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Sample records for progressive shoulder abduction

  1. The Influence of Surgical Stabilization on Glenohumeral Abduction Using 3-Dimensional Computed Tomography in Patients With Shoulder Instability.

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    Bakshi, Neil K; Jameel, Omar F; Merrill, Zachary F; Debski, Richard E; Sekiya, Jon K

    2016-08-01

    This study compared the amount of glenohumeral abduction during arm abduction in the affected and unaffected shoulders of 3 groups of patients with shoulder instability: failed surgical stabilization, successful surgical stabilization, and unstable shoulder with no prior surgical intervention. All patients underwent bilateral shoulder computed tomography scans in 3 positions: 0° of abduction and 0° of external rotation (0-0 position), 30° of abduction and 30° of external rotation (30-30 position), and arms maximally abducted (overhead position). Three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction was performed for both shoulders in all 3 positions. A specialized coordinate system marked specific points and directions on the humerus and glenoid of each model. These coordinates were used to calculate the glenohumeral abduction for the normal and affected sides in the 0-0, 30-30, and overhead positions. Thirty-nine patients with shoulder instability were included, of whom 14 had failed surgical repairs, 10 had successful surgical repairs, and 15 had unstable shoulders with no prior surgical intervention. In the overhead position, patients with failed surgical intervention had significantly less glenohumeral abduction in the failed shoulder (95.6° ± 12.7°) compared with the normal shoulder (101.5° ± 12.4°, P = .02). Patients with successfully stabilized shoulders had significantly less glenohumeral abduction in the successfully stabilized shoulder (93.6° ± 10.8°) compared with the normal shoulder (102.1° ± 12.5°, P = .03). Unstable shoulders with no prior surgical intervention (102.1° ± 10.3°) did not differ when compared with the normal shoulders (101.9° ± 10.9°, P = .95). Surgical intervention, regardless of its success, limits the amount of abduction at the glenohumeral joint. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Measurement of angles of abduction for diagnosis of shoulder instability in dogs using goniometry and digital image analysis.

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    Cook, James L; Renfro, Daniel C; Tomlinson, James L; Sorensen, Jill E

    2005-01-01

    To compare abduction angles of shoulders with medial instability and unaffected shoulders in the same dogs and in age- and breed-matched dogs. Case-control study. Dogs with medial instability of the shoulder (n=33) and 26 control dogs. Dogs were sedated and positioned in lateral recumbency with both scapulas parallel to the table. With the elbow and shoulder in extension, the non-recumbent limb was maximally abducted and the angle between the scapular spine and lateral aspect of the brachium measured with a goniometer; a digital image was taken from the cranial aspect. Both techniques were performed in triplicate by 2 examiners. Mean abduction angles for each shoulder were determined from goniometric measurements and image analysis. Data were analyzed for significant differences between affected and unaffected shoulders, measurement techniques, and examiners. Strength of correlation between measurement techniques was determined. Mean abduction angles for shoulders with instability (53.7+/-4.7 degrees goniometric, 51.2+/-4.9 degrees image) were significantly (P<.001) larger than for all unaffected shoulders (32.6+/-2.0 degrees goniometric, 30.9+/-2.3 degrees image). In dogs diagnosed with instability, affected shoulders had significantly (P<.001) larger abduction angles than the contralateral (unaffected) shoulders. No significant differences were identified between right and left shoulders for control dogs, measurement techniques, or examiners. A strong (r=0.90) significant (P<.001) positive correlation between measurement techniques was noted. Shoulder abduction angles measured under sedation provide objective data for diagnosis of shoulder instability in dogs. Shoulders with clinical and arthroscopic evidence of medial instability have significantly higher abduction angles than shoulders that are considered normal. Determination of shoulder abduction angles should be included in the diagnostic protocol for forelimb lameness assessment in dogs.

  3. Comfort and acceptability of various immobilization positions using a shoulder external rotation and abduction brace.

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    Hatta, Taku; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Sano, Hirotaka; Itoi, Eiji

    2017-03-01

    Immobilization with shoulder braces is used for conservative treatment of an initial shoulder dislocation. Various arm positions have been investigated to determine optimal position in terms of the anatomical reduction of the Bankart lesion. Recently, the effect of immobilization in shoulder abduction as well as in external rotation has been reported. However, there are few studies assessing subjects' acceptability of the brace in various arm positions. We hypothesized that a certain arm position regarding abduction or external rotation for immobilization would induce significant discomfort during activities of daily living. A dominant arm of 20 healthy participants was immobilized with a shoulder brace in 4 different positions; adduction and internal rotation (Add-IR), adduction and external rotation (Add-ER), 30° of abduction and 30° of external rotation (Abd-30ER), and 30° of abduction and 60° of external rotation (Abd-60ER). After completing immobilization for 24 h, subjects were asked to assess the discomfort of bracing for overall and individual activities, using a visual analogue scale. Data were compared among the four positions. For overall activities and several activities (eating, reading books, and removing and putting on pants), Abd-60ER was significantly more uncomfortable than adducted arm positions. Abd-30ER did not show any differences compared to the other arm positions. Immobilization in abduction and external rotation seems to be acceptable although the arm position in 30° of abduction and 60° of external rotation is less comfortable than the others. Our results might be useful in determining and developing the ideal shoulder brace which could keep patients' compliance and improve their outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Reproducibility of a 3-dimensional gyroscope in measuring shoulder anteflexion and abduction

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    Penning Ludo I F

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have investigated the use of a 3-dimensional gyroscope for measuring the range of motion (ROM in the impaired shoulder. Reproducibility of digital inclinometer and visual estimation is poor. This study aims to investigate the reproducibility of a tri axial gyroscope in measurement of anteflexion, abduction and related rotations in the impaired shoulder. Methods Fifty-eight patients with either subacromial impingement (27 or osteoarthritis of the shoulder (31 participated. Active anteflexion, abduction and related rotations were measured with a tri axial gyroscope according to a test retest protocol. Severity of shoulder impairment and patient perceived pain were assessed by the Disability of Arm Shoulder and Hand score (DASH and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. VAS scores were recorded before and after testing. Results In two out of three hospitals patients with osteoarthritis (n = 31 were measured, in the third hospital patients with subacromial impingement (n = 27. There were significant differences among hospitals for the VAS and DASH scores measured before and after testing. The mean differences between the test and retest means for anteflexion were −6 degrees (affected side, 9 (contralateral side and for abduction 15 degrees (affected side and 10 degrees (contralateral side. Bland & Altman plots showed that the confidence intervals for the mean differences fall within −6 up to 15 degrees, individual test - retest differences could exceed these limits. A simulation according to ‘Generalizability Theory’ produces very good coefficients for anteflexion and related rotation as a comprehensive measure of reproducibility. Optimal reproducibility is achieved with 2 repetitions for anteflexion. Conclusions Measurements were influenced by patient perceived pain. Differences in VAS and DASH might be explained by different underlying pathology. These differences in shoulder pathology however did not alter

  5. Effects of experimental muscle pain on shoulder-abduction force steadiness and muscle activity in healthy subjects

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    Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Rasmussen, Lars; Aagaard, Per

    2007-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the steadiness of shoulder abduction is reduced in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), which might be related to shoulder pain associated with the SIS. The aim of the present study was to examine the acute effects of experimental shoulder muscle p...

  6. Abduction and external rotation (ABER) MR arthrography of the shoulder. Benefits and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, A.; Gokan, Takehiko; Munechika, Hirotsugu; Ogawa, Takashi; El-Feky, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to show the benefits and limitations of using abduction and external rotation (ABER) positions of the arm during MR arthrography of the shoulder in the evaluation of the rotator-cuff tendon, the capsulolabral complex and the shoulder joint after surgery. Forty-seven patients complaining of either shoulder instability, chronic shoulder pain, pain of unknown cause or pain following shoulder surgery were studied using the direct MR arthrography technique in both the standard neutral position with the arm adducted as well as with the arm in the ABER position. A correlation was obtained between the MR arthrography findings and the surgical findings in 10 reports and clinical presentations of the examined patients. Three patients [6%] were unable to perform ABER positioning. ABER oblique axial images were better than standard oblique coronal images in revealing undersurface tears of the rotator cuff particularly of the grade I type. Four tears were missed in standard images. Oblique axial images were better than standard axial images in demonstrating non-displaced anterior labral tears. One tear was missed and two tears were suspected in the standard images. Oblique axial images were less sensitive than oblique coronal images in the diagnosis of superior labral tears. Two tears were missed in ABER images. The ABER oblique axial MR arthrogram is a useful adjunct to the standard axial and oblique coronal MR arthrograms for assessment of capsulolabral abnormalities and rotator-cuff tendon tears despite some limitations. (author)

  7. Effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support on shoulder and scapular muscle activity and maximum strength during isometric shoulder abduction.

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    Jang, Hyun-jeong; Kim, Suhn-yeop; Oh, Duck-won

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support (ECS) on the electromyography (EMG) activity of shoulder and scapular muscles and shoulder abductor strength during isometric shoulder abduction. Twenty-six women volunteered for the study. Surface EMG was used to monitor the activity of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and middle deltoid (MD), and shoulder abductor strength was measured using a dynamometer during three experimental conditions: (1) no external support (condition-1), (2) pelvic support (condition-2), and (3) pelvic and thoracic supports (condition-3) in an active therapeutic movement device. EMG activities were significantly lower for UT and higher for MD during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p strength was significantly higher during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p isometric shoulder abduction and increasing shoulder abductor strength. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Glenosphere size in reverse shoulder arthroplasty: is larger better for external rotation and abduction strength?

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    Müller, Andreas M; Born, Marian; Jung, Christian; Flury, Matthias; Kolling, Christoph; Schwyzer, Hans-Kaspar; Audigé, Laurent

    2018-01-01

    The role of glenosphere size in reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) may be important in prosthetic stability, joint kinematics, rotator cuff tension and excursion, scapular impingement, humeral lateralization, deltoid wrap, and the occurrence of "notching." This study compared short- and midterm clinical and radiographic outcomes for 2 different glenosphere sizes of a single RSA type with respect to implant positioning, glenoid size, and morphology. This retrospective analysis included 68 RSA procedures that were prospectively documented in a local register during a 5-year postoperative period. Two glenosphere diameter sizes of 36 mm (n = 33) and 44 mm (n = 35) were used. Standard radiographs were made preoperatively (ie, baseline) and at 6, 12, 24, and 60 months after surgery. Range of motion, strength, the Constant-Murley score, and the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index were also assessed at all follow-up visits. The effect of glenosphere size on measured outcomes was adjusted for baseline values, patient gender, and humeral head diameter. No significant differences were found in the functional scores between treatment groups at all follow-up assessments. At the 12-month follow-up, patients with a 44-mm glenosphere had greater external rotation in adduction (mean difference, 12°; P = .001) and abduction strength (mean difference, 1.4 kg; P = .026) compared with those with the smaller implant. These differences remained at 60 months. Scapular notching was observed in 38% of all patients, without any relevant difference between the groups. An increase in glenosphere diameter leads to a clinically moderate but significant increase in external rotation in adduction and abduction strength at midterm follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Immobilization in external rotation combined with abduction reduces the risk of recurrence after primary anterior shoulder dislocation.

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    Heidari, Kamran; Asadollahi, Shadi; Vafaee, Reza; Barfehei, Abbas; Kamalifar, Hossein; Chaboksavar, Zein Alabedin; Sabbaghi, Mohammad

    2014-06-01

    We aimed to compare the effectiveness of immobilization in abduction and external rotation vs immobilization in adduction and internal rotation after primary anterior dislocation of the shoulder. The study randomized 102 patients (age range, 15-55 years) with the diagnosis of primary anterior dislocation of the shoulder to receive immobilization in adduction and internal rotation (AdIR, n = 51) using sling and swathe bandage or immobilization in abduction and external rotation (AbER, n = 51) with a stabilizer brace. Patients received a rehabilitation program 3 weeks after the intervention. After a 24-month follow-up, 33.3% in the AdIR group and 3.9% in the AbER group had recurrence (P patients in the AbER group (19.6%) and 3 in the AdIR group (5.8%) discontinued shoulder immobilization before 3 weeks (P = .03). In patients without recurrence, the anterior apprehension test was positive in 6 of 34 in the AdIR group (17.6%) and in 4 of 49 in the AbER group (8.1%, P = .19). Immobilization with the shoulder joint in abduction and external rotation is an effective method to reduce the risk of recurrence after primary anterior shoulder dislocations and should be preferred to the traditional method of immobilization in adduction and internal rotation in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of forearm axially rotated posture on shoulder load and shoulder abduction / flexion angles in one-armed arrest of forward falls.

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    Hsu, Hsiu-Hao; Chou, You-Li; Lou, Shu-Zon; Huang, Ming-Jer; Chou, Paul Pei-Hsi

    2011-03-01

    Falling onto the outstretched hand is the most common cause of upper extremity injury. This study develops an experimental model for evaluating the shoulder load during a simulated forward fall onto one hand with three different forearm axially rotated postures, and examines the shoulder abduction angle and shoulder flexion angle in each case. Fifteen healthy young male subjects with an average age of 23.7 years performed a series of one-armed arrests from a height of 5 cm onto a force plate. The kinematics and kinetics of the upper extremity were analyzed for three different forearm postures, namely 45° externally rotated, non-rotated, and 45° internally rotated. The shoulder joint load and shoulder abduction/flexion angles were significantly dependent on the rotational posture of the forearm. The shoulder medio-lateral shear forces in the externally rotated group were found to be 1.61 and 2.94 times higher than those in the non-rotated and internally rotated groups, respectively. The shoulder flexion angles in the externally rotated, non-rotated and internally rotated groups were 0.6°, 8.0° and 19.2°, respectively, while the corresponding shoulder abduction angles were 6.1°, 34.1° and 46.3°, respectively. In falls onto the outstretched hand, an externally rotated forearm posture should be avoided in order to reduce the medio-lateral shear force acting on the shoulder joint. In falls of this type, a 45° internally rotated forearm posture represents the most effective fall strategy in terms of minimizing the risk of upper extremity injuries. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Abduction aiming at empirical progress or even at truth approximation, leading to challenge for computational modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Theo A.F.

    1999-01-01

    This paper primarily deals with the conceptual prospects for generalizing the aim of abduction from the standard one of explaining surprising or anomalous observations to that of empirical progress or even truth approximation. It turns out that the main abduction task then becomes the

  12. Validity and reliability of smartphone magnetometer-based goniometer evaluation of shoulder abduction--A pilot study.

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    Johnson, Linda B; Sumner, Sean; Duong, Tina; Yan, Posu; Bajcsy, Ruzena; Abresch, R Ted; de Bie, Evan; Han, Jay J

    2015-12-01

    Goniometers are commonly used by physical therapists to measure range-of-motion (ROM) in the musculoskeletal system. These measurements are used to assist in diagnosis and to help monitor treatment efficacy. With newly emerging technologies, smartphone-based applications are being explored for measuring joint angles and movement. This pilot study investigates the intra- and inter-rater reliability as well as concurrent validity of a newly-developed smartphone magnetometer-based goniometer (MG) application for measuring passive shoulder abduction in both sitting and supine positions, and compare against the traditional universal goniometer (UG). This is a comparative study with repeated measurement design. Three physical therapists utilized both the smartphone MG and a traditional UG to measure various angles of passive shoulder abduction in a healthy subject, whose shoulder was positioned in eight different positions with pre-determined degree of abduction while seated or supine. Each therapist was blinded to the measured angles. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs), Bland-Altman plotting methods, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical analyses. Both traditional UG and smartphone MG were reliable in repeated measures of standardized joint angle positions (average CCC > 0.997) with similar variability in both measurement tools (standard deviation (SD) ± 4°). Agreement between the UG and MG measurements was greater than 0.99 in all positions. Our results show that the smartphone MG has equivalent reliability compared to the traditional UG when measuring passive shoulder abduction ROM. With concordant measures and comparable reliability to the UG, the newly developed MG application shows potential as a useful tool to assess joint angles. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Use of a shoulder abduction brace after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: A study on gait performance and falls.

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    Sonoda, Yuma; Nishioka, Takashi; Nakajima, Ryo; Imai, Shinji; Vigers, Piers; Kawasaki, Taku

    2018-04-01

    Fall prevention is essential in patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair because of the high risk of re-rupture. However, there are no reports related to falls that occur during the early postoperative period, while the affected limb is immobilized. This study assessed gait performance and falls in patients using a shoulder abduction brace after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Prospective cohort and postoperative repeated measures. This study included 29 patients (mean age, 67.1 ± 7.4 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair followed by rehabilitation. The timed up and go test, Geriatric Depression Scale, and Falls Efficacy Scale were measured, and the numbers of falls were compared between those shoulder abduction brace users and patients who had undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty. In arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients, there were significant improvements in timed up and go test and Geriatric Depression Scale, but no significant differences in Falls Efficacy Scale, between the second and fifth postoperative weeks ( p rotator cuff repair patients fell more often than patients with total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty during the same period. The findings suggest that rehabilitation in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair patients is beneficial, but decreased gait performance due to the immobilizing shoulder abduction brace can lead to falls. Clinical relevance Although rehabilitation helps motor function and mental health after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, shoulder abduction brace use is associated with impaired gait performance, high Falls Efficacy Scale scores, and risk of falls, so awareness of risk factors including medications and lower limb dysfunctions is especially important after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  14. The impact of shoulder abduction loading on EMG-based intention detection of hand opening and closing after stroke.

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    Lan, Yiyun; Yao, Jun; Dewald, Julius P A

    2011-01-01

    Many stroke patients are subject to limited hand functions in the paretic arm due to a significant loss of Corticospinal Tract (CST) fibers. A possible solution for this problem is to classify surface Electromyography (EMG) signals generated by hand movements and uses that to implement Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES). However, EMG usually presents an abnormal muscle coactivation pattern shown as increased coupling between muscles within and/or across joints after stroke. The resulting Abnormal Muscle Synergies (AMS) could make the classification more difficult in individuals with stroke, especially when attempting to use the hand together with other joints in the paretic arm. Therefore, this study is aimed at identifying the impact of AMS following stroke on EMG pattern recognition between two hand movements. In an effort to achieve this goal, 7 chronic hemiparetic chronic stroke subjects were recruited and asked to perform hand opening and closing movements at their paretic arm while being either fully supported by a virtual table or loaded with 25% of subject's maximum shoulder abduction force. During the execution of motor tasks EMG signals from the wrist flexors and extensors were simultaneously acquired. Our results showed that increased synergy-induced activity at elbow flexors, induced by increasing shoulder abduction loading, deteriorated the performance of EMG pattern recognition for hand opening for those with a weak grasp strength and EMG activity. However, no such impact on hand closing has yet been observed possibly because finger/wrist flexion is facilitated by the shoulder abduction-induced flexion synergy.

  15. Effect of shoulder abduction angle on biomechanical properties of the repaired rotator cuff tendons with 3 types of double-row technique.

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    Mihata, Teruhisa; Fukuhara, Tetsutaro; Jun, Bong Jae; Watanabe, Chisato; Kinoshita, Mitsuo

    2011-03-01

    After rotator cuff repair, the shoulder is immobilized in various abduction positions. However, there is no consensus on the proper abduction angle. To assess the effect of shoulder abduction angle on the biomechanical properties of the repaired rotator cuff tendons among 3 types of double-row techniques. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-two fresh-frozen porcine shoulders were used. A simulated rotator cuff tear was repaired by 1 of 3 double-row techniques: conventional double-row repair, transosseous-equivalent repair, and a combination of conventional double-row and bridging sutures (compression double-row repair). Each specimen underwent cyclic testing followed by tensile testing to failure at a simulated shoulder abduction angle of 0° or 40° on a material testing machine. Gap formation and failure loads were measured. Gap formation in conventional double-row repair at 0° (1.2 ± 0.5 mm) was significantly greater than that at 40° (0.5 ± 0.3mm, P = .01). The yield and ultimate failure loads for conventional double-row repair at 40° were significantly larger than those at 0° (P row repair (P row repair was the greatest among the 3 double-row techniques at both 0° and 40° of abduction. Bridging sutures have a greater effect on the biomechanical properties of the repaired rotator cuff tendon at a low abduction angle, and the conventional double-row technique has a greater effect at a high abduction angle. Proper abduction position after rotator cuff repair differs between conventional double-row repair and transosseous-equivalent repair. The authors recommend the use of the combined technique of conventional double-row and bridging sutures to obtain better biomechanical properties at both low and high abduction angles.

  16. Does preoperative abduction value affect functional outcome of combined muscle transfer and release procedures in obstetrical palsy patients with shoulder involvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onel Defne

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obstetric palsy is the injury of the brachial plexus during delivery. Although many infants with plexopathy recover with minor or no residual functional deficits, some children don't regain sufficient limb function because of functional limitations, bony deformities and joint contractures. Shoulder is the most frequently affected joint with internal rotation contracture causing limitation of abduction, external rotation. The treatment comprises muscle release procedures such as posterior subscapularis sliding or anterior subscapularis tendon lengtening and muscle transfers to restore the missing external rotation and abduction function. Methods We evaluated whether the preoperative abduction degree affects functional outcome. Between 1998 and 2002, 46 children were operated on to restore shoulder abduction and external rotation. The average age at surgery was 7.6 years and average follow up was 40.8 months. We compared the postoperative results of the patients who had preoperative abduction less than 90° (Group I: n = 37 with the patients who had preoperative abduction greater than 90° (Group II: n = 9, in terms of abduction and external rotation function with angle measurements and Mallet classification. We inquired whether patients in Group I needed another muscle transfer along with latissimus dorsi and teres major transfers. Results In Group I the average abduction improved from 62.5° to 131.4° (a 68.9° ± 22.9°gain and the average external rotation improved from 21.4° to 82.6° (a 61.1° ± 23°gain. In Group II the average abduction improved from 99.4°to 140°(a40.5° ± 16°gain and the average external rotation improved from 33.2°to 82.7° (a 49.5° ± 23.9° gain. Although there was a significant difference between Group I and II for preoperative abduction (p = 0.000 and abduction gain in degrees (p = 0.001, the difference between postoperative values of both groups was not significant (p = 0.268. There was

  17. MR arthrography including abduction and external rotation images in the assessment of atraumatic multidirectional instability of the shoulder

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    Schaeffeler, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Chur (Switzerland); Waldt, Simone; Bauer, Jan S.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Traumatology, Munich (Germany); Haller, Bernhard [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Schroeder, Michael [Center for Sports Orthopedics and Medicine, Orthosportiv, Munich (Germany); Imhoff, Andreas B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    To evaluate diagnostic signs and measurements in the assessment of capsular redundancy in atraumatic multidirectional instability (MDI) of the shoulder on MR arthrography (MR-A) including abduction/external rotation (ABER) images. Twenty-one MR-A including ABER position of 20 patients with clinically diagnosed MDI and 17 patients without instability were assessed by three radiologists. On ABER images, presence of a layer of contrast between the humeral head (HH) and the anteroinferior glenohumeral ligament (AIGHL) (crescent sign) and a triangular-shaped space between the HH, AIGHL and glenoid (triangle sign) were evaluated; centring of the HH was measured. Anterosuperior herniation of the rotator interval (RI) capsule and glenoid version were determined on standard imaging planes. The crescent sign had a sensitivity of 57 %/62 %/48 % (observers 1/2/3) and specificity of 100 %/100 %/94 % in the diagnosis of MDI. The triangle sign had a sensitivity of 48 %/57 %/48 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/100 %. The combination of both signs had a sensitivity of 86 %/90 %/81 % and specificity of 94 %/94 %/94 %. A positive triangle sign was significantly associated with decentring of the HH. Measurements of RI herniation, RI width and glenoid were not significantly different between both groups. Combined assessment of redundancy signs on ABER position MR-A allows for accurate differentiation between patients with atraumatic MDI and patients with clinically stable shoulders; measurements on standard imaging planes appear inappropriate. (orig.)

  18. Range of impingement-free abduction and adduction deficit after reverse shoulder arthroplasty. Hierarchy of surgical and implant-design-related factors.

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    Gutiérrez, Sergio; Comiskey, Charles A; Luo, Zong-Ping; Pupello, Derek R; Frankle, Mark A

    2008-12-01

    Evaluations of functional outcomes of reverse shoulder arthroplasty have revealed variable improvements in the range of motion and high rates of scapular notching. The purpose of this study was to systematically examine the impact of surgical factors (location of the glenosphere on the glenoid and tilt angle of the glenosphere on the glenoid) and implant-related factors (implant size, center-of-rotation offset, and humeral neck-shaft angle) on impingement-free abduction motion. A computer model was developed to virtually simulate abduction/adduction motion and its dependence on five surgical and implant-related factors. Three conditions were tested for each factor, resulting in a total of 243 simulated combinations. The overall motion was determined from 0 degrees of abduction until maximum abduction, which would be limited by impingement of the humerosocket on the scapula. In those combinations in which 0 degrees of abduction could not be achieved, the adduction deficit was recorded. The largest average increase in the range of impingement-free abduction motion resulted from a more lateral center-of-rotation offset: the average increase was 31.9 degrees with a change in the center-of-rotation offset from 0 to 10 mm, and this change resulted in an increase in abduction motion in eighty of the eighty-one combinations. The position of the glenosphere on the glenoid was associated with the second largest average increase in abduction motion (28.1 degrees when the glenosphere position was changed from superior to inferior, with the change resulting in an increase in seventy-one of the eighty-one combinations). These factors were followed by glenosphere tilt, humeral neck-shaft angle, and prosthetic size in terms of their effects on abduction motion. The largest effect in terms of avoiding an adduction deficit was provided by a humeral neck-shaft angle of 130 degrees (the deficit was avoided in forty-nine of the eighty-one combinations in which this angle was used

  19. Contact mechanics of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty during abduction: the effect of neck-shaft angle, humeral cup depth, and glenosphere diameter.

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    Langohr, G Daniel G; Willing, Ryan; Medley, John B; Athwal, George S; Johnson, James A

    2016-04-01

    Implant design parameters can be changed during reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) to improve range of motion and stability; however, little is known regarding their impact on articular contact mechanics. The purpose of this finite element study was to investigate RSA contact mechanics during abduction for different neck-shaft angles, glenosphere sizes, and polyethylene cup depths. Finite element RSA models with varying neck-shaft angles (155°, 145°, 135°), sizes (38 mm, 42 mm), and cup depths (deep, normal, shallow) were loaded with 400 N at physiological abduction angles. The contact area and maximum contact stress were computed. The contact patch and the location of maximum contact stress were typically located inferomedially in the polyethylene cup. On average for all abduction angles investigated, reducing the neck-shaft angle reduced the contact area by 29% for 155° to 145° and by 59% for 155° to 135° and increased maximum contact stress by 71% for 155° to 145° and by 286% for 155° to 135°. Increasing the glenosphere size increased the contact area by 12% but only decreased maximum contact stress by 2%. Decreasing the cup depth reduced the contact area by 40% and increased maximum contact stress by 81%, whereas increasing the depth produced the opposite effect (+52% and -36%, respectively). The location of the contact patch and maximum contact stress in this study matches the area of damage seen frequently on clinical retrievals. This finding suggests that damage to the inferior cup due to notching may be potentiated by contact stresses. Increasing the glenosphere diameter improved the joint contact area and did not affect maximum contact stress. However, although reducing the neck-shaft angle and cup depth can improve range of motion, our study shows that this also has some negative effects on RSA contact mechanics, particularly when combined. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc

  20. Horizontal gaze palsy and progressive scoliosis in a patient with congenital esotropia and inability to abduct. A case report.

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    Fernández-Vega Cueto, A; Rodríguez-Ezcurra, J J; Rodríguez-Maiztegui, I

    2016-12-01

    The case is presented on a 4- year-old child with congenital esotropia, limitation of abduction, cross-fixation, and thoracolumbar scoliosis. Genetic testing of ROBO3 gene confirmed the diagnosis of horizontal gaze palsy and scoliosis (HGPSS) DISCUSSION: HGPPS is a rare congenital disorder characterised by absence of conjugate horizontal eye movements and progressive scoliosis developed in childhood and adolescence. We highlight this motility disorder as a part of the differential diagnosis of early childhood esotropia with cross- fixation and limitation of abduction. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Post-operative rotator cuff integrity, based on Sugaya's classification, can reflect abduction muscle strength of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masahito; Collin, Phillipe; Josseaume, Thierry; Lädermann, Alexandre; Goto, Hideyuki; Sugimoto, Katumasa; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2018-01-01

    [ICC (2.1) = 0.39 and 0.49]. Although no significant correlation was found between overall post-operative constant score and Sugaya's classification, Sugaya's classification indicated significant correlation with the muscle strength score. Sugaya's classification showed repeatability and good agreement between the orthopaedist and radiologist, who are involved in the patient care for the rotator cuff tear. Common classification of rotator cuff integrity with good reliability will give appropriate information for clinicians to improve the patient care of the rotator cuff tear. This classification also would be helpful to predict the strength of arm abduction in the scapular plane. IV.

  2. Alien Abductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Joe

    2000-03-01

    Since the beginning of the modern UFO craze in 1947, an elaborate mythology has developed concerning alleged extraterrestrial visitations. ``Flying saucer" sightings (typically involving misperceptions of such mundane phenomena as meteors and research balloons) began to be accompanied in the 1950s by reports from ``contactees," persons who claimed to have had close encounters with, even to have been transported to distant planets by, UFO occupants. By the 1960s came reports of sporadic ``abductions" which have proliferated in correlation with media interest. (Indeed, by interaction between claimants and media the portrayal of aliens has evolved from a multiplicity of types into the rather standardized big-eyed humanoid model.) While evidence of alien contact has often been faked--as by spurious photos, ``crop circles," and the notorious ``Alien Autopsy" film--few alien abduction reports appear to be hoaxes. Most seem instead to come from sincere, sane individuals. Nevertheless, not one has been authenticated, and serious investigation shows that such claims can be explained as sleep-related phenomena (notably ``waking dreams"), hypnotic confabulation, and other psychological factors. As is typical of other mythologies, the alien myth involves supernormal beings that may interact with humans, and it purports to explain the workings of the universe and humanity's place within it.

  3. Progressive Abduction Loading Therapy with Horizontal-Plane Viscous Resistance Targeting Weakness and Flexion Synergy to Treat Upper Limb Function in Chronic Hemiparetic Stroke: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael D; Carmona, Carolina; Drogos, Justin; Dewald, Julius P A

    2018-01-01

    Progressive abduction loading therapy has emerged as a promising exercise therapy in stroke rehabilitation to systematically target the loss of independent joint control (flexion synergy) in individuals with chronic moderate/severe upper-extremity impairment. Preclinical investigations have identified abduction loading during reaching exercise as a key therapeutic factor to improve reaching function. An augmentative approach may be to additionally target weakness by incorporating resistance training to increase constitutive joint torques of reaching with the goal of improving reaching function by "overpowering" flexion synergy. The objective was, therefore, to determine the therapeutic effects of horizontal-plane viscous resistance in combination with progressive abduction loading therapy. 32 individuals with chronic hemiparetic stroke were randomly allocated to two groups. The two groups had equivalent baseline characteristics on all demographic and outcome metrics including age (59 ± 11 years), time poststroke (10.1 ± 7.6 years), and motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer, 26.7 ± 6.5 out of 66). Both groups received therapy three times/week for 8 weeks while the experimental group included additional horizontal-plane viscous resistance. Quantitative standardized progression of the intervention was achieved using a robotic device. The primary outcomes of reaching distance and velocity under maximum abduction loading and secondary outcomes of isometric strength and a clinical battery were measured at pre-, post-, and 3 months following therapy. There was no difference between groups on any outcome measure. However, for combined groups, there was a significant increase in reaching distance (13.2%, effect size; d  = 0.56) and velocity (13.6%, effect size; d  = 0.27) at posttesting that persisted for 3 months and also a significant increase in abduction, elbow extension, and external rotation strength at posttesting that did not persist 3

  4. Scapulohumeral rhythm in shoulders with reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David; Matsuki, Keisuke; Struk, Aimee M; Wright, Thomas W; Banks, Scott A

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about kinematic function of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA). Scapulohumeral rhythm (SHR) is a common metric for assessing muscle function and shoulder joint motion. The purpose of this study was to compare SHR in shoulders with RTSA to normal shoulders. Twenty-eight subjects, more than 12 months after unilateral RTSA, were recruited for an Institutional Review Board-approved study. Subjects performed arm abduction in the coronal plane with and without a 1.4-kg hand-held weight. Three-dimensional model-image registration techniques were used to measure orientation and position for the humerus and scapula from fluoroscopic images. Analysis of variance and Tukey tests were used to assess groupwise and pairwise differences. SHR in RTSA shoulders (1.3:1) was significantly lower than in normal shoulders (3:1). Below 30° abduction, RTSA and normal shoulders show a wide range of SHR (1.3:1 to 17:1). Above 30° abduction, SHR in RTSA shoulders was 1.3:1 for unweighted abduction and 1.3:1 for weighted abduction. Maximum RTSA shoulder abduction in weighted trials was lower than in unweighted trials. SHR variability in RTSA shoulders decreased with increasing arm elevation. RTSA shoulders show kinematics that are significantly different from normal shoulders. SHR in RTSA shoulders was significantly lower than in normal shoulders, indicating that RTSA shoulders use more scapulothoracic motion and less glenohumeral motion to elevate the arm. With these observations, it may be possible to improve rehabilitation protocols, with particular attention to the periscapular muscles, and implant design or placement to optimize functional outcomes in shoulders with RTSA. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effectiveness of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training for frequent neck/shoulder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Saervoll, Charlotte A; Mortensen, Ole S

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical exercise is a cornerstone in rehabilitation programs, but adherence to comprehensive exercise remains low. This study determined the effectiveness of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training for relieving neck/shoulder pain in healthy adults with frequent symptoms...

  6. Prioritized Abduction with CHR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2008-01-01

    A class of Prioritized Abductive Logic Programs (PrioALPs) is introduced and an implementation is developed in CHR for solving abductive problems, providing minimal explanations with best-first search. Priorities may represent probabilities or a cost function to be optimized. Compared with other...

  7. Kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the normal shoulder: assessment of the shapes and signals of the superior and inferior labra with abductive movement using an open-type imager.

    OpenAIRE

    Togami, Izumi; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsunoda, Masatoshi; Sei, Tetsuro; Yabuki, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Takahiro; Mitani, Masahiko; Akaki, Shiro; Kuroda, Masahiro; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to evaluate the superior and inferior glenoid labra with abductive movement using an open-type MR unit in asymptomatic healthy volunteers. Both fast low angle shot (FLASH) and turbo spin echo (TSE) images were obtained to evaluate the shapes of both the superior and inferior labra, as well as to assess changes in signal at these sites. As the abduction angle was increased, the shape of the superior labrum changed from round or triangular to crescentic and a h...

  8. Abductive sensemaking through sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes design sketching as a way to make abductive reasoning manifest and concrete. Through sketching, the abductive sensemaking leaves the domain of abstract logics and becomes part of the researchers or practitioner’s reflective practice. This practice is especially evident through...... incorporating sketching as more than a specific technique, but also as ways of applying design thinking through acting upon the world. The paper presents sketching as an integral part of the design epistemology. Furthermore, a categoriza- tion of different dimensions in which sketching can be represented...

  9. The active abduction view: A new maneuvre in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    A new projection is described, the active abduction view of the shoulder, where in many patients with a comlete rotator cuff tear the humeral head is closely apposed to the acromion, obliterating the subacromial space. In such a situation,the medial portion of the torn rotator cuff retracts during active abduction, allowing approximation of the two bones. (orig./GDG)

  10. Psychiatric disorders among war-abducted and non-abducted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychiatric disorders among war-abducted and non-abducted adolescents in Gulu district, ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... and the Mini International Neural-Psychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents English ...

  11. Glenohumeral abduction contracture in children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eismann, Emily A; Little, Kevin J; Laor, Tal; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-01-21

    Following neonatal brachial plexus palsy, the Putti sign-obligatory tilt of the scapula with brachiothoracic adduction-suggests the presence of glenohumeral abduction contracture. In the present study, we utilized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify this glenohumeral abduction contracture and evaluate its relationship to shoulder joint deformity, muscle atrophy, and function. We retrospectively reviewed MRIs of the thorax and shoulders obtained before and after shoulder rebalancing surgery (internal rotation contracture release and external rotation tendon transfer) for twenty-eight children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Two raters measured the coronal positions of the scapula, thoracic spine, and humeral shaft bilaterally on coronal images, correcting trigonometrically for scapular protraction on axial images. Supraspinatus, deltoid, and latissimus dorsi muscle atrophy was assessed, blinded to other measures. Correlations between glenohumeral abduction contracture and glenoid version, humeral head subluxation, passive external rotation, and Mallet shoulder function before and after surgery were performed. MRI measurements were highly reliable between raters. Glenohumeral abduction contractures were present in twenty-five of twenty-eight patients, averaging 33° (range, 10° to 65°). Among those patients, abductor atrophy was present in twenty-three of twenty-five, with adductor atrophy in twelve of twenty-five. Preoperatively, greater abduction contracture severity correlated with greater Mallet global abduction and hand-to-neck function. Abduction contracture severity did not correlate preoperatively with axial measurements of glenohumeral dysplasia, but greater glenoid retroversion was associated with worse abduction contractures postoperatively. Surgery improved passive external rotation, active abduction, and hand-to-neck function, but did not change the abduction contracture. A majority of patients with persistent shoulder weakness

  12. Adversarial Geospatial Abduction Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    better). We assume the reasoning agent is using the Spatial Cultural Abductive Reasoning Engine (SCARE) to provide information on cache locations. OAS...Technology, Vol. , No. , 20. 38 · Paulo Shakarian et al. Rossmo, D. K. and Rombouts, S. 2008. Geographic Profiling. In Enviromental Criminology and Crime

  13. Progressive shoulder-neck exercise on cervical muscle functions in middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Hsien; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Tsou, Chih-Min; Huang, Yi-Ching

    2018-02-01

    Although neck pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder, there is no consensus on suitable exercise methods for middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain. Therefore, this study investigated the effectiveness of a 6-week shoulder-neck exercise intervention program on cervical muscle function improvement in patients aged 45 years or older with chronic neck pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of progressive shoulder-neck exercise on cervical muscle functions of middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain. A randomized controlled single-blind trial. Rehabilitation department of a hospital. A total of 72 subjects aged ≥45 years with chronic neck pain were randomly allocated to either an experimental group (N.=36; age 57.3±8.74 years) or a control group (N.=36; age 58.15±8.17 years). The control group received only traditional physiotherapy, whereas the experimental group participated in a 6-week shoulder-neck exercise program consisting of cranio-cervical flexion and progressive resistance exercises in addition to receiving traditional physiotherapy. The muscle functions of subjects in both groups were tested before the experiment and also after the intervention program. The pretest and posttest measured the cranio-cervical flexion test (CCFT) and the superficial cervical muscle strength. After the intervention, the experimental group had a 56.48 point improvement in the performance index of the CCFT (Pcervical muscle functions. This study confirmed that the 6-week progressive shoulder-neck exercise program can effectively improve cervical muscle function in middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain. Progressive shoulder-neck exercise might provide positive effect on deep and superficial neck muscle strength in patients with chronic neck pain. Therefore, this study may serve as a reference for the clinical rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain.

  14. [Shoulder injuries in golf].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, D; Gosheger, G; Schmidt, C

    2014-03-01

    Due to its growing popularity golf has now come into the focus of orthopedic sports medicine. With a wide range of age groups and playing levels, orthopedic surgeons will encounter a wide range of musculoskeletal problems which are usually the result of overuse rather than trauma. The shoulder joint plays an important role in the golf swing whereby not only the muscles around the glenohumeral joint but also the scapula stabilizing muscles are extremely important for an effective golf swing. Golf is strictly not considered to be an overhead sport; however, the extreme peak positions of the golf swing involve placing the shoulder joint in maximum abduction and adduction positions which can provoke impingement, lesions of the pulley system or even a special form of posterior shoulder instability. Even after complex shoulder operations, such as rotator cuff repair or shoulder arthroplasty, a return to the golf course at nearly the same level of play can be expected.

  15. Elastic Resistance Effectiveness on Increasing Strength of Shoulders and Hips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picha, Kelsey J; Almaddah, Muataz R; Barker, Jordan; Ciochetty, Tavis; Black, W Scott; Uhl, Tim L

    2017-09-12

    Elastic resistance is a common training method used to gain strength. Currently, progression with elastic resistance is based on the perceived exertion of the exercise or completion of targeted repetitions; exact resistance is typically unknown. This study's objective is to determine if knowledge of load during elastic resistance exercise will increase strength gains during exercises. Participants were randomized into two strength training groups, elastic resistance only and elastic resistance using a load cell (LC) that displays force during exercise. The LC group used a Smart Handle (Patterson Medical Supply, Chicago, IL) to complete all exercises. Each participant completed the same exercises three times weekly for 8 weeks. The LC group was provided with a set load for exercises whereas the elastic resistance only group was not. Participant's strength was tested at baseline and program completion, measuring isometric strength for shoulder abduction (SAb), shoulder external rotation (SER), hip abduction (HAb), and hip extension (HEx). Independent t-tests were used to compare the normalized torques between groups. No significant differences were found between groups. Shoulder strength gains did not differ between groups (SAb p>0.05; SER p>0.05). Hip strength gains did not differ between groups (HAb p>0.05; HEx p>0.05). Both groups increased strength due to individual supervision, constantly evaluating degree of difficulty associated with exercise and providing feedback while using elastic resistance. Using a LC is as effective as supervised training and could provide value in a clinic setting when patients are working unsupervised.

  16. The diabetic frozen shoulder: arthroscopic release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie-Harris, D J; Myerthall, S

    1997-02-01

    Seventeen patients who were diabetics developed frozen shoulders which failed to respond to conservative management. They had persistent pain, stiffness, and limited function. An arthroscopic release was performed by progressively releasing the anterior structures from superior to inferior. Starting from the interval area we progressed to the anterior superior glenohumeral ligament, the intra-articular portion of the subscapularis, the anterior capsule, and the inferior capsule. Postoperatively physiotherapy was carried out daily to maintain the range of movement. At a follow up of 1 to 5 years the patients were assessed using the American Shoulder Society scheme. In addition the patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively on four criteria; pain, external rotation, abduction, and function. We found that the patients were statistically significantly improved in all four categories. Thirteen of the 17 patients had no pain, full range of motion compared with the opposite side, and full function. There was one poor result with no improvement. The remaining three patients had improved but still had residual abnormalities. We consider arthroscopic release to be an effective treatment for the resistant diabetic frozen shoulder.

  17. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta)

    OpenAIRE

    Cift, Hakan; Soylemez, Salih; Demiroglu, Murat; Ozkan, Korhan; Ozden, Vahit Emre; Ozkut, Afsar T.

    2015-01-01

    Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients’ ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients’ reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitat...

  18. Abductive Inference using Array-Based Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Falster, Peter; Møller, Gert L.

    The notion of abduction has found its usage within a wide variety of AI fields. Computing abductive solutions has, however, shown to be highly intractable in logic programming. To avoid this intractability we present a new approach to logicbased abduction; through the geometrical view of data...... employed in array-based logic we embrace abduction in a simple structural operation. We argue that a theory of abduction on this form allows for an implementation which, at runtime, can perform abductive inference quite efficiently on arbitrary rules of logic representing knowledge of finite domains....

  19. Passive contribution of the rotator cuff to abduction and joint stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétreault, Patrice; Levasseur, Annie; Lin, Jenny C; de Guise, Jacques; Nuño, Natalia; Hagemeister, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare shoulder joint biomechanics during abduction with and without intact non-functioning rotator cuff tissue. A cadaver model was devised to simulate the clinical findings seen in patients with a massive cuff tear. Eight full upper limb shoulder specimens were studied. Initially, the rotator cuff tendons were left intact, representing a non-functional rotator cuff, as seen in suprascapular nerve paralysis or in cuff repair with a patch. Subsequently, a massive rotator cuff tear was re-created. Three-dimensional kinematics and force requirements for shoulder abduction were analyzed for each condition using ten abduction cycles in the plane of the scapula. Mediolateral displacements of the glenohumeral rotation center (GHRC) during abduction with an intact non-functioning cuff were minimal, but massive cuff tear resulted in significant lateral displacement of the GHRC (p non-functional cuff (p requirements were significantly less with an intact non-functioning cuff than with massive cuff tear (p requirement for abduction from 5 to 30° as compared with the results following a massive rotator cuff tear. This provides insight into the potential biomechanical effect of repairing massive rotator cuff tears with a biological or synthetic "patch," which is a new treatment for massive cuff tear.

  20. Effect of Pitching Consecutive Days in Youth Fast-Pitch Softball Tournaments on Objective Shoulder Strength and Subjective Shoulder Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillington, S Andrew; Brophy, Robert H; Wright, Rick W; Smith, Matthew V

    2017-05-01

    The windmill pitching motion has been associated with risk for shoulder injury. Because there are no pitching limits on youth fast-pitch softball pitchers, these athletes often pitch multiple games across consecutive days. Strength changes, fatigue levels, and shoulder pain that develop among female fast-pitch pitchers over the course of consecutive days of pitching have not been investigated. Over the course of 2- and 3-day fast-pitch softball tournaments, pitchers will develop progressive objective weakness and increased subjective shoulder fatigue and pain without complete recovery between days. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Fourteen female fast-pitch softball pitchers between the ages of 14 and 18 years were evaluated for strength and fatigue changes across 2- and 3-day tournaments. At the beginning and end of each day of tournament play, pitchers were asked to quantify shoulder fatigue and shoulder pain levels of their dominant throwing arm using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS). Shoulder abduction, flexion, external rotation, internal rotation, elbow flexion, and elbow extension strength measurements were gathered using a handheld dynamometer. Over the course of an average single day of tournament participation, pitchers developed significant increases in VAS scores for shoulder fatigue (median, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.3-3.0) and pain (median, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.5-2.3) and significant strength loss in all tested motions. Pitchers also developed significant increases in VAS shoulder fatigue (median, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.5-5.5), VAS shoulder pain (median, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.0-4.5), and strength loss in all tested motions over the entire tournament. Shoulder pain, fatigue, and strength do not fully recover between days. The accumulation of subjective shoulder pain and fatigue over the course of tournament play were closely correlated. Among youth female fast-pitch softball pitchers, there is a progressive increase in shoulder fatigue, pain, and weakness over the

  1. Effect of pitching consecutive days in youth softball tournaments on objective shoulder strength and subjective shoulder symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillington, S. Andrew; Brophy, Robert H.; Wright, Rick W.; Smith, Matthew V.

    2017-01-01

    Background The windmill pitching motion has been associated with risk for shoulder injury. Since there are no pitching limits on youth fast-pitch softball pitchers, these athletes often pitch multiple games across consecutive days. Strength changes, fatigue levels, and shoulder pain that develop among female fast-pitch pitchers over the course of consecutive days of pitching have not been investigated. Hypothesis Over the course of 2 and 3-day fast-pitch softball tournaments, pitchers will develop progressive objective weakness and increased subjective shoulder fatigue and pain without complete recovery between days. Study Design Cross-Sectional Study. Methods Female fast-pitch softball pitchers between the ages of 14 and 18 who were pitching in 2 and 3-day tournaments were recruited for study participation. At the beginning and end of each day of tournament play, pitchers were asked to quantify shoulder fatigue and shoulder pain levels of their dominant throwing arm using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS). Shoulder abduction, flexion, external rotation, internal rotation, elbow flexion, and elbow extension strength measurements were gathered using a hand-held dynamometer. Results Over the course of an average single day of tournament participation, pitchers developed significant increases in VAS shoulder fatigue (2.0, 95% CI: 1.3 to 3.0), and pain (1.3, 95% CI: 0.5 to 2.3) and significant strength loss in all tested motions. Pitchers also developed significant increases in VAS shoulder fatigue (3.5, 95% CI: 1.5 to 5.5), VAS shoulder pain (2.5, 95% CI: 1.0 to 4.5) and strength loss in all tested motions over the entire tournament. Shoulder pain, fatigue, and strength do not fully recover between days. The accumulation of subjective shoulder pain and fatigue over the course of tournament play were closely correlated. Conclusion Among youth female fast-pitch softball pitchers, there is a progressive increase in shoulder fatigue, pain, and weakness over the course

  2. Shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder replacement - discharge Shoulder surgery - discharge Using your shoulder after replacement surgery Using your shoulder after surgery Images Impingement syndrome Rotator cuff muscles Heart attack ...

  3. Frozen shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your hormones, such as during menopause Shoulder injury Shoulder surgery Open heart surgery Cervical disk disease of the ... Instructions Rotator cuff exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder surgery - discharge Images Shoulder joint inflammation References Finnoff JT. ...

  4. Alien abduction: a medical hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, David V

    2008-01-01

    In response to a new psychological study of persons who believe they have been abducted by space aliens that found that sleep paralysis, a history of being hypnotized, and preoccupation with the paranormal and extraterrestrial were predisposing experiences, I noted that many of the frequently reported particulars of the abduction experience bear more than a passing resemblance to medical-surgical procedures and propose that experience with these may also be contributory. There is the altered state of consciousness, uniformly colored figures with prominent eyes, in a high-tech room under a round bright saucerlike object; there is nakedness, pain and a loss of control while the body's boundaries are being probed; and yet the figures are thought benevolent. No medical-surgical history was apparently taken in the above mentioned study, but psychological laboratory work evaluated false memory formation. I discuss problems in assessing intraoperative awareness and ways in which the medical hypothesis could be elaborated and tested. If physicians are causing this syndrome in a percentage of patients, we should know about it; and persons who feel they have been abducted should be encouraged to inform their surgeons and anesthesiologists without challenging their beliefs.

  5. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0A degrees......Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven...... muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper...

  6. A Bizarre, Unexplained, and Progressive External Rotation of the Shoulder as a Presentation of a Metastatic Deposit in the Rotator Cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif El-Tawil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the first reported case of a tumour deposit within the rotator cuff presenting as a bizarre, progressive, and fixed external rotation deformity of the shoulder. It is also the first reported case to our knowledge of an oesophageal primary metastasising to the rotator cuff.

  7. Shoulder replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Replacement - shoulder - discharge; Arthroplasty - shoulder - discharge

  8. The Effect of Fatigued External Rotator Muscles of the Shoulder on the Shoulder Position Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Iida

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of fatigue in shoulder external rotator muscles on position sense of shoulder abduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. The study included 10 healthy subjects. Shoulder position sense was measured before and after a fatigue task involving shoulder external rotator muscles. The fatigue task was performed using an isokinetic machine. To confirm the muscle fatigue, electromyography (EMG was recorded, and an integrated EMG and median power frequency (MDF during 3 sec performed target torque were calculated. After the fatigue task, the MDF of the infraspinatus muscle significantly decreased. This indicates that the infraspinatus muscle was involved in the fatigue task. In addition, the shoulder position sense of internal and external rotation significantly decreased after the fatigue task. These results suggest that the fatigue reduced the accuracy of sensory input from muscle spindles. However, no significant difference was observed in shoulder position sense of abduction before and after the fatigue task. This may be due to the fact that infraspinatus muscle did not act as prime movers in shoulder abduction. These results suggest that muscle fatigue decreased position sense during movements in which the affected muscles acted as prime movers.

  9. On the Implementation of Global Abduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2007-01-01

    Global Abduction (GA) is a recently proposed logical formalism for agent oriented programming which allows an agent to collect information about the world and update this in a nonmonotonic way when changes in the world are observed. A distinct feature of Global Abduction is that in case the agent...

  10. A concept analysis of abductive reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Noeman A; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Noesgaard, Charlotte; Martin, Lynn; Staples, Eric

    2014-09-01

    To describe an analysis of the concept of abductive reasoning. In the discipline of nursing, abductive reasoning has received only philosophical attention and remains a vague concept. In addition to deductive and inductive reasoning, abductive reasoning is not recognized even in prominent nursing knowledge development literature. Therefore, what abductive reasoning is and how it can inform nursing practice and education was explored. Concept analysis. Combinations of specific keywords were searched in Web of Science, CINAHL, PsychINFO, PubMed, Medline and EMBASE. The analysis was conducted in June 2012 and only literature before this period was included. No time limits were set. Rodger's evolutionary method for conducting concept analysis was used. Twelve records were included in the analysis. The most common surrogate term was retroduction, whereas related terms included intuition and pattern and similarity recognition. Antecedents consisted of a complex, puzzling situation and a clinician with creativity, experience and knowledge. Consequences included the formation of broad hypotheses that enhance understanding of care situations. Overall, abductive reasoning was described as the process of hypothesis or theory generation and evaluation. It was also viewed as inference to the best explanation. As a new approach, abductive reasoning could enhance reasoning abilities of novice clinicians. It can not only incorporate various ways of knowing but also its holistic approach to learning appears to be promising in problem-based learning. As nursing literature on abductive reasoning is predominantly philosophical, practical consequences of abductive reasoning warrant further research. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Isometric shoulder strength in young swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaine, Sally J; Ginn, Karen A; Fell, James W; Bird, Marie-Louise

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of shoulder pain in young swimmers is high. Shoulder rotation strength and the ratio of internal to external rotation strength have been reported as potential modifiable risk factors associated with shoulder pain. However, relative strength measures in elevated positions, which include flexion and extension, have not been established for the young swimmer. The aim of this study was to establish clinically useful, normative shoulder strength measures and ratios for swimmers (14-20 years) without shoulder pain. Cross-sectional, observational study. Swimmers (N=85) without a recent history of shoulder pain underwent strength testing of shoulder flexion and extension (in 140° abduction); and internal and external rotation (in 90° abduction). Strength tests were performed in supine using a hand-held dynamometer and values normalised to body weight. Descriptive statistics were calculated for strength and strength ratios (flexion:extension and internal:external rotation). Differences between groups (based on gender, history of pain, test and arm dominance) were explored using independent and paired t tests. Normative shoulder strength values and ratios were established for young swimmers. There was a significant difference (pdifferences in strength ratios. Relative strength of the dominant and non-dominant shoulders (except for extension); and for swimmers with and without a history of shoulder pain was not significantly different. A normal shoulder strength profile for the young swimmer has been established which provides a valuable reference for the clinician assessing shoulder strength in this population. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Total shoulder replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, O; Fruensgaard, S; Johannsen, Hans Viggo

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 62 Neer mark II total shoulder arthroplasties performed during the period from 1981 to 1990 on 51 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was undertaken to evaluate factors associated with component loosening and proximal humeral migration. Thirty-two (51%) showed proximal......, range of movement, abduction force, or function. The risk of clinical asymptomatic loosening is a relatively late complication that is eventually followed by pronounced bone destruction related to the loose component. Long-term radiographic control of total shoulders with rheumatoid arthritis...... is recommended. Hemiarthroplasty with a cemented humeral prosthesis may be a better treatment in the end stage of rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder....

  13. Kidnapping and abduction minimizing the threat and lessons in survival

    CERN Document Server

    Heard, Brian John

    2014-01-01

    Terrorist groups and organized crime cartels pose an increasing threat of kidnapping throughout many regions in the word. At the same time, international travel has become more commonplace for both business and leisure purposes. Kidnapping and Abduction: Minimizing the Threat and Lessons in Survival provides a practical guide on the precautions travelers can take to avoid being kidnapped or derail a kidnapping attempt in progress. In the event this cannot be avoided, the book supplies advice on how to ensure survival during captivity. Readers will learn: The basic elements of kidnapping and abduction The motivations and mechanisms of kidnappers The hotspots where kidnapping/hostage taking is prevalent Vehicles best suited for avoidance of kidnap threat and proposals for up-armoring an existing vehicle How to recognize immediate threats and precautions to be taken in assessing threat level The types of weapons most favored by kidnappers and their threat level Available bullet-resistant materials and their use ...

  14. Irreducible Traumatic Posterior Shoulder Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Collier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 22-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department complaining of right shoulder pain after a motocross accident. He was traveling at approximately 10 mph around a turn when he lost control and was thrown over the handlebars, landing directly on his right shoulder. On arrival, he was holding his arm in adduction and internal rotation. An area of swelling was noted over his anterior shoulder. He was unable to abduct his shoulder. No humeral gapping was noted. He had normal neuro-vascular status distal to the injury. Significant findings: Radiographs demonstrated posterior displacement of the humeral head on the “Y” view (see white arrow and widening of the glenohumeral joint space on anterior-posterior view (see red arrow. The findings were consistent with posterior dislocation and a Hill-Sachs type deformity. Sedation was performed and reduction was attempted using external rotation, traction counter-traction. An immediate “pop” was felt during the procedure. Post-procedure radiographs revealed a persistent posterior subluxation with interlocking at posterior glenoid. CT revealed posterior dislocation with acute depressed impaction deformity medial to the biceps groove with the humeral head perched on the posterior glenoid, interlocked at reverse Hill-Sachs deformity (see blue arrow. Discussion: Posterior shoulder dislocations are rare and represent only 2% of all shoulder dislocations. Posterior shoulder dislocations are missed on initial diagnosis in more than 60% of cases.1 Posterior shoulder dislocations result from axial loading of the adducted and internally rotated shoulder, violent muscle contractions (resulting from seizures or electrocution, a direct posterior force applied to the anterior shoulder.1 Physical findings include decreased anterior prominence of the humeral head, increased palpable posterior prominence of the humeral head below the acromion, increased palpable prominence of the

  15. Effectiveness of a Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation Program Following Shoulder Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bean

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder injuries in working age adults result in a major cost to the health care system. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a new multidisciplinary rehabilitation program and to explore factors that affected a successful return to work (RTW in injured workers with shoulder problems who received this program. Methods: This was a prospective longitudinal study. The patient-oriented outcome measures were the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH. Range of motion (ROM in flexion, abduction, and external rotation and strength in lifting and push/pull were documented. All outcomes were measured before and at the completion of the program. Results: Data of 68 patients were used for analysis. All outcomes showed a statistically significant improvement over time. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs help to improve pain, disability, ROM, strength, and facilitate RTW. Higher stress and a fast-paced work environment increased the risk of not progressing in work status.

  16. Abductive networks applied to electronic combat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Gerard J.; Hess, Paul; Hwang, Jong S.

    1990-08-01

    A practical approach to dealing with combinatorial decision problems and uncertainties associated with electronic combat through the use of networks of high-level functional elements called abductive networks is presented. It describes the application of the Abductory Induction Mechanism (AIMTM) a supervised inductive learning tool for synthesizing polynomial abductive networks to the electronic combat problem domain. From databases of historical expert-generated or simulated combat engagements AIM can often induce compact and robust network models for making effective real-time electronic combat decisions despite significant uncertainties or a combinatorial explosion of possible situations. The feasibility of applying abductive networks to realize advanced combat decision aiding capabilities was demonstrated by applying AIM to a set of electronic combat simulations. The networks synthesized by AIM generated accurate assessments of the intent lethality and overall risk associated with a variety of simulated threats and produced reasonable estimates of the expected effectiveness of a group of electronic countermeasures for a large number of simulated combat scenarios. This paper presents the application of abductive networks to electronic combat summarizes the results of experiments performed using AIM discusses the benefits and limitations of applying abductive networks to electronic combat and indicates why abductive networks can often result in capabilities not attainable using alternative approaches. 1. ELECTRONIC COMBAT. UNCERTAINTY. AND MACHINE LEARNING Electronic combat has become an essential part of the ability to make war and has become increasingly complex since

  17. Shoulder Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hit hard with your shoulder in a football game or serve a volleyball really hard. Diagnosis How ... editorial staff Categories: Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, WomenTags: laxity, out of place, shakiness, shoulder, subluxation ...

  18. Shoulder arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007206.htm Shoulder arthroscopy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Shoulder arthroscopy is surgery that uses a tiny camera called ...

