 0.596 +/- 0.327) (P sperm cultured in the medium with 0.3% bovine albumin serum and light mineral oil, the average sperm survival indexes were 0.821 +/- 0.259 and 0.645 +/- 0.335, respectively, higher than without bovine albumin serum or light mineral oil (0.571 +/- 0.321 and 0.395 +/- 0.245) (P sperm survival bioassay is a sensitivity quality control method to detect the components in the IVF laboratory. The 7 ml tissue culture tube made in Denmark is most suitable for culturing

  14. Comparison of orbital prosthesis motility following enucleation or evisceration with sclerotomy with or without a motility coupling post in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Na Young; Park, Shin Ae; Jeong, Man Bok; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Se Eun; Kim, Ji Youn; Chae, Je Min; Jang, Kyoung Jin; Seong, Je Kyung; Seo, Kang Moon

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate motility of silicone orbital implants and corneoscleral prostheses, with and without use of a motility coupling post (MCP) in dogs. Eighteen mixed-breed dogs. The motility of an orbital silicone implant and corneoscleral prosthesis after enucleation (n = 6), evisceration (n = 6), or use of a MCP with evisceration (n = 6) in dogs were compared. One eye from each dog had surgery whereas the opposite eye was used as a control. Clinical evaluations were performed three times a week. Histopathology of the orbital tissues was performed 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. Implant motility in dogs with evisceration (vertical movement [VM] 8.04 +/- 2.13; horizontal movement [HM] 11 +/- 3.05) and evisceration with MCP (VM 9.61 +/- 1.59); HM was significantly greater than the enucleation group (VM 0.51 +/- 0.5; HM 1.22 +/- 0.68) (P dogs with evisceration with MCP was significantly greater than in dogs with evisceration; dogs with evisceration had significantly greater motility than dogs with enucleation (P dogs. This study supports the use of MCP in silicone orbital implants to enhance corneoscleral prosthesis motility and cosmetics in dogs.

  15. FBX8 Acts as an Invasion and Metastasis Suppressor and Correlates with Poor Survival in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Wang

    Full Text Available F-box only protein 8 (FBX8, a novel component of F-box proteins, is lost in several cancers and has been associated with invasiveness of cancer cells. However, its expression pattern and role in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma remain unclear. This study investigated the prognostic significance of FBX8 in hepatocellular carcinoma samples and analyzed FBX8 function in hepatocellular carcinoma cells by gene manipulation.The expression of FBX8 was detected in 120 cases of clinical paraffin-embedded hepatocellular carcinoma tissues, 20 matched pairs of fresh tissues and five hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines by immunohistochemistry with clinicopathological analyses, real-time RT-PCR or Western blot. The correlation of FBX8 expression with cell proliferation and invasion in five HCC cell lines was analyzed. Moreover, loss of function and gain of function assays were performed to evaluate the effect of FBX8 on cell proliferation, motility, invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo.We found that FBX8 was obviously down-regulated in HCC tissues and cell lines (P<0.05. The FBX8 down-regulation correlated significantly with poor prognosis, and FBX8 status was identified as an independent significant prognostic factor. Over-expression of FBX8 decreased proliferation, migration and invasion in HepG2 and 97H cells, while knock-down of FBX8 in 7721 cells showed the opposite effect. FBX8 negatively correlated with cell proliferation and invasion in 7701, M3, HepG2 and 97H cell lines. In vivo functional assays showed FBX8 suppressed tumor growth and pulmonary metastatic potential in mice. Our results indicate that down-regulation of FBX8 significantly correlates with invasion, metastasis and poor survival in hepatocellular carcinoma patients. It may be a useful biomarker for therapeutic strategy and control in hepatocellular carcinoma treatment.

  16. Sperm motility and morphology as changing parameters linked to sperm count variations.

    OpenAIRE

    Dua A; Vaidya S

    1996-01-01

    Variations in semen analyses of 177 males over a 1 year period were assessed. The average means of total counts, motility, morphology, total motile count and non-motile % were determined for 5 classes of patients ranging from azoospermic to normospermic. Positive relationships between a falling sperm count, a decrease in motility and total motile counts were seen. Also, increasingly, abnormal forms were found with lower sperm counts.

  17. Sperm motility and morphology as changing parameters linked to sperm count variations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dua A

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Variations in semen analyses of 177 males over a 1 year period were assessed. The average means of total counts, motility, morphology, total motile count and non-motile % were determined for 5 classes of patients ranging from azoospermic to normospermic. Positive relationships between a falling sperm count, a decrease in motility and total motile counts were seen. Also, increasingly, abnormal forms were found with lower sperm counts.

  18. Persistent enhancement of bacterial motility increases tumor penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornlow, Dana N; Brackett, Emily L; Gigas, Jonathan M; Van Dessel, Nele; Forbes, Neil S

    2015-11-01

    Motile bacteria can overcome the transport limitations that hinder many cancer therapies. Active bacteria can penetrate through tissue to deliver treatment to resistant tumor regions. Bacterial therapy has had limited success, however, because this motility is heterogeneous, and within a population many individuals are non-motile. In human trials, heterogeneity led to poor dispersion and incomplete tumor colonization. To address these problems, a swarm-plate selection method was developed to increase swimming velocity. Video microscopy was used to measure the velocity distribution of selected bacteria and a microfluidic tumor-on-a-chip device was used to measure penetration through tumor cell masses. Selection on swarm plates increased average velocity fourfold, from 4.9 to 18.7 μm/s (P < 0.05) and decreased the number of non-motile individuals from 51% to 3% (P < 0.05). The selected phenotype was both robust and stable. Repeating the selection process consistently increased velocity and eliminated non-motile individuals. When selected strains were cryopreserved and subcultured for 30.1 doublings, the high-motility phenotype was preserved. In the microfluidic device, selected Salmonella penetrated deeper into cell masses than unselected controls. By 10 h after inoculation, control bacteria accumulated in the front 30% of cell masses, closest to the flow channel. In contrast, selected Salmonella accumulated in the back 30% of cell masses, farthest from the channel. Selection increased the average penetration distance from 150 to 400 μm (P < 0.05). This technique provides a simple and rapid method to generate high-motility Salmonella that has increased penetration and potential for greater tumor dispersion and clinical efficacy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Nuclear non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    DOE's nuclear non-proliferation responsibilities are defined by the provisions of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 (NNPA). The Department's major responsibilities in this area are to: (1) provide technical assistance to the Department of State in negotiating agreements for civil cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy with other countries and international organizations; (2) join with other agencies to reach executive branch judgments with respect to the issuance of export licenses by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; (3) be responsible for processing subsequent arrangements with other agencies as required by the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act; (4) control the distribution of special nuclear materials, components, equipment, and nuclear technology exports; (5) participate in bilateral and multilateral cooperation with foreign governments and organizations to promote the peaceful uses of nuclear energy; and (6) act as a primary technical resource with respect to US participation in the International Atomic Energy Agency

  20. Dynamics of nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    This book looks beyond policy disputes to make a systematic examination of the assumptions and contending hypotheses that constitute contemporary thinking on nuclear proliferation. Rather than determine who is right or wrong, the intent is to develop a better picture by using the various schools of thought as analytic windows. A better understanding of how the process operates should offer better guidance for predicting future nuclear proliferation and, ultimately, for controlling it. Separate chapters deal with the contending views, the technological and motivational bases of nuclear proliferation, the presence of a technological imperative, testing the motivational hypothesis, the dynamics of the process, and forecasting. Four appendices present historical decisions, the technical model, cost-estimating procedures, and procedures for estimating nuclear propensities. 288 references, 17 figures, 26 tables

  1. Proliferation resistance modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, R.; Peterson, P.; Roglans, J.; Mladineo, S.; Nuclear Engineering Division; BNL; Univ. of California at Berkely; PNNL

    2004-01-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration is developing methods for nonproliferation assessments. A working group on Nonproliferation Assessment Methodology (NPAM) assembled a toolbox of methods for various applications in the nonproliferation arena. One application of this methodology is to the evaluation of the proliferation resistance of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. This paper first summarizes the key results of the NPAM program and then provides results obtained thus far in the ongoing application, which is co-sponsored by the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Science and Technology. In NPAM, a top-level measure of proliferation resistance for a fuel cycle system is developed from a hierarchy of metrics. The problem is decomposed into: metrics to be computed, barriers to proliferation, and a finite set of threats. The analyst models the process undertaken by the proliferant to overcome barriers to proliferation and evaluates the outcomes. In addition to proliferation resistance (PR) evaluation, the application also addresses physical protection (PP) evaluation against sabotage and theft. The Generation IV goal for future nuclear energy systems is to assure that they are very unattractive and the least desirable route for diversion or theft of weapons-usable materials, and provide increased physical protection against terrorism. An Expert Group, addressing this application, has identified six high-level measures for the PR goals (six measures have also been identified for the PP goals). Combined together, the complete set of measures provides information for program policy makers and system designers to compare specific system design features and integral system characteristics and to make choices among alternative options. The Group has developed a framework for a phased evaluation approach to analyzing PR and PP of system characteristics and to quantifying metrics and measures. This approach allows evaluations to become more detailed and representative

  2. Oncofetal Chondroitin Sulfate Glycosaminoglycans are Key Players in Integrin Signaling and Tumor Cell Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Thomas Mandel; Pereira, Marina Ayres; Al Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Agerbæk, Mette Ø; Lee, Sherry; Ørum-Madsen, Maj Sofie; Christensen, Anders Riis; El-Naggar, Amal; Grandgenett, Paul M.; Grem, Jean L.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Holst, Peter J.; Theander, Thor; Sorensen, Poul H.; Daugaard, Mads; Salanti, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors express proteoglycans modified with oncofetal chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains (ofCS), which are normally restricted to the placenta. However, the role of ofCS in cancer is largely unknown. The function of ofCS in cancer was analyzed using the recombinant ofCS-binding VAR2CSA protein (rVAR2) derived from the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate that ofCS plays a key role in tumor cell motility by affecting canonical integrin signaling pathways. Binding of rVAR2 to tumor cells inhibited the interaction of cells with extracellular matrix (ECM) components, which correlated with decreased phosphorylation of Src kinase. Moreover, rVAR2 binding decreased migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth of tumor cells in vitro. Mass spectrometry of ofCS-modified proteoglycan complexes affinity purified from tumor cell lines on rVAR2 columns, revealed an overrepresentation of proteins involved in cell motility and integrin signaling, such as integrin β1 (ITGB1) and integrin α4 (ITGA4). Saturating concentrations of rVAR2 inhibited downstream integrin signaling, which was mimicked by knockdown of the core CS synthesis enzymes Beta-1,3-Glucuronyltransferase 1 (B3GAT1) and Chondroitin Sulfate N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 (CSGALNACT1). The ofCS modification was highly expressed in both human and murine metastatic lesions in situ and pre-incubation or early intravenous treatment of tumor cells with rVAR2 inhibited seeding and spreading of tumor cells in mice. This was associated with a significant increase in survival of the animals. These data functionally link ofCS modifications with cancer cell motility and further highlights ofCS as a novel therapeutic cancer target. Implications The cancer specific expression of oncofetal chondroitin sulfate aids in metastatic phenotypes and is a candidate target for therapy. PMID:27655130

  3. MYBPH inhibits NM IIA assembly via direct interaction with NMHC IIA and reduces cell motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Yasuyuki; Usukura, Jiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Motoshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► MYBPH inhibits NMHC IIA assembly and cell motility. ► MYBPH interacts to assembly-competent NM IIA. ► MYBPH inhibits RLC and NMHC IIA, independent components of NM IIA. -- Abstract: Actomyosin filament assembly is a critical step in tumor cell migration. We previously found that myosin binding protein H (MYBPH) is directly transactivated by the TTF-1 lineage-survival oncogene in lung adenocarcinomas and inhibits phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) of non-muscle myosin IIA (NM IIA) via direct interaction with Rho kinase 1 (ROCK1). Here, we report that MYBPH also directly interacts with an additional molecule, non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMHC IIA), which was found to occur between MYBPH and the rod portion of NMHC IIA. MYBPH inhibited NMHC IIA assembly and reduced cell motility. Conversely, siMYBPH-induced increased motility was partially, yet significantly, suppressed by blebbistatin, a non-muscle myosin II inhibitor, while more profound effects were attained by combined treatment with siROCK1 and blebbistatin. Electron microscopy observations showed well-ordered paracrystals of NMHC IIA reflecting an assembled state, which were significantly less frequently observed in the presence of MYBPH. Furthermore, an in vitro sedimentation assay showed that a greater amount of NMHC IIA was in an unassembled state in the presence of MYBPH. Interestingly, treatment with a ROCK inhibitor that impairs transition of NM IIA from an assembly-incompetent to assembly-competent state reduced the interaction between MYBPH and NMHC IIA, suggesting that MYBPH has higher affinity to assembly-competent NM IIA. These results suggest that MYBPH inhibits RLC and NMHC IIA, independent components of NM IIA, and negatively regulates actomyosin organization at 2 distinct steps, resulting in firm inhibition of NM IIA assembly.

  4. Sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of rectal motility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Timothy J; Tong, Wei-Dong; Takahashi, Toku; Kosinski, Lauren; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2009-11-01

    The colon and rectum are regulated by the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Abnormalities of the ANS are associated with diseases of the colon and rectum while its modulation is a putative mechanism for sacral nerve stimulation. The purpose of this study is to establish a rat model elucidating the role of the efferent ANS on rectal motility. Rectal motility following transection or stimulation of parasympathetic pelvic nerves (PN) or sympathetic hypogastric nerves (HGN) was measured with rectal strain gauge transducers and quantified as a motility index (MI). Colonic transit was measured 24 hours after transection by calculating the geometric center (GC) of distribution of (51)Cr Transection of PN and HGN decreased MI to 518 +/- 185 g*s (p < 0.05) and increased MI to 5,029 +/- 1,954 g*s (p < 0.05), respectively, compared to sham (975 +/- 243 g*s). Sectioning of PN and HGN decreased transit with GC = 4.9 +/- 0.2 (p < 0.05) and increased transit with GC = 8.1 +/- 0.7 (p < 0.02), respectively, compared to sham (GC = 5.8 +/- 0.3). Stimulation of PN and HGN increased MI to 831 +/- 157% (p < 0.01) and decreased MI to 251 +/- 24% (p < 0.05), respectively. Rectal motility is significantly altered by sectioning or stimulating either HGN or PN. This model may be useful in studying how sacral nerve stimulation exerts its effects and provide insight into the maladies of colonic motility.

  5. Cellular Scale Anisotropic Topography Guides Schwann Cell Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Directed migration of Schwann cells (SC) is critical for development and repair of the peripheral nervous system. Understanding aspects of motility specific to SC, along with SC response to engineered biomaterials, may inform strategies to enhance nerve regeneration. Rat SC were cultured on laminin-coated microgrooved poly(dimethyl siloxane) platforms that were flat or presented repeating cellular scale anisotropic topographical cues, 30 or 60 µm in width, and observed with timelapse microscopy. SC motion was directed parallel to the long axis of the topography on both the groove floor and the plateau, with accompanying differences in velocity and directional persistence in comparison to SC motion on flat substrates. In addition, feature dimension affected SC morphology, alignment, and directional persistence. Plateaus and groove floors presented distinct cues which promoted differential motility and variable interaction with the topographical features. SC on the plateau surfaces tended to have persistent interactions with the edge topography, while SC on the groove floors tended to have infrequent contact with the corners and walls. Our observations suggest the capacity of SC to be guided without continuous contact with a topographical cue. SC exhibited a range of distinct motile morphologies, characterized by their symmetry and number of extensions. Across all conditions, SC with a single extension traveled significantly faster than cells with more or no extensions. We conclude that SC motility is complex, where persistent motion requires cellular asymmetry, and that anisotropic topography with cellular scale features can direct SC motility. PMID:21949703

  6. Bidirectional motility of the fission yeast kinesin-5, Cut7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edamatsu, Masaki, E-mail: cedam@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Motile properties of Cut7 (fission yeast kinesin-5) were studied for the first time. • Half-length Cut7 moved toward plus-end direction of microtubule. • Full-length Cut7 moved toward minus-end direction of microtubule. • N- and C-terminal microtubule binding sites did not switch the motile direction. - Abstract: Kinesin-5 is a homotetrameric motor with its motor domain at the N-terminus. Kinesin-5 crosslinks microtubules and functions in separating spindle poles during mitosis. In this study, the motile properties of Cut7, fission yeast kinesin-5, were examined for the first time. In in vitro motility assays, full-length Cut7 moved toward minus-end of microtubules, but the N-terminal half of Cut7 moved toward the opposite direction. Furthermore, additional truncated constructs lacking the N-terminal or C-terminal regions, but still contained the motor domain, did not switch the motile direction. These indicated that Cut7 was a bidirectional motor, and microtubule binding regions at the N-terminus and C-terminus were not involved in its directionality.

  7. Microscopic Analysis of Bacterial Motility at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Sowa, Yoshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a molecular machine that converts an ion flux to the rotation of a helical flagellar filament. Counterclockwise rotation of the filaments allows them to join in a bundle and propel the cell forward. Loss of motility can be caused by environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and solvation. Hydrostatic pressure is also a physical inhibitor of bacterial motility, but the detailed mechanism of this inhibition is still unknown. Here, we developed a high-pressure microscope that enables us to acquire high-resolution microscopic images, regardless of applied pressures. We also characterized the pressure dependence of the motility of swimming Escherichia coli cells and the rotation of single flagellar motors. The fraction and speed of swimming cells decreased with increased pressure. At 80 MPa, all cells stopped swimming and simply diffused in solution. After the release of pressure, most cells immediately recovered their initial motility. Direct observation of the motility of single flagellar motors revealed that at 80 MPa, the motors generate torque that should be sufficient to join rotating filaments in a bundle. The discrepancy in the behavior of free swimming cells and individual motors could be due to the applied pressure inhibiting the formation of rotating filament bundles that can propel the cell body in an aqueous environment. PMID:22768943

  8. Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rupert G

    2011-01-01

    A concise summary of the statistical methods used in the analysis of survival data with censoring. Emphasizes recently developed nonparametric techniques. Outlines methods in detail and illustrates them with actual data. Discusses the theory behind each method. Includes numerous worked problems and numerical exercises.

  9. Cell Proliferation in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafman, Laura L.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, continues to carry a dismal prognosis for children diagnosed with advanced stage or relapsed disease. This review focuses upon factors responsible for cell proliferation in neuroblastoma including transcription factors, kinases, and regulators of the cell cycle. Novel therapeutic strategies directed toward these targets in neuroblastoma are discussed. PMID:26771642

  10. Controlling nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, W.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear non-proliferation policy depends on the 1968 Non-Proliferation Treaty, in which countries promise not to acquire nuclear weapons in exchange for open access to peaceful nuclear technology, and a system of international safeguards that are imposed on exported nuclear equipment and facilities operated by parties to the treaty. Critics have feared all along that non-nuclear countries might circumvent or exploit the system to obtain nuclear weapons and that the Atoms for Peace plan would spread the very technology it sought to control. The nuclear weapons states would like everyone else to believe that atomic bombs are undesirable, but they continue to rely on the bombs for their own defense. Israel's raid on Iraq's nuclear reactor focused world attention on the proliferation problem and helped to broaden and sterengthen its prospects. It also highlighted the weakness that there are no effective sanctions against violators. Until the international community can ageee on enforcement measures powerful enough to prevent nuclear proliferation, individual countries may be tempted to follow Israel's example, 19 references

  11. A novel regulator controls Clostridium difficile sporulation, motility and toxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Adrianne N; Tamayo, Rita; McBride, Shonna M

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic pathogen that forms spores which promote survival in the environment and transmission to new hosts. The regulatory pathways by which C. difficile initiates spore formation are poorly understood. We identified two factors with limited similarity to the Rap sporulation proteins of other spore-forming bacteria. In this study, we show that disruption of the gene CD3668 reduces sporulation and increases toxin production and motility. This mutant was more virulent and exhibited increased toxin gene expression in the hamster model of infection. Based on these phenotypes, we have renamed this locus rstA, for regulator of sporulation and toxins. Our data demonstrate that RstA is a bifunctional protein that upregulates sporulation through an unidentified pathway and represses motility and toxin production by influencing sigD transcription. Conserved RstA orthologs are present in other pathogenic and industrial Clostridium species and may represent a key regulatory protein controlling clostridial sporulation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Changes in Swallowing Symptoms and Esophageal Motility After Thyroid Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Markoew, Simone; Døssing, Helle

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Swallowing difficulties, the pathophysiology behind which is incompletely understood, have been reported in 47-83% of goiter patients referred for thyroidectomy. We aimed at examining the influence of thyroid surgery on swallowing symptoms and esophageal motility. METHODS: Thirty-th...... to esophageal motility disturbances. This information is essential when interpreting dysphagia in patients with nodular goiter, and when balancing patients' expectations to surgical goiter therapy. REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03100357 ( www.clinicaltrials.org ).......INTRODUCTION: Swallowing difficulties, the pathophysiology behind which is incompletely understood, have been reported in 47-83% of goiter patients referred for thyroidectomy. We aimed at examining the influence of thyroid surgery on swallowing symptoms and esophageal motility. METHODS: Thirty......-three patients with benign nodular goiter undergoing thyroid surgery were included. All completed high-resolution esophageal manometry examinations and the goiter symptom scale score, assessed by the thyroid-specific patient-reported outcome measure. The evaluations were performed before and 6 months after...

  13. Model for self-polarization and motility of keratocyte fragments

    KAUST Repository

    Ziebert, F.; Swaminathan, S.; Aranson, I. S.

    2011-01-01

    Computational modelling of cell motility on substrates is a formidable challenge; regulatory pathways are intertwined and forces that influence cell motion are not fully quantified. Additional challenges arise from the need to describe a moving deformable cell boundary. Here, we present a simple mathematical model coupling cell shape dynamics, treated by the phase-field approach, to a vector field describing the mean orientation (polarization) of the actin filament network. The model successfully reproduces the primary phenomenology of cell motility: discontinuous onset of motion, diversity of cell shapes and shape oscillations. The results are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments on motility of keratocyte cells and cell fragments. The asymmetry of the shapes is captured to a large extent in this simple model, which may prove useful for the interpretation of experiments.

  14. Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders and Their Clinical Implications in Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Theocharidou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal motility is impaired in a substantial proportion of patients with cirrhosis. Cirrhosis-related autonomic neuropathy, increased nitric oxide production, and gut hormonal changes have been implicated. Oesophageal dysmotility has been associated with increased frequency of abnormal gastro-oesophageal reflux. Impaired gastric emptying and accommodation may result in early satiety and may have an impact on the nutritional status of these patients. Small intestinal dysmotility might be implicated in small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increased bacterial translocation. The latter has been implicated in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Enhanced colonic motility is usually associated with the use of lactulose. Pharmacological interventions aiming to alter gastrointestinal motility in cirrhosis could potentially have a beneficial effect reducing the risk of hepatic decompensation and improving prognosis.

  15. Model for self-polarization and motility of keratocyte fragments

    KAUST Repository

    Ziebert, F.

    2011-10-19

    Computational modelling of cell motility on substrates is a formidable challenge; regulatory pathways are intertwined and forces that influence cell motion are not fully quantified. Additional challenges arise from the need to describe a moving deformable cell boundary. Here, we present a simple mathematical model coupling cell shape dynamics, treated by the phase-field approach, to a vector field describing the mean orientation (polarization) of the actin filament network. The model successfully reproduces the primary phenomenology of cell motility: discontinuous onset of motion, diversity of cell shapes and shape oscillations. The results are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments on motility of keratocyte cells and cell fragments. The asymmetry of the shapes is captured to a large extent in this simple model, which may prove useful for the interpretation of experiments.

  16. The effect of loss of O-antigen ligase on phagocytic susceptibility of motile and non-motile Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirdjian, Sally; Schutz, Kristin; Wargo, Matthew J; Lam, Joseph S; Berwin, Brent

    2017-12-01

    The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes adaptation and selection over the course of chronic respiratory tract infections which results in repeatedly-observed phenotypic changes that are proposed to enable its persistence. Two of the clinically significant P. aeruginosa phenotypic changes are loss of flagellar motility and modifications to LPS structure, including loss of O-antigen expression. The effect of loss of O-antigen, frequently described as conversion from smooth to rough LPS, and the combined effect of loss of motility and O-antigen on phagocytic susceptibility by immune cells remain unknown. To address this, we generated genetic deletion mutants of waaL, which encodes the O-antigen ligase responsible for linking O-antigen to lipid A-core oligosaccharide, in both motile and non-motile P. aeruginosa strains. With the use of these bacterial strains we provide the first demonstration that, despite a progressive selection for P. aeruginosa with rough LPS during chronic pulmonary infections, loss of the LPS O-antigen does not confer phagocytic resistance in vitro. However, use of the waaLmotABmotCD mutant revealed that loss of motility confers resistance to phagocytosis regardless of the smooth or rough LPS phenotype. These findings reveal how the O-antigen of P. aeruginosa can influence bacterial clearance during infection and expand our current knowledge about the impact of bacterial phenotypic changes during chronic infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhancement of mouse sperm motility by trophinin-binding peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Seong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trophinin is an intrinsic membrane protein that forms a complex in the cytoplasm with bystin and tastin, linking it microtubule-associated motor dynein (ATPase in some cell types. Previously, we found that human sperm tails contain trophinin, bystin and tastin proteins, and that trophinin-binding GWRQ (glycine, tryptophan, arginine, glutamine peptide enhanced motility of human sperm. Methods Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine trophinin protein in mouse spermatozoa from wild type mouse, by using spermatozoa from trophinin null mutant mice as a negative control. Multivalent 8-branched GWRQ (glycine, tryptophan, arginine, glutamine peptide or GWRQ-MAPS, was chemically synthesized, purified by HPLC and its structure was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Effect of GWRQ-MAPS on mouse spermatozoa from wild type and trophinin null mutant was assessed by a computer-assisted semen analyzer (CASA. Results Anti-trophinin antibody stained the principal (central piece of the tail of wild type mouse sperm, whereas the antibody showed no staining on trophinin null sperm. Phage particles displaying GWRQ bound to the principal piece of sperm tail from wild type but not trophinin null mice. GWRQ-MAPS enhanced motility of spermatozoa from wild type but not trophinin null mice. CASA showed that GWRQ-MAPS enhanced both progressive motility and rapid motility in wild type mouse sperm. Conclusions Present study established the expression of trophinin in the mouse sperm tail and trophinin-dependent effect of GWRQ-MAPS on sperm motility. GWRQ causes a significant increase in sperm motility.

  18. Oxamate, but Not Selective Targeting of LDH-A, Inhibits Medulloblastoma Cell Glycolysis, Growth and Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara J. Valvona

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant paediatric brain tumour and current therapies often leave patients with severe neurological disabilities. Four major molecular groups of medulloblastoma have been identified (Wnt, Shh, Group 3 and Group 4, which include additional, recently defined subgroups with different prognosis and genetic characteristics. Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA is a key enzyme in the aerobic glycolysis pathway, an abnormal metabolic pathway commonly observed in cancers, associated with tumour progression and metastasis. Studies indicate MBs have a glycolytic phenotype; however, LDHA has not yet been explored as a therapeutic target for medulloblastoma. LDHA expression was examined in medulloblastoma subgroups and cell lines. The effects of LDHA inhibition by oxamate or LDHA siRNA on medulloblastoma cell line metabolism, migration and proliferation were examined. LDHA was significantly overexpressed in Group 3 and Wnt MBs compared to non-neoplastic cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that oxamate significantly attenuated glycolysis, proliferation and motility in medulloblastoma cell lines, but LDHA siRNA did not. We established that aerobic glycolysis is a potential therapeutic target for medulloblastoma, but broader LDH inhibition (LDHA, B, and C may be more appropriate than LDHA inhibition alone.

