WorldWideScience

Sample records for programed desorption tpd

  1. Temperature-programmed desorption of water and ammonia on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of water and ammonia over. ZrO2 and sulphated ZrO2 prepared by different methods has been investigated for measuring strong acidity and acidity distribution on sulphated zirconia-type solid super-acid catalysts. The TPD of water provides a simple reliable method for ...

  2. TEMPERATURE-PROGRAMMED DESORPTION: PRINCIPLES, INSTRUMENT DESIGN, AND DEMONSTRATION WITH NAALH4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowe, A; Ragaiy Zidan, R

    2006-11-07

    This article is a brief introduction to temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), an analytical technique devised to analyze, in this case, materials for their potential as hydrogen storage materials. The principles and requirements of TPD are explained and the different components of a generic TPD apparatus are described. The construction of a modified TPD instrument from commercially available components is reported together with the control and acquisition technique used to create a TPD spectrum. The chemical and instrumental parameters to be considered in a typical TPD experiment and the analytical utility of the technique are demonstrated by the dehydrogenation of titanium-doped NaAlH{sub 4} by means of thermally programmed desorption.

  3. Equilibrium adsorption data from temperature-programmed desorption measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foeth, F.; Mugge, J.M.; van der Vaart, R.; van der Vaart, Rick; Bosch, H.; Reith, T.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes a novel method that enables the calculation of a series of adsorption isotherms basically from a single Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD) experiment. The basic idea is to saturate an adsorbent packed in a fixed bed at a certain feed concentration and temperature and to

  4. Temperature-programmed desorption for membrane inlet mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketola, R.A.; Grøn, C.; Lauritsen, F.R.

    1998-01-01

    We present a novel technique for analyzing volatile organic compounds in air samples using a solid adsorbent together with temperature-programmed desorption and subsequent detection by membrane inlet mass spectrometry (TPD-MIMS). The new system has the advantage of a fast separation of compounds...... to diffuse through the membrane into the mass spectrometer in a few seconds. In this fashion we could completely separate many similar volatile compounds, for example toluene from xylene and trichloroethene from tetrachloroethene. Typical detection limits were at low or sub-nanogram levels, the dynamic range...

  5. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, James P., E-mail: james.tonks@awe.co.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Galloway, Ewan C., E-mail: ewan.galloway@awe.co.uk; King, Martin O. [AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kerherve, Gwilherm [VACGEN Ltd, St. Leonards-On-Sea, East Sussex TN38 9NN (United Kingdom); Watts, John F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  6. Desorption Kinetics of Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, O2, CO, Methane, Ethane, and Propane from Graphene and Amorphous Solid Water Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R. Scott; May, Robert A.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2016-03-03

    The desorption kinetics for Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, O2, CO, methane, ethane, and propane from grapheme covered Pt(111) and amorphous solid water (ASW) surfaces are investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The TPD spectra for all of the adsorbates from graphene have well-resolved first, second, third, and multi- layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent the zero-order desorption for all of the adsorbates. An Arrhenius analysis is used to obtain desorption energies and prefactors for desorption from graphene for all of the adsorbates. In contrast, the leading desorption edges for the adsorbates from ASW do not align (for coverages < 2 ML). The non-alignment of TPD leading edges suggests that there are multiple desorption binding sites on the ASW surface. Inversion analysis is used to obtain the coverage dependent desorption energies and prefactors for desorption from ASW for all of the adsorbates.

  7. Stabilization of mercury over Mn-based oxides: Speciation and reactivity by temperature programmed desorption analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Haomiao [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ma, Yongpeng [Henan Collaborative Innovation Center of Environmental Pollution Control and Ecological Restoration, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, No. 136, Science Avenue, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Huang, Wenjun; Mei, Jian; Zhao, Songjian; Qu, Zan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yan, Naiqiang, E-mail: nqyan@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Hg-TPD method was used for speciation of mercury species. • Different elements modified MnO{sub x} have different mercury binding state. • Understanding mercury existed state was beneficial for designing novel materials. - Abstract: Mercury temperature-programmed desorption (Hg-TPD) method was employed to clarify mercury species over Mn-based oxides. The elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) removal mechanism over MnO{sub x} was ascribed to chemical-adsorption. HgO was the primary mercury chemical compound adsorbed on the surface of MnO{sub x}. Rare earth element (Ce), main group element (Sn) and transition metal elements (Zr and Fe) were chosen for the modification of MnO{sub x}. Hg-TPD results indicated that the binding strength of mercury on these binary oxides followed the order of Sn-MnO{sub x} < Ce-MnO{sub x} ∼ MnO{sub x} < Fe-MnO{sub x} < Zr-MnO{sub x}. The activation energies for desorption were calculated and they were 64.34, 101.85, 46.32, 117.14, and 106.92 eV corresponding to MnO{sub x}, Ce-MnO{sub x}, Sn-MnO{sub x}, Zr-MnO{sub x} and Fe-MnO{sub x}, respectively. Sn-MnO{sub x} had a weak bond of mercury (Hg-O), while Zr-MnO{sub x} had a strong bond (Hg≡O). Ce-MnO{sub x} and Fe-MnO{sub x} had similar bonds compared with pure MnO{sub x}. Moreover, the effects of SO{sub 2} and NO were investigated based on Hg-TPD analysis. SO{sub 2} had a poison effect on Hg{sup 0} removal, and the weak bond of mercury can be easily destroyed by SO{sub 2}. NO was favorable for Hg{sup 0} removal, and the bond strength of mercury was enhanced.

  8. Methanol Reforming over Cobalt Catalysts Prepared from Fumarate Precursors: TPD Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftichia Papadopoulou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD was employed to investigate adsorption characteristics of CH3OH, H2O, H2, CO2 and CO on cobalt-manganese oxide catalysts prepared through mixed Co-Mn fumarate precursors either by pyrolysis or oxidation and oxidation/reduction pretreatment. Pyrolysis temperature and Co/Mn ratio were the variable synthesis parameters. Adsorption of methanol, water and CO2 was carried out at room temperature. Adsorption of H2 and H2O was carried out at 25 and 300 °C. Adsorption of CO was carried out at 25 and 150 °C. The goal of the work was to gain insight on the observed differences in the performance of the aforementioned catalysts in methanol steam reforming. TPD results indicated that activity differences are mostly related to variation in the number density of active sites, which are able to adsorb and decompose methanol.

  9. Nano-nitride cathode catalysts of Ti, Ta, and Nb for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Temperature-programmed desorption investigation of molecularly adsorbed oxygen at low temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Ohnishi, Ryohji

    2013-01-10

    TiN, NbN, TaN, and Ta3N5 nanoparticles synthesized using mesoporous graphitic (mpg)-C3N4 templates were investigated for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of molecularly adsorbed O2 at 120-170 K from these nanoparticles was examined, and the resulting amount and temperature of desorption were key factors determining the ORR activity. The size-dependent TiN nanoparticles (5-8 and 100 nm) were then examined. With decreasing particle size, the density of molecularly adsorbed O2 per unit of surface area increased, indicating that a decrease in particle size increases the number of active sites. It is hard to determine the electrochemical active surface area for nonmetal electrocatalysts (such as oxides or nitrides), because of the absence of proton adsorption/desorption peaks in the voltammograms. In this study, O2-TPD for molecularly adsorbed O2 at low temperature demonstrated that the amount and strength of adsorbed O2 were key factors determining the ORR activity. The properties of molecularly adsorbed O2 on cathode catalysts are discussed against the ORR activity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Dosimeter-Type NOx Sensing Properties of KMnO4 and Its Electrical Conductivity during Temperature Programmed Desorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Moos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An impedimetric NOx dosimeter based on the NOx sorption material KMnO4 is proposed. In addition to its application as a low level NOx dosimeter, KMnO4 shows potential as a precious metal free lean NOx trap material (LNT for NOx storage catalysts (NSC enabling electrical in-situ diagnostics. With this dosimeter, low levels of NO and NO2 exposure can be detected electrically as instantaneous values at 380 °C by progressive NOx accumulation in the KMnO4 based sensitive layer. The linear NOx sensing characteristics are recovered periodically by heating to 650 °C or switching to rich atmospheres. Further insight into the NOx sorption-dependent conductivity of the KMnO4-based material is obtained by the novel eTPD method that combines electrical characterization with classical temperature programmed desorption (TPD. The NOx loading amount increases proportionally to the NOx exposure time at sorption temperature. The cumulated NOx exposure, as well as the corresponding NOx loading state, can be detected linearly by electrical means in two modes: (1 time-continuously during the sorption interval including NOx concentration information from the signal derivative or (2 during the short-term thermal NOx release.

  11. Dosimeter-Type NOx Sensing Properties of KMnO4 and Its Electrical Conductivity during Temperature Programmed Desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groβ, Andrea; Kremling, Michael; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J.; Visser, Jacobus H.; Tuller, Harry L.; Moos, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    An impedimetric NOx dosimeter based on the NOx sorption material KMnO4 is proposed. In addition to its application as a low level NOx dosimeter, KMnO4 shows potential as a precious metal free lean NOx trap material (LNT) for NOx storage catalysts (NSC) enabling electrical in-situ diagnostics. With this dosimeter, low levels of NO and NO2 exposure can be detected electrically as instantaneous values at 380 °C by progressive NOx accumulation in the KMnO4 based sensitive layer. The linear NOx sensing characteristics are recovered periodically by heating to 650 °C or switching to rich atmospheres. Further insight into the NOx sorption-dependent conductivity of the KMnO4-based material is obtained by the novel eTPD method that combines electrical characterization with classical temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The NOx loading amount increases proportionally to the NOx exposure time at sorption temperature. The cumulated NOx exposure, as well as the corresponding NOx loading state, can be detected linearly by electrical means in two modes: (1) time-continuously during the sorption interval including NOx concentration information from the signal derivative or (2) during the short-term thermal NOx release. PMID:23549366

  12. Temperature-programmed desorption of water and ammonia on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 115; Issue 4. Temperature-programmed desorption of water and ammonia on sulphated zirconia catalysts for ... Author Affiliations. Vasant R Choudhary1 Abhijeet J Karkamkar1. Chemical Engineering Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008, India ...

  13. Oxygen Sorption and Desorption Properties of Selected Lanthanum Manganites and Lanthanum Ferrite Manganites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Skou, Eivind M.; Jacobsen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Temperature‐programmed desorption (TPD) with a carrier gas was used to study the oxygen sorption and desorption properties of oxidation catalysts and solid‐oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode materials (La0.85Sr0.15)0.95MnO3+δ (LSM) and La0.60Sr0.40Fe0.80Mn0.20O3‐δ (LSFM). The powders were characteriz...

  14. Thermal transformation of bioactive caffeic acid on fumed silica seen by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry and quantum chemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Tetiana V; Lipkovska, Natalia O; Barvinchenko, Valentyna M; Palyanytsya, Borys B; Kazakova, Olga A; Dudik, Olesia O; Menyhárd, Alfréd; László, Krisztina

    2016-05-15

    Thermochemical studies of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and their surface complexes are important for the pharmaceutical industry, medicine and for the development of technologies of heterogeneous biomass pyrolysis. In this study, structural and thermal transformations of caffeic acid complexes on silica surfaces were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPD MS) and quantum chemical methods. Two types of caffeic acid surface complexes are found to form through phenolic or carboxyl groups. The kinetic parameters of the chemical reactions of caffeic acid on silica surface are calculated. The mechanisms of thermal transformations of the caffeic chemisorbed surface complexes are proposed. Thermal decomposition of caffeic acid complex chemisorbed through grafted ester group proceeds via three parallel reactions, producing ketene, vinyl and acetylene derivatives of 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Immobilization of phenolic acids on the silica surface improves greatly their thermal stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. UV-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption studies of model and bulk heterogeneous catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewell, Craig Richmond [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) have been used to investigate the surface structure of model heterogeneous catalysts in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). UV-Raman spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure of bulk model catalysts in ambient and reaction conditions. The structural information obtained through UV-Raman spectroscopy has been correlated with both the UHV surface analysis and reaction results. The present day propylene and ethylene polymerization catalysts (Ziegler-Natta catalysts) are prepared by deposition of TiCl4 and a Al(Et)3 co-catalyst on a microporous Mg-ethoxide support that is prepared from MgCl2 and ethanol. A model thin film catalyst is prepared by depositing metallic Mg on a Au foil in a UHV chamber in a background of TiCl4 in the gas phase. XPS results indicate that the Mg is completely oxidized to MgCl2 by TiCl4 resulting in a thin film of MgCl2/TiClx, where x = 2, 3, and 4. To prepare an active catalyst, the thin film of MgCl2/TiClx on Au foil is enclosed in a high pressure cell contained within the UHV chamber and exposed to ~1 Torr of Al(Et)3.

  16. Oxygen sorption and desorption properties of selected lanthanum manganites and lanthanum ferrite manganites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Skou, Eivind M; Jacobsen, Torben

    2015-06-08

    Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) with a carrier gas was used to study the oxygen sorption and desorption properties of oxidation catalysts and solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode materials (La(0.85) Sr(0.15)0.95 MnO(3+δ) (LSM) and La(0.60) Sr(0.40) Fe(0.80) Mn(0.20) O(3-δ) (LSFM). The powders were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and BET surface adsorption. Sorbed oxygen could be distinguished from oxygen originating from stoichiometry changes. The results indicated that there is one main site for oxygen sorption/desorption. The amount of sorbed oxygen was monitored over time at different temperatures. Furthermore, through data analysis it was shown that the desorption peak associated with oxygen sorption is described well by second-order desorption kinetics. This indicates that oxygen molecules dissociate upon adsorption and that the rate-determining step for the desorption reaction is a recombination of monatomic oxygen. Typical problems with re-adsorption in this kind of TPD setup were revealed to be insignificant by using simulations. Finally, different key parameters of sorption and desorption were determined, such as desorption activation energies, density of sorption sites, and adsorption and desorption reaction order. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Deuterium desorption from tungsten using laser heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Retention and desorption of hydrogenic species need to be accurately modeled to predict the tritium inventory of next generation fusion devices, which is needed both for tritium fuel recovery and for tritium safety concerns. In this paper, experiments on thermal desorption of deuterium from intrinsic polycrystalline tungsten defects using laser heating are compared to TMAP-7 modeling. The samples during deuterium plasma exposure were at a temperature of 373K for this benchmark study with ion fluence of 0.7–1.0 ×1024Dm−2. Following plasma exposure, a fiber laser (λ= 1100nm heated the samples to peak surface temperatures ranging from ∼500 to 1400K with pulse widths from 10ms to 1s, and 1 to 10 pulses applied to each sample. The remaining deuterium retention was measured using temperature programmed desorption (TPD. Results show that > 95% of deuterium is desorbed when the peak surface temperature reached ∼950K for > 1s. TMAP-7 is used to predict deuterium desorption from tungsten for a range of surface temperatures and heating durations, and is compared to previous work on desorption from beryllium codeposits.

  18. Development of ultralow energy (1-10 eV) ion scattering spectrometry coupled with reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption for the investigation of molecular solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Soumabha; Bhuin, Radha Gobinda; Methikkalam, Rabin Rajan J; Pradeep, T; Kephart, Luke; Walker, Jeff; Kuchta, Kevin; Martin, Dave; Wei, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Extremely surface specific information, limited to the first atomic layer of molecular surfaces, is essential to understand the chemistry and physics in upper atmospheric and interstellar environments. Ultra low energy ion scattering in the 1-10 eV window with mass selected ions can reveal extremely surface specific information which when coupled with reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectroscopies, diverse chemical and physical properties of molecular species at surfaces could be derived. These experiments have to be performed at cryogenic temperatures and at ultra high vacuum conditions without the possibility of collisions of neutrals and background deposition in view of the poor ion intensities and consequent need for longer exposure times. Here we combine a highly optimized low energy ion optical system designed for such studies coupled with RAIR and TPD and its initial characterization. Despite the ultralow collision energies and long ion path lengths employed, the ion intensities at 1 eV have been significant to collect a scattered ion spectrum of 1000 counts/s for mass selected CH2(+).

  19. Investigation of the interaction of benzene with vanadium-molybdenum oxide catalysts by programmed thermal desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belokopytov, Yu.V.; Pyatnitskii, Yu.I.; Grebennikov, Yu.N.

    1985-09-01

    Programmed thermal desorption was used to investigate the interaction of benzene with vanadium-molybdenum oxide catalysts. It was established that the amount of maleic anhydride desorbed from the catalyst surface depends on the catalyst composition and that it varies with its activity and selectivity.

  20. Processes for desorption from LiAlO sub 2 treated with H sub 2 as studied by temperature programmed desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, A.K.

    1990-01-01

    The energetics and kinetics of the evolution of H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} from LiAlO{sub 2} are being studied by the temperature programmed desorption technique. The concentrations of H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} in a helium stream during a temperature ramp are measured simultaneously with a mass spectrometer. Blank experiments with an empty sample tube showed that square wave spikes of H{sub 2} introduced into the helium gas stream were severely distorted by reaction with the tube walls. The tube could be stabilized, however, by sufficiently prolonged heat treatment with H{sub 2} so that H{sub 2} peaks would not be distorted up to approximately 923 K(650{degree}C). The amount of H{sub 2}adsorption/desorption is small compared to the amount of H{sub 2}O adsorption/desorption. After prolonged treatment with helium containing 990 ppm H{sub 2} at 400{degree}C, H{sub 2}O evolution into the He-H{sub 2} stream was observed during 473 to 1023 K (200 to 750{degree}C) ramps at rates of 2 or 5.6 K/min. The different peak shapes reflecting this process were deconvoluted to show that they are composites of only 2 or 3 reproducible processes. The activation energies and pre-exponential terms was evaluated. The different behavior originates in the differences among different surface sites for adsorption. The interpretation of higher temperature peaks (above 873 K (650{degree}C)) must still consider the possibility of contributions from interactions with steel walls. It was found that H{sub 2} enhances evolution of N{sub 2} from the steel. 1 tab., 6 figs., 11 refs.

  1. Identification of expression profiles of tapping panel dryness (TPD) associated genes from the latex of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Perumal; Thulaseedharan, Arjunan; Raghothama, Kashchandra

    2007-07-01

    Tapping panel dryness (TPD) occurrence in high latex yielding rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) is characterized by the partial or complete cessation of latex flow upon tapping leading to severe loss in natural rubber production around the world. The goal of this study was to identify genes whose mRNA transcript levels are differentially regulated in rubber tree during the onset of TPD. To isolate TPD responsive genes, two cDNA libraries (forward and reverse) from total RNA isolated from latex of healthy and TPD trees were constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method. In total, 1,079 EST clones were obtained from two cDNA libraries and screened by reverse Northern blot analysis. Screening results revealed that about 352 clones were differentially regulated and they were selected for sequencing. Based on the nucleotide sequence data, the putative functions of cDNA clones were predicted by BLASTX/BLASTN analysis. Among these, 64 were genes whose function had been previously identified while the remaining clones were genes with either unknown protein function or insignificant similarity to other protein/DNA/EST sequences in existing databases. RT-PCR analysis was carried out to validate the up-regulated genes from both the libraries. Among them, two genes were strongly down-regulated in TPD trees. The level of mRNA transcripts of these two genes was further examined by conventional Northern and RT-PCR analysis. Results indicated that the expression level of two genes was significantly lower in TPD trees compared to healthy trees. Many TPD associated genes were also up-regulated in TPD trees suggesting that they may be involved in triggering programmed cell death (PCD) during the onset of TPD syndrome. The results presented here demonstrate that SSH technique provides a powerful complementary approach for the identification of TPD related genes from rubber tree.

  2. Adsorption and desorption of dibenzothiophene on Ag-titania studied by the complementary temperature-programmed XPS and ESR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, Alexander; Duin, Evert C.; Nair, Sachin; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    2011-02-01

    Adsorption, desorption and structure of the surface chemical compounds formed upon interaction of dibenzothiophene (DBT) in solution of n-octane with the sulfur-selective Ag/Titania sorbent for the ultradeep desulfurization of liquid fuels was characterized by the temperature-programmed X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and Electron Spin Resonance. Adsorption of DBT proceeds via chemisorption via the oxygen-containing surface groups. Desorption of DBT and thermal regeneration of the “spent” Ag/Titania were studied by the complementary temperature-programmed XPS and ESR from 25 °C to 525 °C, in the high vacuum vs. air. The XPS spectrum of the pure DBT is reported for the first time.

  3. Adsorption and desorption of dibenzothiophene on Ag-titania studied by the complementary temperature-programmed XPS and ESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samokhvalov, Alexander, E-mail: alexsam@camden.rutgers.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Camden, NJ 08102 (United States); Duin, Evert C. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Nair, Sachin; Tatarchuk, Bruce J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Adsorption, desorption and structure of the surface chemical compounds formed upon interaction of dibenzothiophene (DBT) in solution of n-octane with the sulfur-selective Ag/Titania sorbent for the ultradeep desulfurization of liquid fuels was characterized by the temperature-programmed X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and Electron Spin Resonance. Adsorption of DBT proceeds via chemisorption via the oxygen-containing surface groups. Desorption of DBT and thermal regeneration of the 'spent' Ag/Titania were studied by the complementary temperature-programmed XPS and ESR from 25 deg. C to 525 deg. C, in the high vacuum vs. air. The XPS spectrum of the pure DBT is reported for the first time.

  4. Comparative TPR and TPD Studies of Cu and Ca Promotion on Fe-Zn- and Fe-Zn-Zr-Based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Olusola O.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrates the effect of zirconium promotion on Fe-Zn-based catalysts to boost the active sites of Fischer-Tropsch (FT catalysts. The catalysts are also promoted by Cu and Ca and the active sites are examined using Temperature-Programmed Reduction (TPR with H2 and CO and Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD with NH3 and CO2. The results are presented as a comparative study between Fe-Zn- and Fe-Zn-Zr-based catalysts. The results show that addition of Zr to Fe-Zn catalysts increases the availability and dispersion of the precursor to the active sites and promotion with Cu and Ca independently and synergistically enhances reduction of Fe-Zn-Zr-based catalysts. The presence of Ca promotes carburisation, while Cu inhibits carburisation. The impact of the Ca and Cu on the surface acidity/basicity is governed by the nature of the interaction between the phases in the catalysts. The extent of reduction reflects the availability and dispersion of the precursor to the active phase, while the extent of carburisation will impact on the selectivity of the catalysts.

  5. The use of thermal desorption in monitoring for the chemical weapons demilitarization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Martin

    2002-10-01

    Under international treaty, the United States and Russia are disposing of their aging stockpile of chemical weapons. Incineration and chemical neutralization are options for sites in the United States, although Russia prefers the latter. The storage and disposal of bulk and chemical agents and weapons involve unique hazards of handling extremely toxic materials. There are three major areas of concern--the storage stockpile, the disposal area, and the discovery and destruction of "found" material not considered part of the stockpile. Methods have been developed to detect the presence of chemical agents in the air, and these are used to help assure worker protection and the safety of the local population. Exposure limits for all chemical agents are low, sometimes nanograms per cubic meter for worker control limits and picograms per cubic meter for general population limits. There are three types of monitoring used in the USA: alarm, confirmation, and historical. Alarm monitors are required to give relatively immediate real-time responses to agent leaks. They are simple to operate and rugged, and provide an alarm in near real-time (generally a few minutes). Alarm monitors for the demilitarization program are based on sorbent pre-concentration followed by thermal desorption and simple gas chromatography. Alarms may need to be confirmed by another method, such as sample tubes collocated with the alarm monitor and analyzed in a laboratory by more sophisticated chromatography. Sample tubes are also used for historical perimeter monitoring, with sample periods typically of 12 h. The most common detector is the flame photometric detector, in sulfur or phosphorous mode, although others, such as mass-selective detectors, also have been used. All agents have specific problems with collection, chromatography and detection. Monitoring is not made easier by interferences from pesticide spraying, busy roadways or military firing ranges. Exposure limits drive the requirements for

  6. Desorption of Water from Distinct Step Types on a Curved Silver Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakrapan Janlamool

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the adsorption of H2O onto the A and B type steps on an Ag single crystal by temperature programmed desorption. For this study, we have used a curved crystal exposing a continuous range of surface structures ranging from [5(111 × (100] via (111 to [5(111 × (110]. LEED and STM studies verify that the curvature of our sample results predominantly from monoatomic steps. The sample thus provides a continuous array of step densities for both step types. Desorption probed by spatially-resolved TPD of multilayers of H2O shows no dependence on the exact substrate structure and thus confirms the absence of thermal gradients during temperature ramps. In the submonolayer regime, we observe a small and linear dependence of the desorption temperature on the A and B step density. We argue that such small differences are only observable by means of a single curved crystal, which thus establishes new experimental benchmarks for theoretical calculation of chemically accurate binding energies. We propose an origin of the observed behavior based on a “two state” desorption model.

  7. Desorption of water from distinct step types on a curved silver crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janlamool, Jakrapan; Bashlakov, Dima; Berg, Otto; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Jongsomjit, Bunjerd; Juurlink, Ludo B F

    2014-07-25

    We have investigated the adsorption of H2O onto the A and B type steps on an Ag single crystal by temperature programmed desorption. For this study, we have used a curved crystal exposing a continuous range of surface structures ranging from [5(111) × (100)] via (111) to [5(111) × (110)]. LEED and STM studies verify that the curvature of our sample results predominantly from monoatomic steps. The sample thus provides a continuous array of step densities for both step types. Desorption probed by spatially-resolved TPD of multilayers of H2O shows no dependence on the exact substrate structure and thus confirms the absence of thermal gradients during temperature ramps. In the submonolayer regime, we observe a small and linear dependence of the desorption temperature on the A and B step density. We argue that such small differences are only observable by means of a single curved crystal, which thus establishes new experimental benchmarks for theoretical calculation of chemically accurate binding energies. We propose an origin of the observed behavior based on a "two state" desorption model.

  8. Ultraviolet Photon-Induced Desorption and Decomposition Kinetics and Dynamics of Methyl Nitrite on SILVER(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Laura Ann

    The wavelength-dependent cross section for decomposition and surface fragment reaction mechanisms for the photon -induced decomposition of CH_3ONO on Ag(111) are determined using the surface analytical techniques of temperature programmed desorption with mass spectroscopy (TPD), x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS, respectively), residual gas analysis with mass spectroscopy (RGA), and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Methyl nitrite adsorbs reversibly on Ag(111) at 100 K with monolayer and multilayer desorption occurring at 131 and 118 K, respectively. The major photodecomposition fragments formed at 100 K include O(a), CH_2 (a), CH_3(a), CH _2O(a), and CH_3O(a). Upon heating to 350 K, these fragments recombine and desorb as H_2 and CH_2OHCH=O. The desorption channel at 350 K accounts for ~ 85% of the available fragments retained on the surface. The remaining fragments react and desorb as CH_3 OCH=O and CH_2OHCH=O at 200 K and 250 K, respectively. The photon-induced desorption dynamics of the nascent fragment, NO, is determined using time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (TOF). At 254, 308, and 313 nm, the translational energy distributions of the desorbing NO is measured at 100 K. Two desorption channels are observed in the TOF spectra at all wavelengths investigated. Irrespective of the excitation wavelength, the flux-weighted mean translational energy, /2k, of the slower channel is around 115 +/- 10 K. We propose that this channel results from an extended interaction of the NO with the Ag(111) surface. The measured /2k of the faster desorption channel of the nascent NO photofragment at 254, 308, and 351 nm is 1980 +/- 100 K, 617 +/- 100 K, and 846 +/- 100 K, respectively. Comparison of the surface and gas phase photochemical kinetics and dynamics indicates that the dominant photodecomposition mechanism on the Ag(111) surface is the direct absorbance of the photon by the adsorbate.

  9. Quantitative Detection of Trace Explosive Vapors by Programmed Temperature Desorption Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Christopher R.; Lubrano, Adam; Woytowitz, Morgan; Giordano, Braden C.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    The direct liquid deposition of solution standards onto sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes is used for the quantitative analysis of trace explosive vapor samples. The direct liquid deposition method yields a higher fidelity between the analysis of vapor samples and the analysis of solution standards than using separate injection methods for vapors and solutions, i.e., samples collected on vapor collection tubes and standards prepared in solution vials. Additionally, the method can account for instrumentation losses, which makes it ideal for minimizing variability and quantitative trace chemical detection. Gas chromatography with an electron capture detector is an instrumentation configuration sensitive to nitro-energetics, such as TNT and RDX, due to their relatively high electron affinity. However, vapor quantitation of these compounds is difficult without viable vapor standards. Thus, we eliminate the requirement for vapor standards by combining the sensitivity of the instrumentation with a direct liquid deposition protocol to analyze trace explosive vapor samples. PMID:25145416

  10. Dual-Mode Teacher Professional Development: Challenges and Re-Visioning Future TPD in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Ari; Riandi

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a two-year research project aimed at developing a teacher professional development (TPD) model in Indonesia. New government policies in this nation, its archipelagic nature, vast numbers of teachers and scarcity of support resources present a unique challenge to TPD. A needs assessment was conducted to identify…

  11. Lentivirus-mediated TPD52L2 depletion inhibits the proliferation of liver cancer cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Ze-Ya; Yang, Yun; Pan, Hao; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Hui; Yang, Yuan; Huang, Gang; Yin, Lei; Huang, Jian; Zhou, Wei-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Tumor protein D52-like 2, known as hD54 in previous studies (TPD52L2), is a member of TPD52 family which has been implicated in multiple human cancers. In recent reports, TPD52 proteins were indicated to be associated with several malignancies, but very little is known about the function of TPD52L2 in liver cancers. In our present study, in order to explore the role of TPD52L2 in liver cancer, TPD52L2 was knocked down in SMMC-7721 liver cancer cell line by lentivirus mediated RNA interference...

  12. Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program. Task 4. Third Contractor Information Meeting. [Adsorption-desorption on geological media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The study subject of this meeting was the adsorption and desorption of radionuclides on geologic media under repository conditions. This volume contans eight papers. Separate abstracts were prepared for all eight papers. (DLC)

  13. Transcriptome sequencing and analysis of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell.) to discover putative genes associated with tapping panel dryness (TPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Ping; Xia, Zhi-Qiang; Tian, Xiao-Yan; Li, Yi-Jian

    2015-05-21

    Tapping panel dryness (TPD) involves in the partial or complete cessation of latex flow thus seriously affect latex production in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). Numerous studies have been conducted to define its origin and nature, but the molecular nature and mechanism of TPD occurrence remains unknown. This study is committed to de novo sequencing and comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of healthy (H) and TPD-affected (T) rubber trees to identify the genes and pathways related to the TPD. Total raw reads of 34,632,012 and 35,913,020 bp were obtained from H and T library, respectively using Illumina Hiseq 2000 sequencing technology. De novo assemblies yielded 141,456 and 169,285 contigs, and 96,070 and 112,243 unigenes from H and T library, respectively. Among 73597 genes, 22577 genes were identified as differential expressed genes between H and T library via comparative transcript profiling. A majority of genes involved in natural rubber biosynthesis and jasmonate synthesis with most potential relevance in TPD occurrence were found to be differentially expressed. In TPD-affected trees, the expression of most genes related to the latex biosynthesis and jasmonate synthesis was severely inhibited and is probably the direct cause of the TPD. These new de novo transcriptome data sets provide a significant resource for the discovery of genes related to TPD and improve our understanding of the occurrence and maintainace of TPD.

  14. microRNA-218 inhibits prostate cancer cell growth and promotes apoptosis by repressing TPD52 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Guangye, E-mail: guangyehan@126.com; Fan, Maochuan, E-mail: maochunfan@outlook.com; Zhang, Xinjun, E-mail: xinjunzhang11@163.com

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • miR-218 expression is downregulated in prostate cancer. • miR-218 inhibits prostate tumor cells proliferation partially through promoting apoptosis. • miR-218 targets TPD52 by binding to its 3′-UTR. • miR-218 suppresses prostate cancer cell growth through inhibiting TPD52 expression. - Abstract: The tumor protein D52 (TPD52) is an oncogene overexpressed in prostate cancer (PC) due to gene amplification. Although the oncogenic effect of TPD52 is well recognized, how its expression is regulated is still not clear. This study tried to explore the regulative role of miR-218, a tumor suppressing miRNA on TPD52 expression and prostate cancer cell proliferation. We found the expression of miR-218 was significantly lower in PC specimens. Based on gain and loss of function analysis, we found miR-218 significantly inhibit cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. These results strongly suggest that miR-218 plays a tumor suppressor role in PC cells. In addition, our data firstly demonstrated that miR-218 directly regulates oncogenic TPD52 in PC3 cells and the miR-218-TPD52 axis can regulate growth of this prostate cancer cell line. Knockdown of TPD52 resulted in significantly increased cancer cell apoptosis. Clearly understanding of oncogenic TPD52 pathways regulated by miR-218 might be helpful to reveal new therapeutic targets for PC.

  15. Lentivirus-mediated TPD52L2 depletion inhibits the proliferation of liver cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ze-Ya; Yang, Yun; Pan, Hao; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Hui; Yang, Yuan; Huang, Gang; Yin, Lei; Huang, Jian; Zhou, Wei-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Tumor protein D52-like 2, known as hD54 in previous studies (TPD52L2), is a member of TPD52 family which has been implicated in multiple human cancers. In recent reports, TPD52 proteins were indicated to be associated with several malignancies, but very little is known about the function of TPD52L2 in liver cancers. In our present study, in order to explore the role of TPD52L2 in liver cancer, TPD52L2 was knocked down in SMMC-7721 liver cancer cell line by lentivirus mediated RNA interference. The results demonstrated that depletion of TPD52L2 could remarkably inhibit proliferation and colony forming ability of cancer cell SMMC-7721. Furthermore, cell cycle in TPD52L2 depleted cells was verified to be arrested in G0/G1 phase as determined by FACS assay, in consistence with the observation of cell proliferation inhibition. These results unraveled that TPD52L2 played an important role in tumorigenesis pathways of liver cancer and might serve as a promising target in human liver cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  16. TNO TPD contributions to high precision optical metrology, a Darwin metrology breadboard for ESA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, A.L.; Dool, T.C. van den; Braam, B.C.; Calvel, B.; Sesselman, R.; Pöschel, W.; Dontsov, D.; Vega, I.C.; Manske, E.; Schuldt, T.; Sodnik, Z.

    2004-01-01

    A Darwin precursor breadboard, comprising both fine lateral and longitudinal metrology sensors was designed, built and partially tested. The lateral metrology sensor was designed and built by TNO TPD and more than meets the imposed requirements. The longitudinal metrology sensor consists of a dual

  17. The interaction of water with Ni(111) and H/Ni(111) studied by TPD and HREELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, J.; Aarts, J. F. M.; Kleyn, A. W.; Juurlink, L. B. F.

    2008-01-01

    We have used temperature-programmed desorption in combination with specular and off-specular high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy to study the interaction of H2O and D2O with the bare and hydrogen-covered Ni(111) surface. Our results for the bare metal surface agree with previous

  18. CO oxidation on nanoporous gold: A combined TPD and XPS study of active catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Röhe, Sarah [Univ. of Bremen (Germany). Inst. of Applied and Physical Chemistry; Frank, Kristian [Univ. of Bremen (Germany). Inst. of Solid State Physics; Schaefer, Andreas [Univ. of Bremen (Germany). Inst. of Applied and Physical Chemistry; Wittstock, Arne [Univ. of Bremen (Germany). Inst. of Applied and Physical Chemistry; Zielasek, Volkmar [Univ. of Bremen (Germany). Inst. of Applied and Physical Chemistry; Rosenauer, Andreas [Univ. of Bremen (Germany). Inst. of Solid State Physics; Bäumer, Marcus [Univ. of Bremen (Germany). Inst. of Applied and Physical Chemistry

    2012-11-30

    Disks of nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by leaching of silver from AgAu alloy and prepared as active catalysts for CO oxidation in a continuous-flow reactor, were investigated in detail by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy in ultra-high vacuum. Np-Au exhibits several oxygen species on and in the surface: Chemisorbed oxygen (Oact), probably generated at residual silver sites at the surface, is readily available after np-Au preparation and consumed by CO oxidation. It can be replenished on activated np-Au by exposure to O2. In addition, strongly bound oxygen, probably at subsurface sites, is present as a major species and not consumed by CO oxidation. Pronounced CO desorption at temperatures above 200 K observed after exposing np-Au to CO at 105 K indicates an additional, more stable type of CO binding sites on np-Au as compared to pure gold. Only CO at these binding sites is consumed by oxidation reaction with Oact. In conclusion, we propose that the presence of strongly bound subsurface oxygen stabilizes CO adsorption on np-Au, thereby being as crucial for the observed catalytic activity of np-Au as residual silver.

  19. Oligomeric Dithienopyrrole-Thienopyrrolodione (DTP-TPD) Donor-Acceptor Copolymer for Organic Photovoltaics: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammond, S. R.; Braunecker, W.; Garcia, A.; Larsen, R.; Owczarczyk, Z.; Olson, D.; Ginley, D.

    2011-07-01

    A new donor-acceptor copolymer system based upon a dithienopyrrole (DTP) donor moiety and a thienopyrrolodione (TPD) accepting moiety has been designed and synthesized for organic photovoltaic (OPV) applications. The TPD accepting moiety has recently gained significant attention in the OPV community and is being incorporated into a number of different polymer systems. In contrast, the DTP donor moiety has received only limited attention, likely due in part to synthetic difficulties relating to the monomer. In our hands, the bis(trimethyltin)-DTP monomer was indelibly contaminated with ~5% of the mono-destannylated DTP, which limited the Stille polymerization with the dibromo-TPD monomer (>99% pure) to produce material with Mn ~ 4130 g/mol (PDI = 1.10), corresponding to around eight repeat units. Despite this limitation, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy demonstrates strong absorption for this material with a band gap of ~1.6 eV. Cyclic voltammetry indicates a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level of -5.3 eV, which is much lower than calculations predicted. Initial bulk heterojunction OPV devices fabricated with the fullerene acceptor phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) exhibit Voc ~ 700 mV, which supports the deep HOMO value obtained from CV. These results suggest the promise of this copolymer system.

  20. CO2 adsorption on the copper surfaces: van der Waals density functional and TPD studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttaqien, Fahdzi; Hamamoto, Yuji; Hamada, Ikutaro; Inagaki, Kouji; Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Mukai, Kozo; Koitaya, Takanori; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun; Morikawa, Yoshitada

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the adsorption of CO2 on the flat, stepped, and kinked copper surfaces from density functional theory calculations as well as the temperature programmed desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Several exchange-correlation functionals have been considered to characterize CO2 adsorption on the copper surfaces. We used the van der Waals density functionals (vdW-DFs), i.e., the original vdW-DF (vdW-DF1), optB86b-vdW, and rev-vdW-DF2, as well as the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) with dispersion correction (PBE-D2). We have found that vdW-DF1 and rev-vdW-DF2 functionals slightly underestimate the adsorption energy, while PBE-D2 and optB86b-vdW functionals give better agreement with the experimental estimation for CO2 on Cu(111). The calculated CO2 adsorption energies on the flat, stepped, and kinked Cu surfaces are 20-27 kJ/mol, which are compatible with the general notion of physisorbed species on solid surfaces. Our results provide a useful insight into appropriate vdW functionals for further investigation of related CO2 activation on Cu surfaces such as methanol synthesis and higher alcohol production.

  1. Changes of structural and hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2 indused by ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurko Sandra V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in structural and hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2 induced by ion irradiation have been investigated. MgH2 powder samples have been irradiated with 45 keV B3+ and 120 keV Ar8+ions, with ion fluence of 1015 ions/cm2. The effects of ion irradiation are estimated by numerical calculations using SRIM package. The induced material modifications and their consequences on hydrogen dynamics in the system are investigated by XRD, particle size distribution and TPD techniques. Changes of TPD spectra with irradiation conditions suggest that there are several mechanisms involved in desorption process which depend on defect concentration and their interaction and ordering. The results confirmed that the near-surface area of MgH2 and formation of a substoichiometric MgHx (x<2 play a crucial role in hydrogen kinetics and that various concentrations of induced defects substantially influence H diffusion and desorption kinetics in MgH2. The results also confirm that there is possibility to control the thermodynamic parameters by controlling vacancies concentration in the system.

  2. Ketoreductase TpdE from Rhodococcus jostii TMP1: characterization and application in the synthesis of chiral alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonita Stankevičiūtė

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Production of highly pure enantiomers of vicinal diols is desirable, but difficult to achieve. Enantiomerically pure diols and acyloins are valuable bulk chemicals, promising synthones and potential building blocks for chiral polymers. Enzymatic reduction of ketones is a useful technique for the synthesis of the desired enantiomeric alcohols. Here, we report on the characterization of a ketoreductase TpdE from Rhodococcus jostii TMP1 that is a prospective tool for the synthesis of such compounds.Results. In this study, NADPH-dependent short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase TpdE from Rhodococcus jostii TMP1 was characterized. The enzyme exhibited broad substrate specificity towards aliphatic 2,3-diketones, butan-3-one-2-yl alkanoates, as well as acetoin and its acylated derivatives. TpdE stereospecifically reduced α-diketones to the corresponding diols. The GC-MS analysis of the reduction products of 2,3- and 3,4-diketones indicated that TpdE is capable of reducing both keto groups in its substrate leading to the formation of two new chiral atoms in the product molecule. Bioconversions of diketones to corresponding diols occurred using either purified enzyme or a whole-cell Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 biocatalyst harbouring recombinant TpdE. The optimum temperature and pH were determined to be 30–35 °C and 7.5, respectively.Conclusions. The broad substrate specificity and stereoselectivity of TpdE from Rhodococcus jostii TMP1 make it a promising biocatalyst for the production of enantiomerically pure diols that are difficult to obtain by chemical routes.

  3. Isoform 1 of TPD52 (PC-1) promotes neuroendocrine transdifferentiation in prostate cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Moritz, Tom

    2016-02-05

    The tumour protein D52 isoform 1 (PC-1), a member of the tumour protein D52 (TPD52) protein family, is androgen-regulated and prostate-specific expressed. Previous studies confirmed that PC-1 contributes to malignant progression in prostate cancer with an important role in castration-resistant stage. In the present work, we identified its impact in mechanisms leading to neuroendocrine (NE) transdifferentiation. We established for long-term PC-1 overexpression an inducible expression system derived from the prostate carcinoma cell line LNCaP. We observed that PC-1 overexpression itself initiates characteristics of neuroendocrine cells, but the effect was much more pronounced in the presence of the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Moreover, to our knowledge, this is the first report that treatment with IL-6 leads to a significant upregulation of PC-1 in LNCaP cells. Other TPD52 isoforms were not affected. Proceeding from this result, we conclude that PC-1 overexpression enhances the IL-6-mediated differentiation of LNCaP cells into a NE-like phenotype, noticeable by morphological changes and increased expression of typical NE markers, like chromogranin A, synaptophysin or beta-3 tubulin. Immunofluorescent staining of IL-6-treated PC-1-overexpressing LNCaP cells indicates a considerable PC-1 accumulation at the end of the long-branched neuron-like cell processes, which are typically formed by NE cells. Additionally, the experimentally initiated NE transdifferentiation correlates with the androgen receptor status, which was upregulated additively. In summary, our data provide evidence for an involvement of PC-1 in NE transdifferentiation, frequently associated with castration resistance, which is a major therapeutic challenge in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  4. Teachers become cocreators through participation in a teacher professional development (TPD) course in a resource constraint environment in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adele

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available badge, and teachers had to provide practice-based evidence of how new knowledge, proficiencies, and skills gained during theTPD sessions was adapted to their own subject and context knowledge and practically implemented in their classrooms. This presents...

  5. MAL2 and tumor protein D52 (TPD52 are frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, but differentially associated with histological subtype and patient outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanayan Susan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The four-transmembrane MAL2 protein is frequently overexpressed in breast carcinoma, and MAL2 overexpression is associated with gain of the corresponding locus at chromosome 8q24.12. Independent expression microarray studies predict MAL2 overexpression in ovarian carcinoma, but these had remained unconfirmed. MAL2 binds tumor protein D52 (TPD52, which is frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, but the clinical significance of MAL2 and TPD52 overexpression was unknown. Methods Immunohistochemical analyses of MAL2 and TPD52 expression were performed using tissue microarray sections including benign, borderline and malignant epithelial ovarian tumours. Inmmunohistochemical staining intensity and distribution was assessed both visually and digitally. Results MAL2 and TPD52 were significantly overexpressed in high-grade serous carcinomas compared with serous borderline tumours. MAL2 expression was highest in serous carcinomas relative to other histological subtypes, whereas TPD52 expression was highest in clear cell carcinomas. MAL2 expression was not related to patient survival, however high-level TPD52 staining was significantly associated with improved overall survival in patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma (log-rank test, p Conclusions MAL2 is frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, and TPD52 overexpression is a favourable independent prognostic marker of potential value in the management of ovarian carcinoma patients.

  6. SCIENCE TEACHERS’ INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIAL LEARNING RELATED TO IBSE IN A LARGE-SCALE, LONG- TERM, COLLABORATIVE TPD PROJECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Sillasen, Martin Krabbe

    2014-01-01

    (IBSE). The research presented focuses on the participating teachers’ intertwined levels of individual and social learning. Data from repeated surveys and case studies reveal a positive attitude towards trying out IBSE locally, however with the main part of the reflections focused on students’ hands......It is acknowledged internationally that teachers’ Professional Development (TPD) is crucial for reforming science teaching. The Danish QUEST project is designed using widely agreed criteria for effective TPD: content focus, active learning, coherence, duration, collaborative activities...... and collective participation, and is organised on principles of situated learning in Professional Learning Communities (PLCs). QUEST-activities follow a rhythm of full day seminars followed by a period of collaborative inquiries locally. A major theme in the first year has been Inquiry Based Science Education...

  7. Thermal desorption of Au from W(001) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Blaszczyszyn, R; Godowski, P J

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of Au on W(001) at 450 K up to multilayer structures was investigated. Temperature programmed desorption technique was used in determination of coverage dependent desorption energy (region up to one monolayer). Results were discussed in terms of competitive interactions of Au-Au and Au-W atoms. Simple procedure for prediction of faceting behavior on the interface, basing on the desorption data, was postulated. It was deduced that the Au/W(001) interface should not show faceting tendency after thermal treatment. (author)

  8. Magnetic properties of U{sub 2}TSi{sub 3} (T=Pd, Rh and Ru) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dexin; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu [Oarai Branch, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kimura, Akihiro; Homma, Yoshiya [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Honma, Tetsuo; Onuki, Yoshichika [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-02-28

    DC magnetization, specific heat and magnetic relaxation measurements are reported for polycrystalline U{sub 2}TSi{sub 3} (T=Pd, Rh, Ru). Spin glass behavior is observed in U{sub 2}PdSi{sub 3} with a freezing temperature T{sub f}=13.5 K. U{sub 2}RhSi{sub 3} shows the re-entrant spin glass properties (paramagnetism{yields}ferromagnetism{yields}spin-glass) with the characteristic temperatures T{sub C}=25 K and T{sub f}=19.6 K. U{sub 2}RuSi{sub 3} is a paramagnet down to 1.8 K and no spin glass behavior is found. The obtained results for compounds are discussed relating to their crystallographic characteristics. (author)

  9. Small Molecules Derived from Thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione (TPD and Their Use in Solution Processed Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Garcias-Morales

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, microwave synthesis, chemical, optical and electrochemical characterization of three small organic molecules, TPA-TPD, TPA-PT-TPD and TPA-TT-TPD with donor-acceptor structure and their use in organic photovoltaic cells are reported. For the synthesis, 5-(2-ethylhexyl-4H-thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6(5H-dione was used as electron withdrawing fragment while the triphenylamine was used as electron donating fragment. Molecular electronic geometry and electronic distribution density were established by density functional theory (DFT calculations and confirmed by optical and chemical characterization. These molecules were employed as electron-donors in the active layer for manufacturing bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, where [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM was used as electron-acceptor. As cathode, Field′s metal (FM, an eutectic alloy (Bi/In/Sn: 32.5%, 51%, and 16.5%, respectively with a melting point above 62 °C, was easily deposited by drop casting under vacuum-free process and at air atmosphere. Prepared devices based on TPA-TPD:PC71BM (1:4 w/w ratio presented a large VOC = 0.97 V, with JSC = 7.9 mA/cm2, a FF = 0.34, then, a power conversion efficiency (PCE of 2.6%.

  10. Study of the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced desorption on accelerator-relevant materials; Untersuchung der Mechanismen schwerioneninduzierter Desorption an beschleunigerrelevanten Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Markus

    2008-02-22

    The ion beam loss induced desorption is a performance limitation for low charge state heavy ion accelerators. If charge exchanged projectile ions get lost onto the beam pipe, desorption of gas is stimulated resulting in a pressure increase inside of the synchrotron and thus, a dramatically reduction of the beam life time. To minimize the amount of desorbed gas an experimental program has been started to measure the desorption yields (released gas molecules per incident ion) of various materials and different projectile ions. The present work is a contribution to the understanding of the physical processes behind the ion beam loss induced desorption. The yield measurements by the pressure rise method have been combined for the rst time with in situ ion beam analysis technologies such as ERDA and RBS. With this unique method the desorption behavior of a sample can be correlated to its surface and bulk properties. The performed experiments with 1,4 MeV/u Xenon-Ions show that the ion induced desorption is mainly a surface effect. Sputtered oxide layers or impurities do not contribute to the desorbed gas significantly. Nevertheless bulk properties play an important role in the desorption strength. Pure metallic samples desorb less gas than isolating materials under swift heavy ion irradiation. From the experimental results it was possible to estimate the desorption yields of various materials under ion bombardment by means of an extended inelastic thermal-spike-model. The extension is the combination of the thermal-spike's temperature map with thermal desorption. Within this model the ion induced desorption can be regarded as the release of adsorbates from a transient overheated spot on the samples surface around the ion impact. Finally a copper substrate with a gold coated surface was developed and proposed as a suitable material for a beam loss collimator with minimum desorption to ensure the performance of GSI's SIS18 in high current beam operation. (orig.)

  11. SPS Ion Induced Desorption Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    This experiment will give a study about the induced desorption from heavy ion (Indium ion run from week 45 in SPS T4-H8 area) impacting LHC type graphite collimator. 4 different samples are located in the 4 chambers 90° one to each other: pure graphite, graphite with copper coating, graphite with NEG coating, 316LN stainless steal (reference).

  12. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  13. miR-139-5p regulates proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle of uterine leiomyoma cells by targeting TPD52

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen H

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hong Chen,1 Hong Xu,1 Yu-gang Meng,1 Yun Zhang,2 Jun-ying Chen,1 Xiao-ning Wei1 1Department of Gynaecology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi, 2Department of Gynaecology, The People’s Hospital of Suzhou High Tech District, Suzhou, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China Background: Uterine leiomyoma is one of the most common benign tumors in women. It dramatically decreases the quality of life in the affected women. However, there is a lack of effective treatment paradigms. Micro-RNAs are small noncoding RNA molecules that are extensively expressed in organisms, and they are interrelated with the occurrence and development of the tumor. miR-139-5p was found to be downregulated in various cancers, but its function and mechanism in uterine leiomyoma remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miR-139-5p and its target gene in uterine leiomyoma.Methods: By using a bioinformatic assay, it was found that TPD52 was a potential target gene of miR-139-5p. Then, expressions of miR-139-5p and TPD52 in uterine leiomyoma and adjacent myometrium tissues were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle of uterine leiomyoma cells transfected by miR-139-5p mimics or TPD52 siRNA were determined.Results: It was observed that the expression of miR-139-5p in uterine leiomyoma tissues was significantly lower (P<0.001 than that in the adjacent myometrium tissues. Overexpression of miR-139-5p inhibited the growth of uterine leiomyoma cells and induced apoptosis and G1 phase arrest. Dual-luciferase reporter assay and Western blot validated that TPD52 is the target gene of miR-139-5p. Furthermore, downregulation of TPD52 by siRNA in uterine leiomyoma cells inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis and G1 phase arrest.Conclusion: Data suggested that miR-139-5p inhibited the proliferation of uterine leiomyoma cells

  14. CO Diffusion and Desorption Kinetics in CO2 Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Ilsa R.; Öberg, Karin I.; Fayolle, Edith C.; Peeler, Zoe; Bergner, Jennifer B.

    2018-01-01

    The diffusion of species in icy dust grain mantles is a fundamental process that shapes the chemistry of interstellar regions; yet, measurements of diffusion in interstellar ice analogs are scarce. Here we present measurements of CO diffusion into CO2 ice at low temperatures (T = 11–23 K) using CO2 longitudinal optical phonon modes to monitor the level of mixing of initially layered ices. We model the diffusion kinetics using Fick’s second law and find that the temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients are well fit by an Arrhenius equation, giving a diffusion barrier of 300 ± 40 K. The low barrier along with the diffusion kinetics through isotopically labeled layers suggest that CO diffuses through CO2 along pore surfaces rather than through bulk diffusion. In complementary experiments, we measure the desorption energy of CO from CO2 ices deposited at 11–50 K by temperature programmed desorption and find that the desorption barrier ranges from 1240 ± 90 K to 1410 ± 70 K depending on the CO2 deposition temperature and resultant ice porosity. The measured CO–CO2 desorption barriers demonstrate that CO binds equally well to CO2 and H2O ices when both are compact. The CO–CO2 diffusion–desorption barrier ratio ranges from 0.21 to 0.24 dependent on the binding environment during diffusion. The diffusion–desorption ratio is consistent with the above hypothesis that the observed diffusion is a surface process and adds to previous experimental evidence on diffusion in water ice that suggests surface diffusion is important to the mobility of molecules within interstellar ices.