  19. Shoulder reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.; Krogsgaard, M.; Voigt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    long latency (300 ms) excitatory reflex has been found when nerves in the capsule were stimulated electrically during shoulder surgery. In addition, when the anterior-inferior capsule was excited in conscious humans with modest amplitude electrical stimuli during muscle activity, a strong inhibition...... activity around the shoulder. This has implications for rehabilitation and shoulder surgery.......Dynamic shoulder stability is dependent on muscular coordination and sensory inputs. In the shoulder, mechanoreceptors are found in the coracoacromial ligament, the rotator cuff tendons, the musculotendinous junctions of the rotator cuff and in the capsule. The number of receptors in the capsule...

  20. Decreased shoulder function and pain common in recreational badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlström, M; Söderman, K

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and consequences of painful conditions in the shoulder region in recreational badminton players. A questionnaire study was performed on 99 players, of whom 57 were also assessed with Constant score. Previous or present pain in the dominant shoulder was reported by 52% of the players. Sixteen percent of the players had on-going shoulder pain associated with badminton play. A majority of these players reported that their training habits were affected by the pain. Total Constant score was lower in the painful shoulders. Furthermore, range of active pain-free shoulder abduction was decreased. However, isometric shoulder strength test showed no differences when compared with pain-free shoulders. Even though the pain caused functional problems, the players were still playing with on-going symptoms. The diagnoses were mostly unknown, although history and clinical tests indicate problems resembling subacromial impingement.

  1. Ontogeny, phylogeny and functional morphology of the hominoid shoulder girdle

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    The shoulder is of particular relevance for resolving issues of locomotor ancestry since, as a group, living hominoids can be defined by the set of functional similarities that they share at this anatomical area (such as a scapula located on the back of the ribcage, and a shoulder joint adapted to allow extensive abduction). However, there is ongoing debate over which selective pressures are responsible for these shared morphologies. The current study addresses the question of whether the sim...

  2. Assessment of Abductive Reasoning in Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guenther, Agnes; Garbuio, Massimo; Eisenbart, Boris

    Strategic tools and frameworks mostly analyse past developments to predict future potentials and rely primarily on deductive/inductive logics. While these logics help decision-makers, they limit the pool of strategic options; resulting strategies often lack novelty. Building on the idea that ‘good......’ and ‘bad’ strategies can be differentiated and that out-of-the-boxthinking creates novel strategies, we analyse differences in strategies’ underlying logics. We develop and test a coding scheme to assess reasoning, in particular abductive reasoning. Furthermore, we introduce the notion of observation set...... and show how analogies, anomalies and paradoxes prompt abductive reasoning and create strategic options....

  3. Computational reverse shoulder prosthesis model: Experimental data and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, A; Quental, C; Folgado, J; Ambrósio, J; Monteiro, J; Sarmento, M

    2015-09-18

    The reverse shoulder prosthesis aims to restore the stability and function of pathological shoulders, but the biomechanical aspects of the geometrical changes induced by the implant are yet to be fully understood. Considering a large-scale musculoskeletal model of the upper limb, the aim of this study is to evaluate how the Delta reverse shoulder prosthesis influences the biomechanical behavior of the shoulder joint. In this study, the kinematic data of an unloaded abduction in the frontal plane and an unloaded forward flexion in the sagittal plane were experimentally acquired through video-imaging for a control group, composed of 10 healthy shoulders, and a reverse shoulder group, composed of 3 reverse shoulders. Synchronously, the EMG data of 7 superficial muscles were also collected. The muscle force sharing problem was solved through the minimization of the metabolic energy consumption. The evaluation of the shoulder kinematics shows an increase in the lateral rotation of the scapula in the reverse shoulder group, and an increase in the contribution of the scapulothoracic joint to the shoulder joint. Regarding the muscle force sharing problem, the musculoskeletal model estimates an increased activity of the deltoid, teres minor, clavicular fibers of the pectoralis major, and coracobrachialis muscles in the reverse shoulder group. The comparison between the muscle forces predicted and the EMG data acquired revealed a good correlation, which provides further confidence in the model. Overall, the shoulder joint reaction force was lower in the reverse shoulder group than in the control group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Handball load and shoulder injury rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M.; Nielsen, R.O.; Attermann, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Knowledge of injury patterns, an essential step towards injury prevention, is lacking in youth handball. Aim To investigate if an increase in handball load is associated with increased shoulder injury rates compared with a minor increase or decrease, and if an association is influenced...... by scapular control, isometric shoulder strength or glenohumeral range of motion (ROM). Methods 679 players (14-18 years) provided weekly reports on shoulder injury and handball load (training and competition hours) over 31 weeks using the SMS, phone and medical examination system. Handball load in a given...... week was categorised into (1) 60% relative to the weekly average amount of handball load the preceding 4 weeks. Assessment of shoulder isometric rotational and abduction strength, ROM and scapular control...

  5. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Cift

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients’ ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients’ reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitation of range of motion of their shoulder at their last control. Luxatio erecta is seen rarely, and these patients may have neurovascular injury. These patients should be carefully examined and treated by the orthopaedic and traumatology surgeons.

  6. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cift, Hakan; Soylemez, Salih; Demiroglu, Murat; Ozkan, Korhan; Ozden, Vahit Emre; Ozkut, Afsar T.

    2015-01-01

    Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients' ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients' reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitation of range of motion of their shoulder at their last control. Luxatio erecta is seen rarely, and these patients may have neurovascular injury. These patients should be carefully examined and treated by the orthopaedic and traumatology surgeons. PMID:25883820

  7. Biomechanical comparison of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty systems in soft tissue-constrained shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, Heath B; King, Frank K; Tashjian, Robert Z; Burks, Robert T

    2014-05-01

    Numerous studies have examined the biomechanics of isolated variables in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. This study directly compared the composite performance of two reverse total shoulder arthroplasty systems; each system was designed around either a medialized or a lateralized glenohumeral center of rotation. Seven pairs of shoulders were tested on a biomechanical simulator. Center of rotation, position of the humerus, passive and active range of motion, and force to abduct the arm were quantified. Native arms were tested, implanted with a Tornier Aequalis or DJO Surgical Reverse Shoulder Prosthesis (RSP), and then retested. Differences from the native state were then documented. Both systems shifted the center of rotation medially and inferiorly relative to native. Medial shifts were greater in the Aequalis implant (P .05). Both reverse total shoulder arthroplasty systems exhibited adduction deficits, but the RSP implant deficit was smaller (P = .046 between implants). Both systems reduced forces to abduct the arm compared with native, although the Aequalis required more force to initiate motion from the resting position (P = .022). Given the differences in system designs and configurations, outcome variables were generally comparable. The RSP implant allowed slightly more adduction, had a more lateralized humeral position, and required less force to initiate elevation. These factors may play roles in limiting scapular notching, improving active external rotation by normalizing the residual rotator cuff length, and limiting excessive stress on the deltoid. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Association of Strength Measurement with Rotator Cuff Tear in Patients with Shoulder Pain: The ROW Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer Earle; Higgins, Laurence D.; Dong, Yan; Collins, Jamie E.; Bean, Jonathan F.; Seitz, Amee L.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Jain, Nitin B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examines the association between strength measurements and supraspinatus tear in patients with shoulder pain. This study characterized determinants of abduction strength among patients with tears. Design Two-hundred and eight patients with shoulder pain (69 with and 110 without tear) were recruited. Strength was tested using hand-held dynamometer. Supraspinatus tears were diagnosed by combination of clinical assessment and blinded MRI review. Associations of supraspinatus tear with patient characteristics and strength measurements (abduction, internal rotation and external rotation) were assessed using multivariable logistic regression models. Results Patients with supraspinatus tear had decreased abduction strength (p=0.02) and decreased external rotation strength (ptear laterality, and BMI, decreased abduction strength (OR= 1.18 per kg, 95% C.I.=1.06–1.32) and decreased external rotation strength (OR=1.29 per kg, 95% C.I.=1.14–1.48) were associated with supraspinatus tear. In patients with tear, age ≥60 years, female sex, and VAS pain score were significantly associated with decreased abduction strength but tear size, fatty infiltration, and atrophy were not. Conclusions Decreased abduction and external rotation strength were associated with supraspinatus tear in patients with shoulder pain. In this cohort, the abduction strength of patients with tears, was influenced by demographic factors but not tear characteristics. PMID:26098921

  9. How does scapula motion change after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty? - a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Myung-Sun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arm elevation is composed of glenohumeral and scapulothoracic motion. Many reports have addressed changes of scapular position across a spectrum of shoulder disease. However, no study has examined changes in scapular position after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in scapular position after RTSA compared to patients’ contralateral, nonoperated shoulder. Methods Seven patients that underwent RTSA for cuff tear arthropathy from July 2007 to October 2008 were enrolled. The distance between the long axis of the thoracic spine and the inferior pole of the scapula (lateralization of the scapula was measured on shoulder A-P radiographs at 0 degrees (the neutral position and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 degrees of shoulder abduction. In addition, the angle between the long axis of the thoracic spine and medial border of the scapula was measured and compared with the patients’ contralateral shoulder. Results Scapulohumeral rhythm was 2.4:1 on the operated shoulder and 4.1:1 on the nonoperated, contralateral shoulder at 120 degrees of abduction. The distance between the line of the interspinous process of upper thoracic vertebra and the inferior pole of the scapula showed a negative slope at 0 to 30 degrees abduction on the operated side, but beyond 30 degrees of abduction, this distance showed a more sudden increase than in the contralateral shoulder. The angle between the vertical vertebral line and the scapular medial border also showed greater increase beyond 30 degrees abduction on the operated limb. Conclusions The pattern of scapular position after RTSA, was found to differ from that of the contralateral shoulder, and showed a more scapular upward rotation.

  10. Relationship between isometric shoulder strength and arms-only swimming power among male collegiate swimmers: study of valid clinical assessment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awatani, Takenori; Morikita, Ikuhiro; Mori, Seigo; Shinohara, Junji; Tatsumi, Yasutaka

    2018-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to confirm the relationships between shoulder strength (extensor strength and internal rotator strength) of the abducted position and swimming power during arm-only swimming. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen healthy male collegiate swimmers participated in the study. Main measures were shoulder strength (strength using torque that was calculated from the upper extremity length and the isometric force of the abducted position) and swimming power. [Results] Internal rotation torque of the dominant side in the abducted external rotated position (r=0.85) was significantly correlated with maximum swimming power. The rate of bilateral difference in extension torque in the maximum abducted position (r=-0.728) was significantly correlated with the swimming velocity-to-swimming power ratio. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that internal rotator strength measurement in the abducted external rotated position and extensor strength measurement in the maximum abducted position are valid assessment methods for swimmers.

  11. Effects of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on in vivo shoulder motion and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Timothy G; Dischler, Jack; Mende, Veronica; Zauel, Roger; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Siegal, Daniel S; Divine, George; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    The incidence of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears has been reported to range from 15% to 39%, but the influence of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on shoulder function is not well understood. This study assessed the effects of asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology on shoulder kinematics, strength, and patient-reported outcomes. A clinical ultrasound examination was performed in 46 asymptomatic volunteers (age: 60.3 ± 7.5 years) with normal shoulder function to document the condition of their rotator cuff. The ultrasound imaging identified the participants as healthy (n = 14) or pathologic (n = 32). Shoulder motion was measured with a biplane x-ray imaging system, strength was assessed with a Biodex (Biodex Medical Systems, Inc., Shirley, NY, USA), and patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and visual analog scale pain scores. Compared with healthy volunteers, those with rotator cuff pathology had significantly less abduction (P = .050) and elevation (P = .041) strength, their humerus was positioned more inferiorly on the glenoid (P = .018), and the glenohumeral contact path length was longer (P = .007). No significant differences were detected in the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index, visual analog scale, range of motion, or acromiohumeral distance. The differences observed between the healthy volunteers and those with asymptomatic rotator cuff pathology lend insight into the changes in joint mechanics, shoulder strength, and conventional clinical outcomes associated with the early stages of rotator cuff pathology. Furthermore, these findings suggest a plausible mechanical progression of kinematic and strength changes associated with the development of rotator cuff pathology. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of 3-Dimensional Shoulder Complex Kinematics in Individuals With and Without Shoulder Pain, Part 1: Sternoclavicular, Acromioclavicular, and Scapulothoracic Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAWRENCE, REBEKAH L.; BRAMAN, JONATHAN P.; LAPRADE, ROBERT F.; LUDEWIG, PAULA M.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional. OBJECTIVES To compare sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and scapulothoracic joint motion between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals during shoulder motion performed in 3 planes of humerothoracic elevation. BACKGROUND Differences in scapulothoracic kinematics are associated with shoulder pain. Several studies have measured these differences using surface sensors, but the results of this technique may be affected by skin-motion artifact. Furthermore, previous studies have not included the simultaneous measurement of sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joint motion. METHODS Transcortical bone pins were inserted into the clavicle, scapula, and humerus of 12 asymptomatic and 10 symptomatic individuals for direct, bone-fixed tracking using electromagnetic sensors. Angular positions for the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and scapulothoracic joints were measured during shoulder flexion, abduction, and scapular plane abduction. RESULTS Differences between groups were found for sternoclavicular and scapulothoracic joint positions. Symptomatic individuals consistently demonstrated less sternoclavicular posterior rotation, regardless of angle, phase, or plane of shoulder motion. Symptomatic individuals also demonstrated less scapulothoracic upward rotation at 30° and 60° of humerothoracic elevation during shoulder abduction and scapular plane abduction. CONCLUSION The results of this study show that differences in shoulder complex kinematics exist between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. However, the magnitude of these differences was small, and the resulting clinical implications are not yet fully understood. The biomechanical coupling of the sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joints requires further research to better understand scapulothoracic movement deviations and to improve manual therapy and exercise-based physical therapy interventions. PMID:25103135

  13. Shoulder reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Voigt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic shoulder stability is dependent on muscular coordination and sensory inputs. In the shoulder, mechanoreceptors are found in the coracoacromial ligament, the rotator cuff tendons, the musculotendinous junctions of the rotator cuff and in the capsule. The number of receptors in the capsule...

  14. Painful shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benno Ejnismann

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many factors can be involved in the painful shoulder. Beyond articularcauses other pathologies such as artrosis, periarticular diseases as rotadorcuff tears, long head of the biceps tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, calcifyingtendinitis, degenerative arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint, cervicalradiculopathy and nervous injuries can cause pain in the shoulder.

  15. Shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobman, William

    2013-03-01

    The frequency of shoulder dystocia in different reports has varied, ranging 0.2-3% of all vaginal deliveries. Once a shoulder dystocia occurs, even if all actions are appropriately taken, there is an increased frequency of complications, including third- or fourth-degree perineal lacerations, postpartum hemorrhage, and neonatal brachial plexus palsies. Health care providers have a poor ability to predict shoulder dystocia for most patients and there remains no commonly accepted model to accurately predict this obstetric emergency. Consequently, optimal management of shoulder dystocia requires appropriate management at the time it occurs. Multiple investigators have attempted to enhance care of shoulder dystocia by utilizing protocols and simulation training. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Shoulder morbidity after non-surgical treatment of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouwe, Merian van; Bree, Remco de; Kuik, Dirk J.; Goede, Cees J.T. de; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.; Doornaert, Patricia; Rene Leemans, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reports on shoulder function after non-surgical treatment are not available. In the present study shoulder morbidity after surgical and non-surgical treatment of the neck is determined and compared. Materials and methods: In 100 head and neck cancer patients 174 neck sides were treated by surgery (n = 51) or (chemo)radiation (n = 123). Abduction, anteflexion, endorotation and exorotation were assessed. Subjective measurements were performed using the Visual Analogue Scale for pain, the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ) and stiffness reporting. Results: Predictive factors for SDQ-score > 0 (n = 54) were VAS pain score, stiffness, abduction, anteflexion, physiotherapy, low shoulder position and surgical treatment. The SDQ, stiffness and pain scores were significantly higher in the surgically treated group than in the non-surgical group (p < 0.01). Anteflexion, abduction and exorotation were less impaired in the non-surgically treated group than in the surgically treated group (p < 0.01). No differences between neck dissection and neck dissection with post-operative radiotherapy, and radiotherapy and chemoradiation were found for these movements. Conclusions: Shoulder morbidity is often present after non-surgical treatment of the neck, but to a lesser extent compared to surgical treatment. Radiotherapy adds no morbidity to neck dissection and chemotherapy does not add extra morbidity to primary radiation

  17. Using the Microsoft Kinect™ to assess 3-D shoulder kinematics during computer use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; Robertson, Michelle; Chen, Karen B; Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W

    2017-11-01

    Shoulder joint kinematics has been used as a representative indicator to investigate musculoskeletal symptoms among computer users for office ergonomics studies. The traditional measurement of shoulder kinematics normally requires a laboratory-based motion tracking system which limits the field studies. In the current study, a portable, low cost, and marker-less Microsoft Kinect™ sensor was examined for its feasibility on shoulder kinematics measurement during computer tasks. Eleven healthy participants performed a standardized computer task, and their shoulder kinematics data were measured by a Kinect sensor and a motion tracking system concurrently. The results indicated that placing the Kinect sensor in front of the participants would yielded a more accurate shoulder kinematics measurements then placing the Kinect sensor 15° or 30° to one side. The results also showed that the Kinect sensor had a better estimate on shoulder flexion/extension, compared with shoulder adduction/abduction and shoulder axial rotation. The RMSE of front-placed Kinect sensor on shoulder flexion/extension was less than 10° for both the right and the left shoulder. The measurement error of the front-placed Kinect sensor on the shoulder adduction/abduction was approximately 10° to 15°, and the magnitude of error is proportional to the magnitude of that joint angle. After the calibration, the RMSE on shoulder adduction/abduction were less than 10° based on an independent dataset of 5 additional participants. For shoulder axial rotation, the RMSE of front-placed Kinect sensor ranged between approximately 15° to 30°. The results of the study suggest that the Kinect sensor can provide some insight on shoulder kinematics for improving office ergonomics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Abduction, ASP and Open Logic Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Bonatti, Piero A.

    2002-01-01

    Open logic programs and open entailment have been recently proposed as an abstract framework for the verification of incomplete specifications based upon normal logic programs and the stable model semantics. There are obvious analogies between open predicates and abducible predicates. However, despite superficial similarities, there are features of open programs that have no immediate counterpart in the framework of abduction and viceversa. Similarly, open programs cannot be immediately simul...

  19. Shoulder replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem. Many people are able to return to sports such as golf, swimming, gardening, bowling, and others. Your new shoulder joint will last longer if less stress is placed on it. With normal use, a ...

  20. Clinical outcome of shoulder muscle transfer for shoulder deformities in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: A study of 150 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Residual muscle weakness, cross-innervation (caused by misdirected regenerating axons, and muscular imbalance are the main causes of internal rotation contractures leading to limitation of shoulder joint movement, glenoid dysplasia, and deformity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Muscle transfers and release of antagonistic muscles improve range of motion as well as halt or reverse the deterioration in the bony architecture of the shoulder joint. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of shoulder muscle transfer for shoulder abnormalities in obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty patients of obstetric brachial plexus palsy with shoulder deformity underwent shoulder muscle transfer along with anterior shoulder release at our institutions from 1999 to 2007. Shoulder function was assessed both preoperatively and postoperatively using aggregate modified Mallet score and active and passive range of motion. The mean duration of follow-up was 4 years (2.5-8 years. Results: The mean preoperative abduction was 45° ± 7.12, mean passive external rotation was 10° ± 6.79, the mean active external rotation was 0°, and the mean aggregate modified Mallet score was 11.2 ± 1.41. At a mean follow-up of 4 years (2.5-8 years, the mean active abduction was 120° ± 18.01, the mean passive external rotation was 80° ± 10.26, while the mean active external rotation was 45° ± 3.84. The mean aggregate modified Mallet score was 19.2 ± 1.66. Conclusions: This procedure can thus be seen as a very effective tool to treat internal rotation and adduction contractures, achieve functional active abduction and external rotation, as well as possibly prevent glenohumeral dysplasia, though the long-term effects of this procedure may still have to be studied in detail clinico-radiologically to confirm this hypothesis. Level of evidence: Therapeutic level IV

  1. Clinical evaluation of shoulder kinematic MRI using an open-type system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Seiichiro; Togami, Izumi; Sasai, Nobuya

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies on kinematic MRI of the shoulder using cylindrical-type MRI systems were limited to internal or external rotation. The open-type MRI system enables kinematic MRI to be carried out for the abductive position, and is expected to permit evaluation of the superior and inferior glenoid labrum. It is important to evaluate the superior and inferior glenoid labrum in cases of sports injuries (baseball, tennis, etc.). We evaluated the superior and inferior glenoid labrum for abductive motion in asymptomatic healthy volunteers as a preliminary study. As the abduction angle increased, the superior labrum moved into the joint space. Its shape changed from round or triangular to crescent (p<0.0001), and there was increased signal for larger abduction angles (p<0.0001). On the other hand, the shape of the inferior labrum tended to change from crescent to triangular or round (p<0.0001). Increased signal was seen in the inferior labrum on about half the shoulders (N.P.). This did not change as the abduction angle increased. Our results define normal patterns for the superior and inferior glenoid labrum on abductive kinematic MRI in healthy volunteers. Abductive kinematic studies using an open-type MRI system, which permits dynamic evaluation of the superior and inferior glenoid labrum, are expected to be useful for various patients with sports injuries. (author)

  2. Shoulder MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder replacement - discharge Shoulder surgery - discharge Using your shoulder after replacement surgery References Hanypsiak B, DeLong JM, Lowe WR. Scapulothoracic ...

  3. Prospective multifactorial analysis of preseason risk factors for shoulder and elbow injuries in high school baseball pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitara, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Tajika, Tsuyoshi; Osawa, Toshihisa; Iizuka, Haku; Takagishi, Kenji

    2017-10-01

    To prospectively identify preseason physical factors for shoulder and elbow injuries during the season in high school baseball pitchers. The study included 105 high school baseball pitchers [median age 16 (15-17) years]. The range of motion of the shoulder (90° abducted external and internal rotation) and elbow (extension/flexion), shoulder muscle strength (abduction and prone internal and external rotation), shoulder and elbow laxity, horizontal flexion, and scapular dyskinesis were assessed. After the season, the participants completed questionnaires regarding shoulder and/or elbow injuries, with injury defined as an inability to play for ≥1 week due to elbow/shoulder problems. The results of two groups (injured and noninjured) were compared using t tests and Chi-square analyses. Stepwise forward logistic regression models were developed to identify risk factors. Twenty-one injuries were observed. In univariate analysis, 90° abducted internal rotation and total arc of the dominant shoulder and the ratio of prone external rotation in the dominant to nondominant sides in the injured group were significantly less than those in the noninjured group (P = 0.02, 0.04, and 0.01, respectively). In logistic regression analysis, 90° abducted internal rotation in the dominant shoulder and prone external rotation ratio were significantly associated with injuries (P = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively). A low prone external rotation ratio and decreased 90° abducted internal rotation in the dominant shoulder in the preseason were significant risk factors for shoulder and elbow injuries in high school baseball pitchers. The results may contribute to reduce the incidence of these injuries. II.

  4. On the Implementation of Global Abduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2007-01-01

    needs to give up one plan, it may start a new one, or continue a suspended plan, while its beliefs learned about the world in the failed attempts persist. This paper describes an implementation of GA in the high-level language of Constraint Handling Rules (CHR). It appears to be a first attempt...... to a full implementation of GA, which also confirms CHR as a powerful meta-programming language for advanced reasoning. The construction gives rise to discussing important issues of the semantics and pragmatics of Global Abduction, leading to proposal for a specific procedural semantics and architecture...

  5. Tool wear modeling using abductive networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masory, Oren

    1992-09-01

    A tool wear model based on Abductive Networks, which consists of a network of `polynomial' nodes, is described. The model relates the cutting parameters, components of the cutting force, and machining time to flank wear. Thus real time measurements of the cutting force can be used to monitor the machining process. The model is obtained by a training process in which the connectivity between the network's nodes and the polynomial coefficients of each node are determined by optimizing a performance criteria. Actual wear measurements of coated and uncoated carbide inserts were used for training and evaluating the established model.

  6. Electromyographical Comparison of Four Common Shoulder Exercises in Unstable and Stable Shoulders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Sciascia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines if electromyographic (EMG amplitude differences exist between patients with shoulder instability and healthy controls performing scaption, prone horizontal abduction, prone external rotation, and push-up plus shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Thirty nine subjects were categorized by a single orthopedic surgeon as having multidirectional instability (n=10, anterior instability (n=9, generalized laxity (n=10, or a healthy shoulder (n=10. Indwelling and surface electrodes were utilized to measure EMG activity (reported as a % of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC in various shoulder muscles during 4 common shoulder exercises. The exercises studied effectively activated the primary musculature targeted in each exercise equally among all groups. The serratus anterior generated high activity (50–80% MVIC during a push-up plus, while the infraspinatus and teres major generated moderate-to-high activity (30–80% MVIC during both the prone horizontal and prone external rotation exercises. Scaption exercise generated moderate activity (20–50% MVIC in both rotator cuff and scapular musculature. Clinicians should feel confident in prescribing these shoulder-strengthening exercises in patients with shoulder instability as the activation levels are comparable to previous findings regarding EMG amplitudes and should improve the dynamic stabilization capability of both rotator cuff and scapular muscles using exercises designed to address glenohumeral joint instability.

  7. Shoulder biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C. Benjamin [Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, University of California, San Francisco, 500 Parnassus Avenue, MU 320W-0728 San Francisco, CA 914143 (United States)], E-mail: maben@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  8. Muscular activation during plyometric exercises in 90° of glenohumeral joint abduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbecker, Todd S; Sueyoshi, Tetsuro; Bailie, David S

    2015-01-01

    Plyometric exercises are frequently used to increase posterior rotator cuff and periscapular muscle strength and simulate demands and positional stresses in overhead athletes. The purpose of this study was to provide descriptive data on posterior rotator cuff and scapular muscle activation during upper extremity plyometric exercises in 90° of glenohumeral joint abduction. Levels of muscular activity in the posterior rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers will be high during plyometric shoulder exercises similar to previously reported electromyographic (EMG) levels of shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Descriptive laboratory study. Twenty healthy subjects were tested using surface EMG during the performance of 2 plyometric shoulder exercises: prone external rotation (PERP) and reverse catch external rotation (RCP) using a handheld medicine ball. Electrode application included the upper and lower trapezius (UT and LT, respectively), serratus anterior (SA), infraspinatus (IN), and the middle and posterior deltoid (MD and PD, respectively) muscles. A 10-second interval of repetitive plyometric exercise (PERP) and 3 repetitions of RCP were sampled. Peak and average normalized EMG data were generated. Normalized peak and average IN activity ranged between 73% and 102% and between 28% and 52% during the plyometric exercises, respectively, with peak and average LT activity measured between 79% and 131% and between 31% and 61%. SA activity ranged between 76% and 86% for peak and between 35% and 37% for average activity. Muscular activity levels in the MD and PD ranged between 49% and 72% and between 12% and 33% for peak and average, respectively. Moderate to high levels of muscular activity were measured in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers during these plyometric exercises with the glenohumeral joint abducted 90°.

  9. Shoulder Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Shoulder Fractures Email to a friend * required fields ...

  10. Three-Dimensional Scapular Kinematics in Patients with Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty during Arm Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Won; Kim, Yong In; Kim, Ha Yong; Yang, Dae Suk; Lee, Gyu Sang; Choy, Won Sik

    2016-09-01

    There have been few reports on altered kinematics of the shoulder after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA). We investigated differences in 3-dimensional (3D) scapular motions assessed using an optical tracking system between RTSA treated shoulders and asymptomatic contralateral shoulders during arm motion. Thirteen patients who underwent RTSA were assessed for active arm elevation in 2 distinct elevation planes (sagittal plane flexion and scapular plane abduction). Their mean age was 72 years (range, 69 to 79 years) and the mean follow-up was 24.4 months (range, 13 to 48 months). The dominant side was the right side in all the 13 patients, and it was also the side treated with RTSA. Scapular kinematics was recorded with an optical tracking system. The scapular kinematics and the scapulohumeral rhythm (SHR) of the RTSA shoulders and asymptomatic contralateral shoulders were recorded and analyzed during arm elevation. There were no significant differences in internal/external rotation and anterior/posterior tilting of the scapula between shoulders during arm motion (p > 0.05). However, upward rotation of the scapula differed significantly during arm motion (p = 0.035 for sagittal plane flexion; p = 0.046 for scapular plane abduction). There were significant differences in the SHR between the two shoulders (p = 0.016 for sagittal plane flexion; p = 0.021 for scapular plane abduction). The shoulder kinematics after RTSA showed significant differences from the contralateral asymptomatic shoulders. Increased upward rotation and decreased SHR after RTSA indicate that RTSA shoulders use more scapulothoracic motion and less glenohumeral motion to elevate the arm.

  11. Implementing Probabilistic Abductive Logic Programming with Constraint Handling Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2008-01-01

    A class of Probabilistic Abductive Logic Programs (PALPs) is introduced and an implementation is developed in CHR for solving abductive problems, providing minimal explanations with their probabilities. Both all-explanations and most-probable-explanations versions are given. Compared with other...

  12. Probabilistic Abductive Logic Programming in Constraint Handling Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    A class of Probabilistic Abductive Logic Programs (PALPs) is introduced and an implementation is developed in CHR for solving abductive problems, providing minimal explanations with their probabilities. Both all-explanations and most-probable-explanations versions are given. % Compared with other...

  13. Did He Jump or Was He Pushed? Abductive Practical Reasoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bex, F.J.; Bench-Capon, T.J.M.; Atkinson, K.; Francesconi, E; Sartor, E; Tiscornia, D

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present an approach to abductive reasoning in law by examining it in the context of an argumentation scheme for practical reasoning. We present a particular scheme, based on an established scheme for practical reasoning, that can be used to reason abductively about how an agent

  14. Agreement between patient self-assessment and physician assessment of shoulder range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Bastian; El Bitar, Youssef; Wolf, Brian R; Bollier, Matthew; Kuhn, John E; Hettrich, Carolyn M

    2016-10-01

    Shoulder outcome scores that include range of motion (ROM) and apprehension signs are limited by the need for direct involvement of the physician. Patient-reported outcome measures are patient centered and self-administered, and they can help physicians track the patient's progress between office visits and for long-term follow-up once the patient has been discharged. Thirty consecutive patients completed a form before their 6-month follow-up after surgery on the labrum or capsule as a result of instability or pain related to instability. The form included bilateral ROM, apprehension, and instability episodes. The same parameters were measured by the physician during the visit. The patient's and physician's responses were compared. The primary outcome was the percentage agreement with exact and approximate agreement. Exact agreement was moderate for forward elevation at 56.6%; fair for abduction and external rotation at 90° at 24.5% and 34%, respectively; and poor for internal rotation at 90° and external rotation with the arm at the side at 2.6% and 12%, respectively. Approximate agreement within a range of positive or negative 20° range was very good for forward elevation (94%), abduction (92%), and external rotation at 90° (87%); moderate for external rotation with the arm at the side; and fair for internal rotation at 90°. There was 70% agreement regarding apprehension, 93% regarding subluxation events, and 100% regarding redislocation events. Some measures of shoulder ROM showed a moderate to high level of agreement between patient-reported measurements and the physician's measurements. This method for short- and long-term follow-up could potentially replace routine clinic visits. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. QUALITATIVE STUDIES IN ACCOUNTING: THE ABDUCTIVE. RESEARCH STRATEGY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia URDARI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses to accounting researchers and proposes the use of abductive research strategy to improve the quality of accounting research outcomes. We argue that abductive reasoning has developed as a typical research method in all fields of interpretive studies but is still unrecognized by accounting researchers and practitioners. Therefore, this study aims to raise awareness on the benefits obtained through the implementation of abduction as a research strategy. Starting from Peirce (1903 and Blaikie (1993, we explore two types of abduction designs and discuss the advantages of building accounting research on grounded concepts. While this is a conceptual paper that only describes the bridge abduction reasoning can build between studying the reality and new theory emergence, we do not tackle any ethnographical case studies, social survey, or other exploratory field analyses.

  16. Flight and abduction in witchcraft and UFO lore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, J B; Houran, J

    2000-04-01

    The lore surrounding the mythical Witches' Sabbat and contemporary reports of UFO abductions share three main characteristics: the use of masks, the appearance of "Men in Black," and references to flight and abduction. We review these three commonalities with particular focus on the aspect of flight and abduction. We argue that narratives of the Witches' Sabbat and UFO abductions share the same basic structure, common symbolism, and serve the same psychological needs of providing a coherent explanation for anomalous (ambiguous) experiences while simultaneously giving the experient a sense of freedom, release, and escape from the self. This pattern of similarities suggests the possibility that UFO abductions are a modern version of tales of flight to the Sabbat.

  17. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper......-105A degrees) at a speed of approximately 120A degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder...... trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows...

  18. Video Analysis of Primary Shoulder Dislocations in Rugby Tackles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Nobukazu; Kawasaki, Takayuki; Mochizuki, Tomoyuki; Ota, Chihiro; Yoneda, Takeshi; Urayama, Shingo; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    Characteristics of rugby tackles that lead to primary anterior shoulder dislocation remain unclear. To clarify the characteristics of tackling that lead to shoulder dislocation and to assess the correlation between the mechanism of injury and morphological damage of the glenoid. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Eleven elite rugby players who sustained primary anterior shoulder dislocation due to one-on-one tackling between 2001 and 2014 were included. Using an assessment system, the tackler's movement, posture, and shoulder and head position were evaluated in each phase of tackling. Based on 3-dimensional computed tomography, the glenoid of the affected shoulder was classified into 3 types: intact, erosion, and bone defect. Orientation of the glenoid defect and presence of Hill-Sachs lesion were also evaluated. Eleven tackles that led to primary shoulder dislocation were divided into hand, arm, and shoulder tackle types based on the site at which the tackler contacted the ball carrier initially. In hand and arm tackles, the tackler's shoulder joint was forcibly moved to horizontal abduction by the impact of his upper limb, which appeared to result from an inappropriate approach to the ball carrier. In shoulder tackles, the tackler's head was lowered and was in front of the ball carrier at impact. There was no significant correlation between tackle types and the characteristics of bony lesions of the shoulder. Although the precise mechanism of primary anterior shoulder dislocation could not be estimated from this single-view analysis, failure of individual tackling leading to injury is not uniform and can be caused by 2 main factors: failure of approach followed by an extended arm position or inappropriate posture of the tackler at impact, such as a lowered head in front of the opponent. These findings indicate that injury mechanisms should be assessed for each type of tackle, as it is unknown whether external force to the glenoid is different in each mechanism

  19. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merl, T.; Weinhardt, H.; Oettl, G.; Lenz, M.; Riel, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a method that has been advancing in the last few years to the modality of choice for diagnostic evaluation of the bone joints, as the method is capable of imaging not only the ossous but also the soft tissue components of the joint. MRI likewise has become an accepted method for diagnostic evaluation of syndromes of the shoulder, with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting rotator cuff lesions, or as an efficient MRI arthrography for evaluation of the instability or lesions of the labrocapsular complex. In the evaluation of early stages of shoulder impingement, the conventional MRI technique as a static technique yields indirect signs which in many cases do not provide the diagnostic certainty required in order to do justice to the functional nature of the syndrome. In these cases, functional MRI for imaging of the arm in abducted position and in rotational movement may offer a chance to early detect impingement and thus identify patients who will profit from treatment at an early stage [de

  20. A comparison of two portable dynamometers in the assessment of shoulder and elbow strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, HM; de Bock, GH; van Houwelingen, HC; van der Meer, RL; Mol, MC; Plus, BT; Rozing, PM; Vlieland, TPMV

    Objectives To compare the practical applicability and measurement properties of a hand-held dynamometer (MicroFET2 (R)) and a fixed dynamometer (Isobex2.1 (R)) in determining isometric strength of the shoulder and elbow. Design Muscle strength in four directions (glenohumeral abduction, external

  1. Shoulder fusion in two patients with a long-standing proximal humerus resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kager, J.; Marti, R. K.; Raaymakers, E. L. F. B.

    2011-01-01

    With a "headless" humerus active abduction and elevation of the arm are hardly possible. Especially if the humeral head was removed because of an infection, shoulder fusion is often the only safe solution for this disabling condition. Large corticocancellous, autologous bone grafts are interposed

  2. Patients who are candidates for subacromial decompression have more pronounced range of motion deficits, but do not differ in self-reported shoulder function, strength or pain compared to non-candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witten, Adam; Clausen, Mikkel B; Thorborg, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    -reported shoulder function, shoulder strength, ROM, and pain in patients with SIS considered candidates and non-candidates for subacromial decompression (SAD). METHOD: Self-reported shoulder function (Q-DASH and SPADI), maximum isometric muscle strength in shoulder abduction (Abd-strength) and external rotation (ER...... or non-candidates for SAD based on their consultation with an orthopedic specialist blinded to test results and self-reported shoulder function. All outcomes and age, gender, weight and duration of symptoms were compared using the unpaired t test or Mann-Whitney's U test as appropriate. RESULTS: One.......3 vs. 3.7, p = 0.02, effect size = 0.21). No other differences were found between the groups. CONCLUSION: A decrease in abduction and internal rotation range of motion, and increased pain during maximal abduction strength effort are associated with being considered a candidate for subacromial...

  3. Shoulder range of motion measures as risk factors for shoulder and elbow injuries in high school softball and baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Ellen; Rauh, Mitchell J; Michener, Lori A; Ellenbecker, Todd S; Garrison, J Craig; Thigpen, Charles A

    2011-09-01

    Range of motion deficits in shoulder external rotation (ER), internal rotation (IR), total rotation range of motion (ER + IR), and horizontal adduction (HA) have been retrospectively associated with overhand athletes' arm injuries. The authors expected the incidence of upper extremity injury in high school softball and baseball players with side-to-side shoulder range of motion deficits to be greater than the incidence of upper extremity injury in players with normal shoulder range of motion. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. High school softball and baseball players (N = 246) participated. Before the start of the season, passive shoulder ER, IR, and HA were assessed at 90° of abduction with the scapula stabilized. Relative risk (RR) was calculated to examine range of motion measure, by categorical criteria, and risk of upper extremity injury. Twenty-seven shoulder and elbow injuries (9 softball, 18 baseball) were observed during the season. The dominant shoulder of all injured players and baseball players displayed a significant decrease in HA (P = .05) and IR (P = .04). The dominant shoulder total rotation of injured baseball players displayed a significant decrease (mean difference = 8.0° ± 0.1°; P = .05) as compared with the dominant shoulder of uninjured baseball players. Players who displayed a decrease of ≥25° of IR in the dominant shoulder were at 4 times greater risk of upper extremity injury compared with players with a .05). There are large mean deficits in shoulder IR and HA between injured and noninjured players, but not in ER or total rotation. Passive shoulder IR loss ≥25° as compared bilaterally was predictive of arm injury. Shoulder range of motion deficits differed between sports and appeared more predictive of injury for baseball players.

  4. Hip adduction and abduction strength profiles in elite soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas; Petersen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    An ipsilateral hip adduction/abduction strength ratio of more than 90%, and hip adduction strength equal to that of the contralateral side have been suggested to clinically represent adequate strength recovery of hip adduction strength in athletes after groin injury. However, to what extent side-......-to-side symmetry in isometric hip adduction and abduction strength can be assumed in soccer players remains uncertain.......An ipsilateral hip adduction/abduction strength ratio of more than 90%, and hip adduction strength equal to that of the contralateral side have been suggested to clinically represent adequate strength recovery of hip adduction strength in athletes after groin injury. However, to what extent side...

  5. Pregnancy Complications: Shoulder Dystocia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Shoulder dystocia Shoulder dystocia Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ... women more likely than others to have shoulder dystocia? A pregnant woman may be at risk for ...

  6. Normative values of eccentric hip abduction strength in novice runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramskov, D; Pedersen, M B; Kastrup, K

    2014-01-01

    normative values of maximal eccentric hip abduction strength in novice runners. METHODS: Novice healthy runners (n = 831) were recruited through advertisements at a hospital and a university. Maximal eccentric hip abduction strength was measured with a hand-held dynamometer. The demographic variables...... was found, p values were identified using a regression equation adjusting for age and gender. Based on this, the equation to calculate normative values for relative eccentric hip abduction strength became: (1.600 + (age * -0.005) + (gender (1 = male / 0 = female) * 0.215) ± 1 or 2 * 0......PURPOSE: Low eccentric strength of the hip abductors, might increase the risk of patellofemoral pain syndrome and iliotibial band syndrome in runners. No normative values for maximal eccentric hip abduction strength have been established. Therefore the purpose of this study was to establish...

  7. Normative values of eccentric hip abduction strength in novice runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Daniel Ramskov; Pedersen, Mette Broen; Kastrup, Kristrian

    2014-01-01

    .354) Nm/kg. CONCLUSION: Normative values for maximal eccentric hip abduction strength in novice runners can be calculated by taking into account the differences in strength across genders and the decline in strength that occurs with increasing age. Age and gender were associated with maximal eccentric hip...... associated with maximal eccentric hip abduction strength from a univariate analysis were included in a multivariate linear regression model. Based on the results from the regression model, a regression equation for normative hip abduction strength is presented. RESULTS: A SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE IN MAXIMAL...... was found, p gender. Based on this, the equation to calculate normative values for relative eccentric hip abduction strength became: (1.600 + (age * -0.005) + (gender (1 = male / 0 = female) * 0.215) ± 1 or 2 * 0...

  8. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890... abduction splint is a device intended for medical purposes to stabilize the hips of a young child with...

  9. ABox abduction in ALC using a DL tableau

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Halland, K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available a DL tableau Ken Halland School of Computing University of South Africa Pretoria, South Africa hallakj@unisa.ac.za Katarina Britz Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research UKZN and CSIR Meraka Institute South Africa arina... Intelligence]: Knowledge Representation Formalisms and Methods General Terms Algorithms, Theory Keywords Description logics, abduction, semantic tableaux 1. INTRODUCTION Abduction is a form of non-standard reasoning where expla- nations are sought...

  10. Hip adduction and abduction strength profiles in elite soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas; Petersen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    An ipsilateral hip adduction/abduction strength ratio of more than 90%, and hip adduction strength equal to that of the contralateral side have been suggested to clinically represent adequate strength recovery of hip adduction strength in athletes after groin injury. However, to what extent side-......-to-side symmetry in isometric hip adduction and abduction strength can be assumed in soccer players remains uncertain....

  11. The champagne toast position isolates the supraspinatus better than the Jobe test: an electromyographic study of shoulder physical examination tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Peter N; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Kupfer, Noam; Wimmer, Markus A; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Nicholson, Gregory P

    2016-02-01

    While Jobe's test is widely used, it does not isolate supraspinatus activity. Our purpose was to examine the electromyographic (EMG) activity within the supraspinatus and deltoid with resisted abduction to determine the shoulder position that best isolates the activity of the supraspinatus. We performed EMG analysis of the supraspinatus, anterior head of the deltoid, and middle head of the deltoid in 10 normal volunteers. We measured EMG activity during resisted shoulder abduction in the scapular plane to both manual resistance and a standardized load in varying degrees of abduction and rotation. To determine which position best isolates supraspinatus activity, the ratio of supraspinatus to deltoid activity (S:D) was calculated for each position. Results were analyzed with a repeated-measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction. The posterior deltoid was excluded as it serves mostly to extend and externally rotate. Our study confirmed Jobe's findings of maximal supraspinatus activity at 90° of abduction. However, decreasing abduction significantly increased S:D for both resisted manual testing and testing against a standardized load (P = .002 and .001, respectively). The greatest S:D ratio (4.6 ± 3.4 for standardized load testing) was seen at the "champagne toast" position, i.e., 30° of abduction, mild external rotation, 30° of flexion, and 90° of elbow flexion. The smallest ratio (0.8 ± 0.6) was seen at Jobe's position. Testing of abduction strength in the champagne toast position, i.e., 30° of abduction, mild external rotation, and 30° of flexion, better isolates the activity of the supraspinatus from the deltoid than Jobe's "empty can" position. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stemless shoulder arthroplasty: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, R Sean

    2014-09-01

    Since the original Neer humeral replacement in the 1950s, the standard primary anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty design has slowly evolved. Most recently, the humeral stem has become progressively shorter to help combat stem-related complications. Currently, there are several companies who have developed and marketed a stemless humeral arthroplasty component. Manufacturers' data for 5 stemless shoulder arthroplasty components currently on the market were analyzed and reviewed. A literature review of short-term results for stemless shoulder arthroplasty was completed. Of the stemless shoulder arthroplasty systems available on the market, 3 are currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States. The Tornier Simpliciti (Tornier, Edina, MN, USA) clinical trial began in 2011. The study with 2-year minimum follow-up results is scheduled for completion in November 2014. The Arthrex Eclipse (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) clinical trial was started in January 2013. The tentative study completion date is 2017. The Biomet Nano (Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA) clinical trial began in October 2013 and also has a tentative completion date of 2017. No other clinical trial is currently under way in the United States. Early results for stemless shoulder arthroplasty indicate clinical results similar to standard stemmed shoulder arthroplasty. Radiographic analysis indicates implant stability without migration or subsidence at 2- to 3-year minimum follow-up.. Several stemless shoulder arthroplasty implants are available outside the United States. Early clinical and radiographic results are promising, but well-designed clinical studies and midterm results are lacking. Three clinical trials are currently under way in the United States with initial availability for use anticipated in 2015. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Shoulder impairment before breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Ann Marie; Dwyer, Kathleen

    2014-09-01

    To compare pre- and post-operative shoulder active range of motion (AROM) values from female breast cancer survivors to population norm values for shoulder AROM; and to compare shoulder AROM differences pre- and post-surgery between female African American and White breast cancer survivors (BCA). This pilot study used a convenience sample and longitudinal design measuring participants 2 times (T0 = baseline, after biopsy but within 2 weeks before BCA surgery; T1 = 2 nd postoperative week). The U.S. has the largest BCA survivor population in history and yet the mortality burden remains highest among AA BCA survivors. AAs may also have greater burden of physical and functional side effects compared to whites and the general population. The data were collected from a convenience sample (n = 33; n AA = 9, n W = 24) and included data on shoulder AROM, medical chart review for pre- and co-morbid conditions, and self-reported demographics and medical history. We used t-tests to compare sample AROM means to population norms. We then compared our sample across 2 timepoints (T0 = pre-surgery; T1 = 2 weeks post-surgery) using independent samples t-tests and repeated measures analysis of variance (p shoulder abduction (at T0) and flexion (at T1) than whites. However, 100% had significantly reduced AROM for all movements at T0 (prior to surgery but after biopsy) when compared to population norms. The significant reduction in shoulder AROM after biopsy but before surgery points to a possible unmet need for early physical therapy intervention. Further research using randomized controlled trial design is recommended.

  14. Suprascapular nerve block for the treatment of frozen shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korhan Ozkan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of our study was to compare the effects of suprascapular nerve block in patients with frozen shoulder and diabetes mellitus unresponsive to intraarticular steroid injections. Settings and Design: Ten patients without improvement of sign and symptoms after intraarticular injections were made a suprascapular nerve block. Methods: Pain levels and active range of movement of patients were recorded at initial attendance and after 1, 4, and 12 weeks. All patients′ simple pain scores, total pain scores, and range of motion of their shoulders were improved significantly after suprascapular nerve block. Statistical Analysis: In this study, the statistical analyses were performed by using the SPSS 8.0 program (SPSS Software, SPSS Inc., USA. To compare pre- and post-injection results of simple pain score, total pain score, shoulder abduction and external rotation, Wilcoxon test was used. Results: Patient′s simple pain scores, total pain scores also abduction, external rotation and internal rotation angles were improved significantly after suprascapular nerve block. Conclusion: Effective results after suprascapular nerve blockage was obtained for the treatment of refractory frozen shoulder cases.

  15. Neck and shoulder muscle strength in patients with tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bjarne K; Søgaard, Karen; Andersen, Lars L.

    2016-01-01

    in TTH patients and healthy controls by examining maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) during shoulder abduction, neck flexion and extension as well as the extension/flexion strength ratio of the neck. METHODS: Sixty TTH patients and 30 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were included......INTRODUCTION: Tension-type headache (TTH) is highly prevalent in the general population, and it is characterized by increased muscle tenderness with increasing headache frequency and intensity. AIM: The aim of this case-control study was to compare muscle strength in neck and shoulder muscles....... Patients were included if they had TTH ≥8 days per month. The MVC neck extensor and flexor muscles were tested with the participant seated upright. MVC shoulder abduction was tested with the individual lying supine. RESULTS: Compared to controls TTH patients had significantly weaker muscle strength in neck...

  16. Isometric Shoulder Strength Reference Values for Physically Active Collegiate Males and Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Richard B.; Duffey, Michele L.; Cameron, Kenneth L.; Gerber, J. Parry; Owens, Brett D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is common clinical practice to assess muscle strength during examination of patients following shoulder injury or surgery. Strength comparisons are often made between the patient’s injured and uninjured shoulders, with the uninjured side used as a reference without regard to upper extremity dominance. Despite the importance of strength measurements, little is known about expected normal baselines of the uninjured shoulder. The purpose of this study was to report normative values for isometric shoulder strength for physically active college-age men and women without history of shoulder injury. Methods: University students—546 males (18.8 ± 1.0 years, 75.3 ± 12.2 kg) and 73 females (18.7 ± 0.9 years, 62.6 ± 7.0 kg)—underwent thorough shoulder evaluations by an orthopaedic surgeon and completed bilateral isometric strength measurements with a handheld dynamometer. Variables measured included internal rotation, external rotation, abduction, supine internal rotation and external rotation at 45°, and lower trapezius in prone flexion. Results: Significant differences were found between the dominant and nondominant shoulder for internal rotation, internal rotation at 45°, abduction, and prone flexion in males and in internal rotation at 45° and prone flexion for females (P ≤ 0.01). PMID:24381696

  17. [POKING REDUCTION TREATMENT OF DISPLACED SCAPULAR NECK FRACTURE WITH SHOULDER ARTHROSCOPY-ASSISTED SURGERY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Feng; Yuan, Bangtuo; Qi, Wei; Wang, Junliang; Shen, Xuezhen; Wang, Jiangtao; Zhao, Gang; Liu, Yujie

    2014-07-01

    To discuss the effectiveness of Poking reduction with shoulder arthroscopy-assisted surgery for displaced scapular neck fracture. Between January 2009 and January 2012, 9 cases of displaced scapular neck fracture underwent shoulder arthroscopy-assisted surgery for Poking reduction treatment. Of 9 cases, 6 were men, and 3 were women, aged 21-54 years (mean, 39 years). The causes were traffic accident injury in 7 cases, falling injury from height in 1 case, and hurt injury in 1 case. The shoulder abduction, flexion, and external rotation were obviously limited. X-ray films showed all cases had obvious displaced scapular neck fracture. Three-dimensional reconstruction of CT showed a grossly displaced of fracture. The time of injury to surgery was 4-27 days (mean, 11 days). Patients obtained healing of incision by first intension, without infection, neurovascular injury, or other surgery-related complications. All patients were followed up 19- 31 months (mean, 23 months). X-ray films showed scapular neck fractures healed from 7 to 11 weeks (mean, 8 weeks). At last follow-up, the shoulder abduction, flexion, and external rotation activity were improved significantly when compared with ones at preoperation (P shoulder Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgenos (ASES) score, and Rowe score were significantly better than preoperative scores (P shoulder stability and reduce complications.

  18. MID-LONG TERM RESULTS OF MANIPULATION AND ARTHROSCOPIC RELEASE IN FROZEN SHOULDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    CELIK, HALUK; SECKIN, MUSTAFA FAIK; AKCAL, MEHMET AKIF; KARA, ADNAN; KILINC, BEKIR ERAY; AKMAN, SENOL

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Surgical treatment options should be discussed in cases of frozen shoulder, which is usually treated in a conservative manner. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of manipulation and arthroscopic release in cases of frozen shoulder which resisted conservative treatment. Methods: A total of 32 patients who underwent manipulation and arthroscopic capsular release in 34 shoulders were included in the study. The average follow-up period was 49.5 months (range: 24-90 months). No reason for onset could be found in 8 (25%) patients, who were classified as primary frozen shoulder; twenty-four (75%) patients were classified as secondary frozen shoulder due to underlying pathologies. The average pre-operative complaint period was 11 months (range: 3-24 months). After arthroscopic examination, manipulation was performed first, followed by arthroscopic capsular release. The range of motion in both shoulders was compared before the procedure and in the last follow-up visit. Constant and Oxford classifications were used to assess functional results, and the results were assessed statistically. Results: Patient values for passive elevation, abduction, adduction-external rotation, abduction-external rotation, and abduction-internal rotation increased in a statistically significant manner between the preoperative assessment and follow-up evaluation (p<0.01). The average change of 47.97±21.03 units observed in the patients’ values obtained in the control measurements against the pre-op Constant scores was determined to be statistically significant (p<0.01). According to the Oxford classification, 29 shoulders were sufficient. Conclusion: Successful results can be obtained with arthroscopic release performed after manipulation in patients with frozen shoulder resistant to conservative treatment. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:29375258

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-02-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages.

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Jan van Breemen Inst., Amsterdam; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-01-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages. (orig.) [de

  1. HYPROLOG: A New Logic Programming Language with Assumptions and Abduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning; Dahl, Veronica

    2005-01-01

    We present HYPROLOG, a novel integration of Prolog with assumptions and abduction which is implemented in and partly borrows syntax from Constraint Handling Rules (CHR) for integrity constraints. Assumptions are a mechanism inspired by linear logic and taken over from Assumption Grammars. The lan......We present HYPROLOG, a novel integration of Prolog with assumptions and abduction which is implemented in and partly borrows syntax from Constraint Handling Rules (CHR) for integrity constraints. Assumptions are a mechanism inspired by linear logic and taken over from Assumption Grammars....... The language shows a novel flexibility in the interaction between the different paradigms, including all additional built-in predicates and constraints solvers that may be available. Assumptions and abduction are especially useful for language processing, and we can show how HYPROLOG works seamlessly together...

  2. Child abduction murder: the impact of forensic evidence on solvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine M; Keppel, Robert D

    2012-03-01

    This study examined 733 child abduction murders (CAMs) occurring from 1968 to 2002 to explore the influence of forensic evidence on case solvability in CAM investigations. It was hypothesized that the presence of forensic evidence connecting the offender to the crime would enhance case solvability in murder investigations of abducted children. This study examined the impact of CAM of different types of forensic evidence and the impact of the summed total of forensic evidence items on case solvability by controlling for victim age, victim race, victim gender, and victim-offender relationship. Time and distance theoretical predictors were also included. Binomial logistic regression models were used to determine whether forensic evidence was a critical solvability factor in murder investigations of abducted children. This research indicated that, while forensic evidence increased case solvability, the impact of forensic evidence on solvability was not as important as other solvability factors examined. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. Shoulder pain -- a common problem in world-class badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlström, Martin; Yeap, Joo Seng; Alfredson, Håkan; Söderman, Kerstin

    2006-06-01

    Badminton is a sport that requires a lot of over-shoulder motion, with the shoulder in abduction/external rotation. This questionnaire study on 188 international top-level badminton players during the World Mixed Team Championships showed that previous or present shoulder pain on the dominant side was reported by 52% of the players. Previous shoulder pain was reported by 37% of the players and on-going shoulder pain by 20% of the players. There were no significant differences in the prevalence of shoulder pain between men and women. The majority of the shoulder pain had started gradually. The pain was usually associated with shoulder activity, and stiffness was a common, associated symptom. Furthermore, the shoulder pain was associated with consequences such as sleeping disturbances, changes in training and competition habits, and it also affected activities of daily living. The majority of the players had sought medical advice and had been given different kinds of treatment. The study showed that shoulder pain is a common and significant problem in world-class badminton players, and the consequences are most likely of importance for their training and playing capacity.

  4. A soft wearable robot for the shoulder: Design, characterization, and preliminary testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Ciaran T; Phipps, Nathan S; Cappello, Leonardo; Paganoni, Sabrina; Walsh, Conor J

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we present a soft wearable robot for the shoulder which has the potential to assist individuals suffering from a range of neuromuscular conditions affecting the shoulder to perform activities of daily living. This wearable robot combines two types of soft textile pneumatic actuators which were custom developed for this particular application to support the upper arm through shoulder abduction and horizontal flexion/extension. The advantage of a textile-based approach is that the robot can be lightweight, low-profile, comfortable and non-restrictive to the wearer, and easy to don like an item of clothing. The actuator's ability to fold flat when not in use allows the robot to be almost invisible under clothing, potentially allowing the user to avoid any stigma associated with using assistive devices in public. To abduct the arm, a textilebased pneumatic actuator was developed to fit within the axilla to push the arm upwards, while a pair of smaller actuators pivot the abduction actuator to allow for horizontal extension and flexion. The individual textile actuators were experimentally evaluated before being integrated into a wearable garment. Human subject testing was performed to evaluate the ability of the robot to assist the arm by monitoring changes in biological muscle activity when comparing the robot powered on and off. Preliminary results show large reductions in muscular effort in targeted muscles, demonstrating the feasibility and promise of such a soft wearable robot for the shoulder.

  5. Using your shoulder after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulder surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder surgery - after ... rotator cuff surgery or other ligament or labral surgery, you need to be careful with your shoulder. Ask the surgeon what arm movements are safe ...

  6. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000179.htm Shoulder surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had shoulder surgery to repair the tissues inside or around your ...

  7. Correlations among visual analogue scale, neck disability index, shoulder joint range of motion, and muscle strength in young women with forward head posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young Jun; Kim, Won Hyo; Kim, Seong Gil

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the correlation between the neck disability index (NDI) and visual analogue scale (VAS), which are indicators of neck pain, shoulder joint range of motion (ROM), and muscle strength in women with a slight forward head posture. This study was carried out on 42 female college students attending Uiduk University in Gyeongju, Korea. The neck pain and disability index for each subject was measured using VAS and NDI, respectively. Two physiotherapists measured the shoulder joint ROM and muscle strengths of the subjects using a goniometer and a dynamometer, respectively. External rotation, internal rotation, and abduction of the shoulder joint were measured for each subject. A significant negative correlation between neck pain and shoulder joint ROM in external rotation and the muscle strength of the shoulder joint in abduction was found in the subjects. In addition, a significant positive correlation was observed between ROM in external rotation and muscle strength in abduction. This study showed a significant negative correlation between neck pain and ROM in external rotation as well as between neck pain and the muscle strength in abduction.

  8. Naive ABox abduction in ALC using a DL tableau

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Halland, K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The formal definition of abduction asks what needs to be added to a knowledge base to enable an observation to be entailed by the knowledge base. An observation which is not entailed by the knowledge base will result in open branches in a complete...

  9. The CIFF proof procedure for abductive logic programming with constraints: Theory, implementation and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mancarella, P.; Terreni, G.; Sadri, F.; Toni, F.; Endriss, U.