  19. High-resolution esophageal pressure topography for esophageal motility disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-resolution manometer (HRM of the esophagus has become the main diagnostic test in the evaluation of esophageal motility disorders. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The first step of the Chicago classification described abnormal esophagogastric junction deglutitive relaxation. The latest classification system, proposed by Pandolfino et al, includes contraction patterns and peristalsis integrity based on integrated relaxation pressure 4 (IRP4. It can be discriminating the achalasia from non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders. The aim of this study was to assessment of clinical findings in non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders based on the most recent Chicago classification. Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 963 patients that had been referred to manometry department of Gastrointestinal and Liver Research Center, Firozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April, 2012 to April, 2015. They had upper GI disorder (Dysphasia, non-cardiac chest pain, regurgitation, heartburn, vomiting and asthma and weight loss. Data were collected from clinical examinations as well as patient questionnaires. Manometry, water-perfused, was done for all patients. Manometry criteria of the patients who had integrated relaxation pressure 4 (IRP4 ≤ 15 mmHg were studied. Results: Our finding showed that the non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders (58% was more common than the achalasia (18.2%. Heartburn (68.5%, regurgitation (65.4% and non-cardiac chest pain (60.6% were the most common clinical symptoms. Although, vomiting (91.7% and weight loss (63% were the most common symptoms in referring patients but did not discriminate this disorders from each other’s. Borderline motor function (67.2% was the most common, absent peristalsis (97% and the hyper

  20. Cell motility and antibiotic tolerance of bacterial swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wenlong

    Many bacteria species can move across moist surfaces in a coordinated manner known as swarming. It is reported that swarm cells show higher tolerance to a wide variety of antibiotics than planktonic cells. We used the model bacterium E. coli to study how motility affects the antibiotic tolerance of swarm cells. Our results provide new insights for the control of pathogenic invasion via regulating cell motility. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: zwlong@live.com.

  1. NtrC-dependent control of exopolysaccharide synthesis and motility in Burkholderia cenocepacia H111.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilei Liu

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia is a versatile opportunistic pathogen that survives in a wide variety of environments, which can be limited in nutrients such as nitrogen. We have previously shown that the sigma factor σ54 is involved in the control of nitrogen assimilation and virulence in B. cenocepacia H111. In this work, we investigated the role of the σ54 enhancer binding protein NtrC in response to nitrogen limitation and in the pathogenicity of H111. Of 95 alternative nitrogen sources tested the ntrC showed defects in the utilisation of nitrate, urea, L-citrulline, acetamide, DL-lactamide, allantoin and parabanic acid. RNA-Seq and phenotypic analyses of an ntrC mutant strain showed that NtrC positively regulates two important phenotypic traits: exopolysaccharide (EPS production and motility. However, the ntrC mutant was not attenuated in C. elegans virulence.

  2. Cell proliferation and ageing in mouse colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, E.; Franks, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    Cell kinetic parameters in the descending colon of unirradiated mice, 3-30-months-old were compared with those in mice irradiated repeatedly from the age of 6 or 24 months. The latter animals were given 1250 rad local X-irradiation to the colon every 6 weeks. Dose-survival curves showed the colon crypts of 6 and 24-months-old mice were similarly radiosensitive. In unirradiated mice the number of crypts per colon section decreased significantly at 30 months, but no significant age-related changes were seen in crypt size or labelling index (LI). Cell proliferation returned to control levels within 6 weeks of each X-ray dose and remained at this level for 20 weeks after the final dose. Later, cell proliferation in the irradiated colon fell significantly below control. A total of 6 or 7 doses each of 1250 rad produced only 1 colon carcinoma amongst 50 mice kept until they died. (author)

  3. Nuclear non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons which is the corner-stone of an international non-proliferation regime which has grown to embrace the overwhelming majority of countries in the world in the period since the Treaty. The other elements of the regime include, first of all, the safeguards system of IAEA-which operates to prevent the diversion of nuclear materials to military or other prohibited activities and must be accepted by all non-nuclear-weapon parties to the Treaty and, secondly, the Antarctic Treaty, the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America (Treaty of Tlatelolco) and the south Pacific Nuclear Free zone Treaty (Treaty of Rarotonga)-which serve to extend the regime geographically. The last two Treaties require safeguards agreements with IAEA. In addition, the Treaty of Tlatelolco contains provisions establishing the agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean to ensure compliance

  4. Proliferation in cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piao Yunsong [College of Physical Sciences, Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)], E-mail: yspiao@gucas.ac.cn

    2009-06-15

    In the contracting phase with w{approx_equal}0, the scale invariant spectrum of curvature perturbation is given by the increasing mode of metric perturbation. In this Letter, it is found that if the contracting phase with w{approx_equal}0 is included in each cycle of a cycle universe, since the metric perturbation is amplified on super horizon scale cycle by cycle, after each cycle the universe will be inevitably separated into many parts independent of one another, each of which corresponds to a new universe and evolves up to next cycle, and then is separated again. In this sense, a cyclic multiverse scenario is actually presented, in which the universe proliferates cycle by cycle. We estimate the number of new universes proliferated in each cycle, and discuss the implications of this result.

  5. Proliferation in cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piao Yunsong

    2009-01-01

    In the contracting phase with w≅0, the scale invariant spectrum of curvature perturbation is given by the increasing mode of metric perturbation. In this Letter, it is found that if the contracting phase with w≅0 is included in each cycle of a cycle universe, since the metric perturbation is amplified on super horizon scale cycle by cycle, after each cycle the universe will be inevitably separated into many parts independent of one another, each of which corresponds to a new universe and evolves up to next cycle, and then is separated again. In this sense, a cyclic multiverse scenario is actually presented, in which the universe proliferates cycle by cycle. We estimate the number of new universes proliferated in each cycle, and discuss the implications of this result.

  6. Global proliferation concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, R.

    1978-01-01

    The Non-Proliferation Treaty and the IAGA Safeguards System are discussed. President Carter's program to defer commercial reprocessing and recycle, to restructure the breeder program, to develop alternative fuel cycles, to increase US uranium enrichment capability, to provide fuel assurance for consumer nations, to continue the embargo of sensitive technology and equipment and to develop the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation Program is outlined

  7. Effects of glucose metabolism pathways on sperm motility and oxidative status during long-term liquid storage of goat semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian-Hua; Li, You-Wei; Xie, Hong-Li; Li, Qing; Dong, Hai-Bo; Sun, Ming-Ju; Gao, Wei-Qiang; Tan, Jing-He

    2016-08-01

    Although great efforts were made to prolong the fertility of liquid-stored semen, limited improvements have been achieved in different species. Although it is expected that energy supply and the redox potential will play an essential role in sperm function, there are few reports on the impact of specific energy substrates on spermatozoa during liquid semen storage. Furthermore, although it is accepted that glucose metabolism through glycolysis provides energy, roles of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and tricarboxylic acid cycle remain to be unequivocally found in spermatozoa. We have studied the pathways by which spermatozoa metabolize glucose during long-term liquid storage of goat semen. The results indicated that among the substrates tested, glucose and pyruvate were better than lactate in maintaining goat sperm motility. Although both glycolysis and PPP were essential, PPP was more important than glycolysis to maintain sperm motility. Pentose phosphate pathway reduced oxidative stress and provided glycolysis with more intermediate products such as fructose-6-phosphate. Pyruvate entered goat spermatozoa through monocarboxylate transporters and was oxidized by the tricarboxylic acid cycle and electron transfer to sustain sperm motility. Long-term liquid semen storage can be used as a good model to study sperm glucose metabolism. The data are important for an optimal control of sperm survival during semen handling and preservation not only in the goat but also in other species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Arginine promotes Proteus mirabilis motility and fitness by contributing to conservation of the proton gradient and proton motive force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Hodges, Steven A; Smith, Sara N; Alteri, Christopher J; Mobley, Harry L T

    2014-10-01

    Swarming contributes to Proteus mirabilis pathogenicity by facilitating access to the catheterized urinary tract. We previously demonstrated that 0.1-20 mmol/L arginine promotes swarming on normally nonpermissive media and that putrescine biosynthesis is required for arginine-induced swarming. We also previously determined that arginine-induced swarming is pH dependent, indicating that the external proton concentration is critical for arginine-dependent effects on swarming. In this study, we utilized survival at pH 5 and motility as surrogates for measuring changes in the proton gradient (ΔpH) and proton motive force (μH(+) ) in response to arginine. We determined that arginine primarily contributes to ΔpH (and therefore μH(+) ) through the action of arginine decarboxylase (speA), independent of the role of this enzyme in putrescine biosynthesis. In addition to being required for motility, speA also contributed to fitness during infection. In conclusion, consumption of intracellular protons via arginine decarboxylase is one mechanism used by P. mirabilis to conserve ΔpH and μH(+) for motility. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Mechanical stress as a regulator of cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putelat, T.; Recho, P.; Truskinovsky, L.

    2018-01-01

    The motility of a cell can be triggered or inhibited not only by an applied force but also by a mechanically neutral force couple. This type of loading, represented by an applied stress and commonly interpreted as either squeezing or stretching, can originate from extrinsic interaction of a cell with its neighbors. To quantify the effect of applied stresses on cell motility we use an analytically transparent one-dimensional model accounting for active myosin contraction and induced actin turnover. We show that stretching can polarize static cells and initiate cell motility while squeezing can symmetrize and arrest moving cells. We show further that sufficiently strong squeezing can lead to the loss of cell integrity. The overall behavior of the system depends on the two dimensionless parameters characterizing internal driving (chemical activity) and external loading (applied stress). We construct a phase diagram in this parameter space distinguishing between static, motile, and collapsed states. The obtained results are relevant for the mechanical understanding of contact inhibition and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  10. Effect of zinc treatment on intestinal motility in experimentally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of zinc treatment on intestinal motility in experimentally induced diarrhea in rats. ... Zinc supplementation is a critical new intervention for treating diarrheal episodes in children. Recent studies suggest that administration of zinc along with new low osmolarity oral rehydration solutions / salts (ORS) can reduce the ...

  11. Photoacclimation state determines the photobehaviour of motile microalgae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezequiel, João; Laviale, Martin; Frankenbach, Silja

    2015-01-01

    High productivity in intertidal microphytobenthic communities is achieved despite exposure to extreme and dynamic conditions (e.g. light, salinity, temperature). As an adaptation to this hostile environment, most of the microalgae species inhabiting fine-sediment habitats are motile, being able...

  12. Chromatographic and anti-motility studies on extracts of Loranthus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-motility properties of the leaves of African mistletoe, Loranthus micranthus (Linn), Loranthaceae harvested from Kola acuminate host tree was studied by the charcoal meal test in mice. The intraperitoneal LD50 of the methanol extract was determined in mice by the Locke's method. The phytochemical constituents of ...

  13. in human sperm motility and level of calcium and magnesium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J. Valsa

    2015-11-06

    Nov 6, 2015 ... Calcium carbonate (AR Grade) (Brittish Drug House,. Bombay), for standard .... able for storage of sample used for chemical study.41,42. Subjects collected .... iod indicated a serious problem even if the sperm count and original motility were ..... Bhattacharya RD. Circadian rhythm of urinary electrolytes from.

  14. Spermometer: electrical characterization of single boar sperm motility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wagenaar, B.; Geijs, Daan J.; de Boer, Hans L.; Bomer, Johan G.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert; Segerink, Loes Irene

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study single sperm boar motility using electrical impedance measurements in a microfluidic system. Design: Comparison of the optical data and electrical impedance data. Setting: Research laboratory at a university. Animal(s): Boar semen sample were used. Intervention(s): A microfluidic

  15. Esophageal motility after peroral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Li, Meng; Lu, Bin; Meng, Lina; Fan, Yihong; Bao, Haibiao

    2016-05-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been introduced as a novel endoscopic treatment for achalasia. The aim of this work is to assess the changes in esophageal motility caused by POEM in patients with achalasia. Forty-one patients with achalasia underwent POEM from September 2012 to November 2014. Esophageal motility of all patients was evaluated preoperatively and 1 month after POEM utilizing high-resolution manometry, which was performed with ten water swallows, ten steamed bread swallows, and multiple rapid swallows (MRS). In single swallows, including liquid swallows and bread swallows, all the parameters of lower esophagus sphincter resting pressure (LESP), 4-s integrated relaxation pressure (4sIRP), and intra-bolus pressure (IBP) were decreased between pre- and post-POEM patients (all p 0.05), but increased in subtype I (subtype I: p > 0.05). In liquid swallows, the Eckardt score of subtype II patients decreased with DCI, and distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude after POEM was significantly lower compared with those showing increased values of those two parameters (p achalasia patients. POEM reduces LES pressure in achalasia, and partly restores esophageal motility. POEM displayed varying effect on esophageal motility in patients with different patterns of swallowing. In addition, the changes in parameters associated with esophageal peristalsis correlated with decreases in Eckardt score.

  16. Opiate Modulation of Gastrointestinal Motility and the Actions of Trimebutine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Collins

    1991-01-01

    novel therapeutic approaches to the treatment of motility disorders, including postoperative ileus and pseudo-obstruction. Finally, the effect of the drug on the colon supports the use of trimcbutine in irritable bowel syndrome patients who have constipation due to colonic inertia.

  17. Villous motility and unstirred water layers in canine intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailman, D.; Womack, W.A.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that villous motility reduces the mucosal unstirred water layer by mechanical stirring was examined. The frequency of contraction of villi was measured by using videomicroscopic techniques while a segment of anesthetized canine jejunum or ileum with its nerve and blood supply intact was maintained in a sealed chamber through which Tyrode solution was perfused. Radioisotopically labeled inulin, H 2 O, and butyric and lauric acid were used to measure net and/or unidirectional fluxes from the chamber. The unidirectional absorptive transport of H 2 O and butyric acid but not lauric acid by jejunal segments was significantly correlated with flow through the chamber. Plasma volume expansion increased villous motility but decreased the absorption of H 2 O and lauric acid. Absorption of butyric acid from the ileum was little different than from the jejunum although the degree of villous motility was less and net water absorption was greater from the ileum. Absorption of butyric acid into dead tissue indicated that passive diffusion into the tissue accounted for between 7 and 25%, depending on flow rate, of the absorption in intact tissue and that nonspecific binding was low. It was concluded that villous motility did not stir the unstirred water layers and was not directly associated with altered transport

  18. Bacillus subtilis Hfq: A role in chemotaxis and motility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-07-16

    Jul 16, 2016 ... motility, thus assigning a new function for Hfq in B. subtilis. 1. Introduction. Hfq in ... to play a role in pathogenecity in mice, tolerance to osmotic and ethanol stress ...... in B. subtilis is characterized by events like surfactin pro- duction .... SM Cutting (New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc) pp 442–444. Nicolas P ...

  19. Oesophageal motility disorders - diagnosis with a barium-rice study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwickert, H.C.; Schadmand-Fischer, S.; Klose, P.; Staritz, M.; Ueberschaer, B.; Thelen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of a 'barium-rice' study for diagnosis of dysphagia and oesophageal motility disorders. Material and methods: 203 patients with oesophageal motility disorders of various aetiologies were examined by both conventional barium study and a 'barium-rice' study. During the latter, oesophageal clearance of a defined mixture of barium sulfate and boiled rice was measured. Results: The conventional barium study revealed prolonged transit time in only 15.8% (32 of 203 cases), whereas barium-rice study was pathological in 50.8% (103 of 203 cases). In 71 of 171 patients (41.5%) with a normal barium study, barium-rice passage was prolonged. In 23 patients, radiological results were confirmed by manometric measurements. Conclusion: Oesophageal motility disorders are detected by a barim-rice study with high sensitivity independent of the underlying disease. The barium-rice study offers a simple diagnostic tool revealing quantitative and reliable results. The barium-rice study is a suitable method for screening and follow-up of patients with dysphagia and oesophageal motility disorders. (orig.) [de

  20. Intestinal mast cells in gut inflammation and motility disturbances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, Benedicte Y.; van den Wijngaard, Rene M.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells may be regarded as prototypes of innate immune cells that can be controlled by neuronal mediators. Their activation has been implicated in many types of neuro-inflammatory responses, and related disturbances of gut motility, via direct or indirect mechanisms that involve several

  1. Gastrointestinal motility during cardiopulmonary bypass : A sonomicrometric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, YJ; de Kroon, TL; Elstrodt, JM; Rakhorst, G

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is known to impair the integrity of the gastrointestinal tract. However, little is known about the movement behavior of the gastrointestinal tract during CPB. This study was aimed to assess the gastrointestinal motility with sonomicrometry, a distance measurement using

  2. Bacterial growth and motility in sub-micron constrictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Männik, J.; Driessen, R.; Galajda, P.; Keymer, J.E.; Dekker, C.

    2009-01-01

    In many naturally occurring habitats, bacteria live in micrometer-size confined spaces. Although bacterial growth and motility in such constrictions is of great interest to fields as varied as soil microbiology, water purification, and biomedical research, quantitative studies of the effects of

  3. Proliferation after the Iraq war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daguzan, J.F.

    2004-09-01

    This article uses the Iraq war major event to analyze the approach used by the US to fight against proliferation. It questions the decision and analysis process which has led to the US-British intervention and analyzes the consequences of the war on the proliferation of other countries and on the expected perspectives. Finally, the future of proliferation itself is questioned: do we have to fear more threat or is the virtuous circle of non-proliferation well started? (J.S.)

  4. Control of exoenzyme production, motility and cell differentiation in Serratia liquefaciens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givskov, Michael Christian; Eberl, Leo; Molin, Søren

    1997-01-01

    Serratia liquefaciens secretes a broad spectrum of hydrolytic enzymes to the surrounding medium and possesses the ability to differentiate into specialized swarmer cells capable of rapid surface motility. Control of exoenzyme production and swarming motility is governed by similar regulatory...

  5. Esophageal Motility Disorders: Current Concepts of Pathogenesis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Kahrilas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Current concepts of esophageal motility disorders are summarized. Primary data sources were located via MEDLINE or cross-citation. No attempt was made to be comprehensive or inclusive of the literature because fewer than 10% of citations are discussed. Instead, emphasis was placed on new developments in diagnosis, therapeutics, and practice patterns. Controlled therapeutic trials and pathophysiological observations are emphasized. Achalasia is a rare disease of failed lower sphincter relaxation and aperistalsis. Diffuse esophageal spasm (DES, an equally rare disease, is defined by non-propagated esophageal contractions. Nonspecific motility disorders, including nutcracker esophagus and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, are identified only by manometry and are ten times as prevalent. Neuromuscular pathology is evident only with achalasia (myenteric plexus neurons destruction. Pharmacological therapies have limited efficacy with achalasia; more limited with DES; and none with the nonspecific motility disorders. More efficacious therapies for the nonspecific disorders are directed at associated reflux disease or psychiatric disorders. Pneumatic dilation is effective therapy for achalasia 72% of instances, but frequently requires repeat dilation and is complicated by a 3% perforation rate. Surgical myotomy is effective in 88% of achalasics; morbidity from thoracotomy has been the major limitation but this has been sharply reduced with a laparoscopic approach. In conclusion, although it has been suggested that esophageal motility disorders are distinct clinical entities, critical review of the literature supports this only in the case of achalasia, a disease of well defined pathophysiology, functional disturbance, and therapies. This clarity diminishes progressively for DES and non-specific esophageal motility disorders.

  6. Polymyxin B effects on motility parameters of cryopreserved bull semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Rashedi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of adding different values of polymyxin B (PMB to bull semen on various motility parameters of post-thawed semen such as total motility, progressive motility and velocity parameters using kinetic parameters of sperm by Computer Assisted Sperm Analysis.Methods: Gram negative bacteria release lipopolysaccharide, which induces the apoptotic pathway. Antibiotics are added to semen in order to prevent bacterial contaminations in bovine semen. These antibiotics kill the bacteria especially gram negative bacteria. Therefore, their endotoxins are released during bacteriolysis and bind to the head region and midpiece of sperm. PMB is a bactericidal antibiotic against multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria and is able to neutralize the toxic effects of the released endotoxin. This study was performed on 3-year old Taleshi bulls.Results: The results showed both positive and negative significant effects of PMB on semen quality. Total motility and progressive motility were significantly increased (P<0.000 1 by 100 μg per mL of PMB (55.2% and 48.8% respectively against the control groups (43.5% and 37.7%, respectively. Moreover, they were significantly decreased (P<0.000 1 by 1 000 μg per mL of PMB (35.2% and 28.8% respectively against the control groups (43.5% and 37.7% respectively in above-mentioned parameters. In Computer Assisted Semen Analyzer, parameter VAP was significantly decreased (P<0.04 in 1 000 μg (69.6 μm/s against the control group (78.7 μm/s. Finally, using PMB in processing cryopreserved bull semen is advised, but before using it, the rate of endotoxins must be measured.Conclusions: We advise using PMB after measuring endotoxin concentration; In vitro, in vivo and in field fertilization, adding other sperm evaluation factors such as acrosomal integrity, DNA integrity, mitochondrial function to PMB treated semen.

  7. Genistein inhibits cell invasion and motility by inducing cell differentiation in murine osteosarcoma cell line LM8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Aizawa, Junichi; Sakayama, Kenshi; Kidani, Teruki; Takata, Tomoyo; Norimatsu, Yoshiaki; Miura, Hiromasa; Masuno, Hiroshi

    2012-09-26

    One of the problems associated with osteosarcoma is the frequent formation of micrometastases in the lung prior to diagnosis because the development of metastatic lesions often causes a fatal outcome. Therefore, the prevention of pulmonary metastases during the early stage of tumor development is critical for the improvement of the prognosis of osteosarcoma patients. In Japan, soy is consumed in a wide variety of forms, such as miso soup and soy sauce. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of genistein, an isoflavone found in soy, on the invasive and motile potential of osteosarcoma cells. LM8 cells were treated for 3 days with various concentrations of genistein. The effect of genistein on cell proliferation was determined by DNA measurement in the cultures and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation study. The assays of cell invasion and motility were performed using the cell culture inserts with either matrigel-coated membranes or uncoated membranes in the invasion chambers. The expression and secretion of MMP-2 were determined by immunohistochemistry and gelatin zymography. The subcellular localization and cellular level of β-catenin were determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot. For examining cell morphology, the ethanol-fixed cells were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E). The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Genistein dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation. Genistein-treated cells were less invasive and less motile than untreated cells. The expression and secretion of MMP-2 were lower in the genistein-treated cultures than in the untreated cultures. β-Catenin in untreated cells was located in the cytoplasm and/or nucleus, while in genistein-treated cells it was translocated near to the plasma membrane. The level of β-catenin was higher in genistein-treated cells than in untreated cells. Treatment of LM8 cells with genistein induced morphological

  8. Genistein inhibits cell invasion and motility by inducing cell differentiation in murine osteosarcoma cell line LM8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Atsushi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the problems associated with osteosarcoma is the frequent formation of micrometastases in the lung prior to diagnosis because the development of metastatic lesions often causes a fatal outcome. Therefore, the prevention of pulmonary metastases during the early stage of tumor development is critical for the improvement of the prognosis of osteosarcoma patients. In Japan, soy is consumed in a wide variety of forms, such as miso soup and soy sauce. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of genistein, an isoflavone found in soy, on the invasive and motile potential of osteosarcoma cells. Methods LM8 cells were treated for 3 days with various concentrations of genistein. The effect of genistein on cell proliferation was determined by DNA measurement in the cultures and 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation study. The assays of cell invasion and motility were performed using the cell culture inserts with either matrigel-coated membranes or uncoated membranes in the invasion chambers. The expression and secretion of MMP-2 were determined by immunohistochemistry and gelatin zymography. The subcellular localization and cellular level of β-catenin were determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot. For examining cell morphology, the ethanol-fixed cells were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results Genistein dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation. Genistein-treated cells were less invasive and less motile than untreated cells. The expression and secretion of MMP-2 were lower in the genistein-treated cultures than in the untreated cultures. β-Catenin in untreated cells was located in the cytoplasm and/or nucleus, while in genistein-treated cells it was translocated near to the plasma membrane. The level of β-catenin was higher in genistein-treated cells than in untreated cells

  9. Can we predict nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertrais, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The author aims at improving nuclear proliferation prediction capacities, i.e. the capacities to identify countries susceptible to acquire nuclear weapons, to interpret sensitive activities, and to assess nuclear program modalities. He first proposes a retrospective assessment of counter-proliferation actions since 1945. Then, based on academic studies, he analyzes what causes and motivates proliferation, with notably the possibility of existence of a chain phenomenon (mechanisms driving from one program to another). He makes recommendations for a global approach to proliferation prediction, and proposes proliferation indices and indicators

  10. Competitive Advantage Provided by Bacterial Motility in the Formation of Nodules by Rhizobium meliloti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Peter; Bergman, Kostia

    1981-01-01

    The effect of motility on the competitive success of Rhizobium meliloti in nodule production was investigated. A motile strain formed more nodules than expected when mixed at various unfavorable ratios with either flagellated or nonflagellated nonmotile derivatives. We conclude that motility confers a selective advantage on rhizobia when competing with nonmotile strains. PMID:7298580

  11. Non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deiseroth, D.; Gustafsson, S.

    1993-01-01

    The issue of Nuclear Non Proliferation has been moved to a leading place on the contemporary international security agenda. What about the situation of nuclear weapons and nuclear technology in Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine and Belorussia? Why did the IAEA-inspectors totally failed to discover any sign of Iraq's clandestine nuclear-weapon programme before the Gulf War? Do the NATO and their nuclear power states violate Art. VI of the Non-Proliferation-Treaty (NPT), because they are - despite the end of the cold war - not willing to renounce of the ''option of the first use of nuclear weapons''? Does the NPT establish a form of nuclear apartheid? What will be the situation if the NPT-Extension-Conference in 1995 will be unable to obtain a majority of the parties for any one extension proposal? Do we need a new international nuclear control agency with severe powers, a sort of nuclear Interpol? The Colloquium ''Saving NPT and abolishing Nuclear Weapons'', held in Stockholm in September 1992, organized by the Swedish and the German Sections of IALANA, tried to analyse some of the raised issues. (orig.) [de

  12. Non Proliferation of Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambang S Irawan

    2004-01-01

    Non-Proliferation Treaty of Nuclear Weapons is the international community's efforts to maintain the security of the world, in order to prevent the spread of nuclear technology and the use of nuclear weapons, promoting cooperation for the use of nuclear peaceful purposes, build mutual trust (Confidence Building Measures) as well as to achieve the ultimate goal of disarmament overall (General and Complete Disarmament). Addressing the post-WTC tragedy, 11 September 2001, the Indonesian government should set up a National Measures (National Action Plan), among others formed the National Security Council and NBC Counter Proliferation Unit, or the National Authority for Nuclear Treaty, preparing national legislation, to prevent the abuse nuclear materials for terrorist acts, prevent Illicit Trafficking of Nuclear materials, developed a National Preparedness and Emergency Response Management in the event of a nuclear accident or attack by the use of nuclear terrorism. Importance of a National Action Plan meant the existence of a national commitment in the context of compliance with treaties and conventions which have been ratified relating to safety, security, safeguards towards a general and complete disarmament, to safeguard national security and maintain peace (safeguards) international

  13. Initiatives for proliferation prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    Preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction is a central part of US national security policy. A principal instrument of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) program for securing weapons of mass destruction technology and expertise and removing incentives for scientists, engineers and technicians in the newly independent states (NIS) of the former Soviet Union to go to rogue countries or assist terrorist groups is the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP). IPP was initiated pursuant to the 1994 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act. IPP is a nonproliferation program with a commercialization strategy. IPP seeks to enhance US national security and to achieve nonproliferation objectives by engaging scientists, engineers and technicians from former NIS weapons institutes; redirecting their activities in cooperatively-developed, commercially viable non-weapons related projects. These projects lead to commercial and economic benefits for both the NIS and the US IPP projects are funded in Russian, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus. This booklet offers an overview of the IPP program as well as a sampling of some of the projects which are currently underway

  14. Proliferation: myth or reality?; La proliferation: mythe ou realite?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This article analyzes the proliferation approach, its technical condition and political motivation, and the share between the myth (political deception, assumptions and extrapolations) and the reality of proliferation. Its appreciation is complicated by the irrational behaviour of some political actors and by the significant loss of the non-use taboo. The control of technologies is an important element for proliferation slowing down but an efficient and autonomous intelligence system remains indispensable. (J.S.)