  15. Science teachers’ individual and social learning related to IBSE in the frames of a large-scale, long-term, collaborative TPD project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Sillasen, Martin

    repeated surveys and case studies reveal a positive attitude towards trying IBSE in the own classroom, however with the main part of the reflections focused on students’ hands-on experiences and fewer including students manipulating science ideas, like posing hypotheses. Teachers’ reflections indicate......It is acknowledged internationally that teachers’ Professional Development (TPD) is crucial for reforming science teaching. The Danish QUEST project (“Qualifying in-service Education of Science Teachers”) is designed using widely agreed criteria for effective TPD: content focus, active learning......, coherence, duration, collaborative activities and collective participation, and organised on principles of situated learning in Professional Learning Communities (PLCs). QUEST-activities follow a rhythm of full day seminars, where teachers are introduced to research-based material followed by a period...

  16. Science teachers’ individual and social learning related to IBSE in the frames of a large-scale, long-term, collaborative TPD project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Sillasen, Martin Krabbe

    It is acknowledged internationally that teachers’ Professional Development (TPD) is crucial for reforming science teaching. The Danish QUEST project (“Qualifying in-service Education of Science Teachers”) is designed using widely agreed criteria for effective TPD: content focus, active learning...... that many are positive toward IBSE-seminars based on trying activities directly applicable in the classroom. Other teachers’ reflections, and case-studies, indicate a potentially more sustainable development, where they collaboratively re-design former teaching using the IBSE thinking - and by doing so...... gaining experiences to support their design of inquiry based learning experiences for students also in new content areas. Case studies support that the PLCs are developing a new focus on student learning, but 25 % of the teachers report little change in collaboration locally with case studies identifying...

  17. Methyl Acetate Synthesis by Esterification on the Modified Ferrierite: Correlation of Acid Sites Measured by Pyridine IR and NH3-TPD for Steady-State Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyun; Pang, Changhyun; Chung, Chan-Hwa; Bae, Jong Wook

    2016-05-01

    The amounts of Brønsted acid sites on K, P, and Zr-modified microporous Ferrierite zeolite were investigated through pyridine FT-IR and NH3-TPD analyses. P-modified Ferrierite showed a superior catalytic activity for methyl acetate synthesis by esterification of methanol and acetic acid. The catalytic activity at steady-state with the acidic properties of as-prepared catalysts was well correlated with the results of pyridine FT-IR (intensity ratio of Brønsted acid sites to total acid sites) compared with that of NH3-TPD. The results can suggest the proper and simple method to estimate the esterification activity at steady-state using the measured acid sites on the as-prepared zeolites.

  18. Spiral Surface Growth without Desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karma, A.; Plapp, M. [Department of Physics and Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Spiral surface growth is well understood in the limit where the step motion is controlled by the local supersaturation of adatoms near the spiral ridge. In epitaxial thin-film growth, however, spirals can form in a step-flow regime where desorption of adatoms is negligible and the ridge dynamics is governed by the nonlocal diffusion field of adatoms on the whole surface. We investigate this limit numerically using a phase-field formulation of the Burton-Cabrera-Frank model, as well as analytically. Quantitative predictions, which differ strikingly from those of the local limit, are made for the selected step spacing as a function of the deposition flux, as well as for the dependence of the relaxation time to steady-state growth on the screw dislocation density. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  19. A comparative study of electrode effects on the electrical and luminescent characteristics of Alq{sub 3}/TPD OLED: Improvements due to conductive polymer (PEDOT) anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0030 (United States); Li, W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0030 (United States); Jones, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0030 (United States); Steckl, A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0030 (United States); Klotzkin, D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0030 (United States)]. E-mail: David.Klotzkin@uc.edu

    2007-09-15

    The performance of organic light emitting device (OLED) structures, based on identically fabricated Alq{sub 3}/TPD active regions, with various anode and cathode electrode structures are compared, and performance differences related to the different anode structure. The best performance was achieved with a conductive polymer, 3,4-polyethylenedioxythiopene-polystyrenesultonate (PEDOT), used as an anode layer, yielding a brightness of 1720 cd/m{sup 2} at 25 V, a turn-on voltage of 3 V, and electroluminescence (EL) efficiency and external quantum efficiency of 8.2 cd/A and 2%, respectively, at a brightness of 100 cd/m{sup 2} and 5 V. Compared to a baseline device (TPD/Alq{sub 3}/Al), PEDOT anodes substantially reduce the turn-on voltage and made current injection almost linear after turn-on, whiles devices incorporating a LiF and CuPc layers significantly improved device efficiency while slightly improving turn-on voltage and maintaining superlinear I-V injection. This is attributed to the reduced barrier at the organic-organic interface in PEDOT, the 'ladder' effect of stepping the band offset over several interfaces, and the favorable PEDOT film morphology. The benefit of the PEDOT anode is clearly seen in the improvement in device brightness and the high external quantum efficiency obtained.

  20. Drifts and TPD analyses of ethanol on Pt catalysts over Al2O3 and ZrO2 - partial oxidation of ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmal, Martin; Cesar, Deborah V.; Souza, Mariana M. V. M.; Guarido, Carlos E. [Chemical Engineering Department, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    In recent years, the growing global demand for energy and need for stringent environmental regulation have accentuated the need to develop technologies that are eco-friendly and can still satisfy the increased demand for energy. Today, the oil industry and industries in many other sectors need alternative fuels if they are to continue adequate levels of service. Combustors and reformers of natural gas, hydrogen fuel cells and diesel or liquid fuels produced from synthesis using natural gas, ethanol and other biomass as raw materials have been proposed as alternatives to conventional power sources. This paper presents the drift and temperature-programmed desorption (TDP) analysis of ethanol adsorption with platinum catalyst supported by Al2O3 and ZrO2. From the TDP ethanol process, it was observed that alumina support favored dehydration and decomposition of ethanol and also the water-gas shift reaction. Drift analyses demonstrated different intermediate species on the Pt/Al2O3 and Pt/ZrO2 catalysts.

  1. Heat-integrated liquid-desorption exchanger (HILDE) for CO2 desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, L.V. van der; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2016-01-01

    A novel type of separating heat exchanger, called a heat-integrated liquid-desorption exchanger (HILDE), applied to a typical CO2 desorption process, has been investigated both numerically and experimentally. Process simulations, hydrodynamic and mass transfer experiments, and a preliminary cost

  2. Atomic-Scale View on the H2O Formation Reaction from H2 on O-Rich RuO2(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Yinying; Martinez, Umberto; Lammich, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The H2O formation reaction from H-2 on O-rich RuO2(110) was studied by temperature-programmed desorption and reaction (TPD/TPR) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the one hand, following H-2 adsorption at 270 K, our TPD/TPR me...

  3. Desorption of 137Cs+ from mosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLGICA NEDIC

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Mosses are biomonitors that accumulate large amounts of various pollutants, including radionuclides. In this work we investigated the possibility of 137Cs extraction from mosses, as well as the significance of species specificity on the efficiency of 137Cs desorption. Salt and acid solutions were used as extraction media. It was shown that a 5 % solution of both ammonium oxalate and phosphoric acid was able to desorb 81.8 % of 137Cs+ from Homalothecium sericeum, which was 39.9 % more than desorption from water. At the same time, most of the desorbed 137Cs+ was incorporated in crystals that precipitated from the solution. An interspecies difference in respect to 137Cs+ desorption was noticed.

  4. Ionic Adsorption and Desorption of CNT Nanoropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jun Shang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method based on classical electrostatic theory. The electrostatic interactions among charged carbon atoms are calculated by using the Coulomb law. It was found here that the charged nanorope can adsorb heavy metal ions, and the adsorption and desorption can be realized by controlling the strength of applied electric field. The distance between the ions and the nanorope as well as the amount of ions have an effect on the adsorption capacity of the nanorope. The desorption process takes less time than that of adsorption. The study indicates that the CNT nanorope can be used as a core element of devices for sewage treatment.

  5. n-alkanes on Pt(111) and on C(0001)/Pt(111): Chain Length Dependence of Kinetic Desorption Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tait, Steven L.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Campbell, Charles T.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2006-12-21

    We have measured the desorption of seven small n-alkanes (CNH2N+2, N = 1-4, 6, 8, 10) from the Pt(111) and C(0001) surfaces by temperature programmed desorption. We compare these results to our recent study of the desorption kinetics of these molecules on MgO(100) [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 164708 (2005)]. There we showed an increase in the desorption pre-exponential factor by several orders of magnitude with increasing n-alkane chain length and a linear desorption energy scaling with a small y-intercept value. We suggest that the significant increase in desorption prefactor with chain length is not particular to the MgO(100) surface, but is a general effect for desorption of the small n-alkanes. This argument is supported by statistical mechanical arguments for the increase in the entropy gain of the molecules upon desorption. In this work, we demonstrate that this hypothesis holds true on both a metal surface and a graphite surface. We observe an increase in prefactor by five orders of magnitude over the range of n-alkane chain lengths studied here. On each surface, the desorption energies of the n-alkanes are found to increase linearly with the molecule chain length and have a small y-intercept value. Prior results of other groups have yielded a linear desorption energy scaling with chain length that has unphysically large y-intercept values. We demonstrate that by allowing the prefactor to increase according to our model, a reanalysis of their data resolves this y-intercept problem to some degree.

  6. Product desorption limitations in selective photocatalytic oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renckens, T.J.A.; Almeida, A.R.; Almeida, A.R.; Damen, M.R.; Kreutzer, M.T.; Mul, Guido

    2010-01-01

    The rate of photocatalytic processes can be significantly improved if strongly bound products rapidly desorb to free up active sites. This paper deals with the rate of desorption of cyclohexanone, the product of the liquid-phase photo-oxidation of cyclohexane. Dynamic step-response and

  7. Quantum theory of laser-stimulated desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, M. S.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    A quantum theory of laser-stimulated desorption (LSDE) is presented and critically analyzed. It is shown how LSDE depends on laser-pulse characteristics and surface-lattice dynamics. Predictions of the theory for a Debye model of the lattice dynamics are compared to recent experimental results.

  8. Residence time dependent desorption of Staphylococcus epidermidis from hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, N.P.; Kaper, H.J.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and desorption are simultaneous events during bacterial adhesion to surfaces. although desorption is far less studied than adhesion. Here, desorption of Staphylococcus epidermidis from substratum surfaces is demonstrated to be residence time dependent. Initial desorption rate coefficients

  9. The deactivation mechanism of Pb on the Ce/TiO2 catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3: TPD and DRIFT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Xian; Guo, Rui-Tang; Pan, Wei-Guo; Li, Ming-Yuan; Sun, Peng; Liu, Shu-Ming; Liu, Shuai-Wei; Sun, Xiao; Liu, Jian

    2017-02-15

    It was well recognized that Pb had a poisoning effect on a SCR catalyst. In this study, the deactivation mechanism of Pb on the Ce/TiO2 catalyst was investigated based on the characterization results of TPD and in situ DRIFT studies. It was found that the addition of Pb on the Ce/TiO2 catalyst not only inhibited the adsorption and activation of NH3 species, but also led to the decrease of the activity of adsorbed NH3 species in the SCR reaction. The adsorption of NOx species and the oxidation of NO by O2 over the Ce/TiO2 catalyst were also suppressed by the addition of Pb, while the reactivity of adsorbed NO2 species did not decrease. Moreover, the results revealed that the NH3-SCR reaction over the Ce/TiO2 catalyst followed both the E-R and L-H mechanisms, while the NH3-SCR reaction over Ce/TiO2-Pb was mainly controlled by the L-H mechanism. The contributions of the L-H mechanism to the SCR reactions over Ce/TiO2 and Ce/TiO2-Pb decreased with increasing reaction temperature. The deactivation of Ce/TiO2-Pb was mainly attributed to the suppressed NH3 adsorption and activation, accompanied by the inhibited NO oxidation and the decrease of Brønsted acid sites.

  10. Study of the thorium phosphate-diphosphate (TPD) dissolution: kinetic aspect - thermodynamic aspect: analysis of the neo-formed phases; Etude de la dissolution du phosphate diphosphate de thorium: - aspect cinetique - aspect thermodynamique: analyse des phases neoformees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, A.Ch

    2000-10-06

    The aim of this work is to study the aqueous corrosion of the thorium phosphate-diphosphate (TPD), of the formula Th{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, in the framework of the actinides immobilization. In order to complete the anterior studies concerning solid solutions where thorium is substituted by a tetravalent ion (uranium (IV) or plutonium (IV)) in the TPD structure, compounds of thorium and neptunium phosphate-diphosphate, of formula Th{sub 4-x}Np{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, have been prepared. Furthermore, a new chemical way of synthesis has been investigated in order to sinter solids solution of thorium and uranium phosphate-diphosphate (TUPD) in good conditions. The TPD dissolution study showed two principals steps. The first one corresponds to the control of element concentration by the material dissolution whereas the second corresponds to the formation of secondary precipitates for which thermodynamic equilibrium controls the concentration of the species in solution. Leaching tests have been performed varying several independent parameters in order to determine the TPD dissolution rate. The partial orders related to the protons or to the hydroxide ions have been found between 0.35 and 0.45 whereas the apparent dissolution rate constants are in the range 1.10{sup -5} for 9.10{sup -5} g.m{sup -2}.j{sup -1} for acidic and basic media. The neo-formed phases have been characterized after the dissolution of TPD and TUPD. We found that the TPD leaching in acidic medium leads to the formation of the crystallized thorium phosphate-hydrogen-phosphate (TPHP), of formula Th{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}), x H{sub 2}O, whereas the TUPD dissolution leads to the TPHP and an other compound, of formula (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, 5 H{sub 2}O. We calculated its solubility product which is in good agreement with those found in the literature. The phases formed during the leaching of solids containing plutonium; americium or curium (Th

  11. Current-Driven Hydrogen Desorption from Graphene: Experiment and Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, L.; Pal, Partha P.; Seideman, Tamar; Guisinger, Nathan P.; Guest, Jeffrey R.

    2016-02-04

    Electron-stimulated desorption of hydrogen from the graphene/SiC(0001) surface at room temperature was investigated with ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations in order to elucidate the desorption mechanisms and pathways. Two different desorption processes were observed. In the high electron energy regime (4-8 eV), the desorption yield is independent of both voltage and current, which is attributed to the direct electronic excitation of the C-H bond. In the low electron energy regime (2-4 eV), however, the desorption yield exhibits a threshold dependence on voltage, which is explained by the vibrational excitation of the C-H bond via transient ionization induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. The observed current-independence of the desorption yield suggests that the vibrational excitation is a singleelectron process. We also observed that the curvature of graphene dramatically affects hydrogen desorption. Desorption from concave regions was measured to be much more probable than desorption from convex regions in the low electron energy regime (~ 2 eV), as would be expected from the identified desorption mechanism

  12. Adsorption and desorption of chlorpyrifos to soils and sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremariam, Seyoum Yami; Beutel, Marc W; Yonge, David R; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B

    2012-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos, one of the most widely used insecticides, has been detected in air, rain, marine sediments, surface waters, drinking water wells, and solid and liquid dietary samples collected from urban and rural areas. Its metabolite, TCP, has also been widely detected in urinary samples collected from people of various age groups. With a goal of elucidating the factors that control the environmental contamination, impact, persistence, and ecotoxicity of chlorpyrifos, we examine, in this review, the peer-reviewed literature relating to chlorpyrifos adsorption and desorption behavior in various solid-phase matrices. Adsorption tends to reduce chlorpyrifos mobility, but adsorption to erodible particulates, dissolved organic matter, or mobile inorganic colloids enhances its mobility. Adsorption to suspended sediments and particulates constitutes a major off-site migration route for chlorpyrifos to surface waters, wherein it poses a potential danger to aquatic organisms. Adsorption increases the persistence of chlorpyrifos in the environment by reducing its avail- ability to a wide range of dissipative and degradative forces, whereas the effect of adsorption on its ecotoxicity is dependent upon the route of exposure. Chlorpyrifos adsorbs to soils, aquatic sediments, organic matter, and clay minerals to differing degrees. Its adsorption strongly correlates with organic carbon con- tent of the soils and sediments. A comprehensive review of studies that relied on the batch equilibrium technique yields mean and median Kd values for chlorpyrifos of 271 and 116 L/kg for soils, and 385 and 403 L/kg for aquatic sediments. Chlorpyrifos adsorption coefficients spanned two orders of magnitude in soils. Normalizing the partition coefficient to organic content failed to substantially reduce variability to commonly acceptable level of variation. Mean and median values for chlorpyrifos partition coefficients normalized to organic carbon, K, were 8,163 and 7,227 L/kg for soils and 13

  13. Structural and energetical studies of the adsorption of para and meta-isomers of xylene on pre-hydrated zeolite BaX. Characterization by neutron diffraction and temperature programmed desorption; Etude structurale et energetique de l'adsorption des isomeres para- et meta- du xylene dans la zeolithe BaX prehydratee. Caracterisation par diffraction des neutrons et thermodesorption programmee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, Ch.

    1999-10-19

    The separation of p-xylene from C{sub 8} aromatics is performed industrially by selective adsorption on zeolitic materials. FAU-type zeolites are currently used for this separation and especially the partially hydrated BaX. The aim of this work is to characterize from a structural (by low temperature neutron powder diffraction) and an energetical (by temperature programmed desorption) point of view, the adsorption of para- and meta- isomers of xylene, for different fillings, as pure substances as well as mixtures, on pre-hydrated zeolite BaX. The influence of the water pre-adsorption on xylene adsorption selectivity is carefully discussed. The crystalline structure of the zeolite BaX (framework and compensation of charge cations) and of the adsorbed phase (water, p- and m-xylene molecules) are completely characterized by neutron diffraction. The location and the distribution of water and xylene molecules on their adsorption sites is especially followed as a function of the filling of the zeolite and of the composition of the adsorbed phase. Microscopic measurements were correlated to the energetical analysis (at a macroscopic level) in order to obtain a consistent description of adsorption phenomenon and to propose a possible origin for adsorption selectivity.

  14. HYDROGEN AND ITS DESORPTION IN RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HSEUH,H.C.

    2002-11-11

    Hydrogen is the dominating gas specie in room temperature, ultrahigh vacuum systems of particle accelerators and storage rings, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven. Rapid pressure increase of a few decades in hydrogen and other residual gases was observed during RHIC's recent high intensity gold and proton runs. The type and magnitude of the pressure increase were analyzed and compared with vacuum conditioning, beam intensity, number of bunches and bunch spacing. Most of these pressure increases were found to be consistent with those induced by beam loss and/or electron stimulated desorption from electron multipacting.

  15. Nonisothermal desorption of droplets of complex compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakoryakov Vladimir E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the process of nonstationary evaporation of aqueous solutions of LiBr-H2O, CaCl2-H2O, NaCl-H2O droplets on a horizontal heating surface. The following typical stages of heat and mass transfer depending on wall temperature have been considered: evaporation below boiling temperature and nucleate boiling. The significant decrease in desorption intensity with a rise of initial mass concentration of salt has been observed. Formation of a surface crystallization front at evaporation of a droplet has been detected. We have developed the experimental method for direct measurements of the mass of evaporating droplet.

  16. Nickel (II) ion desorption kinetic modeling from unmodified and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The desorption of Ni2+ from three oil palm fruit fibre adsorbents (UOPF, 0.5MOPF and 1.0MOPF) using five desorbing solutions showed a desorption efficiency following the trend, 0.1M HCl > 0.1MH2SO4 > 0.1MHNO3 > 0.1MNaOH >hot deionized H2O. The Elovich desorption constant, β values for the 0.1MHCl desorbent ...

  17. An infrared measurement of chemical desorption from interstellar ice analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Y.; Tomaru, T.; Lamberts, T.; Kouchi, A.; Watanabe, N.

    2018-03-01

    In molecular clouds at temperatures as low as 10 K, all species except hydrogen and helium should be locked in the heterogeneous ice on dust grain surfaces. Nevertheless, astronomical observations have detected over 150 different species in the gas phase in these clouds. The mechanism by which molecules are released from the dust surface below thermal desorption temperatures to be detectable in the gas phase is crucial for understanding the chemical evolution in such cold clouds. Chemical desorption, caused by the excess energy of an exothermic reaction, was first proposed as a key molecular release mechanism almost 50 years ago1. Chemical desorption can, in principle, take place at any temperature, even below the thermal desorption temperature. Therefore, astrochemical network models commonly include this process2,3. Although there have been a few previous experimental efforts4-6, no infrared measurement of the surface (which has a strong advantage to quantify chemical desorption) has been performed. Here, we report the first infrared in situ measurement of chemical desorption during the reactions H + H2S → HS + H2 (reaction 1) and HS + H → H2S (reaction 2), which are key to interstellar sulphur chemistry2,3. The present study clearly demonstrates that chemical desorption is a more efficient process for releasing H2S into the gas phase than was previously believed. The obtained effective cross-section for chemical desorption indicates that the chemical desorption rate exceeds the photodesorption rate in typical interstellar environments.

  18. Substrate-Enhanced Micro Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerodyne Research, Inc. and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst will collaborate to develop laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric analysis of...

  19. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  20. Molecular desorption of stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 42 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Laurent, Jean Michel; Madsen, N

    2003-01-01

    In preparation for the heavy ion program of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, accumulation and cooling tests with lead ion beams have been performed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2 MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments (glow discharges, nonevaporable getter coating) are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H/sub 2 /, CH/sub 4/, CO, Ar, and CO/sub 2/. (16 refs).

  1. Field desorption mass spectrometry of oligosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linscheid, Michael; D'Angona, Jay; Burlingame, Alma L.; Dell, Anne; Ballou, Clinton E.

    1981-01-01

    Field desorption mass spectrometry has been used to analyze carbohydrate polymers with 5 to 14 hexose units without prior derivatization. In all examples, the molecular weight of the oligosaccharide could be determined by means of the abundant quasimolecular ions of the type MNa+, MH+, MNa22+, and MNa33+. Fragmentation at glycosidic linkages was observed in varying extents. The reduced oligosaccharide Man8GlcNAcH2, obtained from IgM [Cohen, R. E. & Ballou, C. E. (1980) Biochemistry 19, 4345-4358], gave quasimolecular ion signals MNa+ at m/z 1544, MH+ at m/z 1522, MNa22+ at m/z 784, and MNa33+ at m/z 530, all corresponding to its assumed molecular weight of 1519.5. Mycobacterial methylmannose polysaccharides with the general structure ManxMeMany-OCH3 [Yamada, H., Cohen, R. E. & Ballou, C. E. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 1972-1979] were also successfully analyzed. Man1MeMan13-OCH3, the largest homolog, gave the expected signal of the quasimolecular ion MNa+ at m/z 2506. The larger polysaccharides were analyzed by using a KRATOS MS-50 mass spectrometer with a high-field magnet enabling full sensitivity to be maintained up to 3000 atomic mass units. Polysaccharides up to m/z 1978 were analyzed by using a KRATOS MS-9 mass spectrometer operated at 4 Kv. The signal-to-noise ratio, which becomes a serious problem in field desorption mass spectrometry at low accelerating voltages, and the low instrument sensitivity were improved considerably by our use of a method of adding scans with low total ion currents obtained over a longer desorption time. In this way, we obtained complete sequence information on methylmannose polysaccharides up to Man1MeMan9-OCH3(MNa+ at m/z 1802). Analysis of a presumed Man1MeMan7-OCH3, gave a spectrum consistent only with the structure Man2MeMan6-OCH3, revealing the existence of a methylmannose homolog with 2 unmethylated mannoses at the nonreducing end of the chain. PMID:6940169

  2. Sequential sorption and desorption of chlorinated phenols in organoclays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Shin, W S; Kim, Y H; Choi, S J; Jeon, Y W; Song, D I

    2003-01-01

    Effect of pH on the sorption and desorption of the chlorinated phenols (2-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol) in HDTMA-montmorillonite organoclays was investigated using sequential batch experiments. 2,4-dichlorophenol exhibited higher affinity in both sorption and desorption than 2-chlorophenol at pH 4.85 and 9.15. For both chlorophenols, the protonated speciation (at pH 4.85) exhibited a higher affinity in both sorption and desorption than the predominant deprotonated speciation (about 80% and 95% of 2-chlorophenate and 2,4-dichlophenate anions at pH 9.15, respectively). Desorption of chlorinated phenols was strongly dependent on the current pH regardless of their speciation during the previous sorption stage. No appreciable desorption resistance of the chlorinated phenols was observed in organoclays after sequential desorptions. Affinity of both chlorophenols in bisolute competitive sorption and desorption was reduced compared to that in a single-solute system due to the competition between solutes. The ideal adsorbed solution theory coupled with the single-solute Freundlich model successfully predicted the bisolute competitive sorption and desorption equilibria.

  3. Modeling Organic Contaminant Desorption from Municipal Solid Waste Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappe, D. R.; Wu, B.; Barlaz, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    Approximately 25% of the sites on the National Priority List (NPL) of Superfund are municipal landfills that accepted hazardous waste. Unlined landfills typically result in groundwater contamination, and priority pollutants such as alkylbenzenes are often present. To select cost-effective risk management alternatives, better information on factors controlling the fate of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in landfills is required. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate the effects of HOC aging time, anaerobic sorbent decomposition, and leachate composition on HOC desorption rates, and (2) to simulate HOC desorption rates from polymers and biopolymer composites with suitable diffusion models. Experiments were conducted with individual components of municipal solid waste (MSW) including polyvinyl chloride (PVC), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), newsprint, office paper, and model food and yard waste (rabbit food). Each of the biopolymer composites (office paper, newsprint, rabbit food) was tested in both fresh and anaerobically decomposed form. To determine the effects of aging on alkylbenzene desorption rates, batch desorption tests were performed after sorbents were exposed to toluene for 30 and 250 days in flame-sealed ampules. Desorption tests showed that alkylbenzene desorption rates varied greatly among MSW components (PVC slowest, fresh rabbit food and newsprint fastest). Furthermore, desorption rates decreased as aging time increased. A single-parameter polymer diffusion model successfully described PVC and HDPE desorption data, but it failed to simulate desorption rate data for biopolymer composites. For biopolymer composites, a three-parameter biphasic polymer diffusion model was employed, which successfully simulated both the initial rapid and the subsequent slow desorption of toluene. Toluene desorption rates from MSW mixtures were predicted for typical MSW compositions in the years 1960 and 1997. For the older MSW mixture, which had a

  4. Integrated field emission array for ion desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Paul J; Hertz, Kristin L; Holland, Christopher; Chichester, David; Schwoebel, Paul

    2013-09-17

    An integrated field emission array for ion desorption includes an electrically conductive substrate; a dielectric layer lying over the electrically conductive substrate comprising a plurality of laterally separated cavities extending through the dielectric layer; a like plurality of conically-shaped emitter tips on posts, each emitter tip/post disposed concentrically within a laterally separated cavity and electrically contacting the substrate; and a gate electrode structure lying over the dielectric layer, including a like plurality of circular gate apertures, each gate aperture disposed concentrically above an emitter tip/post to provide a like plurality of annular gate electrodes and wherein the lower edge of each annular gate electrode proximate the like emitter tip/post is rounded. Also disclosed herein are methods for fabricating an integrated field emission array.

  5. Integrated field emission array for ion desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, Paul J; Hertz, Kristin L.; Holland, Christopher; Chichester, David

    2016-08-23

    An integrated field emission array for ion desorption includes an electrically conductive substrate; a dielectric layer lying over the electrically conductive substrate comprising a plurality of laterally separated cavities extending through the dielectric layer; a like plurality of conically-shaped emitter tips on posts, each emitter tip/post disposed concentrically within a laterally separated cavity and electrically contacting the substrate; and a gate electrode structure lying over the dielectric layer, including a like plurality of circular gate apertures, each gate aperture disposed concentrically above an emitter tip/post to provide a like plurality of annular gate electrodes and wherein the lower edge of each annular gate electrode proximate the like emitter tip/post is rounded. Also disclosed herein are methods for fabricating an integrated field emission array.

  6. Copper desorption from Gelidium algal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2007-04-01

    Desorption of divalent copper from marine algae Gelidium sesquipedale, an algal waste (from agar extraction industry) and a composite material (the algal waste immobilized in polyacrylonitrile) was studied in a batch system. Copper ions were first adsorbed until saturation and then desorbed by HNO(3) and Na(2)EDTA solutions. Elution efficiency using HNO(3) increases as pH decreases. At pH=1, for a solid to liquid ratio S/L=4gl(-1), elution efficiency was 97%, 95% and 88%, the stoichiometric coefficient for the ionic exchange, 0.70+/-0.02, 0.73+/-0.05 and 0.76+/-0.06 and the selectivity coefficient, 0.93+/-0.07, 1.0+/-0.3 and 1.1+/-0.3, respectively, for algae Gelidium, algal waste and composite material. Complexation of copper ions by EDTA occurs in a molar proportion of 1:1 and the elution efficiency increases with EDTA concentration. For concentrations of 1.4, 0.88 and 0.57 mmoll(-1), the elution efficiency for S/L=4gl(-1), was 91%, 86% and 78%, respectively, for algae Gelidium, algal waste and composite material. The S/L ratio, in the range 1-20gl(-1), has little influence on copper recovery by using 0.1M HNO(3). Desorption kinetics was very fast for all biosorbents. Kinetic data using HNO(3) as eluant were well described by the mass transfer model, considering the average metal concentration in the solid phase and the equilibrium relationship given by the mass action law. The homogeneous diffusion coefficient varied between 1.0 x 10(-7)cm(2)s(-1) for algae Gelidium and 3.0 x 10(-7)cm(2)s(-1) for the composite material.

  7. Study of the irradiation effects on thorium phosphate diphosphate ({beta}-TPD): consequences on its chemical durability; Etude des effets d'irradiation sur le phosphate diphosphate de thorium ({beta}-PDT): consequences sur la durabilite chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamain, C

    2005-12-15

    Since Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (beta-TPD) can be considered as a potential host matrix for long-term storage in underground repository, it is necessary to study the irradiation effects on the structure of this ceramics and the consequences on its chemical durability. Sintered samples of beta-TPD and of associated solid solutions of beta-TUPD were irradiated under ion beams and then altered in aqueous solutions. Depending on the electronic LET value, beta-TPD can be completely or partly amorphized. Furthermore, the ability of recrystallization of the amorphous material by thermal annealing was also demonstrated. Some leaching tests, realized on these irradiated samples, have shown a significant effect of the amorphous fraction on the normalized dissolution rate which was increased by a factor of 10 from the crystallized to the fully amorphized material. Correlatively, the amorphous fraction also modified the delay to reach the saturation conditions associated to the thermodynamic equilibria involved. On the other hand, it exhibited no influence neither on other kinetic parameters, such as activation energy of the dissolution process or partial order related to the proton concentration, nor on the nature of the neo-formed phase formed at the saturation of the leachate and identified as Thorium Phosphate Hydrogeno-Phosphate Hydrate (TPHPH). Beta-TUPD samples were also irradiated by gamma and alpha rays during leaching tests to study the effects of radiolysis in the leaching medium on the normalized leaching rate. It appeared that the radiolytic species occurring in the dissolution mechanism were unstable, disappearing quickly when stopping the irradiation. (author)

  8. Cs salt of tungstophosphoric acid-promoted zirconium titanium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... N2 adsorption desorption, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD).We have studied the catalytic activities, kinetics and reusability of the catalysts. 60CsTPA-ZTP is found to be an effective and re-usable catalyst for the ...

  9. Energetic Mapping of Ni Catalysts by Detailed Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørgum, Erlend; Chen, De; Bakken, Mari G.

    2005-01-01

    Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO has been performed on supported and unsupported nickel catalysts. The unsupported Ni catalyst consists of a Ni(14 13 13) single crystal which has been studied under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The desorption energy for CO at low CO surface coverage w...... nicely with literature values, providing useful information for identifying active sites on supported Ni catalysts....

  10. [Desorption characteristics of phosphorus in tea tree rhizosphere soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Wei-Jun; Bao, Chun-Hong; Miao, Xiao-Lin; Hu, Wen-Min

    2013-07-01

    In order to explore the phosphorus (P) release process and its supply mechanism in tea tree rhizosphere soil, an exogenous P adsorption and culture experiment was conducted to study the P desorption process and characters in the tea tree rhizosphere soils having been cultivated for different years and derived from different parent materials. The least squares method was used to fit the isotherms of P desorption kinetics. There was an obvious difference in the P desorption process between the rhizosphere soils and non-rhizosphere soils. The P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils was significantly higher than that of the non-rhizosphere soils. As compared with non-rhizosphere soils, rhizosphere soils had higher available P content, P desorption rate, and beta value (desorbed P of per unit adsorbed P), with the average increment being 5.49 mg x kg(-1), 1.7%, and 24.4%, respectively. The P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils derived from different parent materials was in the order of granite > quaternary red clay > slate. The average available P content and P desorption ability of the rhizosphere soils increased with increasing cultivation years.

  11. Kinetic Ising model for desorption from a chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldart, D. J. W.; Kreuzer, H. J.; Rys, Franz S.

    1986-10-01

    Adsorption along a linear chain of adsorption sites is considered in an Ising model with nearest neighbor interactions. The kinetics are studied in a master equation approach with transition probabilities describing single spin flips to mimic adsorption-desorption processes. Exchange of two spins to account for diffusion can be included as well. Numerical results show that desorption is frequently of fractional (including zero) order. Only at low coverage and high temperature is desorption a first order process. Finite size effects and readsorption are also studied.

  12. Salt Tolerance of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Ayanna U. [Purdue University; Talaty, Nari [Purdue University; Cooks, R G [Purdue University; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Suppression of ion intensity in the presence of high salt matrices is common in most mass spectrometry ionization techniques. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is an ionization method that exhibits salt tolerance, and this is investigated. DESI analysis was performed on three different drug mixtures in the presence of 0, 0.2, 2, 5, 10, and 20% NaCl:KCl weight by volume from seven different surfaces. At physiological concentrations individual drugs in each mixture were observed with each surface. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to provide additional confirmation for select compounds. Multiple stage experiments, to MS5, were performed for select compounds. Even in the absence of added salt, the benzodiazepine containing mixture yielded sodium and potassium adducts of carbamazepine which masked the ions of interest. These adducts were eliminated by adding 0.1% 7M ammonium acetate to the standard methanol:water (1:1) spray solvent. Comparison of the salt tolerance of DESI with that of electrospray ionization (ESI) demonstrated much better signal/noise characteristics for DESI in this study. The salt tolerance of DESI was also studied by performing limit of detection and dynamic range experiments. Even at a salt concentration significantly above physiological concentrations, select surfaces were effective in providing spectra that allowed the ready identification of the compounds of interest. The already high salt tolerance of DESI can be optimized further by appropriate choices of surface and spray solution.

  13. On the applicability of Arrhenius plot methods to determine surface energetic heterogeneity of adsorbents and catalysts surfaces from experimental TPD spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzinski, W; Borowiecki, T; Panczyk, T; Dominko, A

    2000-01-01

    Recovering adsorption energy distribution from experimental data belongs to most difficult problems of adsorption science. In the case when thermodesorption data are used as a source of information, that difficult problem is overcome by the common use of the Arrhenius plot methods. So, we decided to carry out an extensive model investigation to show, how reliable information concerning the surface energetic heterogeneity is obtained by using the Arrhenius plot methods. Like in our previous publications we have used the Statistical Rate Theory of Interfacial Transport to describe the adsorption/desorption kinetics. Our model investigations showed, that the Arrhenius plot methods, cannot provide reliable information about the surface energetic heterogeneity. Moreover, for strongly heterogeneous surfaces a linear relationship exists between the logarithm of the pre-exponential constant and the adsorption energy, for certain adsorption coverages. That kind of compensation effect has, so far, been ascribed to interactions between the adsorbed molecules. The failure of the popular Arrhenius plot method puts, as an urgent agenda, the development of reliable methods for recovering adsorption energy distribution from the thermodesorption data.

  14. Cesium sorption and desorption on selected Los Alamos soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, K.S.; Chan, J.; Longmire, P.; Fowler, M.

    1995-08-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the sorptivity of cesium onto Los Alamos soils under controlled experimental conditions. Four soil profiles were collected and each soil profile which is broken into layers according to previously identified soil horizons were studied. Batch sorption isotherms were studied to quantify the chemical reactivity of each soil horizon toward cesium ion. Radioactive cesium-137 was used as sorbent and gamma counting was used to quantify the amount of sorption. Desorption experiments were conducted after the sorption experiments. Batch desorption isotherms were studied to quantify the desorption of presorbed cesium from these Los Alamos soils. This study suggests cesium may sorb strongly and irreversibly on most Los Alamos soils. The amount of cesium sorption and desorption is possibly related to the clay content of the soil sample since subsurface sample has a higher clay content than that of surface sample.

  15. Study on hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of uranium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yamawaki, Michio [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of two U-Mn intermetallic compounds, U{sub 6}Mn and UMn{sub 2}, were investigated. U{sub 6}Mn absorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen desorption pressure of U{sub 6}Mn obtained from this experiment was higher than that of U, which was considered to be the effect of alloying, whereas UMn{sub 2} was not observed to absorb hydrogen up to 50 atm at room temperature. (author)

  16. Desorption by Femtosecond Laser Pulses : An Electron-Hole Effect?

    OpenAIRE

    D. M., NEWNS; T. F., HEINZ; J. A., MISEWICH; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center

    1992-01-01

    Desorption of molecules from metal surfaces induced by femtosecond visible laser pulses has been reported. Since the lattice temperature rise is insufficient to explain desorption, an electronic mechanism is clearly responsible. It is shown that a theory based on direct coupling between the center-of-mass degree of freedom of the adsorbate and the electron-hole excitations of the substrate provides a satisfactory explanation of the various experimental findings.

  17. Adsorption and desorption dynamics of citric acid anions in soil

    KAUST Repository

    Oburger, E.

    2011-07-26

    The functional role of organic acid anions in soil has been intensively investigated, with special focus on (i) microbial respiration and soil carbon dynamics, (ii) nutrient solubilization or (iii) metal detoxification and reduction of plant metal uptake. Little is known about the interaction dynamics of organic acid anions with the soil matrix and the potential impact of adsorption and desorption processes on the functional significance of these effects. The aim of this study was to characterize experimentally the adsorption and desorption dynamics of organic acid anions in five agricultural soils differing in iron and aluminium oxide contents and using citrate as a model carboxylate. Results showed that both adsorption and desorption processes were fast in all soils, reaching a steady state within approximately 1 hour. However, for a given total soil citrate concentration (ct) the steady state was critically dependent on the starting conditions of the experiment, whether most of the citrate was initially present in solution (cl) or held on the solid phase (cs). Specifically, desorption-led processes resulted in significantly smaller steady-state solution concentrations than adsorption-led processes, indicating that hysteresis occurred. As it is not possible to distinguish between different adsorption and desorption pools in soil experimentally, a new dynamic hysteresis model that relies only on measured soil solution concentrations was developed. The model satisfactorily explained experimental data and was able to predict dynamic adsorption and desorption behaviour. To demonstrate its use, we applied the model to two relevant situations involving exudation and microbial degradation. The study highlighted the complex nature of citrate adsorption and desorption dynamics in soil. We conclude that existing models need to incorporate both temporal and hysteresis components to describe realistically the role and fate of organic acids in soil processes. © 2011 The

  18. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano André Petter

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1. In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron, total organic carbon, fulvic acid, humic acid and humin, pH and partition coefficient to organic carbon were evaluated. The Freundlich isotherm was adjusted appropriately to describe diuron sorption kinetics in all the studied treatments. The application of biochar provided increment in the sorption (Kf and reduction in the desorption of diuron in 64 and 44%, respectively. This effect is attributed to the biochar contribution to the total organic carbon and C-humin and of these to diuron through hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds. The positive correlation between the partition coefficient to organic carbon and Kf confirms the importance of soil organic compartment in the sorption of diuron. There was no competition of NPK fertilizer for the same sorption site of diuron. The increase and reduction in sorption and desorption, respectively, show that the application of biochar is an important alternative for the remediation of soil leaching of diuron, especially in sandy soils.

  19. The study of 'microsurfaces' using thermal desorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M. E.; Poppa, H.; Pound, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The use of a newly combined ultrahigh vacuum technique for studying continuous and particulate evaporated thin films using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and transmission electron diffraction (TED) is discussed. It is shown that (1) CO thermal desorption energies of epitaxially deposited (111) Ni and (111) Pd surfaces agree perfectly with previously published data on bulk (111) single crystal, (2) contamination and surface structural differences can be detected using TDS as a surface probe and TEM as a complementary technique, and (3) CO desorption signals from deposited metal coverages of one-thousandth of a monolayer should be detectable. These results indicate that the chemisorption properties of supported 'microsurfaces' of metals can now be investigated with very high sensitivity. The combined use of TDS and TEM-TED experimental methods is a very powerful technique for fundamental studies in basic thin film physics and in catalysis.

  20. Femtosecond laser pulse induced desorption: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lončarić, Ivor, E-mail: ivor.loncaric@gmail.com [Centro de Física de Materiales CFM/MPC (CSIC-UPV/EHU), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Alducin, Maite [Centro de Física de Materiales CFM/MPC (CSIC-UPV/EHU), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Saalfrank, Peter [Institut für Chemie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Juaristi, J. Iñaki [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Químicas, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastián (Spain); Centro de Física de Materiales CFM/MPC (CSIC-UPV/EHU), P. Manuel de Lardizabal 5, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P. Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain)

    2016-09-01

    In recent simulations of femtosecond laser induced desorption of molecular oxygen from the Ag(110) surface, it has been shown that depending on the properties (depth and electronic environment) of the well in which O{sub 2} is adsorbed, the desorption can be either induced dominantly by hot electrons or via excitations of phonons. In this work we explore whether the ratios between the desorption yields from different adsorption wells can be tuned by changing initial surface temperature and laser pulse properties. We show that the initial surface temperature is an important parameter, and that by using low initial surface temperatures the electronically mediated process can be favored. In contrast, laser properties seem to have only a modest influence on the results.

  1. The influence of various factors on the droplet desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S. Y.; Morozov, V. S.

    2017-09-01

    Experimental data on sessile droplet desorption of aqueous salt solution of LiBr on a heated wall were implemented. High-temperature desorption of water-salt solutions in air atmosphere leads to significant difficulties at modeling heat and mass transfer. In this case, the evaporation rate multiply decreases with time and the diffusion coefficient, the desorption heat and the salt concentration change significantly. With the growth of salt concentration in solution from 10 % to 65 %, the steam partial pressure at the interface falls by dozens of times. In this study, we performed experiments in a wide range of salt concentrations and proposed a simple estimated method for calculating the mass flow. The resulting technique can predict the droplet solution behavior with a significant change in the partial vapor pressure on the droplet interphase with time.

  2. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  3. Desorption of toluene from modified clays using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro D. G. P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to study the regeneration capacity of modified clays using supercritical fluid. These modified clays are used as organic compound adsorvents. The experimental step was done using a packed column with the clay contaminated by toluene. The results obtained showed the influence of the density of the supercritical CO2 and of the organic modifier in the desorption process. These data were modeled with first- and second-order models. Better results were obtained using the second-order model. This study makes possible the scale-up of the desorption process for regeneration of solid matrices using supercritical fluids.

  4. Nonthermal current-stimulated desorption of gases from carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Lin, Kevin Y; Field, Christopher R; Masel, Richard I

    2010-09-10

    The desorption of gases from carbon nanotubes is usually a slow process that limits the nanotubes' utility as sensors or as memristors. Here, we demonstrate that flow in the nanotube above the Poole-Frenkel conduction threshold can stimulate adsorbates to desorb without heating the sensor substantially. The method is general: alcohols, aromatics, amines, and phosphonates were all found to desorb. We postulate that the process is analogous to electron-stimulated desorption, but with an internally conducted rather than externally applied source of electrons.

  5. Exploring the Instructional Strategies of Elementary School Teachers When Developing Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge via a Collaborative Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    The technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK) framework has been regarded as potentially effective in helping teachers integrate technology into the classroom. This study explores the instructional strategies of teachers when developing TPACK. A teacher professional development (TPD) program, in which teaching activities and deep…

  6. The Effects of composts on adsorption-desorption of three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    (1/n des). @JASEM. Pesticides adsorption and desorption are the key processes determining whether pesticide used will have any impact on environmental quality. For most of the pesticides soil organic matter and clay contents are the most important properties which affect the sorption and transformation (Durovic et al., ...

  7. Overview literature on matrix assisted laser desorption ionization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Overview literature on matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI MS): basics and its .... Overview literature on MALDI MS. 517 mined as opposed to obtaining relative molecular ...... accurate representation of the overall molecular mass distribution in each of the fractionated materials. This.

  8. Characterizing and optimizing a laser-desorption molecular beam source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschmit, Nicole; Długołecki, Karol; Gusa, Daniel; Rubinsky, Igor; Horke, Daniel A.; Küpper, Jochen

    2017-10-01

    The design and characterization of a new laser-desorption molecular beam source, tailored for use in x-ray free-electron laser and ultrashort-pulse laser imaging experiments, is presented. It consists of a single mechanical unit containing all source components, including the molecular-beam valve, the sample, and the fiber-coupled desorption laser, which is movable in five axes, as required for experiments at central facilities. Utilizing strong-field ionization, we characterize the produced molecular beam and evaluate the influence of desorption laser pulse energy, relative timing of valve opening and desorption laser, sample bar height, and which part of the molecular packet is probed on the sample properties. Strong-field ionization acts as a universal probe and allows detecting all species present in the molecular beam, and hence enables us to analyze the purity of the produced molecular beam, including molecular fragments. We present optimized experimental parameters for the production of the purest molecular beam, containing the highest yield of intact parent ions, which we find to be very sensitive to the placement of the desorbed-molecule plumes within the supersonic expansion.

  9. Adsorption and laser-induced desorption of dimethylcadmium from silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonov, Alexander P.; Varakin, Vladimir N.

    1990-10-01

    The dynamics of Cd (cH ) 2 chemisorption and spontaneous decomposit ion on n-type 51(100) with native surface oxide the pathwa and efficiencies of the adsorbate desorption due to the absorption of the XeC1 laser radiation by silicon have been examined using laser-induced desorption miss spectrorrtry (LIDMS ) . The k inetics of these sur face processes has been found to depend on the preceding laser irradiation of the surface. The extremely fast chemisorption and efficient decomposition of the parent rrlecules have been observed on the irradiated silicon surface. The competition between intact dissociative and recombination desorption pathways was responsible for the observed laser fluence dependences of the desorption of Cd(CI-6) and i ts fragments. 1 . INTROOIJCTIct4 1 . 1 . Laser chemical vapour depos ition (LCVD). Laser-induced deposition of thin filme on solid surfaces by using volatile organometallic precursors has been the subject of numerous investigations in the 8Os2. Due to the spatial/temporal localization of laser radiation and the resonant nature of laser-rr1ecule interaction this deposition technique has such attractive features as submicrometer resolution of deposits high film growth rate and high quality lowtemperature processing. The deposition process can be controlled by varying the laser parameters (wavelength fluence beam spot on the substrate surface scanning speed ). A var iety of mater ials can be depos I ted using LCVD. Of special interest for microelectronics is the deposition of

  10. Stable Isotope Systematics of Coalbed Gas during Desorption and Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Niemann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The stable carbon isotope ratios of coalbed methane (CBM demonstrate diagnostic changes that systematically vary with production and desorption times. These shifts can provide decisive, predictive information on the behaviour and potential performance of CBM operations. Samples from producing CBM wells show a general depletion in 13C-methane with increasing production times and corresponding shifts in δ13C-CH4 up to 35.8‰. Samples from canister desorption experiments show mostly enrichment in 13C for methane with increasing desorption time and isotope shifts of up to 43.4‰. Also, 13C-depletion was observed in some samples with isotope shifts of up to 32.1‰. Overall, the magnitudes of the observed isotope shifts vary considerably between different sample sets, but also within samples from the same source. The δ13C-CH4 values do not have the anticipated signature of methane generated from coal. This indicates that secondary processes, including desorption and diffusion, can influence the values. It is also challenging to deconvolute these various secondary processes because their molecular and isotope effects can have similar directions and/or magnitudes. In some instances, significant alteration of CBM gases has to be considered as a combination of secondary alteration effects.

  11. Organic contaminants in soil : desorption kinetics and microbial degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlebaum, W.

    1999-01-01

    The availability of organic contaminants in soils or sediments for microbial degradation or removal by physical means (e.g.) soil washing or soil venting) depends on the desorption kinetics of these contaminants from the soil matrix. When the organic contaminants desorb very slow from the

  12. Desorption of plutonium from montmorillonite: An experimental and modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, James D.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Kersting, Annie B.

    2017-01-01

    Desorption of plutonium (Pu) will likely control the extent to which it is transported by mineral colloids. We evaluated the adsorption/desorption behavior of Pu on SWy-1 montmorillonite colloids at pH 4, pH 6, and pH 8 using batch adsorption and flow cell desorption experiments. After 21 days adsorption, Pu(IV) affinity for montmorillonite displayed a pH dependency, with Kd values highest at pH 4 and lowest at pH 8. The pH 8 experiment was further allowed to equilibrate for 6 months and showed an increase in Kd, indicating that true sorption equilibrium was not achieved within the first 21 days. For the desorption experiments, aliquots of the sorption suspensions were placed in a flow cell, and Pu-free solutions were then pumped through the cell for a period of 12 days. Changes in influent solution flow rate were used to investigate the kinetics of Pu desorption and demonstrated that it was rate-limited over the experimental timescales. At the end of the 12-day flow cell experiments, the extent of desorption was again pH dependent, with pH 8 > pH 6 > pH 4. Further, at pH 8, less Pu was desorbed after an adsorption contact time of 6 months than after a contact time of 21 days, consistent with an aging of Pu on the clay surface. A conceptual model for Pu adsorption/desorption that incorporated known surface-mediated Pu redox reactions was used to fit the experimental data. The resulting rate constants indicated processes occurring on timescales of months and even years which may, in part, explain observations of clay colloid-facilitated Pu transport on decadal timescales. Importantly, however, our results also imply that migration of Pu adsorbed to montmorillonite colloids at long (50-100 year) timescales under oxic conditions may not be possible without considering additional phenomena, such as co-precipitation.

  13. Investigations into ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heise, Theodore W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) is a technique for converting large biomolecules into gas phase ions. Some characteristics of the commonly used uv matrices are determined. Solubilities in methanol range from 0.1 to 0.5 M. Solid phase absorption spectra are found to be similar to solution, but slightly red-shifted. Acoustic and quartz crystal microbalance signals are investigated as possible means of uv-MALD quantitation. Evidence for the existence of desorption thresholds is presented. Threshold values are determined to be in the range of 2 to 3 MW/cm2. A transient imaging technique based on laser-excited fluorescence for monitoring MALD plumes is described. Sensitivity is well within the levels required for studying matrix-assisted laser desorption, where analyte concentrations are significantly lower than those in conventional laser desorption. Results showing the effect of film morphology, particularly film thickness, on plume dynamics are presented. In particular, MALD plumes from thicker films tend to exhibit higher axial velocities. Fluorescent labeling of protein and of DNA is used to allow imaging of their uv-MALD generated plumes. Integrated concentrations are available with respect to time, making it possible to assess the rate of fragmentation. The spatial and temporal distributions are important for the design of secondary ionization schemes to enhance ion yields and for the optimization of ion collection in time-of-flight MS instruments to maximize resolution. Such information could also provide insight into whether ionization is closely associated with the desorption step or whether it is a result of subsequent collisions with the matrix gas (e.g., proton transfer). Although the present study involves plumes in a normal atmosphere, adaptation to measurements in vacuum (e.g., inside a mass spectrometer) should be straightforward.

  14. Sorption and desorption of carbamazepine from water by smectite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihao; Ding, Yunjie; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Li, Hui

    2010-11-01

    Carbamazepine is a prescription anticonvulsant and mood stabilizing pharmaceutical administered to humans. Carbamazepine is persistent in the environment and frequently detected in water systems. In this study, sorption and desorption of carbamazepine from water was measured for smectite clays with the surface negative charges compensated with K+, Ca2+, NH4+, tetramethylammonium (TMA), trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) cations. The magnitude of sorption followed the order: TMPA-smectite≥HDTMA-smectite>NH4-smectite>K-smectite>Ca-smectite⩾TMA-smectite. The greatest sorption of carbamazepine by TMPA-smectite is attributed to the interaction of conjugate aromatic moiety in carbamazepine with the phenyl ring in TMPA through π-π interaction. Partitioning process is the primary mechanism for carbamazepine uptake by HDTMA-smectite. For NH4-smectite the urea moiety in carbamazepine interacts with exchanged cation NH4+ by H-bonding hence demonstrating relatively higher adsorption. Sorption by K-, Ca- and TMA-smectites from water occurs on aluminosilicate mineral surfaces. These results implicate that carbamazepine sorption by soils occurs primarily in soil organic matter, and soil mineral fractions play a secondary role. Desorption of carbamazepine from the sorbents manifested an apparent hysteresis. Increasing irreversibility of desorption vs. sorption was observed for K-, Ca-, TMA-, TMPA- and HDTMA-clays as aqueous carbamazepine concentrations increased. Desorption hysteresis of carbamazepine from K-, Ca-, NH4-smectites was greater than that from TMPA- and HDTMA-clays, suggesting that the sequestrated carbamazepine molecules in smectite interlayers are more resistant to desorption compared to those sorbed by organic phases in smectite clays. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Co2 desorption from glycerol for reusable absorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindaryani, Aswati; Budhijanto, Wiratni; Narendratama, Roberto Delta

    2017-05-01

    Increasing demand of energy forces human to develop new energy sources. Biogas comes as a reliable option of sustainable energy fulfilment. Biogas consists of methane and some impurities such as CO2 and H2S. CO2 removal from biogas guarantees an elevation of biogas heating value. CO2 removal can be achieved by integrated absorption-desorption process using certain absorbent. Regeneration of absorbent is a necessity to recover CO2 absorption capability of used absorbent. This paper focuses on the study of CO2 desorption from glycerol absorbent using N2 as stripping gas. Effect of desorption temperature and N2 flow rate is studied. Three neck flask equipped with water bath is filled with 750 mL of glycerol. Waterbath temperature is set at 40°C. Absorption starts with flowing 1 LPM gas mixture of 40% CO2 to absorbent through sparger. CO2 concentration of outlet gas is analyzed using gas chromatograph every 10 seconds. Gas flow is stopped when outlet CO2 concentration reaches inlet concentration. Desorption process is conducted as follows, 0.1 LPM nitrogen is flowed through sparger to absorber. Samples of outlet gas are taken at several time. Samples are analyzed with gas chromatograph. The same experiments are conducted for temperature variation of 60°C and 80°C and nitrogen flow rate variation of 0.2 LPM and 0.3 LPM. The model of batch desorption process by gas stripping is developed. Mass transfer coefficient was determined by curve fitting. Result shows a noticeable increase of desorbed CO2 with increasing of temperature and N2 flow rate.