    2009-01-01

    We present the CIFF proof procedure for abductive logic programming with constraints, and we prove its correctness. CIFF is an extension of the IFF proof procedure for abductive logic programming, relaxing the original restrictions over variable quantification (allowedness conditions) and

  10. A Unified Approach to Abductive Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    nEmesis: Which Restaurants Should You Avoid Today?, First AAAI Conference on Human Computation and Crowdsourcing (HCOMP). 07-NOV-13, . : , Young Chol...Relationships in Consumer Photo Collections using Markov Logic, 3rd International Workshop on Semantic Learning and Applications in Multimedia Applications...noisy and fragmentary observations of their behaviour . During the reporting period, we made significant progress on both applied and fundamental work

  11. Shoulder Problems in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, William G., Jr.

    A description is given of typical sport-related injuries to the shoulder area. These include: (1) brachial plexus injuries; (2) peripheral nerve injuries about the shoulder; (3) acromioclavicular injuries; (4) sternoclavicular injuries; (5) shoulder dislocations; (6) recurrent traumatic subluxation/dislocations; and (7) overuse injuries.…

  12. Characterization of a frozen shoulder model using immobilization in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Du Hwan; Lee, Kil-Ho; Lho, Yun-Mee; Ha, Eunyoung; Hwang, Ilseon; Song, Kwang-Soon; Cho, Chul-Hyun

    2016-12-08

    The objective of this study was to investigate serial changes for histology of joint capsule and range of motion of the glenohumeral joint after immobilization in rats. We hypothesized that a rat shoulder contracture model using immobilization would be capable of producing effects on the glenohumeral joint similar to those seen in patients with frozen shoulder. Sixty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into one control group (n = 8) and seven immobilization groups (n = 8 per group) that were immobilized with molding plaster for 3 days, or for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 weeks. At each time point, eight rats were euthanized for histologic evaluation of the axillary recess and for measurement of the abduction angle. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was found in the synovial tissue until 2 weeks after immobilization. However, inflammatory cells were diminished and fibrosis was dominantly observed in the synovium and subsynovial tissue 3 weeks after immobilization. From 1 week after immobilization, the abduction angle of all immobilization groups at each time point was significantly lower than that of the control group. Our study demonstrated that a rat frozen shoulder model using immobilization generates the pathophysiologic process of inflammation leading to fibrosis on the glenohumeral joint similar to that seen in patients with frozen shoulder. This model was attained within 3 weeks after immobilization. It may serve as a useful tool to investigate pathogenesis at the molecular level and identify potential target genes that are involved in the development of frozen shoulder.

  13. Foreign Affairs: Specific Action Plan Needed to Improve Response to Parental Child Abductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    the child or prejudice to interested parties; (3) secure the voluntary return of the child or to bring about an amicable resolution of the issues, and...FOREIGN AFFAIRS Specific Action Plan Needed to Improve Response to Parental Child Abductions DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release...International Parental Child Abduction 17 Page 1 GAO/NSIAD-00-10 Parental Child Abduction Page 2 GAO/NSIAD-00-10 Parental Child Abduction GAP

  14. Effects of external rotation on anteroposterior translations in the shoulder: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew J; Debski, Richard E; Voycheck, Carrie A; McMahon, Patrick J

    2014-08-01

    Using physical examination to make the diagnosis of shoulder instability can be difficult, because typical examination maneuvers are qualitative, difficult to standardize, and not reproducible. Measuring shoulder translation is especially difficult, which is a particular problem, because measuring it inaccurately may result in improper treatment of instability. The objective of this study was to use a magnetic motion tracking system to quantify the effects of external rotation of the abducted shoulder on a simulated simple translation test in healthy subjects. Specifically, we hypothesized that (1) increasing external rotation of the abducted shoulder would result in decreasing translation; (2) intraobserver repeatability would be less than 2 mm at all external rotation positions; and (3) mean side-to-side differences would be less than 2 mm at all external rotation positions. The intraobserver repeatability and side-to-side differences of AP translation were quantified with a noninvasive magnetic motion tracking system and automated data analysis routine in nine healthy subjects at four positions of external rotation with the arm abducted. A shoulder positioning apparatus was used to maintain the desired arm position. No differences in translations between the positions of external rotation were found (p = 0.48). Intraobserver repeatability was 1.1 mm (SD, 0.8 mm) and mean side-to-side differences were small: 2.7 mm (SD, 2.8 mm), 2.8 mm (SD, 1.8 mm), 2.5 mm (SD, 1.8 mm), and 4.0 mm (SD, 2.6 mm) at 0°, 20°, 40°, and 60° of external rotation, respectively. The intraobserver repeatability was strong and the side-to-side differences in translation were small with the magnetic motion tracking system, which is encouraging for development of an improved quantitative test to assess shoulder translation for fast and low-cost diagnosis of shoulder instability. Clinicians may not have to position the contralateral, normal, abducted shoulder in precisely the same position

  15. Effectiveness of massage therapy on the range of motion of the shoulder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeun, Young-Ran

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to identify and analyze the degree of effect of massage therapy on the range of motion of the shoulder. [Subjects and Methods] The database search was conducted using PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, RISS, NDSL, NANET, DBpia, and KoreaMed. The meta-analysis was based on 7 studies, covered a total of 237 participants, and used a random-effects model. [Results] The effect size estimate showed that massage therapy significantly improved the shoulder range of motion, especially the flexion (SMD: 18.21, 95% CI 1.57-34.85) and abduction (SMD: 22.07, 95% CI 5.84-38.30). [Conclusion] The review findings suggest that massage therapy is effective in improving the shoulder flexion and abduction.

  16. The painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartl, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    The painful shoulder syndrome is very common. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis may be difficult. Shoulder pain may be caused by local processes or systemic diseases or can be referred. Periarthritis humeroscapularis (frozen shoulder) is the most common cause of painful shoulder syndrome. Biomechanical factors concerning the rotator cuff are involved in the etiopathogenesis of these pain syndromes. The therapy of frozen shoulder includes physical treatment, antirheumatic drugs, or X-ray treatment. Surgical measures may become necessary. In the course of rheumatoid arthritis the shoulder may be involved. Milwaukee-shoulder-syndrome has been described recently in crystal deposit diseases. Shoulder pain may be referred by mechanical irritations of nerve roots in the course of degenerative lesions of the cervical spine and also in the course of internal diseases of the heart, the lungs, or the gastrointestinal tract. In cases of shoulder pain without pathological data from arthrological, radiological or laboratory studies, one should always consider localized fibromyalgia in the shoulder-neck-region. The precise diagnosis of shoulder pain is an important prerequisite for treatment, the success of which should not be judged as pessimistic as it has been commonly done in the past. (orig.) [de

  17. Postoperative stiff shoulder after open rotator cuff repair: a 3- to 20-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastamäki, H; Vastamäki, M

    2014-12-01

    Stiffness after a rotator cuff tear is common. So is stiffness after an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. In the literature, however, postoperative restriction of passive range of motion after open rotator cuff repair in shoulders with free passive range of motion at surgery has seldom been recognized. We hypothesize that this postoperative stiffness is more frequent than recognized and slows the primary postoperative healing after a rotator cuff reconstruction. We wondered how common is postoperative restriction of both active and passive range of motion after open rotator cuff repair in shoulders with free passive preoperative range of motion, how it recovers, and whether this condition influences short- and long-term results of surgery. We also explored factors predicting postoperative shoulder stiffness. We retrospectively identified 103 postoperative stiff shoulders among 416 consecutive open rotator cuff repairs, evaluating incidence and duration of stiffness, short-term clinical results and long-term range of motion, pain relief, shoulder strength, and functional results 3-20 (mean 8.7) years after surgery in 56 patients. The incidence of postoperative shoulder stiffness was 20%. It delayed primary postoperative healing by 3-6 months and resolved during a mean 6.3 months postoperatively. External rotation resolved first, corresponding to that of the controls at 3 months; flexion and abduction took less than 1 year after surgery. The mean summarized range of motion (flexion + abduction + external rotation) increased as high as 93% of the controls' range of motion by 6 months and 100% by 1 year. Flexion, abduction, and internal rotation improved to the level of the contralateral shoulders as did pain, strength, and function. Age at surgery and condition of the biceps tendon were related to postoperative stiffness. Postoperative stiff shoulder after open rotator cuff repair is a common complication resolving in 6-12 months with good long-term results. © The

  18. Functional connectivity between core and shoulder muscles increases during isometric endurance contractions in judo competitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawczyński, Adam; Samani, Afshin; Mroczek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    endurance contraction consisting of bilateral arm abduction at 90°. The normalized mutual information (NMI) was computed between muscle pairs as an index indicating functional connectivity. Results: The NMIs increased significantly during endurance test for 10 of the 15 muscle pairs (P ... : We concluded that the increases in NMIs highlighted functional changes in the interplay between core and shoulder muscles during an endurance contraction in elite judokas....

  19. MRI of symptomatic shoulders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikukawa, Kenshi; Segata, Tateki; Kunitake, Katsuhiko; Morisawa, Keizo; Harada, Masataka; Hirano, Mako

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cuff tear and acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) osteoarthrosis by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation in symptomatic shoulders. MRI was performed on 124 shoulders in 115 patients whose age ranged from 16 to 83 years (average: 58.0 years). There were 74 men (79 shoulders) and 41 women (45 shoulders). The patients were divided into three groups according to age; A group (10 shoulders: 16-29 years), B group (43 shoulders: 30-59 years), and C group (71 shoulders: 60-83 years). Rotator cuff tears and ACJ osteoarthrosis were graded on scales 0 to 3 (normal, increased signal intensity, incomplete, complete), and 1 to 4 (none, mild, moderate, severe), respectively. There was a significant difference in the severity of the cuff tears and the ACJ osteoarthrosis with respect to age. Twenty percent of the shoulders were graded incomplete or complete cuff tears in group A, 88% in group B, and 93% in group C. No shoulders were graded moderate or severe ACJ changes in group A, 63% in group B, and 93% in group C. There was a definite correlation between the cuff tears and ACJ osteoarthrosis. MRI of the symptomatic shoulders indicated well correlation between the rotator cuff tears and ACJ osteoarthrosis. (author)

  20. Hip abduction strength training in the clinical setting: with or without external loading?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, T; Petersen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    only the weight of the leg as resistance, whereas training with external loading was performed with a relative load corresponding to 10 repetition maximum. Hip abduction strength was measured pre- and post-intervention. Isometric and eccentric hip abduction strength of the trained leg increased after......The side-lying hip abduction exercise is one of the most commonly used exercises in rehabilitation to increase hip abduction strength, and is often performed without external loading. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of 6 weeks of side-lying hip abduction training, with and without...... external loading, on hip abduction strength in healthy subjects. Thirty-one healthy, physically active men and women were included in a randomised controlled trial and allocated to side-lying hip abduction training, with or without external loading. Training without external loading was performed using...

  1. Patient reported activities after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in rotator cuff arthropathy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcobía-Díaz, B; Lópiz, Y; García-Fernández, C; Rizo de Álvaro, B; Marco, F

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in rotator cuff arthropathy patients, improves anteversion and abduction, but not rotational, outcomes. The main aim of this study is to determine its repercussions on daily life activities in our patients. Between 2009 and 2011 we implanted 210 shoulder arthroplasties, 126 of them were reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in a rotator cuff arthropathy context. About 88% were women, with a mean age at time of surgery of 81 years, 95% were retired. The mean follow up was 53 months. The Constant scale, Visual Analogue Scale, Charlson Comorbidity Index, range of motion were measured for each patient and whether they could manage 40 daily life activities by means of a new questionnaire, classifying them according toshoulder functional demand. Mean normalized by sex and age Constant value was 81.2%. Mean Visual Analogue Scale and Charlson Index were 3.56 and 1.69 respectively. Improvement in anteversion and abduction, not in rotational range of motion. Limitation was found in low and high functional demand activities in 20% and 51% respectively, especially those which involved internal rotation. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty treatment for RCA in the elderly, achieves adequate pain management and good functional outcomes. Nevertheless, an important risk of DLA limitation must be accepted in those which involve internal rotation or shoulder high functional demand. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Working Notes of the 1990 Spring Symposium on Automated Abduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-27

    arbitrating it, and updating the database can all be formidable. Conclusion Application of abduction to speech act recognition has used a methodology...inferences to correctly generalizes the plan to many other situations. Forex - compute the new situation B. For example suppose F is (alive ample, the...making assumptions that have nothing to do with unified with a fact in the database (a "zero cost proof"), the observaLion, the syntactic minimality

  3. INTEGRATION BETWEEN MRI AND PHYSICAL THERAPY TO IMPROVE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH SHOULDER PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Mohamed Elkhadir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder pain is the second most common musculoskeletal disorder treated by physical therapists. The cause for the shoulder pain is multifactorial. However, a specific diagnosis is crucial in the right management of shoulder dysfunction. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the efficacy of integrating the MRI for the accurate diagnosis and impact of this on rendering the effective physical therapy interventions in shoulder dysfunction patients. Methods: A retrospective study conducted on 14 patients who undergone an MRI with a 1.5 T unit MAGNETOM Symphony (Siemens, for their shoulder pain, where the diagnosis might be Muscle tears like, subscapularis, infraspinatus,supraspinatus and teres minor muscles; subacromial or subdeltoid bursitis and labral tears were included. All the subjects were then continued with usual physical therapy treatments for four weeks depending on their diagnosis which includes; advice, stretching, mobilization and strengthening exercises, manual therapy, massage, strapping, and electrotherapy . The outcome measures documented from the case sheet were; Visual Analogue Scale grade and passive range of motion of shoulder external / internal rotation and abduction. Results: Paired t test was used to compare the PROM between pre rehabilitation and post rehabilitation testing and the non parametric test, Mann Whitney U test was used for the comparison of VAS. All patients showed a significant improvement in VAS and PROM of abduction, internal and external rotation following physical therapy (P≤ 0.05. Conclusion: MRI is found to be a reliable method of diagnostic procedure for the shoulder pain and the integration of MRI and physical therapy to treat shoulder dysfunction leads to a better outcome.

  4. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Glenohumeral and scapulothoracic strength impairments exists in patients with subacromial impingement, but these are not reflected in the shoulder pain and disability index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M B; Witten, A; Holm, K

    2017-01-01

    in strength and ROM to patient-reported shoulder function is not well described, even though testing of strength is recommended in clinical guidelines. The purpose of this study was, first, to investigate impairments in glenohumeral and scapulothoracic strength and in abduction and internal rotation ROM...

  6. US of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardellin, G.; Perin, B.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty five healty people and 25 patients with shoulder pain underwent US control over a 12-month period: 24 patients with shoulder pain had rotator cuff and/or biceps tendon lesions. The US findings on rotator cuff and biceps tendon lesions are compared with those of arthrography and/or surgery (96% sensitivity). US is rapid, safe, non invasive, inexpensive and often more accurate, and its use is recommended for the routine examination of the shoulder joint insteat of arthrography

  7. The Shoulder Objective Practical Assessment Tool: Evaluation of a New Tool Assessing Residents Learning in Diagnostic Shoulder Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Christopher L; Holt, Edward M; Gooding, Benjamin W T; Tennent, Thomas D; Foden, Philip

    2015-08-01

    To design and validate an objective practical assessment tool for diagnostic shoulder arthroscopy that would provide residents with a method to evaluate their progression in this field of surgery and to identify specific learning needs. We designed and evaluated the shoulder Objective Practical Assessment Tool (OPAT). The shoulder OPAT was designed by us, and scoring domains were created using a Delphi process. The shoulder OPAT was trialed by members of the British Elbow & Shoulder Society Education Committee for internal consistency and ease of use before being offered to other trainers and residents. Inter-rater reliability and intrarater reliability were calculated. One hundred forty orthopaedic residents, of varying seniority, within 5 training regions in the United Kingdom, were questioned regarding the tool. A pilot study of 6 residents was undertaken. Internal consistency was 0.77 (standardized Cronbach α). Inter-rater reliability was 0.60, and intrarater reliability was 0.82. The Spearman correlation coefficient (r) between the global summary score for the shoulder OPAT and the current assessment tool used in postgraduate training for orthopaedic residents undertaking diagnostic shoulder arthroscopy equaled 0.74. Of the residents, 82% agreed or strongly agreed when asked if the shoulder OPAT would be a useful tool in monitoring progression and 72% agreed or strongly agreed with the introduction of the shoulder OPAT within the orthopaedic domain. This study shows that the shoulder OPAT fulfills several aspects of reliability and validity when tested. Despite the inter-rater reliability being 0.60, we believe that the shoulder OPAT has the potential to play a role alongside the current assessment tool in the training of orthopaedic residents. The shoulder OPAT can be used to assess residents during shoulder arthroscopy and has the potential for use in medical education, as well as arthroscopic skills training in the operating theater. Copyright © 2015

  8. The effect of glenosphere diameter in reverse shoulder arthroplasty on muscle force, joint load, and range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langohr, G Daniel G; Giles, Joshua W; Athwal, George S; Johnson, James A

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the effects of glenosphere diameter on shoulder joint loads. The purpose of this biomechanical study was to investigate the effects of glenosphere diameter on joint load, load angle, and total deltoid force required for active abduction and range of motion in internal/external rotation and abduction. A custom, instrumented reverse shoulder arthroplasty implant system capable of measuring joint load and varying glenosphere diameter (38 and 42 mm) and glenoid offset (neutral and lateral) was implanted in 6 cadaveric shoulders to provide at least 80% power for all variables. A shoulder motion simulator was used to produce active glenohumeral and scapulothoracic motion. All implant configurations were tested with active and passive motion with joint kinematics, loads, and moments recorded. At neutral and lateralized glenosphere positions, increasing diameter significantly increased joint load (+12 ± 21 N and +6 ± 9 N; P  .8). Passive internal rotation was reduced with increased diameter at both neutral and lateralized glenosphere positions (-6° ± 6° and -12° ± 6°; P  .05). At neutral glenosphere position, increasing diameter increased the maximum angles of both adduction (+1° ± 1°; P = .03) and abduction (+8° ± 9°; P < .05). Lateralization also increased abduction range of motion compared with neutral (P < .01). Although increasing glenosphere diameter significantly increased joint load and deltoid force, the clinical impact of these changes is presently unclear. Internal rotation, however, was reduced, which contradicts previous bone modeling studies, which we postulate is due to increased posterior capsular tension as it is forced to wrap around a larger 42 mm implant assembly. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Stability versus mobility of the shoulder. Biomechanical aspects in athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M F; Smith, T; Struck, M; Wellmann, M

    2014-03-01

    The demand profile of athletes shoulders is high. On the one hand the shoulder has to provide a maximum active range of motion that allows rapid movements of the arm and on the other hand it has to be sufficiently stabilized to decelerate rapid movements and to neutralize the resulting translational forces. Two general types of instability can be differentiated in athletes shoulders: the macroinstability typically occurring in athletes involved in contact sports and the microinstability occurring in athletes involved in overhead sports.Repetitive abduction and external rotation movements of athletes involved in overhead sports lead to adaptation of the glenohumeral joint capsule and ligaments. The anterior capsule becomes stretched while the posterior capsule develops tightness. These adaptations can result in an anterior microinstability as well as posterosuperior impingement (PSI) which implicates a pathological contact of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with the posterior glenoid and which is also associated with SLAP lesions. In contrast the shoulders of swimmers are prone to anterosuperior impingement because the arm stroke involves a forceful combined anteflexion, adduction and internal rotation of the arm.The macroinstability of contact athletes is caused by sufficient trauma and characterized by a structural lesion of capsulolabral or bony lesion. While the empirical recurrence risk of young contact athletes is already high, it can be further impaired by bony defects of the glenoid. In suspected cases, critical glenoid defects should be quantified by computed tomography (CT) scans and treated by bony augmentation of the glenoid.

  10. Impact of shoulder complaints after neck dissection on shoulder disability and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, Martijn M.; van Wilgen, Cornelis P.; de Boer, Erlijn M.; de Goede, Cees J. T.; Koolstra, Muriel; van Opzeeland, Anita; Venema, Piet; Sterken, Margriet W.; Vincent, Andrew; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    OBJECTIVE: To explore relationships between shoulder complaints after neck dissection, shoulder disability, and quality of life. To find clinical predictors for mid- to long-term shoulder disability. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Shoulder pain, shoulder mobility, and shoulder

  11. Impact of shoulder complaints after neck dissection on shoulder disability and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, M.M.; van Wilgen, C.P.; de Boer, E.M.J.; de Goede, C.J.T.; Koolstra, M.; van Opzeeland, A.; Venema, P.; Sterken, M.W.; Vincent, A.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore relationships between shoulder complaints after neck dissection, shoulder disability, and quality of life. To find clinical predictors for mid- to long-term shoulder disability. Study Design: Prospective. Patients and Methods: Shoulder pain, shoulder mobility, and shoulder

  12. Shoulder pain in hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L T

    1985-01-01

    Development of a painful shoulder in the hemiplegic patient is a significant and serious problem, because it can limit the patient's ability to reach his or her maximum functional potential. Several etiologies of shoulder pain have been identified, such as immobilization of the upper extremity, trauma to the joint structures, including brachial plexus injuries, and subluxation of the gleno-humeral joint. A review of the literature explains the basic anatomy and kinesiology of the shoulder complex, the various etiologies of hemiplegic shoulder pain, and the pros and cons of specific treatment techniques. This knowledge is essential for the occupational therapist to evaluate effectively techniques used to treat the patient with hemiplegic shoulder pain. More effective management of this problem will facilitate the patient's ability to reach his or her maximum functional potential.

  13. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Tempelaere

    Full Text Available MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases.Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI.The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear and without tears (tendinopathy (p = 0.012. The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm than in normals (3.4mm (p = 0.02. The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm and tendinopathy (4.8mm shoulders (p = 0.05.The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; 'Looseness', i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position.

  14. Measurement of Shoulder Range of Motion in Patients with Adhesive Capsulitis Using a Kinect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hak Lee

    Full Text Available Range of motion (ROM measurements are essential for the evaluation for and diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (AC. However, taking these measurements using a goniometer is inconvenient and sometimes unreliable. The Kinect (Microsoft, Seattle, WA, USA is gaining attention as a new motion detecting device that is nonintrusive and easy to implement. This study aimed to apply Kinect to measure shoulder ROM in AC; we evaluated its validity by calculating the agreement of the measurements obtained using Kinect with those obtained using goniometer and assessed its utility for the diagnosis of AC. Both shoulders of 15 healthy volunteers and affected shoulders of 12 patients with AC were included in the study. The passive and active ROM of each were measured with a goniometer for flexion, abduction, and external rotation. Their active shoulder motions for each direction were again captured using Kinect and the ROM values were calculated. The agreement between the two measurements was tested with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Diagnostic performance using the Kinect ROM was evaluated with Cohen's kappa value. The cutoff values of the limited ROM were determined in the following ways: the same as passive ROM values, reflecting the mean difference, and based on receiver operating characteristic curves. The ICC for flexion/abduction/external rotation between goniometric passive ROM and the Kinect ROM were 0.906/0.942/0.911, while those between active ROMs and the Kinect ROMs were 0.864/0.932/0.925. Cohen's kappa values were 0.88, 0.88, and 1.0 with the cutoff values in the order above. Measurements of the shoulder ROM using Kinect show excellent agreement with those taken using a goniometer. These results indicate that the Kinect can be used to measure shoulder ROM and to diagnose AC as an alternative to goniometer.

  15. The all-too-flexible abductive method: ATOM's normative status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeijn, Jan-Willem

    2008-09-01

    The author discusses the abductive theory of method (ATOM) by Brian Haig from a philosophical perspective, connecting his theory with a number of issues and trends in contemporary philosophy of science. It is argued that as it stands, the methodology presented by Haig is too permissive. Both the use of analogical reasoning and the application of exploratory factor analysis leave us with too many candidate theories to choose from, and explanatory coherence cannot be expected to save the day. The author ends with some suggestions to remedy the permissiveness and lack of normative force in ATOM, deriving from the experimental practice within which psychological data are produced.

  16. Functional outcome of nerve transfer for restoration of shoulder and elbow function in upper brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruquee Sajedur

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer (XI-SSN done for restoration of shoulder function and partial transfer of ulnar nerve to the motor branch to the biceps muscle for the recovery of elbow flexion (Oberlin transfer. Methods This is a prospective study involving 15 consecutive cases of upper plexus injury seen between January 2004 and December 2005. The average age of patients was 35.6 yrs (15–52 yrs. The injury-surgery interval was between 2–6 months. All underwent XI-SSN and Oberlin nerve transfer. The coaptation was done close to the biceps muscle to ensure early recovery. The average follow up was 15 months (range 12–36 months. The functional outcome was assessed by measuring range of movements and also on the grading scale proposed by Narakas for shoulder function and Waikakul for elbow function. Results Good/Excellent results were seen in 13/15 patients with respect to elbow function and 8/15 for shoulder function. The time required for the first sign of clinical reinnervation of biceps was 3 months 9 days (range 1 month 25 days to 4 months and for the recovery of antigravity elbow flexion was 5 months (range 3 1/2 months to 8 months. 13 had M4 and two M3 power. On evaluating shoulder function 8/15 regained active abduction, five had M3 and three M4 shoulder abduction. The average range of abduction in these eight patients was 66 degrees (range 45–90. Eight had recovered active external rotation, average 44 degrees (range 15–95. The motor recovery of external rotation was M3 in 5 and M4 in 3. 7/15 had no active abduction/external rotation, but they felt that their shoulder was more stable. Comparable results were observed in both below and above 40 age groups and those with injury to surgery interval less than 3 or 3–6 months. Conclusion Transfer of ulnar nerve fascicle to the motor branch of biceps close to the muscle consistently

  17. Is There Abduction in Aristotle? Peirce, Eco, and Some Further Remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Proni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In several places of the Collected Papers , Peirce states that Abduction, or adoption of a Hypothesis, the form of inference he has discovered and described, could be found in Aristotle, though not fully developed. Umberto Eco (1983, investigates, following Peirce, the presence of abductive elements in Aristotle, and extends Peirce's scope, finding more traces of hypothetical logic. The purpose of this article is to extend and refine the inquiry, trying to answer the question "Did Aristotle know Abductive reasoning?"

  18. Is digital photography an accurate and precise method for measuring range of motion of the shoulder and elbow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Russell R; Burn, Matthew B; Ismaily, Sabir K; Gerrie, Brayden J; Han, Shuyang; Alexander, Jerry; Lenherr, Christopher; Noble, Philip C; Harris, Joshua D; McCulloch, Patrick C

    2018-03-01

    Accurate measurements of shoulder and elbow motion are required for the management of musculoskeletal pathology. The purpose of this investigation was to compare three techniques for measuring motion. The authors hypothesized that digital photography would be equivalent in accuracy and show higher precision compared to the other two techniques. Using infrared motion capture analysis as the reference standard, shoulder flexion/abduction/internal rotation/external rotation and elbow flexion/extension were measured using visual estimation, goniometry, and digital photography on 10 fresh frozen cadavers. These measurements were performed by three physical therapists and three orthopaedic surgeons. Accuracy was defined by the difference from the reference standard (motion capture analysis), while precision was defined by the proportion of measurements within the authors' definition of clinical significance (10° for all motions except for elbow extension where 5° was used). Analysis of variance (ANOVA), t-tests, and chi-squared tests were used. Although statistically significant differences were found in measurement accuracy between the three techniques, none of these differences met the authors' definition of clinical significance. Precision of the measurements was significantly higher for both digital photography (shoulder abduction [93% vs. 74%, p < 0.001], shoulder internal rotation [97% vs. 83%, p = 0.001], and elbow flexion [93% vs. 65%, p < 0.001]) and goniometry (shoulder abduction [92% vs. 74%, p < 0.001] and shoulder internal rotation [94% vs. 83%, p = 0.008]) than visual estimation. Digital photography was more precise than goniometry for measurements of elbow flexion only [93% vs. 76%, p < 0.001]. There was no clinically significant difference in measurement accuracy between the three techniques for shoulder and elbow motion. Digital photography showed higher measurement precision compared to visual estimation for shoulder abduction, shoulder

  19. Biphasic threat to femoral head perfusion in abduction: arterial hypoperfusion and venous congestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefzadeh, David K. [Comer Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Jaramillo, Diego [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Neil [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Doerger, Kirk [Radiology Associates of Northern Kentucky, Crestview Hills, KY (United States); Sullivan, Christopher [University of Chicago, Department of Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Hip abduction can cause avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head in infants. To compare the US perfusion pattern of femoral head cartilage in neutral position with that in different degrees and duration of abduction, testing the venous congestion theory of post-abduction ischemia. In 20 neonates, the Doppler flow characteristics of the posterosuperior (PS) branch of the femoral head cartilage feeding vessels were evaluated in neutral and at 30 , 45 , and 60 abduction. In three neonates the leg was held in 45-degree abduction and flow was assessed at 5, 10, and 15 min. Male/female ratio was 11/9 with a mean age of 1.86 {+-} 0.7 weeks. The peak systolic velocities (PSV) declined in all three degrees of abduction. After 15 min of 45-degree abduction, the mean PSV declined and showed an absent or reversed diastolic component and undetectable venous return. No perfusion was detected at 60-degree abduction. Abduction-induced femoral head ischemia is biphasic and degree- and duration-dependent. In phase I there is arterial hypoperfusion and in phase II there is venous congestion. A new pathogeneses for femoral head ischemia is offered. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of Arm and Shoulder Mobility and Strength after Modified Radical Mastectomy and Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, Lennart; Stark, Birgit; Engler, Natacha; Malm, Maj [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Physiotherapy Center for Surgical Sciences

    2004-04-01

    Seventy-five women, of whom 30 had received postoperative radiotherapy, were tested for range of motion (ROM) and shoulder strength with a goniometer and an isokinetic device (Orthotron II), respectively. On the individual level, irradiated patients exhibited significantly reduced range of motion (varying from p<0.05 to p<0.001) for all movements compared with the non-operated side. In contrast, in the non-irradiated patients only flexion was significantly reduced (p<0.05). The same individual pattern was evident for shoulder strength where all movements except external rotation were significantly reduced in irradiated patients (varying from p<0.05 to p<0.001). Non-irradiated patients exhibited a significant reduction in shoulder strength for flexion and abduction (p<0.05), whereas other movements were less affected. The observed differences in ROM and strength were less pronounced when analyzed on a group level, but were still significant for ROM (p<0.001) for flexion and abduction. Group level analysis also showed reduced shoulder strength for all movements but only rotation was significantly (p<0.01) impaired.

  1. Interventional microadhesiolysis: A new nonsurgical release technique for adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Tae-Kyun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A nonsurgical intervention, interventional microadhesiolysis, was developed to release adhesions in joints and soft tissues. This paper introduces the procedure and evaluates the efficacy of the intervention for adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. Methods Ten patients (five men and five women with primary adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder were treated at a chronic pain management center in Korea. Three specially made needles are used in interventional microadhesiolysis: the Round, Flexed Round, and Ahn's needles. A Round Needle is inserted on the skin over middle of supraspinatus and advanced under the acromion and acromioclavicular joint (subacromial release. A Flexed Round Needle is inserted two-fingers caudal to the inferior border of the scapular spine and advanced over the capsule sliding on the surface of infraspinatus muscle-tendon fascia. The capsule is released while an assistant simultaneously passively abducts the shoulder to full abduction (posteroinferior capsule release. An Ahn's Needle is inserted on the skin over the lesser tubercle and advanced under the coracoid process sliding on the surface of the subscapularis muscle (subcoracoid release. Results After the patients underwent interventional microadhesiolysis, the self-rated pain score or severity declined significantly (p p Conclusion Our findings suggest that interventional microadhesiolysis is effective for managing adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

  2. Evaluation of Arm and Shoulder Mobility and Strength after Modified Radical Mastectomy and Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, Lennart; Stark, Birgit; Engler, Natacha; Malm, Maj

    2004-01-01

    Seventy-five women, of whom 30 had received postoperative radiotherapy, were tested for range of motion (ROM) and shoulder strength with a goniometer and an isokinetic device (Orthotron II), respectively. On the individual level, irradiated patients exhibited significantly reduced range of motion (varying from p<0.05 to p<0.001) for all movements compared with the non-operated side. In contrast, in the non-irradiated patients only flexion was significantly reduced (p<0.05). The same individual pattern was evident for shoulder strength where all movements except external rotation were significantly reduced in irradiated patients (varying from p<0.05 to p<0.001). Non-irradiated patients exhibited a significant reduction in shoulder strength for flexion and abduction (p<0.05), whereas other movements were less affected. The observed differences in ROM and strength were less pronounced when analyzed on a group level, but were still significant for ROM (p<0.001) for flexion and abduction. Group level analysis also showed reduced shoulder strength for all movements but only rotation was significantly (p<0.01) impaired

  3. Simulation and Shoulder Dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaddeau, Angela K; Deering, Shad

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an unpredictable obstetric emergency that requires prompt interventions to ensure optimal outcomes. Proper technique is important but difficult to train given the urgent and critical clinical situation. Simulation training for shoulder dystocia allows providers at all levels to practice technical and teamwork skills in a no-risk environment. Programs utilizing simulation training for this emergency have consistently demonstrated improved performance both during practice drills and in actual patients with significantly decreased risks of fetal injury. Given the evidence, simulation training for shoulder dystocia should be conducted at all institutions that provide delivery services.

  4. Sensorimotor Control of the Shoulder in Professional Volleyball Players with Isolated Infraspinatus Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contemori, Samuele; Biscarini, Andrea; Botti, Fabio Massimo; Busti, Daniele; Panichi, Roberto; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2017-06-12

    Isolated infraspinatus muscle atrophy (IIMA) only affects the hitting shoulder of overhead-activity athletes, and is caused by suprascapular nerve neuropathy. No study has assessed the static and dynamic stability of the shoulder in overhead professional athletes with IIMA to reveal possible shoulder sensorimotor alterations. To assess the shoulder static stability, dynamic stability, and strength in professional volleyball players with IIMA and in healthy control players. Cross-sectional study. Research laboratory. Twenty-four male professional volleyball players (12 players with diagnosed IIMA and 12 healthy players) recruited from local volleyball teams. Static stability was evaluated with two independent force platforms and dynamic stability was assessed with the "Upper Quarter Y Balance Test". The static stability assessment was conducted in different support (single hand and both hand) and vision (open and closed eyes) conditions. Data from each test were analyzed with ANOVA and paired t-test models, to highlight statistical differences within and between groups. In addition to reduced abduction and external rotation strength, athletes with IIMA consistently demonstrated significant less static (P < 0.001) and dynamic stability (P < 0,001), compared with the contralateral shoulder and with healthy athletes. Closed eyes condition significantly enhanced the static stability deficit of the shoulder with IIMA (P = 0.039 and P = 0.034 for both hand and single hand support, respectively), but had no effect in healthy contralateral and healthy players' shoulders. This study highlights an impairment of the sensorimotor control system of the shoulder with IIMA, which likely results from both proprioceptive and strength deficits. This condition could yield subtle alteration in the functional use of the shoulder and predispose it to acute or overuse injuries. The results of this study may help athletic trainers and physical/physiotherapists to prevent shoulder injuries

  5. Effect of power-assisted hand-rim wheelchair propulsion on shoulder load in experienced wheelchair users: A pilot study with an instrumented wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Marieke G M; Buurke, Jaap H; de Vries, Wiebe; Van der Woude, Lucas H V; Rietman, Johan S

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to compare hand-rim and power-assisted hand-rim propulsion on potential risk factors for shoulder overuse injuries: intensity and repetition of shoulder loading and force generation in the extremes of shoulder motion. Eleven experienced hand-rim wheelchair users propelled an instrumented wheelchair on a treadmill while upper-extremity kinematic, kinetic and surface electromyographical data was collected during propulsion with and without power-assist. As a result during power-assisted propulsion the peak resultant force exerted at the hand-rim decreased and was performed with significantly less abduction and internal rotation at the shoulder. At shoulder level the anterior directed force and internal rotation and flexion moments decreased significantly. In addition, posterior and the minimal inferior directed forces and the external rotation moment significantly increased. The stroke angle decreased significantly, as did maximum shoulder flexion, extension, abduction and internal rotation. Stroke-frequency significantly increased. Muscle activation in the anterior deltoid and pectoralis major also decreased significantly. In conclusion, compared to hand-rim propulsion power-assisted propulsion seems effective in reducing potential risk factors of overuse injuries with the highest gain on decreased range of motion of the shoulder joint, lower peak propulsion force on the rim and reduced muscle activity. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Shoulder Impingement Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trunk is crucial for maximizing arm strength and power with throwing or tennis. This part of rehabilitation can usually take place while shoulder pain is subsiding. IV Restore function Resume overhead motion ...

  7. Unusual inferior dislocation of shoulder: reduction by two-step maneuver: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patro Dilip K

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dislocation of the shoulder is the commonest of all large joint dislocations. Inferior dislocation constitutes 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. It characteristically presents with overhead abduction of the arm, the humerus being parallel to the spine of scapula. We present an unusual case of recurrent luxatio erecta in which the arm transformed later into an adducted position resembling the more common anterior shoulder dislocation. Such a case has not been described before in English literature. Closed reduction by the two-step maneuver was successful with a single attempt. MRI revealed posterior labral tear and a Hill-Sachs variant lesion on the superolateral aspect of humeral head. Immobilisation in a chest-arm bandage followed by physiotherapy yielded excellent results. The case is first of its kind; the unusual mechanism, unique radiological findings and alternate method of treatment are discussed.

  8. Shoulder arthroscopy: the basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Kevin W; Wright, Thomas W

    2015-04-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy is a commonly performed and accepted procedure for a wide variety of pathologies. Surgeon experience, patient positioning, knowledge of surgical anatomy, proper portal placement, and proper use of instrumentation can improve technical success and minimize complication risks. This article details the surgical anatomy, indications, patient positioning, portal placement, instrumentation, and complications for basic shoulder arthroscopy. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Complications of shoulder arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Todd C; Rudolph, Glen H; Caswell, Kyle; Espinoza, Christopher; Burkhead, Wayne Z; Krishnan, Sumant G

    2014-07-01

    Over the past 20 to 30 years, arthroscopic shoulder techniques have become increasingly popular. Although these techniques have several advantages over open surgery, surgical complications are no less prevalent or devastating than those associated with open techniques. Some of the complications associated with arthroscopic shoulder surgery include recurrent instability, soft-tissue injury, and neurapraxia. These complications can be minimized with thoughtful consideration of the surgical indications, careful patient selection and positioning, and a thorough knowledge of the shoulder anatomy. Deep infection following arthroscopic shoulder surgery is rare; however, the shoulder is particularly susceptible to Propionibacterium acnes infection, which is mildly virulent and has a benign presentation. The surgeon must maintain a high index of suspicion for this infection. Thromboemoblic complications associated with arthroscopic shoulder techniques are also rare, and studies have shown that pharmacologic prophylaxis has minimal efficacy in preventing these complications. Because high-quality studies on the subject are lacking, minimal evidence is available to suggest strategies for prevention. Copyright 2014 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  10. Experiences and directions for Abduction and Induction using Constraint Handling Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2005-01-01

    Techniques for doing abduction in a combination of Prolog and Constraint Handling Rules (CHR) are reviewed, and the possible extension to combine with induction is considered. While the indicated implementation for abduction is very efficient, the ideas for induction are at a much more experimental...

  11. Sidestep cutting technique and knee abduction loading: implications for ACL prevention exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristianslund, Eirik; Faul, Oliver; Bahr, Roald; Myklebust, Grethe; Krosshaug, Tron

    2014-05-01

    Sidestep cutting technique is essential in programmes to prevent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. A better understanding of how technique affects potentially harmful joint loading may improve prevention programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sidestep cutting technique on maximum knee abduction moments. Cross-sectional study. Whole-body kinematics and knee joint kinetics were calculated in 123 female handball players (mean±SD, 22.5±7.0 years, 171±7 cm, 67±7 kg) performing sidestep cutting. Three cuts from each side were analysed. Linear regression was applied between selected technique factors and maximum knee abduction moment during the first 100 ms of the contact phase. Furthermore, we investigated to what degree the abduction moment originated from the magnitude of the ground reaction force (GRF) or the knee abduction moment arm of the GRF. Technique factors explained 62% of the variance in knee abduction moments. Cut width, knee valgus, toe landing, approach speed and cutting angle were the most significant predictors. An increase in one of these factors of 1 SD increased the knee abduction moment from 12% to 19%. The effect of the moment arm of the GRF was more important than the force magnitude for maximum knee abduction moments. Lower knee abduction loads during sidestep cutting may be achieved if cuts are performed as narrow cuts with low knee valgus and toe landings. These factors may be targeted in ACL injury prevention programmes.

  12. Effect of lateralized design on muscle and joint reaction forces for reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, William; Yang, Yang; Petersen-Fitts, Graysen R; Lombardo, Daniel J; Stine, Sasha; Sabesan, Vani J

    2017-04-01

    Manufacturers of reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) implants have recently designed innovative implants to optimize performance in rotator cuff-deficient shoulders. These advancements are not without tradeoffs and can have negative biomechanical effects. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated finite element analysis-kinematic model to compare the muscle forces and joint reaction forces (JRFs) of 3 different RSA designs. A kinematic model of a normal shoulder joint was adapted from the Delft model and integrated with the well-validated OpenSim shoulder model. Static optimizations then allowed for calculation of the individual muscle forces, moment arms, and JRFs relative to net joint moments. Three-dimensional computer models of 3 RSA designs-humeral lateralized design (HLD), glenoid lateralized design, and Grammont design-were integrated, and parametric studies were performed. Overall, there were decreases in deltoid and rotator cuff muscle forces for all 3 RSA designs. These decreases were greatest in the middle deltoid of the HLD model for abduction and flexion and in the rotator cuff muscles under both internal rotation and external rotation. The JRFs in abduction and flexion decreased similarly for all RSA designs compared with the normal shoulder model, with the greatest decrease seen in the HLD model. These findings demonstrate that the design characteristics implicit in these modified RSA prostheses result in mechanical differences most prominently seen in the deltoid muscle and overall JRFs. Further research using this novel integrated model can help guide continued optimization of RSA design and clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanisms of traumatic shoulder injury in elite rugby players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, James; Jones, Doug R; Funk, Lennard

    2012-01-01

    Background Shoulder injuries in rugby players are common, but the mechanisms of injury are less well understood. This study aims to elucidate common mechanisms of injury and identify the patterns of injury they produce. Materials and methods Twenty-four elite rugby players, referred to the senior author for diagnosis and management of shoulder injuries, were selected. Videos of the injuries were independently reviewed by rugby-medical experts to describe the mechanisms of injury. The mechanisms reported were collated and analysed to determine the level of agreement between reviewers and conclude an overall description of injury mechanisms. Results The authors identified three mechanisms of shoulder injury from the video analysis. These are the ‘Try-Scorer’, characterised by hyperflexion of the outstretched arm such as when scoring a try; the ‘Tackler’, extension of the abducted arm behind the player while tackling; and the ‘Direct Impact’, a direct blow to the arm or shoulder when held by the side in neutral or slight adduction. The Try Scorer and Tackler mechanisms both involve a levering force on the glenohumeral joint (GHJ). These mechanisms predominantly cause GHJ dislocation, with Bankart, reverse Bankart and superior labrum anterior–posterior tears. The Try-Scorer Mechanism also caused the majority (83%) of rotator cuff tears. The Direct Hit mechanism resulted in GHJ dislocation and labral injury in 37.5% of players and was most likely to cause acromioclavicular joint dislocation and scapula fractures, injuries that were not seen with the other mechanisms. Conclusion Greater understanding of the mechanisms involved in rugby shoulder injury is useful in understanding the pathological injuries, guiding treatment and rehabilitation and aiding the development of injury-prevention methods. PMID:22510645

  14. Open MR imaging of the unstable shoulder in the apprehension test position: description and evaluation of an alternative MR examination position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintzell, G.; Larsson, S.; Larsson, H.; Zyto, K.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate an alternative MR assessment procedure for analysis of unstable shoulders. Twelve patients with unilateral recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation had both shoulders examined. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed with an open-MR system in the apprehension position with the shoulder in 90 of abduction and maximum tolerable external rotation. Contrast enhancement was achieved with intravenous gadolinium. Correlations were made to the findings at operation. In 10 of 12 unstable shoulders the inferior glenohumeral ligament labral complex (IGHLLC) was detached from the glenoid as seen on MR and later verified during surgery. In one shoulder MR was unable to show a capsulolabral detachment that was verified at surgery, whereas in one shoulder both MR and surgical assessment revealed no soft tissue detachment (accuracy 92 %). A Hill-Sachs lesion was visualized and verified in all unstable shoulders, whereas the stable controls revealed normal IGHLLC and no Hill-Sachs lesion. Open-MRI evaluation of the shoulder in the apprehension test position may become a useful tool for the evaluation of anterior shoulder instability. (orig.)

  15. How do deltoid muscle moment arms change after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David R; Struk, Aimee M; Matsuki, Keisuke; Wright, Thomas W; Banks, Scott A

    2016-04-01

    Although many advantages of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) have been demonstrated, a variety of complications indicate there is much to learn about how RTSA modifies normal shoulder function. This study used a subject-specific computational model driven by in vivo kinematic data to assess how RTSA affects deltoid muscle moment arms after surgery. A subject-specific 12 degree-of-freedom musculoskeletal model was used to analyze the shoulders of 26 individuals (14 RTSA and 12 normal). The model was modified from the work of Holzbaur to directly input 6 degree-of-freedom humeral and scapular kinematics obtained using fluoroscopy. The moment arms of the anterior, lateral, and posterior aspects of the deltoid were significantly different when RTSA and normal cohorts were compared at different abduction angles. Anterior and lateral deltoid moment arms were significantly larger in the RTSA group at the initial elevation of the arm. The posterior deltoid was significantly larger at maximum elevation. There was large intersubject variability within the RTSA group. Placement of implant components during RTSA can directly affect the geometric relationship between the humerus and scapula and the muscle moment arms in the RTSA shoulder. RTSA shoulders maintain the same anterior and posterior deltoid muscle moment-arm patterns as healthy shoulders but show much greater intersubject variation and larger moment-arm magnitudes. These observations provide a basis for determining optimal implant configuration and surgical placement to maximize RTSA function in a patient-specific manner. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Humeral avulsion of the anterior shoulder stabilizing structures after anterior shoulder dislocation: demonstration by MRI and MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirman, P.F.J.; Steinbach, L.S.; Feller, J.F.; Stauffer, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the MRI findings of an anterior shoulder capsular avulsion from the humerus, with or without subscapularis rupture, after anterior dislocation or severe abduction external rotation injury. Design and patients. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI and MR arthrographic examinations of seven patients who were identified at surgery with avulsion of the anterior shoulder stabilizers from the humerus. MRI was correlated with clinical history and surgical results. Results. MRI findings included: inhomogeneity or frank disruption of the anterior capsule at the humeral insertion (all), fluid intensity anterior to the shoulder (six patients), tear of the subscapularis tendon (six patients), dislocation of the biceps tendon (four patients), and a Hill-Sachs deformity (four patients). MR arthrography additionally found extravasation of contrast through the capsular defect (two patients). Conclusions. Our findings suggest that MRI is helpful for diagnosing humeral avulsion of the anterior glenohumeral capsule, especially when a tear of the subscapularis tendon insertion is present. MR arthrography may be of benefit for diagnosing capsular avulsion without associated subscapularis tendon abnormality. (orig.). With 4 figs

  17. Wearable Inertial Sensors Allow for Quantitative Assessment of Shoulder and Elbow Kinematics in a Cadaveric Knee Arthroscopy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Michael; Curtze, Carolin; O'Sullivan, Joseph; El-Gohary, Mahmoud; Crawford, Dennis; Friess, Darin; Brady, Jacqueline M

    2017-12-01

    To develop a model using wearable inertial sensors to assess the performance of orthopaedic residents while performing a diagnostic knee arthroscopy. Fourteen subjects performed a diagnostic arthroscopy on a cadaveric right knee. Participants were divided into novices (5 postgraduate year 3 residents), intermediates (5 postgraduate year 4 residents), and experts (4 faculty) based on experience. Arm movement data were collected by inertial measurement units (Opal sensors) by securing 2 sensors to each upper extremity (dorsal forearm and lateral arm) and 2 sensors to the trunk (sternum and lumbar spine). Kinematics of the elbow and shoulder joints were calculated from the inertial data by biomechanical modeling based on a sequence of links connected by joints. Range of motion required to complete the procedure was calculated for each group. Histograms were used to compare the distribution of joint positions for an expert, intermediate, and novice. For both the right and left upper extremities, skill level corresponded well with shoulder abduction-adduction and elbow prono-supination. Novices required on average 17.2° more motion in the right shoulder abduction-adduction plane than experts to complete the diagnostic arthroscopy (P = .03). For right elbow prono-supination (probe hand), novices required on average 23.7° more motion than experts to complete the procedure (P = .03). Histogram data showed novices had markedly more variability in shoulder abduction-adduction and elbow prono-supination compared with the other groups. Our data show wearable inertial sensors can measure joint kinematics during diagnostic knee arthroscopy. Range-of-motion data in the shoulder and elbow correlated inversely with arthroscopic experience. Motion pattern-based analysis shows promise as a metric of resident skill acquisition and development in arthroscopy. Wearable inertial sensors show promise as metrics of arthroscopic skill acquisition among residents. Copyright © 2017

  18. [Management of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ray, C; Oury, J-F

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this review is to propose recommendations on the management of shoulder dystocia. The PubMed database, the Cochrane Library and the recommendations from the foreign obstetrical societies or colleges have been consulted. In case of shoulder dystocia, if the obstetrician is not present at delivery, he should be systematically informed as quickly as possible (professional consensus). A third person should also be called for help in order to realize McRoberts maneuver (professional consensus). The patient has to be properly installed in gynecological position (professional consensus). It is recommended not to pull excessively on the fetal head (grade C), do not perform uterine expression (grade C) and do not realize inverse rotation of the fetal head (professional consensus). McRoberts maneuver, with or without a suprapubic pressure, is simple to perform, effective and associated with low morbidity, thus, it is recommended in the first line (grade C). Regarding the maneuvers of the second line, the available data do not suggest the superiority of one maneuver in relation to another (grade C). We proposed an algorithm; however, management should be adapted to the experience of the operator. If the posterior shoulder is engaged, Wood's maneuver should be performed preferentially; if the posterior shoulder is not engaged, delivery of the posterior arm should be performed preferentially (professional consensus). Routine episiotomy is not recommended in shoulder dystocia (professional consensus). Other second intention maneuvers are described. It seems necessary to know at least two maneuvers to perform in case of shoulder dystocia unresolved by the maneuver McRoberts (professional consensus). All physicians and midwives should know and perform obstetric maneuvers if needed quickly but without precipitation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Paraplegia and the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Jennifer; Goldstein, Barry

    2004-08-01

    Among consumers, families, therapists, physicians, and other rehabilitation professionals, there has been an increasing interest in shoulder pain associated with spinal cord injury. These disorders primarily affect the soft tissues, including the tendons (eg, rotator cuff tendonitis and bicipital tendinitis), muscles (eg, myalgias and myofascial pain syndromes), and bursae. Disorders of bone and joints also have been of interest (eg, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints). This article addresses the historical context, epidemiology, pathophysiology,diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of shoulder pain as it relates to patients with spinal cord injury.

  20. Mortality after shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundsen, Alexander; Rasmussen, Jeppe Vejlgaard; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary aim was to quantify the 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year mortality rates after primary shoulder replacement. The secondary aims were to assess the association between mortality and diagnoses and to compare the mortality rate with that of the general population. METHODS: The study...... included 5853 primary operations reported to the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry between 2006 and 2012. Information about deaths was obtained from the Danish Cause of Death Register and the Danish Civil Registration System. Age- and sex-adjusted control groups were retrieved from Statistics Denmark...

  1. MRI findings in little leaguer's shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, James C.; Lazarus, Martin L. [Northwestern University and Evanston Northwestern Healthcare, Department of Radiology, Evanston, IL (United States); Song, Alexandra Pae [Health Department, Evanston, IL (United States)

    2006-02-15

    Little leaguer's shoulder, a stress injury of the proximal humeral physis, should be considered in the differential diagnosis for an adolescent baseball player with shoulder pain, especially if the player is pitching regularly in a competitive environment. While roentgenographs may or may not be helpful, depending on the duration and severity of the injury, we report the MRI appearance of a case of little leaguer's shoulder. We found MRI helpful in diagnosing injury to the growth plate that was radiographically occult; furthermore, we were able to document the patient's progress with a follow-up MRI examination, which showed improvement with treatment. (orig.)

  2. How sensitive is the deltoid moment arm to humeral offset changes with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David R; Kinney, Allison L; Wright, Thomas W; Banks, Scott A

    2016-06-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty commonly treats cuff-deficient or osteoarthritic shoulders not amenable to rotator cuff repair. This study investigates deltoid moment arm sensitivity to variations in the joint center and humeral offset of 3 representative reverse total shoulder arthroplasty subjects. We hypothesized that a superior joint implant placement may exist, indicated by muscle moment arms, compared with the current actual surgical implant configuration. Moment arms for the anterior, lateral, and posterior aspects of the deltoid muscle were determined for 1521 perturbations of the humeral offset location away from the surgical placement in a subject-specific musculoskeletal model with motion defined by subject-specific in vivo abduction kinematics. The humeral offset was varied from its surgical position ±4 mm in the anterior/posterior direction, ±12 mm in the medial/lateral direction, and -10 to 14 mm in the superior/inferior direction. The anterior deltoid moment arm varied in humeral offset and center of rotation up to 20 mm, primarily in the medial/lateral and superior/inferior directions. The lateral deltoid moment arm varied in humeral offset up to 20 mm, primarily in the medial/lateral and anterior/posterior directions. The posterior deltoid moment arm varied up to 15 mm, primarily in early abduction, and was most sensitive to humeral offset changes in the superior/inferior direction. High variations in muscle moment arms were found for all 3 deltoid components, presenting an opportunity to dramatically change the deltoid moment arms through surgical placement of the reverse shoulder components and by varying the overall offset of the humerus. Basic Science Study; Computer Modeling. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Shoulder arthroscopy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a type of surgery to examine or repair the tissues inside or around your shoulder joint. The procedure ... small incision. If the surgeon is going to repair the joint, small surgical instruments are also used, such as a shaver to remove unwanted tissue.

  4. Subscapularis slide correction of the shoulder internal rotation contracture after brachial plexus birth injury: technique and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerman, Igor; Valencia, Herbert; DiTaranto, Patricia; DelSole, Edward M; Glait, Sergio; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2013-03-01

    Internal rotation contracture is the most common shoulder deformity in patients with brachial plexus birth injury. The purpose of this investigation is to describe the indications, technique, and results of the subscapularis slide procedure. The technique involves the release of the subscapularis muscle origin off the scapula, with preservation of anterior shoulder structures. A standard postoperative protocol is used in all patients and includes a modified shoulder spica with the shoulder held in 60 degrees of external rotation and 30 degrees of abduction, aggressive occupational and physical therapy, and subsequent shoulder manipulation under anesthesia with botulinum toxin injections as needed. Seventy-one patients at 2 institutions treated with subscapularis slide between 1997 and 2010, with minimum follow-up of 39.2 months, were identified. Patients were divided into 5 groups based on the index procedure performed: subscapularis slide alone (group 1); subscapularis slide with a simultaneous microsurgical reconstruction (group 2); primary microsurgical brachial plexus reconstruction followed later by a subscapularis slide (group 3); primary microsurgical brachial plexus reconstruction followed later by a subscapularis slide combined with tendon transfers for shoulder external rotation (group 4); and subscapularis slide with simultaneous tendon transfers, with no prior brachial plexus surgery (group 5). Full passive external rotation equivalent to the contralateral side was achieved in the operating room in all cases. No cases resulted in anterior instability or internal rotation deficit. Internal rotation contracture of the shoulder after brachial plexus birth injury can be effectively managed with the technique of subscapularis slide.

  5. Impact of shoulder complaints after neck dissection on shoulder disability and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, Martijn M.; van Wilgen, Cornelis P.; de Boer, Erlijn M.; de Goede, Cees J. T.; Koolstra, Muriel; van Opzeeland, Anita; Venema, Piet; Sterken, Margriet W.; Vincent, Andrew; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2008-01-01

    To explore relationships between shoulder complaints after neck dissection, shoulder disability, and quality of life. To find clinical predictors for mid- to long-term shoulder disability. Prospective. Shoulder pain, shoulder mobility, and shoulder droop, as well as scores on shoulder disability

  6. Rotator cuff tears: should abduction and external rotation (ABER) positioning be performed before image acquisition? A CT arthrography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, Hubert [Hopital Cardiologique du Haut-Leveque, CHU Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Pessac (France); Couderc, Stephane; Pele, Eric; Moreau-Durieux, Marie-Helene; Hauger, Olivier [Hopital Pellegrin, CHU Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Osteo-articulaire, Bordeaux (France); Amoretti, Nicolas [CHU Archet, Unite d' Imagerie Osteo-articulaire, Nice (France)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate the impact of abduction and external rotation (ABER) positioning performed before image acquisition on the assessment of rotator cuff tears. Twenty-seven consecutive patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff tears underwent an initial CT arthrogram of the shoulder in neutral position, immediately followed by temporary ABER positioning, before a second CT acquisition in neutral position. Two observers blinded to potential pre-procedure ABER positioning independently analysed the randomly distributed images. Lesions were classified into partial-thickness (PT) and full-thickness (FT) tear subtypes. Lesion detection and measurements of pre- and post-ABER studies were compared. We found no influence of pre-test ABER positioning on FT detection or measurements. Every PT detected on pre-ABER study was also detected on post-ABER study (28/28 for reader 1, and 32/32 for reader 2). Seven and eight additional PT were found by readers 1 and 2, respectively, on post-ABER study. Lesion size increased after ABER in terms of area (P < 0.001 for both readers) and Ellman's grade (P = 0.02 and 0.002 for reader 1 and 2, respectively). ABER positioning before CT is associated with improved delineation of partial tears, a higher number of detected tears and modification of treatment planning. (orig.)

  7. [Treatment of proximal humeral fractures by reverse shoulder arthroplasty: mid-term evaluation of functional results and Notching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Elena, J; de la Red-Gallego, M Á; Garcés-Zarzalejo, C; Pascual-Carra, M A; Pérez-Aguilar, M D; Rodríguez-López, T; Alfonso-Fernández, A; Pérez-Núñez, M I

    2015-01-01

    An analysis was made on relationship between Notching and functional and radiographic parameters after treatment of acute proximal humeral fractures with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. A retrospective evaluation was performed on 37 patients with acute proximal humeral fracture treated by reversed shoulder arthroplasty. The mean follow-up was 24 months. Range of motion, intraoperative and postoperative complications were recorded. Nerot's classification was used to evaluate Notching. Patient satisfaction was evaluated with the Constant Score (CS). Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between Notching and glenosphere position, or functional outcomes. Mean range of elevation, abduction, external and internal rotation were 106.22°, 104.46°, 46.08° and 40.27°, respectively. Mean CS was 63. Notching was present at 12 months in 29% of patients. Statistical analysis showed significance differences between age and CS, age and notching development, and tilt with notching. No statistical significance differences were found between elevation, abduction, internal and external rotation and CS either with scapular or glenosphere-neck angle. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty is a valuable option for acute humeral fractures in patients with osteoporosis and cuff-tear arthropathy. It leads to early pain relief and shoulder motion. Nevertheless, it is not exempt from complications, and long-term studies are needed to determine the importance of notching. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Shoulder rotator isokinetic strength profile in young swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Miguel Prazeres Batalha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n5p545  Considering that some studies suggest that shoulder rotators muscle imbal­ances are related to joint pain and injury, and that there are no normative data for young swimmers, the aim of this study was: i to describe the muscle balance, fatigue and isokinetic strength profile of the shoulder rotators in young swimmers; ii to compare the results between swimmers and a group of young non-practitioners; iii to contribute to the acquisition of normative data of unilateral ratios of shoulder rotators. We evaluated the shoulder rotators concentric strength and unilateral ratios (ratio between torque of external and internal rotators of 60 swimmers (age: 14.55 ± 0.5 years old; body mass: 61.16 ± 7.08 kg and 60 non-practitioners (age: 14.62 ± 0.49 years old; body mass: 60.22 ± 10.01 kg. The evaluation was performed in the sitting position (90° abduction and elbow flexion at 60º.s-1 and 180º.s-1 angular speeds using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex System 3. The results of the fatigue ratios revealed no differences between the groups. Swimmers showed unilateral ratios of 73.39 ± 17.26% in the dominant limb (DL and 77.89 ± 15,23% in the non-dominant limb (NDL for assessments at 60º.s-1. At 180º.s-1, ratios were 74.77± 13.99% for DL and 70.11 ± 14.57% for NDL. Swimmers presented greater muscle imbalance, and differed from non-practitioners in the ability to produce power with the internal rotators, which was significantly higher in the former group.