  15. Le tecnologie mobili dell’apprendimento permanente, il progetto MOTILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Arrigo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In questo articolo vengono presentati alcuni dei risultati del progetto MOTILL. MOTILL, ovvero «Le Tecnologie Mobili nell’apprendimento permanente: buone pratiche», è un progetto finanziato dalla Comunità Europea, nell’ambito del National Lifelong Learning Strategies (NLLS. Il progetto, durato un anno e terminato a Marzo 2010, si è focalizzato sull’uso delle tecnologie mobili in contesti di lifelong learning (LLL. L’articolo sarà dedicato a una breve introduzione del progetto, dei suoi obiettivi e delle azioni portate avanti, e a un rapido riassunto dei principali risultati ottenuti, i quali sono stati resi disponibili online alla comunità scientifica e diffusi ai policy makers impegnati nei programmi di apprendimento permanente.

  16. Hydration-controlled bacterial motility and dispersal on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Wang, G.; Gulez, Gamze

    2010-01-01

    hydrated habitats, where water dynamics result in fragmented aquatic habitats connected by micrometric films, is debated. Here, we quantify the spatial dynamics of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and its nonflagellated isogenic mutant as affected by the hydration status of a rough porous surface using......Flagellar motility, a mode of active motion shared by many prokaryotic species, is recognized as a key mechanism enabling population dispersal and resource acquisition in microbial communities living in marine, freshwater, and other liquid-replete habitats. By contrast, its role in variably...... an experimental system that mimics aquatic habitats found in unsaturated soils. The flagellar motility of the model soil bacterium decreased sharply within a small range of water potential (0 to −2 kPa) and nearly ceased in liquid films of effective thickness smaller than 1.5 μm. However, bacteria could rapidly...

  17. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Study in the Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Gol; Lee, Min Jae; Song, Chi Wook [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    Esophageal motility was evaluated from the analysis of 10 consecutive swallows using liquid bolus containing 0.5 mCi of {sup 99m}Tc tin colloid. We have reviewed our experience of esophageal transit study in the 20 normal volunteers and 55 patients with dysphagia that was not related to mechanical obstruction. The purpose of this study is to measure the esophageal transit in normal subjects and in patients with various esophageal motility disorders. The overall sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide esophageal transit study in detecting esophageal motor abnormality were compared with manometric results as a gold standard, which were 80% and 100% respectively. Radionuclide transit study is a safe, rapid, noninvasive test and suitable as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders.

  18. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Study in the Esophageal Motility Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Gol; Lee, Min Jae; Song, Chi Wook

    1993-01-01

    Esophageal motility was evaluated from the analysis of 10 consecutive swallows using liquid bolus containing 0.5 mCi of 99m Tc tin colloid. We have reviewed our experience of esophageal transit study in the 20 normal volunteers and 55 patients with dysphagia that was not related to mechanical obstruction. The purpose of this study is to measure the esophageal transit in normal subjects and in patients with various esophageal motility disorders. The overall sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide esophageal transit study in detecting esophageal motor abnormality were compared with manometric results as a gold standard, which were 80% and 100% respectively. Radionuclide transit study is a safe, rapid, noninvasive test and suitable as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders.

  19. Dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic effects on gastric antral motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, K; Hovendal, C P; Gottrup, F

    1984-01-01

    of bethanechol or pentagastrin inducing motor activity patterns as in the phase III of the MMC and the digestive state respectively. The stimulated antral motility was dose-dependently inhibited by dopamine. The effect was significantly blocked by specifically acting dopaminergic blockers, while alpha- and beta......-adrenergic blockers were without any significant effects. Dose-response experiments with bethanechol and dopamine showed inhibition of a non-competitive type. Isoprenaline was used alone and in conjunction with selective blockade of beta 1- and beta 2-receptors during infusion of bethanechol which induces a pattern...... similar to phase III in the migrating myoelectric complex. The stimulated antral motility was dose-dependently inhibited by isoprenaline. The effect could be significantly blocked by propranolol (beta 1 + beta 2-adrenoceptor blocker) and by using in conjunction the beta 1-adrenoceptor blocker practolol...

  20. Microbial Morphology and Motility as Biosignatures for Outer Planet Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay; Lindensmith, Chris; Deming, Jody W.; Fernandez, Vicente I.; Stocker, Roman

    2016-10-01

    Meaningful motion is an unambiguous biosignature, but because life in the Solar System is most likely to be microbial, the question is whether such motion may be detected effectively on the micrometer scale. Recent results on microbial motility in various Earth environments have provided insight into the physics and biology that determine whether and how microorganisms as small as bacteria and archaea swim, under which conditions, and at which speeds. These discoveries have not yet been reviewed in an astrobiological context. This paper discusses these findings in the context of Earth analog environments and environments expected to be encountered in the outer Solar System, particularly the jovian and saturnian moons. We also review the imaging technologies capable of recording motility of submicrometer-sized organisms and discuss how an instrument would interface with several types of sample-collection strategies.

  1. Motility of vestibular hair cells in the chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Y; Sekitani, T

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies of the outer hair cells in cochlea have demonstrated active motilities. However, very little study has been done on the vestibular hair cells (VHCs). The present study shows the motile response of the VHCs induced by application of Ca2+/ATP promoting contraction. Reversible cell shape changes could be shown in 10 of 16 isolated type I hair cells and 9 of 15 isolated type II hair cells by applying the contraction solution. Furthermore, the sensory hair bundles in the utricular epithelium pivoted around the base and stood perpendicularly to the apical borderline of the epithelium in response to the application of the same solution. It is suggested that the contraction of the isolated VHCs may be transferred to tension which causes the sensory hair bundles to restrict their motion in normal tissue, instead of changing the cell shape.

  2. Motility precedes egress of malaria parasites from oocysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Dennis; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2017-01-01

    Malaria is transmitted when an infected Anopheles mosquito deposits Plasmodium sporozoites in the skin during a bite. Sporozoites are formed within oocysts at the mosquito midgut wall and are released into the hemolymph, from where they invade the salivary glands and are subsequently transmitted to the vertebrate host. We found that a thrombospondin-repeat containing sporozoite-specific protein named thrombospondin-releated protein 1 (TRP1) is important for oocyst egress and salivary gland invasion, and hence for the transmission of malaria. We imaged the release of sporozoites from oocysts in situ, which was preceded by active motility. Parasites lacking TRP1 failed to migrate within oocysts and did not egress, suggesting that TRP1 is a vital component of the events that precede intra-oocyst motility and subsequently sporozoite egress and salivary gland invasion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19157.001 PMID:28115054

  3. Impedance planimetric description of normal rectoanal motility in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Inge S; Michelsen, Hanne B; Krogh, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Manometry and pressure-volume measurements are commonly used to study anorectal physiology. However, the methods are limited by several sources of error. Recently, a new impedance planimetric system has been introduced in a porcine model. It allows simultaneous determination of anorectal...... pressures and multiple rectal luminal cross-sectional areas. This study was designed to study normal human rectoanal motility by means of impedance planimetry with multiple rectal cross-sectional areas and rectal and anal pressure. METHODS: Twelve healthy volunteers (10 females), aged 24 to 53 years, were...... the experiment, the cross-sectional area at all channels showed strong cyclic contractile activity and the anal pressure increased by approximately 100 percent. CONCLUSIONS: The new rectal impedance planimetry system allows highly detailed description of rectoanal motility patterns. It has promise as a new...

  4. Endothelial cell motility, coordination and pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czirok, Andras

    2013-01-01

    How vascular networks assemble is a fundamental problem of developmental biology that also has medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how can tissue level structures be controlled through cell behavior patterns like motility and adhesion that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes? We discuss the various ideas that have been proposed as mechanisms for vascular network assembly: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and multicellular sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. All of these processes yield emergent patterns, thus endothelial cells can form an interconnected structure autonomously, without guidance from an external pre-pattern. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Where to Go: Breaking the Symmetry in Cell Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration in the “correct” direction is pivotal for many biological processes. Although most work is devoted to its molecular mechanisms, the cell’s preference for one direction over others, thus overcoming intrinsic random motility, epitomizes a profound principle that underlies all complex systems: the choice of one axis, in structure or motion, from a uniform or symmetric set of options. Explaining directional motility by an external chemo-attractant gradient does not solve but only shifts the problem of causation: whence the gradient? A new study in PLOS Biology shows cell migration in a self-generated gradient, offering an opportunity to take a broader look at the old dualism of extrinsic instruction versus intrinsic symmetry-breaking in cell biology. PMID:27196433

  6. ERβ inhibits proliferation and invasion of breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazennec, Gwendal; Bresson, Damien; Lucas, Annick; Chauveau, Corine; Vignon, Françoise

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the expression of ERβ in breast cancer is lower than in normal breast, suggesting that ERβ could play an important role in carcinogenesis. To investigate this hypothesis, we engineered estrogen-receptor negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells to reintroduce either ERα or ERβ protein with an adenoviral vector. In these cells, ERβ (as ERα) expression was monitored using RT-PCR and Western blot. ERβ protein was localized in the nucleus (immunocytochemistry) and able to transactivate estrogen-responsive reporter constructs in the presence of estradiol. ERβ and ERα induced the expression of several endogenous genes such as pS2, TGFα or the cyclin kinase inhibitor p21, but in contrast to ERα, ERβ was unable to regulate c-myc proto-oncogene expression. The pure antiestrogen ICI 164, 384 completely blocked ERα and ERβ estrogen-induced activities. ERβ inhibited MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation in a ligand-independent manner, whereas ERα inhibition of proliferation is hormone-dependent. Moreover, ERβ and ERα, decreased cell motility and invasion. Our data bring the first evidence that ERβ is an important modulator of proliferation and invasion of breast cancer cells and support the hypothesis that the loss of ERβ expression could be one of the events leading to the development of breast cancer. PMID:11517191

  7. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; Chen, Li; Li, Jie; Li, Hongjun; Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2(+ )concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility.

  8. High-resolution esophageal pressure topography for esophageal motility disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri; Gholamreza Hamsi; Tayeb Ramim

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-resolution manometer (HRM) of the esophagus has become the main diagnostic test in the evaluation of esophageal motility disorders. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The first step of the Chicago classification described abnormal esophagogastric junction deglutitive relaxation. The latest classification system, proposed...

  9. A mechanical microcompressor for high resolution imaging of motile specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Zinskie, Jessica A.; Shribak, Michael; Bruist, Michael F.; Aufderheide, Karl J.; Janetopoulos, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain fine details in 3 dimensions (3D) over time, it is critical for motile biological specimens to be appropriately immobilized. Of the many immobilization options available, the mechanical microcompressor offers many benefits. Our device, previously described, achieves gentle flattening of a cell, allowing us to image finely detailed structures of numerous organelles and physiological processes in living cells. We have imaged protozoa and other small metazoans using differenti...

  10. Surviving Sengstaken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, S; Odulaja, A; Patel, S; Davenport, M; Ade-Ajayi, N

    2015-07-01

    To report the outcomes of children who underwent Sengstaken-Blakemore tube (SBT) insertion for life-threatening haemetemesis. Single institution retrospective review (1997-2012) of children managed with SBT insertion. Patient demographics, diagnosis and outcomes were noted. Data are expressed as median (range). 19 children [10 male, age 1 (0.4-16) yr] were identified; 18 had gastro-oesophageal varices and 1 aorto-oesophageal fistula. Varices were secondary to: biliary atresia (n=8), portal vein thrombosis (n=5), alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency (n=1), cystic fibrosis (n=1), intrahepatic cholestasis (n=1), sclerosing cholangitis (n=1) and nodular hyperplasia with arterio-portal shunt (n=1). Three children deteriorated rapidly and did not survive to have post-SBT endoscopy. The child with an aortooesophageal fistula underwent aortic stent insertion and subsequently oesophageal replacement. Complications included gastric mucosal ulceration (n=3, 16%), pressure necrosis at lips and cheeks (n=6, 31%) and SBT dislodgment (n=1, 6%). Six (31%) children died. The remaining 13 have been followed up for 62 (2-165) months; five required liver transplantation, two underwent a mesocaval shunt procedure and 6 have completed endoscopic variceal obliteration and are under surveillance. SBT can be an effective, albeit temporary, life-saving manoeuvre in children with catastrophic haematemesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Interactions among motility, fertilizing ability, and testosterone binding on spermatozoa of bonnet monkey (Macaca radiata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warikoo, P K; Majumdar, S S; Allag, I S; Das, R P; Roy, S

    1986-01-01

    Fresh ejaculates of bonnet monkeys were separated into fractions rich with highly motile and sluggishly motile spermatozoa. The motility, ability to fertilize zona-free hamster eggs, and distribution of testosterone-binding sites on spermatozoa were assessed to determine the relation between these sperm functions. Two parameters of objective assessment of motility--velocity and degree of flagellar bending--were significantly correlated with the ability to form pronuclei in zona-free hamster eggs. Only spermatozoa with good motility could form pronuclei, which might be important for assessment of the fertilizing ability. The motility was directly related to the distribution of testosterone-binding sites; the fraction having mostly motile spermatozoa was distributed over the sperm surface. The technique is simple and may be used to evaluate semen of nonhuman primates.

  12. Parasites in motion: flagellum-driven cell motility in African trypanosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kent L.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Motility of the sleeping sickness parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, impacts disease transmission and pathogenesis. Trypanosome motility is driven by a flagellum that harbors a canonical 9 + 2 axoneme, together with trypanosome-specific elaborations. Trypanosome flagellum biology and motility have been the object of intense research over the last two years. These studies have led to the discovery of a novel form of motility, termed social motility, and provided revision of long-standing models for cell propulsion. Recent work has also uncovered novel structural features and motor proteins associated with the flagellar apparatus and has identified candidate signaling molecules that are predicted to regulate flagellar motility. Together with earlier inventories of flagellar proteins from proteomic and genomic studies, the stage is now set to move forward with functional studies to elucidate molecular mechanisms and investigate parasite motility in the context of host-parasite interactions. PMID:20591724

  13. The nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gere, F.

    1995-04-01

    In this book is detailed the beginning of nuclear military power, with the first bomb of Hiroshima, the different ways of getting uranium 235 and plutonium 239, and how the first countries (Usa, Ussr, China, United kingdom, France) got nuclear weapons. Then the most important part is reviewed with the details of non-proliferation treaty and the creation of IAEA to promote civilian nuclear power in the world and to control the use of plutonium and uranium in nuclear power plants. The cases of countries who reached the atom mastery, such Israel, South Africa, Pakistan, Iraq, North Korea, Argentina, Brazil, Iran, Algeria, Taiwan and the reasons which they wanted nuclear weapon for or why they gave up, are exposed

  14. Pancreatic Fibroblasts Stimulate the Motility of Pancreatic Cancer Cells through IGF1/IGF1R Signaling under Hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Hirakawa

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is characterized by its hypovascularity, with an extremely poor prognosis because of its highly invasive nature. PDAC proliferates with abundant stromal cells, suggesting that its invasive activity might be controlled by intercellular interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts. Using four PDAC cell lines and two pancreas cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs, the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1 and IGF1 receptor (IGF1R was evaluated by RT-PCR, FACScan, western blot, or ELISA. Correlation between IGF1R and the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 was examined by immunohistochemical staining of 120 pancreatic specimens. The effects of CAFs, IGF1, and IGF1R inhibitors on the motility of cancer cells were examined by wound-healing assay or invasion assay under normoxia (20% O2 and hypoxia (1% O2. IGF1R expression was significantly higher in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells than in Panc-1 cells. Hypoxia increased the expression level of IGF1R in RWP-1, MiaPaCa-2, and OCUP-AT cells. CA9 expression was correlated with IGF1R expression in pancreatic specimens. CAFs produced IGF1 under hypoxia, but PDAC cells did not. A conditioned medium from CAFs, which expressed αSMA, stimulated the migration and invasion ability of MiaPaCa-2, RWP-1, and OCUP-AT cells. The motility of all PDAC cells was greater under hypoxia than under normoxia. The motility-stimulating ability of CAFs was decreased by IGF1R inhibitors. These findings might suggest that pancreas CAFs stimulate the invasion activity of PDAC cells through paracrine IGF1/IGF1R signaling, especially under hypoxia. Therefore the targeting of IGF1R signaling might represent a promising therapeutic approach in IGF1R-dependent PDAC.

  15. Istaroxime Inhibits Motility and Down-Regulates Orai1 Expression, SOCE and FAK Phosphorylation in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias Julian Stagno

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Istaroxime is a validated inotropic Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor currently in development for the treatment of various cardiac conditions. Recent findings established that this steroidal drug exhibits potent apoptotic responses in prostate tumors in vitro and in vivo, by affecting key signaling orchestrating proliferation and apoptosis, such as c-Myc and caspase 3, Rho GTPases and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In the present study we examined whether istaroxime is affecting cell motility and analyzed the underlying mechanism in prostate tumor cells. Methods: Migration was assessed by transwell and wound healing assays, Orai1 and Stim1 abundance by RT-PCR and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, Fura-2 fluorescence was utilized to determine intracellular Ca2+ and Western blotting for FAK/pFAK measurements. Results: We observed strong inhibition of cell migration in istaroxime treated DU-145 prostate cancer cells. Istaroxime further decreased Orai1 and Stim1 transcript levels and downregulated Orai1 protein expression. Moreover, SOCE was significantly decreased upon istaroxime treatment. Furthermore, istaroxime strikingly diminished phosphorylated FAK levels. Interestingly, the efficacy of istaroxime on the inhibition of DU-145 cell migration was further enhanced by blocking Orai1 with 2-APB and FAK with the specific inhibitor PF-00562271. These results provide strong evidence that istaroxime prevents cell migration and motility of DU-145 prostate tumor cells, an effect at least partially attributed to Orai1 downregulation and FAK de-activation. Conclusion: Collectively our results indicate that this enzyme inhibitor, besides its pro-apoptotic action, affects motility of cancer cells, supporting its potential role as a strong candidate for further clinical cancer drug development.

  16. Emergence of coherent motion in aggregates of motile coupled maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Cantu Ros, A.; Antonopoulos, Ch.G.; Basios, V.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A minimal model of motile particles with adjustable intrinsic steering is presented. → Collective motion emerges due to self-adaptation of each particle's intrinsic state. → Adaptation is achieved by a map which behavior ranges from periodic to chaotic. → Higher cohesion occurs in a balanced combination of ordered and chaotic motion. → Exhibits an abrupt change in degree of coherence as a function of particle density. - Abstract: In this paper we study the emergence of coherence in collective motion described by a system of interacting motiles endowed with an inner, adaptative, steering mechanism. By means of a nonlinear parametric coupling, the system elements are able to swing along the route to chaos. Thereby, each motile can display different types of behavior, i.e. from ordered to fully erratic motion, accordingly with its surrounding conditions. The appearance of patterns of collective motion is shown to be related to the emergence of interparticle synchronization and the degree of coherence of motion is quantified by means of a graph representation. The effects related to the density of particles and to interparticle distances are explored. It is shown that the higher degrees of coherence and group cohesion are attained when the system elements display a combination of ordered and chaotic behaviors, which emerges from a collective self-organization process.

  17. Apprenticeship-based training in neurogastroenterology and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasant, Dipesh H; Sharma, Amol; Bhagatwala, Jigar; Viswanathan, Lavanya; Rao, Satish S C

    2018-03-01

    Although neurogastroenterology and motility (NGM) disorders affect 50% of patients seen in clinics, many gastroenterologists receive limited NGM training. One-month apprenticeship-based NGM training has been provided at ten centers in the USA for a decade, however, outcomes of this training are unclear. Our goal was to describe the effectiveness of this program from a trainees perspective. Areas covered: We describe the training model, learning experiences, and outcomes of one-month apprenticeship-based training in NGM at a center of excellence, using a detailed individual observer account and data from 12 consecutive trainees that completed the program. During a one-month training period, 302 procedures including; breath tests (BT) n = 132, anorectal manometry (ARM) n = 29 and esophageal manometry (EM) n = 28, were performed. Post-training, all trainees (n = 12) knew indications for motility tests, and the majority achieved independence in basic interpretation of BT, EM and ARM. Additionally, in a multiple-choice NGM written-test paper, trainees achieved significant improvements in test scores post-training (P = 0.003). Expert commentary: One-month training at a high-volume center can facilitate rapid learning of NGM and the indications, basic interpretation and utility of motility tests. Trainees demonstrate significant independence, and this training model provides an ideal platform for those interested in sub-specialty NGM.

  18. Effects of Lizhong Tang on gastrointestinal motility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Cheol; Ha, Wooram; Park, Jinhyeong; Kim, Junghoon; Jung, Yunjin; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-09-14

    To investigate the effects of Lizhong Tang, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, on gastrointestinal motility in mice. The in vivo effects of Lizhong Tang on GI motility were investigated by measuring the intestinal transit rates (ITRs) and gastric emptying (GE) values in normal mice and in mice with experimentally induced GI motility dysfunction (GMD). In normal ICR mice, the ITR and GE values were significantly and dose-dependently increased by Lizhong Tang (ITR values: 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 65.2% ± 1.8%, P Tang and 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 83.8% ± 1.9%, P Tang; GE values: 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 66.8% ± 2.1%, P Tang and 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 72.5% ± 1.7%, P Tang). The ITRs of the GMD mice were significantly reduced compared with those of the normal mice, which were significantly and dose-dependently reversed by Lizhong Tang. Additionally, in loperamide- and cisplatin-induced models of GE delay, Lizhong Tang administration reversed the GE deficits. These results suggest that Lizhong Tang may be a novel candidate for development as a prokinetic treatment for the GI tract.

  19. PLAG1 deficiency impairs spermatogenesis and sperm motility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juma, Almas R; Grommen, Sylvia V H; O'Bryan, Moira K; O'Connor, Anne E; Merriner, D Jo; Hall, Nathan E; Doyle, Stephen R; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina E; Barriga, Daniel; Hart, Adam H; Van de Ven, Wim J M; De Groef, Bert

    2017-07-13

    Deficiency in pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) leads to reduced fertility in male mice, but the mechanism by which PLAG1 contributes to reproduction is unknown. To investigate the involvement of PLAG1 in testicular function, we determined (i) the spatial distribution of PLAG1 in the testis using X-gal staining; (ii) transcriptomic consequences of PLAG1 deficiency in knock-out and heterozygous mice compared to wild-type mice using RNA-seq; and (iii) morphological and functional consequences of PLAG1 deficiency by determining testicular histology, daily sperm production and sperm motility in knock-out and wild-type mice. PLAG1 was sparsely expressed in germ cells and in Sertoli cells. Genes known to be involved in spermatogenesis were downregulated in the testes of knock-out mice, as well as Hsd17b3, which encodes a key enzyme in androgen biosynthesis. In the absence of Plag1, a number of genes involved in immune processes and epididymis-specific genes were upregulated in the testes. Finally, loss of PLAG1 resulted in significantly lowered daily sperm production, in reduced sperm motility, and in several animals, in sloughing of the germinal epithelium. Our results demonstrate that the subfertility seen in male PLAG1-deficient mice is, at least in part, the result of significantly reduced sperm output and sperm motility.