  16. Molecular desorption of stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 4.2  MeV/u lead ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mahner

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In preparation for the heavy ion program of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, accumulation and cooling tests with lead ion beams have been performed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2  MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments (glow discharges, nonevaporable getter coating are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H_{2}, CH_{4}, CO, Ar, and CO_{2}. Unexpected large values of molecular yields per incident ion up to 2×10^{4} molecules/ion have been observed. The reduction of the ion-induced desorption yield due to continuous bombardment with lead ions (beam cleaning has been investigated for five different stainless steel vacuum chambers. The implications of these results for the vacuum system of the future Low Energy Ion Ring and possible remedies to reduce the vacuum degradation are discussed.

  17. Adsorption-desorption and leaching of pyraclostrobin in Indian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Navakishore; Gupta, Suman; Gajbhiye, Vijay T

    2013-01-01

    Pyraclostrobin is a new broad-spectrum foliar applied and seed protectant fungicide of the strobilurin group. In this paper, adsorption-desorption of pyraclostrobin has been investigated in three different soils viz. Inceptisol (sandy loam, Delhi), Vertisol (sandy clay, Hyderabad) and Ultisol (sandy clay loam, Thrissur). Effect of organic matter and clay content on sorption was also studied in Inceptisol of Delhi. Leaching potential of pyraclostrobin as influenced by rainfall was studied in intact soil columns to confirm the results of adsorption-desorption studies. The adsorption studies were carried out at initial concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 μg mL(-1). The distribution coefficient (Kd) values in three test soils ranged from 4.91 to 18.26 indicating moderate to high adsorption. Among the three test soils, adsorption was the highest in Ultisol (Kd 18.26), followed by Vertisol (Kd 9.87) and Inceptisol (Kd 4.91). KF value was also highest for Ultisol soil (66.21), followed by Vertisol (40.88) and Inceptisol (8.59). S-type adsorption isotherms were observed in all the three test soils. Kd values in organic carbon-removed soil and clay-removed soil were 3.57 and 2.83 respectively, indicating lower adsorption than normal Inceptisol. Desorption studies were carried out at initial concentrations of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 μg mL(-1). Desorption was the greatest in Inceptisol, followed by Vertisol and Ultisol. Amounts of pyraclostrobin desorbed in three desorption cycles for different concentrations were 23.1-25.3%, 9.4-20.7% and 8.1-13.6% in Inceptisol, Vertisol and Ultisol respectively. Desorption was higher in clay fraction-removed and organic carbonremoved soils than normal Inceptisol. Desorption was slower than adsorption in all the test soils, indicating hysteresis effect (with hysteresis coefficient values varying from 0.05 to 0.20). Low values of hysteresis coefficient suggest high hysteresis effect indicating easy and strong adsorption, and slow

  18. Formation of nanocarbon spheres by thermal treatment of woody char from fast pyrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiangu Yan; Hossein Toghiani; Zhiyong Cai; Jilei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Influences of thermal treatment conditions of temperature, reaction cycle and time, and purge gas type on nanocarbon formation over bio-chars from fast pyrolysis and effects of thermal reaction cycle and purge gas type on bio-char surface functional groups were investigated by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature programmed reduction methods....

  19. A new desorption method for removing organic solvents from activated carbon using surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinoue, Mitsuo; Ishimatsu, Sumiyo; Fueta, Yukiko; Hori, Hajime

    2017-03-28

    A new desorption method was investigated, which does not require toxic organic solvents. Efficient desorption of organic solvents from activated carbon was achieved with an ananionic surfactant solution, focusing on its washing and emulsion action. Isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) were used as test solvents. Lauryl benzene sulfonic acid sodium salt (LAS) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were used as the surfactant. Activated carbon (100 mg) was placed in a vial and a predetermined amount of organic solvent was added. After leaving for about 24 h, a predetermined amount of the surfactant solution was added. After leaving for another 72 h, the vial was heated in an incubator at 60°C for a predetermined time. The organic vapor concentration was then determined with a frame ionization detector (FID)-gas chromatograph and the desorption efficiency was calculated. A high desorption efficiency was obtained with a 10% surfactant solution (LAS 8%, SDS 2%), 5 ml desorption solution, 60°C desorption temperature, and desorption time of over 24 h, and the desorption efficiency was 72% for IPA and 9% for MEK. Under identical conditions, the desorption efficiencies for another five organic solvents were investigated, which were 36%, 3%, 32%, 2%, and 3% for acetone, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane, toluene, and m-xylene, respectively. A combination of two anionic surfactants exhibited a relatively high desorption efficiency for IPA. For toluene, the desorption efficiency was low due to poor detergency and emulsification power.

  20. Experimental study on desorption of soluble matter as influenced by cations in static water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-sheng XU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With variation of drainage basin environments, desorption of soluble matter has become one of the significant erosion processes in rivers. It has a considerable impact on flow and sediment transport, as well as processes of river bed deformation and landform evolution throughout a watershed. In this study, considering influences on sediment movement, especially on cohesive sediment transport, Ca2+ and H+ were chosen as characteristic ions of soluble matter, and the total desorption quantity of Ca2+ and pH value when the desorption equilibrium is reached were employed as two indexes representing the desorption of soluble matter. By means of an indoor experiment, desorption of soluble matter as influenced by cations in static water was investigated. The results show that the total desorption quantity of soluble matter increases with the initial cation concentration until a maximum desorption quantity value is obtained and maintained. The total desorption quantity of soluble matter depends on properties of the specific cations in static water, and the stronger the affinity is between the cation and sediment surface, the higher the total desorption quantity will be. Finally, a strong approximate linear relationship between desorption quantities for different kinds of soluble matters was obtained, which means that variation of pH values can accurately reflect the desorption results of soluble matter.

  1. Kinetics of ethylene oxide desorption from sterilized materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Gisela C; Brandão, Teresa R S; Silva, Cristina L M

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene oxide gas is commonly used to sterilize medical devices, and concerns about using this agent on biological systems are well-established. Medical devices sterilized by ethylene oxide must be properly aerated to remove residual gas and by-products. In this work, kinetics of ethylene oxide desorption from different sterilized materials were studied in a range of aeration temperatures. The experimental data were well-described by a Fickian diffusion mass transfer behavior, and diffusivities were estimated for two textile and two polymeric materials within the temperature range of 1.5 to 59.0 degrees C. The results will allow predictions of ethylene oxide desorption, which is a key step for the design of sterilization/aeration processes, contributing to an efficient removal of residual ethylene oxide content.

  2. Nonisothermal Desorption of the Libr Aqueous Salt Solution in Minichannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura S.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted the research for two (three-phase flows of LiBr water solution in minichannels with different heat flux and wall thicknesses. Six flow patterns have been observed: a bubble flow, plug flow, laminar and oscillating laminar flow, mist flow, and flow locking. The physical solution properties and the equilibrium conditions change in time. The desorption rate depends not only on the heat flow and speed ratio of vapor to liquid, but also on the total area of the interface (liquid-vapor. The third phase (solid crystal hydrates are formed under high heat fluxes and in the presence of boiling crisis. A variation in the wall thickness leads to a change in the desorption mode. With increasing wall thickness the boiling crisis is realized at higher heat fluxes.

  3. Unconventional resource's production under desorption-induced effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sina Hosseini Boosari

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a numerical model to study the effect of changes in porosity, permeability and compaction on four major U.S. shale formations considering their Langmuir isotherm desorption behavior. These resources include; Marcellus, New Albany, Barnett and Haynesville Shales. First, we introduced a model that is a physical transport of single-phase gas flow in shale porous rock. Later, the governing equations are implemented into a one-dimensional numerical model and solved using a fully implicit solution method. It is found that the natural gas production is substantially affected by desorption-induced porosity/permeability changes and geomechancis. This paper provides valuable insights into accurate modeling of unconventional reservoirs that is more significant when an even small correction to the future production prediction can enormously contribute to the U.S. economy.

  4. Sorption/desorption reversibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils and carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui

    2008-07-01

    Understanding sorption/desorption is an important prerequisite for the prediction of fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. During the last two decades, numerous studies have reported hysteresis phenomenon for the interaction of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) with natural organic matter (NOM). It manifests as nonsingular sorption/desorption isotherms or different rates for sorption and desorption, where during desorption a higher affinity of a compound on a given sorbent and a longer time scale for release than for sorption is observed. Other studies showed that some of the reported sorption/desorption hysteresis phenomena are due to experimental artifacts, mainly resulting from non-attainment of sorption equilibrium before desorption experiments, which result in 'pseudo-hysteresis'. Except for the hypothesis of sorbent reconfiguration, clear experimental evidence for the physical or chemical mechanisms proposed to lead to hysteresis is still lacking. In this study, sorption/desorption equilibrium and kinetics of phenanthrene sorption/desorption from two soils and three carbonaceous samples were investigated using both batch and column techniques. The main objective of this work was to monitor hysteresis phenomenon by carefully recovering the solute mass in the system and to compare sorption/desorption equilibria and kinetics thermodynamically. Nonsingular isotherms and higher desorption enthalpies as well as increased activation energies with proceeding desorption are expected if significant hysteresis exists. Sorption-desorption cycles were carried out to compare equilibrium isotherms and associated sorption/desorption enthalpies (AeH, isosteric heats). Instead of the traditional decant-and-refill batch method, the experiments were conducted using a newly designed batch protocol, which enables the determination of sorption/desorption isotherms at different temperatures using a closed batch system. This method additionally allows

  5. First principle calculations for improving desorption temperature in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... we predict the improvement of the desorption temperature and the hydrogen storage properties of doped Mg-based hydrides such as,Mg15AMH32 (AM = Ca, Sr and Ba) as a super cell 2 × 2 × 2 of MgH2. In particular, the electronic structure has been obtained numerically using the all-electron full-potential local-orbital ...

  6. Thermal desorption spectroscopy of palladium and copper on silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Daniel E.; Burns, Richard P.; Gabriel, Kenneth A.

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy of palladium and copper films grown on clean silica substrates was performed using CO2 laser heating. After cleaning the surface by high temperature heating, a controlled, low coverage dose of metal atoms was deposited on the substrate. Temperature ramping was achieved using a constant laser power, the value of which depended on the nature of the metal and substrate as well as the substrate size. At high temperatures (above 1025 K for palladium and above 975 K for copper), metal films vaporize and desorption spectra provide information about the nature of the metal deposit and metal-support interaction. With increasing coverage of palladium on silica, a positive temperature shift in the leading edge of desorption was seen. At higher coverages, above about 2 x 10(exp 15) atoms/sq cm, a common leading edge appears and zero-order kinetic analysis gave E(sub act) values between 3.9 and 4.3 +/- 0.1 eV which can be compared with the value of 3.83 eV for Delta (H(sub vap)) (1200 K) for palladium metal. Similar coverage-dependent properties were not seen for copper on silica; instead, a common desorption leading edge appeared down to submonolayer coverages. Zero-order analysis at about 1 x 10(exp 15) atoms/sq cm gave an E(sub act) of 3.3 +/- 0.1 eV, which is comparable with the value of 3.44 eV for Delta (H(sub vap)) (1100 K) for copper metal.

  7. Internal friction and gas desorption of {C}/{C} composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serizawa, H.; Sato, S.; Kohyama, A.

    1994-09-01

    {C}/{C} composites are the most promising candidates as high heat flux component materials, where temperature dependence of mechanical properties and gas desorption behavior at elevated temperature are important properties. At the beginning, the newly developed internal friction measurement apparatus, which enables the accurate measurement of dynamic elastic properties up to 1373 K along with the measurement of gas desorption behavior, was used. The materials studied were unidirectional (UD) {C}/{C} composites reinforced with mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers, which were heat treated at temperatures ranging from 1473 to 2773 K which produced a variety of graphitized microstructures. Two-dimensional (2D) {C}/{C} composites reinfored with flat woven fabrics of PAN type carbon fibers were also studied. These materials were heat treated at 1873 K. From the temperature spectrum of internal friction of 2D {C}/{C} composites, these internal friction peaks were detected and were related to gas desorption. Also the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UD {C}/{C} composites, negative and positive dependence of Young's modulus were observed reflecting microstructure changes resulting from the heat treatments.

  8. The Design and Development of Enhanced Thermal Desorption Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Humble

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This research study is based on a knowledge-transfer collaboration between The National Centre for Product Design and Development Research (PDR and Markes International Ltd. The aim of the two-year collaboration has been to implement design tools and techniques for the development of enhanced thermal desorption products. Thermal desorption is a highly-specialised technique for the analysis of trace-level volatile organic compounds. This technique allows minute quantities of these compounds to be measured; however, there is an increasing demand from customers for greater sensitivity over a wider range of applications, which means new design methodologies need to be evaluated. The thermal desorption process combines a number of disparate chemical, thermal and mechanical disciplines, and the major design constraints arise from the need to cycle the sample through extremes in temperature. Following the implementation of a comprehensive product design specification, detailed design solutions have been developed using the latest 3D CAD techniques. The impact of the advanced design techniques is assessed in terms of improved product performance and reduced development times, and the wider implications of new product development within small companies are highlighted.  

  9. Adsorption and Desorption of Nitrogen and Water Vapor by clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Deshan; Chen, Qiong; Xiang, Wei; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption and desorption of nitrogen and water vapor by clay has a significant impact on unsaturated soil physical and mechanical properties. In order to study the adsorption and desorption characteristics of nitrogen and water vapor by montmorillonite, kaolin and sliding zone soils, the Autosorb-iQ specific surface area and pore size analyzer instrument of United State was taken to carry out the analysis test. The adsorption and desorption of nitrogen at 77K and water vapor at 293K on clay sample were conducted. The theories of BET, FHH and hydration energy were taken to calculate the specific surface, surface fractal dimension and adsorption energy. The results show that the calculated specific surface of water vapor by clay is bigger than nitrogen adsorption test because clay can adsorb more water vapor molecule than nitrogen. Smaller and polar water vapor molecule can access the micropore and then adsorb on the mineral surface and mineral intralayer, which make the mineral surface cations hydrate and the mineral surface smoother. Bigger and nonpolar nitrogen molecule can not enter into the micropore as water vapor molecule and has weak interaction with clay surface.

  10. Sorption and desorption of silver ions by bentonite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Leonel Vinicius; Quirino, Juliana Nunes; Monteiro, Alessandra Maffei; Abrão, Taufik; Parreira, Paulo Sérgio; Urbano, Alexandre; Santos, Maria Josefa

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities have increased the concentration of metal species in the environment. The toxicity of silver ions to aquatic and terrestrial organisms has required monitoring by analytical methods, besides actions to promote its control as pollutant. Sorption and desorption processes are directly related to the mobility and availability of metal ions in the environment. In this context, clay minerals can be used for pre-concentration, removal and recovery of silver ions from aqueous solution. Herein, two bentonite clays (BaVC-1 and SWy-2) were characterised and applied to investigate the sorption and desorption of silver ions. Isotherms were fitted to the dual-mode Langmuir-Freundlich model to qualify and quantify sorption sites and evaluate the mobilisation process. The maximum sorption capacity was 743 and 849 meq kg -1 for BaVC-1 and SWy-2, respectively. Hysteresis index (HI) and mobilisation factor (MF) suggest that the desorption of silver ions in BaVC-1 is about four times more conducive compared to that in SWy-2, although both materials have demonstrated a great potential for Ag + pre-concentration from aqueous solutions.

  11. New perspectives in vacuum high voltage insulation. II. Gas desorption

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, W T

    1998-01-01

    An examination has been made of gas desorption from unbaked electrodes of copper, niobium, aluminum, and titanium subjected to high voltage in vacuum. It has been shown that the gas is composed of water vapor, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, the usual components of vacuum outgassing, plus an increased yield of hydrogen and light hydrocarbons. The gas desorption was driven by anode conditioning as the voltage was increased between the electrodes. The gas is often desorbed as microdischarges-pulses of a few to hundreds of microseconds-and less frequently in a more continuous manner without the obvious pulsed structure characteristic of microdischarge activity. The quantity of gas released was equivalent to many monolayers and consisted mostly of neutral molecules with an ionic component of a few percent. A very significant observation was that the gas desorption was more dependent on the total voltage between the electrodes than on the electric field. It was not triggered by field-emitted electrons but oft...

  12. Investigations on ion-beam induced desorption from cryogenic surfaces; Untersuchungen zu ionenstrahlinduzierter Desorption von kryogenen Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Christoph

    2017-07-03

    A central component of FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, will be the superconducting heavy ion synchrotron SIS100, which is supposed to provide reliable, high intensity beams for various applications. Its beam intensity is governed by the space charge limit, while the maximum energy is determined by the machine's magnetic rigidity. That means, ions with higher charge state can be accelerated to a higher energy, but with less intensity. For highest intensity beams, intermediate charge states have to be used instead of high charge state ions. This alleviates the issue of space charge but gives rise to dynamic vacuum effects, which also limit beam intensity: beam particles collide with residual gas particles, which leads to charge exchange and their subsequent loss. Impacting on the chamber wall, these ions release adsorbed gas particles. This process is called desorption and leads to a localized increase in pressure, which in turn causes more charge exchange. After a few rounds of self amplification, this can lead to total beam loss. This ''runaway-desorption'' is typically the main beam intensity limiting process for intermediate charge state (heavy) ion beams. The extent of this phenomenon is governed by two factors: the initial beam intensity and the desorption yield. The latter is examined within the scope of this thesis. Special emphasis is placed on the influence of the target's temperature, since the SIS100 will be a superconducting machine with cryogenic vacuum chamber walls. In order to investigate this topic, an experimental setup has been devised, built at the SIS18 and taken into commission. Based on the experience gained during operation, it has been continuously improved and extended. Another central innovation presented in this thesis is the use of gas dynamics simulations for an improved method of data analysis. Using this technique, environmental conditions like the chamber geometry and the connected

  13. Rapid prediction of long-term rates of contaminant desorption from soils and sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M D; Weber, W J

    2001-01-15

    A method using heated and superheated (subcritical) water is described for rapid prediction of long-term desorption rates from contaminated geosorbents. Rates of contaminant release are measured at temperatures between 75 and 150 degrees C using a dynamic water desorption technique. The subcritical desorption rate data are then modeled to calculate apparent activation energies, and these activation energies are used to predict desorption behaviors at any desired ambient temperature. Predictions of long-term release rates based on this methodology were found to correlate well with experimental 25 degrees C desorption data measured over periods of up to 640 days, even though the 25 degrees C desorption rates were observed to vary by up to 2 orders of magnitude for different geosorbent types and initial solid phase contaminant loading levels. Desorption profiles measured under elevated temperature and pressure conditions closely matched those at 25 degrees C and ambient pressure, but the time scales associated with the high-temperature measurements were up to 3 orders of magnitude lower. The subcritical water technique rapidly estimates rates of desorption-resistant contaminant release as well as those for more labile substances. The practical implications of the methodology are significant because desorption observed under field conditions and ambient temperatures typically proceeds over periods of months or years, while the high temperature experiments used for prediction of such field desorption phenomena can be completed within periods of only hours or days.

  14. Competitive adsorption of heavy metal ions on carbon nanotubes and the desorption in simulated biofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Tang, Huan; Liu, Yuanfang; Wang, Haifang

    2015-06-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) had meaningful adsorption capacities for Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Cd(2+), while Pb(2+) showed the highest adsorption in the competitive adsorption evaluations. The desorption behaviors of heavy metal ions were completely different in various biofluids, where the desorption was significantly influenced by pH and the presence of proteins/other cations. The desorption was most effective in simulated stomach juice, and much less effective in other simulated biofluids. More Pb(2+) stuck to CNTs than others, resulting in less desorption. Interestingly, the competitive desorption behaviors of four ions were largely changed comparing to the individual desorption behaviors. The implications to the biosafety evaluations and synergistic effects of CNT are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prata Fábio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with KH2PO4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha-1 of P2O5, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L-1, with a 14C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL-1. Four steps of the desorption procedure with CaCl2 0.01 mol L-1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L-1. Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm-3. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%, and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content.

  16. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Fabio [BIOAGRI Labs., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Div. de Quimica. Lab. de Radioquimica; Cardinali, Vanessa Camponez do Brasil; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Ciencias Exatas; Lavorenti, Arquimedes [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Secao de Toxicologia

    2003-03-01

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha{sup -1} of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L{sup -1}), with a {sup 14}C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL{sup -1}. Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl{sub 2} 0.01 mol L{sup -1} and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L{sup -1}). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm{sup -3}. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  17. Radionuclide sorption-desorption pattern in soils from Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil-Garcia, C.J.; Rigol, A.; Rauret, G. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 3a Planta, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Vidal, M. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 3a Planta, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: miquel.vidal@ub.edu

    2008-02-15

    The pattern of radiostrontium and radiocesium sorption-desorption was examined in 30 Spanish soils by the quantification of the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) with batch tests, the evaluation of sorption reversibility with a single extraction, the estimation of sorption dynamics by the application of drying-wetting cycles, and the calculation of K{sub d}{sup adjusted} values as an input for risk assessment models. The data obtained overlapped with those found in soils from other climatic areas, suggesting identical interaction mechanisms and allowing the extrapolation of parameterisations and prediction models among different scenarios.

  18. Photodissociation of Gaseous Ions Formed by Laser Desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-20

    produced by separate pathways from the (M-I)- ion or from consecutive photodissociations. Hesperidin : In the negative ion LD mass spectrum of this compound...an ion of m/z r𔃼 was produced from the sodium salt of hesperidin phosphoric acid ester. This ion was observed to dissociate by loss of the attached...Experimental conditions are same as in the top spectrum. Figure 8. Top. Negative ions formed by laser desorption from Na-salt of hesperidin phosphoric acid ester

  19. Enhanced Atomic Desorption of 209 and 210 Francium from Organic Coating

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Controlled atomic desorption from organic Poly-DiMethylSiloxane coating is demonstrated for improving the loading efficiency of 209,210Fr magneto-optical traps. A three times increase in the cold atoms population is obtained with contact-less pulsed light-induced desorption, applied to different isotopes, either bosonic or fermionic, of Francium. A six times increase of 210Fr population is obtained with a desorption mechanism based on direct charge transfer from a triboelectric probe to the a...

  20. Desorption of metals from Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. Lichen using solutions simulating acid rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čučulović Ana A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desorption of metals K, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ba, Zn, Mn, Cu and Sr from Cetraria islandica (L. with solutions whose composition was similar to that of acid rain, was investigated. Desorption of metals from the lichen was performed by five successive desorption processes. Solution mixtures containing H2SO4, HNO3 and H2SO4-HNO3 were used for desorption. Each solution had three different pH values: 4.61, 5.15 and 5.75, so that the desorptions were performed with nine different solutions successively five times, always using the same solution volume. The investigated metals can be divided into two groups. One group was comprised of K, Ca and Mg, which were desorbed in each of the five desorption processes at all pH values used. The second group included Al, Fe, Zn, Ba, Mn and Sr; these were not desorbed in each individual desorption and not at all pH values, whereas Cu was not desorbed at all under any circumstances. Using the logarithmic dependence of the metal content as a function of the desorption number, it was found that potassium builds two types of links and is connected with weaker links in lichen. Potassium is completely desorbed, 80% in the first desorption, and then gradually in the following desorptions. Other metals are linked with one weaker link (desorption 1-38% and with one very strong link (desorption below the metal detection limit. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009 i br. ON 172019

  1. Adsorption and Dissociation of CO2 on Ru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pachecka, Malgorzata; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    The adsorption and dissociation of carbon dioxide on a Ru(0001) single crystal surface was investigated by reflection–absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) spectroscopy for CO2 adsorbed at 85 K. RAIRS spectroscopy shows that the adsorption of CO2 on a

  2. Adsorption of molecular hydrogen on an ultrathin layer of Ni(111) hydride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, J. J.; Kleyn, A. W.; Juurlink, L. B. F.

    2009-01-01

    We have used high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption to study the interaction of atomic hydrogen with Ni(1 1 1). Our results agree mostly with previous reports. We find that exposing Ni(1 1 1) to atomic hydrogen below 90 K leads to a 125 K TPD feature

  3. Desorption Kinetics and Mechanisms of CO2 on Amine-Based Mesoporous Silica Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Teng; Zhilin Liu; Gang Xu; Kai Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA)-based mesoporous MCM-41 is used as the adsorbent to determine the CO2 desorption kinetics of amine-modified materials after adsorption. The experimental data of CO2 desorption as a function of time are derived by zero-length column at different temperatures (35, 50, and 70 °C) and analyzed by Avrami’s fractional-order kinetic model. A new method is used to distinguish the physical desorption and chemical desorption performance of surface-modified mesoporous MCM-4...

  4. Electrothermal adsorption and desorption of volatile organic compounds on activated carbon fiber cloth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, H.K. [Department of Health and Environment, Kosin University, Dong Sam Dong, Young Do Gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Sivakumar, S., E-mail: ssivaphd@yahoo.com [Department of Bioenvironmental Energy, College of Natural Resource and Life Science, Pusan National University, Miryang-si, Gyeongsangnam-do 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Rood, M.J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Kim, B.J. [Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC-CERL), Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • We study the adsorption and desorption of VOCs by an activated carbon fiber cloth. • Desorption concentration was controlled via electrothermal heating. • The desorption rate was successfully equalized and controlled by this system. - Abstract: Adsorption is an effective means to selectively remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial gas streams and is particularly of use for gas streams that exhibit highly variable daily concentrations of VOCs. Adsorption of such gas streams by activated carbon fiber cloths (ACFCs) and subsequent controlled desorption can provide gas streams of well-defined concentration that can then be more efficiently treated by biofiltration than streams exhibiting large variability in concentration. In this study, we passed VOC-containing gas through an ACFC vessel for adsorption and then desorption in a concentration-controlled manner via electrothermal heating. Set-point concentrations (40–900 ppm{sub v}) and superficial gas velocity (6.3–9.9 m/s) were controlled by a data acquisition and control system. The results of the average VOC desorption, desorption factor and VOC in-and-out ratio were calculated and compared for various gas set-point concentrations and superficial gas velocities. Our results reveal that desorption is strongly dependent on the set-point concentration and that the VOC desorption rate can be successfully equalized and controlled via an electrothermal adsorption system.

  5. Crystallization kinetics and excess free energy of H2O and D2O nanoscale films of amorphous solid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Knox, Jake; Kay, Bruce D

    2011-06-16

    Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) are used to investigate the crystallization kinetics and measure the excess free energy of metastable amorphous solid water films (ASW) of H(2)O and D(2)O grown using molecular beams. The desorption rates from the amorphous and crystalline phases of ASW are distinct, and as such, crystallization manifests can be observed in the TPD spectrum. The crystallization kinetics were studied by varying the TPD heating rate from 0.001 to 3 K/s. A coupled desorption-crystallization kinetic model accurately simulates the desorption spectra and accurately predicts the observed temperature shifts in the crystallization. Isothermal crystallization studies using RAIRS are in agreement with the TPD results. Furthermore, highly sensitive measurements of the desorption rates were used to determine the excess free energy of ASW near 150 K. The excess entropy obtained from these data is consistent with there being a thermodynamic continuity between ASW and supercooled liquid water. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. 酸化マグネシウムの物理化学的特性評価

    OpenAIRE

    羽田, 政明; 加藤, 聖崇; 境, 昭二

    2017-01-01

    This article describs physico-chemical properties of magnesium oxides supplied from Ube Material Industries, Ltd. as a catalyst material for controlling plant diseases. Not only structural characterizations such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms but also surface characterization techniques such as temperature programmed desorption (TPD), in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are introduced. The knowle...

  7. The cooling effect by adsorption-desorption cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolak Eliza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption appliances may turn out to be an alternative to compression-type refrigerators. The adsorption refrigeration machine may be driven by a low-grade heat source, especially solar energy. Solar adsorption cooling systems are environment-friendly and have zero ozone depletion potential. Therefore, the adsorption refrigeration is one kind of energy saving refrigeration methods. The merits of the adsorption refrigeration systems will be more significant especially when it is used in vehicles (automobiles, ships and locomotives, to preserve food and medicines and in air-conditioning. The paper presents the advantages and disadvantages as well as the evolution of the technology of adsorptive refrigeration systems. The methods of improving of adsorption refrigeration systems through improvements in adsorbents properties, use of advanced cycles and hybrid systems is also presented. Possible applications and perspectives for development of adsorption cooling systems are also analyzed. The paper describes a test stand of the adsorption-desorption refrigeration. The present investigations have been carried out utilizing the activated carbon granules as an adsorbent and methanol as an adsorbate. The paper demonstrates the measurement of temperature changes in the adsorbent bed and condenser during adsorption-desorption cycles.

  8. 3rd International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Knotek, Michael

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings are the result of the third international workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions, DIET III, which took place on Shelter Island, NY, May. 20-22, 1987. The work contained in this volume is an excellent summary of the current status of the field and should be a valuable reference text for both "seasoned" researchers and newcomers in the field of DIET. Based on the success of the meeting it seems clear that interest and enthusiasm in the field is strong. It is also apparent, from the many lively discussions during the meeting, that many unanswered questions (and controversies) remain to be solved. It was particularly pleasing to see many new participants from new and rapidly advancing fields, ranging from gas phase dynamics to semiconductor processing. The resulting cross-fertilization from these separate but related fields is playing an important role in helping us understand desorption processes at solid surfaces. In general, the topics covered during the course of the worksh...

  9. 2nd International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, Dietrich

    1985-01-01

    The second workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET II) took place October 15-17, 1984, in SchloB Elmau, Bavaria. DIET II, fol­ lowing the great success of DIET I (edited by N. H. Tolk, M. M. Traum, J. C. Tully, T. E. Madey and published in Springer Ser. Chem. Phys. , Vol. 24), again brought together over 60 workers in this exciting field. The "hard co­ re of experts" was essentially the same as in DIET I but the general overlap of participants between the two meetings was small. While DIET I had the function of an exposition of the status of the field DIET II focussed more on new developments. The main emphasis was again on the microscopic under­ standing of DIET but a number of side aspects and the application of DIET ideas to other fields such as sputtering, laser-induced desorption, fractu­ re, erosion, etc. were considered, too. New mechanisms and new refined expe­ rimental techniques were proposed and discussed at the meeting critically but with great enthusiasm. In addition t...

  10. 5th International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Jennison, Dwight R; Stechel, Ellen B; DIET V; Desorption induced by electronic transitions

    1993-01-01

    This volume in the Springer Series on Surface Sciences presents a recent account of advances in the ever-broadening field of electron-and photon-stimulated sur­ face processes. As in previous volumes, these advances are presented as the proceedings of the International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions; the fifth workshop (DIET V) was held in Taos, New Mexico, April 1-4, 1992. It will be abundantly clear to the reader that "DIET" is not restricted to desorption, but has for several years included photochemistry, non-thermal surface modification, exciton self-trapping, and many other phenomena that are induced by electron or photon bombardment. However, most stimulated surface processes do share a common physics: initial electronic excitation, localization of the excitation, and conversion of electronic energy into nuclear kinetic energy. It is the rich variation of this theme which makes the field so interesting and fruitful. We have divided the book into eleven parts in orde...

  11. Moisture adsorption and desorption behavior of sludge powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, F B; Bentes Freire, F; Pires, E C; Freire, J T

    2007-11-01

    In this work, the moisture adsorption and desorption isotherms were determined with the aim of defining the range of moisture content for storage of sludge powder. Equilibrium moisture content provides the basis for information not only on how much water has been taken out of a system but also on how fast drying is taking place (drying rate). Once the drying process is accomplished, the main concern rests on the storage of the dried final product. Still, the equilibrium moisture content is valuable information in that it has a major effect on the product physical and chemical properties. The present work also addresses the problem of selecting the best fit for equilibrium moisture content of sludge powder out of six well-known correlations for moisture sorption isotherms of solids: Henderson, Henderson-Thompson, Chung-Pfost, Chen-Clayton, Modified Halsey and Oswin. The equilibrium moisture content was determined by the static method (saturated salt solutions), in which the atmosphere surrounding the product is in equilibrium with the product without mechanical movement of the air or the product. Experiments were carried out under isothermal conditions at 20 and 40 degrees C. By calculating the regression coefficient, the residuals and the bias measure of Box for the equilibrium moisture content, the study showed that the Oswin Model was the most suitable. The range enclosed within the adsorption isotherm at 40 degrees C and the desorption isotherm at 20 degrees C defines the moisture extremes for storage in most tropical areas of the world.

  12. Hydrocarbon analysis using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred Paul Mark

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of the various petroleum constituents (hydronaphthalenes, thiophenes, alkyl substituted benzenes, pyridines, fluorenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) was achieved under ambient conditions without sample preparation by desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI). Conditions were chosen for the DAPCI experiments to control whether ionization was by proton or electron transfer. The protonated molecule [M+H]+ and the hydride abstracted [MH]+ form were observed when using an inert gas, typically nitrogen, to direct a lightly ionized plasma generated by corona discharge onto the sample surface in air. The abundant water cluster ions generated in this experiment react with condensed-phase functionalized hydrocarbon model compounds and their mixtures at or near the sample surface. On the other hand, when naphthalene was doped into the DAPCI gas stream, its radical cation served as a charge exchange reagent, yielding molecular radical cations (M+) of the hydrocarbons. This mode of sample ionization provided mass spectra with better signal/noise ratios and without unwanted side-products. It also extended the applicability of DAPCI to petroleum constituents which could not be analyzed through proton transfer (e.g., higher molecular PAHs such as chrysene). The thermochemistry governing the individual ionization processes is discussed and a desorption/ionization mechanism is inferred. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Characterization of porosity via secondary reactions. Final technical report, 1 September 1991--30 November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calo, J.M.; Zhang, L.; Hall, P.J.; Antxustegi, M. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering

    1997-09-01

    A new approach to the study of porosity and porosity development in coal chars during gasification was investigated. This approach involves the establishment of the relationships between the amount and type of surface complexes evolved during post-activation temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and the porosity, as measured by gas adsorption and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques. With this new method, the total surface area and micropore volume can be determined by the interpretation of post-activation TPD spectra. The primary conclusion of this work is that it is possible to predict total surface area and micropore volume from TPD spectra. From the extended random pore model, additional information about the micropore surface area, the nonmicroporous surface area, and the mean micropore size development as a function of reaction time (or burn-off) can also be predicted. Therefore, combining the TPD technique and the extended random pore model provides a new method for the characterization of char porosity.

  14. Feasibility of desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to monitor urinary steroid metabolites during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Kauppila, Tiina J; Cvačka, Josef; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-06-23

    Steroids have important roles in the progress of pregnancy, and their study in maternal urine is a non-invasive method to monitor the steroid metabolome and its possible abnormalities. However, the current screening techniques of choice, namely immunoassays and gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, do not offer means for the rapid and non-targeted multi-analyte studies of large sample sets. In this study, we explore the feasibility of two ambient mass spectrometry methods in steroid fingerprinting. Urine samples from pregnant women were screened by desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The urine samples were processed by solid phase extraction for the DESI measurements and by enzymatic hydrolysis and liquid-liquid-extraction for DAPPI. Consequently, steroid glucuronides and sulfates were detected by negative ion mode DESI-HRMS, and free steroids by positive ion mode DAPPI-HRMS. In DESI, signals of eleven steroid metabolite ions were found to increase as the pregnancy proceeded, and in DAPPI ten steroid ions showed at least an order of magnitude increase during pregnancy. In DESI, the increase was seen for ions corresponding to C18 and C21 steroid glucuronides, while DAPPI detected increased excretion of C19 and C21 steroids. Thus both techniques show promise for the steroid marker screening in pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Carbon dioxide and water adsorption on highly epitaxial Delafossite CuFeO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, S.; Joshi, T.; Borisov, P.; Sarabia, M.; Lederman, D.; Cabrera, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    Thermal programmed desorption (TPD) of CO2 and H2O from a 200 nm thick CuFeO2 Delafossite surface was performed in a standard UHV chamber, The CuFeO2 thin film grown using Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) over an Al2O3 (0001) substrate with controlled O2 atmosphere resulted with highly epitaxial crystal structure. The adsorption/desorption of CO2 and H2O process was also monitored with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). Our results revealed that carbon dioxide interacts with CuFeO2 forming Fe carbonates compounds on its surface. Hydroxides were also formed on the surface due to water presence. Using TPD data, Arrhenius plots for CO2 and water desorption were done and activation energy for desorption was obtained. Funds FONDECyT 1130372; Thanks to P. Ferrari.

  16. Desorption of isopropyl alcohol from adsorbent with non-thermal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiau, Chen Han; Pan, Kuan Lun; Yu, Sheng Jen; Yan, Shaw Yi; Chang, Moo Been

    2017-09-01

    Effective desorption of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) from adsorbents with non-thermal plasma is developed. In this system, IPA is effectively adsorbed with activated carbon while dielectric barrier discharge is applied to replace the conventional thermal desorption process to achieve good desorption efficiency, making the treatment equipment smaller in size. Various adsorbents including molecular sieves and activated carbon are evaluated for IPA adsorption capacity. The results indicate that BAC has the highest IPA adsorption capacity (280.31 mg IPA/g) under the operating conditions of room temperature, IPA of 400 ppm, and residence time of 0.283 s among 5 adsorbents tested. For the plasma desorption process, the IPA selectivity of 89% is achieved with BAC as N2 is used as desorbing gas. In addition, as air or O2 is used as desorbing gas, the IPA desorption concentration is reduced, because air and O2 plasmas generate active species to oxidize IPA to form acetone, CO2, and even CO. Furthermore, the results of the durability test indicate that the amount of IPA desorbed increases with increasing desorption times and plasma desorption process has a higher energy efficiency if compared with thermal desorption. Overall, this study indicates that non-thermal plasma is a viable process for removing VOCs to regenerate adsorbent.

  17. Impact of activated carbon, biochar and compost on the desorption and mineralization of phenanthrene in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchal, Geoffrey; Smith, Kilian E.C.; Rein, Arno

    2013-01-01

    Sorption of PAHs to carbonaceous soil amendments reduces their dissolved concentrations, limiting toxicity but also potentially biodegradation. Therefore, the maximum abiotic desorption of freshly sorbed phenanthrene (≤5 mg kg−1) was measured in three soils amended with activated carbon (AC...... and charcoal treatments bacterial activity did not limit mineralization, but rather desorption into the dissolved phase....

  18. Equilibrium moisture content (EMC) in Norway spruce during the first and second desorptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben; Engelund, Emil Tang; Thygesen, Lisbeth G.

    2011-01-01

    It is a commonly accepted notion that the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood at a given relative humidity (RH) is highest during initial desorption of green wood due to an irreversible loss of hygroscopicity during the 1st desorption. The basis for this notion is investigated by assessing...

  19. Electronically driven adsorbate excitation mechanism in femtosecond-pulse laser desorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegård, Per; Heinz, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    Femtosecond-pulse laser desorption is a process in which desorption is driven by a subpicosecond temperature pulse of order 5000 K in the substrate-adsorbate electron system, whose energy is transferred into the adsorbate center-of-mass degrees of freedom by a direct coupling mechanism. We presen...

  20. Development of methods for thermal desorption of iodine from carbon sorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalova, E. A.; Hlopotov, R. A.

    2017-10-01

    The paper studies and proposes four circuits of thermal iodine desorption from coal, which excludes the use of chemical reagents. The method allows for the sublimation of iodine from coal, avoiding the stage of pre-concentration and crystallization of crude iodine-concentrate. The proposed solution allows carrying out the process of thermal desorption of iodine without unloading it from the reactor.

  1. Equilibrium, hysteresis and kinetics of cadmium desorption from sodium-feldspar using rhamnolipid biosurfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşçi, Yeliz; Açikel, Unsal; Açikel, Yeşim Sağ

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the sorption/desorption equilibruim and the desorption kinetics of Cd by rhamnolipid biosurfactant from Na-feldspar as a soil component were investigated. The linear, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms adequately fitted the equilibrium sorption data with regression coefficients ranging from 0.9836 - 0.9879. However, both the sorption/desorption equilibria were well characterized by the Freundlich model. The extent of hysteresis was quantified based on the differences obtained from sorption and desorption isotherms regarding the quantity of Cd(II) sorbed, the Freundlich exponent, concentration-dependent metal distribution coefficients, and the irreversibility index based on the metal distribution coefficient. The kinetics of desorption of Cd from Na-feldspar was investigated using 77 mM rhamnolipid and at pH 6.8. The first-order, an empirical first-order desorption model (two-coefficient), Lagergren-pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and modified Freundlich models were used to describe the kinetic data to estimate the rate constants. To determine the rate-controlling step, the intra-particle diffusion model was also applied to the desorption process. The desorption kinetics of Cd(II) on Na-feldspar was represented better by the pseudo-second-order, Elovich and modified Freundlich equations with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9941- 0.9982 than by first-order equations. The rate-controlling stage was suggested to be mainly the surface reaction mechanism.

  2. Molecular desorption of stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Laurent, Jean Michel; Madsen, N

    2003-01-01

    In preparation for the heavy ion program of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, accumulation and cooling tests with lead ion beams have been performed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2 MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments (glow-discharges, non-evaporable getter coating) are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H2, CH4, CO, Ar and CO2. Unexpected large values of molecular yields per incident ion up to 2 104 molecules/ion have been observed. The red...

  3. Decomposition kinetics study of zirconium hydride by interrupted thermal desorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Mingwang; Liang, Li; Tang, Binghua; Xiang, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Cheng, Yanlin; Tan, Xiaohua, E-mail: caepiee@163.com

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Interrupted TDS was applied to investigate the mechanism of ZrH{sub 2} decomposition. • The activation energies for the five desorption peaks were determined. • The origins of the five desorption peaks were identified. • The γZrH phase was observed at ambient conditions. - Abstract: Thermal desorption kinetics of zirconium hydride powder were studied using thermogravimetry and simultaneous thermal desorption spectroscopy. The activation energies for observed desorption peaks were estimated according to Kissinger relation. The intermediate phase composition was studied using X-ray diffraction by rapid cooling on different stages of heating. The origins of the peaks were described as the equilibrium hydrogen pressure of a number of consecutive phase regions that decomposition reaction passed through. The zirconium monohydride γZrH was observed for extended periods of time at ambient conditions, which has been supposed to be metastable for a long time.

  4. Binding energies: New values and impact on the efficiency of chemical desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakelam, V.; Loison, J.-C.; Mereau, R.; Ruaud, M.

    2017-03-01

    Recent laboratory measurements have confirmed that chemical desorption (desorption of products due to exothermic surface reactions) can be an efficient process. The impact of including this process into gas-grain chemical models entirely depends on the formalism used and the associated parameters. Among these parameters, binding energies are probably the most uncertain ones for the moment. We propose a new model to compute binding energy of species to water ice surfaces. We have also compared the model results using either the new chemical desorption model proposed by Minissale et al. (2016) or the one of Garrod et al. (2007). The new binding energies have a strong impact on the formation of complex organic molecules. In addition, the new chemical desorption model from Minissale produces a much smaller desorption of these species and also of methanol. Combining the two effects, the abundances of CH3OH and COMs observed in cold cores cannot be reproduced by astrochemical models anymore.

  5. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaima, Nobuhiro; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a powerful tool that enables the simultaneous detection and identification of biomolecules in analytes. MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) is a two-dimensional MALDI-mass spectrometric technique used to visualize the spatial distribution of biomolecules without extraction, purification, separation, or labeling of biological samples. MALDI-IMS has revealed the characteristic distribution of several biomolecules, including proteins, peptides, amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleotides, in various tissues. The versatility of MALDI-IMS has opened a new frontier in several fields such as medicine, agriculture, biology, pharmacology, and pathology. MALDI-IMS has a great potential for discovery of unknown biomarkers. In this review, we describe the methodology and applications of MALDI-IMS for biological samples.

  6. Solvent desorption dynamic headspace sampling of fermented dairy product volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, S A

    2001-01-01

    A method was developed based on solvent desorption dynamic headspace analysis for the identification and relative quantification of volatiles significant to the study of fermented dairy product aroma. Descriptions of applications of this method are presented including the measurement of diacetyl and acetoin in fermented milk, the evaluation of volatile-hydrocolloid interactions in dairy-based matrices, and the identification of volatiles in cheeses for canonical discriminative analysis. Advantages of this method include rapid analysis, minimal equipment investment, and the ability to analyze samples with traditional GC split/splitless inlet systems. Limitations of this method are that the sample must be in the liquid state and the inherent analytical limitation to those compounds that do not coelute with the solvent or solvent impurity peaks.

  7. Ionization Mechanism of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, I.-Chung; Lee, Chuping; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2015-07-01

    In past studies, mistakes in determining the ionization mechanism in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) were made because an inappropriate ion-to-neutral ratio was used. The ion-to-neutral ratio of the analyte differs substantially from that of the matrix in MALDI. However, these ratios were not carefully distinguished in previous studies. We begin by describing the properties of ion-to-neutral ratios and reviews early experimental measurements. A discussion of the errors committed in previous theoretical studies and a comparison of recent experimental measurements follow. We then describe a thermal proton transfer model and demonstrate how the model appropriately describes ion-to-neutral ratios and the total ion intensity. Arguments raised to challenge thermal ionization are then discussed. We demonstrate how none of the arguments are valid before concluding that thermal proton transfer must play a crucial role in the ionization process of MALDI.

  8. Hypotonic elution, a new desorption principle in immunoadsorbent chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Erik Michael; Sjöström, H; Norén, O

    1982-01-01

    A largely unrecognized immunoadsorbent desorption technique, hypotonic elution, has been successfully used in the immunoadsorbent purification of the microvillar enzymes aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2), dipeptidyl peptidase IV (EC 3.4.14.5), sucrase-isomaltase (EC 3.2.1.48-10), lactase-phlorizin h...... of the enzymes but were considered unlikely on several grounds. Hypotonic elution in immunoadsorbent chromatography, therefore, may have a much broader range of applicability, and the method is recommended to be tried out by workers in other areas of protein chemistry.......-phlorizin hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.23-62) and maltase-glucoamylase (EC 3.2.1.20). This elution method proved capable of achieving an acceptable yield (30-70%) while at the same time preserving the purified enzymes in an enzymically active state. It hereby offers a solution to the problem in immunoadsorbent chromatography...

  9. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry analysis of HCOOH ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, D.P.P.; Rocco, M.L.M. [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, 21949-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Boechat-Roberty, H.M. [Observatorio do Valongo, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ladeira Pedro Antonio, 43, Centro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Iza, P.; Martinez, R. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, 22543-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Homem, M.G.P. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Box 6192, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Silveira, E.F. da [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, 22543-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: enio@vdg.fis.puc-rio.br

    2007-03-15

    Planetary magnetospheres, in which outer planet satellites orbit, are bombarded by energetic particles inducing chemical and physical changes in their icy surfaces. The existing condensed gases react to form new products, which then undergo thermal evolution from the natural day/night cycles of these satellites. Plasma irradiation of ice causes phase changes, e.g., water ice from crystalline to amorphous over short timescales. When ice is recrystallized by heating, the surface layers retain some disorder, which promote reactions among adsorbed molecules such as H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}CO, HCOOH and theirs radiolysis products. In this work, chemical reactions involving formic acid condensed at 56 K are analyzed by using Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry-time-of-flight ({sup 252}Cf-PDMS-TOF). Mass spectra of positive and negative desorbed ions were obtained, giving information on the structure and abundance of the molecules on the ice; the expected cations and anions generated by the HCOOH dissociation have been observed. Furthermore, several series of cluster ions were also detected, all exhibiting the structure X{sub n}Y{sub m}R{sup {+-}}, where X and Y are the neutral ice molecules, such as HCOOH or H{sub 2}O, and R{sup {+-}} is either an atomic or a molecular ion, such as H{sup +}, H{sub 3}O{sup +} or COOH{sup -}. In general, the desorption yields of the observed positive and negative ions are characterized by a decreasing exponential function as the emitted ion mass increases; however, the (HCOOH){sub n}OH{sup -} series presents its maximum at n = 8.

  10. Kinetics of thermal desorption of asymmetric dimethylhydrazine and products of its partial oxidation from soil by purging producer gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaitseva, T.B.; Laskin, B.M.; Pimkin, V.G.; Artamonov, D.G.; Luk`yanov, S.N. [Russian Scientific Center Applied Chemistry, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-07-20

    A study has been made of desorption of asymmetric dimethylhydrazine and nitrosodimethyl-amine from various types of soil by purging producer gas. The feasibility of the desorptive removal of these toxic compounds from soils has been demonstrated experimentally.

  11. Surface desorption and bulk diffusion models of tritium release from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, R.E., E-mail: ravila@cchen.c [Departamento de Materiales Nucleares, Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Cas. 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Pena, L.A.; Jimenez, J.C. [Departamento de Produccion y Servicios, Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Cas. 188-D, Santiago (Chile)

    2010-10-30

    The release of tritium from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebbles, in batch experiments, is studied by means of temperature programmed desorption. Data reduction focuses on the analysis of the non-oxidized and oxidized tritium components in terms of release limited by diffusion from the bulk of ceramic grains, or by first or second order surface desorption. By analytical and numerical methods the in-furnace tritium release is deconvoluted from the ionization chamber transfer functions, for which a semi-empirical form is established. The release from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} follows second order desorption kinetics, requiring a temperature for a residence time of 1 day (T{sub 1dRes}) of 620 K, and 603 K, of the non-oxidized, and the oxidized components, respectively. The release from Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} appears as limited by either diffusion from the bulk of the ceramic grains, or by first order surface desorption, the first possibility being the more probable. The respective values of T{sub 1dRes} for the non-oxidized component are 661 K, according to the first order surface desorption model, and 735 K within the bulk diffusion limited model.

  12. Long-term kinetics of uranyl desorption from sediments under advective conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John

    2014-02-01

    Long-term (>4 months) column experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl (U(VI)) desorption in sediments collected from the Integrated Field Research Challenge site at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area. The experimental results were used to evaluate alternative multirate surface complexation reaction (MRSCR) approaches to describe the short and long-term kinetics of U(VI) desorption under flow conditions. The surface complexation reaction (SCR) stoichiometry and equilibrium constants and multirate parameters in the MRSCR models were independently characterized in batch and stirred flow-cell reactors. MRSCR models that were either additively constructed using the MRSCRs for individual size fractions, or composite in nature, could effectively describe short-term U(VI) desorption under flow conditions. The long-term desorption results, however, revealed that using the labile U concentration measured by carbonate extraction underestimated desorbable U(VI) and the long-term rate of U(VI) desorption. This study also found that the gravel size fraction (2-8 mm), which is typically treated as nonreactive in modeling U(VI) reactive transport because of low external surface area, can have an important effect on the U(VI) desorption in the sediment. This study demonstrates an approach to effectively extrapolate U(VI) desorption kinetics for field-scale application and identifies important parameters and uncertainties affecting model predictions.

  13. Gas Desorption and Electron Emission from 1 MeV Potassium Iion Bombardment of Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molvik, A; Covo, M K; Bieniosek, F; Prost, L; Seidl, P; Baca, D; Coorey, A; Sakumi, A

    2004-03-25

    Gas desorption and electron emission coefficients were measured for 1 MeV potassium ions incident on stainless steel at grazing angles (between 80 and 88 degrees from normal incidence) using a new gas-electron source diagnostic (GESD). Issues addressed in design and commissioning of the GESD include effects from backscattering of ions at the surface, space-charge limited emission current, and reproducibility of desorption measurements. We find that electron emission coefficients {gamma}{sub e} scale as 1/cos({theta}) up to angles of 86 degrees, where {gamma}{sub e} = 90. Nearer grazing incidence, {gamma}{sub e} is reduced below the 1/cos({theta}) scaling by nuclear scattering of ions through large angles, reaching {gamma}{sub e} = 135 at 88 degrees. Electrons were emitted with a measured temperature of {approx}30 eV. Gas desorption coefficients {gamma}{sub 0} were much larger, of order {gamma}{sub 0} = 10{sub 4}. They also varied with angle, but much more slowly than 1/cos({theta}). From this we conclude that the desorption was not entirely from adsorbed layers of gas on the surface. Two mitigation techniques were investigated: rough surfaces reduced electron emission by a factor of ten and gas desorption by a factor of two; a mild bake to {approx}220 degrees had no effect on electron emission, but decreased gas desorption by 15% near grazing incidence. We propose that gas desorption is due to electronic sputtering.