  9. Effect of prolotherapy on hemiplegic shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinopathy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Kesikburun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolotherapy on pain and shoulder range of motion in stroke patients with hemiplegic shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinopathy. Material and Methods: The data of 10 patients (mean age, 64.2+/-11.6 years who had a history stroke of more than six months and underwent prolotherapy treatment were collected retrospectively. The treatment included 3 sessions of dextrose pr olotherapy injections applied to rotator cuff tendon. Visual analogue scale pain scores and shoulder range of motions measured at baseline and two weeks later after end of the treatment were assessed. Results: Visual analogue scale shoulder pain scores of the patients decreased from 8.2+/-1.1 at baseline to 4.8+/-1.9 after prolotherapy The degrees of shoulder flexion and abduction increased significantly after the treatment. Conclusion: Preliminary results in this pilot study suggested the beneficial effect of proloterapi in the treatmentof hemiplegicshoulderpain. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 13-18

  10. Degree of Contracture Related to Residual Muscle Shoulder Strength in Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelein Vitringa, Valerie M; van Noort, Arthur; Ritt, Marco J P F; van Royen, Barend J; van der Sluijs, Johannes A

    2015-12-01

     Little is known about the relation between residual muscle strength and joint contracture formation in neuromuscular disorders. This study aimed to investigate the relation between residual muscle strength and shoulder joint contractures in children with sequelae of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). In OBPL a shoulder joint contracture is a frequent finding. We hypothesize that residual internal and external rotator strength and their balance are related to the extent of shoulder joint contracture.  Clinical assessment was performed in 34 children (mean 10.0 years) with unilateral OBPL and Narakas classes I-III. External and internal rotation strengths were measured with the shoulder in neutral position using a handheld dynamometer. Strength on the affected side was given as percentage of the normal side. Contracture was assessed by passive internal and external rotations in degrees (in 0° abduction). Mallet classification was used for active shoulder function.  External and internal rotation strengths on the affected side were approximately 50% of the normal side and on average both equally affected: 56% (SD 18%) respectively 51% (SD 27%); r  = 0.600, p  = 0.000. Residual strengths were not related to passive internal or external rotation ( p  > 0.200). Internal rotation strength ( r  =  - 0.425, p muscle strength influence contracture formation cannot be confirmed in this study. Our results are of interest for the understanding of contracture formation in OBPL.

  11. Early Contralateral Shoulder-Arm Morbidity in Breast Cancer Patients Enrolled in a Randomized Trial of Post-Surgery Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele Adriaenssens

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Shoulder/arm morbidity is a common complication of breast cancer surgery and radiotherapy (RT, but little is known about acute contralateral morbidity. Methods Patients were 118 women enrolled in a RT trial. Arm volume and shoulder mobility were assessed before and 1–3 months after RT. Correlations and linear regression were used to analyze changes affecting ipsilateral and contralateral arms, and changes affecting relative interlimb differences (RID. Results Changes affecting one limb correlated with changes affecting the other limb. Arm volume between the two limbs correlated (R = 0.57. Risk factors were weight increase and axillary dissection. Contralateral and ipsilateral loss of abduction strongly correlated (R = 0.78. Changes of combined RID exceeding 10% affected the ipsilateral limb in 25% of patients, and the contralateral limb in 18%. Aromatase inhibitor therapy was significantly associated with contralateral loss of abduction. Conclusions High incidence of early contralateral arm morbidity warrants further investigations.

  12. The Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP on Improvement in Pain and Symptoms of Shoulder Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Nejati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Subacromial impingement is one of the most common complaints of shoulder. Treatments include avoiding of painful activities, oral anti-pain drugs, physical therapy modalities, corticosteroid injection and exercise therapy. Some studies have shown that platelet- rich plasma(PRP is effective on tendinitis and tearing of tendons, ligaments and muscles, but evidence that has proved PRP as a conservative treatment in shoulder pathologies is very limited. This study aims to investigate the effect of PRP injection on relieving pain and improving daily function of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study, patients older than 40 with pain more than three months were included. If they had three of four positive diagnostic clinical tests of shoulder impingement that were confirmed by shoulder MRI, could be injected PRP twice. The time between injections was 1 month. Pain was measured by visual analog scale (VAS and function was measured by two questionnaires named disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH and western Ontario rotator cuff index (WORC. Range of motion (ROM of shoulder was measured in five directions by goniometry . All of these parameters were evaluated before intervention and in 1, 3, 6 months later. Results: with due attention to a six-month folloe-up, PRR injection was effective in pain reduction and improvement of patient's function (p<0.05. Shoulder Rom increased in all directions except external rotation and the power of shoulder muscles was evidently improved statistically in flexion, abduction and internal toration. Conclusion: PRP injection could effectively reduce pain and improve daily activities in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome.

  13. Automatic fitting of Gaussian peaks using abductive machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aal, R. E.

    1998-02-01

    Analytical techniques have been used for many years for fitting Gaussian peaks in nuclear spectroscopy. However, the complexity of the approach warrants looking for machine-learning alternatives where intensive computations are required only once (during training), while actual analysis on individual spectra is greatly simplified and quickened. This should allow the use of simple portable systems for fast and automated analysis of large numbers of spectra, particularly in situations where accuracy may be traded for speed and simplicity. This paper proposes the use of abductive networks machine learning for this purpose. The Abductory Induction Mechanism (AIM) tool was used to build models for analyzing both single and double Gaussian peaks in the presence of noise depicting statistical uncertainties in collected spectra. AIM networks were synthesized by training on 1000 representative simulated spectra and evaluated on 500 new spectra. A classifier network determines the multiplicity of single/double peaks with an accuracy of 5.8%. With statistical uncertainties corresponding to a peak count of 100, average percentage absolute errors for the height, position, and width of single peaks are 4.9, 2.9, and 4.2%, respectively. For double peaks, these average errors are within 7.0, 3.1, and 5.9%, respectively. Models have been developed which account for the effect of a linear background on a single peak. Performance is compared with a neural network application and with an analytical curve-fitting routine, and the new technique is applied to actual data of an alpha spectrum.

  14. Automatic fitting of Gaussian peaks using abductive machine learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aal, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    Analytical techniques have been used for many years for fitting Gaussian peaks in nuclear spectroscopy. However, the complexity of the approach warrants looking for machine-learning alternatives where intensive computations are required only once (during training), while actual analysis on individual spectra is greatly simplified and quickened. This should allow the use of simple portable systems for fast and automated analysis of large numbers of spectra, particularly in situations where accuracy may be traded for speed and simplicity. This paper proposes the use of abductive networks machine learning for this purpose. The Abductory Induction Mechanism (AIM) tool was used to build models for analyzing both single and double Gaussian peaks in the presence of noise depicting statistical uncertainties in collected spectra. AIM networks were synthesized by training on 1,000 representative simulated spectra and evaluated on 500 new spectra. A classifier network determines the multiplicity of single/double peaks with an accuracy of 98%. With statistical uncertainties corresponding to a peak count of 100, average percentage absolute errors for the height, position, and width of single peaks are 4.9, 2.9, and 4.2%, respectively. For double peaks, these average errors are within 7.0, 3.1, and 5.9%, respectively. Models have been developed which account for the effect of a linear background on a single peak. Performance is compared with a neural network application and with an analytical curve-fitting routine, and the new technique is applied to actual data of an alpha spectrum

  15. MRI of the posttraumatic shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, N.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Abnormalities of the shoulder are common but still unclear for both GPs and the orthopedic surgeon in our community. Difficult and late these patients are directed to a specialist for diagnosis and treatment. Our goal is to address some of the key and most common problem conditions related to the complaints in this area. Incidence of symptomatic ruptures of the shoulder’s rotator cuff is difficult to be evaluated. But it is by no means rare, concerning the research in the world - historically and today. It is also known that ruptures can be asymptomatic. Despite the large percentage of them, many of them are at risk for progression of the symptoms. While, on the world, the authors explicitly state that dealing with a rotator cuff rupture is one of the top 10 issues that are most important for orthopedic surgeons, in our country the most common diagnosis for shoulder complaints is still periarthritis, without specifying of individual muscles pathology. Another major concern is shoulder instability associated with multiple incidents of luxation started either in adolescence with minor traumatic incident, such as recurrent dislocation, or started after severe trauma in older ages. It has to be specified diagnostic type of instability: front, rear or multidirection. Especially it is important to make the initial stabilization period of unavoidable long series of repeated dislocations in adolescents and young people, whether actively practicing sports or not. This point is often missed, and later for large lesions it leads to more invasive surgery. Not infrequently this condition is characterized by pain and limited movement without true dislocation. Then it is mandatory to assess the diagnostic changes in labrum, ligaments and muscles, not to leave the patient to reach first dislocation. Impingement syndrome (IC) is a common suffering, engaging soft tissues in the subacromial bursitis. IC characterizes by pain during the upper limb removal and the

  16. Work related shoulder disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mathiassen, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    and symptoms. Data were analysed by generalised estimating equation and multiple logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Results: For current upper arm elevation above 90°, a duration increment of 1% of the daily working hours was associated with odds ratios of 1.23 (95% CI 1.10 to 1......Aims: To determine quantitative exposure-response relations between work with highly elevated arms and supraspinatus tendinitis, shoulder pain with disability, and shoulder pain without disability. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in a historical cohort of 1886 males from three...... occupational groups. Exposure measurements were performed for four consecutive working days in a random sample of 72 currently employed subjects. Individual work histories were obtained by questionnaire and register data. Health status was ascertained by physical examination blinded towards exposure...

  17. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazaki, Carlos Renato Ticianelli; Trippia, Carlos Henrique; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda Sales Ferreira; Medaglia, Carla Regina Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head), and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder. (author)

  18. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Ticianelli Terazaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head, and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder.

  19. Shoulder Pain After Thoracic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten R; Andersen, Claus; Ørding, Helle

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the time course of ipsilateral shoulder pain after thoracic surgery with respect to incidence, pain intensity, type of pain (referred versus musculoskeletal), and surgical approach. DESIGN: Prospective, observational cohort study. SETTING: Odense University Hospital, Denmark...... for musculoskeletal involvement (muscle tenderness on palpation and movement) with follow-up 12 months after surgery. Clinically relevant pain was defined as a numeric rating scale score>3. Of the 60 patients included, 47 (78%) experienced ipsilateral shoulder pain, but only 25 (42%) reported clinically relevant...... shoulder pain. On postoperative day 4, 19 patients (32%) still suffered shoulder pain, but only 4 patients (7%) had clinically relevant pain. Four patients (8%) still suffered shoulder pain 12 months after surgery. In 26 patients (55%), the shoulder pain was classified as referred versus 21 patients (45...

  20. Usefulness of sono-guided needle puncture for MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Woong; Hong, Suk Ju; Suh, San Il; Yong, Hwan Suk; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Park, Cheol Min; Suh, Won Hyuck; Kim, Myung Gyu

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of sono-guided needle puncture for MR arthrography of the shoulder to locate the path of access and to control the correct placement of the needle into the shoulder. Fifteen patients with suspicion of shoulder pathology were included in this study. Patients were laid in supine positions with the arm extended and slightly abducted, the palm of the hand facing upward. A sonographic unit with a high resolution transducer with 7.5 MHz linear array was used. Axial images in the anterior aspect of the shoulder were obtained to localize the coracoid process and the anteromedical portion of the humerus. Using an aseptic technique, a 21-guage needle was advanced into the shoulder joint under ultrasonographic guidance. When the needle made contract with the articular cartilage of the humeral head, the needle was tiled to position is point in the articular cavity. Solution of 0.1 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine in 25 ml of normal saline was prepared and 12-16 ml was injected into the joint cavity. The intra-articular position of the needle and the compete distension of the shoulder joint were again confirmed by sonography. The needle was accurately placed in 14 out of 15 patients without damage to neighboring structures. It took 10 to 15 minutes to complete the procedure in 14 patients. No side effects attributable to gadopentetate dimeglumine were found. Sono-guided needle puncture for the shoulder MR arthrography can be a substitutable method for fluoroscopic guidance, with easy access, advantages of lacking radiation hazard and eliminating the need for iodized contrast agents.

  1. Manipulation under anaesthetic for frozen shoulder using Codman's paradox: a safe and early return of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvieli, Oren; Atoun, Ehud; Consigliere, Paolo; Polyzois, Ioannis; Walecka, Joanna; Pradhan, Rajib; Ippolito, Giorgio; Rath, Ehud; Levy, Ofer

    2018-02-01

    Although previously frozen shoulder was thought to resolve by two to three years, recent studies demonstrated the symptoms can remain for much longer. Manipulation under anaesthetic (MUA) has been shown to be successful in relieving pain and restoring function. Yet, concerns have been raised regarding its safety and the risks of complications. We utilise Codman's paradox to manipulate the shoulder, avoiding rotational torque on the humerus. The aim of our study was to asses shoulder function in the early post MUA period. Two hundred twelve consecutive patients (224 shoulders) (mean age 52.4 years) underwent MUA using Codman's paradox for frozen shoulder as sole procedure between 2005 and 2013. All were evaluated clinically, preoperatively and postoperatively, at three weeks and three months, for Constant score (CS), pain, range of motion (ROM), patient satisfaction and subjective shoulder value (SSV). At three weeks and three months, a significant improvement was found in CS from 30.7 to 66 and 70 respectively. Forward elevation improved from 91° to 154° and 160 °, abduction from 69° to 150° and 156 °, internal rotation from 12° to 62° and 66 °, and external rotation from 10° to 46° and 50 °. Pain score improved from 4.4/15 to 9.6/15 and 10.4/15, SSV improved from 1.5/10 to 6.5/10 and 6.7/10. (pparadox provides a safe and efficient way to perform MUA for frozen shoulder. It results in dramatic early improvement in ROM, functional outcomes and high satisfaction, as early as three weeks post-operatively.

  2. Shoulder Dystocia: Prediction and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Meghan G; Cohen, Wayne R

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a complication of vaginal delivery and the primary factor associated with brachial plexus injury. In this review, we discuss the risk factors for shoulder dystocia and propose a framework for the prediction and prevention of the complication. A recommended approach to management when shoulder dystocia occurs is outlined, with review of the maneuvers used to relieve the obstruction with minimal risk of fetal and maternal injury.

  3. Shoulder dystocia: prediction and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Meghan G; Cohen, Wayne R

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a complication of vaginal delivery and the primary factor associated with brachial plexus injury. In this review, we discuss the risk factors for shoulder dystocia and propose a framework for the prediction and prevention of the complication. A recommended approach to management when shoulder dystocia occurs is outlined, with review of the maneuvers used to relieve the obstruction with minimal risk of fetal and maternal injury.

  4. Thermal Shrinkage for Shoulder Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Toth, Alison P.; Warren, Russell F.; Petrigliano, Frank A.; Doward, David A.; Cordasco, Frank A.; Altchek, David W.; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal capsular shrinkage was popular for the treatment of shoulder instability, despite a paucity of outcomes data in the literature defining the indications for this procedure or supporting its long-term efficacy. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical evaluation of radiofrequency thermal capsular shrinkage for the treatment of shoulder instability, with a minimum 2-year follow-up. From 1999 to 2001, 101 consecutive patients with mild to moderate shoulder instability underwent...

  5. Shoulder dystocia: management and documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitely, Michael L; Gherman, Robert B

    2014-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency that occurs when the fetal shoulders become impacted at the pelvic inlet. Management is based on performing maneuvers to alleviate this impaction. A number of protocols and training mnemonics have been developed to assist in managing shoulder dystocia when it occurs. This article reviews the evidence regarding the performance, timing, and sequence of these maneuvers; reviews the mechanism of fetal injury in relation to shoulder dystocia; and discusses issues concerning documentation of the care provided during this obstetric emergency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Testing the assumption in ergonomics software that overall shoulder strength can be accurately calculated by treating orthopedic axes as independent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Joanne N; La Delfa, Nicholas J; Potvin, Jim R

    2016-08-01

    To predict shoulder strength, most current ergonomics software assume independence of the strengths about each of the orthopedic axes. Using this independent axis approach (IAA), the shoulder can be predicted to have strengths as high as the resultant of the maximum moment about any two or three axes. We propose that shoulder strength is not independent between axes, and propose an approach that calculates the weighted average (WAA) between the strengths of the axes involved in the demand. Fifteen female participants performed maximum isometric shoulder exertions with their right arm placed in a rigid adjustable brace affixed to a tri-axial load cell. Maximum exertions were performed in 24 directions, including four primary directions, horizontal flexion-extension, abduction-adduction, and at 15° increments in between those axes. Moments were computed and comparisons made between the experimentally collected strengths and those predicted by the IAA and WAA methods. The IAA over-predicted strength in 14 of 20 non-primary exertions directions, while the WAA underpredicted strength in only 2 of these directions. Therefore, it is not valid to assume that shoulder axes are independent when predicting shoulder strengths between two orthopedic axes, and the WAA is an improvement over current methods for the posture tested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The relationship of strength and muscle balance to shoulder pain and impingement syndrome in elite quadriplegic wheelchair rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, M; Sleivert, G G; Gerrard, D F

    1998-04-01

    Wheelchair athletes are susceptible to injuries related to overuse of the shoulder, in particular shoulder impingement syndrome. The present study examined the relationship of shoulder pain to demographic details, isokinetic strength and muscle balance in 8 elite quadriplegic rugby players. Demographic data were collected using personal interviews and each subject was clinically examined for signs of impingement syndrome by a physician. In addition each subject underwent bilateral isokinetic strength testing of the shoulder at 60 and 180 deg/s for abduction/adduction and internal/external rotation. A series of step-wise multiple discriminant analysis successfully predicted clinical symptoms from demographic, muscular strength and balance data. In particular, there was a significant deficit in adductor strength and this was related to shoulder pain and wasting of the scapular muscles. This strength deficit may be due to the high level of spinal lesions in the quadriplegic population. The level of spinal lesion may contribute to the aetiology of shoulder pathology in quadriplegia, and differentiate it from that observed in able-bodied athletes who exhibit weak abductors.

  8. Mobilization with movement and kinesiotaping compared with a supervised exercise program for painful shoulder: results of a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Olivera C; Vukicevic, Danijela; Katunac, Ljiljana; Jovic, Stevan

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of Mobilization with Movement (MWM) and kinesiotaping (KT) techniques with a supervised exercise program in participants with patients with shoulder pain. Twenty subjects with shoulder pain were included if subjects were diagnosed by the referring physician with either rotator cuff lesion with impingement syndrome or impingement shoulder syndrome. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups after clinical and radiologic assessment: group 1 was treated with MWM and KT techniques, whereas group 2 was treated with a supervised exercise program. The main outcome measures were active pain-free shoulder abduction and flexion tested on days 0, 5, and 10. Improvement in active pain-free shoulder range of motion was significantly higher in the group treated with MWM and KT. Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated significant effects of treatment, time, and treatment×time interaction. This study suggests that MWM and KT may be an effective and useful treatment in range of motion augmentation of subjects with rotator cuff lesion and impingement syndrome or impingement shoulder syndrome. Copyright © 2012 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Serious shoulder injuries in professional soccer: return to participation after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, David; Funk, Lennard

    2015-07-01

    An evidence base for the management and prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer is lacking. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the type, mechanism and recovery time after surgery associated with serious shoulder injuries sustained in professional soccer to build an evidence base foundation. Fifty-two professional soccer players underwent shoulder surgery for injuries sustained during match play. Of these, 25 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Data were collected for injury mechanism and type; clinical, radiological and surgical findings and procedures; and return to full participation. Subjects were all managed by the same surgeon. Labral injuries represented the most common injury type affecting 21 (84 %) subjects; two rotator cuff (8 %) and two combined labral/rotator cuff (8 %) injuries were less common. Fourteen (56 %) subjects sustained a high-energy trauma injury in a combined abduction and external rotation position. Six (24 %) subjects sustained a low-energy trauma mechanism in variable positions, while five (20 %) had a gradual onset of symptoms. Twenty-two (88 %) subjects reported a dislocation as a feature of their presentation. All of the subjects with high- and low-energy trauma mechanisms reported a dislocation occurring at the time of injury. Eight (32 %) subjects had sustained a previous significant shoulder injury to the ipsilateral side. Goalkeepers did not sustain low-energy trauma injuries. Outfield players returned to full participation in a mean time of 11.6 weeks, while goalkeepers did so in 11.1 weeks post-surgery. Return to participation time ranged from 7 to 24 weeks with a median of 11 weeks. Professional soccer players can expect a return to participation within 12 weeks post-surgery. The majority of serious shoulder injuries in soccer occur at a positional extreme of external rotation and abduction in high-energy situations, while a significant number occur in low-energy situations away from this position. Most serious shoulder

  10. [Shoulder dystocia: Guidelines for clinical practice--Short text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentilhes, L; Sénat, M-V; Boulogne, A-I; Deneux-Tharaux, C; Fuchs, F; Legendre, G; Le Ray, C; Lopez, E; Schmitz, T; Lejeune-Saada, V

    2015-12-01

    diabetes (grade C), EFW greater than 5000g in the absence of maternal diabetes (grade C), history of shoulder dystocia associated with severe neonatal or maternal complications (Professional consensus), and finally during labor, in case of fetal macrosomia and failure to progress in the second stage, when the fetal head is above a +2 station (grade C). In case of shoulder dystocia, it is recommended not to pull excessively on the fetal head (grade C), do not perform uterine expression (grade C) and do not realize inverse rotation of the fetal head (professional consensus). McRoberts' maneuver, with or without a suprapubic pressure, is recommended in the first line (grade C). In case of failure, if the posterior shoulder is engaged, Wood's maneuver should be performed preferentially; if the posterior shoulder is not engaged, delivery of the posterior arm should be performed preferentially (professional consensus). It seems necessary to know at least two maneuvers to perform in case of shoulder dystocia unresolved by the maneuver of McRoberts (professional consensus). Pediatrician should be immediately informed in case of shoulder dystocia. The initial clinical examination should search complications such as brachial plexus birth injury or clavicle fracture (professional consensus). In absence of neonatal complication, monitoring of the neonate is not modified (professional consensus). The implementation of a practical training using simulation and concerning all caregivers of the delivery room is associated with a significant reduction in neonatal (LE3) but not maternal (LE3) injury. Shoulder dystocia remains a non-predictable obstetrics emergency. All physicians and midwives should know and perform obstetric maneuvers if needed quickly but without precipitation. A training program using simulation for the management of shoulder dystocia is encouraged for the initial and continuing formation of different actors in the delivery room (professional consensus). Copyright

  11. [Epidemiology of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneux-Tharaux, C; Delorme, P

    2015-12-01

    To synthetize the available evidence regarding the incidence and risk factors of shoulder dystocia (SD). Consultation of the Medline database, and of national guidelines. Shoulder dystocia is defined as a vaginal delivery that requires additional obstetric manoeuvres to deliver the foetus after the head has delivered and gentle traction has failed. With this definition, the incidence of SD in population-based studies is about 0.5-1% of vaginal deliveries. Many risk factors have been described but most associations are not independent, or have not been constantly found. The 2 characteristics consistently found as independent risk factors for SD in the literature are previous SD (incidence of SD of about 10% in parturients with previous SD) and foetal macrosomia. Maternal diabetes and obesity also are associated with a higher risk of SD (2 to 4 folds) but these associations may be completely explained by foetal macrosomia. However, even factors independently and constantly associated with SD do not allow a valid prediction of SD because they are not discriminant; 50 to 70% of SD cases occur in their absence, and the great majority of deliveries when they are present is not associated with SD. Shoulder dystocia is defined by the need for additional obstetric manoeuvres to deliver the foetus after the head has delivered and gentle traction has failed, and complicates 0.5-1% of vaginal deliveries. Its main risk factors are previous SD and macrosomia, but they are poorly predictive. SD remains a non-predictable obstetrics emergency. Knowledge of SD risk factors should increase the vigilance of clinicians in at-risk contexts. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Higher-level fusion for military operations based on abductive inference: proof of principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleev, Aleksandar V.; Josephson, John

    2006-04-01

    The ability of contemporary military commanders to estimate and understand complicated situations already suffers from information overload, and the situation can only grow worse. We describe a prototype application that uses abductive inferencing to fuse information from multiple sensors to evaluate the evidence for higher-level hypotheses that are close to the levels of abstraction needed for decision making (approximately JDL levels 2 and 3). Abductive inference (abduction, inference to the best explanation) is a pattern of reasoning that occurs naturally in diverse settings such as medical diagnosis, criminal investigations, scientific theory formation, and military intelligence analysis. Because abduction is part of common-sense reasoning, implementations of it can produce reasoning traces that are very human understandable. Automated abductive inferencing can be deployed to augment human reasoning, taking advantage of computation to process large amounts of information, and to bypass limits to human attention and short-term memory. We illustrate the workings of the prototype system by describing an example of its use for small-unit military operations in an urban setting. Knowledge was encoded as it might be captured prior to engagement from a standard military decision making process (MDMP) and analysis of commander's priority intelligence requirements (PIR). The system is able to reasonably estimate the evidence for higher-level hypotheses based on information from multiple sensors. Its inference processes can be examined closely to verify correctness. Decision makers can override conclusions at any level and changes will propagate appropriately.

  13. Comparison of massage based on the tensegrity principle and classic massage in treating chronic shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassolik, Krzysztof; Andrzejewski, Waldemar; Brzozowski, Marcin; Wilk, Iwona; Górecka-Midura, Lucyna; Ostrowska, Bożena; Krzyżanowski, Dominik; Kurpas, Donata

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of classic massage to massage based on the tensegrity principle for patients with chronic idiopathic shoulder pain. Thirty subjects with chronic shoulder pain symptoms were divided into 2 groups, 15 subjects received classic (Swedish) massage to tissues surrounding the glenohumeral joint and 15 subjects received the massage using techniques based on the tensegrity principle. The tensegrity principle is based on directing treatment to the painful area and the tissues (muscles, fascia, and ligaments) that structurally support the painful area, thus treating tissues that have direct and indirect influence on the motion segment. Both treatment groups received 10 sessions over 2 weeks, each session lasted 20 minutes. The McGill Pain Questionnaire and glenohumeral ranges of motion were measured immediately before the first massage session, on the day the therapy ended 2 weeks after therapy started, and 1 month after the last massage. Subjects receiving massage based on the tensegrity principle demonstrated statistically significance improvement in the passive and active ranges of flexion and abduction of the glenohumeral joint. Pain decreased in both massage groups. This study showed increases in passive and active ranges of motion for flexion and abduction in patients who had massage based on the tensegrity principle. For pain outcomes, both classic and tensegrity massage groups demonstrated improvement. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty leads to significant biomechanical changes in the remaining rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perka Carsten

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective After reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA external and internal rotation will often remain restricted. A postoperative alteration of the biomechanics in the remaining cuff is discussed as a contributing factor to these functional deficits. Methods In this study, muscle moment arms as well as origin-to-insertion distance (OID were calculated using three-dimensional models of the shoulder derived from CT scans of seven cadaveric specimens. Results Moment arms for humeral rotation are significantly smaller for the cranial segments of SSC and all segments of TMIN in abduction angles of 30 degrees and above (p ≤ 0.05. Abduction moment arms were significantly decreased for all segments (p ≤ 0.002. OID was significantly smaller for all muscles at the 15 degree position (p ≤ 0.005, apart from the cranial SSC segment. Conclusions Reduced rotational moment arms in conjunction with the decrease of OID may be a possible explanation for the clinically observed impaired external and internal rotation.

  15. Can we predict shoulder dystocia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revicky, Vladimir; Mukhopadhyay, Sambit; Morris, Edward P; Nieto, Jose J

    2012-02-01

    To analyse the significance of risk factors and the possibility of prediction of shoulder dystocia. This was a retrospective cohort study. There were 9,767 vaginal deliveries at 37 and more weeks of gestation analysed during 2005-2007. Studied population included 234 deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia. Shoulder dystocia was defined as a delivery that required additional obstetric manoeuvres to release the shoulders after gentle downward traction has failed. First, a univariate analysis was done to identify the factors that had a significant association with shoulder dystocia. Parity, age, gestation, induction of labour, epidural analgesia, birth weight, duration of second stage of labour and mode of delivery were studied factors. All factors were then combined in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Adjusted odds ratios (Adj. OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The incidence of shoulder dystocia was 2.4% (234/9,767). Only mode of delivery and birth weight were independent risk factors for shoulder dystocia. Parity, age, gestation, induction of labour, epidural analgesia and duration of second stage of labour were not independent risk factors. Ventouse delivery increases the risk of shoulder dystocia almost 3 times, forceps delivery comparing to the ventouse delivery increases risk almost 3.4 times. Risk of shoulder dystocia is minimal with the birth weight of 3,000 g or less. It is difficult to foretell the exact birth weight and the mode of delivery, therefore occurrence of shoulder dystocia is highly unpredictable. Regular drills for shoulder dystocia and awareness of increased incidence with instrumental deliveries are important to reduce fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality.

  16. [Symphysiotomy to relieve shoulder dystocia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, S.M.; Nieuwenhof, H.P. van de; Biert, J.; Heidema, W.M.; Bekker, M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Symphysiotomy to manage shoulder dystocia is seldom used in the western world. For this reason, in well-resourced countries knowledge of its recuperation rate and the management of physical discomfort in the post-partum period is scarce. We describe two cases of symphysiotomy for shoulder dystocia.

  17. Lasciar parlare il silenzio. La Partition del subcontinente indiano e le abducted women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Cavenaghi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The acts of violence committed during the Partition of India in 1947 are known and proved. Less well known is violence that struck tens of thousands of abducted and raped women. Both India and Pakistan admitted these crimes and agreed to recover and restore the abducted women. The Indian Government especially committed to accomplish the recovery plan even at the cost of sending the women forcedly back. The recovery of abducted women became a issue of national honour that apparently contrasted with the family and community concept of honour. Many of the recovered women were indeed rejected by their families, regarding them as impure. On its part the Indian Government made a great deal of effort to restore them. After that, silence enshrouded them and the memory of their pain faded. By contrast memories of women who had committed suicide “to save their honour”, were emphatically handed on.

  18. The effect of a rotator cuff tear and its size on three-dimensional shoulder motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolk, Arjen; Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; de Witte, Pieter Bas; van Zwet, Erik W; van der Zwaal, Peer; Visser, Cornelis P J; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H; de Groot, Jurriaan H

    2017-06-01

    Rotator cuff-disease is associated with changes in kinematics, but the effect of a rotator cuff-tear and its size on shoulder kinematics is still unknown in-vivo. In this cross-sectional study, glenohumeral and scapulothoracic kinematics of the affected shoulder were evaluated using electromagnetic motion analysis in 109 patients with 1) subacromial pain syndrome (n=34), 2) an isolated supraspinatus tear (n=21), and 3) a massive rotator cuff tear involving the supraspinatus and infraspinatus (n=54). Mixed models were applied for the comparisons of shoulder kinematics between the three groups during abduction and forward flexion. In the massive rotator cuff-tear group, we found reduced glenohumeral elevation compared to the subacromial pain syndrome (16°, 95% CI [10.5, 21.2], protator cuff tears coincides with an increase in scapulothoracic lateral rotation compared to subacromial pain syndrome (11°, 95% CI [6.5, 15.2], protator cuff-tear group had substantially less glenohumeral elevation and more scapulothoracic lateral rotation compared to the other groups. These observations suggest that the infraspinatus is essential to preserve glenohumeral elevation in the presence of a supraspinatus tear. Shoulder kinematics are associated with rotator cuff-tear size and may have diagnostic potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Shoulder Girdle Muscles Endurance in Subjects with and without Impingement Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsoun Nodehi-Moghadam

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Any minimal alteration in performance and coordination of scapular and glenohumeral muscles has the potential to lead to shoulder joint dysfunction. The impingement syndrome has been reported as is the most common diagnosis of shoulder pain. The purpose of this study was to determine whether endurance deficits could be detected in patients with shoulder impingement. Materials & Methods: By convenient sampling 15 patients with impingement syndrome at average of 45.3 years of age and 15 healthy persons (age 45.8 years through a case–control design participated in the study. Endurance of glenohumeral and scapulothoracic muscles were tested with a hand held dynamometer. Independent t–test was used to statistically analyze different groups. Results: Compared to non–impaired subjects, those with impingement syndrome demonstrated a significantly lower endurance of external rotation, scaption and scapular abduction and upward rotation movements (P<0.05. In impingement syndrome patients, the external–to–internal rotator muscles endurance ratio was significantly lower than the control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: The result of the study suggests that endurance deficit of rotator cuff and scapular upward rotator muscles may be an important aspect of the impingement syndrome. Shoulder girdle muscles endurance should be considered in evaluation and physical therapy of impingement syndrome patients.

  20. The relationship between abduction deficit and reoperation among patients with infantile esotropia

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    Zhale Rajavi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the relationship between abduction deficit and reoperation among patients with infantile esotropia (IET. METHODS: The records of 216 patients (432 eyes with IET who underwent surgery, from 2010 to 2015 were studied. Patients with IET whose deviation appeared before 6mo of age and had stable preoperative deviation in two examinations with at least 2wk apart and a minimum 3mo postoperative follow up were included. Cases with early onset accommodative esotropia, congenital cataract, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP, manifest nystagmus, fundus lesions, neurologic and ophthalmic anomalies, 6th nerve palsy and Duane’s syndrome were excluded. Preoperative abduction deficit was considered from -1 to -3 grading scale. Three months after surgery, children were classified into no-need reoperation [deviation≤15 prism diopters (PD], and need-reoperation groups (deviation>15 PD. RESULTS: In this retrospective study, 117 female and 99 male patients with the mean surgical age of 4.7±6.4y were included. Reoperation rate was 33.3% and 16.0% in IET patients with and without abduction deficit, respectively in patients who had a history of late surgery. Abduction deficit increased the odds of reoperation by 82% [OR=1.82, 95% confidence interval (CI =1.05 to 3.19, P=0.003] in patients who had a history of late surgery (>2 years old, P=0.021. Abduction deficit was improved significantly after operation (P<0.001. CONCLUSION: Based on our results, abduction deficit can be considered as a risk factor of reoperation in IET patients who are operated at the age of more than 2y.

  1. The relationship between abduction deficit and reoperation among patients with infantile esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh; Torkian, Pooya; Behradfar, Narges; Yaseri, Mehdi; Feizi, Mohadeseh; Faghihi, Mohammad; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2018-01-01

    To determine the relationship between abduction deficit and reoperation among patients with infantile esotropia (IET). The records of 216 patients (432 eyes) with IET who underwent surgery, from 2010 to 2015 were studied. Patients with IET whose deviation appeared before 6mo of age and had stable preoperative deviation in two examinations with at least 2wk apart and a minimum 3mo postoperative follow up were included. Cases with early onset accommodative esotropia, congenital cataract, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), manifest nystagmus, fundus lesions, neurologic and ophthalmic anomalies, 6 th nerve palsy and Duane's syndrome were excluded. Preoperative abduction deficit was considered from -1 to -3 grading scale. Three months after surgery, children were classified into no-need reoperation [deviation≤15 prism diopters (PD)], and need-reoperation groups (deviation>15 PD). In this retrospective study, 117 female and 99 male patients with the mean surgical age of 4.7±6.4y were included. Reoperation rate was 33.3% and 16.0% in IET patients with and without abduction deficit, respectively in patients who had a history of late surgery. Abduction deficit increased the odds of reoperation by 82% [OR=1.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) =1.05 to 3.19, P =0.003] in patients who had a history of late surgery (>2 years old, P =0.021). Abduction deficit was improved significantly after operation ( P <0.001). Based on our results, abduction deficit can be considered as a risk factor of reoperation in IET patients who are operated at the age of more than 2y.

  2. Searching for the Unknowable: A Process of Detection — Abductive Research Generated by Projective Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri Levin-Rozalis

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This article looks at the process of doing research ‘from scratch.’ The author began a project investigating children of Ethiopian origin living in Israel to see how ones who attended a kindergartern program years earlier differed from those who had not attended. However, the problem from the outset was that there may not be a difference to find. In this article, the author compares inductive, deductive, and abductive reasoning, and argues that abductive reasoning is the proper technique when nothing is known about the research at the outset.

  3. Ultrasonographic measurement of the axillary recess thickness in an asymptomatic shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi-Young Park

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The purpose of this study was to measure the axillary recess (AR thickness in an asymptomatic shoulder by using ultrasonography (US and to analyze the factors affecting it. Methods We recruited 141 patients (52 males; 89 females; age, 57.7±9.9 years with unilateral shoulder pain and performed US on the unaffected shoulder. Two physiatrists measured the AR thickness of the unaffected shoulder independently. All patients were examined in an upright sitting position with 90° shoulder abduction. The ultrasonographic transducer was placed longitudinally on the mid-axillary line and along the long axis of the humeral shaft. The factors affecting the AR thickness values were analyzed, and intra-class correlation coefficients were used for assessing the reproducibility of each measurement. Results The intrarater reliability values for the two physiatrists were 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. The inter-rater reliability of the mean AR thickness measurements was 0.91. The mean AR thickness in all subjects, males, and females was 2.8±0.6 mm, 3.1±0.6 mm, and 2.6±0.5 mm (P<0.01, respectively. No difference between the left and the right sides (males, P=0.086; females, P=0.535 or between the dominant and the non-dominant sides (males, P=0.173; female, P=0.244 was found. The AR thickness correlated positively with the height (r=0.313, P<0.01 and the weight (r=0.319, P<0.01. However, it did not correlate with the body mass index (r=0.152, P=0.077 or the age (r=-0.056, P=0.515. Conclusion US measurements of the AR thickness in asymptomatic shoulders demonstrated excellent intrarater and inter-rater reliabilities. The AR thickness showed anatomical variation with sex, height, and weight.

  4. Factors Associated with Pain, Disability and Quality of Life in Patients Suffering from Frozen Shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Bagheri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frozen shoulder is resulting in limb disability and reduction of quality of life but the factors associated with patients’ disability and quality of life is not clear. To assess pain, disability, the quality of life and factors associated with them in patients suffering from frozen shoulder.  Methods: We enrolled 120 patients (37 men and 83 women with phase-II idiopathic frozen shoulder in our cross-sectional study. Demographic data were collected and shoulder range of motion was measured in four different directions (elevation, abduction, external and internal rotation in both upper limbs. Patients were asked to fill out Visual Analog Scale for pain (VAS and, Short-Form Health Survey questionnaire (SF-36 as well as Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaires. We asked the patients to fill out the Hamilton anxiety and depression questionnaires. Results: The mean of VAS pain, DASH, PCS, and MCS scores were 69(18, 53(17, 35(8.0, and 42(10 respectively. All the domains of SF36 questionnaires where below the normal population except physical function. VAS pain score was correlated to Hamilton depression scores in both bivariate and mulivarilable analysis. DASH score were correlated to sex, age, ROM, and both Hamilton anxiety and depression scores; However, DASH score only impact with Hamilton anxiety and ROM independently. PCS is correlated to age and MCS to Hamilton depression. Conclusion: Patient with frozen shoulder are more suffering from pain and disability secondary to psychiatric parameters such as depression and anxiety than demographic features or even restriction of range of motion.

  5. Ultrasonographic measurement of the axillary recess thickness in an asymptomatic shoulder

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    Park, Gi Young; Lee, Jin Hoon; Kwon, Dae Gil [Dept. of Rehabilitation Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to measure the axillary recess (AR) thickness in an asymptomatic shoulder by using ultrasonography (US) and to analyze the factors affecting it. We recruited 141 patients (52 males; 89 females; age, 57.7±9.9 years) with unilateral shoulder pain and performed US on the unaffected shoulder. Two physiatrists measured the AR thickness of the unaffected shoulder independently. All patients were examined in an upright sitting position with 90° shoulder abduction. The ultrasonographic transducer was placed longitudinally on the mid-axillary line and along the long axis of the humeral shaft. The factors affecting the AR thickness values were analyzed, and intra-class correlation coefficients were used for assessing the reproducibility of each measurement. The intrarater reliability values for the two physiatrists were 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. The inter-rater reliability of the mean AR thickness measurements was 0.91. The mean AR thickness in all subjects, males, and females was 2.8±0.6 mm, 3.1±0.6 mm, and 2.6±0.5 mm (P<0.01), respectively. No difference between the left and the right sides (males, P=0.086; females, P=0.535) or between the dominant and the non-dominant sides (males, P=0.173; female, P=0.244) was found. The AR thickness correlated positively with the height (r=0.313, P<0.01) and the weight (r=0.319, P<0.01). However, it did not correlate with the body mass index (r=0.152, P=0.077) or the age (r=-0.056, P=0.515). US measurements of the AR thickness in asymptomatic shoulders demonstrated excellent intrarater and inter-rater reliabilities. The AR thickness showed anatomical variation with sex, height, and weight.

  6. The efficacy of physiotherapy upon shoulder function following axillary dissection in breast cancer, a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oostendorp Rob AB

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients suffer from severe shoulder complaints after breast cancer surgery and axillary lymph node dissection. Physiotherapy has been clinically observed to improve treatment of these patients. However, it is not a standard treatment regime. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of physiotherapy treatment of shoulder function, pain and quality of life in patients who have undergone breast cancer surgery and axillary lymph node dissection. Methods Thirty patients following breast cancer surgery and axillary lymph node dissection were included in a randomised controlled study. Assessments were made at baseline and after three and six months. The treatment group received standardised physiotherapy treatment of advice and exercises for the arm and shoulder for three months; the control group received a leaflet containing advice and exercises. If necessary soft tissue massage to the surgical scar was applied. Primary outcome variables were amount of pain in the shoulder/arm recorded on the Visual Analogue Scale, and shoulder mobility (flexion, abduction measured using a digital inclinometer under standardized conditions. Secondary outcome measures were shoulder disabilities during daily activities, edema, grip strength of both hands and quality of life. The researcher was blinded to treatment allocation. Results All thirty patients completed the trial. After three and six months the treatment group showed a significant improvement in shoulder mobility and had significantly less pain than the control group. Quality of life improved significantly, however, handgrip strength and arm volume did not alter significantly. Conclusion Physiotherapy reduces pain and improves shoulder function and quality of life following axillary dissection after breast cancer. Trial registration ISRCTN31186536

  7. MRI of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  8. MRI of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-01-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  9. The Influence of Task Constraints on the Glenohumeral Horizontal Abduction Angle of the Overarm Throw of Novice Throwers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Casey M.; Garner, John C.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Parish, Loraine E.; St. Onge, Paul M.; Campbell, Brian J.; Weimar, Wendi H.

    2009-01-01

    This study determines the effects of three baseballs and softballs of different masses (0.113 kg, 0.198 kg, 0.340 kg) and regulation diameters (22.86 and 30.48 cm, respectively) on the glenohumeral horizontal abduction angle of an overarm throw performed by young children who were novice throwers. Glenohumeral horizontal abduction angle was…

  10. Shoulder dystocia: definitions and incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Alexandra; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2014-06-01

    Though subjective in nature, both the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists practice bulletin and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists green guideline are in agreement on the descriptor of shoulder dystocia: requirement of additional obstetric maneuvers when gentle downward traction has failed to affect the delivery of the shoulders. The rate of shoulder dystocia is about 1.4% of all deliveries and 0.7% for vaginal births. Compared to non-diabetics (0.6%), among diabetics, the rate of impacted shoulders is 201% higher (1.9%); newborns delivered by vacuum or forceps have 254% higher likelihood of shoulder dystocia than those born spontaneously (2.0% vs. 0.6%, respectively). When the birthweight is categorized as 4500 g, the likelihood of shoulder dystocia in the US vs. other countries varies significantly. Future studies should focus on lowering the rate of shoulder dystocia and its associated morbidities, without concomitantly increasing the rate of cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Appel, M.; Kaiser, E.; Luttke, G.; Lukas, P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the occurrence, frequency, and significance of increased signal intensity (SI) in the rotator cuff (RC) of normal volunteers suggestive of pathologic findings such as partial tears and tendinitis. Shoulders of 30 volunteers without evidence of prior shoulder disease or trauma were studied. MR imaging at 1.5 T included T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) and T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequences in axial, oblique coronal, and sagittal planes. Shoulders of 30 cadavers were dissected and studied for correlation with MR findings, five of them after MR examination

  12. Ultrasonography of the painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terriza, M.D.; Manzanares, R.

    1995-01-01

    A thorough knowledge of the normal anatomy was applied in the study of 132 patients with painful shoulder to establish the ultrasonographic findings that indicate the diagnosis of lesions of the rotator cuff of the shoulder (tendentious, tendons degeneration and the different types of fracture) as well as bursitis, lesions of the tendon of the long head of the biceps, joint effusions, lesions of the humeral head, etc. As an initial method of studying painful shoulder using standard plain radiography, this techniques is considered a reliable diagnostic procedure. (Author)

  13. Postoperative imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woertler, K.; Rummeny, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Correct interpretation of imaging findings in the postoperative shoulder is impaired by surgical distortion of normal anatomy and possible artifacts. Advanced postoperative imaging of the shoulder in addition to the selection of the best suited modality necessitates familiarity with the surgical procedure that has been performed and its consecutive morphological changes. This article reviews the most common arthroscopic and open techniques used for treatment of shoulder instability, lesions of the superior labral-bicipital complex, primery impingement, and rotator cuff tears, their typical postoperative imaging findings, as well as the diagnostic performance of cross sectional imaging techniques in the detection of recurrent lesions and complications. (orig.) [de

  14. Shoulder Stiffness : Current Concepts and Concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itoi, Eiji; Arce, Guillermo; Bain, Gregory I.; Diercks, Ronald L.; Guttmann, Dan; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Yoo, Yon-Sik

    Shoulder stiffness can be caused by various etiologies such as immobilization, trauma, or surgical interventions. The Upper Extremity Committee of ISAKOS defined the term "frozen shoulder" as idiopathic stiff shoulder, that is, without a known cause. Secondary stiff shoulder is a term that should be

  15. Restoring a functional and mobile shoulder following reconstruction of the sternoclavicular joint with a free vascularized fibular flap

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    Abby Choke

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the sternoclavicular joint (SCJ is rare and often missed at early stage. In extensive disease with bony and soft tissue destruction, radical excision is indicated. The loss of SCJ results in exposure of vital structures of the anterior mediastinum and instability of the shoulder girdle. SCJ reconstruction using locoregional muscle flaps like the pectoralis major or latissimus dorsi flap has been well described. While these options can provide soft tissue coverage, they do not restore the structural framework of the SCJ which is important for shoulder excursion and chest wall movement. We describe a case of SCJ reconstruction using a free vascularized fibular flap following the resection of sternoclavicular tubercular osteomyelitis. The fibula bone was used to restore the clavicular strut by anchoring it to the remaining manubrium with a steel wire and by plating the lateral end to the remnant clavicle. The steel wire served as a “defunctioning” cerclage that allowed motion of the joint to induce fibrous union. A strict post-operative rehabilitation protocol keeping the shoulder adducted at the initial phase was prescribed. At one year follow up, the patient achieved good shoulder function with 140 degrees of shoulder abduction and 110 degrees flexion.

  16. Characteristics of Abductive Inquiry in Earth Science: An Undergraduate Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Phil Seok

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this case study was to describe characteristic features of abductive inquiry learning activities in the domain of earth science. Participants were undergraduate junior and senior students who were enrolled in an earth science education course offered for preservice secondary science teachers at a university in Korea. The undergraduate…

  17. Abduction in Proximal Hamstring Tendon Avulsion Injury Mechanism-A Report on 3 Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Made, Anne D.; Peters, Rolf W.; Verheul, Claire; Maas, Mario; Kerkhoffs, Gino M.

    2017-01-01

    Proximal hamstring tendon avulsions are typically sustained during forced hip hyperflexion combined with knee extension. We present 3 cases of athletes with a proximal hamstring tendon avulsion caused by an alternative injury mechanism that also involves a considerable hip abduction component

  18. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenti Erica E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. Methods We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old. We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. Results There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. Conclusion There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers.

  19. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. Methods We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old). We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction) and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. Results There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides) with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. Conclusion There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers. PMID:21819566

  20. Activation of the gluteus maximus and hamstring muscles during prone hip extension with knee flexion in three hip abduction positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sun-Young; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Kwon, Ohyun; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Choi, Boram

    2013-08-01

    The direction of fiber alignment within a muscle is known to influence the effectiveness of muscle contraction. However, most of the commonly used clinical gluteus maximus (GM) exercises do not consider the direction of fiber alignment within the muscle. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of hip abduction position on the EMG (electromyography) amplitude and onset time of the GM and hamstrings (HAM) during prone hip extension with knee flexion (PHEKF) exercise. Surface EMG signals were recorded from the GM and HAM during PHEKF exercise in three hip abduction positions: 0°, 15°, and 30°. Thirty healthy subjects voluntarily participated in this study. The results show that GM EMG amplitude was greatest in the 30° hip abduction position, followed by 15° and then 0° hip abduction during PHEKF exercise. On the other hand, the HAM EMG amplitude at 0° hip abduction was significantly greater than at 15° and 30° hip abduction. Additionally, GM EMG onset firing was delayed relative to that of the HAM at 0° hip abduction. On the contrary, the GM EMG onset occurred earlier than the HAM in the 15° and 30° hip abduction positions. These findings indicate that performing PHEKF exercise in the 30° hip abduction position may be recommended as an effective way to facilitate the GM muscle activity and advance the firing time of the GM muscle in asymptomatic individuals. This finding provides preliminary evidence that GM EMG amplitude and onset time can be modified by the degree of hip abduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Can shoulder range of movement be measured accurately using the Microsoft Kinect sensor plus Medical Interactive Recovery Assistant (MIRA) software?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James D; Khan-Perez, Jennifer; Marley, Dominic; Buttress, Susan; Walton, Michael; Li, Baihua; Roy, Bibhas

    2017-12-01

    This study compared the accuracy of measuring shoulder range of movement (ROM) with a simple laptop-sensor combination vs. trained observers (shoulder physiotherapists and shoulder surgeons) using motion capture (MoCap) laboratory equipment as the gold standard. The Microsoft Kinect sensor (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA, USA) tracks 3-dimensional human motion. Ordinarily used with an Xbox (Microsoft Corp.) video game console, Medical Interactive Recovery Assistant (MIRA) software (MIRA Rehab Ltd., London, UK) allows this small sensor to measure shoulder movement with a standard computer. Shoulder movements of 49 healthy volunteers were simultaneously measured by trained observers, MoCap, and the MIRA device. Internal rotation was assessed with the shoulder abducted 90° and external rotation with the shoulder adducted. Visual estimation and MIRA measurements were compared with gold standard MoCap measurements for agreement using Bland-Altman methods. There were 1670 measurements analyzed. The MIRA evaluations of all 4 cardinal shoulder movements were significantly more precise, with narrower limits of agreement, than the measurements of trained observers. MIRA achieved ±11° (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.7°-12.6°) for forward flexion vs. ±16° (95% CI, 14.6°-17.6°) by trained observers. For abduction, MIRA showed ±11° (95% CI, 8.7°-12.8°) against ±15° (95% CI, 13.4°-16.2°) for trained observers. MIRA attained ±10° (95% CI, 8.1°-11.9°) during external rotation measurement, whereas trained observers only reached ±21° (95% CI, 18.7°-22.6°). For internal rotation, MIRA achieved ±9° (95% CI, 7.2°-10.4°), which was again better than TOs at ±18° (95% CI, 16.0°-19.3°). A laptop combined with a Microsoft Kinect sensor and the MIRA software can measure shoulder movements with acceptable levels of accuracy. This technology, which can be easily set up, may also allow precise shoulder ROM measurement outside the clinic setting. Copyright © 2017

  2. Shoulder injuries in overhead sports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woertler, K.

    2010-01-01

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence. This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes. (orig.) [de

  3. [Shoulder injuries in overhead sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörtler, K

    2010-05-01

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence.This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes.

  4. Feasibility of vocal fold abduction and adduction assessment using cine-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baki, Marina Mat; Menys, Alex; Atkinson, David; Bassett, Paul; Morley, Simon; Beale, Timothy; Sandhu, Guri; Naduvilethil, Georgekutty; Stevenson, Nicola; Birchall, Martin A; Punwani, Shonit

    2017-02-01

    Determine feasibility of vocal fold (VF) abduction and adduction assessment by cine magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) METHODS: Cine-MRI of the VF was performed on five healthy and nine unilateral VF paralysis (UVFP) participants using an axial gradient echo acquisition with temporal resolution of 0.7 s. VFs were continuously imaged with cine-MRI during a 10-s period of quiet respiration and phonation. Scanning was repeated twice within an individual session and then once again at a 1-week interval. Asymmetry of VF position during phonation (VF phonation asymmetry, VFPa) and respiration (VF respiration asymmetry, VFRa) was determined. Percentage reduction in total glottal area between respiration and phonation (VF abduction potential, VFAP) was derived to measure overall mobility. An un-paired t-test was used to compare differences between groups. Intra-session, inter-session and inter-reader repeatability of the quantitative metrics was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). VF position asymmetry (VFPa and VFRa) was greater (p=0.012; p=0.001) and overall mobility (VFAP) was lower (p=0.008) in UVFP patients compared with healthy participants. ICC of repeatability of all metrics was good, ranged from 0.82 to 0.95 except for the inter-session VFPa (0.44). Cine-MRI is feasible for assessing VF abduction and adduction. Derived quantitative metrics have good repeatability. • Cine-MRI is used to assess vocal folds (VFs) mobility: abduction and adduction. • New quantitative metrics are derived from VF position and abduction potential. • Cine-MRI able to depict the difference between normal and abnormal VF mobility. • Cine-MRI derived quantitative metrics have good repeatability.

  5. Primary joint disease in the shoulder of the beagle dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, J.P.; Pool, R.R.; Miyabayashi, T.; Soo, S.

    1985-01-01

    Shoulder joints of 149 beagle dogs, whose ages were over 8 years at the time of death, were examined to document primary joint disease. Clinical histories of the dogs suggested no underlying causes, i.e. no evidence of osteochondrosis, trauma or joint infection. Radiographic examinations revealed normally developing shoulders in the first years of their lives. Radiographic changes were progressive with age. Bilateral involvement was common. The changes consisted of osteophyte formation on the caudal aspect of the humeral head and glenoid. Postmortem findings included: subchondral bone sclerosis (thin-section radiographs), cartilage wearing, joint capsule thickening, and pannus formation. The authors believe that the changes occurring in the shoulder joints are those of primary joint disease. 12 references

  6. Comparison between conventional MR arthrograhphy and abduction and external rotation MR arthrography in revealing tears of the antero-inferior glenoid labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Ah; Suh, Sang Il; Kim, Baek Hyun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Myung Gyu; Lee, Ki Yeol; Lee, Chang Hee

    2001-01-01

    To compare, in terms of their demonstration of tears of the anterior glenoid labrum, oblique axial MR arthrography obtained with the patient's shoulder in the abduction and external rotation (ABER) position, with conventional axial MR arthrography obtained with the patient's arm in the neutral position. MR arthrography of the shoulder, including additional oblique axial sequences with the patient in the ABER position, was performed in 30 patients with a clinical history of recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. The degree of anterior glenoid labral tear or defect was evaluated in both the conventional axial and the ABER position by two radiologists. Decisions were reached by consensus, and a three-point scale was used: grade 1=normal; grade 2=probable tear, diagnosed when subtle increased signal intensity in the labrum was apparent; grade 3=definite tear/defect, when a contrast material-filled gap between the labrum and the glenoid rim or deficient labrum was present. The scores for each imaging sequence were averaged and to compare conventional axial and ABER position scans, Student's t test was performed. In 21 (70%) of 30 patients, the same degree of anterior instability was revealed by both imaging sequences. Eight (27%) had a lower grade in the axial position than in the ABER position, while one (3%) had a higher grade in the axial position. Three whose axial scan was grade 1 showed only equivocal evidence of tearing, but their ABER-position scan, in which a contrast material-filled gap between the labrum and the glenoid rim was present, was grade 3. The average grade was 2.5 (SD=0.73) for axial scans and 2.8 (SD=0.46) for the ABER position. The difference between axial and ABER-position scans was statistically significant (p<0.05). MR arthrography with the patient's shoulder in the ABER position is more efficient than conventional axial scanning in revealing the degree of tear or defect of the anterior glenoid labrum. When equivocal features are seen at

  7. Effect of pain-free range exercise on shoulder pain and range of motion in an amateur skier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] This study prescribed pain-free range exercises for a female amateur skier who complained of limitations in her shoulder range of motion, and pain caused by protective spasms; the tester evaluated the effects of such exercise on pain. [Subject and Methods] A 23-year-old female who complained of pain of 3 weeks in duration in the right glenohumoral and scapulothoracic joints was enrolled. [Results] After pain-free range exercises, the visual analog pain score was 2 and the shoulder flexion and abduction angles improved compared to the initial values. [Conclusion] Thus, this study suggests muscle-strengthening exercises within the pain-free range, rather than simple pain treatments, as therapy for acute muscle injuries in skiers.

  8. The association between eccentric hip abduction strength and hip and knee angular movements in recreational male runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brund, René B. Korsgaard; Rasmussen, Sten; Nielsen, Rasmus O.

    2018-01-01

    Weak hip abductors may be related with increased hip adduction and knee abduction angular movement, which may be risk factors of lower extremity injuries. As the role of eccentric hip abduction strength (EHAS) on hip adduction angular movement and knee abduction angular movement (KABD) remains...... and Codamotion active marker system. Using multiple linear regression models (n=186 legs), no relationships between EHAS and hip and knee kinematics were found. A possible reason for the lack of relationship between EHAS and hip and knee kinematics may be owing to differences in the running kinematics. Some...

  9. Effectiveness of hydroplasty and therapeutic exercise for treatment of frozen shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callinan, Nancy; McPherson, Scott; Cleaveland, Susan; Voss, Debra Gardiner; Rainville, Darcel; Tokar, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective review was to evaluate the effectiveness of a hydraulic distention technique (hydroplasty) combined with a therapy program for treatment of idiopathic frozen shoulder. Over a two-year period, 60 patients with idiopathic frozen shoulder were identified as having undergone the hydroplasty procedure and therapy protocol at the authors' hand center. Distention of the glenohumeral joint was achieved by an injection of a 10-mL combination of bupivacaine (Marcaine), lidocaine (Xylocaine), and corticosteroid followed by injection of 30 mL of chilled sterile normal saline. Therapy was initiated immediately after the surgeon had completed the hydroplasty. The mean active range of motion improvement was as follows: flexion 28 degrees, abduction 42 degrees, internal rotation 22 degrees, and external rotation 26 degrees. There was no significant difference in outcomes between diabetics and nondiabetics or subjects with symptoms less than six months' duration compared with subjects with symptom duration greater than six months. At discharge, only two (3%) of the subjects reported persistent pain during sleep. The hydroplasty procedure combined with a therapy program is a successful treatment for idiopathic frozen shoulder.