  20. Radiation-induced motility alterations in medulloblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieken, Stefan; Rieber, Juliane; Brons, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Photon irradiation has been repeatedly suspected of increasing tumor cell motility and promoting locoregional recurrence of disease. This study was set up to analyse possible mechanisms underlying the potentially radiation-altered motility in medulloblastoma cells. Medulloblastoma cell lines D425 and Med8A were analyzed in migration and adhesion experiments with and without photon and carbon ion irradiation. Expression of integrins was determined by quantitative FACS analysis. Matrix metalloproteinase concentrations within cell culture supernatants were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test. Both photon and carbon ion irradiation significantly reduced chemotactic medulloblastoma cell transmigration through 8-μm pore size membranes, while simultaneously increasing adherence to fibronectin- and collagen I- and IV-coated surfaces. Correspondingly, both photon and carbon ion irradiation downregulate soluble MMP9 concentrations, while upregulating cell surface expression of proadhesive extracellular matrix protein-binding integrin α 5 . The observed phenotype of radiation-altered motility is more pronounced following carbon ion than photon irradiation. Both photon and (even more so) carbon ion irradiation are effective in inhibiting medulloblastoma cell migration through downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and upregulation of proadhesive cell surface integrin α 5 , which lead to increased cell adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. (author)

  1. Oncofetal Chondroitin Sulfate Glycosaminoglycans Are Key Players in Integrin Signaling and Tumor Cell Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Thomas Mandel; Pereira, Marina Ayres; Al Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Agerbæk, Mette Ø; Lee, Sherry; Ørum-Madsen, Maj Sofie; Kristensen, Anders Riis; El-Naggar, Amal; Grandgenett, Paul M; Grem, Jean L; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Holst, Peter J; Theander, Thor; Sorensen, Poul H; Daugaard, Mads; Salanti, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Many tumors express proteoglycans modified with oncofetal chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains (ofCS), which are normally restricted to the placenta. However, the role of ofCS in cancer is largely unknown. The function of ofCS in cancer was analyzed using the recombinant ofCS-binding VAR2CSA protein (rVAR2) derived from the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum We demonstrate that ofCS plays a key role in tumor cell motility by affecting canonical integrin signaling pathways. Binding of rVAR2 to tumor cells inhibited the interaction of cells with extracellular matrix (ECM) components, which correlated with decreased phosphorylation of Src kinase. Moreover, rVAR2 binding decreased migration, invasion, and anchorage-independent growth of tumor cells in vitro Mass spectrometry of ofCS-modified proteoglycan complexes affinity purified from tumor cell lines on rVAR2 columns revealed an overrepresentation of proteins involved in cell motility and integrin signaling, such as integrin-β1 (ITGB1) and integrin-α4 (ITGA4). Saturating concentrations of rVAR2 inhibited downstream integrin signaling, which was mimicked by knockdown of the core chondroitin sulfate synthesis enzymes β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase 1 (B3GAT1) and chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 (CSGALNACT1). The ofCS modification was highly expressed in both human and murine metastatic lesions in situ and preincubation or early intravenous treatment of tumor cells with rVAR2 inhibited seeding and spreading of tumor cells in mice. This was associated with a significant increase in survival of the animals. These data functionally link ofCS modifications with cancer cell motility and further highlights ofCS as a novel therapeutic cancer target. The cancer-specific expression of ofCS aids in metastatic phenotypes and is a candidate target for therapy. Mol Cancer Res; 14(12); 1288-99. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Cellular Biophysics During Freezing of Rat and Mouse Sperm Predicts Post-thaw Motility1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Mie; Choi, Jeung Hwan; Devireddy, Ramachandra V.; Roberts, Kenneth P.; Wolkers, Willem F.; Makhlouf, Antoine; Bischof, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Though cryopreservation of mouse sperm yields good survival and motility after thawing, cryopreservation of rat sperm remains a challenge. This study was designed to evaluate the biophysics (membrane permeability) of rat in comparison to mouse to better understand the cooling rate response that contributes to cryopreservation success or failure in these two sperm types. In order to extract subzero membrane hydraulic permeability in the presence of ice, a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) method was used. By analyzing rat and mouse sperm frozen at 5°C/min and 20°C/min, heat release signatures characteristic of each sperm type were obtained and correlated to cellular dehydration. The dehydration response was then fit to a model of cellular water transport (dehydration) by adjusting cell-specific biophysical (membrane hydraulic permeability) parameters Lpg and ELp. A “combined fit” (to 5°C/min and 20°C/min data) for rat sperm in Biggers-Whitten-Whittingham media yielded Lpg = 0.007 μm min−1 atm−1 and ELp = 17.8 kcal/mol, and in egg yolk cryopreservation media yielded Lpg = 0.005 μm min−1 atm−1 and ELp = 14.3 kcal/mol. These parameters, especially the activation energy, were found to be lower than previously published parameters for mouse sperm. In addition, the biophysical responses in mouse and rat sperm were shown to depend on the constituents of the cryopreservation media, in particular egg yolk and glycerol. Using these parameters, optimal cooling rates for cryopreservation were predicted for each sperm based on a criteria of 5%–15% normalized cell water at −30°C during freezing in cryopreservation media. These predicted rates range from 53°C/min to 70°C/min and from 28°C/min to 36°C/min in rat and mouse, respectively. These predictions were validated by comparison to experimentally determined cryopreservation outcomes, in this case based on motility. Maximum motility was obtained with freezing rates between 50°C/min and 80

  3. Cellular biophysics during freezing of rat and mouse sperm predicts post-thaw motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Mie; Choi, Jeung Hwan; Devireddy, Ramachandra V; Roberts, Kenneth P; Wolkers, Willem F; Makhlouf, Antoine; Bischof, John C

    2009-10-01

    Though cryopreservation of mouse sperm yields good survival and motility after thawing, cryopreservation of rat sperm remains a challenge. This study was designed to evaluate the biophysics (membrane permeability) of rat in comparison to mouse to better understand the cooling rate response that contributes to cryopreservation success or failure in these two sperm types. In order to extract subzero membrane hydraulic permeability in the presence of ice, a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) method was used. By analyzing rat and mouse sperm frozen at 5 degrees C/min and 20 degrees C/min, heat release signatures characteristic of each sperm type were obtained and correlated to cellular dehydration. The dehydration response was then fit to a model of cellular water transport (dehydration) by adjusting cell-specific biophysical (membrane hydraulic permeability) parameters L(pg) and E(Lp). A "combined fit" (to 5 degrees C/min and 20 degrees C/min data) for rat sperm in Biggers-Whitten-Whittingham media yielded L(pg) = 0.007 microm min(-1) atm(-1) and E(Lp) = 17.8 kcal/mol, and in egg yolk cryopreservation media yielded L(pg) = 0.005 microm min(-1) atm(-1) and E(Lp) = 14.3 kcal/mol. These parameters, especially the activation energy, were found to be lower than previously published parameters for mouse sperm. In addition, the biophysical responses in mouse and rat sperm were shown to depend on the constituents of the cryopreservation media, in particular egg yolk and glycerol. Using these parameters, optimal cooling rates for cryopreservation were predicted for each sperm based on a criteria of 5%-15% normalized cell water at -30 degrees C during freezing in cryopreservation media. These predicted rates range from 53 degrees C/min to 70 degrees C/min and from 28 degrees C/min to 36 degrees C/min in rat and mouse, respectively. These predictions were validated by comparison to experimentally determined cryopreservation outcomes, in this case based on motility. Maximum

  4. In vitro and in vivo motility studies of radiolabelled sperm cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, L.; Szasz, F.; Janoki, Gy.A.; Toth, L.; Zoldag, L.; Huszenicza, Gy.

    1994-01-01

    A new method for radiolabelling of sperm cells with 99m Tc HM-PAO (hexamethyl-propylene-amine-oxide) - LEUCO-SCINT kit, is investigated. The labelling technique for fresh rabbit, bull, sheep and horse as well as frozen-thawed bull sperm was optimized. The optimum conditions for sperm cell labelling (incubation volume, incubation time, initial activity of 99m Tc HM-PAO, cell number) yielded a high labelling efficiency (70-80%) and survival rate (50-60%). The labelled sperm cells were used to study their motility in vitro. The migrating at 37 o C cells incubated capillary tubes containing bovine cervical mucus. The tubes were cut and the activity of the parts measured and valued. We compared the results of living and killed sperm cells and the label alone by the change of species and running time. Ten minutes after the labelling procedures the total activity of microtubes was 2-3 times higher and the activity distribution was different from the results obtained 3 hours after the labelling. The sperm migration in vivo in the living female animals using a non invasive technique was also visualized. The sperm flow was clearly demonstrated in 3 different animal model (rabbit, ewe, hen) under gamma camera. The comparison of the in vivo migration of rabbit and bull sperm cells showed that the homologous sperm migrated faster and farther. On study of bull sperm migration in the ewe genital tract the cornu uteri was clearly visualized. In the hen model the whole genital tract was demonstrated with considerable free activity in the cavum abdominal 24 hours after the artificial insemination. The new method is developed and manufactured by NRIRR, Budapest, originally designed for radiolabelling leucocytes. The 99m Tc HM-PAO Labelled sperm cells with their retained migration properties are suitable for in vitro motility assays and in vitro migration studies in both human and veterinary medicine. (author)

  5. Norepinephrine and dopamine increase motility, biofilm formation and virulence of Vibrio harveyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian eYang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio harveyi is one of the major pathogens of aquatic organisms, affecting both vertebrates and invertebrates, and causes important losses in the aquaculture industry. In order to develop novel methods to control disease caused by this pathogen, we need to obtain a better understanding of pathogenicity mechanisms. Sensing of catecholamines increases both growth and production of virulence-related factors in pathogens of terrestrial animals and humans. However, at this moment, knowledge on the impact of catecholamines on the virulence of pathogens of aquatic organisms is lacking. In the present study, we report that in V. harveyi, norepinephrine and dopamine increased growth in serum-supplemented medium, siderophore production, swimming motility and expression of genes involved in flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and exopolysaccharide production. Consistent with this, pretreatment of V. harveyi with catecholamines prior to inoculation into the rearing water resulted in significantly decreased survival of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, when compared to larvae challenged with untreated V. harveyi. Further, norepinephrine-induced effects could be neutralized by α-adrenergic antagonists or by the bacterial catecholamine receptor antagonist LED209, but not by β-adrenergic or dopaminergic antagonists. Dopamine-induced effects could be neutralized by dopaminergic antagonists or LED209, but not by adrenergic antagonists. Together, our results indicate that catecholamine sensing increases the success of transmission of V. harveyi and that interfering with catecholamine sensing might be an interesting strategy to control vibriosis in aquaculture. We hypothesise that upon tissue and/or hemocyte damage during infection, pathogens come into contact with elevated catecholamine levels, and that this stimulates the expression of virulence factors that are required to colonize a new host.

  6. Norepinephrine and dopamine increase motility, biofilm formation, and virulence of Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Anh, Nguyen D Q; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is one of the major pathogens of aquatic organisms, affecting both vertebrates and invertebrates, and causes important losses in the aquaculture industry. In order to develop novel methods to control disease caused by this pathogen, we need to obtain a better understanding of pathogenicity mechanisms. Sensing of catecholamines increases both growth and production of virulence-related factors in pathogens of terrestrial animals and humans. However, at this moment, knowledge on the impact of catecholamines on the virulence of pathogens of aquatic organisms is lacking. In the present study, we report that in V. harveyi, norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (Dopa) increased growth in serum-supplemented medium, siderophore production, swimming motility, and expression of genes involved in flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and exopolysaccharide production. Consistent with this, pretreatment of V. harveyi with catecholamines prior to inoculation into the rearing water resulted in significantly decreased survival of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, when compared to larvae challenged with untreated V. harveyi. Further, NE-induced effects could be neutralized by α-adrenergic antagonists or by the bacterial catecholamine receptor antagonist LED209, but not by β-adrenergic or dopaminergic antagonists. Dopa-induced effects could be neutralized by dopaminergic antagonists or LED209, but not by adrenergic antagonists. Together, our results indicate that catecholamine sensing increases the success of transmission of V. harveyi and that interfering with catecholamine sensing might be an interesting strategy to control vibriosis in aquaculture. We hypothesize that upon tissue and/or hemocyte damage during infection, pathogens come into contact with elevated catecholamine levels, and that this stimulates the expression of virulence factors that are required to colonize a new host.

  7. Heterogeneity and proliferation of invasive cancer subclones in game theory models of the Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archetti, M

    2015-04-01

    The Warburg effect, a switch from aerobic energy production to anaerobic glycolysis, promotes tumour proliferation and motility by inducing acidification of the tumour microenvironment. Therapies that reduce acidity could impair tumour growth and invasiveness. I analysed the dynamics of cell proliferation and of resistance to therapies that target acidity, in a population of cells, under the Warburg effect. The dynamics of mutant cells with increased glycolysis and motility has been assessed in a multi-player game with collective interactions in the framework of evolutionary game theory. Perturbations of the level of acidity in the microenvironment have been used to simulate the effect of therapies that target glycolysis. The non-linear effects of glycolysis induce frequency-dependent clonal selection leading to coexistence of glycolytic and non-glycolytic cells within a tumour. Mutants with increased motility can invade such a polymorphic population and spread within the tumour. While reducing acidity may produce a sudden reduction in tumour cell proliferation, frequency-dependent selection enables it to adapt to the new conditions and can enable the tumour to restore its original levels of growth and invasiveness. The acidity produced by glycolysis acts as a non-linear public good that leads to coexistence of cells with high and low glycolysis within the tumour. Such a heterogeneous population can easily adapt to changes in acidity. Therapies that target acidity can only be effective in the long term if the cost of glycolysis is high, that is, under non-limiting oxygen concentrations. Their efficacy, therefore, is reduced when combined with therapies that impair angiogenesis. © 2015 The Authors Cell Proliferation Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Characterization of pro-inflammatory flagellin proteins produced by Lactobacillus ruminis and related motile Lactobacilli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Anne Neville

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus ruminis is one of at least twelve motile but poorly characterized species found in the genus Lactobacillus. Of these, only L. ruminis has been isolated from mammals, and this species may be considered as an autochthonous member of the gastrointestinal microbiota of humans, pigs and cows. Nine L. ruminis strains were investigated here to elucidate the biochemistry and genetics of Lactobacillus motility. Six strains isolated from humans were non-motile while three bovine isolates were motile. A complete set of flagellum biogenesis genes was annotated in the sequenced genomes of two strains, ATCC25644 (human isolate and ATCC27782 (bovine isolate, but only the latter strain produced flagella. Comparison of the L. ruminis and L. mali DSM20444(T motility loci showed that their genetic content and gene-order were broadly similar, although the L. mali motility locus was interrupted by an 11.8 Kb region encoding rhamnose utilization genes that is absent from the L. ruminis motility locus. Phylogenetic analysis of 39 motile bacteria indicated that Lactobacillus motility genes were most closely related to those of motile carnobacteria and enterococci. Transcriptome analysis revealed that motility genes were transcribed at a significantly higher level in motile L. ruminis ATCC27782 than in non-motile ATCC25644. Flagellin proteins were isolated from L. ruminis ATCC27782 and from three other Lactobacillus species, while recombinant flagellin of aflagellate L. ruminis ATCC25644 was expressed and purified from E. coli. These native and recombinant Lactobacillus flagellins, and also flagellate L. ruminis cells, triggered interleukin-8 production in cultured human intestinal epithelial cells in a manner suppressed by short interfering RNA directed against Toll-Like Receptor 5. This study provides genetic, transcriptomic, phylogenetic and immunological insights into the trait of flagellum-mediated motility in the lactobacilli.

  9. Down-regulation of UDP-glucose dehydrogenase affects glycosaminoglycans synthesis and motility in HCT-8 colorectal carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tsung-Pao; Pan, Yun-Ru; Fu, Chien-Yu; Chang, Hwan-You, E-mail: hychang@life.nthu.edu.tw

    2010-10-15

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes oxidation of UDP-glucose to yield UDP-glucuronic acid, a precursor of hyaluronic acid (HA) and other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in extracellular matrix. Although association of extracellular matrix with cell proliferation and migration has been well documented, the importance of UGDH in these behaviors is not clear. Using UGDH-specific small interference RNA to treat HCT-8 colorectal carcinoma cells, a decrease in both mRNA and protein levels of UGDH, as well as the cellular UDP-glucuronic acid and GAG production was observed. Treatment of HCT-8 cells with either UGDH-specific siRNA or HA synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone effectively delayed cell aggregation into multicellular spheroids and impaired cell motility in both three-dimensional collagen gel and transwell migration assays. The reduction in cell aggregation and migration rates could be restored by addition of exogenous HA. These results indicate that UGDH can regulate cell motility through the production of GAG. The enzyme may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention of colorectal cancers.

  10. MTSS1 is epigenetically regulated in glioma cells and inhibits glioma cell motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Luxen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic silencing by DNA methylation in brain tumors has been reported for many genes, however, their function on pathogenesis needs to be evaluated. We investigated the MTSS1 gene, identified as hypermethylated by differential methylation hybridization (DMH. Fifty-nine glioma tissue samples and seven glioma cell lines were examined for hypermethylation of the MTSS1 promotor, MTSS1 expression levels and gene dosage. GBM cell lines were treated with demethylating agents and interrogated for functional consequences of MTSS1 expression after transient transfection. Hypermethylation was significantly associated with IDH1/2 mutation. Comparative SNP analysis indicates higher incidence of loss of heterozygosity of MTSS1 in anaplastic astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas as well as hypermethylation of the remaining allele. Reversal of promoter hypermethylation results in an increased MTSS1 expression. Cell motility was significantly inhibited by MTSS1 overexpression without influencing cell growth or apoptosis. Immunofluorescence analysis of MTSS1 in human astrocytes indicates co-localization with actin filaments. MTSS1 is down-regulated by DNA methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and is part of the G-CIMP phenotype in primary glioma tissues. Our data on normal astrocytes suggest a function of MTSS1 at focal contact structures with an impact on migratory capacity but no influence on apoptosis or cellular proliferation.

  11. Valproic acid induces cutaneous wound healing in vivo and enhances keratinocyte motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soung-Hoon Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process involving several signaling pathways such as the Wnt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling pathways. Valproic acid (VPA is a commonly used antiepileptic drug that acts on these signaling pathways; however, the effect of VPA on cutaneous wound healing is unknown. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We created full-thickness wounds on the backs of C3H mice and then applied VPA. After 7 d, we observed marked healing and reduced wound size in VPA-treated mice. In the neo-epidermis of the wounds, β-catenin and markers for keratinocyte terminal differentiation were increased after VPA treatment. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, collagen I and collagen III in the wounds were significantly increased. VPA induced proliferation and suppressed apoptosis of cells in the wounds, as determined by Ki67 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL staining analyses, respectively. In vitro, VPA enhanced the motility of HaCaT keratinocytes by activating Wnt/β-catenin, ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase/Akt signaling pathways. CONCLUSIONS: VPA enhances cutaneous wound healing in a murine model and induces migration of HaCaT keratinocytes.

  12. Analysis of the impact of cryopreservation and theophylline on motility of sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Gorji

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sperm parameters, particularly motility, decrease during cryopreservation. Theophylline generally enhances sperm motility. We analyzed effects of theophylline and freezing on sperm motility.Design: Experimental study.Setting: Private IVF lab.Setting: IVF lab of Mehrgan Hospital. Method: 22–55 year-old men participated in this study (30 fresh ejaculation and 8 TESE samples. After sperm analysis, we added theophylline (40 mM to half of our samples as case group to compare motility with the remaining samples as control group. Cryopreservation was performed in two groups. After thawing, motility of both groups was recorded. Furthermore, theophylline (40 mM was applied to both groups after thawing again. Result: After adding theophylline, sperm motility improved significantly in all samples. Sperm motility reduced in control group more than the study group after freeze-thaw procedure (P < 0.002, normal morphology <5%. Sperm motility was not enhanced significantly by re-adding of theophylline to the two groups. Interactions between stages and groups were statistically significant in semen and biopsy samples (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Adding theophylline before freezing can preserve motility of sperms in samples with different parameters and even sperms extracted in testicular biopsy. Theophylline may have protective impact on sperms in freezing procedure. Keywords: Sperm motility, Theophylline, Freezing, Morphology, Biopsy

  13. Effects of environment factors on initiation of sperm motility in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li; Shao, Mingyu; Bao, Zhenmin; Hu, Jingjie; Zhang, Zhifeng

    2011-06-01

    Sperm of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka) were quiescent in electrolyte NaCl solution and artificial seawater (ASW) and nonelectrolyte glucose and mannitol solutions when the osmolality was less than 200 mOsm kg-1. The sperm started to be motile as a result of increased osmolality, indicating an osmolality-dependent initiation of sperm motility in sea cucumber. After a brief incubation in hypotonic NaCl and glucose solutions with osmolalities of 200 and 400 mOsm kg-1, sperm lost partial motile ability. Sperm became immobilized when pH was 6.0 in NaCl, glucose and mannitol solutions, suggesting that an H+ release is involved in sperm activation. The decreased pH had no effect on the percentage of motile sperm in ASW, whereas it delayed the time period to reach the maximum motility (motilitymax). Extracellular Ca2+ in electrolyte solutions was not essential for motility stimulation but shortened the time of reaching motilitymax. When Ca2+ was mixed in nonelectrolyte solutions the sperm motility was completely suppressed. The K+ channel blocker, quinine, suppressed the sperm motility in electrolyte solution, showing a possible involvement of K+ transport in the process. High K+ concentration did not affect the sperm motility in NaCl solution, but decreased it in ASW and almost entirely suppressed it in nonelectrolyte solutions. The different effects of pH and K+ in ASW and NaCl solution indicate that external ions may also regulate sperm motility.

  14. Nuclear proliferation: linkages and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quester, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear proliferation must be periodically re-examined as a moral as well as a practical foreign policy dilemma. The question is asked whether proliferation precludes a safe and peaceful world, or if a halt to proliferation is adequate without other arms control. The moral dilemma in foreign policy arises over the need to make practical choices which often serve one goal while sacrificing another. The ramifications of nuclear proliferation are examined and the conclusions reached that it is not an acceptable option. It is also decided that, because general disarmament steps will be more difficult to achieve, the world may have to accept a small number of nuclear arsenals as the price of state sovereignties. A high priority for making the effort to prevent proliferation is advised. 8 references

  15. How Helicobacter pylori urease may affect external pH and influence growth and motility in the mucus environment: evidence from in-vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebotham, Ramon L; Worku, Mulugeta L; Karim, Q Najma; Dhir, Nirmal K; Baron, J Hugh

    2003-04-01

    Survival of Helicobacter pylori is dependent upon urease in the cytoplasm and at the bacterial surface. We have sought to clarify how alkaline ammonium salts, released from urea by this enzyme, might alter mucus pH and so affect growth and motility of the bacterium in the gastric mucus environment. Experiments were conducted in vitro to determine how the growth and motility of H. pylori are affected by changes in external pH, and how the bacterium, by hydrolysing urea, alters the pH of the bicarbonate buffer that occurs at the gastric mucosal surface. These data were fitted into experimental models that describe how pH varies within the mucus layer in the acid-secreting stomach. H. pylori was motile between pH 5 and 8, with optimal motility at pH 5. It grew between pH 6 and 8, with optimal growth at pH 6. The bacterium had urease activity between pH 2.7 and 7.4, as evidenced by pH rises in bicarbonate-buffered solutions of urea. Changes in buffer pH were dependent upon initial pH and urea concentration, with the greatest rate of pH change occurring at pH 3. Modelling experiments utilizing these data indicated that (1) in the absence of urease, H. pylori growth and motility in the mucus layer would be restricted severely by low mucus pH in the acid-secreting stomach, and (2) urease will sometimes inhibit H. pylori growth and motility in the mucus layer by elevating the pH of the mucus environment above pH 8. Urease is essential to the growth and motility of H. pylori in the mucus layer in the acid-secreting stomach, but, paradoxically, sometimes it might suppress colonization by raising the mucus pH above 8. This latter effect may protect the bacteria from the adverse consequences of overpopulation.

  16. Effects of diabetes mellitus on gastric motility in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafsanjani, F.N.; Adeli, S.; Ardakani, Z.V.; Ardakani, J.V.; Ardakani, J.V.; Ghotbi, P.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine diseases that affects most body organs. Peristaltic disorders and gastric distension have also been observed in diabetes. Because the effect of diabetes on gastric motility has not been fully examined, we decided to determine if gastric motility is also affected by diabetes in rat. This study was carried out at Kerman University of Medical Science, Kerman, Iran from October 2004 to February 2005. Three groups of male wistar rats (control, vehicle, diabetic) weighing 200-250 g were used. Diabetic state was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 45 mg/kg streptozotocin. Animals were anesthetized by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 50 mg/kg thiopental sodium. After tracheostomy and laparatomy, a balloon was inserted into the stomach, which was attached to a pressure transducer system via a cannula and this whole system was connected to a physiograph. Acetylcholine (Ach) was the stimulant agent which was used intraperitoneally. There was no significant difference between basal intragastric pressures in three groups. Also there was no significant difference in the basal and Ach-stimulated intragastric pressure among the three groups. But Ach-stimulated intragastric pressure was more than the basal state in each group (control 28.3+-1.77 vs 14+-1.4, vehicle 30.8+-2.03 vs 15.9+-1.56 and diabetic 30.6+-0.05 vs 13.7+-0.84 mmHg). Although it has been shown that diabetes can change gastric acid and pepsin secretion in rats, no significant change in gastric motility could be shown. (author)

  17. Analysis of motility in multicellular Chlamydomonas reinhardtii evolved under predation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrethe Boyd

    Full Text Available The advent of multicellularity was a watershed event in the history of life, yet the transition from unicellularity to multicellularity is not well understood. Multicellularity opens up opportunities for innovations in intercellular communication, cooperation, and specialization, which can provide selective advantages under certain ecological conditions. The unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has never had a multicellular ancestor yet it is closely related to the volvocine algae, a clade containing taxa that range from simple unicells to large, specialized multicellular colonies. Simple multicellular structures have been observed to evolve in C. reinhardtii in response to predation or to settling rate-based selection. Structures formed in response to predation consist of individual cells confined within a shared transparent extracellular matrix. Evolved isolates form such structures obligately under culture conditions in which their wild type ancestors do not, indicating that newly-evolved multicellularity is heritable. C. reinhardtii is capable of photosynthesis, and possesses an eyespot and two flagella with which it moves towards or away from light in order to optimize input of radiant energy. Motility contributes to C. reinhardtii fitness because it allows cells or colonies to achieve this optimum. Utilizing phototaxis to assay motility, we determined that newly evolved multicellular strains do not exhibit significant directional movement, even though the flagellae of their constituent unicells are present and active. In C. reinhardtii the first steps towards multicellularity in response to predation appear to result in a trade-off between motility and differential survivorship, a trade-off that must be overcome by further genetic change to ensure long-term success of the new multicellular organism.

  18. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the ‘molecular clutch’ description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of major sperm protein, which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton. (paper)

  19. Thorium cycles and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovins, A.B.

    1979-01-01

    This paper analyzes several prevalent misconceptions about nuclear fuel cycles that breed fissile uranium-233 from thorium. Its main conclusions are: U-233, despite the gamma radioactivity of associated isotopes, is a rather attractive material for making fission bombs, and is a credible material for subnational as well as national groups to use for this purpose; (2) pure thorium cycles, which in effect merely substitute U-233 for Pu, would take many decades and much U to establish, and offer no significant safeguards advantage over Pu, cycles; (3) denatured Th-U cycles, which dilute the U-233 with inert U-238 to a level not directly usable in bombs, are not an effective safeguard even against subnational bomb-making; (4) several other features of mixed Th-U cycles are rather unattractive from a safeguards point of view; (5) thus, Th cycles of any kind are not a technical fix for proliferation (national or subnational) and, though probably more safeguardable than Pu cycles, are less so than once-through U cycles that entail no reprocessing; (6) while thorium cycles have some potential technical advantages, including flexibility, they cannot provide major savings in nuclear fuel resources compared to simpler ways of saving neutrons and U; and (7) while advocates of nuclear power may find Th cycles worth exploring, such cycles do not differ fundamentally from U cycles in any of the respects--including safeguards and fuel resources--that are relevant to the broader nuclear debate, and should not be euphorically embraced as if they did

  20. Rectal motility after sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, H B; Worsøe, J; Krogh, K

    2010-01-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is effective against faecal incontinence, but the mode of action is obscure. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of SNS on fasting and postprandial rectal motility. Sixteen patients, 14 women age 33-73 (mean 58), with faecal incontinence of various...... contractions, total time with cyclic rectal contractions, the number of aborally and orally propagating contractions, the number of anal sampling reflexes or rectal wall tension during contractions. Postprandial changes in rectal tone were significantly reduced during SNS (P

  1. Effect of anthraquinone derivatives on canine and rat intestinal motility.

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Villar, Rafael; Leng-Peschlow, E; Ruckebusch, Y

    1980-01-01

    The effects on gastrointestinal motility of 3 senna preparations containing 18% oxidized Ca-sennosides, 60% Ca-sennosides, or pure sennosides A + B were tested in dogs and rats as measured by electromyography. Oral administration of the oxidized products in the fasted animal increased the activity of the small intestine within 2 h and reduced both caecal and colonic contractions for 24 h. Severe diarrhoea was present 4-6 h after administration and lasted for at least 1 day. Ca-sennosides had ...