  14. Preparación y caracterización de las propiedades fisicoquímicas del óxido mixto NiO/MgO-La2O3. Efecto de la variación de la composición del soporte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lugo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mixed oxide catalysts of NiO/MgO-La2O3 varying the proportions support were synthesized through the Lunsford method, successive impregnation. Different techniques were used to determine their physicochemical properties., EDX analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, XRD, thermal methods, TGA, DSC, BET surface area method, temperature programmed reduction, TPR-H2, temperature programmed desorption, TPD-O2 and TPD-NO. The results show that nickel oxide displays a strong interaction with support, depending mainly on the proportion of these components.

  15. The desorption of condensed noble gases and gas mixtures from cryogenic surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tratnik, H; Störi, H

    2007-01-01

    In accelerators, operating at liquid-helium temperature, cold surfaces are exposed to intense synchrotron radiation and bombardment by energetic electrons and ions. Molecular desorption yield and secondary electron yield can strongly influence the performance of the accelerator. In order to predict the gas density during the operation, the knowledge of electron-induced desorption yields of condensed gases and of its variation with the gas coverage is necessary. Desorption yields under electron impact of various noble gases and gas mixtures condensed on a copper surface cooled at 4.2 K have been measured.

  16. First-principles calculations of helium and neon desorption from cavities in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddin, A Charaf; Pizzagalli, L

    2012-05-02

    Combining density functional theory, the nudged elastic band technique, and the ultradense fluid model, we investigated the desorption process of He and Ne in silicon. Our results show that the internal surfaces of gas-filled bubbles are not a limiting factor during desorption experiments, since the surface reconstruction opens diffusion paths easier than in the bulk. We show that the vibrational contribution to the energy of helium in the bulk has to be considered in order to determine realistic pressures in the bubbles, when comparing experiments and simulations. At the maximum of desorption, an average pressure of 1-2 GPa is computed. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd

  17. Effect of artificial root exudates on the sorption and desorption of PAHs in meadow brown soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong

    2017-10-01

    The batch equilibrium experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of artificial root exudates on sorption and desorption of phenanthrene and pyrene. The result showed sorption isotherms were fitted well to the Freundlich equation with the treatment of artificial root exudates. Fructose had the most obvious effect on sorption. The artificial root exudates improved desorption of PAHs, while low molecular weight organic acids were better than serine and fructose. The capability of sorption and desorption was strengthened with the increase of organic acids concentration. And the DOM in the solution might be the most important factor of the adsorption of PAHs in solid phase.

  18. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-07-10

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I will discuss the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  19. Water Vapor Desorption Characteristics of Honeycomb Type Sorption Element Composed of Organic Sorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hideo; Kida, Takahisa; Horibe, Akihiko; Kaneda, Makoto; Okamoto, Tamio; Seo, Jeong-Kyun

    This paper describes the water vapor desorption characteristics of honeycomb shape type sorbent element containing new organic sorbent of the bridged complex of sodium polyacrylate. The transient experiments in which the dry air was passed into the honeycomb type sorbent element sorbed water vapor were carried out under various conditions of air velocity, temperature, relative humidity and honeycomb length. The obtained data for desorption process were compared with those for sorption process. Finally, Sherwood number of mass transfer of the organic sorbent for desorption process was derived in terms of Reynolds number, modified Stefan number and non-dimensional honeycomb length.

  20. Adsorption and desorption of agricultural waste-derived DOMs in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. L.; Yang, G. H.; Zhu, G. Y.; Sun, Z. Q.; Yu, X. Y.

    2017-04-01

    The sorption and desorption of two forms of dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracted from agricultural wastes were studied by batch experiments. The adsorption of the two DOMs on the soil were well fitted to the Linear and Freundlich isotherms. DOM extracted from cow manure (MDOM) shows higher affinity to the soil than that extracted from wheat straw (SDOM). Significant desorption hysteresis was observed for both DOMs. Due to the desorption of some aromatic substances with larger molecular weight from the soil, the average molecular weight and aromaticity of the DOMs increased at sorption equilibrium compared with those before sorption.

  1. Solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, Markus; Teppo, Jaakko; Ollikainen, Elisa; Kiiski, Iiro; Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-03-17

    A new ambient mass spectrometry method, solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization (DCPI), is described. The method uses a solvent jet generated by a coaxial nebulizer operated at ambient conditions with nitrogen as nebulizer gas. The solvent jet is directed onto a sample surface, from which analytes are extracted into the solvent and ejected from the surface in secondary droplets formed in collisions between the jet and the sample surface. The secondary droplets are directed into the heated capillary photoionization (CPI) device, where the droplets are vaporized and the gaseous analytes are ionized by 10 eV photons generated by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) krypton discharge lamp. As the CPI device is directly connected to the extended capillary inlet of the MS, high ion transfer efficiency to the vacuum of MS is achieved. The solvent jet DCPI provides several advantages: high sensitivity for nonpolar and polar compounds with limit of detection down to low fmol levels, capability of analyzing small and large molecules, and good spatial resolution (250 μm). Two ionization mechanisms are involved in DCPI: atmospheric pressure photoionization, capable of ionizing polar and nonpolar compounds, and solvent assisted inlet ionization capable of ionizing larger molecules like peptides. The feasibility of DCPI was successfully tested in the analysis of polar and nonpolar compounds in sage leaves and chili pepper.

  2. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for fast DNA analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.H.; Ch`ang, L.Y.; Taranenko, N.I.; Allman, S.L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K.J.

    1995-09-01

    During the past few years, major effort has been directed toward developing mass spectrometry to measure biopolymers because of the great potential benefit to biomedical research. Hellenkamp and his co-workers were the first to report that large polypeptide molecules can be ionized and detected without significant fragmentation when a greater number of nicotinic acid molecules are used as a matrix. This method is now well known as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Since then, various groups have reported measurements of very large proteins by MALDI. Reliable protein analysis by MALDI is more or less well established. However, the application of MALDI to nucleic acids analysis has been found to be much more difficult. Most research on the measurement of nucleic acid by MALDI were stimulated by the Human Genome Project. Up to now, the only method for reliable routine analysis of nucleic acid is gel electrophoresis. Different sizes of nucleic acids can be separated in gel medium when a high electric field is applied to the gel. However, the time needed to separate different sizes of DNA segments usually takes from several minutes to several hours. If MALDI can be successfully used for nucleic acids analysis, the analysis time can be reduced to less than I millisecond. In addition, no tagging with radioactive materials or chemical dyes is needed. In this work, we will review recent progress related to MALDI for DNA analysis.

  3. Quantitative analysis of biopolymers by matrix-assisted laser desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, K.; Allman, S.L.; Jones, R.B.; Chen, C.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-08-01

    During the past few years, major efforts have been made to use mass spectrometry to measure biopolymers because of the great potential benefit to biological and medical research. Although the theoretical details of laser desorption and ionization mechanisms of MALDI are not yet fully understood, several models have been presented to explain the production of large biopolymer ions. In brief, it is very difficult to obtain reliable measurements of the absolute quantity of analytes by MALDI. If MALDI is going to become a routine analytical tool, it is obvious that quantitative measurement capability must be pursued. Oligonucleotides and protein samples used in this work were purchased from commercial sources. Nicotinic acid was used as matrix for both types of biopolymers. From this experiment, it is seen that it is difficult to obtain absolute quantitative measurements of biopolymers using MALDI. However, internal calibration with molecules having similar chemical properties can be used to resolve these difficulties. Chemical reactions between biopolymers must be avoided to prevent the destruction of the analyte materials. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Kinetics of Surfactant Desorption at an Air–Solution Interface

    KAUST Repository

    Morgan, C. E.

    2012-12-18

    The kinetics of re-equilibration of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate at the air-solution interface have been studied using neutron reflectivity. The experimental arrangement incorporates a novel flow cell in which the subphase can be exchanged (diluted) using a laminar flow while the surface region remains unaltered. The rate of the re-equilibration is relatively slow and occurs over many tens of minutes, which is comparable with the dilution time scale of approximately 10-30 min. A detailed mathematical model, in which the rate of the desorption is determined by transport through a near-surface diffusion layer into a diluted bulk solution below, is developed and provides a good description of the time-dependent adsorption data. A key parameter of the model is the ratio of the depth of the diffusion layer, H c, to the depth of the fluid, Hf, and we find that this is related to the reduced Péclet number, Pe*, for the system, via Hc/Hf = C/Pe*1/2. Although from a highly idealized experimental arrangement, the results provide an important insight into the "rinse mechanism", which is applicable to a wide variety of domestic and industrial circumstances. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  5. Temperature dependences in electron-stimulated desorption of neutral europium

    CERN Document Server

    Ageev, V N; Madey, T E

    2003-01-01

    The electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) yield for neutral europium (Eu) atoms from Eu layers adsorbed on oxygen-covered tungsten surfaces has been measured as a function of electron energy, europium coverage and degree of oxidation of tungsten, with an emphasis on effects of substrate temperature. The measurements have been carried out using a time-of-flight method and surface ionization detector. We expand on an earlier report, and compare ESD of multivalent Eu with ESD of monovalent alkali atoms, studied previously. The Eu atom ESD is a complicated function of Eu coverage, electron energy and substrate temperature. In the coverage range 0.05-0.35 monolayer (ML), overlapping resonant-like Eu atom yield peaks are observed at electron energies E sub e of 36 and 41 eV that might be associated with Eu or W shallow core level excitations. Additional resonant-like peaks are seen at E sub e of 54 and 84 eV that are associated with W 5p and 5s level excitations. The Eu atom yield peaks at 36 and 41 eV are seen only...

  6. Deuterium thermal desorption and re-emission from RAFM steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabtsev, S. A.; Gasparyan, Yu M.; Harutyunyan, Z. R.; Timofeev, I. M.; Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Pisarev, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, deuterium (D) retention and release during and after ion irradiation of reduced-activation ferritic-marthensitic steels (Eurofer) in comparison with the D retention in pure iron (Fe) was studied. The irradiation was done with 5 keV {{{{D}}}3}+ ions at room temperature at the fluence varied in the range of 1 × 1020-1 × 1022 D m-2. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was also performed in situ in 45 min after irradiation. The D release from both materials between the end of irradiation and the start of TDS was very intensive and the integral amount of D measured during outgassing exceeded the D retention measured by TDS. An influence of surface oxidation on the D release due to contact with an environmental air was also demonstrated by comparison of in situ and ex situ TDS. The integral D retention in Eurofer was 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than in pure iron (Fe) due to the initially high concentration of defects in Eurofer. However, pre-annealing of Eurofer at 800 K reduced the defect concentration in Eurofer and, therefore, reduced the difference in the D retention in Fe and Eurofer.

  7. Operable Unit 7-13/14 in situ thermal desorption treatability study work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, P.; Nickelson, D.; Hyde, R.

    1999-05-01

    This Work Plan provides technical details for conducting a treatability study that will evaluate the application of in situ thermal desorption (ISTD) to landfill waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). ISTD is a form of thermally enhanced vapor vacuum extraction that heats contaminated soil and waste underground to raise its temperature and thereby vaporize and destroy most organics. An aboveground vapor vacuum collection and treatment system then destroys or absorbs the remaining organics and vents carbon dioxide and water to the atmosphere. The technology is a byproduct of an advanced oil-well thermal extraction program. The purpose of the ISTD treatability study is to fill performance-based data gaps relative to off-gas system performance, administrative feasibility, effects of the treatment on radioactive contaminants, worker safety during mobilization and demobilization, and effects of landfill type waste on the process (time to remediate, subsidence potential, underground fires, etc.). By performing this treatability study, uncertainties associated with ISTD as a selected remedy will be reduced, providing a better foundation of remedial recommendations and ultimate selection of remedial actions for the SDA.

  8. Review of Heavy-ion Induced Desorption Studies for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E

    2008-01-01

    During high-intensity heavy-ion operation of several particle accelerators worldwide, large dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were caused by lost beam ions that impacted under grazing angle onto the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced desorption, observed, for example, at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion intensity, luminosity, and beam lifetime of the accelerator. For the heavyion program at CERN's Large Hadron Collider collisions between beams of fully stripped lead (208Pb82+) ions with a beam energy of 2.76 TeV/u and a nominal luminosity of 10**27 cm**-2 s**-1 are foreseen. The GSI future project FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) aims at a beam intensity of 10**12 uranium (238U28+) ions per second to be extracted from the synchrotron SIS18. Over the past years an experimental effort has been made to study the observed dynamic vacuum degradations, which are important to understand and overcome for present and future particle accelerators. The paper reviews the resu...

  9. In situ trace detection of peroxide explosives by desorption electrospray ionization and desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Hernandez-Soto, Heriberto; Chen, Hao; Cooks, R Graham

    2008-03-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry is used for the rapid (process triggered by an unusual homolytic cleavage of the peroxide bond, forming a distonic ion. This is followed by elimination of a fragment of 30 mass units, shown to be the expected neutral molecule, formaldehyde, in the case of HMTD, but shown by isotopic labeling experiments to be ethane in the cases of TATP and TrATrP. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations support the suggested fragmentation mechanisms for the complexes. Binding energies of Na+ of 40.2 and 33.1 kcal/mol were calculated for TATP-Na(+) and HMTD-Na(+) complexes, suggesting a strong interaction between the peroxide groups and the sodium ion. Increased selectivity is obtained either by MS/MS or by doping the spray solvent with additives that produce the lithium and potassium complexes of TATP, HMTD, and TrATrP. Addition of dopants into the solvent spray increased the signal intensity by an order of magnitude. When pure alcohol or aqueous hydrogen peroxide was used as the spray solvent, the (HMTD + Na)+ complex was able to bind a molecule of alcohol (methanol or ethanol) or hydrogen peroxide, providing additional characteristic ions to increase the selectivity of analysis. DESI also allowed the rapid detection of peroxide explosives in complex matrixes such as diesel fuel and lubricants using single or multiple cation additives (Na(+), K(+), and Li(+), and NH4(+)) in the spray solvent. Low-nanogram detection limits were achieved for HMTD, TrATrP, and TATP in these complex matrixes. The DESI response was linear over 3 orders of magnitude for HMTD and TATP on paper surfaces (1-5000 ng), and quantification of both peroxide explosives from paper gave precisions (RSD) of less than 3%. The use of pure water and compressed air as the DESI spray solution and nebulizing gas, respectively, showed similar ionization efficiencies to those obtained using methanol/water mixtures and nitrogen gas (the typical choices). An

  10. Rapid detection of nicotine from breath using desorption ionisation on porous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, T M; Abdelmaksoud, H; Voelcker, N H

    2017-05-04

    Desorption ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) was used for the detection of nicotine from exhaled breath. This result represents proof-of-principle of the ability of DIOS to detect small molecular analytes in breath including biomarkers and illicit drugs.

  11. The adsorption-desorption cycle. Reversibility of the BSA-silica system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, CE; Norde, W

    2001-01-01

    The reversibility of the adsorption-desorption cycle was established by comparing the thermostability (determined by differential scanning calorimetry) and secondary structure (obtained by circular dichroism spectroscopy) of BSA before adsorption, adsorbed on, and exchanged from silica particles.

  12. Functional differential equations of neutral type with integrable weak singularity: hydrogen thermal desorption model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Yury V.; Kostikova, Ekaterina K.

    2017-11-01

    One of the technological challenges for hydrogen materials science (including the ITER project) is the currently active search for structural materials with various potential applications that will have predetermined limits of hydrogen permeability. One of the experimental methods is thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). A hydrogen-saturated sample is degassed under vacuum and monotone heating. The desorption flux is measured by mass spectrometer to determine the character of interactions of hydrogen isotopes with the solid. We are interested in such transfer parameters as the coefficients of diffusion, dissolution, desorption. The paper presents a thermal desorption functional differential equations of neutral type with integrable weak singularity and a numerical method for TDS spectrum simulation, where only integration of a nonlinear system of low order ordinary differential equations (ODE) is required. This work is supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 15-01-00744).

  13. Enhanced Atomic Desorption of 209 and 210 Francium from Organic Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustsson, Steinn; Bianchi, Giovanni; Calabrese, Roberto; Corradi, Lorenzo; Dainelli, Antonio; Khanbekyan, Alen; Marinelli, Carmela; Mariotti, Emilio; Marmugi, Luca; Ricci, Leonardo; Stiaccini, Leonardo; Tomassetti, Luca; Vanella, Andrea

    2017-06-23

    Controlled atomic desorption from organic Poly-DiMethylSiloxane coating is demonstrated for improving the loading efficiency of (209,210)Fr magneto-optical traps. A three times increase in the cold atoms population is obtained with contact-less pulsed light-induced desorption, applied to different isotopes, either bosonic or fermionic, of Francium. A six times increase of (210)Fr population is obtained with a desorption mechanism based on direct charge transfer from a triboelectric probe to the adatom-organic coating complex. Our findings provide new insight on the microscopic mechanisms of atomic desorption from organic coatings. Our results, obtained at room temperature so as to preserve ideal vacuum conditions, represent concrete alternatives, independent from the atomic species in use, for high-efficiency laser cooling in critical conditions.

  14. A model for the catalytic reduction of NO with CO and N desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, J. J.; Buendía, G. M.

    2018-02-01

    In this work we have investigated by Monte Carlo simulations the dynamical behavior of a modified Yaldram-Khan (YK) model for the catalytic reduction of NO on a surface. Our model is simulated on a square lattice and includes the individual desorption of CO molecules and N atoms, processes associated with temperature effects. When CO desorption is added, strong fluctuations appear, which are associated with the spreading of N checkerboard structures on the surface. These structures take a long time to coalesce, allowing the existence of a unsteady but long lasting reactive state. N desorption also favors the reactivity of the system, this time by diminishing the size of the N structures and impeding their coalescence. The combined desorption of CO and N produces a reactive state as well, where reactive zones among N structures can take place on the surface.

  15. In-injection port thermal desorption for explosives trace evidence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, M E; Ma, C Y

    1999-10-01

    A gas chromatographic method utilizing thermal desorption of a dry surface wipe for the analysis of explosives trace chemical evidence has been developed and validated using electron capture and negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometric detection. Thermal desorption was performed within a split/splitless injection port with minimal instrument modification. Surface-abraded Teflon tubing provided the solid support for sample collection and desorption. Performance was characterized by desorption efficiency, reproducibility, linearity of the calibration, and method detection and quantitation limits. Method validation was performed with a series of dinitrotoluenes, trinitrotoluene, two nitroester explosives, and one nitramine explosive. The method was applied to the sampling of a single piece of debris from an explosion containing trinitrotoluene.

  16. Impact of activated carbon, biochar and compost on the desorption and mineralization of phenanthrene in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Geoffrey; Smith, Kilian E C; Rein, Arno; Winding, Anne; Wollensen de Jonge, Lis; Trapp, Stefan; Karlson, Ulrich G

    2013-10-01

    Sorption of PAHs to carbonaceous soil amendments reduces their dissolved concentrations, limiting toxicity but also potentially biodegradation. Therefore, the maximum abiotic desorption of freshly sorbed phenanthrene (≤5 mg kg(-1)) was measured in three soils amended with activated carbon (AC), biochar or compost. Total amounts of phenanthrene desorbed were similar between the different soils, but the amendment type had a large influence. Complete desorption was observed in the unamended and compost amended soils, but this reduced for biochar (41% desorbed) and AC (8% desorbed). Cumulative amounts mineralized were 28% for the unamended control, 19% for compost, 13% for biochar and 4% for AC. Therefore, the effects of the amendments in soil in reducing desorption were also reflected in the extents of mineralization. Modeling was used to analyze key processes, indicating that for the AC and charcoal treatments bacterial activity did not limit mineralization, but rather desorption into the dissolved phase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Desorption of acetone from alkaline-earth exchanged Y zeolite after propane selective oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Mojet, Barbara; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2004-01-01

    The desorption of products from a series of alkaline-earth exchanged Y zeolites after room-temperature propane selective oxidation was investigated by in situ infrared and mass spectroscopy. The intermediate product, isopropylhydroperoxide (IHP), did not desorb during

  18. Sorption and desorption of tritiated water vapor on piping materials of nuclear fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Satoru; Ohmori, Rumi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Sorption and desorption of D{sub 2}O on Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiO, SS316 powders were studied at ambient temperature. When D{sub 2}O were contacted with samples after drying at 303K, broad peak was observed at 2100-2700cm{sup -1} on Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO. Sorption and desorption rate depended on wave numbers. Isotope exchange rate with H{sub 2}O vapor was faster than dry desorption rate. By heating pretreatment, sorption amount and desorption rate for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO decreased. For SS316, broad peak was observed only after heating pretreatment at 673K. (author)

  19. Modelling of hydrogen thermal desorption spectrum in nonlinear dynamical boundary-value problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostikova, E. K.; Zaika, Yu V.

    2016-11-01

    One of the technological challenges for hydrogen materials science (including the ITER project) is the currently active search for structural materials with various potential applications that will have predetermined limits of hydrogen permeability. One of the experimental methods is thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). A hydrogen-saturated sample is degassed under vacuum and monotone heating. The desorption flux is measured by mass spectrometer to determine the character of interactions of hydrogen isotopes with the solid. We are interested in such transfer parameters as the coefficients of diffusion, dissolution, desorption. The paper presents a distributed boundary-value problem of thermal desorption and a numerical method for TDS spectrum simulation, where only integration of a nonlinear system of low order (compared with, e.g., the method of lines) ordinary differential equations (ODE) is required. This work is supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 15-01-00744).

  20. Site Specificity in Femtosecond Laser Desorption of Neutral H Atoms from Graphite(0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigge, R.; Hoger, T.; Siemer, B.

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond laser excitation and density functional theory reveal site and vibrational state specificity in neutral atomic hydrogen desorption from graphite induced by multiple electronic transitions. Multimodal velocity distributions witness the participation of ortho and para pair states of che...

  1. Rapid trace detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) by complexation reactions during desorption electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Chen, Hao; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-03-07

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry is used for rapid, specific and sensitive detection of trace amounts of the notorious explosive TATP present on ambient surfaces by alkali metal complexation in a simple spray technique.

  2. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2014-05-01

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  3. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherwitzl, Boris, E-mail: b.scherwitzl@tugraz.at; Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2014-05-14

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  4. Treating high-mercury-containing lamps using full-scale thermal desorption technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T C; You, S J; Yu, B S; Chen, C M; Chiu, Y C

    2009-03-15

    The mercury content in high-mercury-containing lamps are always between 400 mg/kg and 200,000 mg/kg. This concentration is much higher than the 260 mg/kg lower boundary recommended for the thermal desorption process suggested by the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. According to a Taiwan EPA survey, about 4,833,000 cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs), 486,000 ultraviolet lamps and 25,000 super high pressure mercury lamps (SHPs) have been disposed of in the industrial waste treatment system, producing 80, 92 and 9 kg-mercury/year through domestic treatment, offshore treatment and air emissions, respectively. To deal with this problem we set up a full-scale thermal desorption process to treat and recover the mercury from SHPs, fluorescent tube tailpipes, fluorescent tubes containing mercury-fluorescent powder, and CCFLs containing mercury-fluorescent powder and monitor the use of different pre-heating temperatures and desorption times. The experimental results reveal that the average thermal desorption efficiency of SHPs and fluorescent tube tailpipe were both 99.95%, while the average thermal desorption efficiencies of fluorescent tubes containing mercury-fluorescent powder were between 97% and 99%. In addition, a thermal desorption efficiency of only 69.37-93.39% was obtained after treating the CCFLs containing mercury-fluorescent powder. These differences in thermal desorption efficiency might be due to the complexity of the mercury compounds contained in the lamps. In general, the thermal desorption efficiency of lamps containing mercury-complex compounds increased with higher temperatures.

  5. Enhanced desorption of cesium from collapsed interlayer regions in vermiculite by hydrothermal treatment with divalent cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Xiangbiao, E-mail: yin.x.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Wang, Xinpeng [College of Resources and Metallurgy, Guangxi University, 100 Daxue East Road, Nanning 530004 (China); Wu, Hao; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Takeshita, Kenji [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Desorption of Cs{sup +} fixed in collapsed interlayer region of vermiculite was studied. • Monovalent cations readily induced interlayer collapse inhibiting Cs{sup +} desorption. • Larger hydrous ionic radii of divalent cations greatly prevented Cs{sup +} desorption. • Effect of divalent cation on Cs{sup +} desorption changes depending on thermal treatment. • ∼100% removal of saturated Cs{sup +} was achieved by hydrothermal treatment at 250 °C. - Abstract: Adsorption of cesium (Cs) on phyllosilicates has been intensively investigated because natural soils have strong ability of immobilizing Cs within clay minerals resulting in difficulty of decontamination. The objectives of present study are to clarify how Cs fixation on vermiculite is influenced by structure change caused by Cs sorption at different loading levels and how Cs desorption is affected by various replacing cations induced at different treating temperature. As a result, more than 80% of Cs was readily desorbed from vermiculite with loading amount of 2% saturated Cs (5.49 × 10{sup −3} mmol g{sup −1}) after four cycles of treatment of 0.01 M Mg{sup 2+}/Ca{sup 2+} at room temperature, but less than 20% of Cs was desorbed from saturated vermiculite. These distinct desorption patterns were attributed to inhibition of Cs desorption by interlayer collapse of vermiculite, especially at high Cs loadings. In contrast, elevated temperature significantly facilitated divalent cations to efficiently desorb Cs from collapsed regions. After five cycles of treatment at 250 °C with 0.01 M Mg{sup 2+}, ∼100% removal of saturated Cs was achieved. X-ray diffraction analysis results suggested that Cs desorption was completed through enhanced diffusion of Mg{sup 2+} cations into collapsed interlayer space under hydrothermal condition resulting in subsequent interlayer decollapse and readily release of Cs{sup +}.

  6. Desorption of Pb 2+ and Cu 2+ from Nipa palm ( Nypa fruticans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The data shows that desorption in all the reagent increased with increase in contact time, reaching 75.3 and 63.7% in acid reagent, 18.9 and 14.06% in basic reagent and 3.35 and 2.44% in distilled water for Pb2+ and Cu2+, respectively, at a contact time of 140 min. The desorption kinetic showed that the release constant, ...

  7. Measurements of hydrogen content in bulk niobium by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hakovirta, M

    2001-01-01

    The hydrogen content of bulk niobium has been studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy. The work has been focussed initially on the influence of the vacuum firing and the surface chemical treatment. It is planned to extend the investigation to niobium samples of different quality and origin to ascertain the interest of using the Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy technique to qualify the raw niobium sheets to be used for cavity manufacturing

  8. Analysis of the volatile organic matter of engine piston deposits by direct sample introduction thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaby, M; Kinani, S; Genty, C; Bouchonnet, S; Sablier, M; Le Negrate, A; El Fassi, M

    2009-12-01

    This article establishes an alternative method for the characterization of volatiles organic matter (VOM) contained in deposits of the piston first ring grooves of diesel engines using a ChromatoProbe direct sample introduction (DSI) device coupled to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The addition of an organic solvent during thermal desorption leads to an efficient extraction and a good chromatographic separation of extracted products. The method was optimized investigating the effects of several solvents, the volume added to the solid sample, and temperature programming of the ChromatoProbe DSI device. The best results for thermal desorption were found using toluene as an extraction solvent and heating the programmable temperature injector from room temperature to 300 degrees C with a temperature step of 105 degrees C. With the use of the optimized thermal desorption conditions, several components have been positively identified in the volatile fraction of the deposits: aromatics, antioxidants, and antioxidant degradation products. Moreover, this work highlighted the presence of diesel fuel in the VOM of the piston deposits and gave new facts on the absence of the role of diesel fuel in the deposit formation process. Most importantly, it opens the possibility of quickly performing the analysis of deposits with small amounts of samples while having a good separation of the volatiles.

  9. Electrothermal adsorption and desorption of volatile organic compounds on activated carbon fiber cloth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, H K; Sivakumar, S; Rood, M J; Kim, B J

    2016-01-15

    Adsorption is an effective means to selectively remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial gas streams and is particularly of use for gas streams that exhibit highly variable daily concentrations of VOCs. Adsorption of such gas streams by activated carbon fiber cloths (ACFCs) and subsequent controlled desorption can provide gas streams of well-defined concentration that can then be more efficiently treated by biofiltration than streams exhibiting large variability in concentration. In this study, we passed VOC-containing gas through an ACFC vessel for adsorption and then desorption in a concentration-controlled manner via electrothermal heating. Set-point concentrations (40-900 ppm(v)) and superficial gas velocity (6.3-9.9 m/s) were controlled by a data acquisition and control system. The results of the average VOC desorption, desorption factor and VOC in-and-out ratio were calculated and compared for various gas set-point concentrations and superficial gas velocities. Our results reveal that desorption is strongly dependent on the set-point concentration and that the VOC desorption rate can be successfully equalized and controlled via an electrothermal adsorption system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. ATRAZINE ADSORPTION-DESORPTION BEHAVIOR IN DAREHASALUIE KAVAR CORN FIELD SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dehghani, S. Nasseri, S. Amin, K. Naddafi, M. Yunesian, M. Taghavi and N. Maleki

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption desorption behaviors of widely applied atrazine soil were studied, employing a batch technique as a case study in Darehasaluie Kavar corn field in Fars Province in 2005. Samples were collected into 0 to 20 cm soil depth, where was cultivated under a crop rotation (corn-wheat during the past 10 years. Sorption kinetics exhibited two phenomena: an immediate rapid sorption (1.31 µg/g soil after 12 hours followed by a slow sorption process (1.37 µg/g soil after 24 hours. Desorption behavior of atrazine was similar to its adsorption, but at a very slower rate. Atrazine desorption efficiencies were much less effective and incomplete even after a long equilibration time (only 9.16% after 96 hours. The adsorption-desorption rate for most of the time was positively related to the amount of applied atrazine and the time required for equilibration (P<0.01. Desorption data exhibited hysteresis phenomena. Atrazine adsorption data described well according to Freundlich (r2=0.95, Langmuir (r2=0.82 and Temkin (r2=0.84 isotherms. However, the fit to Freundlich adsorption model in a non linear form (1/n <1 was closer than the others. Desorption isotherm could be well described by the Temkin (r2=0.96 and Freundlich (r2=0.92 isotherms, but the fit to Temkin model was closer than that of Freundlich.

  11. Enhanced hydrogen desorption property of MgH{sub 2} with the addition of cerium fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Huai-Jun, E-mail: huaijun.lin.489@s.kyushu-u.ac.jp [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Matsuda, Junko [International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Li, Hai-Wen [International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Research Center for Hydrogen Energy, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Zhu, Min [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); China–Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Akiba, Etsuo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Research Center for Hydrogen Energy, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Activation energy of MgH{sub 2} desorption is remarkably reduced with the dopant of CeF{sub 4}. • The improvement might be attributed to new Ce–F–Mg species at the CeF{sub 4}/MgH{sub 2} interface. • Easy electron transfer induced from the high valence Ce-cation benefits MgH{sub 2} desorption. - Abstract: Hydrogen desorption property of MgH{sub 2} doped with cerium fluorides with different valences prepared using ball milling has been studied. CeF{sub 4} is catalytically active for hydrogen desorption of MgH{sub 2}. Hydrogen desorption temperature and apparent activation energy of MgH{sub 2} are significantly reduced with dopant of 2 mol% of CeF{sub 4}, which might be attributed to the formation of a new Ce–F–Mg specie at the CeF{sub 4}/MgH{sub 2} interface and the easy electron transfer induced from the high valence Ce-cation. The apparent activation energy of hydrogen desorption of MgH{sub 2} is reduced from ∼160 kJ/mol to ∼110 kJ/mol with the dopant of CeF{sub 4}.

  12. Airborne laser-spark for ambient desorption/ionisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Riedel, Jens

    A novel direct sampling ionisation scheme for ambient mass spectrometry is presented. Desorption and ionisation are achieved by a quasi-continuous laser induced plasma in air. Since there are no solid or liquid electrodes involved the ion source does not suffer from chemical interferences or fatigue originating from erosive burning or from electrode consumption. The overall plasma maintains electro-neutrality, minimising charge effects and accompanying long term drift of the charged particles trajectories. In the airborne plasma approach the ambient air not only serves as the plasma medium but at the same time also slows down the nascent ions via collisional cooling. Ionisation of the analyte molecules does not occur in the plasma itself but is induced by interaction with nascent ionic fragments, electrons and/or far ultraviolet photons in the plasma vicinity. At each individual air-spark an audible shockwave is formed, providing new reactive species, which expands concentrically and, thus, prevents direct contact of the analyte with the hot region inside the plasma itself. As a consequence the interaction volume between plasma and analyte does not exceed the threshold temperature for thermal dissociation or fragmentation. Experimentally this indirect ionisation scheme is demonstrated to be widely unspecific to the chemical nature of the analyte and to hardly result in any fragmentation of the studied molecules. A vast ensemble of different test analytes including polar and non-polar hydrocarbons, sugars, low mass active ingredients of pharmaceuticals as well as natural biomolecules in food samples directly out of their complex matrices could be shown to yield easily accessible yet meaningful spectra. Since the plasma medium is humid air, the chemical reaction mechanism of the ionisation is likely to be similar to other ambient ionisation techniques. Wir stellen hier eine neue Ionisationsmethode für die Umgebungsionisation (ambient ionisation) vor. Sowohl die

  13. Mercury speciation during in situ thermal desorption in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Min, E-mail: cmpark80@gmail.com; Katz, Lynn E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Impact of soil conditions on distribution and phase transitions of Hg was identified. • Metallic Hg was slowly transformed to Hg{sup 0} gas until the temperature reached 358.15 K. • Phase change of HgCl{sub 2(s)} completely occurred without decomposition at 335.15 K. • HgS remained solid in dry soil sharply decreased in the narrow temperature range. • Hg gas can be easily captured with higher vapor pressures of soil compositions. - Abstract: Metallic mercury (Hg{sup 0}) and its compounds are highly mobile and toxic environmental pollutants at trace level. In situ thermal desorption (ISTD) is one of the soil remediation processes applying heat and vacuum simultaneously. Knowledge of thermodynamic mercury speciation is imperative to understand the fate and transport of mercury during thermal remediation and operate the treatment processes in a cost-effective manner. Hence, speciation model for inorganic mercury was developed over a range of environmental conditions to identify distribution of dissolved mercury species and potential transformations of mercury at near source environment. Simulation of phase transitions for metallic mercury, mercury(II) chloride and mercury sulfide with temperature increase showed that complete vaporization of metallic mercury and mercury(II) chloride were achieved below the boiling point of water. The effect of soil compositions on mercury removal was also evaluated to better understand thermal remediation process. Higher vapor pressures expected both from soil pore water and inorganic carbonate minerals in soil as well as creation of permeability were significant for complete vaporization and removal of mercury.

  14. Desorption of a methamphetamine surrogate from wallboard under remediation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppendieck, Dustin; Morrison, Glenn; Corsi, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Thousands of homes in the United States are found to be contaminated with methamphetamine each year. Buildings used to produce illicit methamphetamine are typically remediated by removing soft furnishings and stained materials, cleaning and sometimes encapsulating surfaces using paint. Methamphetamine that has penetrated into paint films, wood and other permanent materials can be slowly released back into the building air over time, exposing future occupants and re-contaminating furnishings. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of two wallboard remediation techniques for homes contaminated with methamphetamine: 1) enhancing desorption by elevating temperature and relative humidity while ventilating the interior space, and 2) painting over affected wallboard to seal the methamphetamine in place. The emission of a methamphetamine surrogate, N-isopropylbenzylamine (NIBA), from pre-dosed wallboard chambers over 20 days at 32 °C and two values of relative humidity were studied. Emission rates from wallboard after 15 days at 32 °C ranged from 35 to 1400 μg h-1 m-2. Less than 22% of the NIBA was removed from the chambers over three weeks. Results indicate that elevating temperatures during remediation and latex painting of impacted wallboard will not significantly reduce freebase methamphetamine emissions from wallboard. Raising the relative humidity from 27% to 49% increased the emission rates by a factor of 1.4. A steady-state model of a typical home using the emission rates from this study and typical residential building parameters and conditions shows that adult inhalation reference doses for methamphetamine will be reached when approximately 1 g of methamphetamine is present in the wallboard of a house.

  15. Surface effects and electrochemical cell capacitance in desorption electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volný, Michael; Venter, Andre; Smith, Scott A; Pazzi, Marco; Cooks, R Graham

    2008-04-01

    Time resolved measurements show that during a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) experiment, the current initially rises sharply, followed by an exponential decrease to a relatively steady current. When the high voltage on the spray emitter is switched off, the current drops to negative values, suggesting that the direction of current flow in the equivalent DESI circuit is reversed. These data demonstrate that the DESI source behaves as a dc capacitor and that the addition of a surface between the sprayer and the counter electrode in DESI introduces a new electrically active element into the system. The charging and discharging behavior was observed using different surfaces and it could be seen both by making current measurements on a plate at the entrance to the mass spectrometer as well as by measuring ion current in the linear ion trap within the vacuum system of the mass spectrometer. The magnitude of the steady state current obtained without analyte present on the surface is different for different surface materials, and different capacitor time constants of the equivalent RC circuits were calculated for different DESI surfaces. The PTFE surface has by far the greatest time constant and is also able to produce the highest DESI currents. Surface properties play a crucial role in charge transfer during DESI in addition to the effects of the chemical properties of the analyte. It is suggested that surface energy (wettability) is an important factor controlling droplet behavior on the surface. The experimental data are correlated with critical surface tension values of different materials. It is proposed, based on the results presented, that super-hydrophobic materials with extremely high contact angles have the potential to be excellent DESI substrates. It is also demonstrated, using the example of the neurotransmitter dopamine, that the surface charge that develops during a DESI-MS experiment can cause electrochemical oxidation of the analyte.

  16. Adsorption of NO on Fe3O4(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Michael; Mehar, Vikram; Merte, Lindsay R.; Shipilin, Mikhail; Lundgren, Edvin; Weaver, Jason F.; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2018-02-01

    Adsorption of NO on Fe3O4(111) is studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. NO is preferably adsorbed atop the octahedral site which has a clearly higher adsorption energy than the tetrahedral site. The difference in adsorption energy correlates with differences in adsorption geometries and Nsbnd O stretch vibrations. The results are in good agreement with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection-adsorption IR spectroscopy (RAIRS) measurements and provide an explanation of the observation of only one vibrational mode despite two distinct TPD features.

  17. Structure, tritium depth profile and desorption from ‘plasma-facing’ beryllium materials of ITER-Like-Wall at JET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Pajuste

    2017-08-01

    Experimental results revealed that > 95% of the tritium was localized in the top 30 – 45µm of the ‘plasma-facing’ surface, however, possible tritium presence up to 100µm cannot be excluded. During temperature programmed desorption at 4.8K/min in the flow of purge gas He+ 0.1% H2 the tritium release started below 475K, the most intense release occurred at 725 – 915K and the degree of detritiation of > 91% can be obtained upon reaching 1075K. The total tritium activity in the samples was in range of 2 – 32kilo Becquerel per square centimetre of the plasma-facing surface area.

  18. A soil-column gas chromatography (SCGC) approach to explore the thermal desorption behavior of hydrocarbons from soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Liu, Liang; Shao, Ziying; Ju, Tianyu; Sun, Bing; Benadda, Belkacem

    2016-01-01

    A soil-column gas chromatography approach was developed to simulate the mass transfer process of hydrocarbons between gas and soil during thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction (T-SVE). Four kinds of hydrocarbons-methylbenzene, n-hexane, n-decane, and n-tetradecane-were flowed by nitrogen gas. The retention factor k' and the tailing factor T f were calculated to reflect the desorption velocities of fast and slow desorption fractions, respectively. The results clearly indicated two different mechanisms on the thermal desorption behaviors of fast and slow desorption fractions. The desorption velocity of fast desorption fraction was an exponential function of the reciprocal of soil absolute temperature and inversely correlated with hydrocarbon's boiling point, whereas the desorption velocity of slow desorption fraction was an inverse proportional function of soil absolute temperature, and inversely proportional to the log K OW value of the hydrocarbons. The higher activation energy of adsorption was found on loamy soil with higher organic content. The increase of carrier gas flow rate led to a reduction in the apparent activation energy of adsorption of slow desorption fraction, and thus desorption efficiency was significantly enhanced. The obtained results are of practical interest for the design of high-efficiency T-SVE system and may be used to predict the remediation time.

  19. Optimization and kinetic modeling of cadmium desorption from citrus peels: A process for biosorbent regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Njikam, Eloh, E-mail: ennjikam@alaska.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, P.O. Box 755900, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Schiewer, Silke, E-mail: sschiewer@alaska.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, P.O. Box 755900, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States)

    2012-04-30

    Graphical abstract: Cadmium was completely and quickly desorbed from grapefruit peels using 0.01 M HNO{sub 3}. The kinetics followed a novel 1st or 2nd order kinetic model, related to the remaining metal bound as the rate-determining reactant concentration. For 0.001 M HNO{sub 3}, desorption was incomplete and the model fit less perfect. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal desorption was over 90% complete within 50 min for most desorbents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Models for biosorbent desorption kinetics were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Desorption kinetics best fit a novel first-order model related to remaining metal bound. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd uptake after desorption by HNO{sub 3} was similar to the original uptake. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimal desorbent was 0.1 or 0.01 M acid, being fast, efficient and cheap. - Abstract: Citrus peel biosorbents are efficient in removing heavy metals from wastewater. Heavy metal recovery and sorbent regeneration are important for the financial competitiveness of biosorption with other processes. The desorbing agents HNO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}, Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, EDTA, S, S-EDDS, and Na-Citrate were studied at different concentrations to optimize cadmium elution from orange or grapefruit peels. In most cases, desorption was fast, being over 90% complete within 50 min. However sodium nitrate and 0.001 M nitric acid were less efficient. Several new models for desorption kinetics were developed. While zero-, first- and second-order kinetics are commonly applied for modeling adsorption kinetics, the present study adapts these models to describe desorption kinetics. The proposed models relate to the number of metal-filled binding sites as the rate-determining reactant concentration. A model based on first order kinetics with respect to the remaining metal bound performed best. Cd bound in subsequent adsorption after desorption was similar to the original amount bound for desorption by

  20. Reactive Desorption of CO Hydrogenation Products under Cold Pre-stellar Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Qasim, D.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2018-02-01

    The astronomical gas-phase detection of simple species and small organic molecules in cold pre-stellar cores, with abundances as high as ∼10‑8–10‑9 n H, contradicts the generally accepted idea that at 10 K, such species should be fully frozen out on grain surfaces. A physical or chemical mechanism that results in a net transfer from solid-state species into the gas phase offers a possible explanation. Reactive desorption, i.e., desorption following the exothermic formation of a species, is one of the options that has been proposed. In astronomical models, the fraction of molecules desorbed through this process is handled as a free parameter, as experimental studies quantifying the impact of exothermicity on desorption efficiencies are largely lacking. In this work, we present a detailed laboratory study with the goal of deriving an upper limit for the reactive desorption efficiency of species involved in the CO–H2CO–CH3OH solid-state hydrogenation reaction chain. The limit for the overall reactive desorption fraction is derived by precisely investigating the solid-state elemental carbon budget, using reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and the calibrated solid-state band-strength values for CO, H2CO and CH3OH. We find that for temperatures in the range of 10 to 14 K, an upper limit of 0.24 ± 0.02 for the overall elemental carbon loss upon CO conversion into CH3OH. This corresponds with an effective reaction desorption fraction of ≤0.07 per hydrogenation step, or ≤0.02 per H-atom induced reaction, assuming that H-atom addition and abstraction reactions equally contribute to the overall reactive desorption fraction along the hydrogenation sequence. The astronomical relevance of this finding is discussed.

  1. Solvent-Assisted Desorption of 2,5-Lutidine from Polyurethane Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyne, Devon A; Varady, Mark J; Lambeth, Robert H; Eikenberg, Janlyn H; Bringuier, Stefan A; Pearl, Thomas P; Mantooth, Brent A

    2018-02-08

    A fundamental understanding of chemical interactions and transport mechanisms that result from introducing multiple chemical species into a polymer plays a key role in the development and optimization of membranes, coatings, and decontamination formulations. In this study, we explore the solvent-assisted desorption of a penetrant (2,5-lutidine) in polyurethane with aprotic (acetonitrile) and protic (methanol) solvents. Chemical interactions between solvent, penetrant, and polymer functional groups are characterized via time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) during single and multicomponent exposures. For both solvents, an increase in the extraction rate of the penetrant is observed when the solvent is applied during desorption. Inspection of the FTIR spectra reveals two potential mechanisms that facilitate the enhanced desorption rate: (1) penetrant/solvent competition for hydrogen donor groups on the polymer backbone and (2) disruption of the self-interaction (cohesive forces) between neighboring polymer chains. Finally, the aprotic solvent is found to generate an order of magnitude greater desorption rate of the penetrant, which is attributed to a greater disruption of the self-interaction during penetrant desorption compared to the protic solvent and the inability of an aprotic solvent to form larger and potentially slower penetrant-solvent complexes.

  2. The characteristics of phosphorus adsorption and desorption in gray desert soil of Xinjiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Sun, J. S.; Liu, H.; Ma, Y. B.

    2017-07-01

    The characteristics of phosphorus (P) adsorption and desorption in Xinjiang gray desert soil (0 - 200 mm) of China in the long-term fertilization condition is affected by the level of soil P content which studied through an isothermal adsorption and desorption experiments of P. The results stated that within the experimental concentration range, with the increase of the amount of outer-source phosphorus, P adsorption, desorption and desorption rate increased and adsorption rate decreased gradually in different Olsen-P levels of gray desert soil in Xinjiang, China. Olsen-P content is significantly correlated with the P adsorption saturation (DPS) of gray desert soil. The maximum adsorption capacity (Xm ) of the treatments followed an extremely significant decreasing order of CK>NPK≈NPKM>PK≈NPKS. The maximum buffer capacity (MBC) and adsorption constant (K) of the NPK treatment was much higher than NPKM, NPKS, PK and CK treatments. And, MBC value of CK treatment was extremely higher than NPKS and PK, however, the differences between NPKM and CK, NPKS and PK were not significant. The comparison between NPKM, NPKS, PK and CK treatments showed no significant difference in K value, but these four showed significantly lower than NPK treatments. The value of soil easy desorption P (RDP) of NPKS and NPKM was significantly higher than NPK and PK, and the chemical fertilizer with organic fertilizer was a best way to release the phosphorus for Xinjiang agricultural production, China.

  3. Sorption and desorption of glyphosate in Mollisols and Ultisols soils of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Ortiz, Ana Maria; Okada, Elena; Bedmar, Francisco; Costa, José Luis

    2017-10-01

    In Argentina, glyphosate use has increased exponentially in recent years as a result of the widespread adoption of no-till management combined with genetically modified glyphosate-resistant crops. This massive use of glyphosate has created concern about its potential environmental impact. Sorption-desorption of glyphosate was studied in 3 Argentinean soils with contrasting characteristics. Glyphosate sorption isotherms were modeled using the Freundlich equation to estimate the sorption coefficient (K f ). Glyphosate sorption was high, and the K f varied from 115.6 to 1612 mg 1-1/n L 1/n /kg. Cerro Azul soil had the highest glyphosate sorption capacity as a result of a combination of factors such as higher clay content, cation exchange capacity, total iron, and aluminum oxides, and lower available phosphorus and pH. Desorption isotherms were also modeled using the Freundlich equation. In general, desorption was very low (glyphosate strongly sorbs to the soils and that it is almost an irreversible process. Anguil soil had a significantly higher desorption coefficient (K fd ) than the other soils, associated with its lower clay content and higher pH and phosphorus. Glyphosate high sorption and low desorption to the studied soils may prevent groundwater contamination. However, it may also affect its bioavailability, increasing its persistence and favoring its accumulation in the environment. The results of the present study contribute to the knowledge and characterization of glyphosate retention in different soils. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2587-2592. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  4. The impact of vegetation on sedimentary organic matter composition and PAH desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Elizabeth Guthrie [North Carolina State University, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, 2800 Faucette Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)], E-mail: elizabeth_nichols@ncsu.edu; Gregory, Samuel T.; Musella, Jennifer S. [North Carolina State University, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, 2800 Faucette Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Relationships between sedimentary organic matter (SOM) composition and PAH desorption behavior were determined for vegetated and non-vegetated refinery distillate waste sediments. Sediments were fractionated into size, density, and humin fractions and analyzed for their organic matter content. Bulk sediment and humin fractions differed more in organic matter composition than size/density fractions. Vegetated humin and bulk sediments contained more polar organic carbon, black carbon, and modern (plant) carbon than non-vegetated sediment fractions. Desorption kinetics of phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene, and C{sub 3}-phenanthrene/anthracenes from humin and bulk sediments were investigated using Tenax beads and a two-compartment, first-order kinetic model. PAH desorption from distillate waste sediments appeared to be controlled by the slow desorbing fractions of sediment; rate constants were similar to literature values for k{sub slow} and k{sub veryslow}. After several decades of plant colonization and growth (Phragmites australis), vegetated sediment fractions more extensively desorbed PAHs and had faster desorption kinetics than non-vegetated sediment fractions. - Plants alter sediment organic matter composition and PAH desorption behavior.

  5. Molecular-Scale Description of SPAN80 Desorption from a Squalane-Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L; Pratt, L R; Chaudhari, M I

    2017-12-15

    Extensive all-atom molecular dynamics calculations on the water-squalane interface for nine different loadings with sorbitan monooleate (SPAN80), at T = 300 K, are analyzed for the surface tension equation of state, desorption free-energy profiles as they depend on loading, and to evaluate escape times for adsorbed SPAN80 into the bulk phases. These results suggest that loading only weakly affects accommodation of a SPAN80 molecule by this squalane-water interface. Specifically, the surface tension equation of state is simple through the range of high tension to high loading studied, and the desorption free-energy profiles are weakly dependent on loading here. The perpendicular motion of the centroid of the SPAN80 headgroup ring is well-described by a diffusional model near the minimum of the desorption free-energy profile. Lateral diffusional motion is weakly dependent on loading. Escape times evaluated on the basis of a diffusional model and the desorption free energies are 7 × 10-2 s (into the squalane) and 3 × 102 h (into the water). The latter value is consistent with desorption times of related lab-scale experimental work.

  6. Simultaneous effect of dissolved organic carbon, surfactant, and organic acid on the desorption of pesticides investigated by response surface methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ha Thu; Duong, Hanh Thi; Ta, Thao Thi

    2017-01-01

    Desorption of pesticides (fenobucarb, endosulfan, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)) from soil to aqueous solution with the simultaneous presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and sodium oxalate (Oxa) was investigated in batch test by applying a full...... caused the minimum desorption. This point at conditions of concern for flooding water is high content of organic compounds causing potentially high contamination by desorption, and the remarkably lower desorption at organic matter-free conditions. The suspended organic matter is one of the common...

  7. Optical laser-induced CO desorption from Ru(0001) monitored with a free-electron X-ray laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öberg, H.; Gladh, J.; Dell'Angela, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present density functional theory modeling of time-resolved optical pump/X-ray spectroscopic probe data of CO desorption from Ru(0001). The BEEF van der Waals functional predicts a weakly bound state as a precursor to desorption. The optical pump leads to a near-instantaneous (b100 fs) increase...... energy based on the computed potential of mean force along the desorption path, we find an entropic barrier to desorption (and by time-reversal also to adsorption). This entropic barrier separates the chemisorbed and precursor states, and becomes significant at the elevated temperature of the experiment...

  8. Laser diode thermal desorption mass spectrometry for the analysis of quinolone antibiotic residues in aquacultured seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohne, Jack J; Andersen, Wendy C; Clark, Susan B; Turnipseed, Sherri B; Madson, Mark R

    2012-12-30

    Veterinary drug residue analysis of meat and seafood products is an important part of national regulatory agency food safety programs to ensure that consumers are not exposed to potentially dangerous substances. Complex tissue matrices often require lengthy extraction and analysis procedures to identify improper animal drug treatment. Direct and rapid analysis mass spectrometry techniques have the potential to increase regulatory sample analysis speed by eliminating liquid chromatographic separation. Flumequine, oxolinic acid, and nalidixic acid were extracted from catfish, shrimp, and salmon using acidified acetonitrile. Extracts were concentrated, dried onto metal sample wells, then rapidly desorbed (6 s) with an infrared diode laser for analysis by laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization with tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-MS/MS). Analysis was conducted in selected reaction monitoring mode using piromidic acid as internal standard. Six-point calibration curves for each compound in extracted matrix were linear with r(2) correlation greater than 0.99. The method was validated by analyzing 23 negative samples and 116 fortified samples at concentrations of 10, 20, 50, 100, and 600 ng/g. Average recoveries of fortified samples were greater than 77% with method detection levels ranging from 2 to 7 /g. Three product ion transitions were acquired per analyte to identify each residue. A rapid method for quinolone analysis in fish muscle was developed using LDTD-MS/MS. The total analysis time was less than 30 s per sample; quinolone residues were detected below 10 ng/g and in most cases residue identity was confirmed. This represents the first application of LDTD to tissue extract analysis. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Investigation of Catalytic Effects and Compositional Variations in Desorption Characteristics of LiNH2-nanoMgH2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sesha S. Srinivasan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available LiNH2 and a pre-processed nanoMgH2 with 1:1 and 2:1 molar ratios were mechano-chemically milled in a high-energy planetary ball mill under inert atmosphere, and at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Based on the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA experiments, 2LiNH2-nanoMgH2 demonstrated superior desorption characteristics when compared to the LiNH2-nanoMgH2. The TGA studies also revealed that doping 2LiNH2-nanoMgH2 base material with 2 wt. % nanoNi catalyst enhances the sorption kinetics at lower temperatures. Additional investigation of different catalysts showed improved reaction kinetics (weight percentage of H2 released per minute of the order TiF3 > nanoNi > nanoTi > nanoCo > nanoFe > multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT, and reduction in the on-set decomposition temperatures of the order nanoCo > TiF3 > nanoTi > nanoFe > nanoNi > MWCNT for the base material 2LiNH2-nanoMgH2. Pristine and catalyst-doped 2LiNH2-nanoMgH2 samples were further probed by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopies, thermal programmed desorption and pressure-composition-temperature measurements to better understand the improved performance of the catalyst-doped samples, and the results are discussed.