  10. Mathematical modelling as a tool to assessment of loads in volleyball player's shoulder joint during spike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkojć, Jacek; Michnik, Robert; Czapla, Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    This article deals with kinematic and kinetic conditions in volleyball attack and identifies loads in the shoulder joint. Joint angles and velocities of individual segments of upper limb were measured with the use of the motion capture system XSENS. Muscle forces and loads in skeletal system were calculated by means of mathematical model elaborated in AnyBody system. Spikes performed by players in the best and worst way were compared with each other. The relationships were found between reactions in shoulder joint and flexion/extension, abduction/adduction and rotation angles in the same joint and flexion/extension in the elbow joint. Reactions in shoulder joint varied from 591 N to 2001 N (in relation to body weight [BW] 83-328%). The analysis proved that hand velocity at the moment of the ball hit (which varied between 6.8 and 13.3 m s -1 ) influences on the value of reaction in joints, but positions of individual segments relative to each other are also crucial. It was also proved in objective way, that position of the upper limb during spike can be more or less harmful assuming that bigger reaction increases possibility of injury, what can be an indication for trainers and physiotherapists how to improve injury prevention.

  11. Outcome measures and psychomotor skills related to shoulder conditions for clinical orthopedic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Surreya; Al-Obaidi, Saud; Al-Zoabi, Baker

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the ability of physical therapy (PT) students to utilize selected outcome measures such as range of motion (ROM), pain and a number of psychomotor skills and to determine the efficacy of treatment they carried out during orthopedic clinical training. The clinical education booklets in orthopedics of all PT students over a 6-year period were reviewed. Students' application of psychomotor skills such as peripheral joint mobilizations (PJM), proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques, therapeutic exercise techniques as well as utilization of basic outcome measures such as ROM and pain were analyzed with descriptive statistics and paired t test. A majority of students used PJM techniques (78.6%) and PNF techniques (58.6%). The paired t test indicated that treatment interventions used by the students were associated with improved shoulder joint ROM and decreased pain levels (p < 0.001). At the same time, therapeutic exercises were employed by the students after PJM and PNF. The most common 'comparable joint sign' was limitation in shoulder abduction ROM, which occurred in 44% of patients seen by the students. PT students' application of PJM, PNF, and therapeutic exercise improved ROM and decreased pain in patients with shoulder pathologies. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Evaluation of muscular activity duration in shoulders with rotator cuff tears using inertial sensors and electromyography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duc, Cyntia; Aminian, Kamiar; Pichonnaz, Claude; Farron, Alain; Jolles, Brigitte M; Bassin, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder disorders, including rotator cuff tears, affect the shoulder function and result in adapted muscle activation. Although these adaptations have been studied in controlled conditions, free-living activities have not been investigated. Based on the kinematics measured with inertial sensors and portable electromyography, the objectives of this study were to quantify the duration of the muscular activation in the upper trapezius (UT), medial deltoid (MD) and biceps brachii (BB) during motion and to investigate the effect of rotator cuff tear in laboratory settings and daily conditions. The duration of movements and muscular activations were analysed separately and together using the relative time of activation (T EMG/mov ). Laboratory measurements showed the parameter’s reliability through movement repetitions (ICC > 0.74) and differences in painful shoulders compared with healthy ones (p < 0.05): longer activation for UT; longer activation for MD during abduction and tendency to shorter activation in other movements; shorter activation for BB. In daily conditions, T EMG/mov for UT was longer, whereas it was shorter for MD and BB (p < 0.05). Moreover, significant correlations were observed between these parameters and clinical scores. This study thus provides new insights into the rotator cuff tear effect on duration of muscular activation in daily activity. (paper)

  13. Scapular Notching on Kinematic Simulated Range of Motion After Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Is Not the Result of Impingement in Adduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Charbonnier, Caecilia; Stimec, Bojan V.; Fasel, Jean H.D.; Zderic, Ivan; Hagen, Jennifer; Walch, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Impingement after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) is believed to occur from repetitive contact in adduction between the humeral component and the inferior scapular pillar. The primary purpose of this biomechanical study was to confirm the presence of different types of impingement and to examine which daily-life movements are responsible for them. A secondary aim was to provide recommendations on the type of components that would best minimize notching and loss of range of motion (ROM). The study included 12 fresh frozen shoulder specimens; each had a computed tomography (CT) image of the entire scapula and humerus in order to acquire topological information of the bones before RSA implantation. Cyclic tests were run postimplantation with 3 shoulders in each modalities. To quantify bone loss due to impingement, 3-dimensional anatomical models of the scapula were reconstructed from the CT scans and compared to their intact states. We found 8 bony impingements in 7 specimens: 2 at the lateral acromion, 1 at the inferior acromion, 4 scapular notching, and 1 with the glenoid resulting to wear at the 3:00 to 6:00 clock-face position. Impingements occurred in all kinds of tested motions, except for the internal/external rotation at 90° of abduction. The 3 specimens tested in abduction/adduction presented bone loss on the acromion side only. Scapular notching was noted in flexion/extension and in internal/external rotation at 0° of abduction. The humeral polyethylene liner was worn in 2 specimens—1 at the 6:00 to 8:00 clock-face position during internal/external rotation at 0° of abduction and 1 at the 4:00 clock-face position during flexion/extension. The present study revealed that 2 types of impingement interactions coexist and correspond to a frank abutment or lead to a scapular notching (friction-type impingement). Scapular notching seems to be caused by more movements or combination of movements than previously considered, and in particular by

  14. Kinematic design of a finger abduction mechanism for an anthropomorphic robotic hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.-A. A. Demers

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the kinematic design of an abduction mechanism for the fingers of an underactuated anthropomorphic robotic hand. This mechanism will enhance the range of feasible grasps of the underactuated hand without significantly increasing its complexity. The analysis of the link between the index finger and the third finger is first assessed, where the parameters are studied in order to follow the amplitude constraint and to minimize the coordination error. Then, the study of the mechanism joining the third finger and the little finger is summarized. Finally, a prototype of the finger's abduction system is presented.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  15. Combined Deep And Shallow Knowledge In A Unified Model For Diagnosis By Abduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel Ariton

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Fault Diagnosis in real systems usually involves human expert’s shallow knowledge (as pattern causes-effects but also deep knowledge(as structural / functional modularization and models on behavior. The paper proposes a unified approach on diagnosis by abduction based onplausibility and relevance criteria multiple applied, in a connectionist implementation. Then, it focuses elicitation of deep knowledge on targetconductive flow systems – most encountered in industry and not only, in the aim of fault diagnosis. Finally, the paper gives hints on design andbuilding of diagnosis system by abduction, embedding deep and shallow knowledge (according to case and performing hierarchical fault isolation,along with a case study on a hydraulic installation in a rolling mill plant.

  16. COMBINED DEEP AND SHALLOW KNOWLEDGE IN A UNIFIED MODEL FOR DIAGNOSIS BY ABDUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel Ariton

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fault Diagnosis in real systems usually involves human expert’s shallow knowledge (as pattern causeseffectsbut also deep knowledge (as structural / functional modularization and models on behavior. The paperproposes a unified approach on diagnosis by abduction based on plausibility and relevance criteria multipleapplied, in a connectionist implementation. Then, it focuses elicitation of deep knowledge on target conductiveflow systems – most encountered in industry and not only, in the aim of fault diagnosis. Finally, the paper giveshints on design and building of diagnosis system by abduction, embedding deep and shallow knowledge(according to case and performing hierarchical fault isolation, along with a case study on a hydraulicinstallation in a rolling mill plant.

  17. Wide step width reduces knee abduction moment of obese adults during stair negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yocum, Derek; Weinhandl, Joshua T; Fairbrother, Jeffrey T; Zhang, Songning

    2018-05-15

    An increased likelihood of developing obesity-related knee osteoarthritis may be associated with increased peak internal knee abduction moments (KAbM). Increases in step width (SW) may act to reduce this moment. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of increased SW on knee biomechanics during stair negotiation of healthy-weight and obese participants. Participants (24: 10 obese and 14 healthy-weight) used stairs and walked over level ground while walking at their preferred speed in two different SW conditions - preferred and wide (200% preferred). A 2 × 2 (group × condition) mixed model analysis of variance was performed to analyze differences between groups and conditions (p < 0.05). Increased SW increased the loading-response peak knee extension moment during descent and level gait, decreased loading-response KAbMs, knee extension and abduction range of motion (ROM) during ascent, and knee adduction ROM during descent. Increased SW increased loading-response peak mediolateral ground reaction force (GRF), increased peak knee abduction angle during ascent, and decreased peak knee adduction angle during descent and level gait. Obese participants experienced disproportionate changes in loading-response mediolateral GRF, KAbM and peak adduction angle during level walking, and peak knee abduction angle and ROM during ascent. Increased SW successfully decreased loading-response peak KAbM. Implications of this finding are that increased SW may decrease medial compartment knee joint loading, decreasing pain and reducing joint deterioration. Increased SW influenced obese and healthy-weight participants differently and should be investigated further. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritts, H.M.; Craig, E.; Kyle, R.; Strefling, M.; Miller, D.; Heithoff, K.; Schellhas, K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (1.5-T unit) was performed in over 600 shoulders to evaluate shoulder pain. Ultrasound (US) and arthrography were performed in over 100 patients. Surgery was performed in over 75 patients. MR imaging offers information not well evaluated with other modalities, including bony impingement, tendinitis, bursitis, and osseous abnormalities, such as primary arthritis, avascular necrosis, occult fractures, and tumors. US and MR findings correlate well with surgical findings for medium to large rotator cuff tears. MR imaging with T2 weighting is superior for differentiating small tears from associated tendinitis. An algorithm for cost-effective shoulder imaging integrating US, MR imaging, arthrography, and computed tomographic arthrography are presented

  19. Behavioural processes in social context: female abductions, male herding and female grooming in hamadryas baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Pablo; Colmenares, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    The formation of bonds between strangers is an event that occurs routinely in many social animals, including humans, and, as social bonds in general, they affect the individuals' welfare and biological fitness. The present study was motivated by an interest in the behavioural processes that drive bond formation in a social context of hostility, in which the incumbent partners vary greatly in physical power and reproductive interests, a situation in which individuals of many group-living species find themselves often throughout their lives. We focused on the quantitative analysis of female abductions via male aggressive herding in a nonhuman primate, the hamadryas baboon, in which intersexual bonds are known to be strong. We tested three hypotheses informed by sexual conflict/sexual coercion theory (male herding-as-conditioning and female grooming-as-appeasement) and by socioecological theory (unit size and female competition). The results supported the predictions: males resorted to coercive tactics (aggressive herding) with abducted females, and abducted females elevated the amount of grooming directed at their new unit males; in fact, they escaped from the otherwise negative effect of unit size on female-to-male grooming. These findings reveal that conflicts of interest are natural ingredients underpinning social bonds and that resorting to coercive aggression may be an option especially when partners differ greatly in their physical power. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Feasibility of vocal fold abduction and adduction assessment using cine-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baki, Marina Mat; Menys, Alex; Morley, Simon; Beale, Timothy; Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit; Bassett, Paul; Sandhu, Guri; Naduvilethil, Georgekutty; Stevenson, Nicola; Birchall, Martin A.

    2017-01-01

    Determine feasibility of vocal fold (VF) abduction and adduction assessment by cine magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) Cine-MRI of the VF was performed on five healthy and nine unilateral VF paralysis (UVFP) participants using an axial gradient echo acquisition with temporal resolution of 0.7 s. VFs were continuously imaged with cine-MRI during a 10-s period of quiet respiration and phonation. Scanning was repeated twice within an individual session and then once again at a 1-week interval. Asymmetry of VF position during phonation (VF phonation asymmetry, VFPa) and respiration (VF respiration asymmetry, VFRa) was determined. Percentage reduction in total glottal area between respiration and phonation (VF abduction potential, VFAP) was derived to measure overall mobility. An un-paired t-test was used to compare differences between groups. Intra-session, inter-session and inter-reader repeatability of the quantitative metrics was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). VF position asymmetry (VFPa and VFRa) was greater (p=0.012; p=0.001) and overall mobility (VFAP) was lower (p=0.008) in UVFP patients compared with healthy participants. ICC of repeatability of all metrics was good, ranged from 0.82 to 0.95 except for the inter-session VFPa (0.44). Cine-MRI is feasible for assessing VF abduction and adduction. Derived quantitative metrics have good repeatability. (orig.)

  1. Feasibility of vocal fold abduction and adduction assessment using cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baki, Marina Mat [National University of Malaysia, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Menys, Alex; Morley, Simon; Beale, Timothy [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Royal National Throat Nose Ear Hospital, University College London Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Bassett, Paul [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Sandhu, Guri [Charing Cross Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Naduvilethil, Georgekutty; Stevenson, Nicola [Royal National Throat Nose Ear Hospital, University College London Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Birchall, Martin A. [Royal National Throat Nose Ear Hospital, University College London Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); University of California, Davis, Department of Otolaryngology, Davis, CA (United States); University College London, Ear Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    Determine feasibility of vocal fold (VF) abduction and adduction assessment by cine magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) Cine-MRI of the VF was performed on five healthy and nine unilateral VF paralysis (UVFP) participants using an axial gradient echo acquisition with temporal resolution of 0.7 s. VFs were continuously imaged with cine-MRI during a 10-s period of quiet respiration and phonation. Scanning was repeated twice within an individual session and then once again at a 1-week interval. Asymmetry of VF position during phonation (VF phonation asymmetry, VFPa) and respiration (VF respiration asymmetry, VFRa) was determined. Percentage reduction in total glottal area between respiration and phonation (VF abduction potential, VFAP) was derived to measure overall mobility. An un-paired t-test was used to compare differences between groups. Intra-session, inter-session and inter-reader repeatability of the quantitative metrics was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). VF position asymmetry (VFPa and VFRa) was greater (p=0.012; p=0.001) and overall mobility (VFAP) was lower (p=0.008) in UVFP patients compared with healthy participants. ICC of repeatability of all metrics was good, ranged from 0.82 to 0.95 except for the inter-session VFPa (0.44). Cine-MRI is feasible for assessing VF abduction and adduction. Derived quantitative metrics have good repeatability. (orig.)

  2. Meaning and Abduction as Process-Structure: A Diagram of Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Semetsky

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is informed by Charles Sanders Peirce’s philosophy as semiotics or the doctrine of signs. The paper’s purpose is to explore Peirce’s category of abduction as not being limited to the inference to the best explanation. In the context of the logic of discovery, abduction is posited as a necessary although not sufficient condition for the production of meanings. The structure of a genuine sign is triadic and represents a synthesis between precognitive ideas and conceptual representations. The novel model of reasoning is offered, based on the mathematical formalism borrowed from Gauss’ interpretation of the complex number. It is suggested that this model in a form of a diagram not only represents a semiotic process-structure but also overcomes the long-standing paradox of new knowledge. For Peirce, it is a diagram as a visual representation that may yield solutions to the otherwise unsolvable logical problems. What appears to us as a paradox is the very presence of abductive, or hypothetical, inference, as Peircean generic category of Firstness within the Thirdness of the total thought-process. Firstness (feeling, Secondness (action, and Thirdness (reason together constitute a dynamic structure of experience.

  3. Mental Health among Former Child Soldiers and Never-Abducted Children in Northern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ughetta Moscardino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate posttraumatic stress symptoms, psychological distress, and emotional and behavioral problems in former Ugandan child soldiers in comparison with civilian children living in the same conflict setting. Participants included 133 former child soldiers and 101 never-abducted children in northern Uganda, who were interviewed about exposure to traumatic war-related experiences, posttraumatic stress symptoms, psychological distress, and emotional and behavioral problems. Results indicated that former child soldiers had experienced significantly more war-related traumatic events than nonabducted children, with 39.3% of girls having been forced to engage in sexual contact. Total scores on measures of PTSD symptoms, psychological distress, and emotional and behavioral problems were significantly higher among child soldiers compared to their never-abducted peers. Girls reported significantly more emotional and behavioral difficulties than boys. In never-abducted children, more mental health problems were associated with experiencing physical harm, witnessing the killings of other people, and being forced to engage in sexual contact.

  4. Thermal shrinkage for shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Alison P; Warren, Russell F; Petrigliano, Frank A; Doward, David A; Cordasco, Frank A; Altchek, David W; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2011-07-01

    Thermal capsular shrinkage was popular for the treatment of shoulder instability, despite a paucity of outcomes data in the literature defining the indications for this procedure or supporting its long-term efficacy. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical evaluation of radiofrequency thermal capsular shrinkage for the treatment of shoulder instability, with a minimum 2-year follow-up. From 1999 to 2001, 101 consecutive patients with mild to moderate shoulder instability underwent shoulder stabilization surgery with thermal capsular shrinkage using a monopolar radiofrequency device. Follow-up included a subjective outcome questionnaire, discussion of pain, instability, and activity level. Mean follow-up was 3.3 years (range 2.0-4.7 years). The thermal capsular shrinkage procedure failed due to instability and/or pain in 31% of shoulders at a mean time of 39 months. In patients with unidirectional anterior instability and those with concomitant labral repair, the procedure proved effective. Patients with multidirectional instability had moderate success. In contrast, four of five patients with isolated posterior instability failed. Thermal capsular shrinkage has been advocated for the treatment of shoulder instability, particularly mild to moderate capsular laxity. The ease of the procedure makes it attractive. However, our retrospective review revealed an overall failure rate of 31% in 80 patients with 2-year minimum follow-up. This mid- to long-term cohort study adds to the literature lacking support for thermal capsulorrhaphy in general, particularly posterior instability. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11420-010-9187-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  5. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbold, W.D.; Hehne, H.J.; Rau, W.S.; Freiburg Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.) [de

  6. MRI of the postoperative shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatkin, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Performing and interpreting MRI of the shoulder in patients after surgery is a difficult task. The normal anatomic features are distorted by the surgical alterations as well as the artifacts that result from metal and other materials used in the surgical procedures. This article reviews the common surgical procedures undertaken in patients with rotator cuff disease and shoulder instability, and how they affect the appearance of the relevant anatomic structures on MRI examination. It also reviews the more common causes for residual and recurrent abnormalities seen in such patients and how MRI can be used to diagnose such lesions, thus aiding the orthopedic surgeon in treating these difficult clinical problems. (orig.)

  7. Painful Shoulder in Swimmers: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, William C.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of painful shoulder in swimmers, including: regional problems that can cause shoulder pain; physical, clinical, and laboratory tests for diagnostic use; and approaches to management of the problem. (Author/CB)

  8. Shoulder Dystocia: Incidence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounian, Joseph G

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia complicates ∼1% of vaginal births. Although fetal macrosomia and maternal diabetes are risk factors for shoulder dystocia, for the most part its occurrence remains largely unpredictable and unpreventable.

  9. Use of soil stabilizers on highway shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated soil additives as stabilizers for aggregate and topsoil shoulders. Its purpose was to determine (1) the effect soil stabilizers have on the strength and stability of soil shoulders, and (2) the costs and benefits of using stabili...

  10. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard-Andersen, P.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Sjøbjerg, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence and location of heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty were evaluated in 58 Neer Mark-II total shoulder replacements. One year after surgery, 45% had developed some ectopic ossification. In six shoulders (10%) the ossifications roentgenographically bridged...... the glenohumeral and/or the glenoacromial space. There was no correlation between shoulder pain and the development of ossification. Shoulders with grade III heterotopic bone formation had a limited range of active elevation compared with shoulders without or with only a milder lesion. Men and patients...... with osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint were significantly disposed to the development of heterotopic bone. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty is frequent, but disabling heterotopic ossifications seem to be rare....

  11. Effect of acetabular cup abduction angle on wear of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene in hip simulator testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korduba, Laryssa A; Essner, Aaron; Pivec, Robert; Lancin, Perry; Mont, Michael A; Wang, Aiguo; Delanois, Ronald E

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acetabular component positioning on the wear rates of metal-on-polyethylene articulations has not been extensively studied. Placement of acetabular cups at abduction angles of more than 40° has been noted as a possible reason for early failure caused by increased wear. We conducted a study to evaluate the effects of different acetabular cup abduction angles on polyethylene wear rate, wear area, contact pressure, and contact area. Our in vitro study used a hip joint simulator and finite element analysis to assess the effects of cup orientation at 4 angles (0°, 40°, 50°, 70°) on wear and contact properties. Polyethylene bearings with 28-mm cobalt-chrome femoral heads were cycled in an environment mimicking in vivo joint fluid to determine the volumetric wear rate after 10 million cycles. Contact pressure and contact area for each cup abduction angle were assessed using finite element analysis. Results were correlated with cup abduction angles to determine if there were any differences among the 4 groups. The inverse relationship between volumetric wear rate and acetabular cup inclination angle demonstrated less wear with steeper cup angles. The largest abduction angle (70°) had the lowest contact area, largest contact pressure, and smallest head coverage. Conversely, the smallest abduction angle (0°) had the most wear and most head coverage. Polyethylene wear after total hip arthroplasty is a major cause of osteolysis and aseptic loosening, which may lead to premature implant failure. Several studies have found that high wear rates for cups oriented at steep angles contributed to their failure. Our data demonstrated that larger cup abduction angles were associated with lower, not higher, wear. However, this potentially "protective" effect is likely counteracted by other complications of steep cup angles, including impingement, instability, and edge loading. These factors may be more relevant in explaining why implants fail at a higher rate if

  12. Dynamic Analysis of the Abnormal Isometric Strength Movement Pattern between Shoulder and Elbow Joint in Patients with Hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yali; Hong, Yuezhen; Ji, Linhong

    2018-01-01

    Patients with hemiplegia usually have weak muscle selectivity and usually perform strength at a secondary joint (secondary strength) during performing a strength at one joint (primary strength). The abnormal strength pattern between shoulder and elbow joint has been analyzed by the maximum value while the performing process with strength changing from 0 to maximum then to 0 was a dynamic process. The objective of this study was to develop a method to dynamically analyze the strength changing process. Ten patients were asked to perform four group asks (maximum and 50% maximum voluntary strength in shoulder abduction, shoulder adduction, elbow flexion, and elbow extension). Strength and activities from seven muscles were measured. The changes of secondary strength had significant correlation with those of primary strength in all tasks ( R > 0.76, p strength ( R > 0.4, p strength pattern (all p strength pattern. The muscles, deltoid muscles, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, and brachioradialis, much influenced the stereotyped movement pattern between shoulder and elbow joint.

  13. Dynamic Analysis of the Abnormal Isometric Strength Movement Pattern between Shoulder and Elbow Joint in Patients with Hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with hemiplegia usually have weak muscle selectivity and usually perform strength at a secondary joint (secondary strength during performing a strength at one joint (primary strength. The abnormal strength pattern between shoulder and elbow joint has been analyzed by the maximum value while the performing process with strength changing from 0 to maximum then to 0 was a dynamic process. The objective of this study was to develop a method to dynamically analyze the strength changing process. Ten patients were asked to perform four group asks (maximum and 50% maximum voluntary strength in shoulder abduction, shoulder adduction, elbow flexion, and elbow extension. Strength and activities from seven muscles were measured. The changes of secondary strength had significant correlation with those of primary strength in all tasks (R>0.76, p0.4, p<0.01. Deltoid muscles, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, and brachioradialis had significant influences on the abnormal strength pattern (all p<0.01. The dynamic method was proved to be efficient to analyze the different influences of muscles on the abnormal strength pattern. The muscles, deltoid muscles, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, and brachioradialis, much influenced the stereotyped movement pattern between shoulder and elbow joint.

  14. Kinematics of the contralateral and ipsilateral shoulder: A possible relationship with post-stroke shoulder pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.; Konijnenbelt, M.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Post-stroke shoulder pain is a common phenomenon in hemiplegia and impedes rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify a possible relationship between post-stroke shoulder pain, scapula resting position and shoulder motion. Methods: Shoulder kinematics of 27 patients after

  15. Arthroscopic Findings in Anterior Shoulder Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Hantes, Michael; Raoulis, Vasilios

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the last years, basic research and arthroscopic surgery, have improved our understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. It is a fact that arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability has evolved considerably over the past decades. The aim of this paper is to present the variety of pathologies that should be identified and treated during shoulder arthroscopy when dealing with anterior shoulder instability cases. Methods: A review of the current literature regarding arthros...

  16. Optimal design of an alignment-free two-DOF rehabilitation robot for the shoulder complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinski, Daniel; Sapin, Julien; Dehez, Bruno

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the optimal design of an alignment-free exoskeleton for the rehabilitation of the shoulder complex. This robot structure is constituted of two actuated joints and is linked to the arm through passive degrees of freedom (DOFs) to drive the flexion-extension and abduction-adduction movements of the upper arm. The optimal design of this structure is performed through two steps. The first step is a multi-objective optimization process aiming to find the best parameters characterizing the robot and its position relative to the patient. The second step is a comparison process aiming to select the best solution from the optimization results on the basis of several criteria related to practical considerations. The optimal design process leads to a solution outperforming an existing solution on aspects as kinematics or ergonomics while being more simple.

  17. Real-time feedback on knee abduction moment does not improve frontal-plane knee mechanics during jump landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, M L; Palmieri-Smith, R M

    2014-08-01

    Excessive knee abduction loading is a contributing factor to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a double-leg landing training program with real-time visual feedback improves frontal-plane mechanics during double- and single-leg landings. Knee abduction angles and moments and vertical ground reaction forces (GRF) of 21 recreationally active women were quantified for double- and single-leg landings before and after the training program. This program consisted of two sessions of double-leg jump landings with real-time visual feedback on knee abduction moments for the experimental group and without real-time feedback for the control group. No significant differences were found between training groups. In comparison with pre-training data, peak knee abduction moments decreased 12% post-training for both double- and single-leg landings; whereas peak vertical GRF decreased 8% post-training for double-leg landings only, irrespective of training group. Real-time feedback on knee abduction moments, therefore, did not significantly improve frontal-plane knee mechanics during landings. The effect of the training program on knee abduction moments, however, transferred from the double-leg landings (simple task) to single-leg landings (more complex task). Consequently, ACL injury prevention efforts may not need to focus on complex tasks during which injury occurs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  19. Frozen shoulder and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Alma B; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Ehrenstein, Vera

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frozen shoulder might be a complication or a presenting symptom of cancer. We examined the risk of a cancer diagnosis after an incident diagnosis of frozen shoulder. METHODS: We used prospectively collected data from Danish registries to identify patients with frozen shoulder during 1...

  20. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Mako; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Suguru; Katahira, Kazuhiro [Kumamoto National Hospital (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  1. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Mako; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Suguru; Katahira, Kazuhiro

    1997-01-01

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  2. Questions and Answers About Shoulder Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injury. Injection of a cortisone medicine into your shoulder joint. Surgery to repair the tear if you don’t ... TENS). Injection of a corticosteroid drug if your shoulder is not better. Surgery if the shoulder does not improve with other ...

  3. Shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, CP; Dijkstra, PU; van der Laan, BFAM; Plukker, JTM; Roodenburg, JLN

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the prevalence of shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissection at least I year after surgery, and to analyse the influence of radiation therapy on shoulder complaints. Patients were interviewed for shoulder complaints, and patients filled out the

  4. Mid-term shoulder functional and quality of life outcomes after shoulder replacement in obese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Heather K.; Struk, Aimee M.; Reed, Austin; Wright, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain and loss of function are directly associated with obesity. Questions/purposes We hypothesized that significant interactions would exist between total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) and obesity status on functional and quality of life (QOL) outcomes over the long term. Clinical and QOL outcomes (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Evaluation form, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, University of California at Los Angeles Sho...

  5. Incidence and prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorevaar, Rinco C T; Van't Riet, Esther; Ipskamp, Marcel; Bulstra, Sjoerd K

    2017-03-01

    Frozen shoulder is a potential complication after shoulder surgery. It is a clinical condition that is often associated with marked disability and can have a profound effect on the patient's quality of life. The incidence, etiology, pathology and prognostic factors of postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery are not known. The purpose of this explorative study was to determine the incidence of postoperative frozen shoulder after various operative shoulder procedures. A second aim was to identify prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery. 505 consecutive patients undergoing elective shoulder surgery were included in this prospective cohort study. Follow-up was 6 months after surgery. A prediction model was developed to identify prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery using the TRIPOD guidelines. We nominated five potential predictors: gender, diabetes mellitus, type of physiotherapy, arthroscopic surgery and DASH score. Frozen shoulder was identified in 11% of the patients after shoulder surgery and was more common in females (15%) than in males (8%). Frozen shoulder was encountered after all types of operative procedures. A prediction model based on four variables (diabetes mellitus, specialized shoulder physiotherapy, arthroscopic surgery and DASH score) discriminated reasonably well with an AUC of 0.712. Postoperative frozen shoulder is a serious complication after shoulder surgery, with an incidence of 11%. Four prognostic factors were identified for postoperative frozen shoulder: diabetes mellitus, arthroscopic surgery, specialized shoulder physiotherapy and DASH score. The combination of these four variables provided a prediction rule for postoperative frozen shoulder with reasonable fit. Level II, prospective cohort study.

  6. Handball load and shoulder injury rate: a 31-week cohort study of 679 elite youth handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, M; Nielsen, R O; Attermann, J; Wedderkopp, N; Lind, M; Sørensen, H; Myklebust, G

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge of injury patterns, an essential step towards injury prevention, is lacking in youth handball. To investigate if an increase in handball load is associated with increased shoulder injury rates compared with a minor increase or decrease, and if an association is influenced by scapular control, isometric shoulder strength or glenohumeral range of motion (ROM). 679 players (14-18 years) provided weekly reports on shoulder injury and handball load (training and competition hours) over 31 weeks using the SMS, phone and medical examination system. Handball load in a given week was categorised into (1) 60% relative to the weekly average amount of handball load the preceding 4 weeks. Assessment of shoulder isometric rotational and abduction strength, ROM and scapular control was performed at baseline and midseason. An increase in handball load by >60% was associated with greater shoulder injury rate (HR 1.91; 95% CI 1.00 to 3.70, p=0.05) compared with the reference group. The effect of an increase in handball load between 20% and 60% was exacerbated among players with reduced external rotational strength (HR 4.0; 95% CI 1.1 to 15.2, p=0.04) or scapular dyskinesis (HR 4.8; 95% CI 1.3 to 18.3, p=0.02). Reduced external rotational strength exacerbated the effect of an increase above 60% (HR 4.2; 95% CI 1.4 to 12.8, p=0.01). A large increase in weekly handball load increases the shoulder injury rate in elite youth handball players; particularly, in the presence of reduced external rotational strength or scapular dyskinesis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Correlation of glenohumeral internal rotation deficit and total rotational motion to shoulder injuries in professional baseball pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Kevin E; Macrina, Leonard C; Fleisig, Glenn S; Porterfield, Ronald; Simpson, Charles D; Harker, Paul; Paparesta, Nick; Andrews, James R

    2011-02-01

    Glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) indicates a 20° or greater loss of internal rotation of the throwing shoulder compared with the nondominant shoulder. To determine whether GIRD and a deficit in total rotational motion (external rotation + internal rotation) compared with the nonthrowing shoulder correlate with shoulder injuries in professional baseball pitchers. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Over 3 competitive seasons (2005 to 2007), passive range of motion measurements were evaluated on the dominant and nondominant shoulders for 170 pitcher-seasons. This included 122 professional pitchers during the 3 seasons of data collection, in which some pitchers were measured during multiple seasons. Ranges of motion were measured with a bubble goniometer during the preseason, by the same examiner each year. External and internal rotation of the glenohumeral joint was assessed with the participant supine and the arm abducted 90° in the plane of the scapula, with the scapula stabilized anteriorly at the coracoid process. The reproducibility of the test methods had an intraclass correlation coefficient of .81. Days in which the player was unable to participate because of injury or surgery were recorded during the season by the medical staff of the team and defined as an injury. Pitchers with GIRD (n = 40) were nearly twice as likely to be injured as those without but without statistical significance (P = .17). Pitchers with total rotational motion deficit greater than 5° had a higher rate of injury. Minor league pitchers were more likely than major league pitchers to be injured. However, when players were injured, major league pitchers missed a significantly greater number of games than minor league pitchers. Compared with pitchers without GIRD, pitchers with GIRD appear to be at a higher risk for injury and shoulder surgery.

  8. History of shoulder instability surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Pietro; Cucchi, Davide; Butt, Usman

    2016-02-01

    The surgical management of shoulder instability is an expanding and increasingly complex area of study within orthopaedics. This article describes the history and evolution of shoulder instability surgery, examining the development of its key principles, the currently accepted concepts and available surgical interventions. A comprehensive review of the available literature was performed using PubMed. The reference lists of reviewed articles were also scrutinised to ensure relevant information was included. The various types of shoulder instability including anterior, posterior and multidirectional instability are discussed, focussing on the history of surgical management of these topics, the current concepts and the results of available surgical interventions. The last century has seen important advancements in the understanding and treatment of shoulder instability. The transition from open to arthroscopic surgery has allowed the discovery of previously unrecognised pathologic entities and facilitated techniques to treat these. Nevertheless, open surgery still produces comparable results in the treatment of many instability-related conditions and is often required in complex or revision cases, particularly in the presence of bone loss. More high-quality research is required to better understand and characterise this spectrum of conditions so that successful evidence-based management algorithms can be developed. IV.

  9. Dislocated Shoulder: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by: Sports injuries. Shoulder dislocation is a common injury in contact sports, such as football and hockey, and in sports that may involve falls, such as downhill skiing, gymnastics and volleyball. ... is a common source of dislocation. Falls. You may dislocate your ...

  10. Throwing Injuries of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Frank C., III; and Others

    The majority of shoulder injuries occurring in throwing sports involve the soft tissue structures. Injuries often occur when the unit is overstretched to a point near its greatest length, involving the elastic tissues. The other injury mechanism involves the contractural unit of the muscle, which occurs near the midpoint of contractions, involving…

  11. Interscalene block for shoulder surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... Fracture dislocation of the shoulder is a common musculoskeletal injury following road traffic accident. Peripheral ... Fracture luxation de l'épaule est une commune blessures musculo-squelettiques suite route trafic accident. Périphériques nerf .... vertebral artery injection, pneumothorax, Horner's syndrome ...

  12. Report of a Rare Case of Gorham-Stout Disease of Both Shoulders: Bisphosphonate Treatment and Shoulder Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Garbers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive osteolysis known as Gorham-Stout disease is a rare idiopathic disorder typically affecting long bones in a unifocal pattern. Angiomatosis is strongly connected to the osteolysis. Weather angiomatosis is the cause or the result of osteolysis is subject of intense discussion (Kawasaki et al. (2003, Möller et al. (1999, Radhakrishnan and Rockson (2008. There are about 200 cases described since 1955. Our patient is a 77-year-old female patient with osteolyses of both shoulders involving the proximal humerus, lateral clavicle, and the glenoid. Under bisphosphonate therapy, the progressive osteolysis stopped on the right side and showed progression on the left. With the patient complaining about severe rest pain and impaired function, we performed surgical reconstruction by implantation of total shoulder prosthesis three months after onset of symptoms. Our case shows a possibility of primary and early surgical reconstruction with good clinical outcome.

  13. Percutaneous radiofrequency lesioning of the suprascapular nerve for the management of chronic shoulder pain: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simopoulos TT

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Thomas T Simopoulos, Jyotsna Nagda, Musa M AnerArnold Pain Management Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAPurpose: The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the analgesic effects of continuous radiofrequency lesioning of the suprascapular nerve (SSN for chronic shoulder pain. The authors sought to obtain insight into the time-sensitive analgesic success and complications of this therapy.Patients and methods: This study was a retrospective case series involving patients with unremitting shoulder pain that had lasted for at least 12 months. Patients were selected if they showed a reduction of at least 50% in pain intensity during the anesthetic phase after SSN block, no additional motor weakness of the shoulder, and pain relief lasting for less than 2 months after separate treatments of the SSN with depot corticosteroids and pulsed radiofrequency. Nine patients were referred to the Arnold Pain Management Center. Of these nine patients, six patients who had significant chronic shoulder pain unresponsive to oral medications and intra-articular injections and who were not considered surgical candidates were selected. These patients were treated with a single radiofrequency lesion of the SSN at 80°C for 60 seconds. The primary outcome was a reduction in pain intensity by 50%, as determined by the numeric rating scale, and duration of this effect. The secondary outcome was improvement in either the passive or the active range of motion (ROM. Patients were also monitored for adverse effects such as weakness or increased pain.Results: The pooled mean numeric rating scale score before the procedure was 7.2 ± 1.2; this fell to 3.0 ± 0.9 at 5–7 weeks post procedure. The duration of pain relief ranged from 3 to 18 months, and all patients underwent at least one additional treatment. The change in baseline ROM improved from an average of 60° ± 28° (flexion and 58° ± 28° (abduction

  14. Recurrent Shoulder Dystocia: Risk Factors and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurewitsch Allen, Edith D

    2016-12-01

    A prior history of delivery complicated by shoulder dystocia confers a 6-fold to nearly 30-fold increased risk of shoulder dystocia recurrence in a subsequent vaginal delivery, with most reported rates between 12% and 17%. Whereas prevention of shoulder dystocia in the general population is neither feasible nor cost-effective, directing intervention efforts at the particular subgroup of women with a prior history of shoulder dystocia has merit. Potentially modifiable risk factors and individualized management strategies that may reduce shoulder dystocia recurrence and its associated significant morbidities are reviewed.

  15. Reflex muscle contraction in anterior shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, D A; Beard, D J; Gill, R H; Eng, B; Carr, A J

    1997-01-01

    Reduced proprioception may contribute to recurrent anterior shoulder instability. Twelve patients with unilateral shoulder instability were investigated for evidence of deficient proprioception with an activated pneumatic cylinder and surface electromyography electrodes; the contralateral normal shoulder was used as a control. The latency between onset of movement and the detection of muscle contraction was used as an index of proprioception. No significant difference in muscle contraction latency was detected between the stable and unstable shoulders, suggesting that there was no significant defect in muscular reflex activity. This study does not support the use proprioception-enhancing physiotherapy in the treatment of posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability.

  16. [Anterior shoulder instabilities: about 73 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Louaste; Bousbaa, Hicham; Cherrad, Taoufik; Wahidi, Mohammed; Amhajji, Larbi; Rachid, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2014, 73 patients (77 shoulders) underwent Latarjet procedure for anterior shoulder instability. This retrospective study aims to evaluate the clinical and radiographic results of this surgical technique. Surgical intervention was performed to treat 69 cases with recurrent dislocation, 5 cases with recurrent painful subluxation and 3 cases with painful shoulder. All patients underwent radiographic evaluation before surgery and during the most recent medical control. According to Rowe score, 73 (94.8%) of 77 shoulders got a good or excellent result. In the longest follow-up, 74 shoulders were free from glenohumeral arthrosis.

  17. The Relative Contribution to Small Finger Abduction of the Ulnar Versus Radial Slip of the EDM: Implications for Tendon Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinleye, Sheriff D; Culbertson, Maya Deza; Cappelleti, Giacomo; Garofolo, Garret; Choueka, Jack

    2017-09-01

    The extensor digiti minimi (EDM) tendon is commonly divided into a radial slip (EDM-R) and an ulnar slip (EDM-U). To our knowledge, the degree to which each EDM slip concomitantly abducts the small finger with active extension has not been formally tested. This study sought to characterize the comparative contributions of finger abduction inherent to each slip of the EDM to observe the sequelae of active small finger extension following transfer of the contralateral slip. Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaveric hands were used in this study. Starting with the hand in resting position, a controlled traction of 10 N was applied to each slip of the EDM tendon. The range of small finger abduction with respect to the fixed ring finger was recorded utilizing infrared reflective markers tracked through the range of motion using a digital video camera. The mean abduction of the small finger when the radial slip of the EDM tendon was tested was 13.33° (95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.10°-16.55°), which was significantly different ( P ≤ .001) than small finger abduction produced by the ulnar slip of the EDM, with a mean of 23.72° (95% CI: 19.40°-28.04°). Given the fact that the ulnar slip of the EDM tendon is shown to be the major contributor of aberrant abduction with active small finger extension, as traction on this slip produces almost twice as much abduction as the radial slip, the EDM-U is the ideal donor graft with respect to tendon transfers of the EDM.

  18. Some Aspects of International Children Abduction - Theoretical and Practical Approach from the Perspective of the European Law and Judicial Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Lupşan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Everyday life revealed even in the media by presenting cases of international abduction of minors, on the one hand, and on the other hand, the existence of cases increasingly complex from the national/ EU practice, to which we should add the insufficient analysis in the doctrine of the topic in representing some evidence to support the elaboration of this paper. Through its international and / or European regulations (Hague Convention of 25 October 1980 on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, which is supplemented by Regulation (EC no. 2201/2003 of 27 November 2003 concerning jurisdiction, the recognition and enforcement of judgments in matrimonial matters and in matters of parental responsibility, (prevailing the latter and national ones (Law no. 63/2014 amending and supplementing Law no. 369/2004 on the application of the Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction which Romania adhered to by the Law no. 100/199, the legislator sought to ensure the prompt return of children abducted in the Member State of origin, the objective being the same: discouraging underage child abduction by a parent or by third parties, usually relatives and, in case of committing an act of international abduction of minors, ensuring the best interests of the child through the cooperation of the competent authorities in the field. The structure includes sections that address theoretical issues (e.g. the notion of international abduction of minors, regulations, procedure for solving the request, the competent authorities and practical aspects, without neglecting the interpretation given by the Court of Justice of the European Union of some texts from the Regulation.

  19. [Case-control study on shoulder pain caused by hook palte for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-guo; Cai, Xiao-bing; Wang, Xiao-min; Zhu, Yong-gan; Pan, He-yong

    2015-06-01

    To explore causes of shoulder pain and propose prevention measures in treating acromioclavicular joint dislocation. From January 2005 to January 2013, 86 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Tossy III) were treated with hook plate fixation, and were divided into two groups. Bsaed on recovery of shoulder function mostly, the patients who suffered from rest pain, motion pain were named as shoulder pain group, while the patients without pain were named as painless group. In shoulder pain group, there were 21 cases including 15 males and and 6 females ranging the age from 22 to 62 years old with an average of (40.6±11.2) years old. There were 8 cases were on the left side and 13 cases were on the right side. In painless group, there were 65 cases including 36 males and and 29 females ranging the age from 19 to 65 years old with an average of (40.0±11.3) years old. There were 33 cases were on the left side and 32 cases were on the right side. The time from injury to operation ranged from 3 h to 8 d with an average of 34.6 h. Shoulder function of all patients were normal before injuried. Postoperative pain, activity of daily living (ADL), range of motion, deltoid muscle strength were compared. Anteflexion,rear protraction, abduction and upthrow of shoulder joint were also compared. Postoperative complications between two groups were observed and compared. All patients were followed up from 12 to 48 months with an average of 18.5 months. Constant-Murley score were used to evaluate clinical efficacy at the least following up, and 13 cases got an excellent results, 5 moderate, 2 good and 1 poor in shoulder pain group ; while 61 cases were obtained excellent results, 3 moderate and 1 good in painless group. There were significantly differences between two groups in Constant-Murley score and activity of shoulder joint (Pacromioclavicular arthritis. Chosing individual clavicular hook plate, fulfilling anatomic reset, paying attention to the repair of articular

  20. Pneumatic Multi-Pocket Elastomer Actuators for Metacarpophalangeal Joint Flexion and Abduction-Adduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapio Veli Juhani Tarvainen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, interest has been rising towards developing fluidic fiber-reinforced elastomer actuators for wearable soft robotics used in hand rehabilitation and power-assist. However, they do not enable finger abduction-adduction, which plays an important role in activities of daily living, when grasping larger objects. Furthermore, the developed gloves often do not have separate control of joints, which is important for doing various common rehabilitation motions. The main obstacle for the development of a fully-assisting glove is moving a joint with multiple degrees of freedom. If the functions are built into the same structure, they are naturally coupled and affect each other, which makes them more difficult to design and complex to control than a simple flexion-extension actuator. In this study, we explored the key design elements and fabrication of pneumatic multi-pocket elastomer actuators for a soft rehabilitation glove. The goal was to gain more control over the metacarpophalangeal joint’s response by increasing the degree of actuation. Three main functional designs were tested for achieving both flexion and abduction-adduction. Five prototypes, with four different actuator geometries and four different reinforcement types, were designed and fabricated. They were evaluated by recording their free motion with motion capture and measuring their torque output using a dummy finger. Results showed the strengths and weaknesses of each design in separating the control of the two functions. We discuss the different improvements that are needed in order to make each design plausible for developing an actuator that meets the requirements for full assist of the hand’s motions. In conclusion, we show that it is possible to produce multi-pocket actuators for assisting MCP joint motion in both flexion and abduction-adduction, although coupling between the separate functions is still problematic and should be considered further.

  1. Does Humeral Component Lateralization in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Affect Rotator Cuff Torque? Evaluation in a Cadaver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; Langohr, G Daniel G; Mahaffy, Matthew; Johnson, James A; Athwal, George S

    2017-10-01

    Humeral component lateralization in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) may improve the biomechanical advantage of the rotator cuff, which could improve the torque generated by the rotator cuff and increase internal and external rotation of the shoulder. The purpose of this in vitro biomechanical study was to evaluate the effect of humeral component lateralization (or lateral offset) on the torque of the anterior and posterior rotator cuff. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders from eight separate donors (74 ± 8 years; six males, two females) were tested using an in vitro simulator. All shoulders were prescreened for soft tissue deficit and/or deformity before testing. A custom RTSA prosthesis was implanted that allowed five levels of humeral component lateralization (15, 20, 25, 30, 35 mm), which avoided restrictions imposed by commercially available designs. The torques exerted by the anterior and posterior rotator cuff were measured three times and then averaged for varying humeral lateralization, abduction angle (0°, 45°, 90°), and internal and external rotation (-60°, -30°, 0°, 30°, 60°). A three-way repeated measures ANOVA (abduction angle, humeral lateralization, internal rotation and external rotation angles) with a significance level of α = 0.05 was used for statistical analysis. Humeral lateralization only affected posterior rotator cuff torque at 0° abduction, where increasing humeral lateralization from 15 to 35 mm at 60° internal rotation decreased external rotation torque by 1.6 ± 0.4 Nm (95% CI, -0.07 -1.56 Nm; p = 0.06) from 4.0 ± 0.3 Nm to 2.4 ± 0.6 Nm, respectively, but at 60° external rotation increased external rotation torque by 2.2 ± 0.5 Nm (95% CI, -4.2 to -0.2 Nm; p = 0.029) from 6.2 ± 0.5 Nm to 8.3 ± 0.5 Nm, respectively. Anterior cuff torque was affected by humeral lateralization in more arm positions than the posterior cuff, where increasing humeral lateralization from 15 to 35 mm when at 60° internal rotation

  2. Abduction of Arm Facilitates Correction of Kinked Peel-Away Sheath During Subclavian Central Line Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghoon

    2015-12-01

    A tunneled central line catheter placement using a subclavian vein approach can be complicated by an occurrence of peel-away sheath kink which prevents the advancement of the catheter through the sheath. The kink is created due to the angular junction of subclavian and brachiocephalic veins which meet at 90 degree angle. A technique is described which corrects the peel-away sheath kink by extending the subclavian/brachiocephalic vein angle to greater than 90 degrees by abducting the patient's arm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Past-life identities, UFO abductions, and satanic ritual abuse: the social construction of memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, N P; Burgess, C A; Burgess, M F

    1994-10-01

    People sometimes fantasize entire complex scenarios and later define these experiences as memories of actual events rather than as imaginings. This article examines research associated with three such phenomena: past-life experiences, UFO alien contact and abduction, and memory reports of childhood ritual satanic abuse. In each case, elicitation of the fantasy events is frequently associated with hypnotic procedures and structured interviews which provide strong and repeated demands for the requisite experiences, and which then legitimate the experiences as "real memories." Research associated with these phenomena supports the hypothesis that recall is reconstructive and organized in terms of current expectations and beliefs.

  4. Risk of shoulder tendinitis in relation to shoulder loads in monotonous repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, P.; Bonde, J. P.; Mikkelsen, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies relate the occurrence of shoulder disorders to quantified ergonomic exposures. This study evaluates the hypothesis that shoulder loads in repetitive work might contribute to the occurrence of shoulder tendinitis. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 1961 workers...... in repetitive work and 782 referents. Shoulder loads were quantified at task level and measures of exposures were assigned based on task distribution. Symptoms in combination with clinical criteria defined shoulder tendinitis. RESULTS: The prevalence of shoulder tendinitis was higher among exposed workers...

  5. The nerves around the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, Alain; Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan

  6. The nerves around the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Alain, E-mail: alain.blum@gmail.com [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan.

  7. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E.; Breitenseher, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  8. Diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, J.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical and imaging findings in shoulder impingement syndrome. Different stages of impingement syndrome are described. Stage I relates to edema and hemorrhage of the supraspinatus tendon. Stage II is characterized by bursal inflammation and fibrosis, as well as tendinopathy. In stage III there is a tear of the rotator cuff. Clinical signs many overlap. Moreover, calcifying tendinitis, fractures and pain originating from the cervical spine may mimic shoulder impingement syndrome. Imaging is important for the exact diagnosis. Standard radiographs are the basis of imaging in shoulder impingement syndrome. They may demonstrate subchondral sclerosis of the major tuberosity, subacromial spurs, and form anomalies of the acromion. They are also important in the differential diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and demonstrate calcifying tendinitis, fractures and neoplasm. Ultrasonography has found acceptance as a screening tool and even as a final diagnostic method by many authors. However, there is a high interobserver variability in the demonstration of rotator cuff tears. Its usefulness has therefore been questioned. MR imaging is probably the method of choice in the evaluation of the rotator cuff and surrounding structures. Several investigations have demonstrated that differentiation of early findings, such as tendinopathy versus partial tears, may be difficult with MR imaging. However, reproducibility for fullthickness tears appears to be higher than for sonography. Moreover, specificity appears to be superior to sonography. MR arthrography is not universally accepted. However, it allows for more exact differentiation of discrete findings and may be indicated in preoperative planning. Standard arthrography and CT have a limited role in the current assessment of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [de

  9. Recurrent shoulder dystocia: is it predictable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleitman, Vered; Feldman, Roi; Walfisch, Asnat; Toledano, Ronen; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-11-01

    To examine the course and outcome of deliveries occurring in women who previously experienced shoulder dystocia. In addition, recurrent shoulder dystocia risk factors were assessed. A retrospective cohort analysis comparing all singleton deliveries with and without shoulder dystocia in their preceding delivery was conducted. Independent predictors of recurrent shoulder dystocia were investigated using a multiple logistic regression model. Of the 201,422 deliveries included in the analysis, 307 occurred in women with a previous shoulder dystocia (0.015 %). Women with a history of shoulder dystocia were more likely to be older, experienced higher rates of gestational diabetes mellitus, polyhydramnios, prolonged second stage, operative delivery and macrosomia (>4000 g) in the following delivery. Previous shoulder dystocia was found to be an independent risk factor for recurrent shoulder dystocia (OR = 6.1, 95 % CI 3.2-11.8, p value dystocia is an independent risk factor for recurrent shoulder dystocia. Deliveries in women with a history of shoulder dystocia are characterized by higher rates of operative delivery, prolonged second stage of labor and macrosomia.

  10. [Imaging evaluation on adaptability of proximal humeral anatomy after shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Youxing; Tang, Kanglai; Yuan, Chengsong; Tao, Xu; Wang, Huaqing; Chen, Bo; Guo, Yupeng

    2015-03-24

    Modern shoulder prosthesis has evolved through four generations. And the fourth generation technology has a core three-dimensional design of restoring 3D reconstruction of proximal humeral anatomy. Thus a new shoulder prosthesis is developed on the basis of the technology of 3D prosthesis. Assessment of whether shoulder prosthesis can restore individualized reconstruction of proximal humeral anatomy is based on the adaptability of proximal humeral anatomy. To evaluate the adaptability of proximal humeral anatomy through measuring the parameters of proximal humeral anatomy after shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis and compare with normal data. The parameters of proximal humeral anatomy were analyzed and evaluated for a total of 12 cases undergoing shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis. The relevant anatomical parameters included neck-shaft angle (NSA), retroversion angle (RA), humeral head height (HH) and humeral head diameter (HD). And the anatomical parameters were compared with the data from normal side. All underwent shoulder replacement with individualized shoulder prosthesis. The postoperative parameters of proximal humeral anatomy were compared with those of normal side. And the difference of NSA was 0.05). Individualized shoulder prosthesis has excellent adaptability to shoulder. All core parameters are freely adjustable and specification models may be optimized. With matching tools, individualized shoulder prosthesis improves the accuracy and reliability in shoulder replacement.

  11. Longitudinal Increases in Knee Abduction Moments in Females during Adolescent Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    HEWETT, TIMOTHY E.; MYER, GREGORY D.; KIEFER, ADAM W.; FORD, KEVIN R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Knee abduction moment (KAM) is an injury risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury that shows divergent incidence between males and females during adolescence. The objective of this study was to determine the relation between skeletal growth and increased KAM. The hypotheses tested were that females would demonstrate peak KAM during landing at peak height velocity (PHV) and that they would diverge from males at PHV. Methods The subject pool consisted of 674 females and 218 males (1387 female and 376 male assessments) who participated in a preseason testing session before their basketball or soccer seasons. They were tested longitudinally for multiple years (2 ± 1 yr) to capture maturation via estimates of percent (%) adult stature and biomechanical analysis during a drop vertical jump maneuver. Data were analyzed using three-dimensional motion analysis that used a 37 retroreflective marker body model and inverse dynamics to calculate segment joint centers and peak KAM. Results Mature females, as defined as 92% adult stature or greater, displayed increased peak KAM and knee abduction angles relative to growing (≤91% adult stature) adolescent females (P injury in females. KAM peaked in females at PHV. Tracking longitudinal increases in peak KAM may be useful for the identification of females at increased risk of ACL injury. PMID:25970663

  12. Heartbeat Classification Using Abstract Features From the Abductive Interpretation of the ECG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teijeiro, Tomas; Felix, Paulo; Presedo, Jesus; Castro, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    This paper aims to prove that automatic beat classification on ECG signals can be effectively solved with a pure knowledge-based approach, using an appropriate set of abstract features obtained from the interpretation of the physiological processes underlying the signal. A set of qualitative morphological and rhythm features are obtained for each heartbeat as a result of the abductive interpretation of the ECG. Then, a QRS clustering algorithm is applied in order to reduce the effect of possible errors in the interpretation. Finally, a rule-based classifier assigns a tag to each cluster. The method has been tested with the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database records, showing a significantly better performance than any other automatic approach in the state-of-the-art, and even improving most of the assisted approaches that require the intervention of an expert in the process. The most relevant issues in ECG classification, related to a large extent to the variability of the signal patterns between different subjects and even in the same subject over time, will be overcome by changing the reasoning paradigm. This paper demonstrates the power of an abductive framework for time-series interpretation to make a qualitative leap in the significance of the information extracted from the ECG by automatic methods.

  13. Effect of a Home Based Exercise Program on Postmenopausal Women’s Shoulder Girdle Muscle Strength for Women with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akoochakian

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Reducing in muscle strength of the shoulder girdle is a side effect of breast cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 4 weeks of resistance and mobility training on the shoulder girdle strength of women with breast cancer. Materials & Methods: In this randomized clinical trial study twenty-seven postmenopausal women with breast cancer (mean age, 51±5.96 years, (mean height, 158.08±7.2 cm, (mean weight, 63.08±11.06 kg who underwent surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, were purposefully selected and divided into two groups of intervention and control. Intervention group performed 4 weeks (4 sessions per week of resistance training with flex-band and stretch training at home, but the control group did not participate in any sports or physical program. Muscle strength before and after intervention was measured using a handheld dynamometer. The data were analyzed using ANCOVA. Results: Significant differences were seen between intervention and control groups in shoulder flexion, scapula abduction and upward rotation, shoulder internal rotation, shoulder external rotation, shoulder horizontal adduction and scapula depression and adduction strength, as all strength variables increased after 4 weeks exercise. Conclusion: Since strength plays an important role in ADL performance and shoulder girdle function in breast cancer survivors, it seems that muscle strength improvement following combined home based exercise program can help patients after treatment to easier and faster rehabilitation. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (3: 185-195

  14. Measurement of muscle thickness of the serratus anterior and lower trapezius using ultrasound imaging in competitive recreational adult swimmers, with and without current shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Leanda J; de Ronde, Mandy; Le, Minyang; Burke, William; Graves, Anna; Williams, Sian A

    2018-02-01

    To compare serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle thickness between swimmers with and without current shoulder pain, and between sides when measured by real-time ultrasound imaging. A single blinded age and gender-matched case-control study with 26 symptomatic and 26 asymptomatic recreational swimmers. Muscle thickness of serratus anterior and lower trapezius were measured using previously validated real-time ultrasound imaging protocols. Serratus anterior thickness was measured in side lying with 90° of glenohumeral flexion at rest and during a scapular protraction contraction. Lower trapezius thickness was measured in prone with 145° of glenohumeral abduction whilst at rest and when holding the weight of the arm. There was no statistically significant difference between the muscle thickness of serratus anterior and lower trapezius between the symptomatic shoulder and the dominance-matched shoulder in the asymptomatic group of swimmers. There was also no significant difference in muscle thickness between the symptomatic side and asymptomatic side within the symptomatic group. There appears to be no difference in serratus anterior and lower trapezius thickness between swimmers who have mild to moderate shoulder pain, who continue to swim and those who do not have shoulder pain. When imaging the serratus anterior and lower trapezius in swimmers with mild shoulder pain, clinicians should expect no differences between sides. If muscle thickness differences between sides are detected in recreational swimmers, this may indicate that the swimmer is participating in other asymmetrical activities or has a higher level of shoulder pain. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Open-wedge osteotomy of the glenoid for treatment of posterior shoulder instability with increased glenoid retroversion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorzelski, J; Braun, S; Imhoff, A B; Beitzel, K

    2016-12-01

    Treatment of posterior shoulder instability with increased retroversion of the glenoid using open-wedge osteotomy of the glenoid neck stabilized with an autologous bone block. Symptomatic, atraumatic posterior shoulder instability with increased retroversion (>20°) of the glenoid and previously failed conservative or surgical treatment. General contraindications against surgery. Relative contraindications: osteoporosis, nicotine abuse, or suspected patient noncompliance. Posterior approach with a 7 cm long incision starting medial of the posterolateral corner of the acromion heading to the posterior axillary fold and subsequent preparation of the deltoid muscle and the infraspinatus muscle. The posterior glenohumeral capsule is incised by performing a capsular T‑shift. The osteotomy is performed intracapsulary medial to the genoid rim. The wedge bone graft, harvested from spina scapulae or iliac spine, is placed "press fit" in position. Additional fixation of the graft is not necessary if the anterior cortex is intact. For reinforcing the posterior capsule, a posterior capsule shift should be performed. Insertion of extracapsular wound drainage. Successive wound closure. Postoperative immobilization in a 0° shoulder orthesis for 6 weeks; avoidance of horizontal abduction for 8 weeks. After removing the wound drainage, start of limited active-assisted range of motion. Over-head sports after 6 months. From 2009-2015, 6 posterior open wedge glenoid osteotomies were performed. Postoperative retroversion of the glenoid was 11.2 ± 9.4° compared to 26.0 ± 8.6° before surgery. Of 6 shoulders, 2 showed postoperative signs of persistent posterior instability; the other 4 shoulders were free of complaints. No revision surgery was needed.