  2. Digital radiography in the evaluation of oesophageal motility disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Yehia A

    2000-07-01

    AIMS: To develop a simple technique for examination of the oesophagus by digital radiography and to assess its role in the evaluation of motility disorders of the oesophagus. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-nine patients and 44 control subjects underwent manometry and digital examination of the oesophagus. The digital study consisted of two parts: firstly examination of the pharynx and cervical oesophagus using 15 ml of fluid barium in anterio-posterior (AP) and lateral views, with image acquisition of four frames/s for 2 s. Secondly, examination of the thoracic oesophagus and oesophagogastric junction using 25 ml of barium in two prone oblique and one supine AP series, with image acquisition of one frame/s for 20 s. Oesophageal transit time (OTT) was measured in each case. Abnormal or non-peristaltic contractions were described regarding their morphology, time of visualization and length. The presence or absence of hiatal hernia, reflux or any associated organic lesions was noted. RESULTS: Digital radiography diagnosed 14 cases of achalasia and 28 cases of non-specific oesophageal motility disorder (NOMD). Normal OTT was 11.95 {+-} 1.304 s. The OTT was prolonged (16 s or more) in all patients except five; four of these were cases of NOMD. Abnormal contractions were classified into circular and longitudinal types. The circular non-obliterating type was commoner. Achalasia was diagnosed in all cases, as failure of relaxation of the inferior oesophageal sphincter was always present and easily depicted by digital radiography. Abnormal contractions in the body of the oesophagus were elicited in 57% of cases of achalasia. The sensitivity of digital radiography in detecting oesophageal motility disorders was 85.7% based on the presence of abnormal contractions and 91.6% by eliciting a prolonged OTT. CONCLUSIONS: Examination of the oesophagus by digital radiography is simple, non-invasive, reproducible, rapid and without discomfort to patients. It allows the diagnosis of

  3. Digital radiography in the evaluation of oesophageal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Yehia A.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS: To develop a simple technique for examination of the oesophagus by digital radiography and to assess its role in the evaluation of motility disorders of the oesophagus. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-nine patients and 44 control subjects underwent manometry and digital examination of the oesophagus. The digital study consisted of two parts: firstly examination of the pharynx and cervical oesophagus using 15 ml of fluid barium in anterio-posterior (AP) and lateral views, with image acquisition of four frames/s for 2 s. Secondly, examination of the thoracic oesophagus and oesophagogastric junction using 25 ml of barium in two prone oblique and one supine AP series, with image acquisition of one frame/s for 20 s. Oesophageal transit time (OTT) was measured in each case. Abnormal or non-peristaltic contractions were described regarding their morphology, time of visualization and length. The presence or absence of hiatal hernia, reflux or any associated organic lesions was noted. RESULTS: Digital radiography diagnosed 14 cases of achalasia and 28 cases of non-specific oesophageal motility disorder (NOMD). Normal OTT was 11.95 ± 1.304 s. The OTT was prolonged (16 s or more) in all patients except five; four of these were cases of NOMD. Abnormal contractions were classified into circular and longitudinal types. The circular non-obliterating type was commoner. Achalasia was diagnosed in all cases, as failure of relaxation of the inferior oesophageal sphincter was always present and easily depicted by digital radiography. Abnormal contractions in the body of the oesophagus were elicited in 57% of cases of achalasia. The sensitivity of digital radiography in detecting oesophageal motility disorders was 85.7% based on the presence of abnormal contractions and 91.6% by eliciting a prolonged OTT. CONCLUSIONS: Examination of the oesophagus by digital radiography is simple, non-invasive, reproducible, rapid and without discomfort to patients. It allows the diagnosis of

  4. Endogenous Ion Dynamics in Cell Motility and Tissue Regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özkucur, N; Perike, S; Epperlein, H H; Funk, R H W

    2011-01-01

    Directional cell migration is an essential process, including regeneration of tissues, wound healing, and embryonic development. Cells achieve persistent directional migration by polarizing the spatiotemporal components involved in the morphological polarity. Ion transporter proteins situated at the cell membrane generates small electric fields that can induce directional cell motility. Besides them, externally applied direct current electric fields induce similar kind of responses as cell orientation and directional migration. However, the bioelectric mechanisms that lead to cellular directedness are poorly understood. Therefore, understanding the bioelectric signaling cues can serve as a powerful modality in controlling the cell behaviour, which can contribute additional insights for development and regeneration.

  5. Cell migration or cytokinesis and proliferation? – Revisiting the “go or grow” hypothesis in cancer cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garay, Tamás; Juhász, Éva; Molnár, Eszter; Eisenbauer, Maria; Czirók, András; Dekan, Barbara; László, Viktória; Hoda, Mir Alireza; Döme, Balázs; Tímár, József; Klepetko, Walter; Berger, Walter; Hegedűs, Balázs

    2013-01-01

    The mortality of patients with solid tumors is mostly due to metastasis that relies on the interplay between migration and proliferation. The “go or grow” hypothesis postulates that migration and proliferation spatiotemporally excludes each other. We evaluated this hypothesis on 35 cell lines (12 mesothelioma, 13 melanoma and 10 lung cancer) on both the individual cell and population levels. Following three-day-long videomicroscopy, migration, proliferation and cytokinesis-length were quantified. We found a significantly higher migration in mesothelioma cells compared to melanoma and lung cancer while tumor types did not differ in mean proliferation or duration of cytokinesis. Strikingly, we found in melanoma and lung cancer a significant positive correlation between mean proliferation and migration. Furthermore, non-dividing melanoma and lung cancer cells displayed slower migration. In contrast, in mesothelioma there were no such correlations. Interestingly, negative correlation was found between cytokinesis-length and migration in melanoma. FAK activation was higher in melanoma cells with high motility. We demonstrate that the cancer cells studied do not defer proliferation for migration. Of note, tumor cells from various organ systems may differently regulate migration and proliferation. Furthermore, our data is in line with the observation of pathologists that highly proliferative tumors are often highly invasive. - Highlights: • We investigated the “go or grow” hypothesis in human cancer cells in vitro. • Proliferation and migration positively correlate in melanoma and lung cancer cells. • Duration of cytokinesis and migration shows inverse correlation. • Increased FAK activation is present in highly motile melanoma cells

  6. Theoretical Approaches to Nuclear Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin S. Tarasov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses discussions between representatives of three schools in the theory of international relations - realism, liberalism and constructivism - on the driving factors of nuclear proliferation. The paper examines major theoretical approaches, outlined in the studies of Russian and foreign scientists, to the causes of nuclear weapons development, while unveiling their advantages and limitations. Much of the article has been devoted to alternative approaches, particularly, the role of mathematical modeling in assessing proliferation risks. The analysis also reveals a variety of different approaches to nuclear weapons acquisition, as well as the absence of a comprehensive proliferation theory. Based on the research results the study uncovers major factors both favoring and impeding nuclear proliferation. The author shows that the lack of consensus between realists, liberals and constructivists on the nature of proliferation led a number of scientists to an attempt to explain nuclear rationale by drawing from the insights of more than one school in the theory of IR. Detailed study of the proliferation puzzle contributes to a greater understating of contemporary international realities, helps to identify mechanisms that are most likely to deter states from obtaining nuclear weapons and is of the outmost importance in predicting short- and long-term security environment. Furthermore, analysis of the existing scientific literature on nuclear proliferation helps to determine future research agenda of the subject at hand.

  7. Leukocyte Motility Models Assessed through Simulation and Multi-objective Optimization-Based Model Selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark N Read

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The advent of two-photon microscopy now reveals unprecedented, detailed spatio-temporal data on cellular motility and interactions in vivo. Understanding cellular motility patterns is key to gaining insight into the development and possible manipulation of the immune response. Computational simulation has become an established technique for understanding immune processes and evaluating hypotheses in the context of experimental data, and there is clear scope to integrate microscopy-informed motility dynamics. However, determining which motility model best reflects in vivo motility is non-trivial: 3D motility is an intricate process requiring several metrics to characterize. This complicates model selection and parameterization, which must be performed against several metrics simultaneously. Here we evaluate Brownian motion, Lévy walk and several correlated random walks (CRWs against the motility dynamics of neutrophils and lymph node T cells under inflammatory conditions by simultaneously considering cellular translational and turn speeds, and meandering indices. Heterogeneous cells exhibiting a continuum of inherent translational speeds and directionalities comprise both datasets, a feature significantly improving capture of in vivo motility when simulated as a CRW. Furthermore, translational and turn speeds are inversely correlated, and the corresponding CRW simulation again improves capture of our in vivo data, albeit to a lesser extent. In contrast, Brownian motion poorly reflects our data. Lévy walk is competitive in capturing some aspects of neutrophil motility, but T cell directional persistence only, therein highlighting the importance of evaluating models against several motility metrics simultaneously. This we achieve through novel application of multi-objective optimization, wherein each model is independently implemented and then parameterized to identify optimal trade-offs in performance against each metric. The resultant Pareto

  8. Nuclear non proliferation and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In the framework of the publication of a document on the ''weapons mastership, disarmament and non proliferation: the french action'', by the ministry of Foreign Affairs and the ministry of Defense, the French Documentation organization presents a whole document. This document describes and details the following topics: the conference on the treaty of non proliferation of nuclear weapons, the France, Usa and Non Governmental Organizations position, the threats of the proliferation, the french actions towards the disarmament, the disarmament in the world, a chronology and some bibliographic resources. (A.L.B.)

  9. International proliferation on nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.

    1977-01-01

    The subject is dealt with under the following headings: introduction; routes to proliferation (preparation of U 235 , Pu 239 , U 233 ); nuclear power fuel cycles and proliferation; the fast reactor fuel cycle; security aspects of the existing fuel cycle; the IAEA and the nuclear non-proliferation treaty. It is concluded that 'the basis for sound international control exists, and taken together with the further technical steps which will be taken to make the existing fuel cycles more robust against the diversion of materials by terrorists and the abuse of civil nuclear power programmes by governments, we have good reason to proceed now with the orderly exploitation of ...nuclear energy...'. (U.K.)

  10. Daikenchuto stimulates colonic motility after laparoscopic-assisted colectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaegashi, Mizunori; Otsuka, Koki; Itabashi, Tetsuya; Kimura, Toshimoto; Kato, Kuniyuki; Fujii, Hitoshi; Koeda, Keisuke; Sasaki, Akira; Wakabayashi, Go

    2014-01-01

    Paralytic ileus after laparoscopic-assisted surgery often occurs. We investigated whether daikenchuto (DKT), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, improves intestinal motility in patients undergoing laparoscopic-assisted colectomy for colon cancer. Fifty-four patients who underwent colectomy at Iwate Medical University Hospital between October 2010 and March 2012 were randomized to either the DKT group (7.5 g/day, p.o.) or the control group (lactobacillus preparation, 3g/day, p.o.). Primary endpoints included time to first flatus, bowel movement, and tolerance of diet after extubation. Secondary endpoints were WBC count, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, length of hospital stay, and postoperative ileus. Colonic transit time was measured using radiopaque markers and abdominal radiographs. Fifty-one patients (DKT, 26 vs. control, 25) were included in the per-protocol analysis. The DKT group had significantly faster time until first flatus (67.5 +/- 13.6h vs. 77.9 +/- 11.8h, P DKT accelerates colonic motility in patients undergoing laparoscopic-assisted colectomy for colon cancer.

  11. Effects of autonomic nerve stimulation on colorectal motility in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei Dong; Ridolfi, Timothy J.; Kosinski, Lauren; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2010-01-01

    Background Several disease processes of the colon and rectum, including constipation and incontinence, have been associated with abnormalities of the autonomic nervous system. However, the autonomic innervation to the colon and rectum are not fully understood. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of stimulation of vagus nerves, pelvic nerves (PN) and hypogastric nerves (HGN) on colorectal motility in rats. Methods Four strain gauge transducers were implanted on the proximal colon, mid colon, distal colon and rectum to record circular muscle contractions in rats. Electrical stimulation was administered to the efferent distal ends of the cervical vagus nerve, PN and HGN. Motility index (MI) was evaluated before and during stimulation. Key Results Electrical stimulation (5–20 Hz) of the cervical vagus elicited significant contractions in the mid colon and distal colon, whereas less pronounced contractions were observed in the proximal colon. PN stimulation elicited significant contractions in the rectum as well as the mid colon and distal colon. Atropine treatment almost completely abolished the contractions induced by vagus nerve and PN stimulation. HGN stimulation caused relaxations in the rectum, mid colon and distal colon. The relaxations in response to HGN stimulation were abolished by propranolol. Conclusions & Inferences Vagal innervation extends to the distal colon, while the PN has projections in the distribution of the rectum through the mid colon. This suggests a pattern of dual parasympathetic innervation in the left colon. Parasympathetic fibers regulate colorectal contractions via muscarinic receptors. The HGN mainly regulates colorectal relaxations via beta-adrenoceptors. PMID:20067587

  12. The physics of the unconventional motility strategy of euglenids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Marino; Noselli, Giovanni; Desimone, Antonio

    Euglenids are a family of unicellular protists, which use flagella to move in a fluid. However, they are also capable of performing elegantly concerted large amplitude deformations of the cell shape, in what is known as metaboly. To perform metaboly, euglenids use an elaborate cortical complex capable of actively imposing spatially modulated shear deformations on the cell surface. This mode of cell deformation has been linked to motility, but biophysical studies have demonstrated that it leads to very small swimming velocities as compared to flagellar locomotion. Furthermore, why would these cells possess two elaborate apparatus for the same function remains unclear. In this work, we combine experimental observations of euglena gracilis cells with theoretical models to shed light into the function of metaboly. The theoretical models account for the force generation and shape evolution at the cell envelop, together with the mechanical interaction of the cell with its environment. We characterize the efficiency of the two modes of locomotion of this cells in terms of the physical nature of their environment. ERC AdG 340685 MicroMotility.

  13. Motility-driven glass and jamming transitions in biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Dapeng; Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Manning, M. Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. To make quantitative predictions about glass transitions in tissues, we study a self-propelled Voronoi (SPV) model that simultaneously captures polarized cell motility and multi-body cell-cell interactions in a confluent tissue, where there are no gaps between cells. We demonstrate that the model exhibits a jamming transition from a solid-like state to a fluid-like state that is controlled by three parameters: the single-cell motile speed, the persistence time of single-cell tracks, and a target shape index that characterizes the competition between cell-cell adhesion and cortical tension. In contrast to traditional particulate glasses, we are able to identify an experimentally accessible structural order parameter that specifies the entire jamming surface as a function of model parameters. We demonstrate that a continuum Soft Glassy Rheology model precisely captures this transition in the limit of small persistence times, and explain how it fails in the limit of large persistence times. These results provide a framework for understanding the collective solid-to-liquid transitions that have been observed in embryonic development and cancer progression, which may be associated with Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal transition in these tissues. PMID:28966874

  14. Flagellar motility is critical for Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Katherine P; Higgins, Darren E; Kolter, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes attaches to environmental surfaces and forms biofilms that can be a source of food contamination, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms of its biofilm development. We observed that nonmotile mutants were defective in biofilm formation. To investigate how flagella might function during biofilm formation, we compared the wild type with flagellum-minus and paralyzed-flagellum mutants. Both nonmotile mutants were defective in biofilm development, presumably at an early stage, as they were also defective in attachment to glass during the first few hours of surface exposure. This attachment defect could be significantly overcome by providing exogenous movement toward the surface via centrifugation. However, this centrifugation did not restore mature biofilm formation. Our results indicate that it is flagellum-mediated motility that is critical for both initial surface attachment and subsequent biofilm formation. Also, any role for L. monocytogenes flagella as adhesins on abiotic surfaces appears to be either minimal or motility dependent under the conditions we examined.

  15. [Primary esophageal motility disorders; especially about esophageal achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Sohda, Makoto; Sakai, Makoto; Tanaka, Naritaka; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Yokobori, Takehiko; Inose, Takanori; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Esophageal motility disorders are classified primary and secondary, and primary esophageal motility disorders are classified esophageal achalasia and other diseases by manometry. An esophageal emptying disorder associated with insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and elimination of peristaltic waves on the esophageal body is the major abnormality of achalasia. Esophagogram, endoscopy, and manometry are used for diagnosis. As pharmacological therapy, administration of a calcium channel blocker or nitrate is useful. The pharmacological therapy is not recommended as long-term basic therapy but as a temporary treatment. At 1st, the balloon dilation method is chosen in treatment of achalasia Surgical treatment is indicated in the following cases: (1) Patients uneffected by balloon dilation, (2) Flask type with grade II to III dilation, and sigmoid type, (3) the gradual progression to the pathophysiological stage, (4) young patients, (5) complicated with esophageal cancer. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor procedure is the most popular surgical procedure, recently. It is somewhat difficult to perform surgical treatment for this functional disease. We should select the most suitable individualized treatment with efficient comprehension of the pathophysiological situation.

  16. T cell motility as modulator of interactions with dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Volker Stein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the balance of costimulatory and inhibitory signals during interactions with dendritic cells (DCs determines T cell transition from a naïve to an activated or tolerant/anergic status. While many of these molecular interactions are well reproduced in reductionist in vitro assays, the highly dynamic motility of naïve T cells in lymphoid tissue acts as an additional lever to fine-tune their activation threshold. T cell detachment from DCs providing suboptimal stimulation allows them to search for DCs with higher levels of stimulatory signals, while storing a transient memory of short encounters. In turn, adhesion of weakly reactive T cells to DCs presenting pMHC with low affinity is prevented by lipid mediators. Finally, controlled recruitment of CD8+ T cells to cognate DC – CD4+ T cell clusters shapes memory T cell formation and the quality of the immune response. Dynamic physiological lymphocyte motility therefore constitutes a mechanism to mitigate low avidity T cell activation and to improve the search for optimal DCs, while contributing to peripheral tolerance induction in the absence of inflammation.

  17. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Park, So-Yeon; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yu, Young Hyun; Nguyen, Tru Van; Sun, Eun Gene; Udeni, Jayalal; Jeong, Min-Hye; Pereira, Iris; Moon, Cheol; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2015-01-01

    Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor) D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin)-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3’-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action. PMID:26371759

  18. Finding Freedom: Exploring the Relationship Between Agency, Motility, and Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Tom

    2018-02-01

    After an overview of the opposed concepts of freedom and psychic determinism, and of the compatibilist reconciliation between the two that is most appropriate for psychoanalysis, the importance of agency as a psychoanalytic idea is considered. In particular, two ways in which the term agency may be used are examined: agency as fact and agency as experience. The former refers to the degree of relative freedom an individual possesses from "inner" constraints, whereas the latter refers to the experience of oneself as having an active impact on the self, other people, and/or the world. Importantly, these two senses are not coextensive. With this distinction in place, it is argued that agency as experience is rooted in the infant's earliest experiences of motility. As an extension of Winnicott's reflections (1950) on the relation between motility and aggression, it is argued that inasmuch as it involves the overcoming of opposition, aggression is integral to the developmental unfolding of the experience of agency. Further developmental conditions needed for a full experience of agency are noted. Ultimately, it is suggested, agency is central to the psychoanalytic project itself.

  19. Membrane tension and cytoskeleton organization in cell motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sens, Pierre; Plastino, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane shape changes are important for many aspects of normal biological function, such as tissue development, wound healing and cell division and motility. Various disease states are associated with deregulation of how cells move and change shape, including notably tumor initiation and cancer cell metastasis. Cell motility is powered, in large part, by the controlled assembly and disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton. Much of this dynamic happens in close proximity to the plasma membrane due to the fact that actin assembly factors are membrane-bound, and thus actin filaments are generally oriented such that their growth occurs against or near the membrane. For a long time, the membrane was viewed as a relatively passive scaffold for signaling. However, results from the last five years show that this is not the whole picture, and that the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are intimately linked to the mechanics of the cell membrane. In this review, we summarize recent findings concerning the role of plasma membrane mechanics in cell cytoskeleton dynamics and architecture, showing that the cell membrane is not just an envelope or a barrier for actin assembly, but is a master regulator controlling cytoskeleton dynamics and cell polarity. (topical review)

  20. Membrane tension and cytoskeleton organization in cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sens, Pierre; Plastino, Julie

    2015-07-15

    Cell membrane shape changes are important for many aspects of normal biological function, such as tissue development, wound healing and cell division and motility. Various disease states are associated with deregulation of how cells move and change shape, including notably tumor initiation and cancer cell metastasis. Cell motility is powered, in large part, by the controlled assembly and disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton. Much of this dynamic happens in close proximity to the plasma membrane due to the fact that actin assembly factors are membrane-bound, and thus actin filaments are generally oriented such that their growth occurs against or near the membrane. For a long time, the membrane was viewed as a relatively passive scaffold for signaling. However, results from the last five years show that this is not the whole picture, and that the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are intimately linked to the mechanics of the cell membrane. In this review, we summarize recent findings concerning the role of plasma membrane mechanics in cell cytoskeleton dynamics and architecture, showing that the cell membrane is not just an envelope or a barrier for actin assembly, but is a master regulator controlling cytoskeleton dynamics and cell polarity.

  1. Studies on the ovarian motility of small laboratory rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, M F; Gimeno, A L

    1975-01-01

    Guinea pig ovaries were isolated and immersed in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution, gassed with carbogen and added with glucose as the substrate. The experiments were carried out at 37 degrees C and the preparations were subjected to a basal tension of 500 mg. The spontaneous motility (contractile tension and frequency) of guinea pig ovaries obtained in late proestrus was significantly greater than that of the estrus or early proestrus. The influence of oxytocin on ovarian motility was significantly more marked in late proestrus than in estrus or early proestrus. Both the spontaneous and induced mortility of guinea pig ovaries are augmented in the immediate prevoulatory moment. In isolated rat ovaries, the isometric contractile tension and the frequency of contractions increased as the estral cycle progressed. During late proestrus, left ovaries had a contractile activity of greater intensity and frequency than the right ones, whereas during early proestrus the magnitudes were comparable. Oxytocin elicited greater responses in left than right ovaries of the late proestrus, the effect becoming similar in estrus and early proestrus. Rat ovaries obtained immediately before ovulation are specifically sensitized to the influence of oxytocin and not to other smooth muscle stimulants.

  2. Pharyngeal swallowing and oesophageal motility during a solid meal test: a prospective study in healthy volunteers and patients with major motility disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenstein, Michael; Thwaites, Philip; Bütikofer, Simon; Heinrich, Henriette; Sauter, Matthias; Ulmer, Irina; Pohl, Daniel; Ang, Daphne; Eberli, Daniel; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Distler, Oliver; Fox, Mark; Misselwitz, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    The factors that determine how people eat when they are healthy or have disease have not been defined. We used high resolution manometry (HRM) to assess pharyngeal swallowing and oesophageal motility during ingestion of a solid test meal (STM) in healthy volunteers and patients with motility disorders. This study was based at University Hospital Zurich (Zürich, Switzerland). Healthy volunteers who responded to an advertisement completed HRM with ten single water swallows (SWS) in recumbent and upright positions followed by a 200 g rice STM in the upright position. Healthy volunteers were stratified for age and sex to ensure a representative population. For comparison, consecutive patients with major motility disorders on SWS and patients with dysphagia but no major motility disorders on SWS (disease controls) were selected from a database that was assembled prospectively; the rice meal data were analysed retrospectively. During STM, pharyngeal swallows were timed and oesophageal contractions were classified as representing normal motility or different types of abnormal motility in accordance with established metrics. Factors that could potentially be associated with eating speed were investigated, including age, sex, body-mass index, and presence of motility disorder. We compared diagnoses based on SWS findings, assessed with the Chicago Classification v3.0, with those based on STM findings, assessed with the Chicago Classification adapted for solids. These studies are registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, numbers NCT02407938 and NCT02397616. Between April 2, 2014, and May 13, 2015, 72 healthy volunteers were recruited and underwent HRM. Additionally, we analysed data from 54 consecutive patients with major motility disorders and 53 with dysphagia but no major motility disorders recruited between April 2, 2013, and Dec 18, 2014. We found important variations in oesophageal motility and eating speed during meal ingestion in healthy volunteers and patients. Increased

  3. Non-proliferation and nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowerby, M.G.

    1978-01-01

    A review is made of the problem of the proliferation of nuclear weapons with particular emphasis on proliferation and nuclear power. Some indications of the nuclear data requirements associated with methods of reducing proliferation risks are presented

  4. Proteasome dynamics between proliferation and quiescence stages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S; Fatehi, Amatullah K; Enenkel, Cordula

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a critical role in cellular protein homeostasis and is required for the turnover of short-lived and unwanted proteins, which are targeted by poly-ubiquitination for degradation. Proteasome is the key protease of UPS and consists of multiple subunits, which are organized into a catalytic core particle (CP) and a regulatory particle (RP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, proteasome holo-enzymes are engaged in degrading poly-ubiquitinated substrates and are mostly localized in the nucleus during cell proliferation. While in quiescence, the RP and CP are sequestered into motile and reversible storage granules in the cytoplasm, called proteasome storage granules (PSGs). The reversible nature of PSGs allows the proteasomes to be transported back into the nucleus upon exit from quiescence. Nuclear import of RP and CP through nuclear pores occurs via the canonical pathway that includes the importin-αβ heterodimer and takes advantage of the Ran-GTP gradient across the nuclear membrane. Dependent on the growth stage, either inactive precursor complexes or mature holo-enzymes are imported into the nucleus. The present review discusses the dynamics of proteasomes including their assembly, nucleo-cytoplasmic transport during proliferation and the sequestration of proteasomes into PSGs during quiescence. [Formula: see text].

  5. Sperm motility in fishes. (II) Effects of ions and osmolality: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad Hadi; Cosson, Jacky

    2006-01-01

    The spermatozoa of most fish species are immotile in the testis and seminal plasma. Therefore, motility is induced after the spermatozoa are released into the aqueous environment during natural reproduction or into the diluent during artificial reproduction. There are clear relationships between seminal plasma composition and osmolality and the duration of fish sperm motility. Various parameters such as ion concentrations (K+, Na+, and Ca2+), osmotic pressure, pH, temperature and dilution rate affect motility. In the present paper, we review the roles of these ions on sperm motility in Salmonidae, Cyprinidae, Acipenseridae and marine fishes, and their relationship with seminal plasma composition. Results in the literature show that: 1. K+ is a key ion controlling sperm motility in Salmonidae and Acipenseridae in combination with osmotic pressure; this control is more simple in other fish species: sperm motility is prevented when the osmotic pressure is high (Cyprinidae) or low (marine fishes) compared to that of the seminal fluid. 2. Cations (mostly divalent, such as Ca2+) are antagonistic with the inhibitory effect of K+ on sperm motility. 3. In many species, Ca2+ influx and K+ or Na+ efflux through specific ionic channels change the membrane potential and eventually lead to an increase in cAMP concentration in the cell, which constitutes the initiation signal for sperm motility in Salmonidae. 4. Media that are hyper- and hypo-osmotic relative to seminal fluid trigger sperm motility in marine and freshwater fishes, respectively. 5. The motility of fish spermatozoa is controlled through their sensitivity to osmolality and ion concentrations. This phenomenon is related to ionic channel activities in the membrane and governs the motility mechanisms of axonemes.

  6. Characterization of Novel Factors Involved in Swimming and Swarming Motility in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Andrea Deditius

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica utilizes flagellar motility to swim through liquid environments and on surfaces. The biosynthesis of the flagellum is regulated on various levels, including transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Here, we investigated the motility phenotype of 24 selected single gene deletions that were previously described to display swimming and swarming motility effects. Mutations in flgE, fliH, ydiV, rfaG, yjcC, STM1267 and STM3363 showed an altered motility phenotype. Deletions of flgE and fliH displayed a non-motile phenotype in both swimming and swarming motility assays as expected. The deletions of STM1267, STM3363, ydiV, rfaG and yjcC were further analyzed in detail for flagellar and fimbrial gene expression and filament formation. A ΔydiV mutant showed increased swimming motility, but a decrease in swarming motility, which coincided with derepression of curli fimbriae. A deletion of yjcC, encoding for an EAL domain-containing protein, increased swimming motility independent on flagellar gene expression. A ΔSTM1267 mutant displayed a hypermotile phenotype on swarm agar plates and was found to have increased numbers of flagella. In contrast, a knockout of STM3363 did also display an increase in swarming motility, but did not alter flagella numbers. Finally, a deletion of the LPS biosynthesis-related protein RfaG reduced swimming and swarming motility, associated with a decrease in transcription from flagellar class II and class III promoters and a lack of flagellar filaments.