  10. Adsorption-desorption kinetics and chemical potential of adsorbed and gas-phase particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2001-03-01

    In the literature, one can find two alternative ways of using the chemical potential of adsorbed and gas-phase particles, μa and μg, for describing the adsorption-desorption kinetics. According to the first approach, the desorption rate depends only on μa. The second approach, proposed by Ward et al. in a series of papers published in the Journal of Chemical Physics, predicts that the desorption rate is proportional to exp[(μa-μg)/kBT]. Scrutinizing the formalism used by Ward et al., we show that the latter dependence makes no sense because it contradicts the basic principles of the general theory of activated rate processes.

  11. Gas Desorption Behavior of Graphite Anodes in Lithium Ion Secondary Batteries After Adsorption of Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toshinori; Nobuta, Yuji; Yamauchi, Yuji; Hino, Tomoaki; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Ohzeki, Katsutomo

    When it was soaked, more were desorbed In this study, gas desorption behaviors of graphite anode samples after various surface treatments and electrolyte solvent adsorption properties were investigated. The total amount of desorbed gases for the natural graphite samples increased after soaking in propylene carbonate, and increased even further with Raman R value, suggesting that surface defects act as an effective adsorption site for the electrolyte. These findings indicate that surface treatment such as a coating might be an effective remedy to reduce the amount of desorption gases in natural graphite samples. It was also found that the total amount of gas desorption largely decreased with the coating with polymer resin and subsequent heat treatment at 423 K for 12 hours in a medium of air. It is likely that the dominant gas species present in the natural graphite after the electrolyte soaking are dependent on the binding energy and the molecular structure of the electrolyte solvent.

  12. Competitive Sorption and Desorption of Chlorinated Organic Solvents (DNAPLs) in Engineered Natural Organic Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jixin; Weber, Walter J., Jr.

    2004-03-31

    The effects of artificially accelerated geochemical condensation and maturation of natural organic matter on the sorption and desorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were studied. The sorption and desorption of TCE in the presence and absence of the competing PCE and 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) were also examined. A sphagnum peat comprising geologically young organic matter was artificially ''aged'' using superheated water, thus increasing the aromaticity and the degree of condensation of its associated organic matter. The sorption of all solutes tested were increased remarkably and their respective desorptions reduced, by the aged peat. The sorption capacities and isotherm nonlinearities of the peat for both TCE and PCE were found to increase as treatment temperature increased. In the competitive sorption studies, both PCE and DCB were found to depress TCE sorption, with PCE having greater effects than DCB, presumably because the molecular structure o f the former is more similar to that of TCE.

  13. Desorption of Furfural from Bimetallic Pt-Fe Oxides/Alumina Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lourdes Dimas-Rivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the desorption of furfural, which is a competitive intermediate during the production of biofuel and valuable aromatic compounds, was studied using pure alumina, as well as alumina impregnated with iron and platinum oxides both individually and in combination, using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The bimetallic sample exhibited the lowest desorption percentage for furfural. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM imaging revealed the intimate connection between the iron and platinum oxide species on the alumina support. The mechanism of furfural desorption from the Pt-Fe/Al2O3 0.5%-0.5% sample was determined using physisorbed furfural instead of chemisorbed furfural; this mechanism involved the oxidation of the C=O group on furfural by the catalyst. The oxide nanoparticles on γ-Al2O3 support helped to stabilize the furfural molecule on the surface.

  14. WATER ADSORPTION AND DESORPTION ISOTHERMS ON MILK POWDER: II. WHOLE MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar M. Soteras

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was the determination of adsorption and desorption isotherms of cow whole milk powder. The experiments have been carried out at 15, 25 and 40 ºC, in ranges of moisture and water activity characteristic of normal conditions in which the processes of drying, packaging and storage are developed. By studying the influence of the temperature on the experimental plots, the isosteric adsorption heat was determined. Experimental data were correlated to the referential model of Guggenheim, Anderson and Boer (GAB. For both, adsorption and desorption, a good model fit was observed. The isotherms showed very similar shapes between them and, by comparing adsorption and desorption isotherms, the phenomenon of hysteresis was confirmed.

  15. Adsorption-desorption dynamics of cyprodinil and fludioxonil in vineyard soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M; Torrente, A C; López, E; Soto, B; Simal-Gándara, J

    2005-07-13

    Cyprodinil and fludioxonil are new-generation fungicides that are employed to protect grapevines from botrytis and various rots. In this work, their adsorption and desorption dynamics in eight vineyard soils from Galicia (northwestern Spain) were examined in batch and column experiments. Both fungicides exhibited linear adsorption isotherms, with more ready adsorption (greater Kd) of fludioxonil. Kd values for cyprodinil were significantly correlated with soil organic matter content (r 2= 0.675, p pesticides exhibited adsorption-desorption hysteresis, but desorption was easier and more variable for cyprodinil (12-21%, RSD = 17%) than for fludioxonil (3-5%, RSD = 13%) and appeared to depend on the formation of irreversible bonds in the former case and on poor solubility in the latter. A linear adsorption model involving nonequilibrium conditions and an irreversible adsorption term was found to reproduce transport behavior accurately.

  16. Electron stimulated desorption of anions and cations from condensed allyl glycidyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Y; Balcan, M; Bass, A D; Cloutier, P; Sanche, L

    2010-07-28

    We report measurements of the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anions and cations from thin films of allyl glycidyl ether (AGE), formed by condensation onto multilayer Kr and Pt substrates using a high sensitivity time of flight mass analyser. Measurements were performed as a function of film thickness, incident electron energy (E(i)) and effective incident current. Below incident electron energies of 20 eV the desorption of anions is dominated by the process of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) via several transient negative ions at E(i) between 5.5 and 16.5 eV. Comparisons between measurements for AGE and ethyl oxirane show that the ESD of anions is essentially that of the glycidyl (epoxide) ring, though DEA occurring at the ether, within the linear part of the AGE molecule is also observed. Cation yields are dominated by the desorption of small fragments formed via scission of the same ether bond.

  17. Assessing pesticide leaching and desorption in soils with different agricultural activities from Argentina (Pampa and Patagonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Mariana; Miglioranza, Karina S B; Aizpún, Julia E; Isla, Federico I; Peña, Aránzazu

    2010-09-01

    Pesticide distribution in the soil profile depends on soil and pesticide properties as well as on the composition of irrigation water. Water containing surfactants, acids or solvents, may alter pesticide desorption from soil. The distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in two Argentinean agricultural areas, Pampa and Patagonia, was evaluated. Furthermore, pesticide desorption from aged and freshly spiked soils was performed by the batch technique, using solutions of sodium oxalate and citrate, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), wastewater and surfactants. Patagonian soil showed the highest OCP levels (46.5-38.1 μg g(-1) OC) from 0 to 30 cm depth and the predominance of p,p'-DDE residues reflected an extensive and past use of DDT. Pampean soil with lower levels (0.039-0.07 μg g(-1) OC) was mainly polluted by the currently used insecticide endosulfan. Sodium citrate and oxalate, at levels usually exuded by plant roots, effectively enhanced desorption of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE and α-cypermethrin, while no effects were observed for α-endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate. The non-ionic surfactant Tween 80 behaved similarly to the acids, whereas the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate enhanced desorption of all pesticides. Increased desorption of the hydrophobic pesticides also occurred when DOC from humic acids but not from sewage sludge or wastewater were used. Soil profile distribution of pesticides was in accordance with results from desorption studies. Data suggest pesticide leaching in Pampean and Patagonian soils, with risk of endosulfan to reach groundwater and that some organic components of wastewaters may enhance the solubilisation and leaching of recalcitrant compounds such as p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental design of diffusion and desorption of contaminant in heterogeneous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guannan; Crimi, Michelle; Fowler, Kathleen; Fu, Xiaojing

    2011-01-01

    Storage of contaminants in low permeability media (LPM) presents a great challenge for prediction of remediation effectiveness and efficiency. The reason lies in the contaminants' complex behaviors within heterogeneous media. Both interparticle and intraparticle diffusion contribute to the difficulty of precise site assessment. Sorption of contaminants--especially within LPM--may sequester the contaminants from active treatment, while desorption over a long period of time leads to contaminant release from storage and consequent re-contamination. Research has been conducted toward better understanding of contaminant diffusion and sorption/desorption processes to better predict contaminant response to site treatment. However, most of the research has been carried out within homogeneous media, while real scenarios in environmental problems feature media whose permeability and other characteristics vary significantly over the treatment volume. Further, few efforts have combined the interparticle/intraparticle diffusion and sorption/desorption processes together. This research aims at a feasible experimental design of diffusion and desorption of contaminant in heterogeneous media to address the gaps in previous research. A 2-D experimental system was designed to evaluate interparticle/intraparticle diffusion processes of trichloroethylene (TCE) in heterogeneous media. The 2-D system was modified to include organic matter in media for simulation of sorption/desorption processes. Results of the research will improve the understanding of how these different transport processes act together within heterogeneous media. Results will also allow for the evaluation of the impact of contaminant mass transport from within low permeability media at a potential treatment site and can support the development of mathematical tools/models combining interparticle/intraparticle and sorption/desorption processes. Such a model will promote more accurate site assessment and provide more

  19. Surface coverage effects on the desorption kinetics of selenite from a hydroxyaluminum-montmorillonite complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, U K; Huang, P M

    2010-10-01

    Information on the desorption of metals and metalloids from soils and clays are essential for a better understanding of their mobility, transport, and fate in natural environments. We investigated nitrate-, phosphate-, and citrate-induced desorption kinetics of preadsorbed selenite (presented as Se henceforth) from a hydroxyaluminum-montmorillonite (HyA-Mt) complex at three different surface coverages of 8%, 25%, and 69% of its Langmuir predicted adsorption maximum (262.61 mmole kg(-1)). Generally the mole fraction of preadsorbed Se released after the attainment of desorption equilibrium was significantly higher with increasing surface coverage. Desorption kinetics of Se from the clay was best described by the Elovich model. The Elovich model parameter beta representing the rate of Se desorption increased as the surface coverage increased. Both kinetic data and mole fraction of Se released at desorption equilibrium supported the contention that adsorption bond strength progressively decreases with increasing surface coverage. Both citrate and phosphate remobilized Se at significantly faster rates than nitrate at any surface coverage level. Citrate showed a significantly faster rate of Se release than phosphate only at 8% surface coverage but not at 25% and 69% surface coverages, suggesting that differential ability of these two ligands to influence the kinetics of Se release was also surface coverage dependent. The findings of the present study would help better understand the consequences of different surface coverages on soil colloids by preadsorbed Se as well as the impacts of phosphate fertilization and rhizospheric processes in influencing Se mobility in soil and related environments. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Kinetic and isothermal adsorption-desorption of PAEs on biochars: effect of biomass feedstock, pyrolysis temperature, and mechanism implication of desorption hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Fanqi; Pan, Minjun; Chen, Jiawei

    2018-02-09

    Biochar has the potential to sequester biomass carbon efficiently into land, simultaneously while improving soil fertility and crop production. Biochar has also attracted attention as a potential sorbent for good performance on adsorption and immobilization of many organic pollutants such as phthalic acid esters (PAEs), a typical plasticizer in plastic and presenting a current environmental issue. Due to lack of investigation on the kinetic and thermodynamic adsorption-desorption of PAEs on biochar, we systematically assessed adsorption-desorption for two typical PAEs, dimethyl phthalate (DMP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP), using biochar derived from peanut hull and wheat straw at different pyrolysis temperatures (450, 550, and 650 °C). The aromaticity and specific surface area of biochars increased with the pyrolysis temperature, whereas the total amount of surface functional groups decreased. The quasi-second-order kinetic model could better describe the adsorption of DMP/DEP, and the adsorption capacity of wheat straw biochars was higher than that of peanut hull biochars, owing to the O-bearing functional groups of organic matter on exposed minerals within the biochars. The thermodynamic analysis showed that DMP/DEP adsorption on biochar is physically spontaneous and endothermic. The isothermal desorption and thermodynamic index of irreversibility indicated that DMP/DEP is stably adsorbed. Sorption of PAEs on biochar and the mechanism of desorption hysteresis provide insights relevant not only to the mitigation of plasticizer mobility but also to inform on the effect of biochar amendment on geochemical behavior of organic pollutants in the water and soil.

  1. Recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Qian; Liang, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have attracted great interest over past decades owing to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, and biological compatibility. In this article, we review recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS). Various types of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon nanodots, nanodiamond, nanofibers, nanohorns, and their derivative forms, are involved. The applications of these materials as new matrices or probes in matrix-assisted or surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI or SELDI MS) are discussed. Finally, we summarize current challenges and give our perspectives on the future of applications of carbon nanomaterials in LDI MS.

  2. Dynamic Moisture Sorption and Desorption in Fumed Silica-filled Silicone Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautschold, Olivia Carol [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-02

    Characterizing dynamic moisture sorption and desorption in fumed silica-filled silicone foam is necessary for determining material compatibilities and life predictions, particularly in sealed environments that may be exposed to a range of environmental conditions. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) were performed on S5470 fumed silica-filled silicone foam to determine the weight percent of moisture at saturation. Additionally, TGA was used to determine the time, temperature, and relative humidity levels required for sorption and desorption of physisorbed moisture in S5470.

  3. Kinetics of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline adsorption and desorption on two acid soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to quantify retention/release of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline on two soils, paying attention to sorption kinetics and to implications of the adsorption/desorption processes on transfer of these pollutants to the various environmental compartments....... We used the stirred flow chamber (SFC) procedure to achieve this goal. All three antibiotics showed high affinity for both soils, with greater adsorption intensity for soil 1, the one with the highest organic matter and Al and Fe oxides contents. Desorption was always ... on soils and other media, thus increasing knowledge on the behavior and evolution of these pharmaceutical residues in the environment....

  4. Frontal analysis for characterizing the adsorption-desorption behavior of beta-lactoglobulin on immunoadsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerta, Angel; Vidal-Madjar, Claire; Jaulmes, Alain; Diez-Masa, Jose-Carlos; de Frutos, Mercedes

    2006-06-30

    High-performance frontal affinity chromatography was employed to study the adsorption-desorption kinetics characterizing the retention of beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) onto polyclonal anti-beta-lactoglobulin (anti-beta-LG) chromatographic supports. The adsorption and desorption processes were studied by analyzing two different elution fronts separated by a relatively long rinsing step. The method consists in performing two successive frontal injections of the protein. In between, the column was rinsed with a given volume of mobile phase (buffer alone). During this rinsing stage, a partial desorption may occur and a novel amount of protein could be adsorbed in the second frontal injection step. The whole process (first adsorption, possible desorption, and second adsorption) was simulated by a numerical procedure, in which the column was divided into a large number of slices. A model based on bi-Langmuir type kinetics was used to describe the adsorption of the protein on the support. The model assumes a non-uniform adsorbent with two types of binding sites. At equilibrium the adsorption isotherm is of the bi-Langmuir type. A global adsorption effect was considered which includes the effective binding process and the mass transfer resistances due to the transport to the binding site. Therefore, the column capacity and the kinetic parameters of the model (apparent adsorption and desorption rate constants) were determined from the best fit of the first and second adsorption fronts to the experimental ones. The other parameters of the model are the saturation capacities for the adsorption on each type of sites. The equilibrium affinity constants were estimated in a single experiment from the ratio of the apparent adsorption and desorption rate constants. The high values found (around 10(8) M(-1)) reveal a strong interaction of beta-LG with the immunoadsorbent. Kinetic measurements were carried out at different flow rates. Both the apparent adsorption and desorption

  5. Comparing the desorption and biodegradation of low concentrations of phenanthrene sorbed to activated carbon, biochar and compost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchal, Geoffrey; Smith, Kilian E.C.; Rein, Arno

    2013-01-01

    can be degraded at all, the desorption and biodegradation of low concentrations of 14C-labelled phenanthrene (⩽5μgL−1) freshly sorbed to suspensions of the pure soil amendments activated carbon (AC), biochar (charcoal) and compost were compared. Firstly, the maximum abiotic desorption of phenanthrene...

  6. Retention of Nickel in Soils: Sorption-Desorption and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption and desorption of heavy metals in soils are primary factors that influence their bioavailability and mobility in the soil profile. To examine the characteristics of nickel (Ni) adsorption-desorption in soils, kinetic batch experiments were carried out followed by Ni re...

  7. The interaction of hyperthermal argon atoms with CO-covered Ru: Scattering and collision-induced desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ueta, H.; Gleeson, M. A.; Kleyn, A. W.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperthermal Ar atoms were scattered under grazing incidence (theta(i) = 60 degrees) from a CO-saturated Ru(0001) surface held at 180 K. Collision-induced desorption involving the ejection of fast CO (similar to 1 eV) occurs. The angularly resolved in-plane CO desorption distribution has a peak

  8. Summary of Adsorption/Desorption Experiments for the European Database on Indoor Air Pollution Sources in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Ulla Dorte; Tirkkonen, T.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental data for adsorption/desorption in building materials. Contribution to the European Database on Indoor Air Pollution Sources in buildings.......Experimental data for adsorption/desorption in building materials. Contribution to the European Database on Indoor Air Pollution Sources in buildings....

  9. Oxygen atom-induced D 2 and D 2O desorption on D/Si(1 1 1) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, F.; Khanom, F.; Inanaga, S.; Tsurumaki, H.; Namiki, A.

    2003-12-01

    We studied reaction of oxygen atoms with D-terminated Si(1 1 1) surfaces from a desorption point of view. As the D (1 ML)/Si(1 1 1) surface was exposed to O atoms D 2 and D 2O molecules were found to desorb from the surface. The desorption kinetics of D 2 and D 2O molecules exhibited a feature characterized with a quick rate jump at the very beginning of O exposure, which was followed by a gradual increase with a delayed maximum and then by an exponential decrease. The O-induced D 2 desorption spectra as a function of Ts appeared to be very similar to the H-induced D 2 desorption spectrum from the D/Si(1 1 1) surfaces. Possible mechanisms for the O-induced desorption reactions were discussed.

  10. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of cryogenic surfaces bombarded with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Evans, L; Kollmus, H; Küchler, D; Scrivens, R; Severin, D; Wengenroth, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy-Ion Accelerator LINAC 3, has been used to study the dynamic outgassing of cryogenic surfaces. Two different targets, bare and goldcoated copper, were bombarded under perpendicular impact with 4.2 MeV/u Pb54+ ions. Partial pressure rises of H2, CH4, CO, and CO2 and effective desorption yields were measured at 300, 77, and 6.3 K using single shot and continuous ion bombardment techniques. We find that the heavy-ion-induced desorption yield is temperature dependent and investigate the influence of CO gas cryosorbed at 6.3 K. The gain in desorption yield reduction at cryogenic temperature vanishes after several monolayers of CO are cryosorbed on both targets. In this paper we describe the new cryogenic target assembly, the temperature-dependent pressure rise, desorption yield, and gas adsorption measurements.

  11. Absorption and desorption mass transfer rates in non-reactive systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamborg, Espen S.; Kersten, Sascha R. A.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid phase mass transfer coefficients have been measured in a controlled environment during gas absorption into a liquid and gas desorption from a liquid in a batch operated stirred tank reactor over a wide range of operating conditions. At identical operating conditions, the mass transfer

  12. The importance of environmental factors and matrices in the adsorption, desorption, and toxicity of butyltins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Liping; Xu, Cuihong; Li, Ji

    2017-01-01

    detrimental effects on humans and aquatic organisms. This work provides a critical review of recent studies on the adsorption, desorption, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of BTs that can notably influence the distribution of BTs in the environment. Influence of environmental factors (e.g., pH and salinity...

  13. Effect of the ionic status and drying on radiocesium adsorption and desorption in organic soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigol, A.; Vidal, M.; Rauret, G.

    1999-11-01

    Radiocesium (RCs) interaction in organic soils has been studied using adsorption and desorption experiments, and the effects of the ionic status and drying were evaluated. Four organic soils were used: three peaty podzols containing illite and a peat without illitic materials, RCs solid-liquid distribution coefficients (K{sub D}) were determined for each soil in water and in several solutions containing Ca, K, or a mixture of the two. RCs contamination was performed either with a single equilibration or after a three-step preequilibration. Whereas the ionic strength of the solution controlled RCs adsorption in the peat, the level of monovalent species was the most important factor in RCs adsorption in the peaty podzols. Reversibility of RCs adsorbed in the different conditions was assessed in the moist sample and after drying by single and consecutive extractions with either CaCl{sub 2} or CH{sub 3}COONH{sub 4}. RCs adsorption was totally reversible in the peat regardless of the ionic status and the desorption approach used. For the three peaty podzols, due to the presence of specific sites, adsorption reversibility was dependent on the scenario in which this adsorption was performed and on the cation used in desorption. Finally, although NH{sub 4} is known to desorb RCs specifically adsorbed in the soil, it was shown to induce interlayer collapse, and consecutive extractions with CaCl{sub 2} led to higher desorption yields.

  14. Description of the phosphorus sorption and desorption processes in lowland peaty clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoumans, O.F.

    2013-01-01

    To determine phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land to surface water, information is needed about the behavior of P in soils. In this study, the sorption and desorption characteristics of lowland peaty clay soils are described based on experimental laboratory studies. The maximum P sorption

  15. Characterisation of bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van

    2000-01-01

    Chemical analysis for the characterisation of micro-organisms is rapidly evolving, after the recent advent of new ionisation methods in mass spectrometry (MS): electrospray (ES) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI). These methods allow quick characterisation of micro-organisms,

  16. Desorption of cryogenic layers of the solid hydrogens by electron bombardment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Tratnik, Herbert; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    For solid hydrogenic films in the thickness range from similar to 50 ML to similar to 500 ML the desorption yield falls off inversely proportional to the thickness for both H-2 and D-2 films. This behavior is common for data obtained at CERN for solid H-2 and at Riso National Laboratory for solid...

  17. Desorption isotherms, drying characteristics and qualities of glace tropical fruits undergoing forced convection solar drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamradloedluk, Jindaporn; Wiriyaumpaiwong, Songchai [Mahasarakham Univ. Khamriang, Kantarawichai, Mahasarakham (Thailand)

    2008-07-01

    Solar energy, a form of sustainable energy, has a great potential for a wide variety of applications because it is abundant and accessible, especially for countries located in the tropical region. Drying process is one of the prominent techniques for utilization of solar energy. This research work proposes a forced convection solar drying of osmotically pretreated fruits viz. mango, guava, and pineapple. The fruit cubes with a dimension of 1cm x 1cm x 1cm were immersed in 35% w./w. sucrose solution prior to the drying process. Drying kinetics, color and hardness of the final products obtained from solar drying were investigated and compared with those obtained from open air-sun drying. Desorption isotherms of the osmosed fruits were also examined and five mathematical models were used to fit the desorption curves. Experimental results revealed that solar drying provided higher drying rate than natural sun drying. Color of glace fruit processed by solar drying was more intense, indicated by lower value of lightness and higher value of yellowness, than that processed by sun drying. Hardness of the products dehydrated by both drying methods, however, was not significantly different (p>0.05). Validation of the mathematical models developed showed that the GAB model was most effective for describing desorption isotherms of osmotically pretreated mango and pineapple whereas Peleg's model was most effective for describing desorption isotherms of osmotically pretreated guava. (orig.)

  18. Bioaerosol detection by aerosol TOF-mass spectrometry: Application of matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuijckhuijse, A.L. van; Stowers, M.A.; Kientz, Ch.E.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Scarlett, B.

    2000-01-01

    In previous publications the use of an aerosol time of flight mass spectrometer was reported for the on-line measurements of aerosols (Weiss 1997, Kievit 1995). The apparatus is capable of measuring the size as well as the chemical composition, by the use of Laser Desorption/Ionisation (LDI), of an

  19. Laboratory experiment on coalbed-methane desorption influenced by water injection and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, D.; Feng, Z.; Zhao, Y.

    2011-07-15

    The exploration of coalbed-methane (CBM) has significantly increased in the last decade, its exploitation is now widely spread. CBM exploitation technologies involve high-pressure water, which reduces the CBM-desorption capacity resulting in a low efficiency. This study has been conducted to examine the CBM desorption and output after water injection and temperature increase. They developed a new experimental system to simulate water-injection in ideal conditions and study the behaviour of water and methane in a coalbed. These experiments revealed that, at constant temperature, water injection pressure controls the CBM-desorption capacity; and that this capacity is highly increased when the temperature is increased. These results show that a higher temperature would increase the efficiency of CBM exploitation, thus producers are likely to use heating in future CBM technologies. Some advances were made in the knowledge of water pressure and temperature effects on desorption behaviour but further research has to be carried to fully define these effects.

  20. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on variou...

  1. Glyphosate sorption/desorption on biochars – Interactions of physical and chemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Biochar, a carbon-rich product of biomass pyrolysis, could limit glyphosate transport in soil and remediate contaminated water. The present study investigates the sorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on biochars prepared from different hardwoods at temperatures ranging from 350°C t...

  2. Experimental factors controlling analyte ion generation in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry on porous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, R A; Li, X; Bohn, P W; Sweedler, J V

    2001-08-01

    Desorption/ionization on porous silicon (DIOS) is a relatively new laser desorption/ionization technique for the direct mass spectrometric analysis of a wide variety of samples without the requirement of a matrix. Porous silicon substrates were fabricated using the recently developed nonelectrochemical H2O2-metal-HF etching as a versatile platform for investigating the effects of morphology and physical properties of porous silicon on DIOS-MS performance. In addition, laser wavelength, mode of ion detection, pH, and solvent contributions to the desorption/ionization process were studied. Other porous substrates such as GaAs and GaN, with similar surface characteristics but differing in thermal and optical properties from porous silicon, allowed the roles of surface area, optical absorption, and thermal conductivities in the desorption/ionization process to be investigated. Among the porous semiconductors studied, only porous silicon has the combination of large surface area, optical absorption, and thermal conductivity required for efficient analyte ion generation under the conditions studied. In addition to these substrate-related factors, surface wetting, determined by the interaction of deposition solvent with the surface, and charge state of the peptide were found to be important in determining ion generation efficiency.

  3. Effect of biochar amendment on tylosin adsorption-desorption and transport in two different soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Yoon Jeong; Jim J. Wang; Syam K. Dodla; Thomas L. Eberhardt; Les Groom

    2012-01-01

    The role of biochar as a soil amendment on the adsorption¨C desorption and transport of tylosin, a macrolide class of veterinary antibiotic, is little known. In this study, batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics and transport of tylosin in forest and agricultural corn field soils amended with hardwood and softwood biochars....

  4. Distinguishing boron desorption from mineral dissolution in arid-zone soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boron release from six arid-zone soils from the San Joaquin Valley of California was investigated as a function of reaction time, solution pH, and suspension density. A multiple batch extraction experiment was carried out for 362 days to distinguish B desorption from mineral dissolution. Amounts o...

  5. Enhanced desorption of Cs from clays by a polymeric cation-exchange agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Woo, E-mail: park85@gmail.com [Decontamination & Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo Hyun [Decontamination & Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung [Decontamination & Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kune-Woo, E-mail: nkwlee@kaeri.re.kr [Decontamination & Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • A cationic polyelectrolyte has excellent ability to desorb Cs bound strongly to clay. • The polycation desorbed significantly more Cs from the clay than did single cations. • Additional NH{sub 4}{sup +} treatment following the polycation treatment enhanced desorption of Cs. • The reaction yielded efficient desorption (95%) of an extremely low concentration of Cs-137 in the clay. - Abstract: We report on a new approach to increase the removal of cesium from contaminated clays based on the intercalation of a cationic polyelectrolyte into the clay interlayers. A highly charged cationic polyelectrolyte, polyethyleneimine (PEI), was shown to intercalate into the negatively charged interlayers and readily replaced Cs ions adsorbed on the interlayers of montmorillonite. The polycation desorbed significantly more Cs strongly bound to the clay than did single cations. Moreover, additional NH{sub 4}{sup +} treatment following the PEI treatment enhanced desorption of Cs ions that were less accessible by the bulky polyelectrolyte. This synergistic effect of PEI with NH{sub 4}{sup +} yielded efficient desorption (95%) of an extremely low concentration of radioactive {sup 137}Cs in the clay, which is very difficult to remove by simple cation-exchange methods due to the increased stability of the binding of Cs to the clay at low Cs concentrations.

  6. Desorption of H atoms from graphite (0001) using XUV free electron laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemer, B.; Olsen, Thomas; Hoger, T.

    2010-01-01

    , and identifies the highest vibrational state in the adsorbate potential as a major source for the slow atoms. It is evident that multiple electron scattering processes are required for this desorption. A direct electronic excitation of a repulsive hydrogen-carbon bond seems not to be important....

  7. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the analysis of chemical food contaminants in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.W.F.; Hooijerink, H.; Zomer, P.; Mol, J.G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction, desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) has been mainly applied in pharmaceutical and forensic analysis. We expect that DESI will find its way in many different fields, including food analysis. In this review, we summarize DESI developments aimed at

  8. Role of organic matter on boron adsorption-desorption hysteresis of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study we evaluated the boron (B) adsorption/desorption reaction in six soils and examined the extent to which organic matter content, as well as incubation time affected B release. Six soils varying in initial pH, clay content, and were selected for the study. Adsorption experiments were c...

  9. Influence of soil properties and test conditions on sorption and desorption of testosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, batch sorption and desorption experiments were conducted for testosterone using four agricultural soils and five clay minerals. Significant differences in sorption behavior were observed between abiotic and biotic systems. The Freundlich sorption coefficient Kf (µg per g)/(µg per mL) ...

  10. Adsorption and desorption of phosphate on limestone in experiments simulating seawater intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The absorption and desorption of phosphorus on a large block of limestone was investigated using deionized water (DIW) and seawater. The limestone had a high affinity to adsorb phosphorus in DIW. Phosphate adsorption was significantly less in seawater, and more phosphorus was desorbed in the seawate...

  11. Thermal desorption of methanol in hot cores. Study with a quartz crystal microbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Ramón; Satorre, Miguel Ángel; Domingo, Manuel; Millán, Carlos; Luna-Ferrándiz, Ramón; Gisbert, Georgina; Santonja, Carmina

    2018-01-01

    The desorption process of methanol in the hot cores of massive young stars is addressed in this work. The study of pure methanol ice and when it is mixed or layered with water allows a better understanding of the physical and chemical processes which could have occurred during the formation of methanol and it is possible to infer the range of temperatures within which methanol can be found in the gas phase in these scenarios. The goal of this study was to model the desorption process of methanol as pure ice and mixed or layered with water under the conditions present in the early stages of hot cores whichcharacterize young star formation. The simulations of desorption of methanol, when it stands alone, performed in this work were compared to the values obtained by other authors to validate the method presented. In this work, the desorption of a water:methanol mixture under astrophysical conditions is also simulated. The theoretical results obtained for layered mixtures match with the temperatures at which an increase of the presence of methanol in the gas phase is detected when young massive mass stars are observed. This study has been performed using the frequency variation of a quartz crystal microbalance which provides a direct measure of the desorbing molecules during the experiments. This process was modelled using the Polanyi-Wigner equation and applied to astrophysical scenarios.

  12. The desorption of ammonia and carbon dioxide from multicomponent solutions: I. Model description and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jotanović Milovan B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of the desorption process based on the synthesised technological topology of the regeneration process gas components NH3 and CO2, was developed. The logical principle methodology of the mathematical modelling of desorption processes was worked out in detail. The mathematical model of the process, including the following: - The synthesized technological scheme of the desorption of components NH3 and CO2, with all the necessary requirements and limitations of the mathematical model; - The relevant multicomponent systems which exist in the process were defined in which the interphase transformation occurs; - The considered units (aparatus are defined which make up the basic technological topology of the process; - Desorption processes in towers with different types of trays were defined and mathematically described; - The cooling process and condensation of gas phase in a complex multicomponent system was of the gas phase in a complex multicomponent system was defined and mathematically described. Many variants of the process were analyzed by using developed model with the aim of determining the relevant functional dependences between some basic parameters of the process. They will be published in the second part of this study.

  13. Laser Infrared Desorption Spectroscopy to Detect Complex Organic Molecules on Icy Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollit, Luke S.; Beegle, Luther W.

    2008-01-01

    Laser Desorption-Infrared Spectroscopy (LD-IR) uses an IR laser pulse to desorb surface materials while a spectrometer measures the emission spectrum of the desorbed materials (Figure 1). In this example, laser desorption operates by having the incident laser energy absorbed by near surface material (10 microns in depth). This desorption produces a plume that exists in an excited state at elevated temperatures. A natural analog for this phenomenon can be observed when comets approach the sun and become active and individual molecular emission spectra can be observed in the IR [1,2,3,4,5]. When this occurs in comets, the same species that initially emit radiation down to the ground state are free to absorb it, reducing the amount of detectable emission features. The nature of our technique results in absorption not occurring, because the laser pulse could easily be moved away form the initial desorption plume, and still have better spatial resolution then reflectance spectroscopy. In reflectance spectroscopy, trace components have a relatively weak signal when compared to the entire active nature of the surface. With LDIR, the emission spectrum is used to identify and analyze surface materials.

  14. Kinetic modeling of metal ion transport for desorption of Pb(II) ion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics of desorption of lead (II) ion from metal loaded adsorbent of mercaptoacetic acid modified and unmodified oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) fruit fiber was studied using different solutions, at different contact times. At the end of 25 minutes, 79.19%, 75.99%, 57.14%, 50.56% and 32.72% of Pb2+ were desorbed using ...

  15. Adsorption, desorption and isotopic exchange of cadmium on illite: evidence for complete reversibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comans, R.N.J.

    1987-01-01

    Adsorption, desorption and isotopic exchange of Cd on illite clay have been studied at low Cd concentrations and low ionic strength. The results indicate that under the conditions of the experiments Cd sorption on illite is completely reversible. Long equilibration times (7–8 weeks) were shown to be

  16. Desorption, partitioning, and dechlorination characteristics of PCBs in sediments in interaction with reactive activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeok, E-mail: hchoi@uta.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Texas at Arlington, 416 Yates Street, Arlington, TX 76019-0308 (United States); Environmental and Earth Sciences Program, The University of Texas at Arlington, 500 Yates Street, Arlington, TX 76019-0049 (United States); Lawal, Wasiu [Environmental and Earth Sciences Program, The University of Texas at Arlington, 500 Yates Street, Arlington, TX 76019-0049 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R. [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • Problematic aged real PCBs-contaminated sediment (WHS) was examined. • Performance of reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with Pd–ZVI was tested. • Fate and transport of PCBs bound to WHS in the presence of RAC was fully traced. • Direct mixing configuration was compared with compartment configuration. • Results reflected real world complexities associated with slow desorption of PCBs. - Abstract: Sediment (WHS) in Waukegan Harbor, Illinois, heavily contaminated and aged with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was treated with reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles. Lab test proceeded in a direct mixing configuration of RAC and WHS. A compartment configuration, where RAC was physically separated from WHS, was also designed to trace the sequential transport and fate of PCBs, including desorption, adsorption, dechlorination, and re-partitioning. PCBs, once desorbed from WHS, were immediately sequestrated to RAC and subject to dechlorination. Direct mixing of WHS with RAC was one-order of magnitude more effective for dechlorination than compartment configuration. Compared to their desorption-followed by-adsorption route, direct physical contact of RAC with PCBs bound to WHS exhibited negligible contribution to the availability of PCBs for dechlorination reaction. Addition of RAC even in compartment configuration facilitated PCBs desorption from WHS. However, slow desorption of PCBs limited overall performance, resulting in a five-order of magnitude lower dechlorination yield when compared with treatment of purely aqueous PCBs. The low dechlorination yield reflected real world complexities in treating 3.19% organic carbon-containing WHS aged with PCBs for 40 years. These observations were further supported when compared with results on clean Cesar Creek sediment spiked with 2-chlorinated biphenyls.

  17. Kinetic desorption of fluoride in a granitic soil column: Experiments and reactive transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, S.; Tokunaga, T.

    2016-12-01

    The transport of fluoride or other contaminants in subsurface largely depends on their interaction with mineral surfaces of contact. Hence, the methods to evaluate and predict the extent of these interactions are of great importance. The commonly used distribution coefficient (Kd) model does not account for temporally and spatially variable geochemical conditions (Curtis et al., 2006). This study aims to investigate the reactive transport of fluoride in a natural soil column by laboratory experiments and solute transport modeling by introducing surface complexation of fluoride to the transport simulation. For our purpose, column experiments for fluoride sorption and desorption under saturated conditions were conducted in the laboratory on a granitic soil from Tsukuba, Japan. Stable isotopes of water (δ18O and δ2H) were used as conservative tracers to evaluate the flow and transport properties. Existence of physical and chemical nonequilibrium during fluoride transport was evaluated by applying stop flow events. Long tailing during fluoride desorption was observed, and the linear Kd model failed to explain this phenomenon. Hence, a geochemical model considering fluoride sorption in soil by surface complexation was developed to explain fluoride transport in the column. The intrinsic surface complexation constants for fluoride sorption reactions and surface site protonation and deprotonation reactions were corrected from that of the optimized results from batch experiments based as suggested by Sverjensky (2003). The model with fluoride sorption defined by surface complexation explained the observed fluoride desorption data quite satisfactorily, especially the long tailing. An overshoot in the breakthrough curve observed by the simulation during early period of desorption could be due to competitive desorption, which need to be further analyzed. References: (1) Curtis, JP, Davis, JA, Nafiz, DL 2006. Wat. Res. Res., 42, W04404, doi:10.1029/2005WR003979; (2

  18. Competitive adsorption-desorption reactions of two hazardous heavy metals in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Masoud; Rahnemaie, Rasoul; Homaee, Mehdi

    2015-09-01

    Investigating the interactions of heavy metals is imperative for sustaining environment and human health. Among those, Cd is toxic for organisms at any concentration. While Ni acts as a micronutrient at very low concentration but is hazardous toxic above certain threshold value. In this study, the chemical adsorption and desorption reactions of Ni and Cd in contaminated soils were investigated in both single and binary ion systems. Both Ni and Cd experimental data demonstrated Langmuir type adsorption. In the competitive systems, an antagonistic effect was observed, implying that both ions compete for same type of adsorption sites. Adverse effect of Cd on Ni adsorption was slightly stronger than that of opposite system, consistent with adsorption isotherms in single ion systems. Variation in ionic strength indicated that Ca, a much weaker adsorbate, could also compete with Cd and Ni for adsorption on soil particles. Desorption data indicated that Cd and Ni are adsorbed very tightly such that after four successive desorption steps, less than 0.5 % of initially adsorbed ions released into the soil solution. This implies that Ca, at concentration in equilibrium with calcite mineral, cannot adequately compete with and replace adsorbed Ni and Cd ions. This adsorption behavior was led to considerable hysteresis between adsorption and desorption in both single and binary ion systems. In the binary ion systems, desorption of Cd and Ni was increased by increase in both equilibrium concentration of adsorbed ion and concentration of competitor ion. The overall results obtained in this research indicate that Cd and Ni are strongly adsorbed in calcareous soil and Ca, the major dissolved ion, insignificantly influences metal ions adsorption. Consequently, the contaminated soils by Ni and Cd can simultaneously be remediated by environmentally oriented technologies such as phytoremediation.

  19. Effect of soil type and organic manure on adsorption-desorption of flubendiamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shaon Kumar; Mukherjee, Irani; Kumar, Aman

    2015-07-01

    Laboratory study on adsorption-desorption of flubendiamide was conducted in two soil types, varying in their physical and chemical properties, by batch equilibrium method. After 4 h of equilibrium time, adsorption of flubendiamide on soil matrix exhibited moderately low rate of accumulation with 4.52 ± 0.21% in red soil and low rate with 3.55 ± 0.21% in black soil. After amending soils with organic manure, adsorption percentage increased to 6.42 ± 0.21% in red soil and (4.18 ± 0.21%) in black soil indicating that amendment significantly increased sorption. Variation in sorption affinities of the soils as indicated by distribution coefficient (K d) for sorption was in the range of 2.98-4.32, 4.91-6.64, 1.04-1.45 and 1.92-2.81 ml/g for red soil, organic manure-treated red soil, black soil and organic manure-treated black soil, respectively. Desorption was slightly slower than adsorption indicating a hysteresis effect having hysteresis coefficient ranges between 0.023 and 0.149 in two test soils. The adsorption data for the insecticide fitted well the Freundlich equation. Results revealed that adsorption-desorption was influenced by soil types and showed that the maximum sorption and minimum desorption of the insecticide was observed in soils with higher organic carbon and clay content. It can be inferred that crystal lattice of the clay soil plays a significant role in flubendiamide adsorption and desorption. Adsorption was lower at acidic pH and gradually increased towards alkaline pH. As this insecticide is poorly sorbed in the two Indian soil types, there may be a possibility of their leaching to lower soil profiles.

  20. Sorption and desorption kinetics of cadmium from soils: Influence of phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurti, G.S.R.; Huang, P.M.; Kozak, L.M.

    1999-12-01

    The mobility and availability of heavy metals is controlled by sorption-desorption characteristics of the soils. There is much literature available about the sorption characteristics of heavy metals by soils. However, the influence of ionic environments on the desorption kinetics of heavy metals, particularly Cd, have not been studied in detail. The present study reports the kinetic data of desorption of Cd from two soils, with contrasting Cd availability characteristics, using 1 M NH{sub 4}Cl. The soils were preadsorbed with different amounts of Cd in the presence of monoammonium phosphate. The Cd was sorbed onto the soils almost instantaneously in the absence of phosphate, with >97% of the Cd added to the soils sorbed within the first 15 min of reaction time. The Freundilich parameter a, the sorption coefficient, which is related to the Cd sorption capacity, indicated that the phosphate retarded Cd sorption by both soils by at least one order of magnitude. The overall diffusion coefficient of Cd release from the Luseland soil by 1 M NH{sub 4}Cl, obtained using the parabolic diffusion model for the desorption kinetics, was 1.62 to 10.1 times higher than that of the Judburgh soil, depending on the initial amount of Cd preadsorbed. The lower the amount of initial Cd preadsorbed, the greater the difference in the rate of Cd released between the two soils. The presence of phosphate during Cd adsorption by the soils increased the amount of Cd released in the initial 30-min reaction period as well as the overall diffusion coefficients of Cd release. The kinetic data of Cd desorption reflect well the Cd availability index and grain Cd content of the durum wheat crops, Kyle and Arcola, grown in the two soils.

  1. Design and fabrication of an automated temperature programmed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    *For correspondence. Design and fabrication of an automated temperature programmed reaction system to evaluate 3-way catalysts ... Since the design of the first desorption system by Cvetonovic and Amenomiya,1 .... tored by a software program through PC via RS232 interface. Typical heating rates range from 5°C min–1.

  2. Desorption process of hydrogen starting from the Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} and Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 0.3}; Proceso de desorcion de hidrogeno a partir del hidruro intermetalico Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} y Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 0.3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iturbe G, J.L.; Basurto S, R.; Lopez M, B.E. [Departamento de Quimica, ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    In this work the desorption velocity of H{sub 2} was determined starting from the magnesium nickel hydride once the reaction between the intermetallic and the hydrogen was realized, the compound were analysed by means of a thermogravimetric equipment, the conditions for carrying out the analysis were: 10 C by minute in nitrogen atmosphere at a volume of 50 ml by minute, subsequently the isotherms at different times were programmed and the desorption velocity of hydrogen was determined. The results show that the desorption velocity of hydrogen depends of the temperature, using only the nitrogen flux which acts as a carrier gas. Observing that the hydrogen liberation is carried out by means of two mechanisms according to the isotherms obtained. (Author)

  3. Laser desorption and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Fundamentals .Applications; Desorption laser et spectrometrie de masse par temps de vol. Aspects fondamentaux. Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaurand, P.

    1994-11-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a very powerful technique for the analysis of heavy molecular ions (100 000 u and more). The ejection in the gas phase and the ionization of these molecules is now possible through the MALDI technique (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization). This technique consists in mixing the heavy molecules to be analysed with a organic matrix which absorbs at the wavelength of the laser. The necessary irradiance are of the order of 10{sup 6} W/cm{sup 2}. In these conditions we have shown that the mass resolutions are optimum and that the relative mass accuracies are of the order of 10{sup -4}. We have also demonstrated that the emission angle of the molecular ions in MALDI depends on the incident angle of the laser light. During the desorption process, the molecular ions are emitted in the opposite direction of the incident laser light. This effect is particularly important for the design of the accelerating stage of the time-of-flight spectrometers. Problems relative to the detection of these heavy molecular ions have been studied in details between 0.5 10{sup 4} m/s and 10{sup 5} m/s. The velocity threshold of the electronic emission is lower than the value of 0.5 10{sup 4} m/s. The relation between the electronic emission and the projectile velocity is complex. Finally, examples on mass identification of C{sub 60} molecules and derivated C{sub 60} are presented. Desorption methods are compared. (author). 32 refs., 34 figs.

  4. A solvent evaporation route towards fabrication of hierarchically porous ZSM-11 with highly accessible mesopores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Wen; Liu, Zhiting; Liu, Liping

    2015-01-01

    from hierarchical ZSM-11 have been conducted to characterize the textural properties of the material. Ammonia temperature-programmed-desorption (NH3-TPD) measurements and infrared spectra using probe molecules such as pyridine (Py-IR) and 2,4,6-collidine (Coll-IR) have been collected to investigate...... in 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene cracking activity and benzene selectivity with respect to a conventional counterpart....

  5. Self Blocking of CO Dissociation on a Stepped Ruthenium Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelbo, Søren Bastholm; Johansson, Martin; Mowbray, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    The influence of steps on CO reactions has been studied on a Ru(0 1 (1) over bar 5 4) single crystal with a step density of 4%. Based on temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and oxygen titration experiments as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that the CO dissociation...... from experiments is in the range 1.3-1.5 eV, while the theoretical barrier for dissociation at low coverage is about 1.4 eV....

  6. Theoretical study of simultaneous water and VOCs adsorption and desorption in a silica gel rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, G.; Zhang, Y.F.; Fang, Lei

    2008-01-01

    One-dimensional partial differential equations were used to model the simultaneous water and VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) adsorption and desorption in a silica gel rotor which was recommended for indoor air cleaning. The interaction among VOCs and moisture in the adsorption and desorption...... process was neglected in the model as the concentrations of VOC pollutants in typical indoor environment were much lower than that of moisture and the adsorbed VOCs occupied only a minor portion of adsorption capacity of the rotor. Consequently VOC transfer was coupled with heat and moisture transfer only...... by the temperatures of the rotor and the air stream. The VOC transfer equations were solved by discretizing them into explicit up-wind finite differential equations. The model was validated with experimental data. The calculated results suggested that the regeneration time designed for dehumidification may...

  7. Hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of UZr sub 0 sub . sub 2 sub 9 alloy

    CERN Document Server

    Shuai Mao Bing; WangZhenHong; Zhang Yi Tao

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of UZr sub 0 sub . sub 2 sub 9 alloy are investigated in detail at hydrogen pressures up to 0.4 MPa and over the temperature range of 300 to 723 K. It absorbs hydrogen up to 2.3 H atoms per F.U. (formula unit) by only one-step reaction and hence each desorption isotherm has a single plateau over nearly the whole hydrogen composition range. The enthalpy and entropy changes of the dissociation reaction are of -78.9 kJ centre dot mol sup - sup 1 H sub 2 and 205.3 J centre dot(K centre dot mol H sub 2) sup - sup 1 , respectively. The alloy shows high durability against powdering upon hydrogenation and may have good heat conductivity. It is predicted that UZr sub 0 sub . sub 2 sub 9 alloy may be a suitable material for tritium treatment and storage

  8. Enhanced desorption of Cs from clays by a polymeric cation-exchange agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Bo Hyun; Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Lee, Kune-Woo

    2017-04-05

    We report on a new approach to increase the removal of cesium from contaminated clays based on the intercalation of a cationic polyelectrolyte into the clay interlayers. A highly charged cationic polyelectrolyte, polyethyleneimine (PEI), was shown to intercalate into the negatively charged interlayers and readily replaced Cs ions adsorbed on the interlayers of montmorillonite. The polycation desorbed significantly more Cs strongly bound to the clay than did single cations. Moreover, additional NH 4 + treatment following the PEI treatment enhanced desorption of Cs ions that were less accessible by the bulky polyelectrolyte. This synergistic effect of PEI with NH 4 + yielded efficient desorption (95%) of an extremely low concentration of radioactive 137 Cs in the clay, which is very difficult to remove by simple cation-exchange methods due to the increased stability of the binding of Cs to the clay at low Cs concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electron Stimulated Molecular Desorption of a NEG St 707 at Room Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Le Pimpec, F; Laurent, Jean Michel

    2001-01-01

    Electron stimulated molecular desorption (ESD) from a NEG St 707 (SAES GettersTM) sample after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide2,13C18O, has been studied on a laboratory setup. Measurements were performed using an electron beam of 300 eV kinetic energy, with an average electron intensity of 1.6 1015 electrons s-1. The electrons were impinging on the 15 cm2 target surface at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields h (molecules/electron) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide) for a fully activated NEG as well as for a NEG fully saturated with 13C18O are lower than for OFHC copper baked at 120oC. A small fraction only of the gas which is required to saturate the getter surface can be re-desorbed and thus appears to be accessible to ESD.

  10. The influences of separators on capacitive deionization systems in the cycle of adsorption and desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qihan; Shi, Zhou; Liu, Qingqing; Gu, Zhengyang; Ning, Ruihuan

    2017-11-17

    This research focused on the influence of different separator compartments on the performance of capacitive deionization (CDI) cells in terms of brackish water treatment. For comparison, different separators including filter paper(FP), carbon nanotube (CNT), and stainless steel fiber (SSF) on deionization and desorption rate of salt were examined. The best performance was obtained when the CNT separator was packed, followed by SSF and FP. Reducing the cell voltage from 1.2 to 0.4 V decreased the salt removal and electrode regeneration rate of SSF-CDI. Electrochemical impedance spectrometry (EIS) analysis revealed that the resistance and specific capacitance of separator materials are essential to the desalination and desorption performance of CDI. The electric double layers (EDLs) accelerated the ion transfer in the flow chamber due to storing excess ions, therefore increasing the desalination and electrode regeneration rate.

  11. Effect of Titanium Doping of Al(111) Surfaces on Alane Formation Mobility, and Desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra I. S.; Graetz J.; Chaudhuri, S.; Veyan, J.-F.; Chabal, Y. J.

    2011-07-05

    Alanes are critical intermediates in hydrogen storage reactions for mass transport during the formation of complex metal hydrides. Titanium has been shown to promote hydrogen desorption and hydrogenation, but its role as a catalyst is not clear. Combining surface infrared (IR) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT), the role of Ti is explored during the interaction of atomic hydrogen with Ti-doped Al(111) surfaces. Titanium is found to reduce the formation of large alanes, due to a decrease of hydrogen mobility and to trapping of small alanes on Ti sites, thus hindering oligomerization. For high doping levels ({approx}0.27 ML Ti) on Al(111), only chemisorbed AlH{sub 3} is observed on Ti sites, with no evidence for large alanes. Titanium also dramatically lowers the desorption temperature of large alanes from 290 to 190 K, due to a more restricted translational motion of these alanes.

  12. Sticking and desorption of hydrogen on graphite: A comparative study of different models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Bruno; Lemoine, Didier; Medina, Zuleika; Jackson, Bret

    2011-03-01

    We study the physisorption of atomic hydrogen on graphitic surfaces with four different quantum mechanical methods: perturbation and effective Hamiltonian theories, close coupling wavepacket, and reduced density matrix propagation methods. Corrugation is included in the modeling of the surface. Sticking is a fast process which is well described by all methods. Sticking probabilities are of the order of a few percent in the collision energy range 0-25 meV, but are enhanced for collision energies close to those of diffraction resonances. Sticking also increases with surface temperature. Desorption is a slow process which involves multiphonon processes. We show, however, how to correct the close coupling wavepacket method to account for such phenomena and obtain correct time constants for initial state decay. Desorption time constants are in the range of 20-50 ps for a surface temperature of 300 K.