  16. Shoulder arthroplasty for sequelae of poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werthel, Jean-David; Schoch, Bradley; Sperling, John W; Cofield, Robert; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2016-05-01

    Polio infection can often lead to orthopedic complications such as arthritis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, skeletal deformation, and chronic instability of the joints. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes and associated complications of arthroplasty in shoulders with sequelae of poliomyelitis. Seven patients (average age, 70 years) were treated between 1976 and 2013 with shoulder arthroplasty for the sequelae of polio. One patient underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty, 2 had a hemiarthroplasty, and 4 had total shoulder arthroplasty. Average follow-up was 87 months. Outcome measures included pain, range of motion, and postoperative modified Neer ratings. Overall pain scores improved from 5 to 1.6 points (on a 5-point scale) after shoulder arthroplasty. Six shoulders had no or mild pain at latest follow-up, and 6 shoulders rated the result as much better or better. Mean shoulder elevation improved from 72° to 129°, and external rotation improved from 11° to 56°. Average strength in elevation decreased from 3.9 to 3.4 postoperatively, and external rotation strength decreased from 3.9 to 3.3. This, however, did not reach significance. Evidence of muscle imbalance with radiographic instability was found in 4 shoulders that demonstrated superior subluxation, anterior subluxation, or both. This remained asymptomatic. No shoulder required revision or reoperation. Shoulder arthroplasty provides significant pain relief and improved motion in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis. Muscle weakness may be responsible for postoperative instability, and careful selection of the patient with good upper extremity muscles must be made. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Shoulder Injury Incidence Rates in NASA Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Foy, Millennia; Wear, Mary L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the astronaut shoulder injury rates began with an operational concern at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) training. An astronaut suffered a shoulder injury during an NBL training run and commented that it was possibly due to a hardware issue. During the subsequent investigation, questions arose regarding the rate of shoulder injuries in recent years and over the entire history of the astronaut corps.

  18. Athletes’ Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Sykhorychko

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The examination of 60 athletes, aged 18-30, suffering from chronic pains in shoulder joints was conducted. So, 20 women and 20 men were engaged in track and field and team sports, 15 in weightlifting and strength sports, 5 women in strength sports. Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy enables to reduce pain syndrome, restore shoulder joint flexibility, normalize trophism after trauma and normalize cervicothoracic transition biomechanics.

  19. Athletes’ Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    A.N. Sykhorychko; Т.G. Kovalenko; М.А. Sykhorychko

    2012-01-01

    The examination of 60 athletes, aged 18-30, suffering from chronic pains in shoulder joints was conducted. So, 20 women and 20 men were engaged in track and field and team sports, 15 in weightlifting and strength sports, 5 women in strength sports. Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy enables to reduce pain syndrome, restore shoulder joint flexibility, normalize trophism after trauma and normalize cervicothoracic transition biomechanics.

  20. Rugby and Shoulder Trauma: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Papalia, R.; Tecame, A.; Torre, G.; Narbona, P.; Maffulli, N.; Denaro, V.

    2014-01-01

    Rugby is a popular contact sport worldwide. Collisions and tackles during matches and practices often lead to traumatic injuries of the shoulder. This review reports on the epidemiology of injuries, type of lesions and treatment of shoulder injuries, risk factors, such as player position, and return to sport activities. Electronic searches through PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library retrieved studies concerning shoulder injuries in rugby players. Data regarding incidence, type and ...

  1. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  2. An investigation of shoulder forces in active shoulder tackles in rugby union football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Juliana; McIntosh, Andrew S; Fréchède, Bertrand

    2011-11-01

    In rugby union football the tackle is the most frequently executed skill and one most associated with injury, including shoulder injury to the tackler. Despite the importance of the tackle, little is known about the magnitude of shoulder forces in the tackle and influencing factors. The objectives of the study were to measure the shoulder force in the tackle, as well as the effects of shoulder padding, skill level, side of body, player size, and experimental setting on shoulder force. Experiments were conducted in laboratory and field settings using a repeated measures design. Thirty-five participants were recruited to the laboratory and 98 to the field setting. All were male aged over 18 years with rugby experience. The maximum force applied to the shoulder in an active shoulder tackle was measured with a custom built forceplate incorporated into a 45 kg tackle bag. The overall average maximum shoulder force was 1660 N in the laboratory and 1997 N in the field. This difference was significant. The shoulder force for tackling without shoulder pads was 1684 N compared to 1635 N with shoulder pads. There was no difference between the shoulder forces on the dominant and non-dominant sides. Shoulder force reduced with tackle repetition. No relationship was observed between player skill level and size. A substantial force can be applied to the shoulder and to an opponent in the tackle. This force is within the shoulder's injury tolerance range and is unaffected by shoulder pads. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Emergency department management of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Portal, Daniel A; Horn, Amanda E; Vilke, Gary M; Chan, Theodore C; Ufberg, Jacob W

    2014-03-01

    Precipitous obstetric deliveries can occur outside of the labor and delivery suite, often in the emergency department (ED). Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency with significant risk of adverse outcome. To review multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia in the ED. We review various techniques and approaches for achieving delivery in the setting of shoulder dystocia. These include common maneuvers, controversial interventions, and interventions of last resort. Emergency physicians should be familiar with multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia to reduce the chances of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Can shoulder dystocia be reliably predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Jodie M; Catcheside, Britt; Scheil, Wendy

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate factors reported to increase the risk of shoulder dystocia, and to evaluate their predictive value at a population level. The South Australian Pregnancy Outcome Unit's population database from 2005 to 2010 was accessed to determine the occurrence of shoulder dystocia in addition to reported risk factors, including age, parity, self-reported ethnicity, presence of diabetes and infant birth weight. Odds ratios (and 95% confidence interval) of shoulder dystocia was calculated for each risk factor, which were then incorporated into a logistic regression model. Test characteristics for each variable in predicting shoulder dystocia were calculated. As a proportion of all births, the reported rate of shoulder dystocia increased significantly from 0.95% in 2005 to 1.38% in 2010 (P = 0.0002). Using a logistic regression model, induction of labour and infant birth weight greater than both 4000 and 4500 g were identified as significant independent predictors of shoulder dystocia. The value of risk factors alone and when incorporated into the logistic regression model was poorly predictive of the occurrence of shoulder dystocia. While there are a number of factors associated with an increased risk of shoulder dystocia, none are of sufficient sensitivity or positive predictive value to allow their use clinically to reliably and accurately identify the occurrence of shoulder dystocia. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  5. Shoulder dystocia: risk factors, predictability, and preventability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shobha H; Sokol, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia remains an unpredictable obstetric emergency, striking fear in the hearts of obstetricians both novice and experienced. While outcomes that lead to permanent injury are rare, almost all obstetricians with enough years of practice have participated in a birth with a severe shoulder dystocia and are at least aware of cases that have resulted in significant neurologic injury or even neonatal death. This is despite many years of research trying to understand the risk factors associated with it, all in an attempt primarily to characterize when the risk is high enough to avoid vaginal delivery altogether and prevent a shoulder dystocia, whose attendant morbidities are estimated to be at a rate as high as 16-48%. The study of shoulder dystocia remains challenging due to its generally retrospective nature, as well as dependence on proper identification and documentation. As a result, the prediction of shoulder dystocia remains elusive, and the cost of trying to prevent one by performing a cesarean delivery remains high. While ultimately it is the injury that is the key concern, rather than the shoulder dystocia itself, it is in the presence of an identified shoulder dystocia that occurrence of injury is most common. The majority of shoulder dystocia cases occur without major risk factors. Moreover, even the best antenatal predictors have a low positive predictive value. Shoulder dystocia therefore cannot be reliably predicted, and the only preventative measure is cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Obstetric Emergencies: Shoulder Dystocia and Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Joshua D; Bhalwal, Asha; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2017-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage represent two of the most common emergencies faced in obstetric clinical practice, both requiring prompt recognition and management to avoid significant morbidity or mortality. Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon, unpredictable, and unpreventable obstetric emergency and can be managed with appropriate intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage occurs more commonly and carries significant risk of maternal morbidity. Institutional protocols and algorithms for the prevention and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage have become mainstays for clinicians. The goal of this review is to summarize the diagnosis, incidence, risk factors, and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Shoulder distention arthrography as a treatment modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Park, Chan Sup; Kim, Jin Ho; Kim, Sang Bum

    1987-01-01

    18 patients with painful stiff shoulder joint were underwent shoulder distension arthrography as a treatment modality, followed by physical therapy. Range of motion of shoulder joint was evaluated at 1 week and 4 weeks after arthrography. The results were as follows; 1. Arthrographic findings were decreased volume of joint cavity, obliteration of axillary recess, small subscapularis bursa, serrated capsular margin and non-filling of biceps tendon sheath. In 3 cases, rotator cuff tear was found. 2. Range of motion of shoulder joint was improved after distension arthrography. 3. In 3 patients have rotator cuff tear, range of motion was not improved

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemianski, A.; Romanowski, L.

    1994-01-01

    The technique of the own method of shoulder examination was presented. Anatomy and the most common diseases of the shoulder are discussed. The diseases of the shoulder diagnosed on the basis of the MR are: rotator cuff disease, impingement syndrome and instability. MR findings occurred in these entities were demonstrated. The most common MR finding of the rotator cuff disease was higher signal intensity within the supraspinatus tendon, while in shoulder instability was labral abnormality. Impingement syndrome is the previous syndrome of the full MR imaging of the rotator cuff disease. (author)

  9. Risk of shoulder tendinitis in relation to shoulder loads in monotonous repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, P.; Bonde, J. P.; Mikkelsen, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies relate the occurrence of shoulder disorders to quantified ergonomic exposures. This study evaluates the hypothesis that shoulder loads in repetitive work might contribute to the occurrence of shoulder tendinitis. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 1961 workers...

  10. Incidence and prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery : a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorevaar, Rinco C. T.; van't Riet, Esther; Ipskamp, Marcel; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.

    Frozen shoulder is a potential complication after shoulder surgery. It is a clinical condition that is often associated with marked disability and can have a profound effect on the patient's quality of life. The incidence, etiology, pathology and prognostic factors of postoperative frozen shoulder

  11. Mobile technology and telemedicine for shoulder range of motion: validation of a motion-based machine-learning software development kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Prem N; Haeberle, Heather S; Navarro, Sergio M; Sultan, Assem A; Mont, Michael A; Ricchetti, Eric T; Schickendantz, Mark S; Iannotti, Joseph P

    2018-03-07

    Mobile technology offers the prospect of delivering high-value care with increased patient access and reduced costs. Advances in mobile health (mHealth) and telemedicine have been inhibited by the lack of interconnectivity between devices and software and inability to process consumer sensor data. The objective of this study was to preliminarily validate a motion-based machine learning software development kit (SDK) for the shoulder compared with a goniometer for 4 arcs of motion: (1) abduction, (2) forward flexion, (3) internal rotation, and (4) external rotation. A mobile application for the SDK was developed and "taught" 4 arcs of shoulder motion. Ten subjects without shoulder pain or prior shoulder surgery performed the arcs of motion for 5 repetitions. Each motion was measured by the SDK and compared with a physician-measured manual goniometer measurement. Angular differences between SDK and goniometer measurements were compared with univariate and power analyses. The comparison between the SDK and goniometer measurement detected a mean difference of less than 5° for all arcs of motion (P > .05), with a 94% chance of detecting a large effect size from a priori power analysis. Mean differences for the arcs of motion were: abduction, -3.7° ± 3.2°; forward flexion, -4.9° ± 2.5°; internal rotation, -2.4° ± 3.7°; and external rotation -2.6° ± 3.4°. The SDK has the potential to remotely substitute for a shoulder range of motion examination within 5° of goniometer measurements. An open-source motion-based SDK that can learn complex movements, including clinical shoulder range of motion, from consumer sensors offers promise for the future of mHealth, particularly in telemonitoring before and after orthopedic surgery. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Two-year outcomes of open shoulder anterior capsular reconstruction for instability from severe capsular deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewing, Christopher B; Horan, Marilee P; Millett, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    To document outcomes after anterior capsulolabral reconstruction for recurrent shoulder instability in 15 patients (20 shoulders) who have had multiple failed stabilizations or collagen disorders. Twenty shoulders with recurrent instability underwent revision stabilization with allograft reconstruction of anterior capsulolabral structures, which re-creates the labrum and capsular ligaments. The patients comprised 3 men and 12 women (mean age, 26 years [range, 18 to 38 years]) in whom multiple prior repairs failed and who had disability from continued pain and instability. Patients could choose to undergo either arthrodesis or salvage allograft reconstruction or to live with permanent disability. Of the patients, 5 had Ehlers-Danlos syndrome whereas 10 had hyperlaxity syndromes without genetic confirmation. Failure was defined as further instability surgery. Pain, shoulder function, instability (dislocations/subluxation), and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores were documented. At follow-up, 9 of 20 shoulders (45%) remained stable. Recurrent instability was reported in 5 shoulders (25%), but the patients chose not to undergo further surgery. In the 14 shoulders without further stabilization (nonfailures), the mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score increased 43 points at a mean of 3.8 years (range, 2 to 6 years) postoperatively (P failed by progressing to instability surgery at a mean of 8.6 months (range, 2.8 to 24 months). In the 6 shoulders that failed, the mean number of prior surgeries was 8 (range, 3 to 15) compared with a mean of 4 prior surgeries (range, 1 to 16) for the 9 nonfailures. Treating patients in whom multiple stabilizations have failed remains challenging. In our series 9 shoulders (45%) remained completely stable at 3.8 years. Recurrent instability (3 reinjuries) requiring further stabilization occurred in 6 (30%). Subsequent treatment for non-instability reasons was performed in 3 (15%). Instability was reported but revision

  13. Ultrasonography of the equine shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dik, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    Six horses with shoulder injuries were presented in this report with emphasis on the use of ultrasonography vs. radiography in diagnosis. The two imaging modalities represented valuable and complementary diagnostic procedures. Two horses had fracture fragments of the lateral humeral tuberosity, the accurate ultrasonographic findings encouraging clearer radiographic identification by oblique projections. In one horseultrasonography enabled more accurate localization of calcification within the supraspinatus muscle. In the remaining three cases ultrasonography visualized distension of the bicipital bursa due to aseptic bursitis, bursal hemorrhage, or associated with injury of the biceps brachii muscle and the underlying intermediate humeral tubercle, the bony involvement more clearly demonstrated radiographically

  14. Shoulder arthropathy in primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaum, A.J.; Doppman, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An erosive arthropathy of the hands and wrists has been recognized in patients with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Recently, intra-articular erosions of the humeral head were described in six patients who had been on chronic long-term hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism. We would like to present the finding of shoulder erosions in four patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and one patient with renal osteodystrophy and suggest that the humeral erosion can occur in both an intra-articular and peri-articular location. (orig.)

  15. Relationship among shoulder proprioception, kinematics, and pain after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.H.; Janssen, T.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Meskers CG, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, Janssen TW. Relationship among shoulder proprioception, kinematics, and pain after stroke. Objective: To identify a possible relationship among chronic poststroke shoulder pain (PSSP), scapular resting pose, and shoulder proprioception.

  16. Posture and isokinetic shoulder strength in female water polo players

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kathryn van Boom

    pathological injuries, such as rotator cuff tendinitis, shoulder instability and shoulder ... and specific postural characteristics, which will be useful in future studies. ... concentric and eccentric IR and ER shoulder muscle strength in 15 club-level ...

  17. Raciocínio abdutivo, criativídade e auto-organiszão [Abductive reasoning, creativity and self-organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, M.E.Q.; Haselager, W.F.G.

    2002-01-01

    We are going to investigate the nature of Creativity focusing on Peirce's notion of abductive reasoning and on the main premises of the Theory of Self-Organization. As an initial hypothesis we characterize Creativity as a self-organizing process in which abductive reasoning occurs allowing the

  18. Modulation of shoulder muscle and joint function using a powered upper-limb exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Fong, Justin; Crocher, Vincent; Lee, Peter V S; Oetomo, Denny; Tan, Ying; Ackland, David C

    2018-04-27

    Robotic-assistive exoskeletons can enable frequent repetitive movements without the presence of a full-time therapist; however, human-machine interaction and the capacity of powered exoskeletons to attenuate shoulder muscle and joint loading is poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify shoulder muscle and joint force during assisted activities of daily living using a powered robotic upper limb exoskeleton (ArmeoPower, Hocoma). Six healthy male subjects performed abduction, flexion, horizontal flexion, reaching and nose touching activities. These tasks were repeated under two conditions: (i) the exoskeleton compensating only for its own weight, and (ii) the exoskeleton providing full upper limb gravity compensation (i.e., weightlessness). Muscle EMG, joint kinematics and joint torques were simultaneously recorded, and shoulder muscle and joint forces calculated using personalized musculoskeletal models of each subject's upper limb. The exoskeleton reduced peak joint torques, muscle forces and joint loading by up to 74.8% (0.113 Nm/kg), 88.8% (5.8%BW) and 68.4% (75.6%BW), respectively, with the degree of load attenuation strongly task dependent. The peak compressive, anterior and superior glenohumeral joint force during assisted nose touching was 36.4% (24.6%BW), 72.4% (13.1%BW) and 85.0% (17.2%BW) lower than that during unassisted nose touching, respectively. The present study showed that upper limb weight compensation using an assistive exoskeleton may increase glenohumeral joint stability, since deltoid muscle force, which is the primary contributor to superior glenohumeral joint shear, is attenuated; however, prominent exoskeleton interaction moments are required to position and control the upper limb in space, even under full gravity compensation conditions. The modeling framework and results may be useful in planning targeted upper limb robotic rehabilitation tasks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Arthroscopic Bankart repair and subscapularis augmentation: an alternative technique treating anterior shoulder instability with bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiotti, Marco; Russo, Raffaele; Zanini, Antonio; Schröter, Steffen; Massoni, Carlo; Bianchedi, Diana

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the preliminary results of a new arthroscopic technique consisting of the association of 2 procedures, capsulolabral repair and subscapularis augmentation tenodesis, in the treatment of traumatic anterior shoulder instability with both glenoid bone loss and a Hill-Sachs lesion. Eighty-nine patients engaged in sports were enrolled in this retrospective case-series study with 2 to 5 years' follow-up. All patients underwent a computed tomography scan to assess the percentage of glenoid bone loss by the Pico method. A prior stabilization procedure had failed in 20 patients, who were then segregated into a different group. Visual analog scale (VAS), Rowe, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores were used to assess the results. Only 3 of 89 patients had a post-traumatic redislocation. The mean length of follow-up was 31.5 months (range, 25-60 months). The VAS, Rowe, and ASES scores showed significant improvements: The VAS score decreased from a mean of 3.1 to 0.5 (P = .0157), the Rowe score increased from 58.9 to 94.1 (P = .0215), and the ASES score increased from 68.5 to 95.5 (P = .0197). The mean deficit of external rotation was 6° with the arm at the side of the trunk, and the mean deficit was 3° with the arm in 90° of abduction. The described procedure is a reproducible and effective technique used to restore joint stability in patients engaged in sports who have incurred anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation associated with glenoid bone loss (Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [The mini-open Latarjet procedure for treatment of recurrent anterior instability of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorzelski, J; Beitzel, K; Imhoff, A B; Braun, S

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder stabilization. Symptomatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability combined with glenoid bone loss of approximately 20-35 % of the glenoid surface, engaging Hill-Sachs lesion and/or previously failed arthroscopic Bankart repair. In patients with a high risk of redislocation (contact sports) or irreparable soft tissue injury the Latarjet procedure can be considered as a first-line treatment. Contraindicated if arthroscopic Bankart repair is possible. Irreparable damage of subscapularis tendon. Bony defect >35 % of the glenoid that cannot be filled with coracoid bone block. Arbitrary shoulder dislocation. Young patients with open growth plates (relative contraindication). Mini-open deltopectoral approach of approximately 6 cm. Preparation of the coracoid process and the conjoined tendons. Osteotomy of the coracoid process at its base using a 90° sawblade. Split of the subscapularis tendon. Preparation of the glenoid defect and implantation of 2-3 suture anchors where appropriate. Drilling of two parallel holes through the coracoid process. Fixation of the bone block with cannulated screws at the anterior glenoid rim and refixation of the joint capsula, if necessary with the help of the suture anchors. Wound drainage and closure in layers. Intermittent immobilization in a sling for 6 weeks with limited abduction, flexion and external rotation. Sport-specific training after 3 months, over-head sports after 6 months. Since 2009 64 mini-open Latarjet procedures (61 patients) performed. In all, 9.4 % of patients suffered from persistent instability (dislocations and subluxations); only 1 patient needed revision surgery due to instability.

  1. Inter-rater reliability of shoulder measurements in middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groef, A; Van Kampen, M; Vervloesem, N; Clabau, E; Christiaens, M-R; Neven, P; Geraerts, I; Struyf, F; Devoogdt, N

    2017-06-01

    To investigate inter-rater reliability of a set of shoulder measurements including inclinometry [shoulder range of motion (ROM)], acromion-table distance and pectoralis minor muscle length (static scapular positioning), upward rotation with two inclinometers (scapular kinematics) and pain pressure thresholds (muscle tenderness) in middle-aged women. Observational study. Thirty symptom-free middle-aged women (first cohort) were measured by two raters. All measurements with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) below 0.75 were retested after an additional training period in a second cohort of 30 symptom-free middle-aged women. Inter-rater reliability of all variables was measured with the ICC (95% confidence interval) and standard error of measurement (SEM). Acromion-table distance (ICC=0.91, SEM 0.22 to 0.28% of body length), pectoralis minor muscle length (ICC=0.91, SEM 0.16% of body length), pain pressure thresholds (ICC=0.78 to 0.85, SEM 0.39 to 0.70kg) and abduction ROM (ICC=0.77, SEM 5°) showed good to excellent inter-rater reliability in the first cohort. After an additional training period, forward flexion ROM showed good inter-rater reliability (ICC=0.83, SEM 5°), scapular upward rotation in resting position showed moderate reliability (ICC=0.52, SEM 2°), and other scaption angles showed weak reliability (ICC=0.26 to 0.43, SEM 3 to 8°). In a battery of clinical tools to evaluate factors contributing to shoulder pain, static scapular positioning and pressure pain thresholds were found to have good to excellent inter-rater reliability in middle-aged women. Additional training is recommended for measurements with a gravity inclinometer. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: the rate of manipulation following distension arthrogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, T; Rahbi, H; Beiri, A; Jeyapalan, K; Taylor, G J S

    2006-11-01

    To determine the rate of manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) following distension arthrogram for adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. Thirty-nine patients (42 shoulders) between 1998 and 2004 were treated with distension arthrogram for adhesive capsulitis diagnosed by the clinical picture of progressive pain and stiffness. Capsular disruption into the subscapular bursa was demonstrated in 40 of the 42 shoulders (95%). Thirty-seven of 42 (88%) shoulders were painfree following distension arthrogram. 15 of 42 (36%) shoulders underwent MUA following distension arthrogram for stiffness although 10 of these (67%) were painfree. Prior to distension arthrogram, the range of external rotation (ER) was no different between those that had MUA and those that did not (P = 0.36). The improvement in ER was 33% (P = 0.28) in those that had MUA and 50% (P = 0.001) in those that did not. The only complication was a vasovagal episode during the procedure. Distension arthrogram can be used as a therapeutic procedure for achieving symptomatic pain relief in the majority of adhesive capsulitis and decrease the rate of MUA of the shoulder.

  3. Observational study on the pavement performance effects of shoulder rumble strip on shoulders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Coffey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rumble strip implementation has shown a constant increase with its safety benefits. Rumble strips are milled into the roadway shoulder to produce noise and vibrations when driven on. With the milling process, the pavement performance is expected to be negatively impacted by the decreased depth, though not mathematically quantified. Using methods defined by the Long-Term Pavement Performance Program, the severity of the shoulder site’s distresses, with and without shoulder rumble strips, will be quantified. The quantification would permit the design to compensate for the impact. This design compensation allows the implementation of hard shoulder running, the use of shoulder as a travel lane during congestion, and retains the shoulder rumble strip safety instead of removing, as suggested by some proposed projects. While hard shoulder running would not impact specific time periods, the safety benefit of rumble strips could be needed at any time. This study aims to quantify the rumble strip impact to enable the full shoulder strength for hard shoulder running while retaining the safety benefits of rumble strips. Keywords: Rumble strips, Shoulder, Cracking, Pavement performance, Hard shoulder running

  4. Low-Cost Alternative External Rotation Shoulder Brace and Review of Treatment in Acute Shoulder Dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacy, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic dislocations of the shoulder commonly present to emergency departments (EDs. Immediate closed reduction of both anterior and posterior glenohumeral dislocations is recommended and is frequently performed in the ED. Recurrence of dislocation is common, as anteroinferior labral tears (Bankart lesions are present in many anterior shoulder dislocations.14,15,18,23 Immobilization of the shoulder following closed reduction is therefore recommended; previous studies support the use of immobilization with the shoulder in a position of external rotation, for both anterior and posterior shoulder dislocations.7-11,19 In this study, we present a technique for assembling a low-cost external rotation shoulder brace using materials found in most hospitals: cotton roll, stockinette, and shoulder immobilizers. This brace is particularly suited for the uninsured patient, who lacks the financial resources to pay for a pre-fabricated brace out of pocket. We also performed a cost analysis for our low-cost external rotation shoulder brace, and a cost comparison with pre-fabricated brand name braces. At our institution, the total materials cost for our brace was $19.15. The cost of a pre-fabricated shoulder brace at our institution is $150 with markup, which is reimbursed on average at $50.40 according to our hospital billing data. The low-cost external rotation shoulder brace is therefore a more affordable option for the uninsured patient presenting with acute shoulder dislocation. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:114–120.

  5. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-01-01

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication. PMID:27672564

  6. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the canine shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, C D; Nyland, T G

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the normal ultrasonographic anatomy of the canine shoulder. Fourteen shoulders from 7 clinically normal mid-sized dogs were radiographed and imaged using high frequency ultrasound. Each shoulder was isolated postmortem, and the ultrasonographic and gross anatomy was studied during dissection. The ultrasonographic appearance of the shoulder specimens was similar to that found in the live dogs. Twenty-four shoulders isolated postmortem from 12 variably sized dogs were also used to characterize the normal ultrasound anatomy over a range of sizes. Important anatomic structures that could be consistently evaluated were the biceps tendon and bursa, the bicipital groove surface, the supraspinatous tendon, the infraspinatous tendon, the teres minor tendon, and the caudal aspect of the humeral head. Results of ultrasonographic examination of 4 dogs with shoulder lameness are described to illustrate some applications of canine shoulder ultrasonography in the evaluation of the canine shoulder. In these dogs, ultrasound was a valuable tool to evaluate effusion and synovial proliferation within the bicipital bursa, supraspinatous and biceps tendinitis, biceps tendon strain, and dystrophic calcification.

  7. Avoiding Shoulder Injury from Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durall, Chris J.; Manske, Robert C.; Davies, George J.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies shoulder exercises commonly performed in fitness centers that may contribute to or exacerbate glenohumeral joint (shoulder) injury, describing alternative exercises that may be substituted and a offering rationale for the variations. The article focuses on anterior and posterior glenohumeral instability, subacromial impingement (primary…

  8. [Prediction, prevention and management of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-05-20

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most tragic, fatal and unexpected obstetrical events, which is mostly unpredictable and unpreventable. This clinical picture is defined as a delivery that requires additional obstetric maneuvers to release the shoulders after gentle downward traction has failed. Shoulder dystocia occurs when the fetal shoulder impacts on the maternal symphysis or sacral promontory. The incidence of shoulder dystocia is 0.2-0.6%. High perinatal mortality and morbidity is associated with the condition, even when it is managed appropriately. Obstetricians should be aware of the existing risk factors, but should always be alert to the possibility of shoulder dystocia in all labors. Maternal morbidity is also increased, particularly postpartum hemorrhage, rupture of the uterus, injury of the bladder, urethra and the bowels and fourth-degree perineal tears. Complications of the newborn include asphyxia, perinatal mortality, fracture of the clavicula and the humerus. Brachial plexus injuries are one of the most important fetal complications of shoulder dystocia, complicating 4-16% of such deliveries. The purpose of this article is to review the current evidence regarding the possible prediction, prevention and management of shoulder dystocia.

  9. Eponymous terms in anterior shoulder stabilization surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somford, M. P.; van der Linde, J. A.; Wiegerinck, J. I.; Hoornenborg, D.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; van Deurzen, D. F. P.

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder dislocation and its treatment are probably as old as time. Surgical treatment has gained acceptance recently, especially in recurrent cases. Within roughly the last 100 years, numerous treatment strategies have been developed and questions elucidated regarding the entity of shoulder

  10. Diagnosing patients with longstanding shoulder joint pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Krogsgaard, M R; Lorenzen, T

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the interobserver agreement of commonly used clinical tests and diagnoses in patients with shoulder pain, and the accuracy of these tests and ultrasonographic findings in comparison with arthroscopic findings. METHODS: Eighty six patients with longstanding shoulder joint pain...

  11. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, van Dieën J, Janssen TW. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke. Objective: To investigate position sense and kinesthesia of the shoulders of stroke patients. Design: Case-control study. Setting: A rehabilitation center. Participants: A total of

  12. From war to classroom: PTSD and depression in formerly abducted youth in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina eWinkler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trained local screeners assessed the mental health status of male and female students in Northern Ugandan schools. The study aimed to disclose potential differences in mental health-related impairment in two groups, former child soldiers (n=354 and other war-affected youth (n=489, as well as to separate factors predicting mental suffering in learners. Methods: Participants were randomly selected. We used the Post-Traumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS to assess symptoms of PTSD and for potential depression the respective section of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (DHSCL with a locally validated cut-off. Results: Almost all respondents had been displaced at least once in their life. Thirty percent of girls and 50% of the boys in the study reported past abduction history. Trauma exposure was notably higher in the group of abductees. In former child soldiers a PTSD rate of 32% was remarkably higher than that for non-abductees (12%. Especially in girls rates of potential depression were double those in the group of former abductees (17% than in the group of non-abductees (8%. In all groups trauma exposure increased the risk of developing PTSD. A path-analytic model for developing PTSD and potential depression revealed both previous trauma exposure as well as duration of abduction to have significant influences on trauma-related mental suffering. Findings also suggest that in Northern Ugandan schools trauma spectrum disorders are common among war-affected learners. Conclusions: Therefore, it is suggested the school context should be used to provide mental health support structures within the education system for war-affected youth at likely risk of developing war-related mental distress.

  13. Influence of body mass index on the outcome of brachial plexus surgery: are there any differences between elbow and shoulder results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Martins, Roberto S; Di Masi, Gilda; Bonilla, Gonzalo; Siqueira, Mario G

    2014-12-01

    Body mass index (BMI) has recently been identified as a predictor of outcomes following reconstructive surgery of shoulder palsies. In this study, we sought to determine if the same holds true for the reconstruction of elbow flexion. Forty patients who had undergone partial ulnar-to-biceps nerve transfer (Oberlin's procedure) for shoulder palsy were assessed and compared against 18 previously reported patients who had undergone reconstruction for elbow palsies. The British Medical Research Council (BMRC) scale and an index dividing shoulder abduction strength in the affected arm by healthy arm were recorded. All patients had undergone surgery within 12 months of injury and had ≥ 12 months of follow-up. M4 or M3 biceps strength was obtained in 90 % of patients. Final strength on the affected side averaged 5.8 kg, versus 20.2 kg on the normal side, for a mean recovery index score of 0.30. In this sample of 40 patients, BMI did not predict percentage strength or BMRC grade recovery. Neither did age, number of roots involved, the affected side, nor time to surgery. Comparing patients with elbow versus shoulder reconstruction, there were no differences, except that patients undergoing Oberlin's procedure had a statistically longer duration of time between injury and surgical repair (7.4 vs 5.1 months, p surgery.

  14. ICD-11 Trauma Questionnaires for PTSD and Complex PTSD: Validation among Civilians and Former Abducted Children in Northern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokkedahl, Sarah Bøgelund; Oboke, Henry; Elklit, Ask

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: ICD-11 is expected to introduce a new diagnosis of C-PTSD, along with a revision of the current PTSD diagnosis. Are the suggested diagnostic tools for PTSD and C-PTSD valid in a developing country? Method: The tools have been tested on former abducted and regular civilians in northern...

  15. Using Abductive Research Logic: "The Logic of Discovery", to Construct a Rigorous Explanation of Amorphous Evaluation Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin-Rozalis, Miri

    2010-01-01

    Background: Two kinds of research logic prevail in scientific research: deductive research logic and inductive research logic. However, both fail in the field of evaluation, especially evaluation conducted in unfamiliar environments. Purpose: In this article I wish to suggest the application of a research logic--"abduction"--"the logic of…

  16. Heroines of gendercide: The religious sensemaking of rape and abduction in Aramean, Assyrian and Chaldean migrant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutlu-Numansen, Sofia; Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to understand a diaspora community narrative of rape and abduction suffered during the genocidal massacre of 1915 in the Ottoman Empire and its aftermath. Based on interviews with 50 Aramean, Assyrian and Chaldean migrants in Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands, whose families are

  17. [Turning the head, an unusual mechanism to compensate for diplopia caused by abduction restriction of one eye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappelle, A.C.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Pasman, J.W.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    A 59-year-old-man visited the neurological outpatient clinic because of a leftward rotation of his head for the last 8 months. This head deviation turned out to represent a compensatory mechanism to alleviate diplopia that resulted from an abduction restriction of his left eye. By turning his head

  18. Shoulder Ultrasonography: Performance and Common Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gaitini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US of the shoulder is the most commonly requested examination in musculoskeletal US diagnosis. Sports injuries and degenerative and inflammatory processes are the main sources of shoulder pain and functional limitations. Because of its availability, low cost, dynamic examination process, absence of radiation exposure, and ease of patient compliance, US is the preferred mode for shoulder imaging over other, more sophisticated, and expensive methods. Operator dependence is the main disadvantage of US examinations. Use of high range equipment with high resolution transducers, adhering to a strict examination protocol, good knowledge of normal anatomy and pathological processes and an awareness of common pitfalls are essential for the optimal performance and interpretation of shoulder US. This article addresses examination techniques, the normal sonographic appearance of tendons, bursae and joints, and the main pathological conditions found in shoulder ultrasonography.

  19. Physiotherapy in frozen shoulder syndrome - literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Korabiusz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The frozen shoulder syndrome is seen as civilization illness. A significant amount of people suffer from it. The frozen shoulder syndrome is one of the most frequent dysfunctions of pectoral girdle. It is seen as a second frequent reason for visits at General Practicioner. There are three stages of this illness, there are a lot of symptoms, but one that occurs most commonly is pain. This illness can be completely curable. Research goal: Goal of this dissertation is a review of literature about available physiotherapy methods used in frozen shoulder syndrome. Conclusion: Kinesiotherapy, kinesiotaping, criotherapy, LASER, Traebert’s currents, iontophoresis, magnetic fields, ultrasounds, massage, manual therapy and combined therapy   are effective physiotherapy methods used in treating frozen shoulder syndrome. Those methods reduce pain indispositions and increase range of movement in shoulder joint.

  20. Contribution of Lateral Column Lengthening to Correction of Forefoot Abduction in Stage IIb Adult Acquired Flatfoot Deformity Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jeremy Y; Greenfield, Stephen T; Soukup, Dylan S; Do, Huong T; Deland, Jonathan T; Ellis, Scott J

    2015-12-01

    Correction of forefoot abduction in stage IIb adult acquired flatfoot likely depends on the amount of lateral column lengthening (LCL) performed, although this represents only one aspect of a successful reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between common reconstructive variables and the observed change in forefoot abduction. Forty-one patients who underwent flatfoot reconstruction involving an Evans-type LCL were assessed retrospectively. Preoperative and postoperative anteroposterior (AP) radiographs of the foot at a minimum of 40 weeks (mean, 2 years) after surgery were reviewed to determine correction in forefoot abduction as measured by talonavicular coverage (TNC) angle, talonavicular uncoverage percent, talus-first metatarsal (T-1MT) angle, and lateral incongruency angle. Fourteen demographic and intraoperative variables were evaluated for association with change in forefoot abduction including age, gender, height, weight, body mass index, as well as the amount of LCL and medializing calcaneal osteotomy performed, LCL graft type, Cotton osteotomy, first tarsometatarsal fusion, flexor digitorum longus transfer, spring ligament repair, gastrocnemius recession and any one of the modified McBride/Akin/Silver procedures. Two variables significantly affected the change in lateral incongruency angle. These were weight (P = .04) and the amount of LCL performed (P < .001). No variables were associated with the change in TNC angle, talonavicular uncoverage percent, or T-1MT angle. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that LCL was the only significant predictor of the change in lateral incongruency angle. The final regression model for LCL showed a good fit (R2 = 0.70, P < .001). Each millimeter of LCL corresponded to a 6.8-degree change in lateral incongruency angle. Correction of forefoot abduction in flatfoot reconstruction was primarily determined by the LCL procedure and could be modeled linearly. We believe that the

  1. AN ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF THE SHOULDER COMPLEX MUSCULATURE WHILE PERFORMING EXERCISES USING THE BODYBLADE® CLASSIC AND BODYBLADE® PRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Yamashiro, Kyle; Dunning, Russell; Mikla, Tony; Grover, Matthew; Kenniston, Mike; Loera, Jesse; Tanasse, Travis; Andrews, James R

    2016-04-01

    In spite of the bodyblade (BB®) being used in clinical settings during shoulder and trunk rehabilitation and training for 24 years, there are only five known scientific papers that have described muscle recruitment patterns using the BB®. Moreover, there are no known studies that have examined muscle activity differences between males and females (who both use the bodyblade in the clinic) or between different BB® devices. The primary purposes of this investigation were to compare glenohumeral and scapular muscle activity between the Bodyblade® Pro (BB®P) and Bodyblade® Classic (BB®C) devices while performing a variety of exercises, as well as to compare muscle activity between males and females. It was hypothesized that glenohumeral and scapular muscle activity would be significantly greater in females compared to males, significantly greater while performing exercises with the BB®P compared to the BB®C, significantly different among various BB® exercises, and greater with two hand use compared to one hand use for the same exercise. Controlled laboratory study using a repeated-measures, counterbalanced design. Twenty young adults, 10 males and 10 females, performed seven BB® exercises using the BB®C and BB®P, which are: 1) BB®1 - one hand, up and down motion, arm at side; 2) BB®2 - one hand, front to back motion, shoulder flexed 90 °; 3) BB®3 - one hand, up and down motion, shoulder abducted 90 °; 4) BB®4 - one hand, side to side motion, shoulder and elbow flexed 45 °; 5) BB®5 - two hands, side to side motion, shoulders and elbows flexed 45 °; 6) BB®6 - two hands, up and down motion, shoulders flexed 90 °; and 7) BB®7 - two hands, front to back motion, shoulders flexed 90 °. EMG data were collected from anterior and posterior deltoids, sternal pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, infraspinatus, upper and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior during 10 sec of continuous motion for each exercise, and then normalized using maximum

  2. Effect of baseplate size on primary glenoid stability and impingement-free range of motion in reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Soo-Won; Kim, Soung-Yon; Lee, Haea; Yon, Joung-Ro; Lee, Juneyoung; Han, Seung-Ho

    2014-12-09

    Use of a baseplate with a smaller diameter in reverse shoulder arthroplasty is increasing, especially in patients with a small glenoid or glenoid wear. However, the effect of a smaller baseplate on stability of the glenoid component has not been evaluated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a smaller baseplate (25 mm) is beneficial to the initial stability of the glenoid component compared to that with a baseplate of a commonly used size (29 mm). Micromotion of glenoid components attached to 14 scapulae of fresh-frozen cadavers was measured and compared between 25- and 29-mm baseplates in biomechanical testing. Impingement-free range of motion in abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation was evaluated by using a simulated computer model constructed based on the same fresh-frozen cadavers used in biomechanical testing. Micromotion at the inferior third of the glenoid-glenosphere interface was higher in the 29-mm baseplate group than in the 25-mm baseplate group during both 0.7- and 1-body weight cyclic loading in biomechanical testing. Adduction deficit was smaller, and total impingement-free range of motion from abduction to adduction and rotation were greater in the 25-mm baseplate group than in the 29-mm baseplate group in the simulated computer model. Use of a baseplate with a smaller diameter (25 mm) in reverse shoulder arthroplasty is suitable for improving the primary stability of the glenoid component. With a smaller baseplate, impingement-free range of motion is optimized in a smaller glenoid.

  3. An entropy-assisted musculoskeletal shoulder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W

    2017-04-01

    Optimization combined with a musculoskeletal shoulder model has been used to estimate mechanical loading of musculoskeletal elements around the shoulder. Traditionally, the objective function is to minimize the summation of the total activities of the muscles with forces, moments, and stability constraints. Such an objective function, however, tends to neglect the antagonist muscle co-contraction. In this study, an objective function including an entropy term is proposed to address muscle co-contractions. A musculoskeletal shoulder model is developed to apply the proposed objective function. To find the optimal weight for the entropy term, an experiment was conducted. In the experiment, participants generated various 3-D shoulder moments in six shoulder postures. The surface EMG of 8 shoulder muscles was measured and compared with the predicted muscle activities based on the proposed objective function using Bhattacharyya distance and concordance ratio under different weight of the entropy term. The results show that a small weight of the entropy term can improve the predictability of the model in terms of muscle activities. Such a result suggests that the concept of entropy could be helpful for further understanding the mechanism of muscle co-contractions as well as developing a shoulder biomechanical model with greater validity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, E.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive imaging tool that can complement the physical examination in the evaluation of traumatic and non-traumatic injuries of the shoulder. The superb soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capabilities of MRI make it a preferred modality to provide a global assessment of the soft tissue and osseous structures of the shoulder. Learning objectives: to review briefly the anatomy of the shoulder and the specificity of sequences and planes for MRI; to demonstrate the characteristic MR findings of some of the most common shoulder disorders; to indicate how MR arthrography (MRA) of the shoulder can add extra value to the diagnostic process; to outline a systematic approach to the interpretation of the shoulder MR examination. Choosing the most suitable sequences and planes as well as the thorough knowledge of the anatomic structures assist the correct diagnosis of the pathologic disorders of the shoulder which is of great importance for the precise treatment management, surgical versus conservative, as well as for the appropriate surgical approach, open versus arthroscopic

  5. [Shoulder disability questionnaires: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, F; Mace, Y; Lefevre-Colau, M M

    2005-07-01

    To identify all available shoulder disability questionnaires designed to measure physical functioning and to examine those with satisfactory clinimetric quality. We used the Medline database and the "Guide des outils de mesure de l'évaluation en médecine physique et de réadaptation" textbook to search for questionnaires. Analysis took into account the development methodology, clinimetric quality of the instruments and frequency of their utilization. We classified the instruments according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Thirty-eight instruments have been developed to measure disease-, shoulder- or upper extremity-specific outcome. Four scales assess upper-extremity disability and 3 others shoulder disability. We found 6 scales evaluating disability and shoulder pain, 7 scales measuring the quality of life in patients with various conditions of the shoulder, 14 scales combining objective and subjective measures, 2 pain scales and 2 unclassified scales. Older instruments developed before the advent of modern measurement development methodology usually combine objective and subjective measures. Recent instruments were designed with appropriate methodology. Most are self-administered questionnaires. Numerous shoulder outcome measure instruments are available. There is no "gold standard" for assessing shoulder function outcome in the general population.

  6. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bureau, N.J.; Dussault, R.G.; Keats, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs

  7. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau, N.J. [Department of Radiology, Hotel-Dieu de Montreal Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dussault, R.G. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Keats, T.E. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs.

  8. CT diagnosis with shoulder joint injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, B.; Hoerl, M.; Schindler, G.

    1986-01-01

    With recidivistic shoulder luxation the CT examination makes possible the objective comprehension of predisposable anatomical evidence as well as the proof of posttraumatic changes. Changes in the acetabular margin (Bankart lesion) as well as in the humerus head (Hills-Sachs lesion) are depicted with recidivistic shoulder luxation as the morphological substrate of the posttraumatic damage. Individual examinations of 83 patients with recidivistic shoulder luxations showed that the mentioned changes often appear in combinations. With the CT examination the Hills-Sachs lesion can be comprehended and its location, extension and depth can be judged as well. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Navigating the Alphabet Soup of Labroligamentous Pathology of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Darren; Grubin, Jeremy

    2016-02-01

    Because of the widespread use of eponyms and acronyms to describe labroligamentous findings in the shoulder, interpreting shoulder magnetic resonance imaging reports can be challenging. A summary of the appearance of these lesions on shoulder magnetic resonance images can help the orthopedic surgeon to understand these entities as imaging findings and to determine the appropriate treatment for patients with shoulder injuries.

  10. Magnetic resonance appearance of posterosuperior labral peel back during humeral abduction and external rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrero, Camilo G.; Casagranda, Bethany U.; Towers, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bradley, James P. [Department of Orthopedics, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2010-01-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance appearance of posterosuperior labral peel back and determine the reliability of MR in the abducted and externally rotated (ABER) position for the prospective diagnosis of arthroscopically proven cases of posterosuperior labral peel back. After approval by the institutional review board (IRB) of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, USA, databases of patients who underwent arthroscopy over a 2-year period for one of three clinical diagnoses [suspected type 2 superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears, posterior instability, or multidirectional instability] were reviewed after anonymization by an honest broker. Sixty-three cases were selected by the following inclusion criteria: operative report documenting labral peel back in the ABER position, age <40 years, and preceding MR arthrogram evaluations with images in the ABER position (n = 34). Inclusion criteria for the control group differed from those for the case group insofar as the operative note documented the absence of posterosuperior labral peel back (n = 29). Cases and controls were randomized in one list and evaluated independently by two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists unaware of the surgical results and using a three-point grading system (0 = posterosuperior labrum normally positioned lateral/craniad to glenoid articular plane in ABER; 1 = posterosuperior labral tissue flush with the glenoid articular plane in ABER; 2 = posterosuperior labral tissue identified medial/caudal to glenoid articular plane in ABER). Only one image in ABER showing abnormal posterosuperior labral position was required for a grade of 1 or 2 to be assigned. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value were calculated as well as the level of agreement between readers (kappa). Both readers assigned a grade of 2 to 25 of 34 patients with surgically proven labral peel back. Of the patients with surgically proven SLAP tears with peel back in ABER

  11. Magnetic resonance appearance of posterosuperior labral peel back during humeral abduction and external rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, Camilo G; Casagranda, Bethany U; Towers, Jeffrey D; Bradley, James P

    2010-01-01

    To describe the magnetic resonance appearance of posterosuperior labral peel back and determine the reliability of MR in the abducted and externally rotated (ABER) position for the prospective diagnosis of arthroscopically proven cases of posterosuperior labral peel back. After approval by the institutional review board (IRB) of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, USA, databases of patients who underwent arthroscopy over a 2-year period for one of three clinical diagnoses [suspected type 2 superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears, posterior instability, or multidirectional instability] were reviewed after anonymization by an honest broker. Sixty-three cases were selected by the following inclusion criteria: operative report documenting labral peel back in the ABER position, age position (n=34). Inclusion criteria for the control group differed from those for the case group insofar as the operative note documented the absence of posterosuperior labral peel back (n=29). Cases and controls were randomized in one list and evaluated independently by two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists unaware of the surgical results and using a three-point grading system (0 = posterosuperior labrum normally positioned lateral/craniad to glenoid articular plane in ABER; 1 = posterosuperior labral tissue flush with the glenoid articular plane in ABER; 2 = posterosuperior labral tissue identified medial/caudal to glenoid articular plane in ABER). Only one image in ABER showing abnormal posterosuperior labral position was required for a grade of 1 or 2 to be assigned. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value were calculated as well as the level of agreement between readers (kappa). Both readers assigned a grade of 2 to 25 of 34 patients with surgically proven labral peel back. Of the patients with surgically proven SLAP tears with peel back in ABER, reader A assigned a grade of 1 to seven patients and a grade of 0 to two

  12. Magnetic resonance appearance of posterosuperior labral peel back during humeral abduction and external rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrero, Camilo G.; Casagranda, Bethany U.; Towers, Jeffrey D.; Bradley, James P.

    2010-01-01

    To describe the magnetic resonance appearance of posterosuperior labral peel back and determine the reliability of MR in the abducted and externally rotated (ABER) position for the prospective diagnosis of arthroscopically proven cases of posterosuperior labral peel back. After approval by the institutional review board (IRB) of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, USA, databases of patients who underwent arthroscopy over a 2-year period for one of three clinical diagnoses [suspected type 2 superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears, posterior instability, or multidirectional instability] were reviewed after anonymization by an honest broker. Sixty-three cases were selected by the following inclusion criteria: operative report documenting labral peel back in the ABER position, age <40 years, and preceding MR arthrogram evaluations with images in the ABER position (n = 34). Inclusion criteria for the control group differed from those for the case group insofar as the operative note documented the absence of posterosuperior labral peel back (n = 29). Cases and controls were randomized in one list and evaluated independently by two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists unaware of the surgical results and using a three-point grading system (0 = posterosuperior labrum normally positioned lateral/craniad to glenoid articular plane in ABER; 1 = posterosuperior labral tissue flush with the glenoid articular plane in ABER; 2 = posterosuperior labral tissue identified medial/caudal to glenoid articular plane in ABER). Only one image in ABER showing abnormal posterosuperior labral position was required for a grade of 1 or 2 to be assigned. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value were calculated as well as the level of agreement between readers (kappa). Both readers assigned a grade of 2 to 25 of 34 patients with surgically proven labral peel back. Of the patients with surgically proven SLAP tears with peel back in ABER

  13. Kinematic analysis of dynamic shoulder motion in patients with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young W; Pinto, Vivek J; Yoon, Jangwhon; Frankle, Mark A; Dunning, Page E; Sheikhzadeh, Ali

    2012-09-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (rTSA) has been used to treat patients with irreparable rotator cuff dysfunction. Despite the proven clinical efficacy, there is minimal information regarding the underlying changes to the shoulder kinematics associated with this construct. Therefore, we sought to examine the kinematics of dynamic shoulder motion in patients with well-functioning rTSA. We tested 12 healthy subjects and 17 patients with rTSA. All rTSA patients were able to elevate their arms to at least 90° and received the implant as the primary arthroplasty at least 6 months before testing. On average, the rTSA patients elevated their arms to 112° ± 12° (mean ± SD) and reported an American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons outcome score of 90.6 ± 6.3. A 3-dimensional electromagnetic motion capture device was used to detect the dynamic motion of the trunk, scapula, and humerus during bilateral active shoulder elevation along the sagittal, scapular, and coronal planes. In both healthy and rTSA shoulders, the majority of the humeral-thoracic motion was provided by the glenohumeral motion. Therefore, the ratio of glenohumeral to scapulothoracic (ST) motion was always greater than 1.62 during elevation along the scapular plane. In comparison to healthy subjects, however, the contribution of ST motion to overall shoulder motion was significantly increased in the rTSA shoulders. This increased contribution was noted in all planes of shoulder elevation and was maintained when weights were attached to the arm. Kinematics of the rTSA shoulders are significantly altered, and more ST motion is used to achieve shoulder elevation. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Outcomes of an anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty with a contralateral reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Ryan M; Padegimas, Eric M; Abboud, Joseph A; Getz, Charles L; Lazarus, Mark D; Ramsey, Matthew L; Williams, Gerald R; Horneff, John G

    2018-06-01

    It is common for patients to require staged bilateral shoulder arthroplasties. There is a unique cohort of patients who require an anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and a contralateral reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). This study compared the outcomes of patients with a TSA in 1 shoulder and an RSA in the contralateral shoulder. Our institutional database was queried to identify all patients with a TSA and a contralateral RSA. Data collection included patient demographics, preoperative and latest follow-up shoulder range of motion, radiographic analysis, and postoperative complications. Identified patients were assessed at follow-up visits or contacted by phone for functional outcome scores. Nineteen patients met our inclusion/exclusion criteria. There was statistically significant greater internal rotation in the TSA shoulder (P= .044) but no significant difference in forward elevation (P = .573) or external rotation (P= .368). There was no radiographic evidence of humeral or glenoid component loosening of any arthroplasty implants. There were no significant differences between TSA and RSA shoulders for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment (P= .381), Simple Shoulder Test (P = .352), Single Assessment Numerical Evaluation (P = .709), and visual analog scale satisfaction (P= .448) or pain scores (P= .305). Thirteen patients (68.4%) preferred the RSA side, 1 patient (5.3%; z = 4.04, P < .001) patient preferred the TSA side, and 5 patients expressed no preference. Despite known limitations and differences between TSA and RSA designs, patients who have received both implants are highly satisfied with both. The only parameter in which the TSA had superior outcomes was internal rotation. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of mastectomy and radiotherapy for breast carcinoma on soft tissues of the shoulder and join mobility among Egyptian patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saied, G.M.; Kamel, R.M.; Dessouki, N.R.

    2007-01-01

    Patients with pos mastectomy soft tissue shoulder disorders usually benefit from various lines of physiotherapy treatment. However, the controversy about their efficacy persists. The aim of this work was to study and asses the efficacy of each, and to identify the best intervention. One hundred female patients with ipsilateral post mastectomy shoulder problems were enrolled in the stud, from September 2003 until December 2004. They were followed up for 32 weeks. Mastectomy, both radical and conservative and axillary lymph node clearance, was the standard surgery applied for operable breast carcinoma in this series. Clinical examination was followed by testing for the shoulder complaint by measuring maximal protrusion at the inferior scapular angle, scapular stabilization and the lift-off tests. Approved physiotherapy modalities were then applied, viz: no treatment (randomly chosen 12 patients), passive and active motion therapy (14 patients], oral diclofenac sodium (19 patients), local triamcinilone injection (40 patients] and manually applied low intensity laser therapy (15 patients). Assessment was by determining overall success rate for each intervention modality. Intervention outcome was assessed at 8, 16 and 32 weeks as shown by physical examination using the healthy shoulder as a reference, and by measuring restricted mobility during passive lateral rotation and glenohumeral abduction. Success rate was determined separately for each group at the end of the intervention period. The applied surgery was followed by radiotherapy in 90%, chemotherapy in 24% and both in 11%. The presenting post mastectomy symptoms at the shoulder were pain (100% shoulder weakness (88%), winging of the scapula (11%) and inability to perform everyday shoulder movements (23%). Evaluation was by overall improvement score. The results were: 14% for untreated patients, 43.3% for those treated by motion therapy 42% for diclofenac therapy, 80.7% for local triamcinolone, and lastly 68% for

  16. Visuomotor correction is a robust contributor to force variability during index finger abduction by older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L Tracy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined aging-related differences in the contribution of visuomotor correction to force fluctuations during index finger abduction via the analysis of two datasets from similar subjects. Study 1 Young (N= 27, 23+/-8 yrs and older adults (N=14, 72+/- 9 yrs underwent assessment of maximum voluntary contraction force (MVC and force steadiness during constant-force (CF index finger abduction (2.5, 30, 65% MVC. For each trial, visual feedback of the force (VIS was provided for 8-10 s and removed for 8-10s (NOVIS. Visual gain of the force feedback at 2.5% MVC was high; 12- and 26-fold greater than the 30% and 65% MVC targets. Mean force, standard deviation (SD of force, and coefficient of variation (CV of force was calculated for detrended (<0.5Hz drift removed VIS and NOVIS data segments. Study 2 A similar group of 14 older adults performed discrete, randomly-ordered VIS or NOVIS trials at low target forces (1-3% MVC and high visual gain. Study 1 For young adults the CV of force was similar between VIS and NOVIS for the 2.5% (4.8 vs. 4.3%, 30% (3.2 vs. 3.2% and 65% (3.5 vs. 4.2% target forces. In contrast, for older adults the CV of force was greater for VIS than NOVIS for 2.5% MVC (6.6 vs. 4.2%, P<0.001, but not for the 30% (2.4 vs. 2.4% and 65% (3.1 vs. 3.3% target forces. At 2.5% MVC, the increase in CV of force for VIS compared with NOVIS was significantly greater (age x visual condition P=0.008 for older than young adults. Study 2 Similarly, for older adults performing discrete, randomly ordered trials the CV of force was greater for VIS than NOVIS (6.04 vs. 3.81%, P=0.01. When visual force feedback was a dominant source of information at low forces, normalized force variability was ~58% greater for older adults, but only 11% greater for young adults. The significant effect of visual feedback for older adults was not dependent on the order of presentation of visual conditions. The results indicate that impaired processing of visuomotor

  17. Proton Density Fat-Fraction of Rotator Cuff Muscles Is Associated With Isometric Strength 10 Years After Rotator Cuff Repair: A Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampinos, Dimitrios C; Holwein, Christian; Buchmann, Stefan; Baum, Thomas; Ruschke, Stefan; Gersing, Alexandra S; Sutter, Reto; Imhoff, Andreas B; Rummeny, Ernst J; Jungmann, Pia M

    2017-07-01

    Quantitative muscle fat-fraction magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques correlate with semiquantitative Goutallier scores with failure after rotator cuff (RC) repair. To investigate the relationship of proton density fat fraction (PDFF) of the RC muscles with semiquantitative MR scores, cartilage T2 relaxation times, and clinical isometric strength measurements in patients 10 years after unilateral RC repair. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Bilateral shoulder MR imaging was performed in 13 patients (11 male, 2 female; age, 72 ± 8 years) 10.9 ± 0.4 years after unilateral autologous periosteal flap augmented RC repair (total shoulders assessed, N = 26). Goutallier classification, muscle atrophy, RC tendon integrity, and cartilage defects were determined based on morphological MR sequences. A paracoronal 2D multi-slice multi-echo sequence was used for quantitative cartilage T2 mapping. A chemical shift-encoding-based water-fat separation technique (based on a 6-echo 3D spoiled gradient echo sequence) was used for quantification of the PDFF of RC muscles. Isometric shoulder abduction strength was measured clinically. Mean and SD, Pearson correlation, and partial Spearman correlation were calculated. There were 6 RC full-thickness retears in ipsilateral shoulders and 6 RC full-thickness tears in contralateral shoulders. Isometric shoulder abduction strength was not significantly different between ipsilateral and contralateral shoulders (50 ± 24 N vs 54 ± 24 N; P = .159). The mean PDFF of RC muscles was 11.7% ± 10.4% (ipsilateral, 14.2% ± 8.5%; contralateral, 9.2% ± 7.8%; P = .002). High supraspinatus PDFF correlated significantly with higher Goutallier scores ( R = 0.75, P isometric muscle strength ( R = -0.49, P = .011). This correlation remained significant after adjustment for muscle area measurements and tendon rupture ( R = -0.41, P = .048). More severe cartilage defects at the humerus were significantly associated with higher supraspinatus

  18. MRI findings in the painful hemiplegic shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavora, D.G.F.; Gama, R.L.; Bomfim, R.C.; Nakayama, M.; Silva, C.E.P.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) in hemiplegic post-stroke patients. Materials and methods: Patients with hemiplegia following their first cerebrovascular accident who were admitted to the Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation were studied. Forty-five patients with pain in the hemiplegic shoulder and 23 post-stroke patients without shoulder pain were investigated. MRI and radiographic findings of the hemiplegic and contralateral asymptomatic shoulders were evaluated. Results: Some MRI findings were more frequent in PHS group, including synovial capsule thickening, synovial capsule enhancement, and enhancement in the rotator cuff interval. Conclusions: Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of PHS.

  19. MRI findings in the painful hemiplegic shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavora, D.G.F., E-mail: danielgurgel@sarah.b [Department of Radiology, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil); Gama, R.L.; Bomfim, R.C. [Department of Radiology, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil); Nakayama, M. [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Grande Dourados, Dourados (Brazil); Silva, C.E.P. [Department of Statistics, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    Aim: To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) in hemiplegic post-stroke patients. Materials and methods: Patients with hemiplegia following their first cerebrovascular accident who were admitted to the Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation were studied. Forty-five patients with pain in the hemiplegic shoulder and 23 post-stroke patients without shoulder pain were investigated. MRI and radiographic findings of the hemiplegic and contralateral asymptomatic shoulders were evaluated. Results: Some MRI findings were more frequent in PHS group, including synovial capsule thickening, synovial capsule enhancement, and enhancement in the rotator cuff interval. Conclusions: Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of PHS.