  7. Different computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems highly influence sperm motility parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boryshpolets, S; Kowalski, R K; Dietrich, G J; Dzyuba, B; Ciereszko, A

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we examined different computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) systems (CRISMAS, Hobson Sperm Tracker, and Image J CASA) on the exact same video recordings to evaluate the differences in sperm motility parameters related to the specific CASA used. To cover a wide range of sperm motility parameters, we chose 12-second video recordings at 25 and 50 Hz frame rates after sperm motility activation using three taxonomically distinct fish species (sterlet: Acipenser ruthenus L.; common carp: Cyprinus carpio L.; and rainbow trout: Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum) that are characterized by essential differences in sperm behavior during motility. Systematically higher values of velocity and beat cross frequency (BCF) were observed in video recordings obtained at 50 Hz frame frequency compared with 25 Hz for all three systems. Motility parameters were affected by the CASA and species used for analyses. Image J and CRISMAS calculated higher curvilinear velocity (VCL) values for rainbow trout and common carp at 25 Hz frequency compared with the Hobson Sperm Tracker, whereas at 50 Hz, a significant difference was observed only for rainbow trout sperm recordings. No significant difference was observed between the CASA systems for sterlet sperm motility at 25 and 50 Hz. Additional analysis of 1-second segments taken at three time points (1, 6, and 12 seconds of the recording) revealed a dramatic decrease in common carp and rainbow trout sperm speed. The motility parameters of sterlet spermatozoa did not change significantly during the 12-second motility period and should be considered as a suitable model for longer motility analyses. Our results indicated that the CASA used can affect motility results even when the same motility recordings are used. These results could be critically altered by the recording quality, time of analysis, and frame rate of camera, and could result in erroneous conclusions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In silico reconstitution of actin-based symmetry breaking and motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Dayel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells assemble viscoelastic networks of crosslinked actin filaments to control their shape, mechanical properties, and motility. One important class of actin network is nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex and drives both membrane protrusion at the leading edge of motile cells and intracellular motility of pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes. These networks can be reconstituted in vitro from purified components to drive the motility of spherical micron-sized beads. An Elastic Gel model has been successful in explaining how these networks break symmetry, but how they produce directed motile force has been less clear. We have combined numerical simulations with in vitro experiments to reconstitute the behavior of these motile actin networks in silico using an Accumulative Particle-Spring (APS model that builds on the Elastic Gel model, and demonstrates simple intuitive mechanisms for both symmetry breaking and sustained motility. The APS model explains observed transitions between smooth and pulsatile motion as well as subtle variations in network architecture caused by differences in geometry and conditions. Our findings also explain sideways symmetry breaking and motility of elongated beads, and show that elastic recoil, though important for symmetry breaking and pulsatile motion, is not necessary for smooth directional motility. The APS model demonstrates how a small number of viscoelastic network parameters and construction rules suffice to recapture the complex behavior of motile actin networks. The fact that the model not only mirrors our in vitro observations, but also makes novel predictions that we confirm by experiment, suggests that the model captures much of the essence of actin-based motility in this system.

  9. Electrospun Gelatin–Chondroitin Sulfate Scaffolds Loaded with Platelet Lysate Promote Immature Cardiomyocyte Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Saporito

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was the development of heart patches based on gelatin (G and chondroitin sulfate (CS to be used as implants to improve heart recovery after corrective surgery for critical congenital heart defects (CHD. Patches were prepared by means of electrospinning to obtain nanofibrous scaffolds and they were loaded with platelet lysate (PL as a source of growth factors to further enhance the repair process. Scaffolds were characterized for morphology and mechanical properties and for the capability to support in vitro adhesion and proliferation of dermal fibroblasts in order to assess the system’s general biocompatibility. Adhesion and proliferation of endothelial cells and cardiac cells (cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts from rat fetuses onto PL-loaded patches was evaluated. Patches presented good elasticity and high stiffness suitable for in vivo adaptation to heart contraction. CS improved adhesion and proliferation of dermal fibroblasts, as proof of their biocompatibility. Moreover, they enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of endothelial cells, a crucial mediator of cardiac repair. Cell adhesion and proliferation could be related to elastic properties, which could favor cell motility. The presence of platelet lysate and CS was crucial for the adhesion and proliferation of cardiac cells and, in particular, of cardiomyocytes: G/CS scaffold embedded with PL appeared to selectively promote proliferation in cardiomyocytes but not cardiac fibroblasts. In conclusion, G/CS scaffold seems to be a promising system to assist myocardial-repair processes in young patient, preserving cardiomyocyte viability and preventing cardiac fibroblast proliferation, likely reducing subsequent uncontrolled collagen deposition by fibroblasts following repair.

  10. An automatic system to study sperm motility and energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linda Z; Nascimento, Jaclyn M; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Botvinick, Elliot L; Berns, Michael W

    2008-08-01

    An integrated robotic laser and microscope system has been developed to automatically analyze individual sperm motility and energetics. The custom-designed optical system directs near-infrared laser light into an inverted microscope to create a single-point 3-D gradient laser trap at the focal spot of the microscope objective. A two-level computer structure is described that quantifies the sperm motility (in terms of swimming speed and swimming force) and energetics (measuring mid-piece membrane potential) using real-time tracking (done by the upper-level system) and fluorescent ratio imaging (done by the lower-level system). The communication between these two systems is achieved by a gigabit network. The custom-built image processing algorithm identifies the sperm swimming trajectory in real-time using phase contrast images, and then subsequently traps the sperm by automatically moving the microscope stage to relocate the sperm to the laser trap focal plane. Once the sperm is stably trapped (determined by the algorithm), the algorithm can also gradually reduce the laser power by rotating the polarizer in the laser path to measure the trapping power at which the sperm is capable of escaping the trap. To monitor the membrane potential of the mitochondria located in a sperm's mid-piece, the sperm is treated with a ratiometrically-encoded fluorescent probe. The proposed algorithm can relocate the sperm to the center of the ratio imaging camera and the average ratio value can be measured in real-time. The three parameters, sperm escape power, sperm swimming speed and ratio values of the mid-piece membrane potential of individual sperm can be compared with respect to time. This two-level automatic system to study individual sperm motility and energetics has not only increased experimental throughput by an order of magnitude but also has allowed us to monitor sperm energetics prior to and after exposure to the laser trap. This system should have application in both the

  11. Cell proliferation and ageing in mouse colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, E.

    1978-01-01

    The descending colon of 4 month and 2 year old mice was exposed to 1250 rad X-rays. This killed most of the epithelial cells. The surviving cells formed new crypts and surface epithelium in animals of both ages. Not all of the crypts were replaced. The irradiated area contained not more than 80% of the control number of crypts per section for at least 6 weeks after irradiation. In the young mice new crypts were much larger and the labelling index (LI) was much higher than in unirradiated animals during the first week after irradiation. In the old mice the overshoot in LI and crypt size began later and continued longer than in young animals. This may be because the control of cell proliferation was much less precise in old than in young mice. The irradiation was repeated, in attempt to age prematurely the epithelial cells by increasing the number of divisions they underwent. The overshoot in LI and cells per crypt was smaller after a second dose than after the first in both young and old mice. There was almost no overshoot after a third dose was given to young mice. Increasing the number of divisions undergone by the surviving epithelial cells did not change the timing of repopulation in young mice compared to that found in old mice. Little evidence was found for the presence of a limited proliferative lifespan in colon epithelial cells. (author)

  12. Future non-proliferation challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yelchenko, Volodymyr

    2008-01-01

    Having chaired the Second Session of the Preparatory Committee Mr. Volodymyr Yelchenko noted that the NPT States parties reaffirmed the important role of the Treaty as the cornerstone of the global non-proliferation regime. They stressed that non-compliance with the Treaty provisions by States parties undermined non-proliferation and placed emphasis on the mutually reinforcing nature of disarmament and non-proliferation, and due respect for the right of States parties to the peaceful use of nuclear energy in conformity with the treaty. They reaffirmed the importance of promoting the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and international nuclear cooperation for peaceful purposes in ways consistent with the non-proliferation goal of the Treaty. The universality aspect was brought to the front with the lack of progress in this area. States parties called upon India, Israel and Pakistan to accede to the Treaty as non-nuclear-weapons states, promptly and without conditions and to bring into force comprehensive safeguards agreements, together with Additional Protocols, for ensuring non-proliferation. There is concern that non-States actors could gain access to weapons of mass destruction. One of the underlying themes at the Second Prepcom was the total elimination of nuclear weapons as the only absolute guarantee against their proliferation. Negative consequences to nuclear non-proliferation were also mentioned in the context of the abrogation of the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty and the development of missile defense systems, with the risk of a new arms race on Earth and in outer space. The importance of the immediate commencement of negotiations in the Conference of Disarmament on a treaty concerning fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices and the urgent conclusion of such a treaty as a beneficial step towards non-proliferation was stressed. The NPT states parties reaffirmed the role of the IAEA as the sole competent authority responsible for

  13. Rhamnolipid but not motility is associated with the initiation of biofilm ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-01-10

    Jan 10, 2013 ... In this study, confocal scanning laser microscope combined with .... Images were obtained by ... plates were inverted and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. .... and twitching motility of PAO1; d, e and f represent the motility of PA17.

  14. Time bound changes (in 24 h) in human sperm motility and level of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A detailed sperm motility study for 24 h after collection was done. The level of calcium and magnesium in seminal plasma during this period was also seen to understand the role of these electrolytes on sperm motility. Good care was taken in selection of subjects (young and healthy), collection and pre-physical analysis of ...

  15. Effect of semen extenders on the motility and viability of stored ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clarias gariepinus) spermatozoa. ... The results of the effect of freezing (at -40°C) on motility revealed that no motility was observed in all the cryopreserved trials except the sample containing 10% egg yolk and 10% tomato juice, which recorded ...

  16. Relationship between Porcine Sperm Motility and Sperm Enzymatic Activity using Paper-based Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Koji; Huang, Han-Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yu; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2017-04-01

    Mammalian sperm motility has traditionally been analyzed to determine fertility using computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) systems. To develop low-cost and robust male fertility diagnostics, we created a paper-based MTT assay and used it to estimate motile sperm concentration. When porcine sperm motility was inhibited using sperm enzyme inhibitors for sperm enzymes related to mitochondrial activity and glycolysis, we simultaneously recorded sperm motility and enzymatic reactivity using a portable motility analysis system (iSperm) and a paper-based MTT assay, respectively. When using our paper-based MTT-assay, we calculated the area mean value signal intensity (AMV) to evaluate enzymatic reactivity. Both sperm motility and AMV decreased following treatment with iodoacetamide (IODO) and 3-bromopyruvic acid (3BP), both of which are inhibitors of glycolytic enzymes including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). We found a correlation between recorded motility using iSperm and AMV from our paper-based assay (P Based on this inhibitor study, sperm motility can be estimated using our paper-based MTT-assay.

  17. Effect of isoprenaline on bethanechol-stimulated gastric antral motility in dogs with gastric fistula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, K; Hovendal, C P

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of isoprenaline on gastric antral motility in conscious dogs with gastric fistula, using intraluminal strain-gauge transducers. Infusion of bethanechol increased the motility for both frequency and strength. Isoprenaline, a beta 1...

  18. Effect of dopamine on bethanechol-stimulated gastric antral motility in dogs with gastric fistula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, K; Hovendal, C P

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of dopamine on gastric antral motility in conscious dogs with gastric fistula, using intraluminal strain-gauge transducers. Infusion of bethanechol increased the motility with regard to both frequency and strength. Dopamine, an endogenous...

  19. Spontaneous membrane formation and self-encapsulation of active rods in an inhomogeneous motility field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauer, J.; Löwen, H.; Janssen, L.M.C.

    2018-01-01

    We study the collective dynamics of self-propelled rods in an inhomogeneous motility field. At the interface between two regions of constant but different motility, a smectic rod layer is spontaneously created through aligning interactions between the active rods, reminiscent of an artificial,

  20. hemingway is required for sperm flagella assembly and ciliary motility in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulavie, Fabien; Piepenbrock, David; Thomas, Joëlle; Vieillard, Jennifer; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Cortier, Elisabeth; Laurençon, Anne; Göpfert, Martin C; Durand, Bénédicte

    2014-04-01

    Cilia play major functions in physiology and development, and ciliary dysfunctions are responsible for several diseases in humans called ciliopathies. Cilia motility is required for cell and fluid propulsion in organisms. In humans, cilia motility deficiencies lead to primary ciliary dyskinesia, with upper-airways recurrent infections, left-right asymmetry perturbations, and fertility defects. In Drosophila, we identified hemingway (hmw) as a novel component required for motile cilia function. hmw encodes a 604-amino acid protein characterized by a highly conserved coiled-coil domain also found in the human orthologue, KIAA1430. We show that HMW is conserved in species with motile cilia and that, in Drosophila, hmw is expressed in ciliated sensory neurons and spermatozoa. We created hmw-knockout flies and found that they are hearing impaired and male sterile. hmw is implicated in the motility of ciliated auditory sensory neurons and, in the testis, is required for elongation and maintenance of sperm flagella. Because HMW is absent from mature flagella, we propose that HMW is not a structural component of the motile axoneme but is required for proper acquisition of motile properties. This identifies HMW as a novel, evolutionarily conserved component necessary for motile cilium function and flagella assembly.

  1. The Effects of NDRG2 Overexpression on Cell Proliferation and Invasiveness of SW48 Colorectal Cancer Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestan, Ali; Mojtahedi, Zahra; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Hamidinia, Maryam; Takhshid, Mohammad Ali

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in the world. The expression of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) is down-regulated in CRC. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of NDRG2 overexpression on cell proliferation and invasive potential of SW48 cells. SW48 cells were transfected with a plasmid overexpressing NDRG2. After stable transfection, the effect of NDRG2 overexpression on cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. The effects of NDRG2 overexpression on cell migration, invasion and cell motility and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) activities were also investigated using matrigel transwell assay, wound healing assay and gelatin zymography, respectively. MTT assay showed that overexpression of NDRG2 caused attenuation of SW48 cell proliferation. Transwell and wound healing assay revealed that NDRG2 overexpression led to inhibition of migration, invasion, and motility of SW48 cells. The overexpression of NDRG2 also reduced the activity of secreted MMP-9. The results of this study suggest that NDRG2 overexpression inhibits proliferation and invasive potential of SW48 cells, which likely occurs via suppression of MMP-9 activity.

  2. Gastrointestinal Motility, Part 2: Small-Bowel and Colon Transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Alan H

    2016-03-01

    Because of the difficulty often encountered in deciding whether a patient's symptoms originate in the upper or lower gastrointestinal tract, gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy is a uniquely suited noninvasive, quantitative, and physiologic method of determining whether there is a motility disorder affecting the stomach, small bowel, or colon. Small-bowel and colon transit studies can be performed alone or together with gastric emptying studies after oral administration of an appropriately radiolabeled meal. It is hoped that newly published standards for performing these studies and the anticipated arrival of new Current Procedural Terminology codes in the United States for small-bowel and colon transit studies will increase their availability and use. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  3. Hydrogel Walkers with Electro-Driven Motility for Cargo Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Wei; Yao, Chen; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Zhuang; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-08-28

    In this study, soft hydrogel walkers with electro-driven motility for cargo transport have been developed via a facile mould-assisted strategy. The hydrogel walkers consisting of polyanionic poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid-co-acrylamide) exhibit an arc looper-like shape with two "legs" for walking. The hydrogel walkers can reversibly bend and stretch via repeated "on/off" electro-triggers in electrolyte solution. Based on such bending/stretching behaviors, the hydrogel walkers can move their two "legs" to achieve one-directional walking motion on a rough surface via repeated "on/off" electro-triggering cycles. Moreover, the hydrogel walkers loaded with very heavy cargo also exhibit excellent walking motion for cargo transport. Such hydrogel systems create new opportunities for developing electro-controlled soft systems with simple design/fabrication strategies in the soft robotic field for remote manipulation and transportation.

  4. Actin dynamics, architecture, and mechanics in cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchoin, Laurent; Boujemaa-Paterski, Rajaa; Sykes, Cécile; Plastino, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Tight coupling between biochemical and mechanical properties of the actin cytoskeleton drives a large range of cellular processes including polarity establishment, morphogenesis, and motility. This is possible because actin filaments are semi-flexible polymers that, in conjunction with the molecular motor myosin, can act as biological active springs or "dashpots" (in laymen's terms, shock absorbers or fluidizers) able to exert or resist against force in a cellular environment. To modulate their mechanical properties, actin filaments can organize into a variety of architectures generating a diversity of cellular organizations including branched or crosslinked networks in the lamellipodium, parallel bundles in filopodia, and antiparallel structures in contractile fibers. In this review we describe the feedback loop between biochemical and mechanical properties of actin organization at the molecular level in vitro, then we integrate this knowledge into our current understanding of cellular actin organization and its physiological roles.

  5. Functional Magnetic Resonance in the Evaluation of Oesophageal Motility Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Covotta

    2011-01-01

    Our aim is to assess the role of fMRI as a technique to assess morphological and functional parameters of the esophagus in patients with esophageal motor disorders and in healthy controls. Subsequently, we assessed the diagnostic efficiency of fMRI in comparison to videofluoroscopic and manometric findings in the investigation of patients with esophageal motor disorders. Considering that fMRI was shown to offer valuable information on bolus transit and on the caliber of the esophagus, variations of these two parameters in the different types of esophageal motor alterations have been assessed. fMRI, compared to manometry and videofluoroscopy, showed that a deranged or absent peristalsis is significantly associated with slower transit time and with increased esophageal diameter. Although further studies are needed, fMRI represents a promising noninvasive technique for the integrated functional and morphological evaluation of esophageal motility disorders.

  6. Nonspecific motility disorders, irritable esophagus, and chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krarup, Anne Lund; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Hejazi, Reza A; McCallum, Richard W; Vega, Kenneth J; Frazzoni, Marzio; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Clarke, John O; Achem, Sami R

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents commentaries on whether Starling's law applies to the esophagus; whether erythromycin affects esophageal motility; the relationship between hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter and vigorous achalasia; whether ethnic- and gender-based norms affect diagnosis and treatment of esophageal motor disorders; health care and epidemiology of chest pain; whether normal pH excludes esophageal pain; the role of high-resolution manometry in noncardiac chest pain; whether pH-impedance should be included in the evaluation of noncardiac chest pain; whether there are there alternative therapeutic options to PPI for treating noncardiac chest pain; and the usefulness of psychological treatment and alternative medicine in noncardiac chest pain. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. Antroduodenal motility in neurologically handicapped children with feeding intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werlin Steven L

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia and feeding intolerance are common in neurologically handicapped children. The aim is to determine the etiologies of feeding intolerance in neurologically handicapped children who are intolerant of tube feedings. Methods Eighteen neurologically handicapped children, followed in the Tube Feeding Clinic at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin who were intolerant of gastrostomy feedings. The charts of these 18 patients were reviewed. Past medical history, diagnoses, history of fundoplication and results of various tests of gastrointestinal function including barium contrast radiography, endoscopy and antroduodenal manometry were documented. Results Five of 11 children had abnormal barium upper gastrointestinal series. Seven of 14 had abnormal liquid phase gastric emptying tests. Two of 16 had esophagitis on endoscopy. All 18 children had abnormal antroduodenal motility. Conclusions In neurologically handicapped children foregut dysmotility may be more common than is generally recognized and can explain many of the upper gastrointestinal symptoms in neurologically handicapped children.

  8. Motility of magnetotactic bacteria/MTB to Geomagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidajatullah-Maksoed, Fatahillah

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria with motility directed by a local geomagnetic fields have been observed in marine sediments'' discussed by R. Blakemore, 1975. Magnetotactic bacteria/MTB discovered in 1963 by Salvatore Bellini. For ``off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope was used to correlates the physical & magnetic microstructure of magnetite nanocrystals in magnetotactic bacteria'' sought ``single-domain magnetite in hemopelagic sediments'' from JF Stolz. Otherwise, for potential source of bioproducts- product meant from result to multiplier -of magnetotactic bacteria[ACV Araujo, et.al, 2014 ] of marine drugs retrieved the `measurement of cellular chemotaxis with ECIS/Taxis, from KM Pietrosimone, 2012, whereas after ``earth magnetic field role on small living models'' are other interpretation of ``taxis'' as a movement of a cell instead usual ``tax'' for yew's taxus cuspidate, hired car & taxes in financial realms. Acknowledgements to HE. Mr. H. TUK SETYOHADI, Jl. Sriwijaya Raya 3, South-Jakarta, INDONESIA.

  9. Deployable micro-traps to sequester motile bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Giacomo, Raffaele; Krödel, Sebastian; Maresca, Bruno; Benzoni, Patrizia; Rusconi, Roberto; Stocker, Roman; Daraio, Chiara

    2017-04-01

    The development of strategies to reduce the load of unwanted bacteria is a fundamental challenge in industrial processing, environmental sciences and medical applications. Here, we report a new method to sequester motile bacteria from a liquid, based on passive, deployable micro-traps that confine bacteria using micro-funnels that open into trapping chambers. Even in low concentrations, micro-traps afford a 70% reduction in the amount of bacteria in a liquid sample, with a potential to reach >90% as shown by modelling improved geometries. This work introduces a new approach to contain the growth of bacteria without chemical means, an advantage of particular importance given the alarming growth of pan-drug-resistant bacteria.

  10. Persistence-Driven Durotaxis: Generic, Directed Motility in Rigidity Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Elizaveta A.; Raab, Matthew; Discher, Dennis E.; Storm, Cornelis

    2017-02-01

    Cells move differently on substrates with different rigidities: the persistence time of their motion is higher on stiffer substrates. We show that this behavior—in and of itself—results in a net flux of cells directed up a soft-to-stiff gradient. Using simple random walk models with varying persistence and stochastic simulations, we characterize the propensity to move in terms of the durotactic index also measured in experiments. A one-dimensional model captures the essential features and highlights the competition between diffusive spreading and linear, wavelike propagation. Persistence-driven durokinesis is generic and may be of use in the design of instructive environments for cells and other motile, mechanosensitive objects.

  11. Universal entrainment mechanism controls contact times with motile cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijssen, Arnold J. T. M.; Jeanneret, Raphaël; Polin, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Contact between particles and motile cells underpins a wide variety of biological processes, from nutrient capture and ligand binding to grazing, viral infection, and cell-cell communication. The window of opportunity for these interactions depends on the basic mechanism determining contact time, which is currently unknown. By combining experiments on three different species—Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Tetraselmis subcordiforms, and Oxyrrhis marina—with simulations and analytical modeling, we show that the fundamental physical process regulating proximity to a swimming microorganism is hydrodynamic particle entrainment. The resulting distribution of contact times is derived within the framework of Taylor dispersion as a competition between advection by the cell surface and microparticle diffusion, and predicts the existence of an optimal tracer size that is also observed experimentally. Spatial organization of flagella, swimming speed, and swimmer and tracer size influence entrainment features and provide tradeoffs that may be tuned to optimize the estimated probabilities for microbial interactions like predation and infection.

  12. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Treating Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Young Hoon; Minami, Hitomi; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is the application of esophageal myotomy to the concept of natural orifice transluminal surgery (NOTES) by utilizing a submucosal tunneling method. Since the first case of POEM was performed for treating achalasia in Japan in 2008, this procedure is being more widely used by many skillful endosopists all over the world. Currently, POEM is a spotlighted, emerging treatment option for achalasia, and the indications for POEM are expanding to include long-standing, sigmoid shaped esophagus in achalasia, even previously failed endoscopic treatment or surgical myotomy, and other spastic esophageal motility disorders. Accumulating data about POEM demonstrate excellent short-term outcomes with minimal risk of major adverse events, and some existing long-term data show the efficacy of POEM to be long lasting. In this review article, we review the technical details and clinical outcomes of POEM, and discuss some considerations of POEM in special situations. PMID:26717928

  13. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang

    2011-01-01

    protected animal models from developing chronic lung infection by P. aeruginosa. In the present study, the effects of ginseng on the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms were further investigated in vitro and in vivo. Ginseng aqueous extract at concentrations of 0.5-2.0% did not inhibit the growth of P......Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments....... aeruginosa, but significantly prevented P. aeruginosa from forming biofilm. Exposure to 0.5% ginseng aqueous extract for 24 h destroyed most 7-day-old mature biofilms formed by both mucoid and nonmucoid P. aeruginosa strains. Ginseng treatment enhanced swimming and twitching motility, but reduced swarming...

  14. LBP based detection of intestinal motility in WCE images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Giovanni; Granata, Eliana

    2011-03-01

    In this research study, a system to support medical analysis of intestinal contractions by processing WCE images is presented. Small intestine contractions are among the motility patterns which reveal many gastrointestinal disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, paralytic ileus, irritable bowel syndrome, bacterial overgrowth. The images have been obtained using the Wireless Capsule Endoscopy (WCE) technique, a patented, video colorimaging disposable capsule. Manual annotation of contractions is an elaborating task, since the recording device of the capsule stores about 50,000 images and contractions might represent only the 1% of the whole video. In this paper we propose the use of Local Binary Pattern (LBP) combined with the powerful textons statistics to find the frames of the video related to contractions. We achieve a sensitivity of about 80% and a specificity of about 99%. The achieved high detection accuracy of the proposed system has provided thus an indication that such intelligent schemes could be used as a supplementary diagnostic tool in endoscopy.

  15. Evaluation of methods for assessment of esophageal motility disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endert, G.; Nagel, F.; Erler, M.; Hasse, C.; Ritter, E.P.; Nowak, W. (Medical Academy Erfurt, Clinic of Radiology and Clinic of Surgery (Germany))

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare two forms of parametric imaging of esophageal motility, the condensed image and the esophageal kinetogram, with a standard esophageal transit study in 64 patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopy. A multiple swallow test with a liquid tracer of 150 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA was used. During the investigation-time of 9 min 300 pictures were recorded and with the KANDI DS-system the parametric images generated and the clearance time, the transit time and the index of reflux were determined. The comparison of kinetogram and condensed image shows a higher sensitivity to detect functional disturbances in the multiple swallow test (kinetogram). In the diagnosis of the reflux disease the transit study and the parametric imaging demonstrated a comparable sensitivity. (orig.).

  16. Evaluation of methods for assessment of esophageal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endert, G.; Nagel, F.; Erler, M.; Hasse, C.; Ritter, E.P.; Nowak, W.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare two forms of parametric imaging of esophageal motility, the condensed image and the esophageal kinetogram, with a standard esophageal transit study in 64 patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopy. A multiple swallow test with a liquid tracer of 150 MBq 99m Tc-DTPA was used. During the investigation-time of 9 min 300 pictures were recorded and with the KANDI DS-system the parametric images generated and the clearance time, the transit time and the index of reflux were determined. The comparison of kinetogram and condensed image shows a higher sensitivity to detect functional disturbances in the multiple swallow test (kinetogram). In the diagnosis of the reflux disease the transit study and the parametric imaging demonstrated a comparable sensitivity. (orig.)