  13. Simultaneous adsorption/desorption of quaternary ammonium herbicides by acid vineyard soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde Cid, Manuel; Paradelo Núñez, Remigio; Fernández Calviño, David; Nóvoa Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias Estévez, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Competitive adsorption and desorption of three quaternary ammonium herbicides (paraquat, diquat, and difenzoquat) have been studied in four sandy-loam acid vineyard soils from NW Spain and Portugal. The soils present organic matter contents between 3 and 48 g kg-1 and copper contents ranging from 25 to 107 mg kg-1. Adsorption has been studied under equilibrium conditions in batch experiments, and kinetics were studied in a stirred-flow chamber. Adsorption and desorption followed a Freundlich model and kinetics were well described by the pseudo-first-order model. The retention capacity for the pesticides by the four soils followed the sequence: paraquat > diquat > difenzoquat. The different adsorption capacities of each soil were not related to pH, clay or organic matter contents, as could be expected, but rather to soil copper content. The results show that competition with copper for adsorption sites is an important factor in quaternary ammonium herbicides retention in soils with these characteristics.

  14. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Chongxuan; Hu, Bill X.; Zhang, Guannan

    2014-01-01

    Multi-rate surface complexation models have been proposed to describe the kinetics of uranyl (U(VI) surface complexation reactions (SCR) rate-limited by diffusive mass transfer to and from intragranular sorption sites in subsurface sediments. In this study, a Bayesian-based, Differential Evolution Markov Chain method was used to assess the uncertainty and to identify factors controlling the uncertainties of the multi-rate SCR model. The rate constants in the multi-rate SCR were estimated with and without assumption of a specified lognormal distribution to test the lognormal assumption typically used to minimize the number of the rate constants in the multi-rate model. U(VI) desorption under variable chemical conditions from a contaminated sediment at US Hanford 300 Area, Washington was used as an example. The results indicated that the estimated rate constants without a specified lognormal assumption approximately followed a lognormal distribution, indicating that the lognormal is an effective assumption for the rate constants in the multi-rate SCR model. However, those rate constants with their corresponding half-lives longer than the experimental durations for model characterization had larger uncertainties and could not be reliably estimated. The uncertainty analysis revealed that the time-scale of the experiments for calibrating the multi-rate SCR model, the assumption for the rate constant distribution, the geochemical conditions involved in predicting U(VI) desorption, and equilibrium U(VI) speciation reaction constants were the major factors contributing to the extrapolation uncertainties of the multi-rate SCR model. Overall, the results from this study demonstrated that the multi-rate SCR model with a lognormal distribution of its rate constants is an effective approach for describing rate-limited U(VI) desorption; however, the model contains uncertainties, especially for those smaller rate constants, that require careful consideration for predicting U

  15. Moisture sorption–desorption characteristics and the corresponding thermodynamic properties of carvedilol phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikiran Allada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Carvedilol phosphate (CDP is a nonselective beta-blocker used for the treatment of heart failures and hypertension. In this work, moisture sorption–desorption characteristics and thermodynamic properties of CDP have been investigated. Materials and Methods: The isotherms were determined using dynamic vapor sorption analyzer at different humidity conditions (0%–90% relative humidity and three pharmaceutically relevant temperatures (20°C, 30°C, and 40°C. The experimental sorption data determined were fitted to various models, namely, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller; Guggenheim-Anderson-De Boer (GAB; Peleg; and modified GAB. Isosteric heats of sorption were evaluated through the direct use of sorption isotherms by means of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Statistical Analysis Used: The sorption model parameters were determined from the experimental sorption data using nonlinear regression analysis, and mean relative percentage deviation (P, correlation (Correl, root mean square error, and model efficiency were considered as the criteria to select the best fit model. Results: The sorption–desorption isotherms have sigmoidal shape – confirming to Type II isotherms. Based on the statistical data analysis, modified GAB model was found to be more adequate to explain sorption characteristics of CDP. It is noted that the rate of adsorption and desorption is specific to the temperature at which it was being studied. It is observed that isosteric heat of sorption decreased with increasing equilibrium moisture content. Conclusions: The calculation of the thermodynamic properties was further used to draw an understanding of the properties of water and energy requirements associated with the sorption behavior. The sorption–desorption data and the set of equations are useful in the simulation of processing, handling, and storage of CDP and further behavior during manufacture and storage of CDP formulations.

  16. A Filtering Method to Reveal Crystalline Patterns from Atom Probe Microscopy Desorption Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-26

    reveal crystalline patterns from atom probe microscopy desorption maps Lan Yao Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann...reveal the crystallographic information present in Atom Probe Microscopy (APM) data is presented. Themethod filters atoms based on the time difference...between their evaporation and the evaporation of the previous atom . Since this time difference correlates with the location and the local structure of

  17. The Sorption/Desorption Behavior of Uranium in Transport Studies Using Yucca Mountain Alluvium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scism, Cynthia D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is the proposed site of a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. In the event repository engineered barriers fail, the saturated alluvium located south of Yucca Mountain is expected to serve as a natural barrier to the migration of radionuclides to the accessible environment. The purpose of this study is to improve the characterization of uranium retardation in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain to support refinement of an assessment model. The distribution of uranium desorption rates from alluvium obtained from Nye County bore holes EWDP-19IM1, EWDP-10SA, EWDP-22SA were studied to address inconsistencies between results from batch sorption and column transport experiments. The alluvium and groundwater were characterized to better understand the underlying mechanisms of the observed behavior. Desorption rate constants were obtained using an activity based mass balance equation and column desorption experiments were analyzed using a mathematical model utilizing multiple sorption sites with different first-order forward and reverse reaction rates. The uranium desorption rate constants decreased over time, suggesting that the alluvium has multiple types of active sorption sites with different affinities for uranium. While a significant fraction of the initially sorbed uranium desorbed from the alluvium quite rapidly, a roughly equivalent amount remained sorbed after several months of testing. The information obtained through this research suggests that uranium may experience greater effective retardation in the alluvium than simple batch sorption experiments would suggest. Electron Probe Microanalysis shows that uranium is associated with both clay minerals and iron oxides after sorption to alluvial material. These results provide further evidence that the alluvium contains multiple sorption sites for uranium.

  18. Approach for predicting P sorption/desorption behaviour of potentially eroded topsoil in watercourses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borovec, Jakub; Jan, Jiří

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 624, May (2018), s. 1316-1324 ISSN 0048-9697 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04021342; GA MZe QI102A265; GA MŠk(CZ) EF16_013/0001782 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : erosion * Mehlich 3 * sorption/desorption Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2016

  19. Strontium Adsorption and Desorption Reactions in Model Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-04

    One system was maintained with chlorine-disinfected drinking water and the other with the same water with secondary chloramine disinfection. Flow...constant flow conditions. Differences between adsorption and desorption based on disinfection type (chlorine versus chlorine plus chloramine ) cannot be...systems (DWDS). One system was maintained with chlorine-disinfected drinking water and the other with the same water with secondary chloramine

  20. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  1. Adsorption, desorption, and diffusion of k-mers on a one-dimensional lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncarević, I; Budinski-Petković, Lj; Vrhovac, S B; Belić, A

    2009-08-01

    Kinetics of the deposition process of k -mers in the presence of desorption or/and diffusional relaxation of particles is studied by Monte Carlo method on a one-dimensional lattice. For reversible deposition of k-mers, we find that after the initial "jamming," a stretched exponential growth of the coverage theta(t) toward the steady-state value theta(eq) occurs, i.e., theta(eq)-theta(t) is proportional to exp[-(t/tau)(beta)]. The characteristic time scale tau is found to decrease with desorption probability P(des) according to a power law, tau is proportional to P(des)(-gamma), with the same exponent gamma=1.22+/-0.04 for all k-mers. For irreversible deposition with diffusional relaxation, the growth of the coverage theta(t) above the jamming limit to the closest packing limit (CPL) theta(CPL) is described by the pattern theta(CPL)-theta(t) is proportional to E(beta)[-(t/tau)(beta)], where E(beta) denotes the Mittag-Leffler function of order beta(0,1) . Similarly to the reversible case, we found that the dependence of the relaxation time tau on the diffusion probability P(dif) is consistent again with a simple power-law, i.e., tau is proportional to P(dif)(-delta). When adsorption, desorption, and diffusion occur simultaneously, coverage always reaches an equilibrium value theta(eq), which depends only on the desorption/adsorption probability ratio. The presence of diffusion only hastens the approach to the equilibrium state, so that the stretched exponential function gives a very accurate description of the deposition kinetics of these processes in the whole range above the jamming limit.

  2. Sorption and desorption studies of chromium(VI) from nonviable cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V.K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)], E-mail: vinodfcy@iitr.ernet.in; Rastogi, A. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2008-06-15

    This communication presents results pertaining to the sorptive and desorptive studies carried out on chromium(VI) removal onto nonviable freshwater cyanobacterium (Nostoc muscorum) biomass. Influence of varying the conditions for removal of chromium(VI), such as the pH of aqueous solution, the dosage of biosorbent, the contact time with the biosorbent, the temperature for the removal of chromium, the effect of light metal ions and the adsorption-desorption studies were investigated. Sorption interaction of chromium on to cyanobacterial species obeyed both the first and the second-order rate equation and the experimental data showed good fit with both the Langmuir and freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity was 22.92 mg/g at 25 {sup o}C and pH 3.0. The adsorption process was endothermic and the values of thermodynamic parameters of the process were calculated. Various properties of the cyanobacterium, as adsorbent, explored in the characterization part were chemical composition of the adsorbent, surface area calculation by BET method and surface functionality by FTIR. Sorption-desorption of chromium into inorganic solutions and distilled water were observed and this indicated the biosorbent could be regenerated using 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} and EDTA with upto 80% recovery. The biosorbents were reused in five biosorption-desorption cycles without a significant loss in biosorption capacity. Thus, this study demonstrated that the cyanobacterial biomass N. muscorum could be used as an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of chromium(VI) bearing wastewater.

  3. Remote mass spectrometric sampling of electrospray- and desorption electrospray-generated ions using an air ejector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R Brent; Bereman, Michael S; Muddiman, David C; Hawkridge, Adam M

    2007-10-01

    A commercial air ejector was coupled to an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ) to transport remotely generated ions from both electrospray (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. We demonstrate the remote analysis of a series of analyte ions that range from small molecules and polymers to polypeptides using the AE-LTQ interface. The details of the ESI-AE-LTQ and DESI-AE-LTQ experimental configurations are described and preliminary mass spectrometric data are presented.

  4. Moisture Sorption–desorption Characteristics and the Corresponding Thermodynamic Properties of Carvedilol Phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allada, Ravikiran; Maruthapillai, Arthanareeswari; Palanisamy, Kamaraj; Chappa, Praveen

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Carvedilol phosphate (CDP) is a nonselective beta-blocker used for the treatment of heart failures and hypertension. In this work, moisture sorption–desorption characteristics and thermodynamic properties of CDP have been investigated. Materials and Methods: The isotherms were determined using dynamic vapor sorption analyzer at different humidity conditions (0%–90% relative humidity) and three pharmaceutically relevant temperatures (20°C, 30°C, and 40°C). The experimental sorption data determined were fitted to various models, namely, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller; Guggenheim-Anderson-De Boer (GAB); Peleg; and modified GAB. Isosteric heats of sorption were evaluated through the direct use of sorption isotherms by means of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Statistical Analysis Used: The sorption model parameters were determined from the experimental sorption data using nonlinear regression analysis, and mean relative percentage deviation (P), correlation (Correl), root mean square error, and model efficiency were considered as the criteria to select the best fit model. Results: The sorption–desorption isotherms have sigmoidal shape – confirming to Type II isotherms. Based on the statistical data analysis, modified GAB model was found to be more adequate to explain sorption characteristics of CDP. It is noted that the rate of adsorption and desorption is specific to the temperature at which it was being studied. It is observed that isosteric heat of sorption decreased with increasing equilibrium moisture content. Conclusions: The calculation of the thermodynamic properties was further used to draw an understanding of the properties of water and energy requirements associated with the sorption behavior. The sorption–desorption data and the set of equations are useful in the simulation of processing, handling, and storage of CDP and further behavior during manufacture and storage of CDP formulations. PMID:28584488

  5. Moisture Sorption-desorption Characteristics and the Corresponding Thermodynamic Properties of Carvedilol Phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allada, Ravikiran; Maruthapillai, Arthanareeswari; Palanisamy, Kamaraj; Chappa, Praveen

    2017-01-01

    Carvedilol phosphate (CDP) is a nonselective beta-blocker used for the treatment of heart failures and hypertension. In this work, moisture sorption-desorption characteristics and thermodynamic properties of CDP have been investigated. The isotherms were determined using dynamic vapor sorption analyzer at different humidity conditions (0%-90% relative humidity) and three pharmaceutically relevant temperatures (20°C, 30°C, and 40°C). The experimental sorption data determined were fitted to various models, namely, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller; Guggenheim-Anderson-De Boer (GAB); Peleg; and modified GAB. Isosteric heats of sorption were evaluated through the direct use of sorption isotherms by means of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. The sorption model parameters were determined from the experimental sorption data using nonlinear regression analysis, and mean relative percentage deviation (P), correlation (Correl), root mean square error, and model efficiency were considered as the criteria to select the best fit model. The sorption-desorption isotherms have sigmoidal shape - confirming to Type II isotherms. Based on the statistical data analysis, modified GAB model was found to be more adequate to explain sorption characteristics of CDP. It is noted that the rate of adsorption and desorption is specific to the temperature at which it was being studied. It is observed that isosteric heat of sorption decreased with increasing equilibrium moisture content. The calculation of the thermodynamic properties was further used to draw an understanding of the properties of water and energy requirements associated with the sorption behavior. The sorption-desorption data and the set of equations are useful in the simulation of processing, handling, and storage of CDP and further behavior during manufacture and storage of CDP formulations.

  6. Mechanical desorption of immobilized proteins using carbon dioxide aerosols for reusable biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Renu; Hong, Seongkyeol [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jaesung, E-mail: jjang@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Immobilized proteins were removed using carbon dioxide aerosols. • We observed high removal efficiencies due to the aerosol treatment. • We confirmed the removal with FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • This CO{sub 2} aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization. • This technique is a fast and damage-free method to reuse a sensor surface. - Abstract: Reusability of a biosensor has recently received considerable attention, and it is closely related with the effective desorption of probe molecules. We present a novel mechanical desorption technique to reuse biosensors by using periodic jets of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) aerosols (a mixture of solid and gaseous CO{sub 2}), and demonstrate its feasibility by removing physically adsorbed and covalently bonded fluorescent proteins i.e., Escherichia coli fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody and bovine serum albumin (E. coli FITC–Ab and FITC–BSA) from silicon chips. The proteins on the chip surfaces were measured by fluorescent images before and after applying the aerosols. The removal efficiency of the aerosol treatment was measured for various concentrations (1–20 μg mL{sup −1}) of E. coli FITC–Ab and FITC–BSA with two different removal cycles (5 and 11 cycles; each cycle: 8 s). We observed high removal efficiencies (>93.5% for physically adsorbed Ab and >84.6% for covalently bonded Ab) at 11 cycle aerosol treatment. This CO{sub 2} aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization, which was confirmed by the fluorescent images of FITC–Abs for fresh and reused chips. Desorption of the immobilized layers was validated by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses. We also conducted an experiment on the regeneration of E. coli sensing chips using this aerosol treatment, and the chips were re-used 5 times successfully. This mechanical desorption technique is a highly effective and novel strategy for reusable biosensors.

  7. Molecular-scale Description of SPAN80 Desorption from the Squalane-Water Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, L.; Pratt, L. R.; Chaudhari, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive all-atom molecular dynamics calculations on the water-squalane interface for nine different loadings with sorbitan monooleate (SPAN80), at $T=300$K, are analyzed for the surface tension equation of state, desorption free energy profiles as they depend on loading, and to evaluate escape times for absorbed SPAN80 into the bulk phases. These results suggest that loading only weakly affects accommodation of a SPAN80 molecule by this squalane-water interface. Specifically, the surface te...

  8. Methanol Adsorption and Reaction on Samaria Thin Films on Pt(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hao Jhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the adsorption and reaction of methanol on continuous and discontinuous films of samarium oxide (SmOx grown on Pt(111 in ultrahigh vacuum. The methanol decomposition was studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS, while structural changes of the oxide surface were monitored by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED. Methanol dehydrogenates to adsorbed methoxy species on both the continuous and discontinuous SmOx films, eventually leading to the desorption of CO and H2 which desorbs at temperatures in the range 400–600 K. Small quantities of CO2 are also detected mainly on as-prepared Sm2O3 thin films, but the production of CO2 is limited during repeated TPD runs. The discontinuous film exhibits the highest reactivity compared to the continuous film and the Pt(111 substrate. The reactivity of methanol on reduced and reoxidized films was also investigated, revealing how SmOx structures influence the chemical behavior. Over repeated TPD experiments, a SmOx structural/chemical equilibrium condition is found which can be approached either from oxidized or reduced films. We also observed hydrogen absence in TPD which indicates that hydrogen is stored either in SmOx films or as OH groups on the SmOx surfaces.

  9. PCDD/F formation during thermal desorption of p,p'-DDT contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhonghua; Ni, Mingjiang; Li, Xiaodong; Buekens, Alfons; Yan, Jianhua

    2017-05-01

    Thermal treatment of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) contaminated soil was shown in earlier work to generate polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF). In this study, the PCDD/F were studied arising during the remediation of p,p'-DDT contaminated soil by thermal desorption. Three kinds of soil (sandy, clayey and lateritic soil) were tested to investigate the effect of soil texture on PCDD/F formation. Those soils were artificially polluted with p,p'-DDT, obtaining a concentration level of 100 mg/kg. Thermal desorption experiments were conducted for 10 min at 300 °C in an air atmosphere. The total concentration of PCDD/F generated for three soils were 331, 803 and 865 ng/kg, respectively, and TeCDD and TeCDF were dominant among all PCDD/F congeners. After thermal desorption, the total amount of PCDD/F generated both in soil and in off-gas correlated positively with the amount of DDT added to soil. In addition, a possible pathway of the formation of PCDD/F was presented.

  10. Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Drosophila Brain Using Matrix Sublimation versus Modification with Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Nhu T N; Mohammadi, Amir Saeid; Dowlatshahi Pour, Masoumeh; Ewing, Andrew G

    2016-02-02

    Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is used to image brain lipids in the fruit fly, Drosophila, a common invertebrate model organism in biological and neurological studies. Three different sample preparation methods, including sublimation with two common organic matrixes for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) using gold nanoparticles, are examined for sample profiling and imaging the fly brain. Recrystallization with trifluoroacetic acid following matrix deposition in MALDI is shown to increase the incorporation of biomolecules with one matrix, resulting in more efficient ionization, but not for the other matrix. The key finding here is that the mass fragments observed for the fly brain slices with different surface modifications are significantly different. Thus, these approaches can be combined to provide complementary analysis of chemical composition, particularly for the small metabolites, diacylglycerides, phosphatidylcholines, and triacylglycerides, in the fly brain. Furthermore, imaging appears to be beneficial using modification with gold nanoparticles in place of matrix in this application showing its potential for cellular and subcellular imaging. The imaging protocol developed here with both MALDI and SALDI provides the best and most diverse lipid chemical images of the fly brain to date with LDI.

  11. Processes of adsorption/desorption of iodides and cadmium cations onto/from Ag(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR D. JOVIĆ

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the adsorption/desorption processes of iodides and cadmium cations in the presence of iodides onto/from Ag(111 were investigated. It was shown that both processes were complex, characterized by several peaks on the cyclic voltammograms (CVs. By PeakFit analysis of the recorded CVs and subsequent fitting of the obtained peaks by the Frumkin adsorption isotherm, the interaction parameter (f and the Gibbs energy of adsorption (DGads for each adsorbed phase were determined. In the case of iodide adsorption, four peaks were characterized by negative values of f, indicating attractive lateral interaction between the adsorbed anions, while two of them possessed value of f < –4, indicating phase transition processes. The adsorption/desorption processes of cadmium cations (underpotential deposition – UPD of cadmium in the presence of iodide anions was characterized by two main peaks, each of them being composed of two or three peaks with negative values of f. By the analysis of charge vs. potential dependences obtained either from the CVs or current transients on potentiostatic pulses, it was concluded that adsorbed iodides did not undergo desorption during the process of Cd UPD, but became replaced by Cd ad-atoms and remained adsorbed on top of a Cd layer and/or in between Cd the ad-atoms.

  12. Coffee-ring effects in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie-Bi; Chen, Yu-Chie; Urban, Pawel L

    2013-03-05

    This report focuses on the heterogeneous distribution of small molecules (e.g. metabolites) within dry deposits of suspensions and solutions of inorganic and organic compounds with implications for chemical analysis of small molecules by laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Taking advantage of the imaging capabilities of a modern mass spectrometer, we have investigated the occurrence of "coffee rings" in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) sample spots. It is seen that the "coffee-ring effect" in MALDI/SALDI samples can be both beneficial and disadvantageous. For example, formation of the coffee rings gives rise to heterogeneous distribution of analytes and matrices, thus compromising analytical performance and reproducibility of the mass spectrometric analysis. On the other hand, the coffee-ring effect can also be advantageous because it enables partial separation of analytes from some of the interfering molecules present in the sample. We report a "hidden coffee-ring effect" where under certain conditions the sample/matrix deposit appears relatively homogeneous when inspected by optical microscopy. Even in such cases, hidden coffee rings can still be found by implementing the MALDI-MS imaging technique. We have also found that to some extent, the coffee-ring effect can be suppressed during SALDI sample preparation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Adsorption and desorption of dissolved organic matter by carbon nanotubes: Effects of solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-06-01

    Increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to their introduction into the environment where they can interact with dissolved organic matter (DOM). This study focuses on solution chemistry effects on DOM adsorption/desorption processes by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Our data show that DOM adsorption is controlled by the attachment of DOM molecules to the SWCNTs, and that the initial adsorption rate is dependent on solution parameters. Adsorbed amount of DOM at high ionic strength was limited, possibly due to alterations in SWCNT bundling. Desorption of DOM performed at low pH resulted in additional DOM adsorption, whereas at high pH, adsorbed DOM amount decreased. The extent of desorption conducted at increased ionic strength was dependent on pre-adsorbed DOM concentration: low DOM loading stimulated additional adsorption of DOM, whereas high DOM loading facilitated release of adsorbed DOM. Elevated ionic strength and increased adsorbed amount of DOM reduced the oxidation temperature of the SWCNTs, suggesting that changes in the assembly of the SWCNTs had occurred. Moreover, DOM-coated SWCNTs at increased ionic strength provided fewer sites for atrazine adsorption. This study enhances our understanding of DOM-SWCNT interactions in aqueous systems influenced by rapid changes in salinity, and facilitates potential use of SWCNTs in water-purification technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and electron stimulated desorption from CaF sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Huisinga, M

    1999-01-01

    resulted in a positively charged sample surface, thus giving an undetermined electrostatic contribution to the F+ desorption energies. In this thesis, a method was developed allowing for the first time to measure a positive surface potential of an insulator under electron irradiation. Thus, the kinetic energy of F+ ions desorbing from CaF sub 2 crystals could be corrected for surface charge to determine the energy characteristic for the desorption process. The corrected peak of the F+ kinetic energy distribution was at about 0.9 eV for crystals cleaved in UHV. It was shown that coverage of the surface with oxygen or fluorine results in a high positive potential, while metallization causes a low surface potential. In particular, the surface potential of crystals cleaved in UHV shows a pronounced minimum after about 10 to 20 min of electron irradiation. This effect could be explained by a balance of F sup + desorption and diffusion of fluorine from the bulk. Calcium difluoride crystals were investigated with ul...

  15. Competitive sorption and desorption of heavy metals by individual soil components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covelo, E.F. [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal y Ciencia del Suelo, Universidad de Vigo, As Lagoas, Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain)]. E-mail: emmaf@uvigo.es; Vega, F.A. [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal y Ciencia del Suelo, Universidad de Vigo, As Lagoas, Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain)]. E-mail: florav@uvigo.es; Andrade, M.L. [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal y Ciencia del Suelo, Universidad de Vigo, As Lagoas, Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain)]. E-mail: mandrade@uvigo.es

    2007-02-09

    Knowledge of sorption and desorption of heavy metals by individual soil components should be useful for modelling the behaviour of soils of arbitrary composition when contaminated by heavy metals, and for designing amendments increasing the fixation of heavy metals by soils polluted by these species. In this study the competitive sorption and desorption of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn by humified organic matter, Fe and Mn oxides, kaolinite, vermiculite and mica were investigated. Due to the homogeneity of the sorbents, between-metal competition for binding sites led to their preferences for one or another metal being much more manifest than in the case of whole soils. On the basis of k {sub d100} values (distribution coefficients calculated in sorption-desorption experiments in which the initial sorption solution contained 100 mg L{sup -1} of each metal), kaolinite and mica preferentially sorbed and retained chromium; vermiculite, copper and zinc; HOM, Fe oxide and Mn oxide, lead (HOM and Mn oxide also sorbed and retained considerable amounts of copper). Mica only retained sorbed chromium, Fe oxide sorbed cadmium and lead, and kaolinite did not retain sorbed copper. The sorbents retaining the greatest proportions of sorbed metals were vermiculite and Mn oxide, but the ratios of k {sub d100} values for retention and sorption suggest that cations were least reversibly bound by Mn oxide, and most reversibly by vermiculite.

  16. Status of the project TRAPSENSOR: Performance of the laser-desorption ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo, J.M.; Lorenzo, A. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Renisch, D. [Institut für Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Block, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Düllmann, Ch.E. [Institut für Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); SHE Chemistry section, Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Rodríguez, D., E-mail: danielrodriguez@ugr.es [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Description of the status of the project TRAPSENSOR. • Study of a laser desorption ion source to perform experiments with Penning traps. • Production of calcium, rhenium and osmium ions by laser desorption for precision experiments. -- Abstract: Penning traps provide mass measurements on atomic nuclei with the highest accuracy and sensitivity. Depending on the experiment and on the physics goal, a relative mass uncertainty varying from 10{sup −7} to below 10{sup −11} is required. Regarding sensitivity, the use of only one ion for the measurement is crucial, either to perform mass measurements on superheavy elements (SHE), or to reach δm/m≈10{sup -11} in order to contribute to the direct determination of the mass of the electron-antineutrino with accurate mass measurements on specific nuclei. This has motivated the development of a new technique called Quantum Sensor based on a laser-cooled ion stored in a Penning trap, to perform mass measurements using fluorescence photons instead of electronic detection. The device is currently under development at the University of Granada (Spain) within the project TRAPSENSOR. We describe the physics which motivates the construction of this device, the expected performance of the Quantum Sensor compared to that from existing techniques, and briefly present the main components of the project. As a specific aspect of the project, the performance of the laser-desorption ion source utilized to produce calcium, rhenium and osmium ions at different kinetic energies is presented.

  17. Arsenite oxidation by a poorly-crystalline manganese oxide. 3. Arsenic and manganese desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Brandon J; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Sparks, Donald L

    2011-11-01

    Arsenic (As) mobility in the environment is greatly affected by its oxidation state and the degree to which it is sorbed on metal oxide surfaces. Manganese oxides (Mn oxides) have the ability to decrease overall As mobility both by oxidizing toxic arsenite (As(III)) to less toxic arsenate (As(V)), and by sorbing As. However, the effect of competing ions on the mobility of As sorbed on Mn-oxide surfaces is not well understood. In this study, desorption of As(V) and As(III) from a poorly crystalline phyllomanganate (δ-MnO(2)) by two environmentally significant ions is investigated using a stirred-flow technique and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). As(III) is not observed in solution after desorption under any conditions used in this study, agreeing with previous studies showing As sorbed on Mn-oxides exists only as As(V). However, some As(V) is desorbed from the δ-MnO(2) surface under all conditions studied, while neither desorptive used in this study completely removes As(V) from the δ-MnO(2) surface.

  18. Scattering, Adsorption, and Langmuir-Hinshelwood Desorption Models for Physisorptive and Chemisorptive Gas-Surface Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Brook I.

    Surface effects limit the performance of hypersonic vehicles, micro-electro-mechanical devices, and directed energy systems. This research develops methods to predict adsorption, scattering, and thermal desorption of molecules on a surface. These methods apply to physisorptive (adsorption and scattering) and chemisorptive (thermal desorption) gas-surface systems. Engineering and design applications will benefit from these methods, hence they are developed under the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo construct. The novel adsorption and scattering contribution, the Modified Kisliuk with Scattering method, predicts angular and energy distributions, and adsorption probabilities. These results agree more closely with experiment than the state-of-the-art Cercignani-Lampis-Lord scattering kernel. Super-elastic scattering is predicted. Gas-adlayer interactions are included for the first time. Accommodation coefficents can be determined by fitting simulations to experimental data. The new thermal desorption model accurately calculates angular, translational, rotational, and vibrational distributions, and the rotational alignment parameter. The model is validated by comparing with experiments. Multiple transition states are considered in a set of non-dimensionalized equations of motion, linked with temporally-accurate event timing. Initial conditions are chosen from a new truncated Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Run times are improved by eliminating the Gaussian Weighting of desorbing products. The absorption energy barrier is shown to significantly contribute only to the translational energy of desorbing molecules by contributing energy to each adatom in a similar manner.

  19. Sorption and desorption of Eu and Yb on alumina: mechanisms and effect of fulvic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiangke; Dong Wenming; Dai Xiongxin; Wang Aixia; Du Jinzhou; Tao Zuyi E-mail: dongwm@lzu.edu.cn

    2000-02-01

    The effects of pH, ionic strength and FA (fulvic acid) on the sorption and desorption of Eu(III) and Yb(III) on alumina were respectively investigated by using batch technique and radiotracers {sup 152+154}Eu and {sup 169}Yb. The distribution coefficients for sorption and desorption of Eu on alumina at pH 4.4, 4.6 and 5.7 in 1 mol/l NaCl solutions as a function of solid phase concentration were determined in the presence or absence of FA. The effects of pH, FA and ionic strength on the distribution coefficients for sorption and desorption of Yb on alumina were determined in 0.01-2.0 mol/l NaNO{sub 3}. It was found that pH and FA influenced the sorption of Eu(III) and Yb(III) on alumina greatly. A surface hydrolysis model can satisfactorily and qualitatively explain the observations on bare alumina. The competition among the complexations of surface free hydroxyl groups, soluble and sorbed fulvic acids can satisfactorily and qualitatively explain the observations on the coated alumina.

  20. A Transformational Journey: Compositional Changes in Organic Matter during Desorption from Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiasek, S. J.; Pellerin, B. A.; Spencer, R.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Hernes, P.

    2016-12-01

    The release of organic matter (OM) from suspended particles via desorption is a critical component of OM cycling since dissolved OM (DOM) fuels aquatic ecosystems and is a precursor for disinfection by-products formation. This study assessed the elemental and molecular composition of DOM desorbed abiotically from sediments and soils of an irrigated agricultural watershed of northern California. Relative to mineral-bound OM, the released DOM was nitrogen-poor (lower carbon:nitrogen ratios) and depleted in amino acids and lignin phenols (lower carbon-normalized yields). Water-extracted DOM appeared substantially more degraded than its parent particulate OM with increased molar contributions of acidic amino acids, non-protein amino acids, and acidic lignin phenols, all molecular indicators of a more extensively processed OM pool. Desorption processes also significantly altered lignin compositional ratios which help distinguish vascular-plant sources of DOM. Specific optical parameters, including spectral slope, specific UV absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254), and fluorescence index (FI), did not constitute useful proxies for the desorbed DOM pool, while absorption coefficients and fluorescence peak intensities were strongly correlated with extracted DOM concentrations and composition. This study highlights the profound impact of desorption on DOM composition which, if unaccounted for, could lead to misinterpretations of common biomarkers and optical proxies used to predict DOM sources and reactivity. Our findings suggest that sediments contribute a biogeochemically distinct source of DOM to surface waters, with potential impacts on aquatic health and drinking water quality.

  1. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of adlay bran free phenolics on macroporous resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingyun; Zhao, Mouming; Lin, Lianzhu

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of six macroporous resins including XAD-7HP, XAD-16, HP-20, HP-2MGL, SP-207 and SP-825 for enrichment of adlay bran free phenolics were studied. XAD-16, SP-207 and SP-825 were chosen for further study due to their strong adsorption and desorption capacities. XAD-16, SP-207 and SP-825 had similar phenolics adsorption/desorption behaviors. Pseudo-second-order kinetics model and Freundlich isotherm model were suitable for describing the whole exothermic and physical adsorption processes of adlay bran free phenolics on XAD-16, SP-207 and SP-825. After treatment with gradient elution on XAD-16 resin column, the free phenolics were mostly enriched (from 89.61 to 1015.26mg/100g) in 50% ethanol fraction. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity of 50% ethanol fraction was eight times higher than that of the crude extract. Therefore, the production of highly concentrated phenolics might expand the application of adlay bran used as a bioactive ingredient in functional food. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sampling analytes from cheese products for fast detection using neutral desorption extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongchen; Chingin, Konstantin; Chen, Huanwen; Zhu, Liang; Jia, Bin; Zenobi, Renato

    2010-06-01

    The development of analytical techniques suitable for sensitive, high-throughput, and nondestructive food analysis has been of increasing interest in recent years. In this study, mass-spectral fingerprints of various cheese products were rapidly recorded in the mass range of m/z 50-300 Da without any sample pretreatment, using neutral desorption extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ND-EESI-MS) in negative ion mode. The results demonstrate that both volatile and nonvolatile analytes on greasy cheese surfaces can be directly sampled by a neutral desorption gas beam. The influence of the neutral desorption gas flow on the analyte signal was systematically investigated. Under optimized experimental conditions, reproducible results were obtained using ND-EESI-MS. Principal component analysis was applied to differentiate a total of 49 individual cheese samples (four different types), which were purchased from three different supermarkets. All samples were successfully classified according to their types; but distributors and sensory properties were not distinguishable from the spectra data. The principal components 2, 3, and 4 scores showed an excellent capacity of distinguishing types of cheese. Molecular markers of interest can be identified using tandem mass spectrometry and matching the data with those from reference compounds. The experimental data show that ND-EESI-MS is able to sensitively and directly detect analytes on greasy surfaces without chemical contamination, providing a convenient method for high-throughput food analysis with a high degree of safety.

  3. Brominated Tyrosine and Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Analysis by Laser Desorption VUV Postionization and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Illinois at Chicago; Blaze, Melvin M. T.; Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Gasper, Gerald; Pleticha, F. Douglas; Hanley, Luke

    2011-03-14

    The small molecular analyte 3,5-dibromotyrosine (Br2Y) and chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) with and without adsorbed Br2Y were analyzed by laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). LDPI-MS using 7.87 eV laser and tunable 8 ? 12.5 eV synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation found that desorption of clusters from Br2Y films allowed detection by≤8 eV single photon ionization. Thermal desorption and electronic structure calculations determined the ionization energy of Br2Y to be ~;;8.3?0.1 eV and further indicated that the lower ionization energies of clusters permitted their detection at≤8 eV photon energies. However, single photon ionization could only detect Br2Y adsorbed within PEMs when using either higher photon energies or matrix addition to the sample. All samples were also analyzed by 25 keV Bi3 + secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), with the negative ion spectra showing strong parent ion signal which complemented that observed by LDPI-MS. The negative ion SIMS depended strongly on the high electron affinity of this specific analyte and the analyte?s condensed phase environment.

  4. Adsorption-desorption behavior of atrazine on agricultural soils in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Lin; Ge, ChengJun; Feng, Dan; Yu, Huamei; Deng, Hui; Fu, Bomin

    2017-07-01

    Adsorption and desorption are important processes that affect atrazine transport, transformation, and bioavailability in soils. In this study, the adsorption-desorption characteristics of atrazine in three soils (laterite, paddy soil and alluvial soil) were evaluated using the batch equilibrium method. The results showed that the kinetics of atrazine in soils was completed in two steps: a "fast" adsorption and a "slow" adsorption and could be well described by pseudo-second-order model. In addition, the adsorption equilibrium isotherms were nonlinear and were well fitted by Freundlich and Langmuir models. It was found that the adsorption data on laterite, and paddy soil were better fitted by the Freundlich model; as for alluvial soil, the Langmuir model described it better. The maximum atrazine sorption capacities ranked as follows: paddy soil>alluvial soil>laterite. Results of thermodynamic calculations indicated that atrazine adsorption on three tested soils was spontaneous and endothermic. The desorption data showed that negative hysteresis occurred. Furthermore, lower solution pH value was conducive to the adsorption of atrazine in soils. The atrazine adsorption in these three tested soils was controlled by physical adsorption, including partition and surface adsorption. At lower equilibrium concentration, the atrazine adsorption process in soils was dominated by surface adsorption; while with the increase of equilibrium concentration, partition was predominant. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in two typical agricultural soils in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Sheng; Zhu, Heng; Xiong, Bailian; Zheng, Guocan; Zhang, Jinzhong; Xu, Weihong

    2017-04-01

    Endosulfan is an organochlorine pesticide widely used in Southwest China. In this paper, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in two typical agricultural soils (latosol and lateritic red soil) in this area were studied. The results showed that Langmuir isothermal equation could well describe the adsorption thermodynamic characteristics of endosulfan in latosol and lateritic red soil, and the maximum adsorption capacities of α-endosulfan were 0.186 and 0.209 mg/g, while those of β-endosulfan were 0.140 and 0.148 mg/g, respectively. Endosulfan adsorption in the two soils was an exothermic physicochemical process, but dominated by physical process. The adsorption kinetic characteristics of endosulfan in the two soils could be well described by second-order kinetic equation, and the initial rate constants were 0.228 and 0.325 mg/(g min) for α-endosulfan, while those were 0.119 and 0.125 mg/(g min) for β-endosulfan, respectively. The adsorbed endosulfan in the two soils was difficult to be desorbed into the liquid phase, and showed weak desorption hysteresis. These results implied that endosulfan could be firmly adsorbed by the two soils, and their adsorption and desorption abilities may be related to the contents of soil clay and organic matter.

  6. Effects of earthworm casts on sorption-desorption, degradation, and bioavailability of nonylphenol in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Yang, Yi; Jia, Lin Xian; Liu, Ying; Pan, Bo; Lin, Yong

    2018-01-04

    Up to hundreds of milligrams per kilogram (dry weight) of nonylphenol (NP) reportedly entered the soil and sediment through the agricultural reuse of biosolids, pesticide application, etc. Organic pollutants in soil could not only further trigger groundwater contamination via leaching (that highly depends upon sorption-desorption and degradation phenomena) but also harm food safety by crop uptake (that mainly rests with the bioavailability of pollutants in soil). Thus, we first investigated the effects of earthworm casts (EWCs) on the sorption-desorption, degradation, and bioavailability of NP in soil under laboratory microcosm conditions, and then, analyzed the FT-IR spectra of EWC and soil samples (with and without EWC). The application of EWC could notably increase the sorption capacity of soils for NP and in turn significantly inhibited the desorption of NP from soil; responsively lengthened the half-time of NP in the soil; and reduced the uptake and translocation of NP in tomato seedlings and promoted their growth during the first 3 weeks. Finally, FT-IR spectra of EWC and soil samples indicated that the application of EWC increased the content of N, P, and organic matter in soil.

  7. [Combination process of microwave desorption-catalytic combustion for toluene treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiao-Qiang; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Xue-Min

    2013-07-01

    Using activated carbon as adsorbent, toluene waste gas was treated by adsorption process. After the adsorption process was completed, the adsorbent was desorbed by microwave irradiation; then Cu-Mn oxide composite catalysts were prepared by impregnation and the desorbed toluene gas was treated by catalytic combustion so as to completely purify the pollutant. The concentration of toluene was measured by gas chromatography (GC). The results indicated that it is feasible to add air to provide oxygen to the desorbed gas after the completion of the desorption process, in order to achieve the catalytic combustion; the ratio of desorbed gas and air was 1 : 1 (volume ratio), and the corresponding catalytic space velocity was 2.67 s(-1). Desorption temperature could affect the concentration of toluene in the desorption gas thereby affecting the catalytic combustion efficiency; the results indicated that 400 degrees C was an appropriate temperature for desorbing the activated carbon. When the catalytic combustion was kept at 300 degrees C, the final toluene treatment efficiency was higher than 90%, which was higher than 95% during the most time of the treatment process.

  8. Thermodynamics of the CO2–Absorption/Desorption Section in the Integrated Gasifying Combined Cycle — I. modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav KOZACZKA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The carbon dioxide absorption/desorption unit of the Integrated Gasifying Combined Cycle has been detailed described to formulate appropriate model equations for the processes, suitable for further thermodynamic analyzes. There are two principal technologies of the CO2–removing section, namely the absorption with the following expanding desorption process, and the absorption with the following classical plates (or packing desorption one. The physics of thermodynamic properties of the water/carbon dioxide solution have been presented thoroughly using hitherto literature data. The Henry's Law has been emphasized as the base for further thermodynamic analyzes. The numerical results of appropriate absorption/desorption units have been compiled presuming fundamental relations, which are also presented. They should be the base for their thermodynamic analyzes.

  9. Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: powerful analytical tools in recombinant protein chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens S.; Svensson, B; Roepstorff, P

    1996-01-01

    Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization are effective ionization methods for mass spectrometry of biomolecules. Here we describe the capabilities of these methods for peptide and protein characterization in biotechnology. An integrated analytical strategy is presen......Electrospray ionization and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization are effective ionization methods for mass spectrometry of biomolecules. Here we describe the capabilities of these methods for peptide and protein characterization in biotechnology. An integrated analytical strategy...

  10. Studies of hydrogen absorption and desorption processes in advanced intermetallic hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Masashi

    2005-07-01

    This work is a part of the research program performed in the Department of Energy Systems, Institute for Energy Technology (Kjeller, Norway), which is focused on the development of the advanced hydrogen storage materials. The activities are aimed on studies of the mechanisms of hydrogen interactions with intermetallic alloys with focus on establishing an interrelation between the crystal structure, thermodynamics and kinetics of the processes in the metal-hydrogen systems, on the one hand, and hydrogen storage properties (capacity, rates of desorption, hysteresis). Many of the materials under investigation have potential to be applied in applications, whereas some already have been commercialised in the world market. A number of metals take up considerable amounts of hydrogen and form chemical compounds with H, metal hydrides. Unfortunately, binary hydrides are either very stable (e.g. for the rare earth metals [RE], Zr, Ti, Mg: metal R) or are formed at very high applied pressures of hydrogen gas (e.g. for the transition metals, Ni, Co, Fe, etc.: Metal T). However, hydrogenation process becomes easily reversible at very convenient from practical point of view conditions, around room temperature and at H2 pressures below 1 MPa for the two-component intermetallic alloys R{sub x}T{sub y}. This raised and maintains further interest to the intermetallic hydrides as solid H storage materials. Materials science research of this thesis is focused on studies of the reasons staying behind the beneficial effect of two non-transition elements M(i.e., In and Sn) contributing to the formation of the ternary intermetallic alloys R{sub x}T{sub y}M{sub 2}., on the hydrogen storage behaviours. Particular focus is on two aspects where the remarkable improvement of ordinary metal hydrides is achieved via introduction of In and Sn: a) Increase of the volume density of stored hydrogen in solid materials to the record high level. b) Improvement of the kinetics of hydrogen charge and

  11. Remediation and desorption kinetics of pyrene from kaolinite co-contaminated with heavy metals at various organic matter contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Mohsen; Li, Loretta Y.; Grace, John R.

    2017-04-01

    Soils co-contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals are challenging for remediation. In the present study desorption of pyrene in kaolinite, co-contaminated by Ni, Pb and Zn, was examined by combinations of surfactants and chelating agents such as Triton X-100, Tween 80, Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and citric acid. Results showed that a combination of Triton X-100 (7.5 % w/w) + EDTA (0.01 M) and Tween 80 (7.5 % w/w) + EDTA (0.01 M) were effective in simultaneously desorbing both types of contaminants. Batch desorption tests were conducted using single and combined enhancing agents containing Triton X-100 and Tween 80 as non-ionic surfactants, EDTA as a chelating agent, and citric acid as an organic acid. The solution with the highest removal efficiency was the combined solution containing Triton X-100 (7.5 % w/w) + EDTA (0.01M). Triton X-100 (7.5% w/w) + EDTA (0.01M) led to removal efficiencies of 88% for pyrene in base kaolinite. Batch desorption kinetic experiments were performed using Triton X-100 (7.5% w/w) + EDTA (0.01M). During the first 24 h, desorption was rapid. Organic matter content in the kaolinite led to a reduction in the desorption rate of the contaminants. The desorption kinetic data were well fitted by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  12. [Characteristics of DNA adsorption and desorption in variable and constant charge soil colloids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dai-Zhang; Wang, Shen-Yang; Jiang, Xin; Heng, Li-Sha; Tan, Jin-Fang; Liu, Shi-Liang; Cao, Yong-Xian

    2009-09-15

    The characteristics of adsorption and desorption of DNA by Red soil colloid, Latosol colloid, Chao colloid and Cinnamon colloid at different pH values were studied using a batch method. It showed that there was an increase of solution pH after adsorption of DNA by the four soil colloids in both NaCl and KCl electrolyte systems. The increasing ranges of pH values were in order of Red soil colloid > Latosol colloid > Chao colloid > Cinnamon colloid, and NaCl electrolyte system > KCl electrolyte system. The amounts of DNA adsorption on soil colloids decreased with the increase of pH value. The maximum amounts of DNA adsorption in different colloids were about 13.1-14.8 microg x mg(-1) when pH values were 2-4. The decreasing ranges of the amounts of DNA adsorption were about 5.5 microg x mg(-1) in NaCl electrolyte system and 2.1 Mg x mg(-1) in KCl electrolyte system in Red soil colloid and Latosol colloid after the rising of equilibrium solution pH from 4.2 to 8.6, whereas the remarked decreasing ranges of the adsorption amounts of DNA were about 8.3-12.2 microg x mg(-1) on Chao colloid and Cinnamon colloid in two electrolyte systems. The decreasing ranges of DNA adsorption were in order of the constant charge (Chao soil and Cinnamon) colloids > the variable charge (Red soil and Latosol) colloids. The differences of desorption on the variable and the constant charge colloids are very significant while the DNA adsorbed was desorbed with NaOAc solution and NaH2 PO4 solution. The desorption percent desorption of DNA as NaH2PO4 desorbent was 23.5%-40.2% larger on the variable charge colloids than 8.8%-21.6% on the constant charge of colloids at the three different solution pH values of 3, 5 and 7, while that as NaOAc desorbent was 72.3%-85.9% larger on the constant charge colloids than 10%-24.5% on the variable charge colloids. These results implied that the ligand exchange played a more important role in DNA adsorption on the variable charge colloids, and electrostatic

  13. Adsorption-desorption of tricyclazole: effect of soil types and organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Mukherjee, Irani; Varghese, Eldho

    2015-03-01

    Adsorption-desorption of tricyclazole was studied by batch equilibrium method in two soil types, varying in their physical and chemical properties. The adsorption of tricyclazole on the soil matrix exhibited low rate of accumulation with 18.24 ± 0.14 % in Ultisol and moderately high rate with 43.62 ± 0.14 % in Vertisol after 6 h of equilibrium time. For soils amended with farmyard manure (FYM), the adsorption percentage increased to 32.52 ± 0.14 % in Ultisol and 55.14 ± 0.14 % in Vertisol. The Freundlich model was used to describe the adsorption-desorption of the tricyclazole in two soils. The adsorption isotherm suggested a relatively higher affinity of tricyclazole to the adsorption sites at low equilibrium concentrations. Variation in sorption affinities of the soils as indicated by the distribution coefficient (K d) for sorption in the range of 0.78 ± 0.01-1.38 ± 0.03, 1.71 ± 0.03-2.99 ± 0.09, 2.75 ± 0.05-4.69 ± 0.01, and 4.65 ± 0.08-7.64 ± 0.01 mL/g for Ultisol, FYM-amended Ultisol, Vertisol, and FYM-amended Vertisol, respectively. Desorption was slower than adsorption, indicating a hysteresis effect. The hysteresis coefficient varied from 0.023 ± 0.15 to 0.160 ± 0.12 in two test soils. A good fit to the linear and Freundlich isotherms was observed with correlation coefficients >0.96. The results revealed that adsorption-desorption was influenced by soil properties and showed that the maximum sorption and minimum desorption of pesticide were observed in soils with higher organic carbon and clay content. Thus, groundwater contamination may be minimized, on application of tricyclazole in high-sorption soils of rice-growing regions.

  14. Binding and catalytic reduction of NO by transition metal aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Hou, S.

    1992-09-01

    Extensive series of experiments were carried out with CO(II)A zeolites containing 2.6 and 3.9 Co[sup 2+] ions per unit cell in which NO and N[sub 2]0 were separately adsorbed, and subsequent temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and optical spectroscopy analyses were carried out to study the desorption and decomposition behavior of these catalysts toward the adsorbates. The solid phase was monitored by optical diffuse reflectance (UV-Vis-NIR), while the gas phase was monitored by mass spectrometry. The experimental data are summarized here, and interpretation of these results is being carried out.

  15. Binding and catalytic reduction of NO by transition metal aluminosilicates. Technical progress report, June--August 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Hou, S.

    1992-09-01

    Extensive series of experiments were carried out with CO(II)A zeolites containing 2.6 and 3.9 Co{sup 2+} ions per unit cell in which NO and N{sub 2}0 were separately adsorbed, and subsequent temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and optical spectroscopy analyses were carried out to study the desorption and decomposition behavior of these catalysts toward the adsorbates. The solid phase was monitored by optical diffuse reflectance (UV-Vis-NIR), while the gas phase was monitored by mass spectrometry. The experimental data are summarized here, and interpretation of these results is being carried out.

  16. Very-large-volume sampling of water in gas chromatography using the through oven transfer adsorption desorption (TOTAD) interface for pesticide-residue analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario, J; Perez, M; Vazquez, A; Villén, J

    2001-02-01

    The Through Oven Transfer Adsorption Desorption (TOTAD) interface is used to directly introduce large volumes of water (1 mL or more) into a capillary gas chromatograph. The TOTAD interface is a greatly modified programmed temperature vaporizer injector incorporating changes that affect the pneumatics, sample introduction, solvent elimination, and operation mode. The system can easily be automated. The technique is applied to the analysis of pesticide residue in standard solutions and real water samples from the Ebro River (northeastern Spain). The speed of sample introduction was 1 mL/min, and the solvent elimination was almost complete. A nitrogen phosphorous detector is used, and the relative standard deviation varied from 5.7% to 11.7% for the absolute peak areas. The sensitivity achieved by introducing 1 mL of the sample is sufficient for most pesticide-residue analyses in water. The limits of detection ranged from 0.5 to 8.1 ng/L.

  17. Enhanced capabilities for imaging gangliosides in murine brain with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled to ion mobility separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrášková, Karolina; Claude, Emmanuelle; Jones, Emrys A; Towers, Mark; Ellis, Shane R; Heeren, Ron M A

    2016-07-15

    The increased interest in lipidomics calls for improved yet simplified methods of lipid analysis. Over the past two decades, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been established as a powerful technique for the analysis of molecular distribution of a variety of compounds across tissue surfaces. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MSI is widely used to study the spatial distribution of common lipids. However, a thorough sample preparation and necessity of vacuum for efficient ionization might hamper its use for high-throughput lipid analysis. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is a relatively young MS technique. In DESI, ionization of molecules occurs under ambient conditions, which alleviates sample preparation. Moreover, DESI does not require the application of an external matrix, making the detection of low mass species more feasible due to the lack of chemical matrix background. However, irrespective of the ionization method, the final information obtained during an MSI experiment is very complex and its analysis becomes challenging. It was shown that coupling MSI to ion mobility separation (IMS) simplifies imaging data interpretation. Here we employed DESI and MALDI MSI for a lipidomic analysis of the murine brain using the same IMS-enabled instrument. We report for the first time on the DESI IMS-MSI of multiply sialylated ganglioside species, as well as their acetylated versions, which we detected directly from the murine brain tissue. We show that poly-sialylated gangliosides can be imaged as multiply charged ions using DESI, while they are clearly separated from the rest of the lipid classes based on their charge state using ion mobility. This represents a major improvement in MSI of intact fragile lipid species. We additionally show that complementary lipid information is reached under particular conditions when DESI is compared to MALDI MSI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Resupply mechanism to a contaminated aquifer: A laboratory study of U(VI) desorption from capillary fringe sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Wooyong; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Moore, Dean A.; Rod, Kenton A.

    2010-09-01

    Contaminated capillary fringe sediments are believed to function as long-term source of U(VI) to Hanford's 300 Area groundwater uranium plume that discharges to the Columbia River. The deep vadose zone at this site experiences seasonal water table elevation and water compositional changes in response to Columbia River stage. Batch and column desorption experiments of U(VI) were performed on two mildly contaminated sediments from this system that vary in hydrologic position to ascertain their U(VI) release behavior and factors controlling it. Solid phase characterization of the sediments was performed to identify mineralogic and chemical factors controlling U(VI) desorption. Low adsorbed U(VI) concentrations prevented spectroscopic analysis. The desorption behavior of U(VI) was different for the two sediments in spite of similar chemical and textural characteristics, and non-carbonate mineralogy. Adsorption strength and sorbed U(VI) lability was higher in the near-river sediment. The inland sediment displayed low sorbed U(VI) lability (˜10%) and measurable solid-phase carbonate content. Kinetic desorption was observed that was attributed to regeneration of labile U(VI) in the near river sediment, and carbonate mineral dissolution in the inland sediment. The desorption reaction was best described as an equilibrium surface complexation reaction. The noted differences in desorption behavior appear to result from U(VI) contamination and hydrologic history, as well as sediment carbonate content. Insights are provided on the dynamic adsorption/desorption behavior of contaminants in linked groundwater-river systems.