  20. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtman, E.A.

    1983-09-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole.

  1. [Neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, E; de Courtivron, B; Saliba, E

    2015-12-01

    To describe neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia. This systematic evidence review is based on PubMed search, Cochrane library and experts' recommendations. The risks of brachial plexus birth injury, clavicle and humeral fracture, perinatal asphyxia, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and perinatal mortality are increased after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to provide neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room in case of perinatal asphyxia following shoulder dystocia, according to national and international guidelines. The initial clinical examination should search for complications such as brachial plexus birth injury or clavicle fracture. The risk of perinatal complications is increased in newborn after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to manage these complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtman, E.A.; Veterans Administration Medical Center, New York

    1983-01-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole. (orig.)

  3. Pseudotumors of the shoulder invited review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Suzanne E. [Department of Radiology, Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne, Grattan Street, Parkville 3050, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Diagnostic, Pediatric, and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Bern, Inselspital, Freiburg Str. 10, 3005 Bern (Switzerland)], E-mail: andersonsembach@yahoo.com.au; Johnston, James O. [Department of Radiology, Bone Section, University of California, San Francisco (United States); Tumour Oncology, Orthopedic Surgery, Kaiser Health, Bay Area, San Francisco (United States); Steinbach, Lynne S. [Department of Radiology, Bone Section, University of California, San Francisco (United States)

    2008-10-15

    This paper discusses the main types of MRI pseudotumors in and around the shoulder region. Some unusual types of pseudotumor will also be mentioned. Suggestions on how to improve awareness and diagnosis are also given.

  4. Subacromial shoulder disorders among baggage handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the influence of cumulative employment as baggage handler on the risk of incident subacromial shoulder disorders. Baggage handling is characterized by repetitive work primarily consisting of heavy lifting in awkward positions and time pressure. METHODS: This cohort study is based...... increased incidence of subacromial shoulder disorders for workers with longer cumulative years of employment. These results support that long-term lifting in awkward positions and time pressure influences the risk of subacromial shoulder disorders....... System. The primary exposure was cumulative years of employment as a baggage handler, and the primary outcome was diagnoses and surgical treatment of subacromial shoulder disorders. RESULTS: The cohort contained 3396 baggage handlers and 63,909 workers in the reference group. Baggage handlers with longer...

  5. High Fidelity In Situ Shoulder Dystocia Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Pelikan, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: Resident physicians, emergency department (ED staff Introduction: Precipitous deliveries are high acuity, low occurrence in most emergency departments. Shoulder dystocia is a rare but potentially fatal complication of labor that can be relieved by specific maneuvers that must be implemented in a timely manner. This simulation is designed to educate resident learners on the critical management steps in a shoulder dystocia presenting to the emergency department. A special aspect of this simulation is the unique utilization of the “Noelle” model with an instructing physician at bedside maneuvering the fetus through the stations of labor and providing subtle adjustments to fetal positioning not possible though a mechanized model. A literature search of “shoulder dystocia simulation” consists primarily of obstetrics and mid-wife journals, many of which utilize various mannequin models. None of the reviewed articles utilized a bedside provider maneuvering the fetus with the Noelle model, making this method unique. While the Noelle model is equipped with a remote-controlled motor that automatically rotates and delivers the baby either to the head or to the shoulders and can produce a turtle sign and which will prevent delivery of the baby until signaled to do so by the instructor, using the bedside instructor method allows this simulation to be reproduced with less mechanistically advanced and lower cost models.1-5 Objectives: At the end of this simulation, learners will: 1 Recognize impending delivery and mobilize appropriate resources (ie, both obstetrics [OB] and NICU/pediatrics; 2 Identify risk factors for shoulder dystocia based on history and physical; 3 Recognize shoulder dystocia during delivery; 4 Demonstrate maneuvers to relieve shoulder dystocia; 5 Communicate with team members and nursing staff during resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: High-fidelity simulation. Topics: High fidelity, in situ, Noelle model

  6. Little Leaguer's shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, J.L.; Hollingsworth, C.L.; Bisset, G.S. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Squire, D.L. [Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2004-06-01

    A case of Little Leaguer's shoulder in a skeletally immature patient is described with a review of the English literature. This entity manifests as widening of the proximal humeral physis and is well known to our orthopedic colleagues. To our knowledge, however, there is little in the current radiologic literature describing Little Leaguer's shoulder. We describe such a case. (orig.)

  7. Severe refractory hypertension during shoulder arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R O Abrons

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of epinephrine-containing saline irrigating solutions during arthroscopic shoulder surgery gained popularity after it was reported that the addition of epinephrine reduced bleeding and improved visualization without adverse cardiovascular effects. We share a case of a patient undergoing shoulder arthroscopy who received a standard intra-articular infusion of epinephrine-containing normal saline (1 mcg/mL and experienced severe hemodynamic consequences.

  8. Shoulder Injuries in Individuals Who Participate in CrossFit Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summitt, Ryan J; Cotton, Ryan A; Kays, Adam C; Slaven, Emily J

    CrossFit, a sport and fitness program, has become increasingly popular both nationally and internationally. Researchers have recently identified significant improvements in health and wellness due to CrossFit. However, some individuals assert that CrossFit poses an inherent risk of injury, specifically to the shoulder, due to the intensity of training. Currently, there is limited evidence to support this assertion. Exercises performed during CrossFit do not place the shoulder at greater risk for injury. Injury rates are comparable to other sports of similar intensity. Descriptive survey study. Level 5. An electronic survey was developed and dispersed to approximately 980 individuals who trained in CrossFit gyms. The survey identified demographic data, training characteristics, and the prevalence of injury over a 6-month period in individuals who participated in CrossFit training. A total of 187 (19.1%) individuals completed the survey. Forty-four (23.5%) indicated that they had experienced a shoulder injury during CrossFit training over the previous 6 months. Of those who reported injury, 17 (38.6%) stated that this injury was an exacerbation of a previous injury sustained prior to starting CrossFit. There was no significant relationship between several demographic and training variables and shoulder injury. All shoulder injuries occurred at a rate of 1.94 per 1000 hours training, while "new" shoulder injuries occurred at a rate of 1.18 per 1000 hours training. The most commonly attributed causes of injury were improper form (33.3%) and exacerbation of a previous injury (33.3%). Twenty-five (64.1%) of those who experienced injury reported 1 month or less of training reduction due to the injury. Shoulder injury rates during CrossFit training are comparable to other methods of recreational exercise. Clinicians should be aware of training demands of exercises in CrossFit and modifications for these exercises to safely progress their patients back to participation.

  9. Shoulder Strength Requirements for Upper Limb Functional Tasks: Do Age and Rotator Cuff Tear Status Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santago, Anthony C; Vidt, Meghan E; Li, Xiaotong; Tuohy, Christopher J; Poehling, Gary G; Freehill, Michael T; Saul, Katherine R

    2017-12-01

    Understanding upper limb strength requirements for daily tasks is imperative for early detection of strength loss that may progress to disability due to age or rotator cuff tear. We quantified shoulder strength requirements for 5 upper limb tasks performed by 3 groups: uninjured young adults and older adults, and older adults with a degenerative supraspinatus tear prior to repair. Musculoskeletal models were developed for each group representing age, sex, and tear-related strength losses. Percentage of available strength used was quantified for the subset of tasks requiring the largest amount of shoulder strength. Significant differences in strength requirements existed across tasks: upward reach 105° required the largest average strength; axilla wash required the largest peak strength. However, there were limited differences across participant groups. Older adults with and without a tear used a larger percentage of their shoulder elevation (p functional tasks to effectively detect early strength loss, which may lead to disability.

  10. SUSTAINED ISOMETRIC SHOULDER CONTRACTION ON MUSCULAR STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE: A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Natalie L; Toonstra, Jenny L; Smith, Jacob S; Padgett, Cooper A; Uhl, Tim L

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Throwers Ten Exercise Program incorporates sustained isometric contractions in conjunction with dynamic shoulder movements. It has been suggested that incorporating isometric holds may facilitate greater increases in muscular strength and endurance. However, no objective evidence currently exists to support this claim. The purpose of this research was to compare the effects of a sustained muscle contraction resistive training program (Advanced Throwers Ten Program) to a more traditional exercise training protocol to determine if increases in shoulder muscular strength and endurance occur in an otherwise healthy population. It was hypothesized that utilizing a sustained isometric hold during a shoulder scaption exercise from the Advanced Throwers Ten would produce greater increases in shoulder strength and endurance as compared to a traditional training program incorporating a isotonic scapular plane abduction (scaption) exercise. Randomized Clinical Trial. Fifty healthy participants were enrolled in this study, of which 25 were randomized into the traditional training group (age: 26 ± 8, height:172 ± 10 cm, weight: 73 ± 13 kg, Marx Activity Scale: 11 ± 4) and 25 were randomized to the Advanced Throwers Ten group (age: 28 ± 9, height: 169 ± 23 cm, weight: 74 ± 16 kg, Marx Activity Scale: 11 ± 5). No pre-intervention differences existed between the groups (P>0.05). Arm endurance and strength data were collected pre and post intervention using a portable load cell (BTE Evaluator, Hanover, MD). Both within and between group analyses were done in order to investigate average torque (strength) and angular impulse (endurance) changes. The traditional and Advanced Throwers Ten groups both significantly improved torque and angular impulse on both the dominant and non-dominant arms by 10-14%. There were no differences in strength or endurance following the interventions between the two training groups (p>0

  11. Shoulder External Rotation Fatigue and Scapular Muscle Activation and Kinematics in Overhead Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Mithun; Thigpen, Charles A.; Bunn, Kevin; Karas, Spero G.; Padua, Darin A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Glenohumeral external rotation (GH ER) muscle fatigue might contribute to shoulder injuries in overhead athletes. Few researchers have examined the effect of such fatigue on scapular kinematics and muscle activation during a functional movement pattern. Objective: To examine the effects of GH ER muscle fatigue on upper trapezius, lower trapezius, serratus anterior, and infraspinatus muscle activation and to examine scapular kinematics during a diagonal movement task in overhead athletes. Setting: Human performance research laboratory. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Patients or Other Participants: Our study included 25 overhead athletes (15 men, 10 women; age = 20 ± 2 years, height = 180 ± 11 cm, mass = 80 ± 11 kg) without a history of shoulder pain on the dominant side. Interventions: We tested the healthy, dominant shoulder through a diagonal movement task before and after a fatiguing exercise involving low-resistance, high-repetition, prone GH ER from 0° to 75° with the shoulder in 90° of abduction. Main Outcome Measure(s): Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activity for the upper trapezius, lower trapezius, serratus anterior, and infraspinatus. An electromyographic motion analysis system was used to assess 3-dimensional scapular kinematics. Repeated-measures analyses of variance (phase × condition) were used to test for differences. Results: We found a decrease in ascending-phase and descending-phase lower trapezius activity (F1,25 = 5.098, P = .03) and an increase in descending-phase infraspinatus activity (F1,25 = 5.534, P = .03) after the fatigue protocol. We also found an increase in scapular upward rotation (F1,24 = 3.7, P = .04) postfatigue. Conclusions: The GH ER muscle fatigue protocol used in this study caused decreased lower trapezius and increased infraspinatus activation concurrent with increased scapular upward rotation range of motion during the functional task. This highlights the interdependence of scapular

  12. Rugby and Shoulder Trauma: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, R; Tecame, A; Torre, G; Narbona, P; Maffulli, N; Denaro, V

    2015-01-01

    Rugby is a popular contact sport worldwide. Collisions and tackles during matches and practices often lead to traumatic injuries of the shoulder. This review reports on the epidemiology of injuries, type of lesions and treatment of shoulder injuries, risk factors, such as player position, and return to sport activities. Electronic searches through PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library retrieved studies concerning shoulder injuries in rugby players. Data regarding incidence, type and mechanisms of lesion, risk factors and return to sport were extracted and analyzed. The main reported data were incidence, mechanism of injury and type of lesion. Most of the studies report tackle as the main event responsible for shoulder trauma (between 50% and 85%), while the main lesions reported were Bankart lesions, Superior Labral tear from Anterior to Posterior (SLAP tears), anterior dislocation and rotator cuff tears. Open or arthroscopic repair improve clinical outcomes. Shoulder lesions are common injuries in rugby players. Surgical treatment seems to be effective in for rotator cuff tears and shoulder instability. More and better designed studies are needed for a higher Level of Evidence analysis of this topic.

  13. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation of shoulder problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternostro-Sluga, T.; Zoech, C.

    2004-01-01

    The shoulder joint has an important influence on arm- and handfunction. Therefore, activities of daily living, working and leisure time can be negatively influenced by diseases of the shoulder joint. Problems of the shoulder joint can be induced by muscular dysbalance and poor body posture. There is a strong relationship between shoulder function and body posture. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation of the shoulder joint aims at improving the local dysfunction of the shoulder joint as well as at improving function and social participation. Antiinflammatory and pain medication, exercise, occupational, electro-, ultrasound and shock wave therapy, massage, thermotherapy and pulsed electromagnetic fields are used as conservative treatments. Exercise therapy aims at improving muscular performance, joint mobility and body posture. Occupational therapy aims at improving functional movements for daily living and work. Electrotherapy is primarily used to relieve pain. Shock wave and ultrasound therapy proved to be an effective treatment for patients with calcific tendinitis. The subacromial impingement syndrome can be effectively treated by conservative therapy. (orig.) [de

  14. Development of an Arthroscopic Joint Capsule Injury Model in the Canine Shoulder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kovacevic

    Full Text Available The natural history of rotator cuff tears can be unfavorable as patients develop fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy that is often associated with a loss of muscle strength and shoulder function. To facilitate study of possible biologic mechanisms involved in early degenerative changes to rotator cuff muscle and tendon tissues, the objective of this study was to develop a joint capsule injury model in the canine shoulder using arthroscopy.Arthroscopic surgical methods for performing a posterior joint capsulectomy in the canine shoulder were first defined in cadavers. Subsequently, one canine subject underwent bilateral shoulder joint capsulectomy using arthroscopy, arthroscopic surveillance at 2, 4 and 8 weeks, and gross and histologic examination of the joint at 10 weeks.The canine subject was weight-bearing within eight hours after index and follow-up surgeries and had no significant soft tissue swelling of the shoulder girdle or gross lameness. Chronic synovitis and macroscopic and microscopic evidence of pathologic changes to the rotator cuff bony insertions, tendons, myotendinous junctions and muscles were observed.This study demonstrates feasibility and proof-of-concept for a joint capsule injury model in the canine shoulder. Future work is needed to define the observed pathologic changes and their role in the progression of rotator cuff disease. Ultimately, better understanding of the biologic mechanisms of early progression of rotator cuff disease may lead to clinical interventions to halt or slow this process and avoid the more advanced and often irreversible conditions of large tendon tears with muscle fatty atrophy.

  15. Perceptions of the risk of child abduction or loss and the utility of child electronic security devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R M; Pasnak, R

    1997-09-01

    Perceptions of the susceptibility of young children to becoming lost or being abducted, and of the potential usefulness of child electronic security devices, were examined via a questionnaire. Data were provided by 41 volunteers, most of them from a local government office centre. The questionnaire asked for demographic data, and then for the risk of a child being abducted or lost when under the supervision of different caregivers and in different situations. The probable effectiveness of three common abductor ploys was also addressed. The questionnaire concluded with 10 questions about child electronic security devices. Respondents viewed mothers, fathers, and grandparents as equally responsible caregivers and young adults/babysitters as the least responsible. These effects diminished as the age of the children increased. The garden at home was judged to be the most secure environment for children of all ages, while an amusement park was judged the least secure environment. Children were perceived to be more at risk of an abduction when a stranger asked for physical assistance or to take them to the hospital because their parents were hurt, than when asked for directions. Furthermore, the respondents expressed a moderately strong need for child electronic security devices, and viewed parents who use them as more responsible than those who do not.

  16. INTERACTION BETWEEN HAGUE CONVENTION ON THE CIVIL ASPECTS OF INTERNATIONAL CHILD ABDUCTION AND DOMESTIC LITIGATIONS CONCERNING DOMICILE OF THE CHILD AND PARENTAL AUTHORITY

    OpenAIRE

    Anca Magda VOICULESCU

    2018-01-01

    In the vast majority of cases, international abduction of a child determines almost per se litigations both at international and national level, namely an international litigation based on provisions of Hague Convention on the civil aspects of international child abduction and a domestic litigation aiming at establishing the domicile of the child in the state of destination and other different measures concerning the child which fall within the area of parental authority (joint or ...

  17. Hip abduction weakness in elite junior footballers is common but easy to correct quickly: a prospective sports team cohort based study

    OpenAIRE

    Osborne, Hamish R; Quinlan, John F; Allison, Garry T

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Hip abduction weakness has never been documented on a population basis as a common finding in a healthy group of athletes and would not normally be found in an elite adolescent athlete. This study aimed to show that hip abduction weakness not only occurs in this group but also is common and easy to correct with an unsupervised home based program. Methods A prospective sports team cohort based study was performed with thirty elite adolescent under-17 Australian Rules Footba...

  18. Assessing physical function in adult acquired major upper-limb amputees by combining the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) Outcome Questionnaire and clinical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostlie, Kristin; Franklin, Rosemary J; Skjeldal, Ola H; Skrondal, Anders; Magnus, Per

    2011-10-01

    To describe physical function in adult acquired major upper-limb amputees (ULAs) by combining self-assessed arm function and physical measures obtained by clinical examinations; to estimate associations between background factors and self-assessed arm function in ULAs; and to assess whether clinical examination findings may be used to detect reduced arm function in unilateral ULAs. postal questionnaires and clinical examinations. Norwegian ULA population. Clinical examinations performed at 3 clinics. Questionnaires: population-based sample (n=224; 57.4% response rate). Clinical examinations: combined referred sample and convenience sample of questionnaire responders (n=70; 83.3% of those invited). SURVEY inclusion criteria: adult acquired major upper-limb amputation, resident in Norway, mastering of spoken and written Norwegian. Not applicable. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) Outcome Questionnaire, and clinical examination of joint motion and muscle strength with and without prostheses. Mean DASH score was 22.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 20.3-25.0); in bilateral amputees, 35.7 (95% CI, 23.0-48.4); and in unilateral amputees, 22.1 (95% CI, 19.8-24.5). A lower unilateral DASH score (better function) was associated with paid employment (vs not in paid employment: adjusted regression coefficient [aB]=-5.40, P=.033; vs students: aB=-13.88, P=.022), increasing postamputation time (aB=-.27, P=.001), and Norwegian ethnicity (aB=-14.45, P<.001). At clinical examination, we found a high frequency of impaired neck mobility and varying frequencies of impaired joint motion and strength at the shoulder, elbow, and forearm level. Prosthesis wear was associated with impaired joint motion in all upper-limb joints (P<.006) and with reduced shoulder abduction strength (P=.002). Impaired without-prosthesis joint motion in shoulder flexion (ipsilateral: aB=12.19, P=.001) and shoulder abduction (ipsilateral: aB=12.01, P=.005; contralateral: aB=28.82, P=.004

  19. The critical shoulder angle is associated with osteoarthritis in the shoulder but not rotator cuff tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnison, Arnar O; Sørensen, Thomas J; Kallemose, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2013 Moor et al introduced the concept of the critical shoulder angle (CSA) and suggested that an abnormal CSA was a leading factor in development of rotator cuff tear (RCT) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the shoulder. This study assessed whether the CSA was associated with RCT and OA...

  20. Capsule-Preserving Hydrodilatation With Corticosteroid Versus Corticosteroid Injection Alone in Refractory Adhesive Capsulitis of Shoulder: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo-Hyung; Yoon, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Michael Y; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Rah, Ueon Woo

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether capsule-preserved hydrodilatation with corticosteroid improves pain and function in patients with refractory adhesive capsulitis (AC) better than intra-articular corticosteroid injection (IACI) alone. Prospective randomized controlled study. University-affiliated tertiary care hospital. Subjects with primary AC (N=64) with shoulder pain level of visual analog scale (VAS) score ≥5, even after the initial administration of IACI alone. Participants randomly received ultrasound-guided IACI alone with 1mL of 40mg/mL triamcinolone acetonide and 3mL of 1% lidocaine (n=32) or ultrasound-guided capsule-preserved hydrodilatation with corticosteroid with a mixture of 1mL of 40mg/mL triamcinolone acetonide, 6mL of 1% lidocaine, and normative saline (n=32). The primary outcome measure was the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index score. Secondary outcomes were the VAS of shoulder pain level and angles of shoulder passive range of motion, including flexion, abduction, extension, external rotation, and internal rotation at pretreatment and weeks 3, 6, and 12 of posttreatment. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of demographic characteristics (age, sex, duration of symptoms, shoulder affected, and body mass index) at baseline. Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed significant effect of time in all outcome measurements in both groups. However, group-by-time interactions were not significantly different for any of the outcomes between groups. This study shows that compared with pretreatment, all outcome measures improved significantly in both groups by time; however, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups. Therefore, we recommend IACI alone over capsule-preserved hydrodilatation with corticosteroid when considering the corticosteroid injection as a secondary option after the initial IACI fails to improve symptoms for patients with refractory AC. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation

  1. Shoulder magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, wheelchair propulsion, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boninger, Michael L; Dicianno, Brad E; Cooper, Rory A; Towers, Jeffrey D; Koontz, Alicia M; Souza, Aaron L

    2003-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between pushrim forces and the progression of shoulder injuries in manual wheelchair users. Longitudinal case series. Biomechanics laboratory and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facility at a Veterans Health Administration medical center and university hospital, respectively. Fourteen individuals with spinal cord injury (8 men, 6 women) who used manual wheelchairs. Subjects propelled their own wheelchairs on a dynamometer at 0.9 and 1.8m/s. Bilateral biomechanical data were obtained by using force and moment sensing pushrims at time 1. Bilateral shoulder MR images were also completed on 2 occasions, at time 1 and, approximately 2 years later, at time 2. The peak pushrim forces in a pushrim coordinate system were calculated, weight normalized and averaged over 5 strokes (presented as % body weight). MRI abnormalities were graded by using a summated scale. Differences between scores between times 1 and 2 were calculated. Subjects were divided into 2 groups based on change in MRI score. Seven subjects were in the group with worsening scores (MRI+; mean, 8.14 points; range, 5-16), and 7 were in the group with improving or unchanging scores (MRI-; mean, -1.00 point; range, -5 to 1). There was no significant difference between groups with respect to age, body mass index, or years from injury. There were significantly more women in the MRI+ group (6 women, 1 man) than in the MRI- group (7 men) (P=.001). The MRI+ group used significantly greater weight-normalized radial force, or force directed toward the axle at time 1, to propel their wheelchairs at each speed (Ppay particular attention to women who use wheelchairs. Reducing forces during wheelchair propulsion may minimize the likelihood of developing shoulder injuries.

  2. Using the American alligator and a repeated-measures design to place constraints on in vivo shoulder joint range of motion in dinosaurs and other fossil archosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Joel D; Hutson, Kelda N

    2013-01-15

    Using the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs (crocodylians and birds), recent work has reported that elbow joint range of motion (ROM) studies of fossil dinosaur forearms may be providing conservative underestimates of fully fleshed in vivo ROM. As humeral ROM occupies a more central role in forelimb movements, the placement of quantitative constraints on shoulder joint ROM could improve fossil reconstructions. Here, we investigated whether soft tissues affect the more mobile shoulder joint in the same manner in which they affect elbow joint ROM in an extant archosaur. This test involved separately and repeatedly measuring humeral ROM in Alligator mississippiensis as soft tissues were dissected away in stages to bare bone. Our data show that the ROMs of humeral flexion and extension, as well as abduction and adduction, both show a statistically significant increase as flesh is removed, but then decrease when the bones must be physically articulated and moved until they separate from one another and/or visible joint surfaces. A similar ROM pattern is inferred for humeral pronation and supination. All final skeletonized ROMs were less than initial fully fleshed ROMs. These results are consistent with previously reported elbow joint ROM patterns from the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs. Thus, studies that avoid separation of complementary articular surfaces may be providing fossil shoulder joint ROMs that underestimate in vivo ROM in dinosaurs, as well as other fossil archosaurs.

  3. Parsonage-Turner syndrome in a patient with bilateral shoulder pain: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Ryuichi; Shimabukuro, Akira

    2017-11-01

    Objective: Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a peripheral neuropathy characterized by acute onset shoulder pain, myalgia, and sensory disturbances. The present report discusses a rare case of Parsonage-Turner syndrome and highlights the importance of accurate history recording and thorough physical examination for the diagnosis of the disease in rural areas. Patient: A 28-year-old woman presented to our clinic with acute bilateral shoulder pain and difficulty moving her right arm. A diagnosis of Parsonage-Turner syndrome was suspected based on the progression of symptoms, severity of pain, and lack of musculoskeletal inflammation. The diagnosis was confirmed by neurological specialists, and the patient was treated with methylprednisolone, after which her symptoms gradually improved. Discussion: The differential diagnosis of shoulder pain is complicated due to the wide variety of conditions sharing similar symptoms. Accurate history recording and thorough physical examination are required to differentiate among conditions involving the central nerves, peripheral nerves, and nerve plexuses. Conclusion: Although the symptoms of Parsonage-Turner syndrome vary based on disease progression and the location of impairment, proper diagnosis of acute shoulder pain without central neurological symptoms can be achieved in rural areas via thorough examination.

  4. The substance of love when encountering suffering: an interpretative research synthesis with an abductive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorkildsen, Kari Marie; Eriksson, Katie; Råholm, Maj-Britt

    2013-06-01

    This study presents the results of an interpretative research synthesis undertaken to explore the essence of love when encountering suffering. The idea of caring as an expression of love and compassion belongs with ideas that have shaped caring for hundreds of years. Love and suffering are the core concepts in caring science and thus demand a basic research approach. The synthesis was undertaken by the interpretation of 15 articles focusing on love in different aspects, but within a caring science perspective. The research process was guided by a hermeneutical perspective with an abductive approach. The substance of love, when encountering suffering, reveals itself in three themes: love as a holy power, love as fundamental for being and love as an ethical act, which are to be found, respectively, within three dimensions: love as holiness, love as a communion and love as an art. Love is a holy power and encompasses everything; it is the well of strength that heals. No human can exist without love: this points to the ethical responsibility one has as a neighbour. In the ethical act, love is evident in concrete caring actions. The core of the substance of love within the three dimensions can be understood as agape. Agape connects and mirrors the dimensions, while at the same time it is clear that agape stems from and moves towards holiness, enabling love to be the ethical foundation when encountering suffering. Through the dimensions of love as communion and love as an art agape intertwine with eros forming caritas enabling the human being to move towards the dimension of holiness, which signifies becoming through suffering. © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  5. Transfracture abduction osteotomy: A solution for nonunion of femoral neck fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairamchander Pingle

    2014-01-01

    femur with or without bone graft, valgus osteotomy or hip arthroplasty. We conducted a retrospective analysis of cases of nonunion of femoral neck fracture treated by transfracture abduction osteotomy (TFAO. Materials and Methods: Over a period of 35 years (1974-2008, 30 patients with nonunion of femoral neck fractures were treated with TFAO over a period of 35 years (1974-2008, All patients were less than 50 years of age. Absence of clinical and radiological signs of union after four months was considered as nonunion. Patients more than 50 years of age were excluded from the study. Union was assessed at 6 months radiologically. Limb length was measured at six months. The mean duration of femoral neck fracture was 19 months (range 4 months 10 years. Results were analyzed in terms of radiological union at six months. Average followup was five years and six months. Results: Consistent union was noted at the followup after six months in 29 cases. One case was lost to followup after five and one-half months postoperatively. However, the fracture had united in this case at the last followup. Average shortening of the limb at six months was 1.9 cm. Average neck shaft angle was 127° (range 120-145°. Five cases went into AVN but were asymptomatic. Two cases required reoperation due to back out of Moore′s pins. These were reopened and cancellous screws were inserted in the same tracks. Conclusions: Consistent union of nonunion femoral neck fracture was noted at the followup after six months in 29 cases. The major drawback of the procedure is immobilization of the patient in the hip spica for eight weeks.

  6. Neonatal morbidity associated with shoulder dystocia maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Janine E; Frey, Heather A; Tuuli, Methodius G; Colvin, Ryan; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-03-01

    We sought to examine neonatal morbidity associated with different maneuvers used among term patients who experience a shoulder dystocia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all women who experienced a clinically diagnosed shoulder dystocia at term requiring obstetric maneuvers at a single tertiary care hospital from 2005 through 2008. We excluded women with major fetal anomaly, intrauterine death, multiple gestation, and preterm. Women exposed to Rubin maneuver, Wood's screw maneuver, or delivery of the posterior arm were compared to women delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure only, which served as the reference group. The primary outcome was a composite morbidity of neonatal injury (defined as clavicular or humeral fracture or brachial plexus injury) and neonatal depression (defined as Apgar dystocia, defined as time from delivery of fetal head to delivery of shoulders. Among the 231 women who met inclusion criteria, 135 were delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure alone (57.9%), 83 women were exposed to Rubin maneuver, 53 women were exposed to Wood's screw, and 36 women were exposed to delivery of posterior arm. Individual maneuvers were not associated with composite morbidity, neonatal injury, or neonatal depression after adjusting for nulliparity and duration of shoulder dystocia. We found no association between shoulder dystocia maneuvers and neonatal morbidity after adjusting for duration, a surrogate for severity. Our results demonstrate that clinicians should utilize the maneuver most likely to result in successful delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horii, Motoyuki

    1994-01-01

    The diagnostic capability of MRI in depicting abnormalities in traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder (TAI) was evaluated with special attention to MR arthrogram enhanced by joint effusion or saline solution. Sixty five shoulders with TAI and 19 control shoulders were scanned using the field gradient echo method (STAGE technique) on axial plane with a 1.0 or 1.5 Tesla system. MR arthrogram was obtained in 36 shoulders with TAI (Group A) and 11 control shoulders (Group C). Conventional MRI was obtained in 29 shoulders with TAI (Group B) and 8 control shoulders (Group D). Abnormalities in Bankart lesion were assessed according to signal intensity and labral shape. Abnormal signal was obtained in 8 shoulders (27.6%) in group B. Changes in shape were seen in 35 shoulders (97.2%) in group A and 18 (62.1%) in group B. Interruption of the anterior capsule was suspected in 3 (8.3%) in group A. Hill-Sachs lesion was suspected in 60 shoulders. Shoulders in the control group showed no abnormal change. Details of Bankart lesion confirmed by subsequent arthroscopy were diagnosed correctly in all of 14 shoulders on MR arthrogram and 8 of 16 shoulders on conventional MRI. These results show that MRI, MR arthrogram in particular, is useful for depicting abnormalities in TAI. (author)

  8. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Menticoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1 the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2 the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner.

  9. Cost Analysis in Shoulder Arthroplasty Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Teusink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost in shoulder surgery has taken on a new focus with passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. As part of this law, there is a provision for Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs and the bundled payment initiative. In this model, one entity would receive a single payment for an episode of care and distribute funds to all other parties involved. Given its reproducible nature, shoulder arthroplasty is ideally situated to become a model for an episode of care. Currently, there is little research into cost in shoulder arthroplasty surgery. The current analyses do not provide surgeons with a method for determining the cost and outcomes of their interventions, which is necessary to the success of bundled payment. Surgeons are ideally positioned to become leaders in ACOs, but in order for them to do so a methodology must be developed where accurate costs and outcomes can be determined for the episode of care.

  10. Kinetic chain abnormalities in the athletic shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciascia, Aaron; Thigpen, Charles; Namdari, Surena; Baldwin, Keith

    2012-03-01

    Overhead activities require the shoulder to be exposed to and sustain repetitive loads. The segmental activation of the body's links, known as the kinetic chain, allows this to occur effectively. Proper muscle activation is achieved through generation of energy from the central segment or core, which then transfers the energy to the terminal links of the shoulder, elbow, and hand. The kinetic chain is best characterized by 3 components: optimized anatomy, reproducible efficient motor patterns, and the sequential generation of forces. However, tissue injury and anatomic deficits such as weakness and/or tightness in the leg, pelvic core, or scapular musculature can lead to overuse shoulder injuries. These injuries can be prevented and maladaptations can be detected with a thorough understanding of biomechanics of the kinetic chain as it relates to overhead activity.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Appel, M.; Lehner, K.; Luttke, G.; Technische Univ. Muenchen; Muenchen Univ.

    1990-01-01

    In order to test the criteria for abnormalities of the shoulder as seen on MR, 30 normal shoulders were examined. The examination included T 1 , proton and T 2 -weighted SE sequences and T 2 * -weighted FE sequences, using transverse, oblique coronary and oblique sagittal planes. In 57% there was increased signal intensity in the tendon of the rotator cuff; this might have been interpreted as a rupture of the cuff or tendinitis. Anatomical examination suggests that the finding is due to a normal layer between the long head of the biceps and the tendon joint complex. The anterior glenoid labrum could not be clearly delineated in 57% and the posterior labrum in 5%. In two cases there was a superior, postero-lateral defect in the head of the humerus. The currently accepted criteria for the MRT diagnosis of shoulder abnormalities need to be critically re-evaluated. (orig.) [de

  12. Ten questions on prosthetic shoulder infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Elizabeth M; Ong, Joshua Cy; Bale, R Stephen; Trail, Ian A

    2016-07-01

    Prosthetic shoulder infection can cause significant morbidity secondary to pain and stiffness. Symptoms may be present for years before diagnosis because clinical signs are often absent and inflammatory markers may be normal. An emerging common culprit, Propionibacterium acnes, is hard to culture and so prolonged incubation is necessary. A negative culture result does not always exclude infection and new synovial fluid biochemical markers such as α defensin are less sensitive than for lower limb arthroplasty. A structured approach is necessary when assessing patients for prosthetic shoulder joint infection. This includes history, examination, serum inflammatory markers, plain radiology and aspiration and/or biopsy. A classification for the likelihood of prosthetic shoulder infection has been described based on culture, pre-operative and intra-operative findings. Treatment options include antibiotic suppression, debridement with component retention, one-stage revision, two-stage revision and excision arthroplasty. Revision arthroplasty is associated with the best outcomes.

  13. Registro de artroplastias do ombro Shoulder arthroplasty records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Motta Filho

    2009-04-01

    fracture. 12% of the cases required total arthroplasties and 88% partial arthroplasties. Five major complications were observed on early postoperative period. CONCLUSION: Shoulder arthroplasties have become a common procedure in orthopaedic practice. Surgical records are important in evidencing progressive evolution and in enabling future clinical outcomes evaluation.

  14. Proposal for SICSeG guidelines for rehabilitation after anatomical shoulder prosthesis in concentric shoulder osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, I; Orsini, S; Stignani, S; Creta, D; Cava, F C; Benedetti, M G

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide up-to-date guidelines on rehabilitation after anatomical shoulder prosthesis for concentric shoulder osteoarthritis, as previous guidelines date back to late 1970s and are no longer adequate due to the evolution of prosthesis models and surgical techniques. The physiatric committee of the Italian Society of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (SICSeG-Società Italiana di Chirurgia della Spalla e del Gomito) performed a search for all the existing literature related to rehabilitation after shoulder replacement. A total of 29 papers concerning shoulder rehabilitation were reviewed. In addition, the main Italian orthopedic surgeons and physiatrists dealing with shoulder surgery and rehabilitation were interviewed to obtain indications when literature was not conclusive. From literature evaluation and expert consultation, we produced guidelines concerning: patient evaluation by means of adequate rating scales, preoperative treatment, early intermediate and advanced postoperative phases, rehabilitation of scapulo-thoracic joint, return to work and sports, length of rehabilitation and follow-up. This proposal for guidelines was presented during the 11th SICSeG Congress on May 2012 and to the main scientific societies concerned in shoulder surgery and rehabilitation. A consensus conference is needed in order to formalize and make them usable from all the professional figures involved in this field.

  15. Shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers: review and development of a FIFA 11+ shoulder injury prevention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejnisman B

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Benno Ejnisman,1 Gisele Barbosa,1 Carlos V Andreoli,1 A de Castro Pochini,1 Thiago Lobo,2 Rodrigo Zogaib,2 Moises Cohen,1 Mario Bizzini,3 Jiri Dvorak3 1Department of Orthopaedics, Federal University of São Paulo, 2Sports Medicine Department, Santos FC, São Paulo, Brazil; 3FIFA-Medical Assessment and Research Centre, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: In the last years, shoulder injuries have represented an increasing health problem in soccer players. The goalkeepers are more exposed to shoulder disorders than other field players. Injury prevention exercises for upper limbs were cited in few studies involving throwing athletes, but we know that goalkeepers need a specific program. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of an adapted Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA 11+ program, namely the FIFA 11+ shoulder, which targets the prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers. The FIFA 11+ shoulder program is structured into three parts: general warming-up exercises, exercises to improve strength and balance of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger muscles, and advanced exercises for core stability and muscle control. The exercises were selected based on recommendations from studies demonstrating high electromyographic activity. Keywords: goalkeeper, shoulder, injury prevention, prevention program

  16. Shoulder Arthroscopy Simulator Training Improves Shoulder Arthroscopy Performance in a Cadaver Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, R. Frank; Shah, Neel; Warner, Jon J.P.; Gomoll, Andreas H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to quantify the benefits of shoulder arthroscopy simulator training with a cadaver model of shoulder arthroscopy. Methods Seventeen first year medical students with no prior experience in shoulder arthroscopy were enrolled and completed this study. Each subject completed a baseline proctored arthroscopy on a cadaveric shoulder, which included controlling the camera and completing a standard series of tasks using the probe. The subjects were randomized, and nine of the subjects received training on a virtual reality simulator for shoulder arthroscopy. All subjects then repeated the same cadaveric arthroscopy. The arthroscopic videos were analyzed in a blinded fashion for time to task completion and subjective assessment of technical performance. The two groups were compared with students t-tests, and change over time within groups was analyzed with paired t-tests. Results There were no observed differences between the two groups on the baseline evaluation. The simulator group improved significantly from baseline with respect to time to completion and subjective performance (parthroscopy simulator training resulted in significant benefits in clinical shoulder arthroscopy time to task completion in this cadaver model. This study provides important additional evidence of the benefit of simulators in orthopaedic surgical training. Clinical Relevance There may be a role for simulator training in shoulder arthroscopy education. PMID:23591380

  17. Shoulder arthroscopy simulator training improves shoulder arthroscopy performance in a cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, R Frank; Shah, Neel; Warner, Jon J P; Gomoll, Andreas H

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the benefits of shoulder arthroscopy simulator training with a cadaveric model of shoulder arthroscopy. Seventeen first-year medical students with no prior experience in shoulder arthroscopy were enrolled and completed this study. Each subject completed a baseline proctored arthroscopy on a cadaveric shoulder, which included controlling the camera and completing a standard series of tasks using the probe. The subjects were randomized, and 9 of the subjects received training on a virtual reality simulator for shoulder arthroscopy. All subjects then repeated the same cadaveric arthroscopy. The arthroscopic videos were analyzed in a blinded fashion for time to task completion and subjective assessment of technical performance. The 2 groups were compared by use of Student t tests, and change over time within groups was analyzed with paired t tests. There were no observed differences between the 2 groups on the baseline evaluation. The simulator group improved significantly from baseline with respect to time to completion and subjective performance (P arthroscopy simulator training resulted in significant benefits in clinical shoulder arthroscopy time to task completion in this cadaveric model. This study provides important additional evidence of the benefit of simulators in orthopaedic surgical training. There may be a role for simulator training in shoulder arthroscopy education. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Iatrogenic nerve injuries during shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carofino, Bradley C; Brogan, David M; Kircher, Michelle F; Elhassan, Bassem T; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2013-09-18

    The current literature indicates that neurologic injuries during shoulder surgery occur infrequently and result in little if any morbidity. The purpose of this study was to review one institution's experience treating patients with iatrogenic nerve injuries after shoulder surgery. A retrospective review of the records of patients evaluated in a brachial plexus specialty clinic from 2000 to 2010 identified twenty-six patients with iatrogenic nerve injury secondary to shoulder surgery. The records were reviewed to determine the operative procedure, time to presentation, findings on physical examination, treatment, and outcome. The average age was forty-three years (range, seventeen to seventy-two years), and the average delay prior to referral was 5.4 months (range, one to fifteen months). Seven nerve injuries resulted from open procedures done to treat instability; nine, from arthroscopic surgery; four, from total shoulder arthroplasty; and six, from a combined open and arthroscopic operation. The injury occurred at the level of the brachial plexus in thirteen patients and at a terminal nerve branch in thirteen. Fifteen patients (58%) did not recover nerve function after observation and required surgical management. A structural nerve injury (laceration or suture entrapment) occurred in nine patients (35%), including eight of the thirteen who presented with a terminal nerve branch injury and one of the thirteen who presented with an injury at the level of the brachial plexus. Nerve injuries occurring during shoulder surgery can produce severe morbidity and may require surgical management. Injuries at the level of a peripheral nerve are more likely to be surgically treatable than injuries of the brachial plexus. A high index of suspicion and early referral and evaluation should be considered when evaluating patients with iatrogenic neurologic deficits after shoulder surgery.

  19. Sonographic assessment of the subscapularis after reverse shoulder arthroplasty: impact of tendon integrity on shoulder function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedy, Nicolas J; Gouk, Conor J; Taylor, Fraser J; Thomas, Michael; Tan, S L Ezekiel

    2018-06-01

    The deltopectoral approach for reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) requires subscapularis tenotomy or lesser tuberosity osteotomy. Whether the subscapularis should be repaired at the conclusion of the procedure remains controversial. The present study sonographically assessed the subscapularis after RSA and evaluated the effect of tendon integrity on functional outcome. All patients who had undergone RSA in the Gold Coast University Hospital between 2005 and 2016 were included. Sonography was performed by a blinded examiner. Function was assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand, the Constant-Murley, and Oxford Shoulder scores. Internal rotation ability was recorded on a 6-point scale. The study included 43 patients (48 shoulders). Median length of follow-up was 19 months (range, 4-132 months). On sonography, the subscapularis was graded intact in 6 shoulders (13%), intact with mild attenuation in 16 (33%), severely attenuated in 15 (31%), and not intact or absent in 11 (23%). Differences in Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand, Constant-Murley, or Oxford Shoulder scores between intact and attenuated or absent subscapularis shoulders were not significant. Internal rotation scores were significantly higher in the intact and mildly attenuated tendon group than in the absent tendon group (U = 1.0, P = .001 and U = 28.5, P = .007, respectively). The present work is the first long-term outcome study of RSA using sonography to assess the subscapularis. Subscapularis integrity did not appear to have a measurable effect on patient outcome as measured by standard scores but was important for internal rotation ability after RSA. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Kinesiotaping and Stretching Exercise on Forward Shoulder Angle in Females with Rounded Shoulder Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghavan Hajibashi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rounded shoulder posture is a common abnormal posture in upper quarter. Kinesiotape is a new intervention that recently used in rehabilitation. There are no studies have examined the effect of kinesiotape on rounded shoulder posture. Therefore the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of scapular kinesiotaping and pectoralis minor stretching exercise on forward shoulder angle in female subjects with rounded shoulder posture. Methods: Twenty female students aged between 18 to 25 years old with rounded shoulder posture participated in this study. Then, the subjects were randomly and equally assigned to two groups: the stretch group and the stretch plus kinesiotape group. Both groups were trained for doing home exercise to stretch Pectoralis minor bilaterally for two weeks. Kinesiotape group received kinesiotape on scapular area additionally. Forward shoulder angle was measured in four sessions including pre-intervention (first session, immediately after the first intervention (second session, fourth day (third session and at the end of two weeks (fourth session. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA (4×2 was used for data analysis. Results: kinesiotape group showed significant within-group decrease in forward shoulder angle between first session with three other sessions (P≤0.05.There was no significant within-group difference in stretch group and between groups (P=0.20 forward shoulder angle-by-group interaction in measurement sessions was significantly different (P=0.02 Conclusion: scapular kinesiotaping along with pectoralis minor stretching exercise improved rounded shoulder posture in subjects of the present study. kinesiotape is suggested as a complem

  1. Clinical anatomy of the elbow and shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Vargas, Angélica; Chiapas-Gasca, Karla; Canoso, Juan J; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Kalish, Robert A

    The elbow patients herein discussed feature common soft tissue conditions such as tennis elbow, golfers' elbow and olecranon bursitis. Relevant anatomical structures for these conditions can easily be identified and demonstrated by cross examination by instructors and participants. Patients usually present rotator cuff tendinopathy, frozen shoulder, axillary neuropathy and suprascapular neuropathy. The structures involved in tendinopathy and frozen shoulder can be easily identified and demonstrated under normal conditions. The axillary and the suprascapular nerves have surface landmarks but cannot be palpated. In neuropathy however, physical findings in both neuropathies are pathognomonic and will be discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Shoulder pain: the role of diagnostic injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, H M; O'Connor, F G; Nirschl, R P

    1996-04-01

    Many different shoulder disorders cause similar symptoms and pain patterns. An accurate diagnosis can generally be made by obtaining a detailed history, performing a comprehensive, directed physical examination and obtaining selected radiographs. Occasionally, shoulder injections can be of great assistance in establishing a clear diagnosis and providing relief of symptoms. Subacromial space injection, acromioclavicular joint injection, intra-articular injection and injection of the biceps tendon are helpful in identifying such disorders as subacromial bursitis, acromioclavicular arthritis, injury to the glenohumeral joint and bicipital tendinitis.

  3. Frozen shoulder or missed posterior dislocation? | Leijnen | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Sports Medicine ... has similarities with an idiopathic frozen shoulder masking proper diagnosis at the time of injury. ... shoulder pain which demonstrates the importance of correct initial diagnosis and management.

  4. Soft tissue disorders of the shoulder. Frozen shoulder, calcific tendintis, and bicipital tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, W H

    1975-04-01

    The painful periarticular conditions about the shoulder joint-calcific tendinitis, bicipital tendinitis, and frozen shoulder syndrome-are seen commonly in the general practice of medicine or in the practice of orthopedic surgery. Their etiologies are unknown. Their treatment is relatively simple and depends upon a knowledge of the anatomic structures involved and the proper use of rest and exercise. Operative intervention is rarely necessary in any of these conditions. The frozen shoulder syndrome, however, in our experience is best treated in the subacute or chronic stages by infiltration brisement under general anesthesia.

  5. Effect of combined actions of hip adduction/abduction on the force generation and maintenance of pelvic floor muscles in healthy women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda C Amorim

    Full Text Available Pelvic floor muscle (PFM force and coordination are related to urinary incontinence severity and to sexual satisfaction. Health professionals frequently combine classic PFM exercises with hip adduction/abduction contraction to treat these disorders, but the real benefits of this practice are still unknown. Based on a theoretical anatomy approach whereby the levator ani muscle is inserted into the obturator internus myofascia and in which force generated by hip movements should increase the contraction quality of PFMs, our aim was to investigate the effects of isometric hip adduction and abduction on PFM force generation. Twenty healthy, nulliparous women were evaluated using two strain-gauge dynamometers (one cylinder-like inside the vaginal cavity, and the other measuring hip adduction/abduction forces around both thighs while performing three different tasks: (a isolated PFM contraction; (b PFM contraction combined with hip adduction (30% and 50% maximum hip force; and (c PFM contraction combined with hip abduction (30% and 50% maximum hip force. Data were sampled at 100Hz and subtracted from the offset if existent. We calculated a gradient between the isolated PFM contraction and each hip condition (Δ Adduction and Δ Abduction for all variables: Maximum force (N, instant of maximum-force occurrence (s, mean force in an 8-second window (N, and PFM force loss (N.s. We compared both conditions gradients in 30% and 50% by paired t-tests. All variables did not differ between hip conditions both in 30% and 50% of maximum hip force (p>.05. PFM contraction combined with isometric hip abduction did not increase vaginal force in healthy and nulliparous women compared to PFM contraction combined with isometric hip adduction. Therefore, so far, the use of hip adduction or abduction in PFM training and treatments are not justified for improving PFM strength and endurance.

  6. Gorham-Stout disease of the shoulder girdle and cervico-thoracic spine: fatal course in a 65-year-old woman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode-Lesniewska, B.; Hochstetter, A. von; Exner, G.U.; Hodler, J.

    2002-01-01

    A case of Gorham-Stout disease of the shoulder girdle and cervico-thoracic spine in a 65-year-old woman is described. The patient presented with progressive neurologic symptoms, pain, and deformities of the cervico-thoracic spine as well as of her left shoulder following a traumatic shoulder luxation. Since the patient had a history of uterine carcinoma, the current disease was clinically difficult to differentiate from osteolytic metastases. The results of the clinical, radiological and histopathologic examination leading to the diagnosis of Gorham-Stout disease are described. Neither attempted surgery nor radiotherapy produced clinical improvement and the patient died 1 year after the first clinical evaluation. (orig.)

  7. Frozen shoulder and the Big Five personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeer, Philippe; Franssens, Fien; Roosen, Isabelle; Dankaerts, Wim; Claes, Laurence

    2014-02-01

    In the past, several studies have suggested the existence of a "periarthritic personality" in patients with frozen shoulder. We conducted a study to determine differences in personality traits in patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulders. We prospectively evaluated 118 patients (84 women and 34 men; mean age, 53.8 years; SD 7.56) with a frozen shoulder. Of these patients, 48 had an idiopathic frozen shoulder and 70 had a secondary frozen shoulder. Personality traits were determined by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) scale. This questionnaire measures the 5 major personality traits and is based on the norms determined in a neutral test situation for 2415 controls. Compared with healthy controls, no differences in personality traits were found in patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulder, except for Conscientiousness and Extraversion, for which patients with secondary frozen shoulder scored significantly higher than healthy controls. Patients with primary frozen shoulder scored significantly higher on Openness to Experience than did patients with secondary frozen shoulder; on the other 4 Big Five personality traits, no significant differences were found between patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulder. More specifically, patients with idiopathic frozen shoulder did not score higher on the trait Neuroticism as would be expected from previous publications. Our study results do not indicate that patients with an idiopathic frozen shoulder have a specific personality compared with healthy controls. Only a few differences were found in personality traits when the entire frozen shoulder group was compared with healthy controls and between patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulders. The results of this study suggest that these differences are not sufficient to speak about a specific "frozen shoulder personality." Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  8. Effect of brief daily resistance training on rapid force development in painful neck and shoulder muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jay, Kenneth; Schraefel, Mc; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training on rapid force development of painful neck/shoulder muscles. METHODS: 198 generally healthy adults with frequent neck/shoulder muscle pain (mean: age 43.1 years, computer use 93% of work time, 88% women......, duration of pain 186 day during the previous year) were randomly allocated to 2- or 12 min of daily progressive resistance training with elastic tubing or to a control group receiving weekly information on general health. A blinded assessor took measures at baseline and at 10-week follow-up; participants.......05) for both training groups. Maximal muscle strength increased only ~5-6% [mean and 95% confidence interval for 2- and 12-min groups to control, respectively: 2.5 Nm (0.05-0.73) and 2.2 Nm (0.01-0.70)]. No significant differences between the 2- and 12-min groups were evident. A weak but significant...

  9. Shoulder disorders in general practice : Prognostic indicators of outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Windt, Daniëlle A W M; Koes, Bart W.; Boeke, A. Joan P; Devillé, Walter; De Jong, Bareld A.; Bouter, Lex M.

    Background. Shoulder pain is common in primary health care. Nevertheless, information on the outcome of shoulder disorders is scarce, especially for patients encountered in general practice. Aim. To study the course of shoulder disorders in general practice and to determine prognostic indicators of

  10. Interobserver reliability of physical examination of shoulder girdle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nomden, Jettie G.; Slagers, Anton J.; Bergman, Geert; Winters, Jan C.; Kropmans, Thomas J. B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    The object of this study was to assess interobserver reliability in 23 tests concerning physical examination of the shoulder girdle. A physical therapist and a physical therapist/manual therapist independently performed a physical examination of the shoulder girdle in 91 patients with shoulder

  11. Massive Emphysema and Pneumothorax Following Shoulder Arthroscopy under General Anaesthesia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariyate, Mohammad J; Kachooei, Amir R; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H

    2017-11-01

    The patient was a 61-year-old female with massive rotator cuff tear who had no history of smoking, COPD, asthma, or other pulmonary diseases. Four hours following shoulder arthroscopy, the patient developed progressive dyspnea, which was diagnosed as pneumothorax with subcutaneous emphysema extending to the neck and face. Chest tube was inserted promptly. The patient was discharged with a good condition after 7 days. Follow up of the patient for the next 3 months was uneventful.

  12. Massive Emphysema and Pneumothorax Following Shoulder Arthroscopy under General Anaesthesia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad J. Shariati

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The patient was a 61-year-old female with massive rotator cuff tear who had no history of smoking, COPD, asthma, or other pulmonary diseases. Four hours following shoulder arthroscopy, the patient developed progressive dyspnea, which was diagnosed as pneumothorax with subcutaneous emphysema extending to the neck and face. Chest tube was inserted promptly. The patient was discharged with a good condition after 7 days. Follow up of the patient for the next 3 months was uneventful.

  13. Progression of Fatty Muscle Degeneration in Atraumatic Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert-Davies, Jonah; Teefey, Sharlene A; Steger-May, Karen; Chamberlain, Aaron M; Middleton, William; Robinson, Kathryn; Yamaguchi, Ken; Keener, Jay D

    2017-05-17

    The purpose of this prospective study was to examine the progression of fatty muscle degeneration over time in asymptomatic shoulders with degenerative rotator cuff tears. Subjects with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear in 1 shoulder and pain due to rotator cuff disease in the contralateral shoulder were enrolled in a prospective cohort. Subjects were followed annually with shoulder ultrasonography, which evaluated tear size, location, and fatty muscle degeneration. Tears that were either full-thickness at enrollment or progressed to a full-thickness defect during follow-up were examined. A minimum follow-up of 2 years was necessary for eligibility. One hundred and fifty-six shoulders with full-thickness rotator cuff tears were potentially eligible. Seventy shoulders had measurable fatty muscle degeneration of at least 1 rotator cuff muscle at some time point. Patients with fatty muscle degeneration in the shoulder were older than those without degeneration (mean, 65.8 years [95% confidence interval (CI), 64.0 to 67.6 years] compared with 61.0 years [95% CI, 59.1 to 62.9 years]; p tears at baseline was larger in shoulders with degeneration than in shoulders that did not develop degeneration (13 and 10 mm wide, respectively, and 13 and 10 mm long; p Tears with fatty muscle degeneration were more likely to have enlarged during follow-up than were tears that never developed muscle degeneration (79% compared with 58%; odds ratio, 2.64 [95% CI, 1.29 to 5.39]; p muscle degeneration occurred more frequently in shoulders with tears that had enlarged (43%; 45 of 105) than in shoulders with tears that had not enlarged (20%; 10 of 51; p tears with enlargement and progression of muscle degeneration were more likely to extend into the anterior supraspinatus than were those without progression (53% and 17%, respectively; p tear size (p = 0.56). The median time from tear enlargement to progression of fatty muscle degeneration was 1.0 year (range, -2.0 to 6.9 years) for the

  14. The effect of hip abduction on the EMG activity of vastus medialis obliquus, vastus lateralis longus and vastus lateralis obliquus in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arakaki Juliano

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study design Controlled laboratory study. Objectives The purposes of this paper were to investigate (d whether vastus medialis obliquus (VMO, vastus lateralis longus (VLL and vastus lateralis obliquus (VLO EMG activity can be influenced by hip abduction performed by healthy subjects. Background Some clinicians contraindicate hip abduction for patellofemoral patients (with based on the premise that hip abduction could facilitate the VLL muscle activation leading to a VLL and VMO imbalance Methods and measures Twenty-one clinically healthy subjects were involved in the study, 10 women and 11 men (aged X = 23.3 ± 2.9. The EMG signals were collected using a computerized EMG VIKING II, with 8 channels and three pairs of surface electrodes. EMG activity was obtained from MVIC knee extension at 90° of flexion in a seated position and MVIC hip abduction at 0° and 30° with patients in side-lying position with the knee in full extension. The data were normalized in the MVIC knee extension at 50° of flexion in a seated position, and were submitted to ANOVA test with subsequent application of the Bonferroni multiple comparisons analysis test. The level of significance was defined as p ≤ 0.05. Results The VLO muscle demonstrated a similar pattern to the VMO muscle showing higher EMG activity in MVIC knee extension at 90° of flexion compared with MVIC hip abduction at 0° and 30° of abduction for male (p Conclusion The results showed that no selective EMG activation was observed when comparison was made between the VMO, VLL and VLO muscles while performing MVIC hip abduction at 0° and 30° of abduction and MVIC knee extension at 90° of flexion in both male and female subjects. Our findings demonstrate that hip abduction do not facilitated VLL and VLO activity in relation to the VMO, however, this study included only healthy subjects performing maximum voluntary isometric contraction contractions, therefore much remains to be discovered by

  15. Looking over the shoulders of researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt; Autzen, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    The Galathea 3 Expedition from 2006 to 2007 combined research and online news media, allowing journalists literally to “look over the shoulders of researchers.” The authors analyze 781 news articles published online by three media partners of the expedition, all well-established media companies...

  16. Reading on the Shoulders of Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Chaim, Michael; Riendeau, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Reflecting on his successful scientific career, Isaac Newton highlighted his intellectual debt to his predecessors. "If I have seen further," he wrote, "it was "only" by standing on the shoulders of giants." The authors have chosen the title of their article as a token of recognition of their debt to the teachings of…

  17. Frozen shoulder or missed posterior dislocation?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    initial diagnosis and management. ... D Leijnen,1,2 MD, MMed (Sports Med); J T Viljoen,1 BSc (Physio), MPhil (Exercise Sci); J H Kirby,1 MB ChB, MSc (Sports Med); ... diagnosis of posterior shoulder dislocation at the time of injury could.

  18. ultrasound-guided shoulder arthrogram injection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-10-15

    Oct 15, 2008 ... Using an aseptic technique and without moving the ultrasound transducer from the desired transverse plane, the needle is advanced into the joint space through the rotator cuff interval, using real-time ultrasound guidance (Fig.2). The needle is inserted into the shoulder approximately midway between the ...

  19. A Simple Technique for Shoulder Arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna-Serna, J.D.; Redondo, M.V.; Martinez, F.; Reus, M.; Alonso, J.; Parrilla, A.; Campos, P.A. [Virgen de la Arrixaca Univ. Hospital, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To present a systematic approach to teaching a technique for arthrography of the shoulder. Using an adhesive marker-plate with radiopaque coordinates, precise sites for puncture can be identified and the need for fluoroscopic guidance obviated. Material and Methods: Forty-six glenohumeral arthrograms were performed in 45 patients; in 1 case involving examination of both shoulders. The stages of the technique are described in detail, as are the fundamental aspects of achieving an effective glenohumeral injection. Pain intensity was measured in all patients using a verbal description scale. Results: Shoulder arthrography was successful in all cases. Average time taken for the procedure was 7 min, with no difference in the respective times required by an experienced radiologist and a resident. The procedure was well tolerated by most patients, with slight discomfort being observed in a very few cases. Conclusion: The arthrographic technique used in this study is simple, safe, rapid, and reproducible, and has the advantage of precise localization of the site for puncture without need for fluoroscopic guidance. The procedure described in this study can be of help in teaching residents and can reduce the learning curve for radiologists with no experience in arthrographic methods. It also reduces the time of exposure to fluoroscopy Keywords: Arthrography, joint, shoulder.