  17. Oropharyngeal acid reflux and motility abnormalities of the proximal esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaretti, Sandro; Mazzoleni, Giorgia; Vailati, Cristian; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2016-10-28

    To investigate the relationship between pathological oropharyngeal (OP) acid exposure and esophageal motility in patients with extra-esophageal syndromes. In this prospective study we enrolled consecutive outpatients with extra-esophageal symptoms suspected to be related to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We enrolled only patients with a reflux symptom index (RSI) score-higher than 13 and with previous lung, allergy and ear, nose and throat evaluations excluding other specific diagnoses. All patients underwent 24-h OP pH-metry with the Dx probe and esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM). Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of a normal or pathological pH-metric finding (Ryan Score) and all manometric characteristics of the two groups were compared. We examined 135 patients with chronic extra-esophageal syndromes. Fifty-one were considered eligible for the study. Of these, 42 decided to participate in the protocol. Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of normal or pathological OP acid exposure. All the HRM parameters were compared for the two groups. Significant differences were found in the median upper esophageal sphincter resting pressure (median 71 mmHg vs 126 mmHg, P = 0.004) and the median proximal contractile integral (median 215.5 cm•mmHg•s vs 313.5 cm•mmHg•s, P = 0.039), both being lower in the group with pathological OP acid exposure, and the number of contractions with small or large breaks, which were more frequent in the same group. This group also had a larger number of peristaltic contractions with breaks in the 20 mmHg isobaric contour (38.7% vs 15.38%, P acid exposure was associated with weaker proximal esophageal motility.

  18. Calcium Sensor, NCS-1, Promotes Tumor Aggressiveness and Predicts Patient Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lauren M; England, Allison; Ehrlich, Barbara E; Rimm, David L

    2017-07-01

    Neuronal Calcium Sensor 1 (NCS-1) is a multi-functional Ca 2+ -binding protein that affects a range of cellular processes beyond those related to neurons. Functional characterization of NCS-1 in neuronal model systems suggests that NCS-1 may influence oncogenic processes. To this end, the biological role of NCS-1 was investigated by altering its endogenous expression in MCF-7 and MB-231 breast cancer cells. Overexpression of NCS-1 resulted in a more aggressive tumor phenotype demonstrated by a marked increase in invasion and motility, and a decrease in cell-matrix adhesion to collagen IV. Overexpression of NCS-1 was also shown to increase the efficacy of paclitaxel-induced cell death in a manner that was independent of cellular proliferation. To determine the association between NCS-1 and clinical outcome, NCS-1 expression was measured in two independent breast cancer cohorts by the Automated Quantitative Analysis method of quantitative immunofluorescence. Elevated levels of NCS-1 were significantly correlated with shorter survival rates. Furthermore, multivariate analysis demonstrated that NCS-1 status was prognostic, independent of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2, and lymph node status. These findings indicate that NCS-1 plays a role in the aggressive behavior of a subset of breast cancers and has therapeutic or biomarker potential. Implications: NCS-1, a calcium-binding protein, is associated with clinicopathologic features of aggressiveness in breast cancer cells and worse outcome in two breast cancer patient cohorts. Mol Cancer Res; 15(7); 942-52. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. A novel splice variant of supervillin, SV5, promotes carcinoma cell proliferation and cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xueran; Yang, Haoran; Zhang, Shangrong; Wang, Zhen; Ye, Fang; Liang, Chaozhao; Wang, Hongzhi; Fang, Zhiyou

    2017-01-01

    Supervillin is an actin-associated protein that regulates actin dynamics by interacting with Myosin II, F-actin, and Cortactin to promote cell contractility and cell motility. Two splicing variants of human Supervillin (SV1 and SV4) have been reported in non-muscle cells; SV1 lacks 3 exons present in the larger isoform SV4. SV2, also called archvillin, is present in striated muscle; SV3, also called smooth muscle archvillin or SmAV, was cloned from smooth muscle. In the present study, we identify a novel splicing variant of Supervillin (SV5). SV5 contains a new splicing pattern. In the mouse tissues and cell lines examined, SV5 was predominantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles and in proliferating cells, but was virtually undetectable in most normal tissues. Using RNAi and rescue experiments, we show here that SV5 displays altered functional properties in cancer cells, and regulates cell proliferation and cell migration.

  20. CASAnova: a multiclass support vector machine model for the classification of human sperm motility patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Summer G; White, Sarah; Stevans, Alicia M; Bhat, Sanjana; Kao, Chia-Yu; Jaworski, Scott; Marlowe, Tamara R; Kohlmeier, Martin; McMillan, Leonard; Zeisel, Steven H; O'Brien, Deborah A

    2017-11-01

    The ability to accurately monitor alterations in sperm motility is paramount to understanding multiple genetic and biochemical perturbations impacting normal fertilization. Computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) of human sperm typically reports motile percentage and kinematic parameters at the population level, and uses kinematic gating methods to identify subpopulations such as progressive or hyperactivated sperm. The goal of this study was to develop an automated method that classifies all patterns of human sperm motility during in vitro capacitation following the removal of seminal plasma. We visually classified CASA tracks of 2817 sperm from 18 individuals and used a support vector machine-based decision tree to compute four hyperplanes that separate five classes based on their kinematic parameters. We then developed a web-based program, CASAnova, which applies these equations sequentially to assign a single classification to each motile sperm. Vigorous sperm are classified as progressive, intermediate, or hyperactivated, and nonvigorous sperm as slow or weakly motile. This program correctly classifies sperm motility into one of five classes with an overall accuracy of 89.9%. Application of CASAnova to capacitating sperm populations showed a shift from predominantly linear patterns of motility at initial time points to more vigorous patterns, including hyperactivated motility, as capacitation proceeds. Both intermediate and hyperactivated motility patterns were largely eliminated when sperm were incubated in noncapacitating medium, demonstrating the sensitivity of this method. The five CASAnova classifications are distinctive and reflect kinetic parameters of washed human sperm, providing an accurate, quantitative, and high-throughput method for monitoring alterations in motility. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Nuclear proliferation and safeguards. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This comprehensive analysis of the technological, economic, and political factors affecting the potential spread of nuclear weapons proved useful in the congressional debate which culminated in the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978. The report was subsequently published commercially and has been a frequently cited reference in the literature on proliferation and nuclear power. Despite developments since 1977, the information in the OTA report is still useful to those wishing to obtain an indepth understanding of the issues. Included is an analysis of why a nation might want nuclear weapons development program and the various sources of nuclear material are discussed. The control of proliferation is considered as well as its relation to the nuclear industry

  2. Domestic Politics and Nuclear Proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chul Min; Yim, Man Sung

    2016-01-01

    The external security threat is known as the most important factor of nuclear weapons program, the domestic politics situation can also affect the nuclear proliferation decision of a country. For example, when a leader wants nuclear weapons as an ultimate weapon, the domestic politics situation can determine the effectiveness of the weapons program of a country. This study analyzes the current knowledge of the relationship between domestic politics and nuclear proliferation and suggests the main challenges of the quantitative models trying to calculate nuclear proliferation risk of countries. The domestic politics status is one of the most important indicators of nuclear program. However, some variables have never been used in quantitative analyses; for example, number of veto players and the public opinion on nuclear weapons; despite they are considered to be important in various qualitative studies. Future studies should focus on how should they be coded and how can they be linked with existing domestic politics variables

  3. Domestic Politics and Nuclear Proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chul Min; Yim, Man Sung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The external security threat is known as the most important factor of nuclear weapons program, the domestic politics situation can also affect the nuclear proliferation decision of a country. For example, when a leader wants nuclear weapons as an ultimate weapon, the domestic politics situation can determine the effectiveness of the weapons program of a country. This study analyzes the current knowledge of the relationship between domestic politics and nuclear proliferation and suggests the main challenges of the quantitative models trying to calculate nuclear proliferation risk of countries. The domestic politics status is one of the most important indicators of nuclear program. However, some variables have never been used in quantitative analyses; for example, number of veto players and the public opinion on nuclear weapons; despite they are considered to be important in various qualitative studies. Future studies should focus on how should they be coded and how can they be linked with existing domestic politics variables.

  4. UV-B affects photosynthesis, ROS production and motility of the freshwater flagellate, Euglena agilis Carter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kottuparambil, Sreejith [Institute of Green Environmental Research Center, University of Incheon, Incheon, 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Woongghi [Department of Biology, Chungnam University, Daejeon, 306 764 (Korea, Republic of); Brown, Murray T. [School of Marine Science and Engineering, Plymouth University, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Han, Taejun, E-mail: hanalgae@hanmail.net [Institute of Green Environmental Research Center, University of Incheon, Incheon, 406 840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Marine Science, University of Incheon, Incheon, 406 840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We proposed a hypothesis for the UV-B protective/adaptive mechanism in Euglena agilis. After moderate levels of UV-B radiation, ROS plays a signaling role to shut down photosynthetic system for protection against harmful UV radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer E. agilis exposed to excessive UV appears to become animal-like, investing all its stored energy into movement rather than into sustaining its photosynthetic machinery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This adaptation allows E. agilis to avoid harmful UV and seek a safe place where the organism may regain its photosynthetic capacity for survival. - Abstract: The effects of ultraviolet B (UV-B; 295-320 nm) radiation on certain vital physiological (photosynthesis), biochemical (production of reactive oxygen species - ROS) and behavioral (motility and orientation) characteristics were investigated in the unicellular photoautotroph, Euglena agilis Carter. The photosynthetic performance of E. agilis was recorded after exposure of between 15 and 60 min followed by a period of recovery lasting 6-24 h under dim light (5-10 {mu}mol photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1}). The maximum quantum yield of PS II (F{sub v}/F{sub m}) was reduced to 65% and 14% of initial values immediately following 15 and 30 min UV-B exposure, but recovered to 100 and 86% of the initials, respectively. Values of rETR{sub max} in E. agilis exposed to 15 min UV-B were similar to those of the initials, but a 30 min UV exposure resulted in 75% reduction of rETR{sub max} with only a 43% recovery as compared with the initial after 24 h recovery. After a 60 min UV-B exposure, there were no Chl a fluorescence signals, and hence no F{sub v}/F{sub m} or rETR{sub max}. A UV dose-dependent increase in DCFH-DA fluorescence was found in E. agilis cells, reflecting an increase in ROS production. After exposures to UV-B for between 15 and 60 min, the percentages of motile cells in the population decreased to 76, 39 and 15

  5. Ultracentrifuge and non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voortman, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    The author states that there is no meaningful difference, from the point of view of proliferation between peaceful, civil, scientific application of nuclear fission, and the use of it in nuclear weapons. The proliferation of the nuclear technology for weapons appeared and appears to be closely connected with the spread of peaceful applications of nuclear technology. In connection with this, he discusses the Ultracentrifuge plant at Almelo (Netherlands) and the supply of nuclear technology by West-Germany especially to Brazil. Further the changed American policy and the possibility of an American/Russian deal to prevent the spread of the nuclear enrichment technology is discussed

  6. Spontaneous mutations in the flhD operon generate motility heterogeneity in Escherichia coli biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Shelley M; Sayler, Joseph; Scarberry, Nicholas; Schroeder, Meredith; Lynnes, Ty; Prüß, Birgit M

    2016-11-08

    Heterogeneity and niche adaptation in bacterial biofilm involve changes to the genetic makeup of the bacteria and gene expression control. We hypothesized that i) spontaneous mutations in the flhD operon can either increase or decrease motility and that ii) the resulting motility heterogeneity in the biofilm might lead to a long-term increase in biofilm biomass. We allowed the highly motile E. coli K-12 strain MC1000 to form seven- and fourteen-day old biofilm, from which we recovered reduced motility isolates at a substantially greater frequency (5.4 %) than from a similar experiment with planktonic bacteria (0.1 %). Biofilms formed exclusively by MC1000 degraded after 2 weeks. In contrast, biofilms initiated with a 1:1 ratio of MC1000 and its isogenic flhD::kn mutant remained intact at 4 weeks and the two strains remained in equilibrium for at least two weeks. These data imply that an 'optimal' biofilm may contain a mixture of motile and non-motile bacteria. Twenty-eight of the non-motile MC1000 isolates contained an IS1 element in proximity to the translational start of FlhD or within the open reading frames for FlhD or FlhC. Two isolates had an IS2 and one isolate had an IS5 in the open reading frame for FlhD. An additional three isolates contained deletions that included the RNA polymerase binding site, five isolates contained point mutations and small deletions in the open reading frame for FlhC. The locations of all these mutations are consistent with the lack of motility and further downstream within the flhD operon than previously published IS elements that increased motility. We believe that the location of the mutation within the flhD operon determines whether the effect on motility is positive or negative. To test the second part of our hypothesis where motility heterogeneity in a biofilm may lead to a long-term increase in biofilm biomass, we quantified biofilm biomass by MC1000, MC1000 flhD::kn, and mixtures of the two strains at ratios of 1:1, 10

  7. Cell proliferation is a key determinant of the outcome of FOXO3a activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulsen, Raewyn C., E-mail: raewyn.poulsen@gmail.com; Carr, Andrew J.; Hulley, Philippa A.

    2015-06-19

    The FOXO family of forkhead transcription factors have a pivotal role in determining cell fate in response to oxidative stress. FOXO activity can either promote cell survival or induce cell death. Increased FOXO-mediated cell death has been implicated in the pathogenesis of degenerative diseases affecting musculoskeletal tissues. The aim of this study was to determine the conditions under which one member of the FOXO family, FOXO3a, promotes cell survival as opposed to cell death. Treatment of primary human tenocytes with 1 pM hydrogen peroxide for 18 h resulted in increased protein levels of FOXO3a. In peroxide-treated cells cultured in low serum media, FOXO3a inhibited cell proliferation and protected against apoptosis. However in peroxide treated cells cultured in high serum media, cell proliferation was unchanged but level of apoptosis significantly increased. Similarly, in tenocytes transduced to over-express FOXO3a, cell proliferation was inhibited and level of apoptosis unchanged in cells cultured in low serum. However there was a robust increase in cell death in FOXO3a-expressing cells cultured in high serum. Inhibition of cell proliferation in either peroxide-treated or FOXO3a-expressing cells cultured in high serum protected against apoptosis induction. Conversely, addition of a Chk2 inhibitor to peroxide-treated or FOXO3a-expressing cells overrode the inhibitory effect of FOXO3a on cell proliferation and led to increased apoptosis in cells cultured in low serum. This study demonstrates that proliferating cells may be particularly susceptible to the apoptosis-inducing actions of FOXO3a. Inhibition of cell proliferation by FOXO3a may be a critical event in allowing the pro-survival rather than the pro-apoptotic activity of FOXO3a to prevail. - Highlights: • FOXO3a activity can result in either promotion of cell survival or apoptosis. • The outcome of FOXO3a activation differs in proliferating compared to non-proliferating cells. • Proliferating

  8. Cell proliferation is a key determinant of the outcome of FOXO3a activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Raewyn C.; Carr, Andrew J.; Hulley, Philippa A.

    2015-01-01

    The FOXO family of forkhead transcription factors have a pivotal role in determining cell fate in response to oxidative stress. FOXO activity can either promote cell survival or induce cell death. Increased FOXO-mediated cell death has been implicated in the pathogenesis of degenerative diseases affecting musculoskeletal tissues. The aim of this study was to determine the conditions under which one member of the FOXO family, FOXO3a, promotes cell survival as opposed to cell death. Treatment of primary human tenocytes with 1 pM hydrogen peroxide for 18 h resulted in increased protein levels of FOXO3a. In peroxide-treated cells cultured in low serum media, FOXO3a inhibited cell proliferation and protected against apoptosis. However in peroxide treated cells cultured in high serum media, cell proliferation was unchanged but level of apoptosis significantly increased. Similarly, in tenocytes transduced to over-express FOXO3a, cell proliferation was inhibited and level of apoptosis unchanged in cells cultured in low serum. However there was a robust increase in cell death in FOXO3a-expressing cells cultured in high serum. Inhibition of cell proliferation in either peroxide-treated or FOXO3a-expressing cells cultured in high serum protected against apoptosis induction. Conversely, addition of a Chk2 inhibitor to peroxide-treated or FOXO3a-expressing cells overrode the inhibitory effect of FOXO3a on cell proliferation and led to increased apoptosis in cells cultured in low serum. This study demonstrates that proliferating cells may be particularly susceptible to the apoptosis-inducing actions of FOXO3a. Inhibition of cell proliferation by FOXO3a may be a critical event in allowing the pro-survival rather than the pro-apoptotic activity of FOXO3a to prevail. - Highlights: • FOXO3a activity can result in either promotion of cell survival or apoptosis. • The outcome of FOXO3a activation differs in proliferating compared to non-proliferating cells. • Proliferating

  9. Bacterial motility complexes require the actin-like protein, MreB and the Ras homologue, MglA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriello, Emilia M F; Mouhamar, Fabrice; Nan, Beiyan; Ducret, Adrien; Dai, David; Zusman, David R; Mignot, Tâm

    2010-01-20

    Gliding motility in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus uses two motility engines: S-motility powered by type-IV pili and A-motility powered by uncharacterized motor proteins and focal adhesion complexes. In this paper, we identified MreB, an actin-like protein, and MglA, a small GTPase of the Ras superfamily, as essential for both motility systems. A22, an inhibitor of MreB cytoskeleton assembly, reversibly inhibited S- and A-motility, causing rapid dispersal of S- and A-motility protein clusters, FrzS and AglZ. This suggests that the MreB cytoskeleton is involved in directing the positioning of these proteins. We also found that a DeltamglA motility mutant showed defective localization of AglZ and FrzS clusters. Interestingly, MglA-YFP localization mimicked both FrzS and AglZ patterns and was perturbed by A22 treatment, consistent with results indicating that both MglA and MreB bind to motility complexes. We propose that MglA and the MreB cytoskeleton act together in a pathway to localize motility proteins such as AglZ and FrzS to assemble the A-motility machineries. Interestingly, M. xanthus motility systems, like eukaryotic systems, use an actin-like protein and a small GTPase spatial regulator.

  10. Increased count, motility, and total motile sperm cells collected across three consecutive ejaculations within 24 h of oocyte retrieval: implications for management of men presenting with low numbers of motile sperm for assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Al-Hasen; Reed, Michael L

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate changes in seminal volume, sperm count, motility, qualitative forward progression, and total motile sperm cells per ejaculate, across three consecutive ejaculates collected from individuals within 24 h preceding an IVF cycle. Men presenting with oligoasthenozoospermia or asthenozoospemia attempted three ejaculates within 24 h preceding IVF. Ejaculate 1 was produced the afternoon prior to oocyte retrieval, and ejaculates 2 and 3 were produced the morning of oocyte retrieval with 2-3 h between collections. Ejaculates 1 and 2 were extended 1:1 v/v with room temperature rTYBS. Test tubes were placed into a beaker of room temperature water, then placed at 4 °C for gradual cooling. Ejaculate 3 was not extended, but pooled with ejaculates 1 and 2 and processed for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Out of 109 oocyte retrievals, 28 men were asked to attempt multiple consecutive ejaculations. Among this population, 25/28 (89.3 %) were successful, and 3/28 men (10.7 %) could only produce two ejaculates. Mean volumes for ejaculates 1, 2, and 3 were significantly different from each other (p sperm counts, motility, qualitative forward progression, and total motile cells per ejaculate for the ejaculates1, 2, and 3 demonstrated the following: ejaculates 2 and 3 were not significantly different, but counts, motility, and total motile sperm were improved over ejaculate 1 (p sperm in this population by 8-fold compared to the first ejaculate alone, facilitating avoidance of sperm cryopreservation and additional centrifugation steps that could affect sperm viability and/or function.

  11. Survival pathways under stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Survival pathways under stress. Bacteria survive by changing gene expression. pattern. Three important pathways will be discussed: Stringent response. Quorum sensing. Proteins performing function to control oxidative damage.

  12. Proliferating macrophages prevail in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Gwendalyn J

    2013-09-01

    Macrophages accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions during the inflammation that is part of atherosclerosis development and progression. A new study in mice indicates that the accumulation of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques depends on local macrophage proliferation rather than the recruitment of circulating monocytes.

  13. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  14. Investigation of motility and biofilm formation by intestinal Campylobacter concisus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavrencic Peter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motility helps many pathogens swim through the highly viscous intestinal mucus. Given the differing outcomes of Campylobacter concisus infection, the motility of eight C. concisus strains isolated from patients with Crohn’s disease (n=3, acute (n=3 and chronic (n=1 gastroenteritis and a healthy control (n=1 were compared. Following growth on solid or liquid media the eight strains formed two groups; however, the type of growth medium did not affect motility. In contrast, following growth in viscous liquid medium seven of the eight strains demonstrated significantly decreased motility. In media of increasing viscosities the motility of C. concisus UNSWCD had two marked increases at viscosities of 20.0 and 74.7 centipoises. Determination of the ability of UNSWCD to swim through a viscous medium, adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells showed that while adherence levels significantly decreased with increasing viscosity, invasion levels did not significantly change. In contrast, adherence to and invasion of UNSWCD to mucus-producing intestinal cells increased upon accumulation of mucus, as did bacterial aggregation. Given this aggregation, we determined the ability of the eight C. concisus strains to form biofilms, and showed that all strains formed biofilms. In conclusion, the finding that C. concisus strains could be differentiated into two groups based on their motility may suggest that strains with high motility have an increased ability to swim through the intestinal mucus and reach the epithelial layer.

  15. Relationships between parameters of gallbladder motility and brain electrical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena M Marfiyan

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Earlier we shown that Cholecystokinetic effect of balneotherapy on spa Truskavets’ may be the result of modulation of neuroendocrine-immune complex. The aim of present investigation: clarification relationships between parameters of gallbladder motility and ongoing Electroencephalogram (EEG as well as Heart Rate Variability (HRV. Material and Methods. At 22 men with chronic cholecystite combined with pyelonephrite we recorded twice basal and postprandial volume of gallbladder (Echoscopy by “Radmir”, EEG ("NeuroCom Standard" and HRV ("CardioLab+HRV". Results. Basal gallbladder volume correlated positively with HRV markers of Vagal tone (HF, RMSSD, pNN50 and relative Power Spectrum Density (PSD C4-δ while negatively with Amplitude of β-Rhythm and its absolute PSD in loci P3, P4, Fp1, C3, F3, F4 as well as PSD T3-δ and Frequency of α-Rhythm. Canonical correlation is very strong: R=0,96; Adjusted R2=0,85; χ2(15=61; p<10-5. Gallbladder volume after 5 min after taking of Cholekinetik (50 ml of 40% solution of xylitol, expressed as portion its basal volume, correlated positively with VLF, Deviation of θ-Rhythm and its relative PSD in loci F4, P4 and P3 while negatively with relative PSD O1-θ and absolute PSD P4-β and T6-β as well as Asymmetry of θ-Rhythm. Canonical correlation is very strong too: R=0,87; Adjusted R2=0,66; χ2(9=38; p<10-4. As distinct from early next postprandial volumes significantly less liable to neural regulatory influences: R makes 0,67 (p=0,003 and 0,60 (p=0,009 after 15 and 30 min respectively. In particular, both V15 and V30 equal positively correlated with HF and Laterality of α-Rhythm, however V15 correlated with Asymmetry of θ-Rhythm (r=-0,45 and its PSD in loci F3 (r=0,28 and C4 (r=0,27, while V30 correlated with Asymmetry of δ-Rhythm (r=-0,28 and PSD C4-β (r=-0,34. Conclusion. Fasting gallbladder volume is strong controlled by Vagal nerves as well as by neural structures generating β-Rhythm, whereas early (5

  16. Estimate of oxygen consumption and intracellular zinc concentration of human spermatozoa in relation to motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Ralf R; Defosse, Kerstin; Koyro, Hans-Wilhelm; Weissmann, Norbert; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard

    2003-03-01

    To investigate the human sperm oxygen/energy consumption and zinc content in relation to motility. In washed spermatozoa from 67 ejaculates, the oxygen consumption was determined. Following calculation of the total oxygen consumed by the Ideal Gas Law, the energy consumption of spermatozoa was calculated. In addition, the zinc content of the sperm was determined using an atomic absorption spectrometer. The resulting data were correlated to the vitality and motility. The oxygen consumption averaged 0.24 micromol/10(6) sperm x 24h, 0.28 micromol/10(6) live sperm x 24h and 0.85 micromol/10(6) live motile sperm x 24h. Further calculations revealed that sperm motility was the most energy consuming process (164.31 mJ/10(6) motile spermatozoa x 24h), while the oxygen consumption of the total spermatozoa was 46.06 mJ/10(6) spermatozoa x 24h. The correlation of the oxygen/energy consumption and zinc content with motility showed significant negative correlations (r= -0.759; P<0.0001 and r=-0.441; P<0.0001, respectively). However, when correlating sperm energy consumption with the zinc content, a significant positive relation (r=0.323; P=0.01) was observed. Poorly motile sperm are actually wasting the available energy. Moreover, our data clearly support the "Geometric Clutch Model" of the axoneme function and demonstrate the importance of the outer dense fibers for the generation of sperm motility, especially progressive motility.

  17. Electroacupuncture at LI11 promotes jejunal motility via the parasympathetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuanming; Yuan, Mengqian; Yin, Yin; Wang, Yidan; Li, Yuqin; Zhang, Na; Sun, Xueyi; Yu, Zhi; Xu, Bin

    2017-06-21

    Gastrointestinal motility disorder has been demonstrated to be regulated by acupuncture treatment. The mechanisms underlying the effects of acupuncture stimulation of abdominal and lower limb acupoints on gastrointestinal motility have been thoroughly studied; however, the physiology underlying the effects of acupuncture on the forelimbs to mediate gastrointestinal motility requires further exploration. The aim of this study was to determine whether electroacupuncture (EA) at LI11 promotes jejunal motility, whether the parasympathetic pathway participates in this effect, and if so, which somatic afferent nerve fibres are involved. A manometric balloon was used to observe jejunal motility. The effects and mechanisms of EA at LI11 were explored in male Sprague-Dawley rats with or without drug administration (propranolol, clenbuterol, acetylcholine, and atropine) and with or without vagotomy. Three types of male mice (β 1 β 2 receptor-knockout [β 1 β 2 -/- ] mice, M 2 M 3 receptor-knockout [M 2 M 3 -/- ] mice and wild-type [WT] mice) were also studied by using different EA intensities (1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 mA). A total of 72 rats and 56 mice were included in the study. EA at LI11 increased the contractile amplitude of jejunal motility in the majority of both rats and mice. However, EA at LI11 did not enhance jejunal motility in rats administered atropine, rats that underwent vagotomy, and M 2 M 3 -‍‍/- mice (at all intensities). In WT mice, EA at LI11 significantly increased jejunal motility at all intensities except 1 mA, and a plateau was reached at intensities greater than 4 mA. Our results suggest that EA at LI11 promotes jejunal motility primarily by exciting the parasympathetic pathway, and that Aδ-fibres and C-fibres may play important roles in the process.

  18. Gliding motility of Babesia bovis merozoites visualized by time-lapse video microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Asada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Babesia bovis is an apicomplexan intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite that induces babesiosis in cattle after transmission by ticks. During specific stages of the apicomplexan parasite lifecycle, such as the sporozoites of Plasmodium falciparum and tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, host cells are targeted for invasion using a unique, active process termed "gliding motility". However, it is not thoroughly understood how the merozoites of B. bovis target and invade host red blood cells (RBCs, and gliding motility has so far not been observed in the parasite. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites was revealed by time-lapse video microscopy. The recorded images revealed that the process included egress of the merozoites from the infected RBC, gliding motility, and subsequent invasion into new RBCs. The gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites was similar to the helical gliding of Toxoplasma tachyzoites. The trails left by the merozoites were detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay using antiserum against B. bovis merozoite surface antigen 1. Inhibition of gliding motility by actin filament polymerization or depolymerization indicated that the gliding motility was driven by actomyosin dependent process. In addition, we revealed the timing of breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole. Time-lapse image analysis of membrane-stained bovine RBCs showed formation and breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole within ten minutes of invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of the gliding motility of B. bovis. Since merozoites of Plasmodium parasites do not glide on a substrate, the gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites is a notable finding.