  19. TPD52: A Novel Vaccine Target for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    peptide(s) could be used to stimulate and expand T cells from patients ex vivo for therapeutic transfer back to the patient as adoptive cell therapies ...Chinnaiyan AM and Rubin MA. (2006). Defining aggressive prostate cancer using a 12-gene model. Neoplasia 8: 59-68. 12. Scanlan MJ, Gout I, Gordon CM...University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas; 2Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, Oregon; 3The

  20. Radionuclide sorption-desorption characterization of soils from non-temperate areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, C.J.; Rigol, A.; Vidal, M.; Rauret, G. [Barcelona Univ., Dept. de Quimica Analitica (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The prediction of the radionuclide mobility in terrestrial ecosystems needs of specific information on radionuclide speciation and interaction in soils. Radionuclide transfer in the food chain is the result of a multifactorial process in which, from the soil standpoint, sorption and desorption steps in the solid phase govern the amount of radionuclide that can be available for root uptake. One of the lessons learnt from the Chernobyl accident was that any soil scenario could be contaminated. Therefore, data on radionuclide interaction in various types of soil/climate must be available. Moreover, environmental decision support systems may become useless when extrapolated to other conditions than those used in their construction. The significance of considering the specificity of the scenarios is due to the distinctive interaction in every radionuclide-soil combination. Although relevant information is available for a certain number of radionuclides in soils from temperate areas, there are still gaps of data for significant scenarios, such as those affected by the Mediterranean conditions. The potentially distinctive characteristics of the soils in this area (high carbonate and clay content; low organic matter content; dry seasons followed by potential flooding periods) justify further studies to adapt or verify conclusions and ranges of values for the most significant parameters derived from previous experiments performed in other environmental conditions. Here we present radiostrontium and radiocaesium sorption-desorption data (mainly soil-soil solution distribution coefficient and reversibly sorbed fraction) of soils coming from areas representative of the Spanish territory, including soils from areas close to radioactive facilities. Data obtained are compared with sorption-desorption data previously obtained by the authors in areas affected by the Chernobyl accident and common default data used in prediction models. (author)

  1. Thermal desorption of deuterium from Be, and Be with helium bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, A.V.; Van Veen, A.; Busker, G.J. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Interfaculty Reactor Inst.

    1998-01-01

    Deuterium desorption measurements carried out on a single-crystalline beryllium sample are presented. Deuterium ions were implanted at room temperature at the energy of 0.7 and 1.2 keV up to doses ranging from 10{sup 19} to 3.6 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -2}. In order to eliminate the influence of the beryllium-oxide surface layer, before the implantation the surface of the sample was cleaned by argon sputtering. After the implantation the sample was annealed up to 1200 K at a constant rate of 10 K/s. Deuterium released from the sample was monitored by a calibrated quadrupole mass-spectrometer. The desorption spectra revealed two different contributions. One is a well defined and very narrow peak centered around 450 K. This peak is observed only at high implantation doses > 7.8 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -2}, which is close to the deuterium saturation limit of 0.3 D/Be and is related to deuterium release from blisters or interconnected bubbles. The activation energy of 1.1 eV and the threshold implantation dose are consistent with the values reported in literature. The second contribution in the release spectra is found in the temperature range from 600 to 900 K and is present throughout the whole range of the implantation doses. The activation energies corresponding to this release lie in the range between 1.8 and 2.5 eV and are ascribed to the release from deuterium-vacancy type of defects. In a number of experiments the deuterium implantation was preceded by helium implantation followed by partial annealing to create helium bubbles. The resulting deuterium desorption spectra indicate that deuterium detrapping from helium bubbles is characterized by an activation energy of 2.7 eV. (author)

  2. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Electron Ionization of Amino Acids and Small Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Tiffany M.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Riedeman, James S.; Prentice, Boone M.; Pulliam, Chris J.; Max, Joann; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2017-06-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) allows for desorption of neutral nonvolatile compounds independent of their volatility or thermal stability. Many different ionization methods have been coupled with LIAD. Hence, this setup provides a better control over the types of ions formed than other mass spectrometry evaporation/ionization methods commonly used to characterize biomolecules, such as ESI or MALDI. In this study, the utility of LIAD coupled with electron ionization (EI) was tested for the analysis of common amino acids with no derivatization. The results compared favorably with previously reported EI mass spectra obtained using thermal desorption/EI. Further, LIAD/EI mass spectra collected for hydrochloride salts of two amino acids were found to be similar to those measured for the neutral amino acids with the exception of the appearance of an HCl+● ion. However, the hydrochloride salt of arginine showed a distinctly different LIAD/EI mass spectrum than the previously published literature EI mass spectrum, likely due to its highly basic side chain that makes a specific zwitterionic form particularly favorable. Finally, EI mass spectra were measured for seven small peptides, including di-, tri-, and tetrapeptides. These mass spectra show a variety of ion types. However, an type ions are prevalent. Also, electron-induced dissociation (EID) of protonated peptides has been reported to form primarily an type ions. In addition, the loss of small neutral molecules and side-chain cleavages were observed that are reminiscent of other high-energy fragmentation methods, such as EID. Finally, the isomeric dipeptides LG and IG were found to produce drastically different EI mass spectra, thus allowing differentiation of the leucine and isoleucine amino acids in these dipeptides. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. [Influences of cation species on adsorption and desorption of oxytetracycline in two typical soils of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yan-Yu; Zhou, Qi-Xing; Zhang, Hao

    2009-02-15

    On the basis of the OECD Guideline 106, batch sorption methods were employed to reveal the effect of different cations (0.01 mol x L(-1) Ca2+, K+ and Na+) on oxytetracycline (OTC) adsorption and desorption process in two tested soils (cinnamon soil and red soil). Results show that the Freundlich model is the best isotherm to describe the experimental data of adsorption and desorption, and the average fitting correlation coefficient is 0.989. Except for the adsorption isotherm of cinnamon soil on OTC in 0.01 mol x L(-1) KCl, the other isotherms resemble the L-type curves. To the same cation, OTC adsorption capacity (lgKf) in the red soil (ranging from 2.907 to 3.173) is always higher than in the cinnamon soil (ranging from 2.577 to 2.885), and the adsorption strength (1/n) in the red soil (ranging from 0.672 to 0.825) is always lower than the cinnamon (ranging from 0.713 to 1.005). The dominant mechanism is physical adsorption in two soils. To the same soil, cation species don't affect OTC adsorption capacity (lgKf) (p > 0.05). And Ca2+ can reduce significantly the adsorption strength (p adsorption-desorption hysteresis is found, and the average hysteresis index (HI) in all soils are from 0.015 to 0.053. To the same cation, OTC HI is significantly higher than that of red soil (p < 0.05). In cinnamon soil, there is significantly HI difference (p < 0.01) between K+ and Ca2+, Na+. However, three cations have no significantly difference effect on HI in red soil.

  4. Effect of soil pH and organic matter on the adsorption and desorption of pentachlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Shui-Wen Chang; Chen, Shou-Hung; Li, Chi-Jui

    2017-08-12

    Various properties of soil affect the partition of organic contaminants within, and conversely, the properties of the organic contaminants also directly affect their partition behavior in soil. Therefore, understanding the effects of various properties of soil on the partition of organic contaminants favors subsequent assessment and provides soil remediation methods for policymakers. This study selected pentachlorophenol (PCP), a common hydrophobic ionizable organic compound in contaminated sites worldwide, as the target contaminant. The effects of pH, organic matter, and the combination of both, on PCP adsorption/desorption behavior in soil were investigated. Phosphoric acid and potassium hydroxide were used as buffer solutions to modify the soil pH by the batch and column extraction methods. A common retail organic fertilizer and fulvic acid were selected as additives to manipulate the soil organic content. Modifying the pH of the soil samples revealed that acidic soil exhibited a greater PCP adsorption rate than alkaline soil. The amount of PCP desorption increased regardless of pH of the in situ contaminated soil. The adsorption of PCP increased with increasing amount of organic additive. However, addition of fulvic acid yielded different results compared to the addition of organic fertilizer. Specifically, the organic fertilizer could not compete with the in situ contaminated soil in PCP adsorption, whereas fulvic acids increased the PCP dissolution to facilitate adsorbing contaminant adsorption. The combined effect of pH modification and organic matter addition provides additional PCP adsorption sites; therefore, adding the organic fertilizer to decrease the soil pH elevated the PCP adsorption rates of the laterite, alluvial, and in situ contaminated soil samples. The study results revealed that both pH and organic matter content are crucial to PCP adsorption/desorption in soil. Therefore, the effects of soil pH and organic matter should be considered in

  5. Adsorption, desorption and dissipation of metolachlor in surface and subsurface soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Youbin; Takagi, Kazuhiro; Iwasaki, Akio; Zhou, Dongmei

    2009-09-01

    Variations in soil properties with depth influence retention and degradation of pesticides. Understanding how soil properties within a profile affect pesticide retention and degradation will result in more accurate prediction by simulation models of pesticide fate and potential groundwater contamination. Metolachlor is more persistent than other acetanilide herbicides in the soil environment and has the potential to leach into groundwater. Reasonably, information is needed about the dissipation and eventual fate of metolachlor in subsoils. The objectives were to evaluate the adsorption and desorption characteristics and to determine the dissipation rates of metolachlor in both surface and subsurface soil samples. Adsorption of metolachlor was greater in the high-organic-matter surface soil than in subsoils. Lower adsorption distribution coefficient (K(ads)) values with increasing depth indicated less adsorption at lower depths and greater leaching potential of metolachlor after passage through the surface horizon. Desorption of metolachlor showed hysteresis, indicated by the higher adsorption slope (1/n(ads)) compared with the desorption slope (1/n(des)). Soils that adsorbed more metolachlor also desorbed less metolachlor. Metolachlor dissipation rates generally decreased with increasing soil depth. The first-order dissipation rate was highest at the 0-50 cm depth (0.140 week(-1)) and lowest at the 350-425 cm depth (0.005 week(-1)). Degradation of the herbicide was significantly correlated with microbial activity in soils. Metolachlor that has escaped degradation or binding to organic matter at the soil surface might leach into the subsurface soil where it will dissipate slowly and be subject to transport to groundwater. Copyright 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Isosteric heat of water adsorption and desorption in homoionic alkaline-earth montmorillonites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhocine, M.; Haouzi, A.; Bassou, G.; Phou, T.; Maurin, D.; Bantignies, J. L.; Henn, F.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to study by means of thermodynamic measurements and Infrared spectroscopy, the effect of the interlayer cations on the adsorption-desorption of water in the case of a montmorillonite exchanged with alkaline-earth metals. For the first time, the net isosteric heat of water adsorption and desorption is determined from isotherms recorded at three temperatures. The net isosteric heat is a very useful parameter for getting more insights into the sorption mechanism since it provides information about the sorption energy evolution which can be complementary to that obtained from structural or gravimetric measurements. The homoionic montmorillonite samples are prepared from purification and cationic exchanged in aqueous solution of the raw material, i.e. the reference SWy-2 Wyoming material. XRD at the dry state and elemental chemical analysis confirm that the treatment does not deteriorate the clay structure and yield the expected homoionic composition. The sorption isotherms measured at various temperatures show that the nature of the interlayer, i.e. exchangeable, cation changes the adsorbed/desorbed amount of water molecules for a given water relative pressure. The total amount of water adsorbed at P/P∘ = 0.5 follows the cation sequence Ca ∼ Mg>Ba while the sorption isosteric heats follow a slightly different sequence, i.e. Ca > Mg>Ba. This discrepancy between the adsorption and desorption heat is due to the higher irreversibility of water sorption process in the Ca exchanged montmorillonite. Finally, analysis of the IR spectra recorded at room temperature and under a primary vacuum reveals that the amount of adsorbed water follows the same sequence as that of the isosteric heat of adsorption and shows the coexistence of liquid-like and solid-like water confined in the interlayer space.

  7. Sorption-desorption equilibrium and diffusion of tetracycline in poultry litter and municipal biosolids soil amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, E

    2017-12-01

    Tetracycline (TET) is commonly used to treat bacterial diseases in humans and chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus), is largely excreted, and is found at elevated concentrations in treated sewage sludge (biosolids) and poultry litter (excrement plus bedding materials). Routine application of these nutrient-and carbon-enriched materials to soils improves fertility and other characteristics, but the presence of antibiotics (and other pharmaceuticals) in amendments raises questions about potential adverse effects on biota and development of antibiotic resistance in the environment. Hazard risks are largely dictated by sorption-desorption and diffusion behavior in amendments, so these processes were evaluated from sorption-desorption equilibrium isotherm and diffusion cell experiments with four types amendments (biosolids, poultry manure, wood chip litter, and rice hull litter) at three temperatures (8 °C, 20 °C and 32 °C). Linear sorption-desorption equilibrium distribution constants (Kd) in native amendments ranged between 124-2418 L kg-1. TET sorption was significantly increased after treatment with alum, and there was a strong exponential relationship between Kd and the concentration of bound Al3+ in amendments (R2 = 0.94), which indicated that amendments contained functional groups capable of chelating Al3+ and forming metal bridges with TET. Effective diffusion coefficients of TET in amendments ranged between 0.1 and 5.2 × 10-6 cm2 s-1, which were positively related to temperature and inversely related to Kd by a multiple regression model (R2 = 0.86). Treatment of organic amendments with alum greatly increased Kd, would decrease Ds, and so would greatly reduce hazard risks of applying these organic amendments with this antibiotic to soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Towards matrix-free femtosecond-laser desorption mass spectrometry for in situ space research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, Pavel; Grimaudo, Valentine; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter; Broekmann, Peter

    2016-04-30

    There is an increasing interest in the quest for low molecular weight biomarkers that can be studied on extra-terrestrial objects by direct laser desorption mass spectrometry (LD-MS). Although molecular structure investigations have recently been carried out by direct LD-MS approaches, there is still a lack of suitable instruments for implementation on a spacecraft due to weight, size and power consumption demands. In this contribution we demonstrate the feasibility of LD-MS structural analysis of molecular species by a miniature laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometer (instrument name LMS) originally designed for in situ elemental and isotope analysis of solids in space research. Direct LD-MS studies with molecular resolution were carried out by means of a Laser Ablation/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LIMS) technique. Two polymer samples served as model systems: neutral polyethylene glycol (PEG) and cationic polymerizates of imidazole and epichlorohydrin (IMEP). Optimal conditions for molecular fragmentation could be identified for both polymers by tuning the laser energy and the instrument-sample distance. PEG and IMEP polymers show sufficient stability over a relatively wide laser energy range. Under mild LD conditions only moderate fragmentation of the polymers takes place so that valuable structural characterization based on fragment ions can be achieved. As the applied laser pulse energy rises, the abundance of fragment ions increases, reaches a plateau and subsequently drops down due to more severe fragmentation and atomization of the polymers. At this final stage, usually referred to as laser ablation, only elemental/isotope analysis can be achieved. Our investigations demonstrate the versatility of the LMS instrument that can be tuned to favourable laser desorption conditions that successfully meet molecule-specific requirements and deliver abundant fragment ion signals with detailed structural information. Overall, the results show promise for use in

  9. Adsorption and desorption of Cu2+on paddy soil aggregates pretreated with different levels of phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Wang, Wenqin; Wu, Wenchen; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Changxun

    2017-05-01

    Interactions between anions and cations are important for understanding the behaviors of chemical pollutants and their potential risks in the environment. Here we prepared soil aggregates of a yellow paddy soil from the Taihu Lake region, and investigated the effects of phosphate (P) pretreatment on adsorption-desorption of Cu 2+ of soil aggregates, free iron oxyhydrates-removed soil aggregates, goethite, and kaolinite with batch adsorption method. The results showed that Cu 2+ adsorption was reduced on the aggregates pretreated with low concentrations of P, and promoted with high concentrations of P, showing a V-shaped change. Compared with the untreated aggregates, the adsorption capacity of Cu 2+ was reduced when P application rates were lower than 260, 220, 130 and 110mg/kg for coarse, clay, silt and fine sand fractions, respectively. On the contrary, the adsorption capacity of Cu 2+ was higher on P-pretreated soil aggregates than on the control ones when P application rates were greater than those values. However, the desorption of Cu 2+ was enhanced at low levels of P, but suppressed at high levels of P, displaying an inverted V-shaped change over P adsorption. The Cu 2+ adsorption by the aggregate particles with and without P pretreatments was well described by the Freundlich equation. Similar results were obtained on P-pretreated goethite. However, such P effects on Cu 2+ adsorption-desorption were not observed on kaolinite and free iron oxyhydrates-removed soil aggregates. The present results indicate that goethite is one of the main soil substances responsible for the P-induced promotion and inhibition of Cu 2+ adsorption. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Adsorption-desorption reactions of selenium (VI) in tropical cultivated and uncultivated soils under Cerrado biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessa, J H L; Araujo, A M; Silva, G N T; Guilherme, L R G; Lopes, G

    2016-12-01

    Soil management may affect selenium (Se) adsorption capacity. This study investigated adsorption and desorption of Se (VI) in selected Brazilian soils from the Cerrado biome, an area of ever increasing importance for agriculture expansion in Brazil. Soil samples were collected from cultivated and uncultivated soils, comprising clayed and sandy soils. Following chemical and mineralogical characterization, soil samples were subjected to Se adsorption and desorption tests. Adsorption was evaluated after a 72-h reaction with increasing concentrations of Se (0-2000 μg L(-1)) added as Na2SeO4 in a NaCl electrolyte solution (pH 5.5; ionic strength 15 mmol L(-1)). Desorption, as well as distribution coefficients (Kd) for selenate were also assessed. Soil management affected Se adsorption capacity, i.e., Se adsorbed amounts were higher for uncultivated soils, when compared to cultivated ones. Such results were also supported by data of Kd and maximum adsorption capacity of Se. This fact was attributed mainly to the presence of greater amounts of competing anions, especially phosphate, in cultivated soils, due to fertilizer application. Phosphate may compete with selenate for adsorption sites, decreasing Se retention. For the same group of soils (cultivated and uncultivated), Se adsorption was greater in the clayed soils compared to sandy ones. Our results support the idea that adding Se (VI) to the soil is a good strategy to increase Se levels in food crops (agronomic biofortification), especially when crops are grown in soils that have been cultivated over the time due to their low Se adsorption capacity (high Se availability). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Arsenate adsorption and desorption kinetics on a Fe(III)-modified montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luengo, Carina; Puccia, Virginia [INQUISUR, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Avena, Marcelo, E-mail: mavena@uns.edu.ar [INQUISUR, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Consejo de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas de Argentina (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2011-02-28

    Graphical abstract: Arsenate adsorption is much higher in Fe-exchanged montmorillonite (Fe-M) than in Na-exchanged montmorillonite (Na-M). The adsorption takes place in a two-step mechanism. Research highlights: {yields} Adsorption-desorption kinetics of arsenate on a Fe(III)-modified montmorillonite is reported. {yields} Fe(III) species are the responsible for arsenate adsorption. {yields} The adsorption takes place in a two-step mechanism. {yields} Adsorption and desorption studies reflect the presence of externally and internally adsorbed arsenate. {yields} Fe(III) species in Fe-M are more efficient in binding arsenate than in ferrihydrite or goethite. - Abstract: The adsorption-desorption kinetics of arsenate on a Fe(III)-modified montmorillonite (Fe-M) was studied at different arsenate concentrations, pH and stirring rates. The synthesized solid was a porous sample with Fe(III) present as a mix of monomeric and polymeric Fe(III) species in the interlayer and on the external surface. Adsorption took place in a two-step mechanism, with an initial fast binding of arsenate to Fe(III) species at the external surface (half-lives of 1 min or shorter) followed by a slower binding to less accessible Fe(III) species in pores and the interlayer (half-lives of around 1 h). Desorption kinetics also reflected the presence of externally and internally adsorbed arsenate. At pH 6 the maximum adsorbed arsenate was 52 {mu}mol/g, a value that is low as compared to adsorption on ferrihydrite (700 {mu}mol/g) and goethite (192-220 {mu}mol/g). However, since the Fe(III) content of Fe-M is much lower than that of ferrihydrite and goethite, Fe(III) species in Fe-M are more efficient in binding arsenate than in ferrihydrite or goethite (one As atom is attached every 8.95 iron atoms). This high binding efficiency indicates that Fe(III) species are well spread on montmorillonite, forming small oligomeric species or surface clusters containing just a few iron atoms.

  12. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry of transfer ribonucleic acids isolated from yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruic-Sovulj, I; Lüdemann, H C; Hillenkamp, F; Weygand-Durasevic, I; Kucan, Z; Peter-Katalinic, J

    1997-01-01

    tRNATyr and tRNASer purified from bulk brewer's yeast tRNA were subjected to analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Choosing a mixture of 2,4,6- and 2,3,4-trihydroxy-acetophenone and diammonium citrate as matrix a mass resolution of up to 220 (FWHM) was achieved in the linear mode of operation. Cation adduct suppression by addition of cation exchange beads and a chelating agent (CDTA) is shown to substantially improve mass resolution for this class of molecules. PMID:9108172

  13. Multivariate analysis of progressive thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2010-09-01

    Thermal decomposition of poly dimethyl siloxane compounds, Sylgard{reg_sign} 184 and 186, were examined using thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. This work describes a method of producing multiway data using a stepped thermal desorption. The technique involves sequentially heating a sample of the material of interest with subsequent analysis in a commercial GC/MS system. The decomposition chromatograms were analyzed using multivariate analysis tools including principal component analysis (PCA), factor rotation employing the varimax criterion, and multivariate curve resolution. The results of the analysis show seven components related to offgassing of various fractions of siloxanes that vary as a function of temperature. Thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique for analyzing chemical mixtures. It has great potential in numerous analytic areas including materials analysis, sports medicine, in the detection of designer drugs; and biological research for metabolomics. Data analysis is complicated, far from automated and can result in high false positive or false negative rates. We have demonstrated a step-wise TD/GC-MS technique that removes more volatile compounds from a sample before extracting the less volatile compounds. This creates an additional dimension of separation before the GC column, while simultaneously generating three-way data. Sandia's proven multivariate analysis methods, when applied to these data, have several advantages over current commercial options. It also has demonstrated potential for success in finding and enabling identification of trace compounds. Several challenges remain, however, including understanding the sources of noise in the data, outlier detection, improving the data pretreatment and analysis methods, developing a software tool for ease of use by the chemist, and demonstrating our belief

  14. The effect of ozone on nicotine desorption from model surfaces:evidence for heterogeneous chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Singer, Brett C.; Lee, Sharon K.; Gundel, LaraA.

    2005-05-01

    Assessment of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure using nicotine as a tracer or biomarker is affected by sorption of the alkaloid to indoor surfaces and by its long-term re-emission into the gas phase. However, surface chemical interactions of nicotine have not been sufficiently characterized. Here, the reaction of ozone with nicotine sorbed to Teflon and cotton surfaces was investigated in an environmental chamber by monitoring nicotine desorption over a week following equilibration in dry or humid air (65-70 % RH). The Teflon and cotton surfaces had N{sub 2}-BET surface areas of 0.19 and 1.17 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, and water mass uptakes (at 70 % RH) of 0 and 7.1 % respectively. Compared with dry air baseline levels in the absence of O{sub 3}, gas phase nicotine concentrations decrease, by 2 orders of magnitude for Teflon after 50 h at 20-45 ppb O{sub 3}, and by a factor of 10 for cotton after 100 h with 13-15 ppb O{sub 3}. The ratios of pseudo first-order rate constants for surface reaction (r) to long-term desorption (k) were r/k = 3.5 and 2.0 for Teflon and cotton surfaces, respectively. These results show that surface oxidation was competitive with desorption. Hence, oxidative losses could significantly reduce long-term re-emissions of nicotine from indoor surfaces. Formaldehyde, N-methylformamide, nicotinaldehyde and cotinine were identified as oxidation products, indicating that the pyrrolidinic N was the site of electrophilic attack by O{sub 3}. The presence of water vapor had no effect on the nicotine-O{sub 3} reaction on Teflon surfaces. By contrast, nicotine desorption from cotton in humid air was unaffected by the presence of ozone. These observations are consistent with complete inhibition of ozone-nicotine surface reactions in an aqueous surface film present in cotton but not in Teflon surfaces.

  15. Aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization for liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, K.K.; Lewis, T.M.; Beeson, M.D.; Russell, D.H. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

    1994-05-15

    We report the application of aerosol matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) to liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The aerosol MALDI experiment uses aerosol liquid introduction in conjunction with pulsed UV laser ionization to form ions from large biomolecules in solution. Mass analysis is achieved in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In the LC/MALDI-MS experiment, the matrix solution is combined with the column effluent in a mixing tee, LC/MALDI-MS is demonstrated for the separation of bradykinin, gramicidin S, and myoglobin. 32 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Variable Temperature Infrared Spectroscopy Investigations of Benzoic Acid Desorption from Sodium and Calcium Montmorillonite Clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Tara M; Ingram, Audrey L; Maraoulaite, Dalia K; White, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    Processes involved in thermal desorption of benzoic acid from sodium and calcium montmorillonite clays are investigated by using variable temperature diffuse reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). By monitoring the temperature dependence of infrared absorbance bands while heating samples, subtle changes in molecular vibrations are detected and employed to characterize specific benzoic acid adsorption sites. Abrupt changes in benzoic acid adsorption site properties occur for both clay samples at about 125 °C. Difference spectra absorbance band frequency variations indicate that adsorbed benzoic acid interacts with interlayer cations through water bridges and that these interactions can be disrupted by the presence of organic anions, in particular, benzoate.

  17. Solid solution barium–strontium chlorides with tunable ammonia desorption properties and superior storage capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bialy, Agata; Jensen, Peter Bjerre; Blanchard, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Metal halide ammines are very attractive materials for ammonia absorption and storage—applications where the practically accessible or usable gravimetric and volumetric storage densities are of critical importance. Here we present, that by combining advanced computational materials prediction...... with different ammonia ab- and desorption properties. In particular it is shown, that in the molar range of 35–50% barium and 65–50% strontium, stable materials can be produced with a practically usable ammonia density (both volumetric and gravimetric) that is higher than any of the pure metal halides...

  18. Effect of Initial Moisture on the Adsorption and Desorption Equilibrium Moisture Contents of Polished Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Murata, Satoshi; Amaratunga, K.S.P.; Tanaka, Fumihiko; Hori, Yoshiaki

    1993-01-01

    The moisture adsorption and desorption properties for polished rice have been measured using a dynamic ventilatory method. Air temperatures of 10,20,30 and 40℃, relative humidities of 50,60,70,80 and 90%, and five levels of initial moisture contents ranging approximately from 8% to 19% d.b. were used to obtain moisture content data. The value of equilibrium moisture content for each initial moisture content at the range of air condition was determined by a method of nonlinear least squares. R...

  19. Laser desorption ionization and peptide sequencing on laser induced silicon microcolumn arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertes, Akos [Reston, VA; Chen, Yong [San Diego, CA

    2011-12-27

    The present invention provides a method of producing a laser-patterned silicon surface, especially silicon wafers for use in laser desorption ionization (LDI-MS) (including MALDI-MS and SELDI-MS), devices containing the same, and methods of testing samples employing the same. The surface is prepared by subjecting a silicon substrate to multiple laser shots from a high-power picosecond or femtosecond laser while in a processing environment, e.g., underwater, and generates a remarkable homogenous microcolumn array capable of providing an improved substrate for LDI-MS.

  20. Oxygen isotopic fractionation of O₂ during adsorption and desorption processes using molecular sieve at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Insu; Kusakabe, Minoru; Lee, Jong Ik

    2014-06-15

    Cryogenic trapping using molecular sieves is commonly used to collect O2 extracted from silicates for (17)O/(16)O and (18)O/(16)O analyses. However, gases which interfere with (17)O/(16)O analysis, notably NF3, are also trapped and their removal is essential for accurate direct measurement of the (17)O/(16)O ratio. It is also necessary to identify and quantify any isotopic fractionation associated with the use of cryogenic trapping using molecular sieves. The oxygen isotopic compositions of O2 before and after desorption from, and adsorption onto, 13X and 5A molecular sieves (MS13X and MS5A) at 0°C, -78°C, -114°C, and -130°C were measured in order to determine the oxygen isotopic fractionation at these temperatures. We also investigated whether isotopic fractionation occurred when O2 gas was transferred sequentially into a second cold finger, also containing molecular sieve. It was confirmed that significant oxygen isotopic fractionation occurs between the gaseous O2 and that adsorbed onto molecular sieve, if desorption and adsorption are incomplete. As the fraction of released or untrapped O2 becomes smaller with decreasing trapping temperature (from 0 to -130°C), the isotopic fractionation becomes larger. Approximately half of the total adsorbed O2 is released from the molecular sieve during desorption at -114°C, which is the temperature recommended for separation from NF3 (retained on the molecular sieve), and this will interfere with (17)O/(16)O measurements. The use of a single cold finger should be avoided, because partial desorption is accompanied by oxygen isotopic fractionation, thereby resulting in inaccurate isotopic data. The use of a dual cold finger arrangement is recommended because, as we have confirmed, the transfer of O2 from the first trap to the second is almost 100%. However, even under these conditions, a small isotopic fractionation (0.18 ± 0.05‰ in δ(17)O values and 0.26 ± 0.06‰ in δ(18)O values) occurred, with O2 in

  1. Membrane solubility of chlorpromazine. Hygroscopic desorption and centrifugation methods yield comparable results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxnat, M; Müller, H J; Galla, H J

    1984-01-01

    Binding of the positively charged drug chlorpromazine to artificial and erythrocyte bilayer membranes was investigated by the filtration method called hygroscopic desorption [Conrad & Singer (1979) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 76, 5202-5206] and by the conventional centrifugation method. Only minor differences in the partition coefficients were observed using the two methods. Our finding is not consistent with the observation of Conrad & Singer that amphipaths are completely excluded from biological membranes. However, the partition coefficient is dependent on membrane composition, which means dependent on the physical properties of a membrane. PMID:6525170

  2. Arsenic Adsorption and Desorption by Drinking Water Treatment Residuals: Incubation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandanapu, V.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Makris, K.

    2005-05-01

    Arsenic (As) has been used for a long time in agricultural practices, primarily to control pests and noxious weeds. In many cases, the indiscriminate usage of toxic arsenical compounds has left a legacy of contaminated soils. Recent awareness of the toxicity of As at much lower concentrations than previously deemed to be dangerous has led to increased interest in the environmental chemistry of As. The immediate challenge, as perceived by various regulatory bodies is to develop a cost-effective, reliable and environmentally sound approach to cleaning up such contaminated soils. In-situ immobilization technologies are an attractive alternative to conventional remediation methods. One of the most interesting of these in-situ techniques is the use of Water Treatment Residuals (WTRs). The WTRs are by-products of drinking water purification processes and generally contain sediments, organic carbon, and Al/Fe oxides. The oxides are typically amorphous (with very high specific surface area) and have tremendous affinity for oxyanions (e.g., arsenate), due to their high positive surface charge. Recent studies conducted by our group have suggested that WTRs retain As and decrease arsenic mobility. However, a better understanding of As adsorption/desorption by WTRs is necessary for effective implementation of appropriate in-situ remedial strategies. Hence, the present study examines the potential use of WTRs (Al-WTR and Fe-WTR) as adsorbents for the removal of arsenate in solutions. Furthermore, it investigates the extent of desorption of the pre-adsorbed arsenate onto the WTR surfaces. Effects of various key parameters, such as solid solution ratio, equilibration time and arsenic concentration were examined to achieve the optimized conditions for arsenate adsorption. Preliminary batch adsorption experiments showed the optimum equilibration time to be 24 h and the solid/solution ratio to be 1:5 for arsenate adsorption. Sorption data has been evaluated using both Langmuir and

  3. Cosmetic Analysis Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ramos Catharino

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A new “omic” platform—Cosmetomics—that proves to be extremely simple and effective in terms of sample preparation and readiness for data acquisition/interpretation is presented. This novel approach employing Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI for cosmetic analysis has proven to readily identify and quantify compounds of interest. It also allows full control of all the production phases, as well as of the final product, by integration of both analytical and statistical data. This work has focused on products of daily use, namely nail polish, lipsticks and eyeliners of multiple brands sold in the worldwide market.

  4. Application of ASTM E-1559 Apparatus to Study H2O Desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woronowicz, Michael; Perry, Radford, III; Meadows, George A.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA James Webb Space Telescope project identified a need to measure water vapor desorption from cryogenic surfaces in order to validate predictions of spacecraft design performance. A review of available scientific literature indicated no such measurements had been reported below 131 K. Contamination control personnel at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center recognized the possibility they readily possessed the means to collect these measurements at lower temperatures using an existing apparatus commonly employed for making outgassing observations. This presentation will relate how the ASTM E-1559 Molekit apparatus was used without physical modification to measure water vapor sublimation down to 120 K and compare this data to existing equilibrium vapor pressure models.

  5. The role of electron-stimulated desorption in focused electron beam induced deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, Willem F.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of our study about the deposition rate of focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) as a function of the substrate temperature with the substrate being an electron-transparent amorphous carbon membrane. When W(CO)6 is used as a precursor it is observed that the growth......, the majority desorbs from the surface rather than dissociates to contribute to the deposit. It is important to take this into account during FEBIP experiments, for instance when determining fundamental process parameters such as the activation energy for desorption....

  6. Kinetic isotope effect for H2 and D2 quantum molecular sieving in adsorption/desorption on porous carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuebo; Villar-Rodil, Silvia; Fletcher, Ashleigh J; Thomas, K Mark

    2006-05-25

    Adsorption and desorption of H(2) and D(2) from porous carbon materials, such as activated carbon at 77 K, are usually fully reversible with very rapid adsorption/desorption kinetics. The adsorption and desorption of H(2) and D(2) at 77 K on a carbon molecular sieve (Takeda 3A), where the kinetic selectivity was incorporated by carbon deposition, and a carbon, where the pore structure was modified by thermal annealing to give similar pore structure characteristics to the carbon molecular sieve substrate, were studied. The D(2) adsorption and desorption kinetics were significantly faster (up to x1.9) than the corresponding H(2) kinetics for specific pressure increments/decrements. This represents the first experimental observation of kinetic isotope quantum molecular sieving in porous materials due to the larger zero-point energy for the lighter H(2), resulting in slower adsorption/desorption kinetics compared with the heavier D(2). The results are discussed in terms of the adsorption mechanism.

  7. Desorption of hydrocarbon chains by association with ionic and nonionic surfactants under flow as a mechanism for enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrón-Mejía, Ketzasmin A; López-Rendón, Roberto; Goicochea, Armando Gama

    2017-08-29

    The need to extract oil from wells where it is embedded on the surfaces of rocks has led to the development of new and improved enhanced oil recovery techniques. One of those is the injection of surfactants with water vapor, which promotes desorption of oil that can then be extracted using pumps, as the surfactants encapsulate the oil in foams. However, the mechanisms that lead to the optimal desorption of oil and the best type of surfactants to carry out desorption are not well known yet, which warrants the need to carry out basic research on this topic. In this work, we report non equilibrium dissipative particle dynamics simulations of model surfactants and oil molecules adsorbed on surfaces, with the purpose of studying the efficiency of the surfactants to desorb hydrocarbon chains, that are found adsorbed over flat surfaces. The model surfactants studied correspond to nonionic and cationic surfactants, and the hydrocarbon desorption is studied as a function of surfactant concentration under increasing Poiseuille flow. We obtain various hydrocarbon desorption isotherms for every model of surfactant proposed, under flow. Nonionic surfactants are found to be the most effective to desorb oil and the mechanisms that lead to this phenomenon are presented and discussed.

  8. Behavior of hydrogen atoms in boron films during H{sub 2} and He glow discharge and thermal desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuzuki, K.; Natsir, M.; Inoue, N. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics in boron films deposited on a graphite liner have been studied. Number of hydrogen atoms absorbed in the films is estimated from a decrease in hydrogen pressure during a hydrogen glow discharge. It was 1.9 x 10{sup 17} atoms/cm{sup 2} in the 1 hour discharge after an evacuation of H atoms contained in the original boron films by thermal desorption. Hydrogen atoms were absorbed continuously without saturation for 3 hours during the discharge. Number of H atoms absorbed reached to 2.6 x 10{sup 17} atoms/cm{sup 2} at 3 hour. A discharge in helium was carried out to investigate H desorption characteristics from hydrogen implanted boron films. It was verified that reactivity for hydrogen absorption was recovered after the He discharge. Hydrogen atoms were accumulated in the films by repetition of alternate He and H{sub 2} discharge. Thermal desorption experiments have been carried out by raising the liner temperature up to 500degC for films after 1 hour, 3 hours hydrogen discharge and 6 times repetition of H{sub 2}/He discharges. Most of H atoms in the films were desorbed for all these cases. The slow absorption process was confirmed through the thermal desorption experiments. (author).

  9. Competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline on two acid soils: Stirred flow chamber experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Fernández-Sanjurjo, Maria J; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work was to study the competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC) and chlortetracycline (CTC) on two acid soils. We used the stirred flow chamber technique to obtain experimental data on rapid kinetic processes affecting the retention/release of the antibiotics. Both adsorption and desorption were higher on soil 1 (which showed the highest carbon, clay and Al and Fe oxides content) than on soil 2. Moreover, hysteresis affected the adsorption/desorption processes. Experimental data were fitted to a pseudo-first order equation, resulting qamax (adsorption maximum) values that were higher for soil 1 than for soil 2, and indicating that CTC competed with TC more intensely than OTC in soil 1. Regarding soil 2, the values corresponding to the adsorption kinetics constants (ka) and desorption kinetics constants for fast sites (kd1), followed a trend inverse to qamax and qdmax respectively. In conclusion, competition affected adsorption/desorption kinetics for the three antibiotics assayed, and thus retention/release and subsequent transport processes in soil and water environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Kinetics of Cation and Oxyanion Adsorption and Desorption on Ferrihydrite: Roles of Ferrihydrite Binding Sites and a Unified Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Shi, Zhenqing; Lu, Yang; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Lin, Zhang; Dang, Zhi

    2017-09-19

    Quantitative understanding the kinetics of toxic ion reactions with various heterogeneous ferrihydrite binding sites is crucial for accurately predicting the dynamic behavior of contaminants in environment. In this study, kinetics of As(V), Cr(VI), Cu(II), and Pb(II) adsorption and desorption on ferrihydrite was studied using a stirred-flow method, which showed that metal adsorption/desorption kinetics was highly dependent on the reaction conditions and varied significantly among four metals. High resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that all four metals were distributed within the ferrihydrite aggregates homogeneously after adsorption reactions. Based on the equilibrium model CD-MUSIC, we developed a novel unified kinetics model applicable for both cation and oxyanion adsorption and desorption on ferrihydrite, which is able to account for the heterogeneity of ferrihydrite binding sites, different binding properties of cations and oxyanions, and variations of solution chemistry. The model described the kinetic results well. We quantitatively elucidated how the equilibrium properties of the cation and oxyanion binding to various ferrihydrite sites and the formation of various surface complexes controlled the adsorption and desorption kinetics at different reaction conditions and time scales. Our study provided a unified modeling method for the kinetics of ion adsorption/desorption on ferrihydrite.

  11. Kinetics of Cation and Oxyanion Adsorption and Desorption on Ferrihydrite: Roles of Ferrihydrite Binding Sites and a Unified Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Lei [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry; Shi, Zhenqing [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry; Lu, Yang [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry; Dohnalkova, Alice C. [Environmental; Lin, Zhang [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry; Dang, Zhi [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006, People’s Republic of China; The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry

    2017-08-29

    Understanding the kinetics of toxic ion reactions with ferrihydrite is crucial for predicting the dynamic behavior of contaminants in soil environments. In this study, the kinetics of As(V), Cr(VI), Cu, and Pb adsorption and desorption on ferrihydrite were investigated with a combination of laboratory macroscopic experiments, microscopic investigation and mechanistic modeling. The rates of As(V), Cr(VI), Cu, and Pb adsorption and desorption on ferrihydrite, as systematically studied using a stirred-flow method, was highly dependent on the reaction pH and metal concentrations and varied significantly among four metals. Spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM) showed, at sub-nano scales, all four metals were distributed within the ferrihydrite particle aggregates homogeneously after adsorption reactions, with no evidence of surface diffusion-controlled processes. Based on experimental results, we developed a unifying kinetics model for both cation and oxyanion adsorption/desorption on ferrihydrite based on the mechanistic-based equilibrium model CD-MUSIC. Overall, the model described the kinetic results well, and we quantitatively demonstrated how the equilibrium properties of the cation and oxyanion binding to various ferrihydrite sites affected the adsorption and desorption rates. Our results provided a unifying quantitative modeling method for the kinetics of both cation and oxyanion adsorption/desorption on iron minerals.

  12. Determination of a Polymeric Hindered Amine Light Stabilizer in Polypropylene Formulated with Magnesium Hydroxide Flame Retardant by Reactive Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TAGUCHI, Yoshihiko; ISHIDA, Yasuyuki; OHTANI, Hajime; BEKKU, Hiroyuki; SERA, Masaya

    2004-01-01

    A polymeric hindered amine light stabilizer (HALS), Tinuvin 622 (MW = 4000), in PP materials formulated with a magnesium hydroxide flame retardant was determined by reactive thermal desorption (RTD...

  13. In-situ regeneration of activated carbon with electric potential swing desorption (EPSD) for the H2S removal from biogas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, M.; Almustapha, M. N.; Imran, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    treating a gas mixture with 10,000 ppm H2S. Breakthrough times, adsorption desorption volume, capacities, effect of regeneration and desorption kinetics were investigated. The analysis showed that desorption of H2S using the new EPSD system was 3 times quicker compared with the no potential system. Hence......, physical adsorption using EPSD over activated carbon is efficient, safe and environmental friendly and could be used for the in-situ regeneration of granular activated carbon without using a PSA and/or TSA system. Additionally, adsorption and desorption cycles can be obtained with a classical two column...

  14. The impact of soil organic matter and soil sterilisation on the bioaccessibility of {sup 14}C-azoxystrobin determined by desorption kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clegg, Helen; Riding, Matthew J. [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Oliver, Robin [Syngenta, Jealotts Hill Research Station, Bracknell RG42 6ET (United Kingdom); Jones, Kevin C. [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Semple, Kirk T., E-mail: k.semple@lancaster.ac.uk [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Desorption of azoxystrobin from soils occurs in a bi-phasic manner. • Soil organic matter, indigenous microorganisms and contact time reduce desorption. • Choice of extractant is important in determining predicting the bioaccessible fraction. - Abstract: As soils represent a major sink for most pesticides, factors influencing pesticide degradation are essential in identifying their potential environmental risk. Desorption of {sup 14}C-azoxystrobin was investigated over time in two soils under sterile and non-sterile conditions using exhaustive (solvent) and non-exhaustive (aqueous) methods. Desorption data were fitted to a two-compartment model, differentiating between fast and slow desorbing fractions. With increased ageing, rapid desorption (F{sub rap}) (bioaccessibility) decreased with corresponding increases in slowly desorbing fractions (F{sub slow}). The rapid desorption rate constant (k{sub fast}) was not affected by ageing, sterility or extraction solvent. The non-exhaustive extractions had similar desorption profiles; whereas exhaustive extractions in aged soils had the highest F{sub rap}. In non-sterile soil, F{sub rap} was lower resulting in higher F{sub slow}, while desorption rates remained unaffected. Organic matter (OM) reduces F{sub rap}; but not desorption rates. Microorganisms and OM enhanced ageing effects, reducing the fraction of fast desorbing chemicals and potentially the bioaccessibility of pesticides in soil.

  15. Ambient femtosecond laser vaporization and nanosecond laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Paul; Levis, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations of ambient laser-based transfer of molecules into the gas phase for subsequent mass spectral analysis have undergone a renaissance resulting from the separation of vaporization and ionization events. Here, we seek to provide a snapshot of recent femtosecond (fs) duration laser vaporization and nanosecond (ns) duration laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments. The former employs pulse durations of vaporization with little or no fragmentation. When coupled to electrospray ionization, femtosecond laser vaporization provides a universal, rapid mass spectral analysis method requiring no sample workup. Remarkably, laser pulses with intensities exceeding 10(13) W cm(-2) desorb intact macromolecules, such as proteins, and even preserve the condensed phase of folded or unfolded protein structures according to the mass spectral charge state distribution, as demonstrated for cytochrome c and lysozyme. Because of the ability to vaporize and ionize multiple components from complex mixtures for subsequent analysis, near perfect classification of explosive formulations, plant tissue phenotypes, and even the identity of the manufacturer of smokeless powders can be determined by multivariate statistics. We also review the more mature field of nanosecond laser desorption for ambient mass spectrometry, covering the wide range of systems analyzed, the need for resonant absorption, and the spatial imaging of complex systems like tissue samples.

  16. Statistical optimization, interaction analysis and desorption studies for the azo dyes adsorption onto chitosan films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rêgo, T V; Cadaval, T R S; Dotto, G L; Pinto, L A A

    2013-12-01

    Chitosan films (CF) were applied to remove azo dyes (tartrazine and amaranth) from aqueous solutions by adsorption. CF were prepared by casting technique and characterized. Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the adsorption process as a function of pH (2, 3 and 4) and CF concentration (100, 150 and 200 mg L(-1)). The possible interactions CF-dyes were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dispersive energy X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and color parameters. Adsorption-desorption cycles were also performed. The more appropriate conditions for the adsorption of both dyes were pH of 2 and CF concentration of 100 mg L(-1). Under these conditions, the tartrazine and amaranth adsorption capacities were 413.8 and 278.3 mg g(-1), respectively. The interactions between the CF protonated amino groups and anionic form of the dyes at pH 2 were confirmed. Desorption experiments showed that the CF can keep its adsorption capacity maximum for two cycles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of nitrogen-based explosives with desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, T J; Flink, A; Pukkila, J; Ketola, R A

    2016-02-28

    Fast methods that allow the in situ analysis of explosives from a variety of surfaces are needed in crime scene investigations and home-land security. Here, the feasibility of the ambient mass spectrometry technique desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) in the analysis of the most common nitrogen-based explosives is studied. DAPPI and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) were compared in the direct analysis of trinitrotoluene (TNT), trinitrophenol (picric acid), octogen (HMX), cyclonite (RDX), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and nitroglycerin (NG). The effect of different additives in DAPPI dopant and in DESI spray solvent on the ionization efficiency was tested, as well as the suitability of DAPPI to detect explosives from a variety of surfaces. The analytes showed ions only in negative ion mode. With negative DAPPI, TNT and picric acid formed deprotonated molecules with all dopant systems, while RDX, HMX, PETN and NG were ionized by adduct formation. The formation of adducts was enhanced by addition of chloroform, formic acid, acetic acid or nitric acid to the DAPPI dopant. DAPPI was more sensitive than DESI for TNT, while DESI was more sensitive for HMX and picric acid. DAPPI could become an important method for the direct analysis of nitroaromatics from a variety of surfaces. For compounds that are thermally labile, or that have very low vapor pressure, however, DESI is better suited. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Water adsorption-desorption isotherms of two-dimensional hexagonal mesoporous silica around freezing point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaura, Toshio; Yamashita, Kyohei; Matsuoka, Fumio; Hihara, Eiji; Daiguji, Hirofumi

    2012-02-01

    Zr-doped mesoporous silica with a diameter of approximately 3.8 nm was synthesized via an evaporation-induced self-assembly process, and the adsorption-desorption isotherms of water vapor were measured in the temperature range of 263-298 K. The measured adsorption-desorption isotherms below 273 K indicated that water confined in the mesopores did not freeze at any relative pressure. All isotherms had a steep curve, resulting from capillary condensation/evaporation, and a pronounced hysteresis. The hysteresis loop, which is associated with a delayed adsorption process, increased with a decrease in temperature. Furthermore, the curvature radius where capillary evaporation/condensation occurs was evaluated by the combined Kelvin and Gibbs-Tolman-Koening-Buff (GTKB) equations for the modification of the interfacial tension due to the interfacial curvature. The thickness of the water adsorption layer for capillary condensation was slightly larger, whereas that for capillary evaporation was slightly smaller than 0.7 nm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ammonium Bicarbonate Addition Improves the Detection of Proteins by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarvar, Elahe; Venter, Andre R.

    2017-06-01

    The analysis of protein by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is considered impractical due to a mass-dependent loss in sensitivity with increase in protein molecular weights. With the addition of ammonium bicarbonate to the DESI-MS analysis the sensitivity towards proteins by DESI was improved. The signal to noise ratio (S/N) improvement for a variety of proteins increased between 2- to 3-fold relative to solvent systems containing formic acid and more than seven times relative to aqueous methanol spray solvents. Three methods for ammonium bicarbonate addition during DESI-MS were investigated. The additive delivered improvements in S/N whether it was mixed with the analyte prior to sample deposition, applied over pre-prepared samples, or simply added to the desorption spray solvent. The improvement correlated well with protein pI but not with protein size. Other ammonium or bicarbonate salts did not produce similar improvements in S/N, nor was this improvement in S/N observed for ESI of the same samples. As was previously described for ESI, DESI also caused extensive protein unfolding upon the addition of ammonium bicarbonate. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Angular distributions of H-induced HD and D2 desorptions from the Si(100) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanaga, S.; Kiyonaga, T.; Rahman, F.; Khanom, F.; Namiki, A.; Lee, J.

    2006-02-01

    We measured angular distributions of HD and D2 molecules desorbed via the reactions H +D/Si(100)→HD [abstraction (ABS)] and H +D/Si(100)→D2 [adsorption-induced-desorption (AID)], respectively. It was found that the angular distribution of HD molecules desorbed along ABS is broader than that of D2 molecules desorbed along AID, i.e., the former could be fit with cos2.0±0.2θ, while the latter with cos5.0±0.5θ. This difference of the angular distributions between the two reaction paths suggests that their dynamic mechanisms are different. The observed cos2θ distribution for the ABS reaction was reproduced by the classical trajectory calculations over the London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato potential-energy surfaces. The simulation suggests that the HD desorption along the ABS path takes place along the direction of Si-D bonds, but the apparent angular distribution is comprised of multiple components reflecting the different orientations of D-occupied Si dimers in the (2×1) and (1×2) double domain structures.

  1. Laser Desorption Postionization Mass Spectrometry of Antibiotic-Treated Bacterial Biofilms using Tunable Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasper, Gerald L; Takahashi, Lynelle K; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moore, Jerry F; Hanley, Luke

    2010-08-04

    Laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) with 8.0 ? 12.5 eV vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation is used to single photon ionize antibiotics andextracellular neutrals that are laser desorbed both neat and from intact bacterial biofilms. Neat antibiotics are optimally detected using 10.5 eV LDPI-MS, but can be ionized using 8.0 eV radiation, in agreement with prior work using 7.87 eV LDPI-MS. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation also postionizes laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotics and extracellular material from within intact bacterial biofilms. Different extracellular material is observed by LDPI-MS in response to rifampicin or trimethoprim antibiotic treatment. Once again, 10.5 eV LDPI-MS displays the optimum trade-off between improved sensitivity and minimum fragmentation. Higher energy photons at 12.5 eV produce significant parent ion signal, but fragment intensity and other low mass ions are also enhanced. No matrix is added to enhance desorption, which is performed at peak power densities insufficient to directly produce ions, thus allowing observation of true VUV postionization mass spectra of antibiotic treated biofilms.

  2. Charging-assisted desorption of deuterium films by keV electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2009-01-01

    m. The initial film thickness and the mass loss as result of desorption were monitored by the QCM. The electron beam current was kept at about or below 100 nA to avoid beam-induced evaporation. Secondary electron emission was suppressed to a value below 0.01-0.03 electrons/electron by a repeller...... ring at a bias of – 90 V. However, for films thicker than 3-4 times the range of the bombarding electrons, the electron yield suddenly rose to a value close to 0.40. From this secondary electron yield the voltage potential could be determined unambiguously from secondary electron emission curves...... obtained by short pulse measurements on fresh films. For the thickest films the charging induced a surface potential of more than 1.0 kV, i.e. one-half of the energy of the bombarding electron. For these thick films the desorption yield increased from the minimum value of 6-10 D2/electron up to 380 D2...

  3. Heavy metals fractionation and desorption in pine bark amended mine soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Cutillas-Barreiro, Laura; Paradelo-Núñez, Remigio; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María J; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2017-05-01

    The European Community Bureau of Reference method (BCR) was used for evaluating the effects of pine bark amendment (0, 24 and 48 g kg-1) and ageing (1 and 30 days) on Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn fractionation, on samples from an acid mine soil. In addition, the stirred flow chamber technique was applied for analyzing heavy metals desorption from the unamended and pine bark amended mine soil. When the unamended soil were not subjected to ageing, the added heavy metals were mainly accumulated as soluble fraction (>90% for Cd, Ni and Zn; 71% for Cu; and 45% for Pb). Pine bark amendment and ageing had little effect on Cd, Ni and Zn fractionation, whereas important changes were detected for Cu and Pb in response to both pine bark amendment and ageing (decrease in the soluble fractions, and increase in less mobile fractions). Desorption experiments showed that both pine bark amendment and ageing decreased heavy metals release from the mine soil. The results of this study indicate that pine bark amendment could be used to increase heavy metals retention (especially in the case of Cu and Pb) in acid mine soils, thus reducing the risks of metal transfer to uncontaminated environmental zones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of chlorosulfuron in selected minerals and Pakistani soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuram Shahzad Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sorption and desorption efficiency of Chlorosulfuron that is sulfonylurea herbicide was checked by selecting different minerals and two types of Pakistani soils that were different on spatial scale. In Pakistan, sulfonylurea herbicide is being used against wide varieties of broad leaf weeds and for some grasses as well. Results obtained after the experimental work showed that adsorption co-efficient isotherm for Chlorosulfuron in tested soils data well fitted the Freundlich equation. In all the cases, slope n<1 was resembling the C type curve and isotherm was nonlinear. Due to low adsorption, distribution co-efficient (Kd parameters were also low. Results indicated that soil samples (silt loam collected from northern hilly areas Ayubia, Khyber Pukhtunkhwa showed more adsorption for Chlorosulfuron herbicide i.e. 25.5% than the sandy soil of Multan Punjab. The major difference between the sorption capacities of both of the soil was due to the difference in soil organic matter and soil pH. Among both these factors, organic matter plays more significant role in sorption. Adsorption efficiency of synthesized compounds on different soil types of known composition can be predicted by the adsorption and desorption results of the present study.