  20. Shoulder complaints : the occurence, course and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Luime (Jolanda)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractShoulder complaints are expressed in a variety of symptoms. In many cases, the prominent symptom is pain. In some cases, pain is present most of the day and frequently also at night. In other cases, it is provoked primarily by physical activities. Often it is accompanied

  1. Imaging of the shoulder after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMenamin, Drew; Koulouris, George; Morrison, William B.

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative imaging of the shoulder is challenging. This article reviews the radiologic evaluation following surgery for subacromial impingment, rotator cuff lesions and glenohumeral instability, including the common surgical procedures, the expected postoperative findings and potential complications. A specific emphasis is made on magnetic resonance imaging

  2. Imaging of the shoulder after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMenamin, Drew [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Box 354755, 4245 Roosevelt Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States)], E-mail: drewmcm@u.washington.edu; Koulouris, George [Gold Coast Medical Imaging, 123 Nerang Street, Southport, QLD 4215 (Australia); Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 132 South 10th Street, Suite 1079a, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Postoperative imaging of the shoulder is challenging. This article reviews the radiologic evaluation following surgery for subacromial impingment, rotator cuff lesions and glenohumeral instability, including the common surgical procedures, the expected postoperative findings and potential complications. A specific emphasis is made on magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Radiographic analysis of shoulder anatomical arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merolla, Giovanni [Unit of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, ' D. Cervesi' Hospital, L. Van Beethoven 46 Street, 47841 Cattolica (Italy)], E-mail: gmerolla@shouldertech.it; Di Pietto, Francesco; Romano, Stefania [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A. Cardarelli' Hospital, Naples (Italy); Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe [Unit of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, ' D. Cervesi' Hospital, L. Van Beethoven 46 Street, 47841 Cattolica (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    Arthroplasty is the standard treatment for advanced shoulder osteoarthritis. Modern prostheses designs have modular features whose size, shaft/head and body morphology can be adjusted. Total Shoulder Arthroplasty (TSA) provides better results. A complete X-ray follow-up is essential to assess the results and evaluate the survival rates of a shoulder prosthesis. Antero-posterior at 40 deg. in both internal and external rotation (true AP view) and axillary view are recommended to assess the following parameters: orientation and translation of the humeral component, offset, size and height of the humeral head, acromio-humeral distance, distribution and fixation of the cement, stress shielding and cortical resorption, radiolucent lines, subsidence and tilt, glenoid wear and 'bone stock', prostheses instability, glenoid component shift. Shoulder hemiarthroplasty can lead to glenoid wear; the true AP film at 40 deg. of internal rotation provides the best profile of gleno-humeral joint to depict glenoid erosion. Shift of the glenoid component in TSA is identified as tilting or medial migration on true AP and axillary views in the early postoperative period (1-2 months) and at minimum of 2 years. An exhaustive radiographic analysis remains essential to monitor the prosthetic implant and detect early and late complications or risk factors of prosthetic loosening.

  4. Standing on the shoulders of giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2014-01-01

    In this editorial, the author explains that the journal Temperature stands on the shoulders of giants-prominent scientists of the past and current members of the Temperature community. Temperature also uses the best tools, such as Google Scholar profiles. The editorial includes a new puzzle: why does warm water freeze faster than cold water?

  5. Validity and reliability of isometric muscle strength measurements of hip abduction and abduction with external hip rotation in a bent-hip position using a handheld dynamometer with a belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, Hidefumi; Katoh, Munenori; Hiiragi, Yukinobu; Kawasaki, Tsubasa; Kurihara, Tomohisa; Ohmi, Yorikatsu

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the relatedness, reliability, and validity of isometric muscle strength measurements of hip abduction and abduction with an external hip rotation in a bent-hip position using a handheld dynamometer with a belt. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy young adults, with a mean age of 21.5 ± 0.6 years were included. Isometric hip muscle strength in the subjects' right legs was measured under two posture positions using two devices: a handheld dynamometer with a belt and an isokinetic dynamometer. Reliability was evaluated using an intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC); relatedness and validity were evaluated using Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient. Differences in measurements of devices were assessed by two-way ANOVA. [Results] ICC (1, 1) was ≥0.9; significant positive correlations in measurements were found between the two devices under both conditions. No main effect was found between the measurement values. [Conclusion] Our findings revealed that there was relatedness, reliability, and validity of this method for isometric muscle strength measurements using a handheld dynamometer with a belt.

  6. Investigation of radialization and rerouting of the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) in the abduction deformity of the little finger: a cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aaken, Jan; Zhu, Jin; Fasel, Jean H D; Beaulieu, Jean-Yves

    2011-06-01

    One of several operations to correct abduction deformity of the little finger, (Wartenberg's sign) in ulnar nerve palsy, is a combined procedure that radializes the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) at the level of the fifth metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint and reroutes it from the fifth to fourth extensor compartment. This cadaveric study was designed to investigate the impact of both elements on adduction. Anatomy of the little finger extensor apparatus was studied in 16 freshly frozen cadaver hands sectioned at mid forearm. We observed little finger motion after different modifications of the EDM. We tested the effect of a rerouting maneuver by pulling on the EDM, as well as radialization of the EDM alone and in combination with rerouting. The EDM was present in all cases. Little finger extensor digitorum communis (EDC(V)) was missing in two cadavers. In no case was adduction created by rerouting the EDM to the fourth compartment. Radialization of the EDM corrected the abduction deformity beyond the axis of abduction/adduction of the fifth MCP joint in 13 cases and only up to it in three cases. In one of the three with limited correction, a rerouting maneuver allowed for further adduction. The key to correct abduction deformity of the little finger is radialization of the EDM, which can be done through a solitary incision at the level of the MCP joint. Rerouting alone does not correct the abduction deformity, and in combination with radialization it does not predictably enhance the correction.

  7. Radiography of the acutely injured shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neep, M.J.; Aziz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Routine radiological examination of the acute shoulder has been unchanged in radiology departments for many years. At UCLH (University College London Hospitals, UK) this examination consists of two projections, an AP (antero-posterior) and an LS (lateral scapula). Following a review of the related literature and the possible advantages of an axial style projection, a study was performed to evaluate whether a new projection named modified trauma axial (MTA) shoulder projection could replace the existing LS projection in the routine examination of the acute shoulder. A retrospective analysis of 244 acute shoulder examinations over a 5-month period was performed. AP, LS and MTA projections were taken with paired AP and LS, and AP and MTA radiographs were reported separately. 97 traumatic abnormalities were reported using AP and MTA whilst only 64 abnormalities were reported using AP and LS views. The MTA projection demonstrated it was significant for evaluating articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid, defects in the humeral head, greater tuberosity fractures, glenoid fractures and fractures of the acromion. It was established that if the LS projection was replaced with the MTA view no traumatic pathologies would have been overlooked and in fact there was a 52% increase in traumatic abnormalities detected. Use of a chi-squared test demonstrated a highly significant difference in the number of traumatic abnormalities detected between the two pairs of projection combinations (p = 0.0004). Based on this study and the examined literature the routine examination of the acutely injured shoulder is recommended to include the AP and MTA projections only.

  8. Shoulder Dystocia: Quality, Safety, and Risk Management Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Saila; Lee, Colleen; Goffman, Dena

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a term that evokes terror and fear among many physicians, midwives, and health care providers as they recollect at least 1 episode of shoulder dystocia in their careers. Shoulder dystocia can result in significant maternal and neonatal complications. Because shoulder dystocia is an urgent, unanticipated, and uncommon event with potentially catastrophic consequences, all practitioners and health care teams must be well-trained to manage this obstetric emergency. Preparation for shoulder dystocia in a systematic way, through standardization of process, practicing team-training and communication, along with technical skills, through simulation education and ongoing quality improvement initiatives will result in improved outcomes.

  9. Comparison of range of motion and function of subjects with reverse anatomy Bayley-Walker shoulder replacement with those of normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjedi, Milad; Lovell, Cara; Johnson, Garth R

    2011-12-01

    Patients with rotator cuff tear and degenerative shoulder joint disease commonly experience severe pain and reduced performance during activities of daily living. A popular way to treat these patients is by means of reverse anatomy shoulder prosthesis. Studying the kinematics of subjects with reverse anatomy implant would be useful in order to gain knowledge about functionality of different designs. It is hypothesized that the kinematics of these subjects, in the absence of rotator cuff muscles, differs from that of normal subjects. In this study the upper limb kinematics of 12 subjects with a Bayley-Walker reverse anatomy shoulder prosthesis while performing tasks common in everyday activities and those that represent the range of motion was analyzed and compared to that of 12 normal subjects. Each patient also completed an Oxford Shoulder Score. Substantial reduction in the Bayley-Walker subjects' ranges of motion was observed compared to normal subjects. The mean abduction angle decreased from 109° (±20) for normal subjects to 64° (±25). A similar trend was observed during flexion and axial rotation tasks. Furthermore, the normal group showed less variable ranges of motion performing the standard tasks, whereas for the prosthetic group this varied greatly, which is likely to be dependent on muscle strength. Although the decreased range of motion was prominent, subjects were able to complete most of the tasks by compensating with their elbow and trunk. The most challenging task for Bayley-Walker subjects was lifting an object to head height. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Shoulder rotator isokinetic strength profile in young swimmers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n5p545

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Tomas-Carus

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering that some studies suggest that shoulder rotators muscle imbal­ances are related to joint pain and injury, and that there are no normative data for young swimmers, the aim of this study was: i to describe the muscle balance, fatigue and isokinetic strength profile of the shoulder rotators in young swimmers; ii to compare the results between swimmers and a group of young non-practitioners; iii to contribute to the acquisition of normative data of unilateral ratios of shoulder rotators. We evaluated the shoulder rotators concentric strength and unilateral ratios (ratio between torque of external and internal rotators of 60 swimmers (age: 14.55 ± 0.5 years old; body mass: 61.16 ± 7.08 kg and 60 non-practitioners (age: 14.62 ± 0.49 years old; body mass: 60.22 ± 10.01 kg. The evaluation was performed in the sitting position (90° abduction and elbow flexion at 60º.s-1 and 180º.s-1 angular speeds using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex System 3. The results of the fatigue ratios revealed no differences between the groups. Swimmers showed unilateral ratios of 73.39 ± 17.26% in the dominant limb (DL and 77.89 ± 15,23% in the non-dominant limb (NDL for assessments at 60º.s-1. At 180º.s-1, ratios were 74.77± 13.99% for DL and 70.11 ± 14.57% for NDL. Swimmers presented greater muscle imbalance, and differed from non-practitioners in the ability to produce power with the internal rotators, which was significantly higher in the former group.

  11. Human rather than ape-like orbital morphology allows much greater lateral visual field expansion with eye abduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denion, Eric; Hitier, Martin; Levieil, Eric; Mouriaux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    While convergent, the human orbit differs from that of non-human apes in that its lateral orbital margin is significantly more rearward. This rearward position does not obstruct the additional visual field gained through eye motion. This additional visual field is therefore considered to be wider in humans than in non-human apes. A mathematical model was designed to quantify this difference. The mathematical model is based on published computed tomography data in the human neuro-ocular plane (NOP) and on additional anatomical data from 100 human skulls and 120 non-human ape skulls (30 gibbons; 30 chimpanzees / bonobos; 30 orangutans; 30 gorillas). It is used to calculate temporal visual field eccentricity values in the NOP first in the primary position of gaze then for any eyeball rotation value in abduction up to 45° and any lateral orbital margin position between 85° and 115° relative to the sagittal plane. By varying the lateral orbital margin position, the human orbit can be made “non-human ape-like”. In the Pan-like orbit, the orbital margin position (98.7°) was closest to the human orbit (107.1°). This modest 8.4° difference resulted in a large 21.1° difference in maximum lateral visual field eccentricity with eyeball abduction (Pan-like: 115°; human: 136.1°). PMID:26190625

  12. Detection of heat abduction on the walls by artificial neural network and selection of materials with decision support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egemen Tekkanat

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Today energy conservation is a very important issue in the world and Turkey. The aim of this study is to minimize the heat abduction, thus to save energy by utilizing the factors to prevent the heat abduction on the walls of buildings. First of all, a back-propagation network model with artificial neural network model was used for the factors that can cause heat loss on the walls. Whether the walls have insulation were considered. After that, Decision Support Systems were used for heat insulation to select the appropriate materials. A Decision Support Model with Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP was recommended to meet the needs of a customer best and to make better decisions for the selection of the materials. The method was used by construction firms for their decision processes for the best materials and the results were evaluated. After the evaluations were done, the factors that cause heat loss were considered and it became clear which factors were more important for the prevention of heat loss.

  13. Treatment of the Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip with an Abduction Brace in Children up to 6 Months Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Wahlen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Use of Pavlik harness for the treatment of DDH can be complicated for parents. Any misuse or failure in the adjustments may lead to significant complications. An abduction brace was introduced in our institution, as it was thought to be easier to use. Aim. We assess the results for the treatment of DDH using our abduction brace in children of 0–6 months old and compare these results with data on treatments using the Pavlik harness. Method. Retrospective analysis of patients with DDH from 0 to 6 months old at diagnosis, performed from 2004 to 2009. Outcomes were rates of reduction of the hip and avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVN. Follow-up was at one year and up to 4 years old. Results. Hip reduction was successful in 28 of 33 patients (85%, with no AVN. Conclusion. Our results in terms of hip reduction rate and AVN rate are similar to those found in literature assessing Pavlik harness use, with a simpler and comfortable treatment procedure.

  14. Painful shoulder. Introduction into fundamental facts and problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartl, P W

    1987-10-19

    The painful shoulder syndrome is very common. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis may be difficult. Shoulder pain may be caused by local processes or systemic diseases or can be referred. Periarthritis humeroscapularis (frozen shoulder) is the most common cause of painful shoulder syndrome. Biomechanical factors concerning the rotator cuff are involved in the etiopathogenesis of these pain syndromes. The therapy of frozen shoulder includes physical treatment, antirheumatic drugs, or X-ray treatment. Surgical measures may become necessary. In the course of rheumatoid arthritis the shoulder may be involved. Milwaukee-shoulder-syndrome has been described recently in crystal deposit diseases. Shoulder pain may be referred by mechanical irritations of nerve roots in the course of degenerative lesions of the cervical spine and also in the course of internal diseases of the heart, the lungs, or the gastrointestinal tract. In cases of shoulder pain without pathological data from arthrological, radiological or laboratory studies, one should always consider localized fibromyalgia in the shoulder-neck-region. The precise diagnosis of shoulder pain is an important prerequisite for treatment, the success of which should not be judged as pessimistic as it has been commonly done in the past.

  15. Optimal Design of a Bio-Inspired Anthropocentric Shoulder Rehabilitator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a bio-inspired anthropocentric 7-DOF wearable robotic arm for the purpose of stroke rehabilitation. The proposed arm rehabilitator synergistically utilizes the human arm structure with non-invasive kinematically under-deterministic cable-driven mechanisms to form a completely deterministic structure. It offers the advantages of being lightweight and having high dexterity. Adopting an anthropocentric design concept also allows it to conform to the human anatomical structure. The focus of this paper is on the analysis and design of the 3-DOF-shoulder module, called the shoulder rehabilitator. The design methodology is divided into three main steps: (1 performance evaluation of the cable-driven shoulder rehabilitator, (2 performance requirements of the shoulder joint based on its physiological characteristics and (3 design optimization of the shoulder rehabilitator based on shoulder joint physiological limitations. The aim is to determine a suitable configuration for the development of a shoulder rehabilitator prototype.

  16. Risk of subacromial shoulder disorder in airport baggage handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Sanne Pagh; Brauer, Charlotte; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2018-01-01

    age,exposure variables showed close to significant associations with subacromial shoulder disorder.Results could not confirm our hypothesis that combined information on work task duration and shoulder load intensity was stronger associated with subacromial shoulder disorder than seniority.......Musculoskeletal shoulder-load among baggage handlers measured by combining duration and intensity based on biomechanical and epidemiological information may be a stronger predictor of subacromial shoulder disordersthanbaggage handler seniority.In 2012, a cohort of baggage handlers employed...... at Copenhagen Airport in 1990-2012, and a cohort of unskilledotherwise employed men answered a survey.Self-reported information on work tasks during employment in the airport in combination with work task specific biomechanically modelled forces in the shoulder joint was used to estimate shoulder-load. Exposure...

  17. Bone mineral density measurement over the shoulder region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, A M; Faber, J; Lynnerup, N

    2002-01-01

    values decreased with age (P shoulder BMD levels increased significantly with increased body mass index (BMI) (P positive relationship between the increased hip/shoulder BMD differential with BMI supports the conclusion that the shoulder is subject......The purpose of this study was to (1). establish a method for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) over the shoulder region; (2). compare the relationship between shoulder BMD levels with hip BMD and body mass index (BMI); and (3). discuss the relevance of the shoulder scan as an early indicator...... of osteoporosis compared with hip scans, the latter representing a weight-bearing part of the skeleton. We developed a scanning procedure, including a shoulder fixation device, and determined the most appropriate software in order to establish a reference material with the highest possible precision. Duplicate...

  18. ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF BANKART’S LESION USING SUTURE ANCHORS IN RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar

    2015-06-01

    , rest 14(40% patients had Left shoulder involved. The mean follow - up period was 12 months (range 8 - 28 months. The patients were evaluated by visual analogue score (VAS, ROWE’s score at final fo llow - up. RESULTS : 34/35 patient’s regained almost preoperative range of forward flexion at the last follow - up. Preoperative scores were compared with the most recent follow - up scores for all variables with the help of paired t test. All patients had significant improvement in visual analogue score and ROWE’s score. In the preoperative period 18(51.43% patients had full range and 14(48.57% patient had painful/limited terminal range of motion, as regards external rotation with arm at the side (ER1. A nd 07(20% patients had 0 - 65º, 22(62.85% patients had 0 - 70º, 3(8.57% patient had 0 - 70º with pain at terminal range of motion, 3(8.57% of patients had full range of motion, as regards external rotation at 90º abduction (ER2. At the last follow - up, 33/35 (94.28% patients had full range of ER1 & 32/35(91.42% patients had full range of ER2. This improvement in external rotation deficit was statistically significant (P <.05 . Preoperative scores were compared with the most recent follow - up scores for all var iables with the help of paired t test. Three of the patients developed apprehension which got resolved after proper physiotherapy. Pre - operative: mean Total Rowe score was 48.51, mean scores of stability 21.17, mean score of function 12.14, mean score of motion 15.77. The mean post - operative Rowe score improved to 97.63, mean stability component to 47.77, mean motion component to19.47 and mean function component to 28.63 compared to the pre - operative Rowe scores. We had final Rowe’s Score excelle nt in 32 patients, good in 2 and fair in 1 and Poor in 1 (P - value 2.992X10 - 12 . There was no radiological evidence of loosening and migration of anchors or any gleno - humeral arthritis on subsequent follow - up skiagrams in any of our patients

  19. Strength asymmetry of the shoulders in elite volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzic, Vedran; Sattler, Tine; Veselko, Matjaž; Markovic, Goran; Dervisevic, Edvin

    2014-01-01

    Volleyball players are reported to have shoulder strength imbalances. Previous authors have primarily investigated small samples of male players at a single skill level, without considering playing position, and with inconsistent findings. To evaluate shoulder strength asymmetry and a history of shoulder injury in a large sample of professional volleyball players of both sexes across different playing positions and skill levels. Descriptive laboratory study. A sample of 183 volleyball players (99 men, 84 women). We assessed shoulder internal-rotator and external-rotator concentric strength at 60°/s using an isokinetic dynamometer and dominant-nondominant differences in shoulder strength and strength ratios using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Peak torque was normalized for body mass and external-rotation/internal-rotation concentric strength. Internal-rotation strength was asymmetric in favor of the dominant side in both sexes, regardless of previous shoulder injury status. Male volleyball players had a lower shoulder strength ratio on the dominant side, regardless of previous shoulder injury status. However, this finding was valid only when hand dominance was taken into account. Female volleyball players playing at a higher level (ie, first versus second division) were 3.43 times more likely to have an abnormal strength ratio. Playing position was not associated with an abnormal shoulder strength ratio or strength asymmetry. In male volleyball players, the external-rotation/internal-rotation strength ratio of the dominant shoulder was lower, regardless of playing position, skill level, or a previous shoulder injury. In female players, the ratio was less only in those at a higher skill level. Although speculative, these findings generally suggest that female volleyball players could have a lower risk of developing shoulder-related problems than male volleyball players. Isokinetic shoulder testing may reveal important information about the possible risk

  20. Dominant vs. non-dominant shoulder morphology in volleyball players and associations with shoulder pain and spike speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challoumas, Dimitrios; Artemiou, Andreas; Dimitrakakis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    The aims of our study were to compare the dominant (DOM) and non-dominant (NDOM) shoulders of high-level volleyball athletes and identify possible associations of shoulder adaptations with spike speed (SS) and shoulder pathology. A total of 22 male volleyball players from two teams participating in the first division of the Cypriot championship underwent clinical shoulder tests and simple measurements around their shoulder girdle joints bilaterally. SS was measured with the use of a sports speed radar. Compared with the NDOM side, the DOM scapula was more lateralised, the DOM dorsal capsule demonstrated greater laxity, the DOM dorsal muscles stretching ability was compromised, and the DOM pectoralis muscle was more lengthened. Players with present or past DOM shoulder pain demonstrated greater laxity in their DOM dorsal capsule, tightening of their DOM inferior capsule, and lower SS compared with those without shoulder pain. Dorsal capsule measurements bilaterally were significant predictors of SS. None of the shoulder measurements was associated with team roles or infraspinatus atrophy, while scapular lateralisation was more pronounced with increasing years of experience, and scapular antetilting was greater with increasing age. Adaptations of the DOM shoulder may be linked to pathology and performance. We describe simple shoulder measurements that may have the potential to predict chronic shoulder injury and become part of injury prevention programmes. Detailed biomechanical and large prospective studies are warranted to assess the validity of our findings and reach more definitive conclusions.

  1. Effects of Messages Delivered by Mobile Phone on Increasing Compliance With Shoulder Exercises Among Patients With a Frozen Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Chun; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Lin, Pi-Chu; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Chuang, Yeu-Hui

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of reminders, encouragement, and educational messages delivered by mobile phone on shoulder exercise compliance and improvements in shoulder function among patients with a frozen shoulder. A randomized controlled trial design was used. A convenience sample of patients with a frozen shoulder in an orthopedic outpatient clinic was recruited. All participants were instructed on how to do shoulder exercises and were provided with a printed pamphlet about shoulder exercises. Then, the intervention group received reminders, encouragement, and educational messages by mobile phone daily for the next 2 weeks, while the comparison group did not. The intervention group had higher compliance with shoulder exercises than did the comparison group (t = 2.263, p = .03) and had significant improvements in shoulder forward flexion (F = 12.067, p = .001), external rotation (F = 13.61, p = .001), and internal rotation (F = 5.903, p = .018) compared to those in the comparison group after the 2-week intervention. The text messages significantly increased patient compliance with shoulder exercises and thus improved patients' shoulder range of motion. Hospital or clinics can send appropriate messages to patients via text message platforms in order to remind and encourage them to do shoulder exercises. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Shoulder strengthening exercises adapted to specific shoulder pathologies can be selected using new simulation techniques: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Caecilia; Lädermann, Alexandre; Kevelham, Bart; Chagué, Sylvain; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Holzer, Nicolas

    2018-02-01

    Shoulder strength training exercises represent a major component of rehabilitation protocols designed for conservative or postsurgical management of shoulder pathologies. Numerous methods are described for exercising each shoulder muscle or muscle group. Limited information is available to assess potential deleterious effects of individual methods with respect to specific shoulder pathologies. Thus, the goal of this pilot study was to use a patient-specific 3D measurement technique coupling medical imaging and optical motion capture for evaluation of a set of shoulder strength training exercises regarding glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as elongation of the rotator cuff muscles. One volunteer underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and motion capture of the shoulder. Motion data from the volunteer were recorded during three passive rehabilitation exercises and twenty-nine strengthening exercises targeting eleven of the most frequently trained shoulder muscles or muscle groups and using four different techniques when available. For each exercise, glenohumeral and labral compression, subacromial space height and rotator cuff muscles elongation were measured on the entire range of motion. Significant differences in glenohumeral, subacromial and labral compressions were observed between sets of exercises targeting individual shoulder muscles. Muscle lengths computed by simulation compared to MRI measurements showed differences of 0-5%. This study represents the first screening of shoulder strengthening exercises to identify potential deleterious effects on the shoulder joint. Motion capture combined with medical imaging allows for reliable assessment of glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as muscle-tendon elongation during shoulder strength training exercises.

  3. Comparative characteristics of shoulder blade (Scapula) and shoulder bone (Humerus) of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and sheep (Ovis aries) in order to determine the animal species

    OpenAIRE

    Blagojević Miloš; Nikolić Zora; Prokić Bogomir Bolka; Ćupić-Miladinović Dejana

    2016-01-01

    In illegal hunting it is often possible only on the basis of morphological characteristics to determine the animal species. By the method of comparison there was performed the forensic analysis of roe deer and sheep osteological features. For the purpose of investigating the shoulder blade (Scapula) and shoulder bone (Humerus) comparative characteristics, there were used 6 shoulder blades and 6 shoulder bones of roe deer and 8 shoulder blades and 8 shoulder...

  4. Multimodal assessment of sensorimotor shoulder function in patients with untreated anterior shoulder instability and asymptomatic handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mornieux, Guillaume; Hirschmüller, Anja; Gollhofer, Albert; Südkamp, Norbert P; Maier, Dirk

    2018-04-01

    Functional evaluation of sensorimotor function of the shoulder joint is important for guidance of sports-specific training, prevention and rehabilitation of shoulder instability. Such assessment should be multimodal and comprise all qualities of sensorimotor shoulder function. This study evaluates feasibility of such multimodal assessment of glenohumeral sensorimotor function in patients with shoulder instability and handball players. Nine patients with untreated anterior instability of their dominant shoulder and 15 asymptomatic recreational handball players performed proprioceptive joint position sense and dynamic stabilization evaluations on an isokinetic device, as well as a functional throwing performance task. Outcome measures were analysed individually and equally weighted in a Shoulder-Specific Sensorimotor Index (S-SMI). Finally, isokinetic strength evaluations were conducted. We observed comparable sensorimotor functions of unstable dominant shoulders compared to healthy, contralateral shoulders (e.g. P=0.59 for S-SMI). Handball players demonstrated superior sensorimotor function of their dominant shoulders exhibiting a significantly higher throwing performance and S-SMI (P0.22). The present study proves feasibility of multimodal assessment of shoulder sensorimotor function in overhead athletes and patients with symptomatic anterior shoulder instability. Untreated shoulder instability led to a loss of dominance-related sensorimotor superiority indicating functional internal rotation deficiency. Dominant shoulders of handball players showed a superior overall sensorimotor function but weakness of dominant internal rotation constituting a risk factor for occurrence of posterior superior impingement syndrome. The S-SMI could serve as a diagnostic tool for guidance of sports-specific training, prevention and rehabilitation of shoulder instability.

  5. Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder includes radiography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography, computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, and ultrasound. Target-oriented evaluation of the postoperative shoulder necessitates familiarity with surgical techniques, their typical complications and sources of failure, knowledge of normal and abnormal postoperative findings, awareness of the advantages and weaknesses with the different radiologic techniques, and clinical information on current symptoms and function. This article reviews the most commonly used surgical procedures for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability, lesions of the labral-bicipital complex, subacromial impingement, and rotator cuff lesions and highlights the significance of imaging findings with a view to detection of recurrent lesions and postoperative complications in a multimodality approach. (orig.)

  6. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederic.lecouvet@uclouvain.be; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-10-15

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings.

  7. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E.; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile

    2008-01-01

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings

  8. Dexamethasone for pain after outpatient shoulder surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholdt, K. T.; Mønsted, P. N.; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Background Dexamethasone has analgesic properties when given intravenously before surgery, but the optimal dose has not been determined. We hypothesised that a dose of 40 mg dexamethasone would improve analgesia after outpatient shoulder surgery compared with 8 mg. Methods A randomised, double...... a dose–response relationship, increasing the dexamethasone dose from 8 to 40 mg did not improve analgesia significantly after outpatient shoulder surgery.......) or placebo (D0) before surgery. The primary outcome was pain intensity 8 h after surgery rated on a numeric rating scale of 0 to 10. Secondary outcomes were pain intensity, analgesic consumption and side effects during the first 3 days after surgery. Results Data from 73 patients were available for analysis...

  9. Association Between Years of Competition and Shoulder Function in Collegiate Swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dischler, Jack D; Baumer, Timothy G; Finkelstein, Evan; Siegal, Daniel S; Bey, Michael J

    Shoulder injuries are common among competitive swimmers, and the progression of shoulder pathology is not well understood. The objective of this study was to assess the extent to which years of competitive swim training were associated with physical properties of the supraspinatus muscle and tendon, shoulder strength, and self-reported assessments of shoulder pain and function. Increasing years of competition will be associated with declining physical properties of the supraspinatus muscle/tendon and declining self-reported assessments of pain and function. Descriptive epidemiology study. Level 4. After institutional approval, 18 collegiate female swimmers enrolled in the study. For each swimmer, supraspinatus tendon thickness was measured; tendinosis was assessed using ultrasound imaging, supraspinatus muscle shear wave velocity was assessed using shear wave elastography, isometric shoulder strength was measured using a Biodex system, and self-reported assessments of pain/function were assessed using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) score. All subjects were tested before the start of the collegiate swim season. Linear regression was used to assess the association between years of competition and the outcome measures. Years of participation was positively associated with tendon thickness ( P = 0.01) and negatively associated with shear wave velocity ( P = 0.04) and WORC score ( P 0.39). Long-term competitive swim training is associated with declining measures of supraspinatus muscle/tendon properties and self-reported measures of pain and function. Although specific injury mechanisms are still not fully understood, these findings lend additional insight into the development of rotator cuff pathology in swimmers. Lengthy swimming careers may lead to a chronic condition of reduced mechanical properties in the supraspinatus muscle and tendon, thereby increasing the likelihood of rotator cuff pathology.

  10. An electromyographic evaluation of elastic band exercises targeting neck and shoulder pain among helm bearing military helicopter crew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Askær; Grøndberg, Thomas Stig; Murray, Mike

    INTRODUCTION Flight related neck and shoulder pain is a frequent problem in helicopter pilots and crew [1]. Pain causes personnel suffering, reduces operational capabilities and incurs high financial cost due to the loss of manpower. Evidence suggests that the occupational loading such as posture...... adopted during flight and increased weight added to the mass of the head due to the helmet and night vision equipment contribute to the development of neck and shoulder pain. Strength training has among other occupational groups been found to reduce musculoskeletal pain [2]. A 20-week exercise program...... for the neck and shoulder muscles using elastic bands has been applied for helicopter pilots and crew in the Royal Danish Air Force to prevent and reduce pain. The exercise program had an initial loading of 20RM and was increased progressively towards 12RM in the final weeks. A muscle activity >60% MVE...

  11. The prevalence of radiological glenohumeral osteoarthritis in long-term type 1 diabetes: the Dialong shoulder study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel, N G; Brox, J I; Hellund, J C; Holte, K B; Berg, T J

    2017-12-14

    This study compares the prevalence of radiological osteoarthritis (OA) in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) for > 45 years and controls, and explores the association with shoulder pain and glycaemic burden in patients with DM1. The Dialong study is a cross-sectional, observational study with 30 years of historical data on long-term glycaemic control. We included 102 patients with DM1 and 73 diabetes-free controls. Demographic data, worst shoulder pain last week [numeric rating scale (NRS) 0-10], pain on abduction at examination (NRS 0-10), and current and historical glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA 1c ) levels were collected. Standardized shoulder X-rays were taken and interpreted for OA applying the Kellgren-Lawrence classification. In the diabetes group (49% women), the mean ± sd duration of DM1 was 50.6 ± 4.8 years, mean 30 year HbA 1c 7.4%, and age 61.9 ± 7.1 years. The mean age of controls (57% women) was 62.6 ± 7.0 years. Radiological glenohumeral OA was found in 36 diabetes patients (35%) and 10 controls (14%) [odds ratio (OR) 3.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6 to 7.5; p = 0.002]. Few persons had moderate and severe OA [6.9% vs 1.3%, OR 5.3 (95% Cl 0.6 to 44.1); p = 0.1]. Fifteen diabetes patients had painful OA versus two controls (adjusted OR 5.4, 95% CI 0.6 to 47.9; p = 0.13). There was no association between OA and long-term glycaemic burden (mean 30 year HbA 1c ) in the diabetes group (p > 0.2). Radiological glenohumeral OA was more common in patients with DM1 than in controls for mild, but not moderate and severe OA. The radiological findings were not associated with shoulder pain or long-term glycaemic burden.

  12. The reliability of three-dimensional scapular attitudes in healthy people and people with shoulder impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hébert Luc J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal scapular displacements during arm elevation have been observed in people with shoulder impingement syndrome. These abnormal scapular displacements were evaluated using different methods and instruments allowing a 3-dimensional representation of the scapular kinematics. The validity and the intrasession reliability have been shown for the majority of these methods for healthy people. However, the intersession reliability on healthy people and people with impaired shoulders is not well documented. This measurement property needs to be assessed before using such methods in longitudinal comparative studies. The objective of this study is to evaluate the intra and intersession reliability of 3-dimensional scapular attitudes measured at different arm positions in healthy people and to explore the same measurement properties in people with shoulder impingement syndrome using the Optotrak Probing System. Methods Three-dimensional scapular attitudes were measured twice (test and retest interspaced by one week on fifteen healthy subjects (mean age 37.3 years and eight subjects with subacromial shoulder impingement syndrome (mean age 46.1 years in three arm positions (arm at rest, 70° of humerothoracic flexion and 90° of humerothoracic abduction using the Optotrak Probing System. Two different methods of calculation of 3-dimensional scapular attitudes were used: relative to the position of the scapula at rest and relative to the trunk. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and standard error of measure (SEM were used to estimate intra and intersession reliability. Results For both groups, the reliability of the three-dimensional scapular attitudes for elevation positions was very good during the same session (ICCs from 0.84 to 0.99; SEM from 0.6° to 1.9° and good to very good between sessions (ICCs from 0.62 to 0.97; SEM from 1.2° to 4.2° when using the method of calculation relative to the trunk. Higher levels of

  13. Systematics of shoulder instability; Systematik der Schulterinstabilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Maehringer-Kunz, A. [Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to the causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options. Instabilities are classified into traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome and into microtraumatic instabilities. For diagnostics plain radiographs (''trauma series'') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful repositioning. Direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation of the different injury patterns of the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast computed tomography (CT) arthrography with the use of multidetector CT scanners represents an alternative imaging modality; however, MR imaging should be preferred in the work-up of shoulder instabilities due to the mostly younger age of patients. (orig.) [German] Unter einer Schulterinstabilitaet versteht man jede zu Beschwerden fuehrende Translation des Humeruskopfs in Relation zur Gelenkpfanne waehrend einer aktiven Bewegung der Schulter. Glenohumerale Instabilitaeten werden heute nach ihrer Aetiologie eingeteilt, da bei der Wahl der Therapie der Entstehungsmechanismus der Instabilitaet eine wichtige Rolle spielt. Danach unterscheidet man primaer traumatisch von atraumatisch entstandenen Instabilitaeten sowie Mikroinstabilitaeten. Bei der Diagnostik dienen konventionelle Roentgenuebersichtsaufnahmen nur noch zur Dokumentation einer Luxation und zur Beurteilung der Reposition. Die durch eine Instabilitaet hervorgerufenen Verletzungsfolgen am labroligamentaeren Komplex und den knoechernen Strukturen werden heute bevorzugt mit der direkten MR-Arthrographie dargestellt. Hierbei koennen unterschiedliche Verletzungsmuster dargestellt werden. Nach

  14. Double contrast arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparini, D.

    1991-01-01

    From 1980 to 1989 the author performed 481 double-contrast arthrographic examinations of the shoulder (DCSA). A hundred and forty-two complete and 46 partial rotator cuff tears were demonstrated; 68 of them underwent surgical exploration. Results confirmed DCSA capabilities in detecting both their location (100%) and size (95%). Moreover, thickness (89%) and erosions (94%) in tendon edges and surfaces were demonstrated - that is, all the qualitative information needed to depict degenerative processes. Such evidence may also affect treatment planning

  15. Geometrical analysis of stemless shoulder arthroplasty: a radiological study of seventy TESS total shoulder prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadum, Bakir; Hassany, Hamid; Wadsten, Mats; Sayed-Noor, Arkan; Sjödén, Göran

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a stemless shoulder prosthesis to restore shoulder anatomy in relation to premorbid anatomy. This prospective study was performed between May 2007 and December 2013. The inclusion criteria were patients with primary osteoarthritis (OA) who had undergone stemless total anatomic shoulder arthroplasty. Radiographic measurements were done on anteroposterior X-ray views of the glenohumeral joint. Sixty-nine patients (70 shoulders) were included in the study. The mean difference between premorbid centre of rotation (COR) and post-operative COR was 1 ± 2 mm (range -3 to 5.8 mm). The mean difference between premorbid humeral head height (HH) and post-operative HH was -1 ± 3 mm (range -9.7 to 8.5 mm). The mean difference between premorbid neck-shaft angle (NSA) and post-operative NSA was -3 ± 12° (range -26 to 20°). Stemless implants could be of help to reconstruct the shoulder anatomy. This study shows that there are some challenges to be addressed when attempting to ensure optimal implant positioning. The critical step is to determine the correct level of bone cut to avoid varus or valgus humeral head inclination and ensure correct head size.

  16. Posterior glenoid rim deficiency in recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishaupt, D.; Zanetti, M.; Hodler, J.; Nyffeler, R.W.; Gerber, C.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To assess the shape of the posterior glenoid rim in patients with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability.Design and patients. CT examinations of 15 shoulders with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability were reviewed in masked fashion with regard to abnormalities of the glenoid shape, specifically of its posterior rim. The glenoid version was also assessed. The findings were compared with the findings in 15 shoulders with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and 15 shoulders without instability. For all patients, surgical correlation was available.Results. Fourteen of the 15 (93%) shoulders with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability had a deficiency of the posteroinferior glenoid rim. In patients with recurrent anterior instability or stable shoulders such deficiencies were less common (60% and 73%, respectively). The craniocaudal length of the deficiencies was largest in patients with posterior instability. When a posteroinferior deficiency with a craniocaudal length of 12 mm or more was defined as abnormal, sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability were 86.7% and 83.3%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in glenoid version between shoulders with posterior instability and stable shoulders (P=0.01).Conclusion. Recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability should be considered in patients with a bony deficiency of the posteroinferior glenoid rim with a craniocaudal length of more than 12 mm. (orig.)

  17. Shoulder joint loading and posture during medicine cart pushing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; Lin, Jia-Hua; Boyer, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Excessive physical loads and awkward shoulder postures during pushing and pulling are risk factors for shoulder pain. Pushing a medicine cart is a major component of a work shift for nurses and medical assistants in hospitals and other health care facilities. A laboratory experiment was conducted to examine the effects of common factors (e.g., lane congestion, cart load stability, floor surface friction) on shoulder joint moment and shoulder elevation angle of participants during cart pushing. Participants pushed a medicine cart on straight tracks and turning around right-angle corners. Peak shoulder joint moments reached 25.1 Nm, 20.3 Nm, and 26.8 Nm for initial, transition, and turning phases of the pushing tasks, indicating that shoulder joint loading while pushing a medical cart is comparable to levels previously reported from heavy manual activities encountered in industry (e.g., garbage collection). Also, except for user experience, all other main study factors, including congestion level, cart load stability, location of transition strip, shoulder tendency, surface friction, and handedness, significantly influenced shoulder joint moment and shoulder elevation angle. The findings provide a better understanding of shoulder exposures associated with medicine cart operations and may be helpful in designing and optimizing the physical environment where medicine carts are used.

  18. Shoulder dystocia--malpractice or acceptable risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolbekken, J A

    2000-09-01

    In 1988 a new patient insurance system was introduced in Norway. It was initially described as an 'objectified' system, similar to one based on the no-fault principle. Early doubts were raised about the system's status, as it contains rules stating that compensation will not be given if the medical intervention is adequate and the involved risk is acceptable. This study was undertaken to examine the practice of these rules. An archival study was performed on the 41 shoulder dystocia cases that had been closed in the decade from 1988-1997. These cases were selected as shoulder dystocia was found to be the obstetrical event most often leading to a decision on acceptable risk. The most common injury in these cases was Erb's palsy, but fatalities and brain injuries were also observed. Compensation was given in nine cases, whereas it was denied due to an acceptable medical risk in the remaining cases. Indications of inconsistency among the reached decisions were found, and judged to be a result of differences of opinion between expert witnesses on the adequacy of the obstetrical practice. Doubts are raised as to whether similar decisions are reached in similar cases. Shoulder dystocia may be an acceptable risk in the sense that it is hard to predict and prevent. Whether the consequences of such a risk should be compensated, remains a political and economical issue. Present thinking leads to decisions that create a divide between the lucky unlucky and the plainly unlucky.

  19. The epidemiology of shoulder dislocations in Oslo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liavaag, S; Svenningsen, S; Reikerås, O; Enger, M; Fjalestad, T; Pripp, A H; Brox, J I

    2011-12-01

    There are few previous studies on the incidence of shoulder dislocation in the general population. The aim of the study was to report the incidence of acute shoulder dislocations in the capital of Norway (Oslo) in 2009. Patients of all ages living in Oslo, sustaining a dislocation of the glenohumeral joint, were identified using electronic diagnosis registers, patient protocols, radiological registers of the hospitals, and the Norwegian Patient Register (NPR). The overall incidence rate was 56.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 50.2-62.4] per 100,000 person-years, with rates of 82.2 (95% CI 71.7-92.8) and 30.9 (95% CI 24.5-37.3) in men and women, respectively. The incidence of primary dislocations was 26.2 (95% CI 22.1-30.4). The overall incidence of shoulder dislocations in Oslo was higher than previously reported incidences. The incidence of primary dislocations was also higher than that in previously reported studies for the general population but it was close to the incidence reported in Malmø, Sweden. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Arthrography of the equine shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, A.J.; Spencer, C.P.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques and normal radiographic anatomy for positive and double contrast shoulder arthrography in horses were evaluated. General anaesthesia was used for most radiographic projections of the shoulder. The mediolateral projection provided the most information during arthrography, although the supinated mediolateral view occasionally allowed better definition of the cartilage surfaces on the medial aspects of the humeral head. The craniocaudal mediolateral oblique and caudocranial projections provided limited additional information. Water soluble non-ionic contrast agents, such as metrizamide and iohexol, were suitable for shoulder arthrography; iohexol resulted in less synovitis and lameness. Arthrography in cases of osteochondrosis and osteochondritis dissecans allowed better evaluation of cartilage attachment to subchondral bone, better evaluation of the length and depth of cartilage lesions and more accurately defined the site and shape of osteocartilaginous free bodies. Cartilage thickening without detachment from the subchondral bone could only be determined by arthrography. Although these thick cartilage regions may later dissect from the subchondral bone, most cases where the cartilage was firmly adherent were not candidates for surgical debridement and carried a favourable prognosis. The determination of a free flap by arthrography indicated the need for surgery. Extensive humeral and glenoid cavity lesions were better defined by arthrography, allowing a rational decision between surgical debridement or euthanasia. Using arthrography, evaluation of the size and patency of the communicating canal to a subchondral cystic defect better separated cases with long, narrow and poorly patent canals for conservative rather than surgical therapy

  1. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, Martin [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lang, Philipp [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Wagner, Ulli [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Moeller, Frank [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Deimling, Urs van [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Genant, H K [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Schild, Hans H [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures.

  2. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, Martin; Lang, Philipp; Wagner, Ulli; Moeller, Frank; Deimling, Urs van; Genant, H.K.; Schild, Hans H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T 1 -weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T 2 *-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures

  3. Ironman triathletes: MRI assessment of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, W.D.; Dierenfield, Laura [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Kamuela, HI (United States); Ainge, George R.; Brown, David W. [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kamuela, HI (United States); Shellock, Frank G. [University of Southern California, Education and Research, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crues, John V. [Radnet Inc., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reuter, Robert M.

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate the prevalence of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including abnormal bone marrow signal at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in symptomatic and asymptomatic Ironman Triathletes. The shoulders of 23 Ironman Triathletes, seven asymptomatic (group I) and 16 symptomatic (group II), were studied by MRI. A separate, non-triathlete group was evaluated specifically for AC joint marrow signal abnormalities to compare with the Ironman Triathletes. Partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and AC joint arthrosis were common findings in both groups of triathletes. Tendinopathy was the only finding that was more prevalent in the symptomatic group, but this was not a statistically significant difference (p=0.35). There were no tears of the glenoid labrum seen in group I or II subjects. Of note is that 71% (5/7) of group I subjects and 62% (10/16) of group II subjects had increased signal changes in the marrow of the AC joint (p=0.68). The comparison group showed a lower prevalence (35%, p=0.06) of this finding. No statistically significant difference was found among the findings for group 1, group 2, or the comparison group, although the difference between the comparison group and Ironman Triathletes approached statistical significance when evaluating for AC joint abnormal signal. Shoulder MRI of Ironman Triathletes should be interpreted with an appreciation of the commonly seen findings in asymptomatic subjects. (orig.)

  4. Ironman triathletes: MRI assessment of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, W.D.; Dierenfield, Laura; Ainge, George R.; Brown, David W.; Shellock, Frank G.; Crues, John V.; Reuter, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate the prevalence of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including abnormal bone marrow signal at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in symptomatic and asymptomatic Ironman Triathletes. The shoulders of 23 Ironman Triathletes, seven asymptomatic (group I) and 16 symptomatic (group II), were studied by MRI. A separate, non-triathlete group was evaluated specifically for AC joint marrow signal abnormalities to compare with the Ironman Triathletes. Partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and AC joint arthrosis were common findings in both groups of triathletes. Tendinopathy was the only finding that was more prevalent in the symptomatic group, but this was not a statistically significant difference (p=0.35). There were no tears of the glenoid labrum seen in group I or II subjects. Of note is that 71% (5/7) of group I subjects and 62% (10/16) of group II subjects had increased signal changes in the marrow of the AC joint (p=0.68). The comparison group showed a lower prevalence (35%, p=0.06) of this finding. No statistically significant difference was found among the findings for group 1, group 2, or the comparison group, although the difference between the comparison group and Ironman Triathletes approached statistical significance when evaluating for AC joint abnormal signal. Shoulder MRI of Ironman Triathletes should be interpreted with an appreciation of the commonly seen findings in asymptomatic subjects. (orig.)

  5. The imaging of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayamizu, Kyoko; Ito, Katsuhide; Naito, Akira

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomographic arthrography (arthro-CT) and rotator cuff sonography (RC-US) are new methods for investigating cases with shoulder disorders. We present details of these techniques and report normal and pathological findings of the shoulder joint composed of the glenoid lablum, glenoid, joint capsule and RC. Twenty nine cases with shoulder instability and RC tears were evaluated by arthro-CT. Arthro-CT findings were correlated with surgical ones in three operated cases. Arthro-CT has provided excellent visualizations of labral tears and capsular lesions and has been successfully utilized for detection of the spilled contrast material with RC tears. We examined RC-US in 9 cases who underwent surgery or arthrography on suspicion of rotator cuff tears, and 12 normal volunteers. RC-US findings indicative of the tears included (1) defect or focal thinning of the RC in 3 cases, (2) discontinuity in the homogenous echogenicity of the RC in 2 cases, (3) presence of the abnormal central echogenic band or echogenic foci in the RC in 6 cases. The defect or thinning of the RC represented full-thickness tears. RC-US is a rapid, noninvasive and reliable method of detecting RC tears. (author)

  6. Postoperative MR arthography of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, T.; Trattnig, S.; Breitenseher, M.; Freilinger, W.; Cochole, M.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    Indications of MR arthrography were analyzed in this prospective study. The aim was to evaluate possible advantages over conventional MRI, establish diagnostic criteria and to analyze its meaning further for the therapeutic management of postoperative patients. MR arthrography was performed in eight patients who had undergone surgical repair of rotator cuff lesions (modified Neer acromioplasty) and in six patients who had undergone arthroscopic therapy of recurrent unidirectional dislocation of the shoulder by combined arthroscopic intra- and extracapsular repair. MR investigations were performed before and after application of a contrast solution (2 mmol Gd-DTPA). All patients suffered from chronic postoperative pain. In patients with rotator cuff lesions, a partial tear could be verified in one patient and excluded in all others. In patients after arthroscopic therapy by combined intra- and extracapsular repair, a radiologically patulous-appearing capsule correlated with clinically recurrent dislocations. In all other patients diagnostic criteria, such as distribution of the intra-articular contrast solution, proliferation of scar tissue, nodular appearance of the glenohumeral ligaments and capsule thickness, correlated with a regular postoperative status. MR arthrography of the shoulder represents a promising method in the evaluation of the postoperative shoulder. It might further improve the evaluation of reactive capsule alterations, scar tissue proliferation, and the labroligamentous complex, as well as the ability to differentiate partial and complete rerupture from degenerative changes of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [de

  7. Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction. Report from the Committee on Foreign Relations (To Accompany Treaty Doc. 99-11). 99th Congress, 2d Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.

    The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, an international law whose purpose is to establish uniform rules to be applied in cases of international child abduction, is described. The Hague Convention requires that children wrongfully removed or retained abroad in connection with parental custody disputes be…

  8. Protocol for Shoulder function training reducing musculoskeletal pain in shoulder and neck: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Andersen, Lars L; Mortensen, Ole S

    2011-01-01

    treated by physical therapists. The exact mechanism of neck pain is rarely revealed by clinical examination and the treatment has varied from passive rest to active treatments. Active treatments have often been divided into either training of the painful area or the surrounding musculature avoiding direct...... training of the painful area. Our study investigates the effect of the latter approach. METHODS/DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial of 10 weeks duration is currently being conducted. Employed office workers with severe neck-shoulder pain are randomized to 3 × 20 min shoulder function training...... with training supervision or to a reference group receiving advice to stay physically active. Shoulder function training primarily focuses on the serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle with only minimal activation the upper trapezius.An announcement was sent to the administrative section of the university...

  9. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings; Osteocondromatose sinovial no ombro: achados por metodos de imagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terazaki, Carlos Renato Ticianelli; Trippia, Carlos Henrique; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda Sales Ferreira; Medaglia, Carla Regina Miranda, E-mail: reticianelli@hotmail.com [Hospital Sao Vicente (FUNEF), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem; Trippia, Cesar Rodrigo [Hospital Sao Vicente (FUNEF), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head), and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder. (author)

  10. Mid-term shoulder functional and quality of life outcomes after shoulder replacement in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Heather K; Struk, Aimee M; Reed, Austin; Wright, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder pain and loss of function are directly associated with obesity. We hypothesized that significant interactions would exist between total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) and obesity status on functional and quality of life (QOL) outcomes over the long term. Clinical and QOL outcomes (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Evaluation form, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating scale, Medical Outcomes Short Form 12 (SF-12), range of motion (ROM), and strength) were longitudinally compared in patients with low and high body mass index (BMI) after a TSA or a RSA. Prospectively collected data of patients with a TSA or RSA were reviewed (N = 310). Preoperative, 2-year, and final follow-up visits were included (range 3-17 years; mean 5.0 ± 2.5 years). Patient data were stratified for analysis using BMI. Morbidly obese patients had worse preoperative functional scores and QOL compared to the other groups. There were no significant interactions of BMI group by surgery type for any of the outcome variables except for active external rotation ROM. Morbidly obese patients attained lower SF-12 scores compared to the remaining groups at each time point. Both TSA and RSA can be expected to impart positive functional outcomes in patients irrespective of BMI. Morbidly obese patients do not attain the same gains in Medical Outcomes SF-12 scores as the non-morbidly obese patients. The lower improvements in active external ROM may be due to morphological limitations of excessive adiposity. This is a level II study.

  11. Abductive diagnostic procedure based on an and/or/not graph for expected behaviour: application to a gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuster, P. [Dept. Mat. and Infor. UIB, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)] Ligeza, A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Automation and Electrics, Technical University of Cracow (Poland)] Martin, J.A. [LEA-SICA: LAAS-CNRS Toulouse, France and IIiA-UdG Girona (Spain)

    1998-12-31

    In this presentation the diagnostic of technical systems is adressed by considering first of all their expected normal behaviour. The formalism that is used is called AND/OR/NOT causal graphs. This approach can be regarded as an extension of abductive models. A symptom can be True. False or Unknown, it can be represented by a propositional formula. The nodes are partitioned into: Manifestations, that characterize each type of misbehaviour, Elementary diagnosis, that correspond to single faulty states and Intermediate, these last are observable or not partial symptoms. An illustration about the on-line diagnosis of a gas turbine shows also some of the steps leading to a causal graph modelisation in which this diagnosis methodology has been applied. (orig.) 5 refs.

  12. Abductive diagnostic procedure based on an and/or/not graph for expected behaviour: application to a gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuster, P. [Dept. Mat. and Infor. UIB, Palma de Mallorca (Spain)] Ligeza, A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Automation and Electrics, Technical University of Cracow (Poland)] Martin, J.A. [LEA-SICA: LAAS-CNRS Toulouse, France and IIiA-UdG Girona (Spain)

    1997-12-31

    In this presentation the diagnostic of technical systems is adressed by considering first of all their expected normal behaviour. The formalism that is used is called AND/OR/NOT causal graphs. This approach can be regarded as an extension of abductive models. A symptom can be True. False or Unknown, it can be represented by a propositional formula. The nodes are partitioned into: Manifestations, that characterize each type of misbehaviour, Elementary diagnosis, that correspond to single faulty states and Intermediate, these last are observable or not partial symptoms. An illustration about the on-line diagnosis of a gas turbine shows also some of the steps leading to a causal graph modelisation in which this diagnosis methodology has been applied. (orig.) 5 refs.

  13. Abduction of children of political dissidents in Argentina and the role of human genetics in their restitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penchaszadeh, V B

    1992-01-01

    Between 1976 and 1983 a brutal military dictatorship governed Argentina. The most basic human rights were severely violated and the method of forced disappearances of approximately 30,000 political dissidents was instituted. In this process, about 300 babies and children of the disappeared victims were also abducted by the military and given to childless families linked to the security forces. Women whose children and grandchildren had disappeared organized themselves as Grandmothers of Plaza de Mayo to search for their missing loved ones. This search was aided by human geneticists from different parts of the world who provided the scientific basis to establish the genetic identification through "grandpaternity testing," and by mental health professionals who provided the psychological theory supporting restitution of appropriated children to their legitimate families. Thus far, close to 50 children have been located, identified and restituted.

  14. Association of head circumference and shoulder dystocia in macrosomic neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Austin; Mandelbaum, David E

    2013-04-01

    To determine whether asymmetric macrosomia (disproportionately large body size in comparison to head circumference) could be demonstrated in a population of infants suffering shoulder dystocia during delivery relative to those that did not suffer from shoulder dystocia. A case-control study was conducted as a retrospective chart review over 3 years at a large maternity hospital in an urban setting. Among infants over 4,000 g, those that suffered from shoulder dystocia during delivery had a smaller mean head circumference than infants of a similar size that did not suffer from shoulder dystocia. A statistically significant difference was also present when cases of documented gestational diabetes were excluded. Asymmetric macrosomia is more likely to be present in a population of infants who suffered shoulder dystocia during delivery. This knowledge could be used in designing tools to predict which pregnancies are at highest risk for shoulder dystocia during delivery.

  15. Extravasation of joint fluid into the mediastinum and the deep neck during atthoscopic shoulder surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ji Yeon; Lee, Ki Nam [Dept. of Radiology, Dong-A University Hospital, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Extravasation of shoulder joint fluid into the surrounding muscles during shoulder arthroscopic surgery is common and inevitable. Here, we report a case of massive extravasation of shoulder joint fluid leading to mediastinal and retrotracheal effusion after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. We will discuss the anatomical basis of fluid leakage from the shoulder to the mediastinum and to the deep neck on CT.

  16. Extravasation of joint fluid into the mediastinum and the deep neck during atthoscopic shoulder surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ji Yeon; Lee, Ki Nam

    2014-01-01

    Extravasation of shoulder joint fluid into the surrounding muscles during shoulder arthroscopic surgery is common and inevitable. Here, we report a case of massive extravasation of shoulder joint fluid leading to mediastinal and retrotracheal effusion after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. We will discuss the anatomical basis of fluid leakage from the shoulder to the mediastinum and to the deep neck on CT.

  17. Electromyographic Activity of Shoulder Girdle Muscles in Patients With Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Rotator Cuff Tears: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spall, Peter; Ribeiro, Daniel Cury; Sole, Gisela

    2016-09-01

    To compare electromyographic activity in patients with symptomatic rotator cuff tears with healthy controls or to those with asymptomatic cuff tears. TYPE: Systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed, Scopus, Ovid Medline, and Web of Science were searched from inception to August 1, 2014, and a search update was performed on June 8, 2015. Case-control studies or intervention studies that had baseline comparisons for symptomatic versus healthy shoulders or those with asymptomatic rotator cuff tear were searched. Methodological quality was assessed with a modified Critical Appraisal Skills Programme score and meta-analyses were performed when 2 or more studies explored the same outcome measures. Nine studies were included, with the quality ranging from 1 to 3 (maximum 6). Electromyographic outcomes included amplitudes and ratios thereof, activity duration, and median frequency of shoulder girdle muscles during isometric contractions (4 studies) and functional tasks (5 studies). Longer activity duration was found for upper trapezius during glenohumeral movements, and greater fatigability of anterior and middle deltoids during isometric hand gripping for patients with rotator cuff tears compared to controls. The meta-analysis (3 studies) showed that patients with rotator cuff tears had lower activation ratios for latissimus dorsi during isometric abduction contraction compared to controls (P muscle activity differences between the rotator cuff tear group and controls is thus limited. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. DYNAMIC HIP ADDUCTION, ABDUCTION AND ABDOMINAL EXERCISES FROM THE HOLMICH GROIN-INJURY PREVENTION PROGRAM ARE INTENSE ENOUGH TO BE CONSIDERED STRENGTHENING EXERCISES - A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krommes, Kasper; Bandholm, Thomas; Jakobsen, Markus D

    2017-01-01

    and external obliques during isometric adduction against a football placed between the ankles (IBA), isometric adduction against a football placed between the knees (IBK), folding knife (FK), cross-country skiing on one leg (CCS), adduction partner (ADP) and abduction partner (ABP). The EMG-signals were...

  19. High eccentric hip abduction strength reduces the risk of developing patellofemoral pain among novice runners initiating a self-structured running program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramskov, Daniel; Barton, Christian; Nielsen, Rasmus O

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Observational prospective cohort study with 1-year follow-up. Objectives To investigate the relationship between eccentric hip abduction strength and the development of patellofemoral pain (PFP) in novice runners, during a self-structured running regime. Background Recent research...

  20. Clinical Outcomes after Arthroscopic Release for Recalcitrant Frozen Shoulder

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Moradi, Ali; Pour, Mostafa Khalili; Moghadam, Mohammad Hallaj; Kachooei, Amir Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: To explain the role of arthroscopic release in intractable frozen shoulders. We used different questionnaires and measuring tools to understand whether arthroscopic release is the superior modality to treat patients with intractable frozen shoulders. Methods: Between 2007 and 2013, in a prospective study, we enrolled 80 patients (52 females and 28 males) with recalcitrant frozen shoulder, who underwent arthroscopic release at Ghaem Hospital, a tertiary referral center, in Mashhad,...