  19. Data Motility: The Materiality of Big Social Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Coté

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author uses Foucault's largely overlooked but vital concept, the dispositif, in relation to the recent rise of mobility, explosion of data and proliferation of platforms and apps. With a focus on how data an individual generates increasingly moves autonomously of their control, he presents the dispositif of ‘data motility’ to develop a new materialist analysis of the digital human as a discursive and non-discursive assemblage.

  20. Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Motility Disorders in Women, Gastroparesis, and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Jasmine K; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the sex differences in upper gastrointestinal (GI) motility for both healthy and common dysmotility conditions. It focuses on gastroesophageal reflux disease and other esophageal motor disorders for the esophagus and on gastroparesis and accelerated gastric emptying for the stomach. It also describes differences in upper GI motility signs and symptoms during each female hormonal stage (ie, menstrual cycle, pregnancy, perimenopause, menopause) for both healthy participants and those suffering from one of the aforementioned upper GI dysmotility conditions. More research still needs to be conducted to better understand sex differences in upper GI motility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Primary presentation of Jeune's syndrome as gastric motility disorder in an infant: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Katyan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 4-week-old female neonate with Jeune's asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD and coexistent situs anomaly, primarily presenting as gastric motility disorder. The child presented with abdominal distension and nonbilious vomiting since birth with failure to thrive. However, skeletal survey revealed JATD. Upper gastrointestinal contrast study showed situs inversus with delayed gastric emptying. Pyloric biopsy and intraoperative antro-duodenal manometry confirmed association of gastric motility disorder. Awareness of the unusual possibility of primary presentation of Jeune syndrome as gastric motility disorder will improve the management approach in such infants.

  2. In-vitro effect of estrogen-antagonist on motility and penetration ability of human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allag, I S; Rangari, K

    1997-08-01

    Antiestrogens affect spermatozoa through their action on Leydig and Sertoli cells. Direct effect of antiestrogens namely tamoxifen and centchroman in concentration of 1, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 micrograms/ml in incubation medium was determined on motility and penetration ability of human spermatozoa. Motility (%) was invariably reduced after 15, 30 and 60 min. of incubation. Addition of 17 beta-estradiol to medium with antagonist caused inhibition of motility in dose related manner. The distance travelled by spermatozoa treated with tamoxifen or centchroman in media was reduced by 30% and addition of estradiol along with antiestrogen reduced it to 50% compared to that of untreated spermatozoa.

  3. The contribution of cell-cell signaling and motility to bacterial biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrout, Joshua D; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Many bacteria grow attached to a surface as biofilms. Several factors dictate biofilm formation, including responses by the colonizing bacteria to their environment. Here we review how bacteria use cell-cell signaling (also called quorum sensing) and motility during biofilm formation. Specifically...... gene expression important to the production of polysaccharides, rhamnolipid, and other virulence factors. Surface motility affects the assembly and architecture of biofilms, and some aspects of motility are also influenced by quorum sensing. While some genes and their function are specific to P....... aeruginosa, many aspects of biofilm development can be used as a model system to understand how bacteria differentially colonize surfaces....

  4. Proliferation of Genetically Modified Human Cells on Electrospun Nanofiber Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandula Borjigin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene editing is a process by which single base mutations can be corrected, in the context of the chromosome, using single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODNs. The survival and proliferation of the corrected cells bearing modified genes, however, are impeded by a phenomenon known as reduced proliferation phenotype (RPP; this is a barrier to practical implementation. To overcome the RPP problem, we utilized nanofiber scaffolds as templates on which modified cells were allowed to recover, grow, and expand after gene editing. Here, we present evidence that some HCT116-19, bearing an integrated, mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP gene and corrected by gene editing, proliferate on polylysine or fibronectin-coated polycaprolactone (PCL nanofiber scaffolds. In contrast, no cells from the same reaction protocol plated on both regular dish surfaces and polylysine (or fibronectin-coated dish surfaces proliferate. Therefore, growing genetically modified (edited cells on electrospun nanofiber scaffolds promotes the reversal of the RPP and increases the potential of gene editing as an ex vivo gene therapy application.

  5. A mechanical microcompressor for high resolution imaging of motile specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinskie, Jessica A; Shribak, Michael; Bruist, Michael F; Aufderheide, Karl J; Janetopoulos, Chris

    2015-10-01

    In order to obtain fine details in 3 dimensions (3D) over time, it is critical for motile biological specimens to be appropriately immobilized. Of the many immobilization options available, the mechanical microcompressor offers many benefits. Our device, previously described, achieves gentle flattening of a cell, allowing us to image finely detailed structures of numerous organelles and physiological processes in living cells. We have imaged protozoa and other small metazoans using differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy, orientation-independent (OI) DIC, and real-time birefringence imaging using a video-enhanced polychromatic polscope. We also describe an enhancement of our previous design by engineering a new device where the coverslip mount is fashioned onto the top of the base; so the entire apparatus is accessible on top of the stage. The new location allows for easier manipulation of the mount when compressing or releasing a specimen on an inverted microscope. Using this improved design, we imaged immobilized bacteria, yeast, paramecia, and nematode worms and obtained an unprecedented view of cell and specimen details. A variety of microscopic techniques were used to obtain high resolution images of static and dynamic cellular and physiological events. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oesophageal motility disorders in patients with psychiatric disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland, J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Free University of Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Dhaenen, H. [Department of Psychiatry, Free University of Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Ham, H.R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Free University of Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Peters, O. [Department of Gastro-enterology, Free University of Brussels, Brussels (Belgium); Piepsz, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Free University of Brussels, Brussels (Belgium)

    1996-12-01

    Clinical and experimental observations indicate that the motility of the oesophagus may be affected by emotional stimuli. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of oesophageal contractility impairment in patients suffering from a psychiatric disorder. Fifty-one patients admitted to the psychiatric department were submitted to an oesophageal transit study by means of krypton-81m. All patients with an abnormal oesophageal transit underwent manometry and endoscopy. The level of depression and anxiety was evaluated by the treating psychiatrist, using the Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Rating Scales. The oesophageal transit was abnormal in 13 patients. Two of these 13 patients refused manometric investigation. In ten of the 11 remaining patients, the manometry revealed functional motor abnormalities. Endoscopy, performed in all these ten patients, was normal. In conclusion, a high percentage of oesophageal contractility disturbances was found in psychiatric patients complaining of anxiety and/or depression. These abnormalities were detected by scintigraphy as well as by manometry. Owing to the normal endoscopic findings, these contraction abnormalities are likely to reflect a functional motor impairment. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Exosome secretion affects social motility in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dror Eliaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV secreted by pathogens function in a variety of biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, exosome secretion is induced by stress that affects trans-splicing. Following perturbations in biogenesis of spliced leader RNA, which donates its spliced leader (SL exon to all mRNAs, or after heat-shock, the SL RNA is exported to the cytoplasm and forms distinct granules, which are then secreted by exosomes. The exosomes are formed in multivesicular bodies (MVB utilizing the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT, through a mechanism similar to microRNA secretion in mammalian cells. Silencing of the ESCRT factor, Vps36, compromised exosome secretion but not the secretion of vesicles derived from nanotubes. The exosomes enter recipient trypanosome cells. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that cells secreting exosomes or purified intact exosomes affect social motility (SoMo. This study demonstrates that exosomes are delivered to trypanosome cells and can change their migration. Exosomes are used to transmit stress signals for communication between parasites.

  8. Depression and embodiment: phenomenological reflections on motility, affectivity, and transcendence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Kevin A

    2013-11-01

    This paper integrates personal narratives with the methods of phenomenology in order to draw some general conclusions about 'what it means' and 'what it feels like' to be depressed. The analysis has three parts. First, it explores the ways in which depression disrupts everyday experiences of spatial orientation and motility. This disruption makes it difficult for the person to move and perform basic functional tasks, resulting in a collapse or contraction of the life-world. Second, it illustrates how depression creates a situational atmosphere of emotional indifference that reduces the person's ability to qualitatively distinguish what matters in his or her life because nothing stands out as significant or important anymore. In this regard, depression is distinct from other feelings because it is not directed towards particular objects or situations but to the world as a whole. Finally, the paper examines how depression diminishes the possibility for 'self-creation' or 'self-making'. Restricted by the illness, depression becomes something of a destiny, preventing the person from being open and free to access a range of alternative self-interpretations, identities, and possible ways of being-in-the-world.

  9. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for treating esophageal motility disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Pneumatic dilatation and Heller myotomy have been thoroughly studied as the most viable treatment options for achalasia. The pendulum, however, is shifting to the minimally invasive approach. Since Inoue et al. published the experience of the first 17 cases of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) in 2010, there have been at least 5,000 cases performed worldwide and the number is increasing exponentially. Experts across the globe have been extending the indications to various esophageal motility disorders, to patients of extremes of age, sigmoidal esophagus and re-operated patients. There are a few variations in technique across different centers in defining the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) and adequacy of myotomy, the optimal length, site of myotomy and whether the full thickness of the muscle wall should be cut. Large case series demonstrated its promising efficacy & reasonable complication profile. Randomized controlled trial in comparison with the gold standard, Heller myotomy, is ongoing. The future application of submucosal tunnelling technique is thrilling with its extension in tumour resection, antropyloromyotomy and other natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). PMID:28616407

  10. Influence of Helical Cell Shape on Motility of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Joseph; Martinez, Laura; Salama, Nina; Bansil, Rama; Boston University Collaboration; University of Washington Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria's body shape plays an important role in motility by effecting chemotaxis, swimming mechanisms, and swimming speed. A prime example of this is the bacteria Helicobacter Pylori;whose helical shape has long been believed to provide an advantage in penetrating the viscous mucus layer protecting the stomach lining, its niche environment. To explore this we have performed bacteria tracking experiments of both wild-type bacteria along with mutants, which have a straight rod shape. A wide distribution of speeds was found. This distribution reflects both a result of temporal variation in speed and different shape morphologies in the bacterial population. Our results show that body shape plays less role in a simple fluid. However, in a more viscous solution the helical shape results in increased swimming speeds. In addition, we use experimentally obtained cell shape measurements to model the hydrodynamic influence of cell shape on swimming speed using resistive force theory. The results agree with the experiment, especially when we fold in the temporal distribution. Interestingly, our results suggest distinct wild-type subpopulations with varying number of half helices can lead to different swimming speeds. NSF PHY

  11. Ursodeoxycholic acid improves gastrointestinal motility defects in gallstone patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colecchia, A; Mazzella, G; Sandri, L; Azzaroli, F; Magliuolo, M; Simoni, P; Bacchi-Reggiani, ML; Roda, E; Festi, D

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To simultaneously evaluate the presence of defects in gallbladder and gastric emptying, as well as in intestinal transit in gallstone patients (GS) and the effect of chronic ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) administration on these parameters and on serum bile acids and clinical outcome in GS and controls (CTR). METHODS: After a standard liquid test meal, gallbla-dder and gastric emptying (by ultrasound), oroileal transit time (OITT) (by an immunoenzymatic technique) and serum bile acids (by HPLC) were evaluated before and after 3 mo of UDCA (12 mg/kg bw/d) or placebo administration in 10 symptomatic GS and 10 matched healthy CTR. RESULTS: OITT was longer in GS than in CTR (P < 0.0001); UDCA significantly reduced OITT in GS (P < 0.0001), but not in CTR. GS had longer gastric half-emptying time (t1/2) than CTR (P < 0.0044) at baseline; after UDCA, t1/2 significantly decreased (P < 0.006) in GS but not in CTR. Placebo administration had no effect on gastric emptying and intestinal transit in both GS and CTR. CONCLUSION: The gallstone patient has simultaneous multiple impairments of gallbladder and gastric emptying, as well as of intestinal transit. UDCA administration restores these defects in GS, without any effect in CTR. These results confirm the pathogenetic role of gastrointestinal motility in gallstone disease and suggest an additional mechanism of action for UDCA in reducing bile cholesterol supersaturation. PMID:16981264

  12. L-Plastin promotes podosome longevity and supports macrophage motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Julie Y.; Szasz, Taylor P.; Stewart-Hutchinson, Phillip J.; Sivapalan, Janardan; Todd, Elizabeth M.; Deady, Lauren E.; Cooper, John A.; Onken, Michael D.; Morley, S. Celeste

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular regulation of macrophage migration is essential for understanding the patho-physiology of multiple human diseases, including host responses to infection and autoimmune disorders. Macrophage migration is supported by dynamic rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, with formation of actin-based structures such as podosomes and lamellipodia. Here we provide novel insights into the function of the actin-bundling protein l-plastin (LPL) in primary macrophages. We found that podosome stability is disrupted in primary resident peritoneal macrophages from LPL−/− mice. Live-cell imaging of F-actin using resident peritoneal macrophages from LifeACT-RFP+ mice demonstrated that loss of LPL led to decreased longevity of podosomes, without reducing the number of podosomes initiated. Additionally, macrophages from LPL−/− mice failed to elongate in response to chemotactic stimulation. These deficiencies in podosome stabilization and in macrophage elongation correlated with impaired macrophage transmigration in culture and decreased monocyte migration into murine peritoneum. Thus, we have identified a role for LPL in stabilizing long-lived podosomes and in enabling macrophage motility. PMID:27614263

  13. Oesophageal motility disorders in patients with psychiatric disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, J.; Dhaenen, H.; Ham, H.R.; Peters, O.; Piepsz, A.

    1996-01-01

    Clinical and experimental observations indicate that the motility of the oesophagus may be affected by emotional stimuli. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of oesophageal contractility impairment in patients suffering from a psychiatric disorder. Fifty-one patients admitted to the psychiatric department were submitted to an oesophageal transit study by means of krypton-81m. All patients with an abnormal oesophageal transit underwent manometry and endoscopy. The level of depression and anxiety was evaluated by the treating psychiatrist, using the Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Rating Scales. The oesophageal transit was abnormal in 13 patients. Two of these 13 patients refused manometric investigation. In ten of the 11 remaining patients, the manometry revealed functional motor abnormalities. Endoscopy, performed in all these ten patients, was normal. In conclusion, a high percentage of oesophageal contractility disturbances was found in psychiatric patients complaining of anxiety and/or depression. These abnormalities were detected by scintigraphy as well as by manometry. Owing to the normal endoscopic findings, these contraction abnormalities are likely to reflect a functional motor impairment. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Gastrointestinal symptoms and motility disorders in patients with systemic scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palasciano Giuseppe

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on gastrointestinal symptoms, dysfunctions, and neurological disorders in systemic scleroderma are lacking so far. Methods Thirty-eight scleroderma patients (34 limited, 4 diffuse, 60 healthy controls and 68 dyspeptic controls were scored for upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms (dyspepsia, bowel habits, gastric and gallbladder emptying to liquid meal (functional ultrasonography and small bowel transit (H2-breath test. Autonomic nerve function was assessed by cardiovascular tests. Results The score for dyspepsia (mainly gastric fullness was greater in scleroderma patients than healthy controls, but lower than dyspeptic controls who had multiple symptoms, instead. Scleroderma patients with dyspepsia had a longer disease duration. Fasting antral area and postprandial antral dilatation were smaller in scleroderma patients than dyspeptic and healthy controls. Gastric emptying was delayed in both scleroderma patients (particularly in those with abnormal dyspeptic score and dyspeptic controls, who also showed a larger residual area. Despite gallbladder fasting and postprandial volumes were comparable across the three groups, gallbladder refilling appeared delayed in dyspeptic controls and mainly dependent on delayed gastric emptying in scleroderma. Small intestinal transit was also delayed in 74% of scleroderma and 66% of dyspeptic controls. Bowel habits were similar among the three groups. Autonomic neuropathy was not associated with dyspepsia, gastric and gallbladder motility and small intestinal transit. Conclusion In scleroderma patients dyspepsia (mainly gastric fullness, restricted distension of the gastric antrum and diffuse gastrointestinal dysmotility are frequent features. These defects are independent from the occurrence of autonomic neuropathy.

  15. Anorectal motility abnormalities in children with encopresis and chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Neeraj; Glassman, Mark S; Halata, Michael S; Berezin, Stuart H; Stewart, Julian M; Medow, Marvin S

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the response to rectal distension in children with chronic constipation and children with chronic constipation and encopresis. We studied 27 children, aged 3 to 16 years, with chronic constipation; 12 had encopresis. Anorectal motility was measured with a solid state catheter. When the catheter was located in the internal sphincter, the balloon was inflated to 60 mL with air. There were no differences in age, sex distribution, and duration of constipation in the two groups. Comparing groups, anorectal manometry showed no differences in the resting sphincter pressure, recovery pressure, the lowest relaxation pressure, and percent relaxation. However, time to maximum relaxation, time to recovery to baseline pressure, and duration of relaxation were significantly higher in patients with constipation and encopresis, compared with patients who had constipation alone. There may be an imbalance in neuromuscular control of defecation in constipated patients with encopresis that results in incontinence as a consequence of the increased time to recovery and duration of relaxation of the internal anal sphincter. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Network survivability performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This technical report has been developed to address the survivability of telecommunications networks including services. It responds to the need for a common understanding of, and assessment techniques for network survivability, availability, integrity, and reliability. It provides a basis for designing and operating telecommunications networks to user expectations for network survivability and a foundation for continuing industry activities in the subject area. This report focuses on the survivability of both public and private networks and covers a wide range of users. Two frameworks are established for quantifying and categorizing service outages, and for classifying network survivability techniques and measures. The performance of the network survivability techniques is considered; however, recommended objectives are not established for network survivability performance.

  17. Nuclear non-proliferation: a guide to the debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldblat, Jozef.

    1985-01-01

    The non-proliferation policies of 15 countries have been studied and summarized for use by participants of the third Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation (NPT) of Nuclear weapons held in September 1985. The main purpose of the guide is to examine what action must be taken to ensure the Treaty's survival. There are four chapters following an introduction, covering the implementation of the essential provisions of the NPT, the motivations of the countries which have not joined the NPT, together with the motivations of those which have formally renounced the possession of nuclear weapons, even though they possess the technical and economic potential necessary to manufacture them. The last chapter summarises measures which might be taken to strengthen the NPT including ideas put forward at a workshop held in 1984. (author)

  18. Non proliferation of nuclear weapons?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guelte, Georges

    2015-10-01

    After having evoked the behaviour of nuclear countries regarding the development of nuclear weapons and uranium procurement, or nuclear programmes after the Second World War until nowadays, the author presents the non proliferation Treaty (NPT) as a construction at the service of super-powers. He comments and discusses the role of the IAEA control system and its evolutions: a control limited to declared installations, an export control with the spectre of plutonium, a control system thwarted by some technological innovations, information systems coming in, and an additional protocol related to the application of guarantees. He comments the evolution of the context from a bipolar world to a world without pole which raises the issue of how to have commitments respected: description of the role and practice of non proliferation during the Cold War, after the Cold War, and in a world without governance

  19. Proliferation Vulnerability Red Team report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinton, J.P.; Barnard, R.W.; Bennett, D.E. [and others

    1996-10-01

    This report is the product of a four-month independent technical assessment of potential proliferation vulnerabilities associated with the plutonium disposition alternatives currently under review by DOE/MD. The scope of this MD-chartered/Sandia-led study was limited to technical considerations that could reduce proliferation resistance during various stages of the disposition processes below the Stored Weapon/Spent Fuel standards. Both overt and covert threats from host nation and unauthorized parties were considered. The results of this study will be integrated with complementary work by others into an overall Nonproliferation and Arms Control Assessment in support of a Secretarial Record of Decision later this year for disposition of surplus U.S. weapons plutonium.

  20. Nuclear power and weapons proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, T.; Rathjens, C.W.; Ruina, J.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear weapons development and nuclear electric power is examined. A brief description of nuclear weapons design is first given. This is then followed by a discussion of various aspects of nuclear power technology and of how they affect a nuclear weapon programme. These include fuel cycles, chemical reprocessing of spent fuel, uranium enrichment, and the control of dissemination of nuclear technology. In conclusion there is a discussion of possible political and institutional controls for limiting nuclear proliferation. (U.K.)

  1. CBRN and proliferation in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisset, Jean-Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The author proposes a brief overview of the history, evolution and status of military nuclear weapons and programmes as well as bacteriologic and chemical weapons (nuclear weapons, ballistic missile, and position with respect with the Conventions on chemical and bacteriologic weapons) in Asian countries (China, Japan, India, Pakistan, North Korea). In a second part, he discusses issues related to exports and possible proliferation from these countries

  2. Early postoperative enteral nutrition is useful for recovering gastrointestinal motility and maintaining the nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Naruo; Suzuki, Yutaka; Nakayoshi, Tomoko; Hanyu, Nobuyoshi; Nakao, Masatoshi; Takeda, Akihiro; Furukawa, Yoshiyuki; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of enteral nutrition in postoperative nutritional management is known, but the effects on gastrointestinal motility and nutrition have not yet been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of enteral and parenteral nutrition soon after open abdominal surgery on gastrointestinal motility and nutritional status. A partial resection of rectum models was prepared to compare two types of nutrient administration: enteral nutrition and total parenteral nutrition. The differences between the effects of nutrition types in terms of gastrointestinal motility and nutritional status were investigated. Enteral nutrition contributed to recovery of gastrointestinal motility and maintenance of nutritional status. Enteral nutrition should therefore be initiated soon after surgery if the gastrointestinal tract is available.

  3. The Role of TSC Proteins in Regulating Cell Adhesion and Motility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this project was to define the molecular signaling mechanisms by which TSCI and TSC2 proteins regulate cell adhesion and motility as it relates to the genetic disorder tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC...

  4. Inhibition of motility in the cyanobacterium, Phormidium uncinatum, by solar and monochromatic UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Häder, D.P.; Watanabe, M.; Furuya, M.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of solar radiation and monochromatic UV radiation on the motility of the filamentous cyanobacterium Phormidium uncinatum was determined. Solar radiation (mid-day, in midsummer at a location near Lisboa, Portugal) was found to impair motility within about 30 min. This effect is neither a result of a temperature increase nor of visible light. The spectral sensitivity determined using the Okazaki Largé Spectrograph shows the maximal effectiveness of radiation of ≤300 nm. The short time requirement for the response and the lack of any photoreactivation of motility argues against DNA being the UV target. Investigations using reagents diagnostic of superoxide free radicals and singlet oxygen failed to confirm the involvement of photodynamic effects as the molecular mechanism causing UV inhibition of motility

  5. Inhibition of human pancreatic and biliary output but not intestinal motility by physiological intraileal lipid loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Holst, Jens Juul; Layer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Lipid perfusion into the distal ileal lumen at supraphysiological loads inhibits pancreatic exocrine secretion and gastrointestinal motility in humans. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of physiological postprandial intraileal lipid concentrations on endogenously stimulated...

  6. Role of electrogastrography and gastric impedance measurements in evaluation of gastric emptying and motility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, A. J.; Jebbink, H. J.; Akkermans, L. M.; Bruijs, P. P.

    1994-01-01

    Electrogastrography records electrical potential variations brought about by myoelectrical activity of the stomach. Abnormal myoelectrical rhythms such as tachygastrias may also be detected. Electrogastrography provides little information on gastric motility and emptying. Impedance epigastrography

  7. Effect of Air Space in Storage Vials on Motility of Spermatozoa in Chilled Buck Semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Paul K and Lali F Anand 1

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to find out the effect of air space on the top of glass vial in which semen is stored, on the motility of spermatozoa. 45 samples collected from two bucks over a span of 6 months were used for experiment. Goat milk extender was the diluent used. Two ml each of diluted semen after noting their initial motility was stored in 2 ml and 5 ml vials. Samples were stored at 5°C and motility of spermatozoa noted at 24 and 48 hours. Semen without air space was found to preserve the motility better than semen with air space on 24 and 48 hours of incubation. This could be better attributed to reactive oxygen species production by the spermatozoa, but further investigation is needed in this aspect to confirm it. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(9.000: 421-423

  8. An evolutionary link between capsular biogenesis and surface motility in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrebi, Rym; Wartel, Morgane; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Mignot, Tâm

    2015-05-01

    Studying the evolution of macromolecular assemblies is important to improve our understanding of how complex cellular structures evolved, and to identify the functional building blocks that are involved. Recent studies suggest that the macromolecular complexes that are involved in two distinct processes in Myxococcus xanthus - surface motility and sporulation - are derived from an ancestral polysaccharide capsule assembly system. In this Opinion article, we argue that the available data suggest that the motility machinery evolved from this capsule assembly system following a gene duplication event, a change in carbohydrate polymer specificity and the acquisition of additional proteins by the motility complex, all of which are key features that distinguish the motility and sporulation systems. Furthermore, the presence of intermediates of these systems in bacterial genomes suggests a testable evolutionary model for their emergence and spread.

  9. Gastrointestinal Motility Variation and Implications for Plasma Level Variation: Oral Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talattof, Arjang; Price, Judy C; Amidon, Gordon L

    2016-02-01

    The oral route of administration is still by far the most ubiquitous method of drug delivery. Development in this area still faces many challenges due to the complexity and inhomogeneity of the gastrointestinal environment. In particular, dosing unpredictably relative to motility phase means the gastrointestinal environment is a random variable within a defined range. Here, we present a mass balance analysis that captures this variation and highlights the effects of gastrointestinal motility, exploring what impacts it ultimately has on plasma levels and the relationship to bioequivalence for high solubility products with both high and low permeability (BCS I and III). Motility-dependent compartmental absorption and transit (MDCAT) mechanistic analysis is developed to describe the underlying fasted state cyclical motility and how the contents of the gastrointestinal tract are propelled.

  10. Chicago classification criteria of esophageal motility disorders defined in high resolution esophageal pressure topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Fox, M.; Kahrilas, P. J.; Pandolfino, J. E.; Schwizer, W.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Conklin, Jeffrey L.; Cook, Ian J.; Gyawali, C. Prakash; Hebbard, Geoffrey; Holloway, Richard H.; Ke, Meiyun; Keller, Jutta; Mittal, Ravinder K.; Peters, Jeff; Richter, Joel; Roman, Sabine; Rommel, Nathalie; Sifrim, Daniel; Tutuian, Radu; Valdovinos, Miguel; Vela, Marcelo F.; Zerbib, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Background The Chicago Classification of esophageal motility was developed to facilitate the interpretation of clinical high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) studies, concurrent with the widespread adoption of this technology into clinical practice. The Chicago Classification has been

  11. Marine Heat Waves Hazard 3D Maps and the Risk for Low Motility Organisms in a Warming Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Galli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Frequency and severity of heat waves is expected to increase as a consequence of climate change with important impacts on human and ecosystems health. However, while many studies explored the projected occurrence of hot extremes on terrestrial systems, few studies dealt with marine systems, so that both the expected change in marine heat waves occurrence and the effects on marine organisms and ecosystems remain less understood and surprisingly poorly quantified. Here we: (i assess how much more frequent, severe, and depth-penetrating marine heat waves will be in