  5. Adsorption-desorption processes of polydisperse mixtures on a triangular lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujak, D.; Lončarević, I.; Budinski-Petković, Lj.; Vrhovac, S. B.; Karač, A.

    2015-03-01

    Adsorption-desorption processes of polydisperse mixtures on a triangular lattice are studied by numerical simulations. Mixtures are composed of the shapes of different numbers of segments and rotational symmetries. Numerical simulations are performed to determine the influence of the number of mixture components and the length of the shapes making the mixture on the kinetics of the deposition process. We find that, above the jamming limit, the time evolution of the total coverage of a mixture can be described by the Mittag-Leffler function θ (t ) =θ∞-Δ θ Eβ[-(t/τ ) β] for all the mixtures we have examined. Our results show that the equilibrium coverage decreases with the number of components making the mixture and also with the desorption probability, via corresponding stretched exponential laws. For the mixtures of equal-sized objects, we propose a simple formula for predicting the value of the steady-state coverage fraction of a mixture from the values of the steady-state coverage fractions of pure component shapes.

  6. Adsorption-desorption processes of polydisperse mixtures on a triangular lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujak, D; Lončarević, I; Budinski-Petković, Lj; Vrhovac, S B; Karač, A

    2015-03-01

    Adsorption-desorption processes of polydisperse mixtures on a triangular lattice are studied by numerical simulations. Mixtures are composed of the shapes of different numbers of segments and rotational symmetries. Numerical simulations are performed to determine the influence of the number of mixture components and the length of the shapes making the mixture on the kinetics of the deposition process. We find that, above the jamming limit, the time evolution of the total coverage of a mixture can be described by the Mittag-Leffler function θ(t)=θ∞-ΔθE[-(t/τ)β] for all the mixtures we have examined. Our results show that the equilibrium coverage decreases with the number of components making the mixture and also with the desorption probability, via corresponding stretched exponential laws. For the mixtures of equal-sized objects, we propose a simple formula for predicting the value of the steady-state coverage fraction of a mixture from the values of the steady-state coverage fractions of pure component shapes.

  7. Surfactant-Enhanced Desorption and Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Contaminated Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongbo; Aitken, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated two nonionic surfactants, one hydrophobic (Brij 30) and one hydrophilic (C12E8), for their ability to enhance the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil after it had been treated in an aerobic bioreactor. The effects of each surfactant were evaluated at doses corresponding to equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations well above the surfactant’s critical micelle concentration (CMC), slightly above the CMC, and below the CMC. The concentrations of all 3- and 4-ring PAHs were significantly lower in the soil amended with Brij 30 at the two lower doses compared to controls, whereas removal of only the 3-ring PAHs was significantly enhanced at the highest Brij 30 dose. In contrast, C12E8 did not enhance PAH removal at any dose. In the absence of surfactant, soil over an 18-d period. Brij 30 addition at the lowest dose significantly increased the desorption of most PAHs, whereas the addition of C12E8 at the lowest dose actually decreased the desorption of all PAHs. These findings suggest that the effects of the two surfactants on PAH biodegradation could be explained by their effects on PAH bioavailability. Overall, this study demonstrates that the properties of the surfactant and its dose relative to the corresponding aqueous-phase concentration are important factors in designing systems for surfactant-enhanced bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils in which PAH bioavailability is limited. PMID:20586488

  8. Adsorption and Reactive Desorption on Metal-Organic Frameworks: A Direct Strategy for Lactic Acid Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassin, Timothée; Reinsch, Helge; Van de Voorde, Ben; Wuttke, Stefan; Medina, Dana D; Stock, Norbert; Bein, Thomas; Ameloot, Rob; De Vos, Dirk

    2017-02-08

    Biomass-derived lactic acid (LA) is an important platform chemical towards the sustainable production of numerous materials. However, the fermentation process currently in use is limited by the difficult recovery of the LA product from the fermentation broth and results in the generation of stoichiometric amounts of gypsum waste. Herein, we show that metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) of the UiO-66(Zr) type are effective adsorbents for the separation of LA from aqueous (buffer) solutions. These frameworks based on zirconium clusters and terephthalic acid derivatives display a tremendous uptake (up to 42 wt %) and a high affinity for LA. The latter can further be tuned by changing the hydrogen-bonding properties of the functional groups present on the organic ligand. A Rietveld refinement disclosed the specific interaction of LA with the clusters of UiO-66(Zr) and a preferential adsorption on open zirconium sites. Taking advantage of the catalytic activity of UiO-66(Zr), desorption of LA was performed in alcohols to recover up to 73 % as ester. Applied to the recovery of LA, adsorption and reactive desorption offer a direct and gypsum-free strategy as an alternative for the current multi-step process. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Analysis of organic compounds in water by direct adsorption and thermal desorption. [Dissertation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, J.P. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    An instrument was designed and constructed that makes it possible to thermally desorb organic compounds from wet adsorption traps to a gas chromatograph in an efficient and reproducible manner. Based on this device, a method of analyzing organics in water was developed that is rapid, sensitive, and of broader scope than previously published methods. The system was applied to the analysis of compounds with a wide range of volatilities. Temperature and flow parameters were investigated and specific procedures for quantitation were established. Real samples, including tap water and well water, were also analyzed with this system. Depending on the analysis requirements, the thermal desorption instrument can be used with either packed column or high resolution open-tubular column gas chromatography. The construction plans of normal and high-resolution systems are presented along with chromatograms and data produced by each. Finally, an improved thermal desorption instrument is described. Modifications to the basic system, including splitless injection onto a capillary column, automation, dual cryogenic trapping, reduction of scale, and effluent splitting to dual detection are discussed at length as they relate to the improved instrument.

  10. Effects of exogenous rare earth elements on phosphorus adsorption and desorption in different types of soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an important biogeochemical element and the environmental fate of P receives increasing attention. Through batch equilibration experiments, the adsorption and desorption of P in the absence and presence of exogeneous rare earth elements (REEs) were investigated in five types of agricultural soil samples collected from China. The results showed that the addition of different doses of REEs had influences on P adsorption processes in the soils, and there were differences in different soil types and different P concentrations of the P solutions. The amount of P adsorption tended to decline when the five types of soils were amended with low concentrations of REEs. The characteristics of P adsorption were more complicated when high concentrations of REEs were added to the different soils. Affected by the high concentrations of REEs, when the P concentration of the P solution added to soils was less than 20 mg L(-1), the rate of P adsorption tended to increase in all the five types of soils. However, when the P concentration of the P solution added to soil was greater than 30 mg L(-1), the rate of P adsorption tended to decrease. The Langmuir equation fitted P adsorption in all the five types of soils well. Compared with the control, when soil samples were amended with REEs, the P desorption rates of the five types of soils increased. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of Microalgae by Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Multiple Nanomatrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lung-Hsiang; Unnikrishnan, Binesh; Shih, Chi-Yu; Hsiung, Tung-Ming; Chang, Jeng; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Chiu, Tai-Chia; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a simple method to identify microalgae by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) using three different substrates: HgSe, HgTe, and HgTeSe nanostructures. The fragmentation/ionization processes of complex molecules in algae varied according to the heat absorption and transfer efficiency of the nanostructured matrices (NMs). Therefore, the mass spectra obtained for microalgae showed different patterns of m/z values for different NMs. The spectra contained both significant and nonsignificant peaks. Constructing a Venn diagram with the significant peaks obtained for algae when using HgSe, HgTe, and HgTeSe NMs in m/z ratio range 100-1000, a unique relationship among the three sets of values was obtained. This unique relationship of sets is different for each species of microalgae. Therefore, by observing the particular relationship of sets, we successfully identified different algae such as Isochrysis galbana, Emiliania huxleyi, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Nannochloris sp., Skeletonema cf. costatum, and Tetraselmis chui. This simple and cost-effective SALDI-MS analysis method coupled with multi-nanomaterials as substrates may be extended to identify other microalgae and microorganisms in real samples. Graphical Abstract Identification of microalgae by surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry coupled with three different mercury-based nanosubstrates.

  12. Laser Desorption of Tryptophan from Tryptophan-HCl Salt on a Graphite Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hae Jun; Kim, Jeong Jin; Kang, Hyuk [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Laser spectroscopy of biological molecules in the gas phase has been pioneered by Levy and coworkers when they first produced a supersonic molecular beam of tryptophan (Trp) and obtained its electronic spectrum. They were able to obtain enough vapor pressure needed for spectroscopy by heating a powder sample of Trp, although a special thermal spray was used to minimize fragmentation during heating. Many amine compounds, including biomolecules like amino acids and peptides, are usually available only as HCl salt form in order to prevent oxidation in air. Chemical processing is required to recover a neutral amine compound from its salt, thus limiting the applicability of laser-desorption spectroscopy of biomolecules. The experimental setup is a standard molecular beam machine composed of a pulsed valve with a laser-desorption module in a vacuum chamber, a second buffer chamber, a skimmer that separates the first and the second chambers, and a third vacuum chamber that is a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF MS)

  13. Effect of salinity on adsorption and desorption of paraquat in Pak Phanang river sediment, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noicharoen, Damrongsak; Parkpian, Preeda; Shipin, Oleg V; Polprasert, Chongrak; Delaune, Ronald D; Kongchum, Manoch

    2012-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to study the effect of salinity (0-30 g L(-1)) on adsorption and desorption of paraquat (1, 1'-dimethyl-4, 4'-dipyridylium dichloride), one of the most widely used herbicides in the world, in sediment of Pak Phanang River Basin, Thailand. Sediments from five locations were used in the studies (two from freshwater sites and three sites under saline environment). The adsorption capacity (K(f)) of the sediments was positively correlated with CEC (r = 0.81**) and clay content (r = 0.70*). Paraquat adsorption by sediment was faster under fresh water (0 g L(-1)) versus saline conditions (10 and 20 g L(-1)). The adsorption coefficient (K(f)) at low salinity (0 g L(-1)) was 17,302 whereas the K(f) at 10 and 20 g L(-1) were 5,344 and 4,263, respectively. Paraquat desorption was greater at higher salinity, which is similar to the salinity of estuarine or seawater. Approximately 12-31 % of sorbed paraquat in fresh water and saline sediment (7.67 and 7.98 mg kg(-1)) were released when leaching with 20 g L(-1) salinity. The amount of paraquat released was in proportion to the amount sorbed. Results show that increases in salinity resulting from salt water intrusion from the lower estuary into the Pak Phanang River Basin would result in release of adsorbed paraquat from sediment into the water column.

  14. Ambient Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanosecond Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Paul; Levis, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Recent investigations of ambient laser-based transfer of molecules into the gas phase for subsequent mass spectral analysis have undergone a renaissance resulting from the separation of vaporization and ionization events. Here, we seek to provide a snapshot of recent femtosecond (fs) duration laser vaporization and nanosecond (ns) duration laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments. The former employs pulse durations of proteins, and even preserve the condensed phase of folded or unfolded protein structures according to the mass spectral charge state distribution, as demonstrated for cytochrome c and lysozyme. Because of the ability to vaporize and ionize multiple components from complex mixtures for subsequent analysis, near perfect classification of explosive formulations, plant tissue phenotypes, and even the identity of the manufacturer of smokeless powders can be determined by multivariate statistics. We also review the more mature field of nanosecond laser desorption for ambient mass spectrometry, covering the wide range of systems analyzed, the need for resonant absorption, and the spatial imaging of complex systems like tissue samples.

  15. A STUDY ON ADSORPTION AND DESORPTION BEHAVIORS OF 14C FROM A MIXED BED RESIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEUNG-CHUL PARK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Spent resin waste containing a high concentration of 14C radionuclide cannot be disposed of directly. A fundamental study on selective 14C stripping, especially from the IRN-150 mixed bed resin, was carried out. In single ion-exchange equilibrium isotherm experiments, the ion adsorption capacity of the fresh resin for non-radioactive HCO3− ion, as the chemical form of 14C, was evaluated as 11mg-C/g-resin. Adsorption affinity of anions to the resin was derived in order of NO3− > HCO3− ≥ H2PO4−. Thus the competitive adsorption affinity of NO3− ion in binary systems appeared far higher than that of HCO3− or H2PO4−, and the selective desorption of HCO3− from the resin was very effective. On one hand, the affinity of Co2+ and Cs+ for the resin remained relatively higher than that of other cations in the same stripping solution. Desorption of Cs+ was minimized when the summation of the metal ions in the spent resin and the other cations in solution was near saturation and the pH value was maintained above 4.5. Among the various solutions tested, from the view-point of the simple second waste process, NH4H2PO4 solution was preferable for the stripping of 14C from the spent resin.

  16. Rapid metabolic profiling of Nicotiana tabacum defence responses against Phytophthora nicotianae using direct infrared laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Alfredo J; Scharte, Judith; Bones, Philipp; Pirkl, Alexander; Meldau, Stefan; Baldwin, Ian T; Hillenkamp, Franz; Weis, Engelbert; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2010-06-09

    Successful defence of tobacco plants against attack from the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae includes a type of local programmed cell death called the hypersensitive response. Complex and not completely understood signaling processes are required to mediate the development of this defence in the infected tissue. Here, we demonstrate that different families of metabolites can be monitored in small pieces of infected, mechanically-stressed, and healthy tobacco leaves using direct infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The defence response was monitored for 1 - 9 hours post infection. Infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry allows rapid and simultaneous detection in both negative and positive ion mode of a wide range of naturally occurring primary and secondary metabolites. An unsupervised principal component analysis was employed to identify correlations between changes in metabolite expression (obtained at different times and sample treatment conditions) and the overall defence response.A one-dimensional projection of the principal components 1 and 2 obtained from positive ion mode spectra was used to generate a Biological Response Index (BRI). The BRI obtained for each sample treatment was compared with the number of dead cells found in the respective tissue. The high correlation between these two values suggested that the BRI provides a rapid assessment of the plant response against the pathogen infection. Evaluation of the loading plots of the principal components (1 and 2) reveals a correlation among three metabolic cascades and the defence response generated in infected leaves. Analysis of selected phytohormones by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry verified our findings. The described methodology allows for rapid assessment of infection-specific changes in the plant metabolism, in particular of phenolics, alkaloids, oxylipins, and carbohydrates

  17. Rapid metabolic profiling of Nicotiana tabacum defence responses against Phytophthora nicotianae using direct infrared laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and principal component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weis Engelbert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful defence of tobacco plants against attack from the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae includes a type of local programmed cell death called the hypersensitive response. Complex and not completely understood signaling processes are required to mediate the development of this defence in the infected tissue. Here, we demonstrate that different families of metabolites can be monitored in small pieces of infected, mechanically-stressed, and healthy tobacco leaves using direct infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The defence response was monitored for 1 - 9 hours post infection. Results Infrared laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry allows rapid and simultaneous detection in both negative and positive ion mode of a wide range of naturally occurring primary and secondary metabolites. An unsupervised principal component analysis was employed to identify correlations between changes in metabolite expression (obtained at different times and sample treatment conditions and the overall defence response. A one-dimensional projection of the principal components 1 and 2 obtained from positive ion mode spectra was used to generate a Biological Response Index (BRI. The BRI obtained for each sample treatment was compared with the number of dead cells found in the respective tissue. The high correlation between these two values suggested that the BRI provides a rapid assessment of the plant response against the pathogen infection. Evaluation of the loading plots of the principal components (1 and 2 reveals a correlation among three metabolic cascades and the defence response generated in infected leaves. Analysis of selected phytohormones by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry verified our findings. Conclusion The described methodology allows for rapid assessment of infection-specific changes in the plant metabolism, in particular

  18. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis of small molecules using fullerene-derivatized silica as energy-absorbing material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Zoltan; Vallant, Rainer M; Takátsy, Anikó; Bakry, Rania; Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad; Rainer, Matthias; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Günther K

    2010-05-01

    In spite of the growing acceptance of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the analysis of a wide variety of compounds, including polymers and proteins, its use in analyzing low-molecular-weight molecules (silica particles with different pore sizes are applied as thin layer for laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric analysis. Thus, an interference of intrinsic matrix ions can be eliminated or minimized in comparison with the state-of-the-art weak organic acid matrices. The desorption/ionization ability of the developed fullerene-silica materials depends on the applied laser power, sample preparation and pore size of the silica particles. Thus, fullerene-silica serves as an LDI support for mass spectrometric analysis of molecules (silica is demonstrated by the mass analysis of variety of small molecules such as carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, phospholipids and drugs. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Drawing a different picture with pencil lead as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization matrix for fullerene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Leanne C; Hungerbühler, Hartmut; Drewello, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by reports on the use of pencil lead as a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization matrix, paving the way towards matrix-free matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, the present investigation evaluates its usage with organic fullerene derivatives. Currently, this class of compounds is best analysed using the electron transfer matrix trans-2-[3-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-2-methyl-2-propenylidene] malononitrile (DCTB), which was employed as the standard here. The suitability of pencil lead was additionally compared to direct (i.e. no matrix) laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry. The use of (DCTB) was identified as the by far gentler method, producing spectra with abundant molecular ion signals and much reduced fragmentation. Analytically, pencil lead was found to be ineffective as a matrix, however, appears to be an extremely easy and inexpensive method for producing sodium and potassium adducts.

  20. Studies on adsorption-desorption of xenon on surface of BC-404 plastic scintillator based on soaking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongchun, Xiang; Tieshuan, Fan; Chuanfei, Zhang; Fei, Luo; Qian, Wang; Rende, Ze; Qingpei, Xiang

    2017-03-01

    The phoswich coincidence detector is used to verify the CTBT treaty by measuring radioxenon and as such needs to possess high detection sensitivity. However, residual xenon adsorbed onto the surface of β detectors greatly influences subsequent measurements of weak samples. In this study, we investigate the adsorption-desorption behavior of xenon on BC-404 scintillator surfaces with different coating thicknesses using the soaking method. The results present the desorption behavior of xenon on a BC-404 surface for the first time. The calculated adsorption capacity for an uncoated surface is consistent with that from previous studies. However, due to factors such as limitations in coating technology, the effectiveness of coating on reducing the ;memory effect; of the detector was poor. The proposed method is suitable for studying the adsorption-desorption behavior of gases on solid surfaces due to its simplicity and flexibility.

  1. Competitive adsorption-desorption of IgM monomers-dimers on silica and modified silica surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Suvajyoti; Wayment, Joshua; Rastogi, Vinayak; Li, Mingdong; Tarlov, Michael J; Zachariah, Michael R

    2013-07-15

    Understanding competitive adsorption-desorption of proteins onto surfaces is an important area of research in food processing and biomedical engineering. Here, we demonstrate, how electrospray-differential mobility analysis that has been traditionally used for characterizing bionanoparticles, can be used for quantifying complex competitive adsorption-desorption of oligomeric proteins or multiprotein systems using monomers and dimers of IgM as a model example onto silica and modified silica surfaces. Using ES-DMA, we show that IgM dimers show a preference to stay adsorbed to different surfaces although monomers adsorb more easily and desorption rates of monomers and dimers of IgM are surface-type-dependent and are not significantly affected by shear. We anticipate that this demonstration will make ES-DMA a popular "label-free" method for studying multicomponent multi-oligomeric protein adsorption to different surfaces in the future. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Huang, Xiaobo; Kang, Zhan

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials.

  3. CO desorption from a catalytic surface: elucidation of the role of steps by velocity-selected residence time measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Shirhatti, Pranav R; Geweke, Jan; Werdecker, Jörn; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Bartels, Christof

    2015-02-04

    Directly measuring the rate of a surface chemical reaction remains a challenging problem. For example, even after more than 30 years of study, there is still no agreement on the kinetic parameters for one of the simplest surface reactions: desorption of CO from Pt(111). We present a new experimental technique for determining rates of surface reactions, the velocity-selected residence time method, and demonstrate it for thermal desorption of CO from Pt(111). We use UV−UV double resonance spectroscopy to record surface residence times at selected final velocities of the desorbing CO subsequent to dosing with a pulsed molecular beam. Velocity selection differentiates trapping-desorption from direct scattering and removes influences on the temporal profile arising from the velocity distribution of the desorbing CO. The kinetic data thus obtained are of such high quality that bi-exponential desorption kinetics of CO from Pt(111) can be clearly seen. We assign the faster of the two rate processes to desorption from (111) terraces, and the slower rate process to sequential diffusion from steps to terraces followed by desorption. The influence of steps, whose density may vary from crystal to crystal, accounts for the diversity of previously reported (single exponential) kinetics results. Using transition-state theory, we derive the binding energy of CO to Pt(111) terraces, D(0)(terr) (Pt−CO) = 34 ± 1 kcal/mol (1.47 ± 0.04 eV) for the low coverage limit (≤0.03 ML) where adsorbate−adsorbate interactions are negligible. This provides a useful benchmark for electronic structure theory of adsorbates on metal surfaces.

  4. Study of Adsorption and Desorption Performances of Zr-Based Metal–Organic Frameworks Using Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Chen, Ying; Zheng, Yajun

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic pore systems and high surface areas of flexible metal–organic framework materials make them excellent candidates to be used in different kinds of adsorption processes. However, the adsorption and desorption behaviors of therapeutic drugs on metal–organic frameworks in solution are not fully developed. Here, we systematically investigated the adsorption and desorption behaviors of a typical therapeutic drug, verapamil, over several Zr-based metal–organic frameworks [e.g., Zr-FUM, UiO-66(Zr), UiO-66(Zr)-NH2 and UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH] as well as ZrO2 in an acetonitrile solution by using paper spray mass spectrometry. In contrast to other materials, UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH demonstrated a superior adsorption performance to verapamil due to their strong acid-base and/or hydrogen-bond interactions, and the adsorption process fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. As verapamil-adsorbed materials were used for desorption experiments, ZrO2 demonstrated the most favorable desorption performance, whereas UiO-66(Zr)-2COOH yielded the poorest desorption capability. These Zr-based materials had also been coated at the surface with filter papers for the analysis of various drugs and proteins in the process of paper spray mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated that among the studied materials, ZrO2-coated paper gave the most favorable desorption performance as a pure drug solution, whereas the paper from UiO-66(Zr) demonstrated the optimal capability in the analyses of therapeutic drugs in a complex matrix (e.g., blood) and a protein (e.g., myoglobin). PMID:28773131

  5. Thermodynamics of the CO2–Absorption/Desorption Section in the Integrated Gasifying Combined cycle — II. Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav KOZACZKA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic analysis of the absorption/desorption section of the ICGC–cycle has been presented using the Second Law with special emphasis on the thermodynamic effectivity concept and usability for complex systems investigations. Essential problems have been discussed based on the classical bibliographical items on the subject. Numerical calculations have been accomplished using results obtained in the first part, which contained absorption and desorption modeling approach oriented onto thermodynamic analyzes. Additionally the special properties of dilute solutions, especially the CO2/water system, have been presented and the problem of the solute chemical concentration exergy change suggested.

  6. Temperature dependence of CO desorption kinetics at a novel Pt-on-Au/C PEM fuel cell anode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitois, A.; Pilenga, A.; Pfrang, A.

    2010-01-01

    -modified catalysts, the interactions between underlayer and overlayer materials are worthy of consideration, since they can significantly modify the intrinsic properties of the active sites. The kinetics of the CO desorption process have been discussed with regard to the CO tolerance issue at the PEM fuel cell anode.......A Pt-on-Au/C fuel cell anode catalyst has been obtained by electrochemical deposition of platinum on carbon-supported gold nanoparticles. Its composition, structure and nanoparticle size distribution have been characterised before and after the desorption experiments using microstructural...

  7. Electron-induced desorption of europium atoms from oxidized tungsten surface: concentration dependence of low-energy peak

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, S Y

    2002-01-01

    One discusses nature of electron induced desorption of Eu sup 0 europium atoms under E sub e irradiating electron low-energies (approx 30 eV) and peculiarities of yield dependence of Eu sup 0 atoms on their concentration at oxidized tungsten surface. Primary act of vacancy origination in europium adatom inner 5p-shell turned to be the determining stage. Evaluations have shown that just the first of two possible scenarios of ionization (electron intra-atomic to Eu adatom external quasi-level or realise of knocked out electron into vacuum) leads to Eu sup 0 desorption. One determined concentration threshold for yield of Eu sup 0 atoms

  8. Development of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for ion desorption studies at HiSOR

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, K; Nakashima, Y; Waki, S; Sardar, S A; Yasui, Y; Wada, S I; Sekitani, T; Tanaka, K

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a time-of-flight mass spectrometer which is now under operation at HiSOR storage ring for research of photon stimulated ion desorption (PSID). The employment of the pulsed high voltage method as a trigger allowed us to perform the investigations at a multi bunch operation of the storage ring. The performance of this spectrometer was evaluated by applying to the PSID measurements of PMMA (poly-methylmethacrylate) thin films. The results are compared with those obtained at Photon Factory by using pulsed synchrotron radiation in a single bunch operation. The capabilities of the apparatus for ion desorption studies are discussed.

  9. Correlation of the applied electrical field and CO adsorption/desorption behavior on Al-doped graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Z. M.; Li, S.; Jiang, Q.

    2010-05-01

    Recently, Al-doped graphene was proposed as a highly sensitive CO gas sensor material. In this work, the correlation of the applied electric field F and the adsorption/desorption behavior of a CO molecule on Al-doped graphene was studied by density functional theory calculations. The results indicate that a negative F strengthens the adsorption of the CO on the Al-doped graphene, while the adsorption is reduced when a positive F is present. Furthermore, desorption of the CO molecule from the graphene layer commences when F≥0.03 a.u. is applied, which can be used to reactivate the sensor material for repetitious application.

  10. Incorporation of tetravalent actinides in three phosphated matrices: britholite, monazite/brabandite and thorium phosphate diphosphate ({beta}-TPD); Incorporation d'actinides tetravalents dans trois matrices phosphatees: britholite, monazite/brabantite et phosphate - diphosphate de thorium ({beta}-PDT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra, O

    2005-03-01

    Three phosphate based ceramics were studied for the immobilization of tri- and tetravalent actinides: britholite Ca{sub 9}Nd{sub 1-x}An{sub x}{sup IV}(PO{sub 4}){sub 5-x}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 1+x}F{sub 2}, monazite/brabantite solid solutions Ln{sub 1-2x}{sup III} Ca{sub x}An{sub x}{sup IP}O{sub 4} and Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate ({beta}-TPD) Th{sub 4-}xAn{sub x}{sup IV}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}. For each material, the incorporation of thorium and uranium (IV) was studied as a surrogate of plutonium. This work was the early beginning of the incorporation of {sup 239}Pu and/or {sup 238}Pu in order to evaluate the effects of {alpha}-decay on the three crystallographic structures. The incorporation of tetravalent cations was carried out by dry chemistry methods, using mechanical grinding to improve the reactivity of the initial mixture then the homogeneity of final solid prepared after calcination at high temperature (1200-1400 deg C). For britholites, the thorium incorporation was complete for weight loading up to 20 wt.%, leading to the preparation of homogeneous and single phase solid solutions when using the coupled substitution (Nd{sup 3+}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}) {r_reversible} (Th{sup 4+}, SiO{sub 4}{sup 4-}). Due to redox problems, the incorporation of uranium was limited to 5 to 8 wt.% and always led to a two-phase mixture of U-britholite and CaU{sub 2}O{sub 5+y}. The preparation of homogeneous solid solutions of {beta}-TUPD and of brabantites containing thorium and uranium samples was successfully obtained using three steps of mechanical grinding/calcination. For each matrix, dense pellets were prepared prior to the study of their chemical behaviour during leaching tests. The chemical durability of brabantites and {beta}-TUPD were found to be close to that reported in literature. The formation of neo-formed phases was also evidenced onto the surface of Th-britholite samples. (author)

  11. [Adsorption-desorption Characteristics of Fermented Rice Husk for Ferrous and Sulfur Ions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiao-mei; Liao, Min; Hua, Jia-yuan; Chen, Na; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Pei-zhi; Xie Kai-zhi; XU, Chang-xu; Liu, Guang-rong

    2015-10-01

    To understand the potential of rice husk to fix Fe2+ and S2- ions, the sorption of Fe2+ and S2- by fermented rice husk was studied by using batch incubation experiments in the present study. The effects of adsorption time, Fe2+ and S2- concentration, pH, the temperature and ionic strength in adsorption reaction solution on the sorption were investigated. Therefore, the stability of Fe2+ and S2- adsorbed by fermented rice husk was further validated by desorption experiments performed under similar conditions as adsorption. The results showed that, the adsorption kinetics of Fe2+ (r = 0.912 1) and S2- (r = 0.901 1) by fermented rice husk fits the Elovich kinetics equation, and Freundlich isotherm model could simulate the isotherm adsorption processes of Fe2+ (R2 = 0.965 1) and S2- (R2 = 0.936 6) on fermented rice husk was better than other models. The adsorption processes on fermented rice husk were non- preferential adsorption for Fe2+ and S2, while the adsorption process of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was spontaneous reaction and the adsorption process of S2- was non-spontaneous reaction. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk were endothermic process since high temperature could benefit to the adsorption. The adsorption mechanism of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by coordination adsorption, the adsorption mechanism of S2- on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by ligand exchange adsorption. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk showed greater pH adaptability which ranged from 1.50 to 11.50. With the increasing of ionic strength, the amount of adsorbed Fe2+ on fermented rice husk wasincreased in some extent, the amount of adsorbed S2- on fermented rice husk was slightly decreased, which further proved the adsorption of Fe2+ was major in inner sphere complexation and the adsorption of S2- was major in outer complexation. The desorption rates of Fe2+ and S2- which was adsorbed by fermented

  12. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater-bentonite-fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L(-1)) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10(-10) M (241)Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (k(f)) of 0.01-0.02 h(-1). Am recoveries in each column were 55-60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h(-1) in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. Our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long distance scales because

  13. Non-isothermal kinetics of the thermal desorption of mercury from a contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López, Félix A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Almadén mining district (Ciudad Real, Spain was the largest cinnabar (mercury sulphide mine in the world. Its soils have high levels of mercury a consequence of its natural lithology, but often made much worse by its mining history. The present work examines the thermal desorption of two contaminated soils from the Almadén area under non-isothermal conditions in a N2 atmosphere, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. DSC was performed at different heating rates between room temperature and 600 °C. Desorption temperatures for different mercury species were determined. The Friedman, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Coasts–Redfern methods were employed to determine the reaction kinetics from the DSC data. The activation energy and pre-exponential factor for mercury desorption were calculated.El distrito minero de Almadén (Ciudad Real, España tiene la mayor mina de cinabrio (sulfuro de mercurio del mundo. Sus suelos tienen altos niveles de mercurio como consecuencia de su litología natural, pero a menudo su contenido en mercurio es mucho más alto debido a la historia minera de la zona. Este trabajo examina la desorción térmica de dos suelos contaminados procedentes de Almadén bajo condiciones isotérmicas en atmósfera de N2, empleando calorimetría diferencial de barrido (DSC. La calorimetría se llevó a cabo a diferentes velocidades de calentamiento desde temperatura ambiente hasta 600 °C. Se determinaron las diferentes temperaturas de desorción de las especies de mercurio presentes en los suelos. Para determinar la cinética de reacción a partir de los datos de DSC se utilizaron los métodos de Friedman, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa y Coasts–Redfern. Además se calcularon las energías de activación y los factores pre-exponenciales para la desorción del mercurio.

  14. Competitive sorption and desorption behavior for three fluoroquinolone antibiotics in a wastewater treatment wetland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkle, Jeremy L; Lattao, Charisma; White, John R; Cook, Robert L

    2010-09-01

    Significant amounts of pharmaceuticals are discharged into the environment through wastewater effluent. Sorption has been shown to be a significant aqueous removal pathway for many of these compounds. Competition between ciprofloxacin (CIP), ofloxacin (OFL) and norfloxacin (NOR) and their sorption to, and desorption from, a surrogate Louisiana wastewater treatment wetland soil were investigated to gain insight into the fate and transport of the pollutants within wastewater treatment wetlands. This study was undertaken in the context of a treatment wetland that continuously receives pharmaceuticals. Therefore it is important to understand the total capacity of this soil to sorb these compounds. Sorption to this treatment wetland soil was found to provide a major and potentially long-term removal pathway for these antibiotics from wastewater. LogK(F) values for all three compounds were between 4.09 and 3.90 for sorption and 4.24 and 4.05 microg(1-1/)(n)(cm(3))(1/)(n)g(-1) for desorption. The compounds were sorbed in amounts ranging from 60% to 90% for high and low loading, respectively. The majority of the compounds were sorbed to the soil within the first 20h, indicating that treatment wetland may not need long retention times (weeks to months) in order to remove these compounds. Sorption K(D) values for competition (20 ppm of each compound for 60 ppm of total fluoroquinolones) ranged from 2300 to 3800 cm(3)g(-1) which is between both the 20 (4300-5800 cm(3)g(-1)) and 60 (1300-3000 cm(3)g(-1)) ppm single compound K(D) values, indicating that there is competition between these three compound for sorption sites. Sorption and desorption data (single component and mixture) collectively provide the following evidence: (1) NOR and, to a lesser extent, CIP outcompete OFL for sorption sites, (2) OFL sorbes to its share of "quality" sorption sites, and (3) competition only occurs for lesser "quality" binding sites. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adsorption-desorption properties and characterization of crosslinked Konjac glucomannan-graft-polyacrylamide-co-sodium xanthate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Lufeng; Duan Jiacai; Miao Wenhua; Zhang Ruojie; Pan Siyi [College of Food Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, No.1, Shizishan Street, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Xu Xiaoyun, E-mail: xiaoyunxu88@gmail.com [College of Food Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, No.1, Shizishan Street, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China)

    2011-02-28

    A new flocculant, based on Konjac-graft-poly (acrylamide)-co-sodium xanthate (CKAX), was synthesized in aqueous solution using epichlorohydrin (ECH) as the cross-linker and ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) as the initiator. X-ray diffraction indicated the existence of strong interaction between KGM and reactant, including intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Microscopy images exhibited the appropriate pore size and distribution, which might be related to a higher capacity of flocculation and adsorption. Thermo gravimetric analysis showed that the synthetic polymer could improve the thermo-stability of the natural polysaccharides, and there was a positive correlation between polymer residual weight and flocculation. The adsorption and desorption properties for copper ions indicated that the adsorption rate could be described by a pseudo-second-order rate model, and the Freundlich model provides the best fit for the resulting adsorption isotherm. The flocculant can be regenerated in HNO{sub 3} solution.

  16. Finite-temperature hydrogen adsorption and desorption thermodynamics driven by soft vibration modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sung-Jae; Lee, Eui-Sup; Yoon, Mina; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2013-08-09

    It has been widely accepted that enhanced dihydrogen adsorption is required for room-temperature hydrogen storage on nanostructured porous materials. Here we report, based on results of first-principles total energy and vibrational spectrum calculations, finite-temperature adsorption and desorption thermodynamics of hydrogen molecules that are adsorbed on the metal center of metal-porphyrin-incorporated graphene. We have revealed that the room-temperature hydrogen storage is achievable not only with the enhanced adsorption enthalpy, but also with soft-mode driven vibrational entropy of the adsorbed dihydrogen molecule. The soft vibration modes mostly result from multiple orbital coupling between the hydrogen molecule and the buckled metal center, for example, in Ca-porphyrin-incorporated graphene. Our study suggests that the current design strategy for room-temperature hydrogen storage materials should be modified with explicitly taking the finite-temperature vibration thermodynamics into account.

  17. Shotgun Approach for Quantitative Imaging of Phospholipids Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Laskin, Julia

    2014-02-04

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been extensively used for determining spatial distributions of molecules in biological samples, and there is increasing interest in using MSI for quantification. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, or nano-DESI, is an ambient MSI technique where a solvent is used for localized extraction of molecules followed by nanoelectrospray ionization. Doping the nano-DESI solvent with carefully selected standards enables online quantification during MSI experiments. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate this quantification approach can be extended to provide shotgun-like quantification of phospholipids in thin brain tissue sections. Specifically, two phosphatidylcholine (PC) standards were added to the nano-DESI solvent for simultaneous imaging and quantification of 22 PC species observed in nano-DESI MSI. Furthermore, by combining the quantitative data obtained in the individual pixels, we demonstrate quantification of these PC species in seven different regions of a rat brain tissue section.

  18. Sorbent Tube Sampling and an Automated Thermal Desorption System for Halocarbon Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Anwar Hossain Khan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Development and deployment of the analytical sys tem, ATD-GC-ECD has been established to monitor a suite of halogenated com pounds found in the atmosphere at trace concentrations. The instrument has been used to monitor urban back ground emission flux levels in Bristol, UK as well as Yellow stone National Park, USA and an in door rain forest (Wild Walk@Bristol, UK. The newly established sorbent tube sampling system is small and easily portable and has been used for large volume sample collection from remote areas. Auto mated Thermal Desorption (ATD provides routine atmospheric measurements with out cryogenic pre-concentration. The instrument provides good precision where the detection limit was _T_n3 pptv for the species of interest and the reproducibility was within 4% for all of the selected halocarbons. The results from two field experiments have also pro vided insight about natural missing sources of some ozone depleting halocarbons.

  19. Identification of Molds by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posteraro, Brunella

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although to a lesser extent than diagnostic bacteriology, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has recently revolutionized the diagnostic mycology workflow. With regard to filamentous fungi (or molds), the precise recognition of pathogenic species is important for rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment, especially for invasive diseases. This review summarizes the current experience with MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of common and uncommon mold species of Aspergillus, Fusarium, Mucorales, dimorphic fungi, and dermatophytes. This experience clearly shows that MALDI-TOF MS holds promise as a fast and accurate identification tool, particularly with common species or typical strains of filamentous fungi. PMID:27807151

  20. Identification of Molds by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella

    2017-02-01

    Although to a lesser extent than diagnostic bacteriology, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has recently revolutionized the diagnostic mycology workflow. With regard to filamentous fungi (or molds), the precise recognition of pathogenic species is important for rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment, especially for invasive diseases. This review summarizes the current experience with MALDI-TOF MS-based identification of common and uncommon mold species of Aspergillus, Fusarium, Mucorales, dimorphic fungi, and dermatophytes. This experience clearly shows that MALDI-TOF MS holds promise as a fast and accurate identification tool, particularly with common species or typical strains of filamentous fungi. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Quantification of Selected Vapour-Phase Compounds using Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLaughlin DWJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A robust method for the analysis of selected vapour phase (VP compounds in mainstream smoke (MSS is described. Cigarettes are smoked on a rotary smoking machine and the VP that passes through the Cambridge filter pad collected in a TedlarA¯ bag. On completion of smoking, the bag contents are sampled onto an adsorption tube containing a mixed carbon bed. The tube is subsequently analysed on an automated thermal desorption (TD system coupled to a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID using a PoraPLOT-Q column. Quantification of 14 volatile compounds including the major carbonyls is achieved. Details of the method validation data are included in this paper. This method has been used to analyse the VP of cigarette MSS over a wide range of ‘tar’ deliveries and configurations with excellent repeatability. Results for the University of Kentucky reference cigarette 1R4F are in good agreement with reported values.

  2. Temperature-jump investigation of adsorption/desorption kinetics at methylated silica/solution interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, F.Y.; Waite, S.W.; Harris, J.M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    A temperature-jump relaxation technique is used to monitor reversible adsorption/desorption kinetics at the reversed-phase C1-silica/solution interface. A Joule discharge is used to heat a packed bed of trimethylchlorosilane-derivatized silica gel on a microsecond time scale. Single-exponential relaxation kinetics are observed for adsorption of an ionic fluorescent probe, 1-anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate, to a C1-silica surface from methanol/water solution. The relaxation rate increases with concentration of solute in solution, which shows that adsorption kinetics are detectable in the relaxation. The adsorption rate of the ionic probe is slower than diffusion-controlled, exhibiting significant influence over the adsorption equilibrium constant. The adsorption rate of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine is indistinguishable from the diffusion limit, indicating a negligible barrier to adsorption for this neutral species. 20 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Adsorption-desorption isotherms and heat of sorption of prickly pear fruit (Opuntia ficus indica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahsasni, S.; Kouhila, M. E-mail: kouhila@hotmail.com; Mahrouz, M

    2004-01-01

    The equilibrium moisture contents were determined for prickly pear fruit using the gravimetric static method at t=30, 40 and 50 deg. C over a range of relative humidities from 0.05 to 0.9. The sorption curves of prickly pear fruit decreased with increase in temperature at constant relative humidity. The hysteresis effect was observed. The GAB, modified Halsey, modified Chung-Pfost, modified Oswin and modified Henderson models were tested to fit the experimental data. The GAB model was found to be the most suitable for describing the sorption curves. The monolayer moisture content values for the sorption at different temperatures are calculated using a modified BET equation. The isosteric heats of desorption and adsorption of water were determined from the equilibrium data at different temperatures.

  4. Desorption of phosphate from iron oxides in relation to equilibrium pH and porosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, F.; de Arambarri, P.; Madrid, L.; Toca, C.G. (Centro de Edafologia y Biologia Aplicada del Cuarto, Sevilla (Spain))

    1981-01-01

    Reactions of phosphated lepidocrocites and goethites with 0.1 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaOH and 0.5 M NH/sub 4/F solutions have been studied. Solutions of indifferent electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl) at the same pH as used during adsorption of P were used to desorb P so that new apparent equilibria were reached, but a slow readsorption was also observed. Strongly alkaline solutions seemed to cause some breakdown of the solid surface and part of the adsorbed P became occluded. Desorption and isotopic exchange data have been related to porosity of the two oxides, and presence of a component of the exchangeable P released very slowly, has been attributed to P adsorbed on surfaces of micropores.

  5. Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of peptides on a hybrid CHCA organic-inorganic matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleith, Clément; Cantel, Sonia; Subra, Gilles; Mehdi, Ahmad; Ciccione, Jeremie; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2014-08-07

    We report applications of new hybrid organic-inorganic silica based materials as laser desorption/ionization (LDI)-promoting surfaces for high-throughput identification of peptides. The driving force of our work was to design a new material composed of a conventional MALDI matrix covalently attached to silica with a high organic/inorganic ratio in order to improve the UV absorption by such LDI hybrid matrices. Amorphous CHCA-functionalized silica presenting an organic content up to 1.3 mmol g(-1) (around 40% in weight from TGA and elementary analysis measurements) gave very interesting LDI performances in terms of detection sensitivity as well as relative ionization discrepancy (spectral suppression) through the analyses of small synthetic peptide mixtures (550-1300 Da) taking CHCA and amorphous silica as model matrices for control experiments.

  6. Use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry in cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Hannah; Saleem, Saira; Loadman, Paul M; Sutton, Chris W

    2011-01-01

    Cancer significantly affects millions of people worldwide. It is possible to use proteomic techniques to aid in detection, monitoring of treatment and progression, as well as gaining an increased understanding of cancer. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) mass spectrometry can be utilised to detect the presence of proteins and peptides within various samples from the body, including blood, biological fluids and tumour tissue. This review aims to introduce MALDI mass spectrometry and discuss a range of applications in the field of cancer research, from quantitative to qualitative methods. Also described is MALDI imaging mass spectrometry which differs from typical sample preparation methods, as analytes are ionised directly from the tissue. Finally, presented is a brief summary of the status of biomarker discovery using blood/serum and biological fluids samples, and the implications in the clinic. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of alkyl length of cationic surfactants on desorption of Cs from contaminated clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Hyun; Park, Chan Woo; Yang, Hee Man; Seo, Bum Kyoung; Lee, Kune Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Jin [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    In this study, desorption characteristics of Cs from clay according to the hydrophobic alkyl chain length of the cationic surfactant were investigated. Alkyltrimethylammonium bromide was used as a cationic surfactant, and the length of the hydrophobic alkyl chain of the cationic surfactant was varied from –octyl to –cetyl. The adsorbed amount of the cationic surfactant on montmorillonite increased with the length of the hydrophobic alkyl chain, and intercalation of the cationic surfactant into the clay interlayer increased the interlayer distances. The Cs removal efficiency was also enhanced with increasing alkyl chain length, and the cationic surfactant with the cetyl group showed a maximum Cs removal efficiency of 99±2.9%.

  8. Effect of morphology of thin DNA films on the electron stimulated desorption of anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Bass, Andrew D.; Sanche, Léon

    2011-01-01

    We present a comparison between the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anions from DNA samples prepared by lyophilization (an example of poorly organized or nonuniform films) and molecular self-assembly (well-ordered films). The lyophilization (or freeze- drying) method is perhaps the most frequently employed technique for forming DNA films for studies of low-energy electron (LEE) interactions leading to DNA damage; however, this technique usually produces nonuniform films with considerable clustering which may affect DNA configuration and enhance sample charging when the film is irradiated. Our results confirm the general validity of ESD measurements obtained with lyophilized samples, but also reveal limitations of lyophilization for LEE studies on DNA films. Specifically we observe some modulation of structures, associated with dissociative electron attachment, in the anion yield functions from different types of DNA film, confirming that conformational factors play a role in the LEE induced damage to DNA.

  9. Delayed Ionization of Fullerenes and Fullerene Derivatives upon Laser Desorption and Surface Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R. D.; Weis, P.; Rockenberger, J.; Kappes, M. M.

    Delayed electron emission has been observed upon laser desorption for several fullerenes, endohedral metallofullerenes, and large carbon clusters formed by coalescence reactions. Odd-numbered carbon clusters and fullerene derivatives with exohedral functional groups do not show delayed ionization under similar conditions, presumably due to lower dissociation energies. Thus, delayed electron emission is suggested to be a characteristic indicator for strongly bound fullerene structures. Measurements of the rate of delayed electron emission are used together with structural information from other sources to calculate ionization potentials for these species. Selective observation of delayed electron emission from scattered {C}60* after surface impact and neutralization of {C}+{60 on graphite confirms an earlier report of this process by Whetten et al.6

  10. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-collision induced dissociation of poly(styrene).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A T; Yates, H T; Scrivens, J H; Green, M R; Bateman, R H

    1998-04-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-collision induced dissociation (MALDI-CID) has been employed for the analysis of poly(styrene) in a tandem hybrid sector-time of flight instrument. Spectra are shown for adducts of poly(styrene) with copper and silver ions. The distributions of fragment ion peaks were found to be consistent from precursor ions containing both metal ions. It is shown how the masses of the end groups of the polymer may be inferred from the mass-to-charge ratios of two of the series of ion peaks that are seen in the MALDI-CID spectra. Mechanisms are proposed for the formation of some of the other series of ion peaks that are observed in the spectra.

  11. Affinity surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for peptide enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffinier, Yannick; Nguyen, Nhung; Drobecq, Hervé; Melnyk, Oleg; Thomy, Vincent; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2012-12-07

    In this paper, we report on the functionalization of silicon nanostructured (NanoSi) surface with an organic layer of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and its subsequent use as an affinity surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) interface for histidine-tagged peptide enrichment and mass spectrometry analysis. The NTA terminal groups are immobilized onto the NanoSi surface via very stable Si-C covalent bonds. The NTA-modified NanoSi (NTA-NanoSi) interface was characterized by contact angle measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The NTA-NanoSi interface has shown a good selectivity toward His-tagged peptide and permits its enrichment from an artificial mixture of both tagged and untagged peptides and its subsequent mass spectrometry detection with good signal/noise ratio.

  12. In situ detection of hydrogen retention in TEXTOR by laser induced desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweer, B., E-mail: B.Schweer@fz-juelich.d [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Energy Research, IEF-4 Plasma Physis, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Irrek, F.; Zlobinski, M.; Huber, A.; Sergienko, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Philipps, V.; Samm, U. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Energy Research, IEF-4 Plasma Physis, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Long term tritium retention is one of the most critical issues for ITER and future fusion devices. While a global analysis of the T retention can be made by T accountancy in the activated phase of ITER, fuel retention and control must be already addressed in the non- activated phase, to identify the mechanism, location and amount of retention, its dependence on plasma and wall conditions and to qualify T retention mitigation and control techniques. For this purpose a new diagnostic, laser induced desorption spectroscopy of retained fuel has been developed and applied in TEXTOR. Hydrogen isotopes are desorbed from re-deposited layers on graphite plates by rapid heating with laser radiation. The released particles have been quantified in situ by spectroscopic measurements of hydrogen lines in a tokamak plasma. The results were validated by ex situ analysis of the hydrogen content of deposited a-C:H layers.

  13. Direct Surface Analysis of Fungal Species by Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, Nancy B.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wahl, Jon H.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Kingsley, Mark T.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wahl, Karen L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2001-12-01

    Intact spores and/or hyphae of Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus oryzae, Trichoderma reesei and Phanerochaete chrysosporium are analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). This study investigates various methods of sample preparation and matrices to determine optimum collection and analysis criteria for fungal analysis by MALDI-MS. Fungi are applied to the MALDI sample target as untreated, sonicated, acid/heat treated, or blotted directly from the fungal culture with double-stick tape. Ferulic acid or sinapinic acid matrix solution is layered over the dried samples and analyzed by MALDI-MS. Statistical analysis of the data show that simply using double stick tape to collect and transfer to a MALDI sample plate typically worked as well as the other preparation methods, but requires the least sample handling.

  14. Imaging of Lipids and Metabolites Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-17

    In recent years, mass spectroscopy imaging (MSI) has emerged as a foundational technique in metabolomics and drug screening providing deeper understanding of complex mechanistic pathways within biochemical systems and biological organisms. We have been invited to contribute a chapter to a new Springer series volume, entitled “Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Small Molecules”. The volume is planned for the highly successful lab protocol series Methods in Molecular Biology, published by Humana Press, USA. The volume is aimed to equip readers with step-by-step mass spectrometric imaging protocols and bring rapidly maturing methods of MS imaging to life science researchers. The chapter will provide a detailed protocol of ambient MSI by use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization.

  15. Manganese oxide nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for medical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Taira, Kenji Kitajima, Hikaru Katayanagi, Eiichiro Ichiishi and Yuko Ichiyanagi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We prepared and characterized manganese oxide magnetic nanoparticles (d =5.6 nm and developed nanoparticle-assited laser desorption/ionization (nano-PALDI mass spectrometry. The nanoparticles had MnO2 and Mn2O3 cores conjugated with hydroxyl and amino groups, and showed paramagnetism at room temperature. The nanoparticles worked as an ionization assisting reagent in mass spectroscopy. The mass spectra showed no background in the low m/z. The nanoparticles could ionize samples of peptide, drug and proteins (approx. 5000 Da without using matrix, i.e., 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB, 4-hydroxy-α-cinnamic acid (CHCA and liquid matrix, as conventional ionization assisting reagents. Post source decay spectra by nano-PALDI mass spectrometry will yield information of the chemical structure of analytes.

  16. Enrichment of tropical peat with micronutrients for agricultural applications: evaluation of adsorption and desorption processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Camila de A.; Oliveira, Lilian K. de; Fraceto, Leonardo F.; Rosa, Andre H., E-mail: ahrosa@sorocaba.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Ambiental; Goveia, Danielle [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2014-01-15

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the adsorption and desorption of micronutrients in tropical peats, from the perspective of potential agricultural applications. Adsorption experiments were performed at different pH values, using solutions containing individual and multiple metal ions. Maximum adsorption capacity occurred at pH 6.0, and the order of affinity was Cu > Fe > Co > Ni > Zn = Mn. Release of the micronutrients was evaluated at different pH values, using an aqueous medium as well as soil and plants. Release of the micronutrients was most efficient at pH 6.0, and followed the order: Fe > Zn > Mn > Co = Ni > Cu. Micronutrient release to the soil was accompanied by uptake by the plant. The use of tropical peat enriched with micronutrients could contribute to improved agricultural productivity, since the release profile of the micronutrients can effectively stimulate plant growth. (author)

  17. TRANSPORT MODEL FOR ADSORPTION-DESORPTION OF ARSENIC ON IRON HYDROXIDE UNDER REDOX CONDITION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Keiji; Andou, Toshihiro; Oda, Keita; Hiroshiro, Yoshinari

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater has been rising as a critical issue to be solved. In this study, one-dimensional transport model for arsenic behavior with microbiological redox mechanism was developed. This model defined five reductive-bacterial groups and two oxidative-bacterial groups to model reductive sequence and oxidizing process. Microbial growth was assumed to follow Monod type kinetics. The numerical simulation model includes the chemical species in the bio-, mobile- and matrix phases. This model can describe the mass transport, bacteria mediated bio-chemical reducing processes, iron precipitation and Fe-As adsorption and desorption process. The simulation results can reproduce the results of soil column experiment, and validity of the model was confirmed.

  18. Comparison of a disposable sorptive sampler with thermal desorption in a gas chromatographic inlet, or in a dedicated thermal desorber, to conventional stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption for the determination of micropollutants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooding, Madelien; Rohwer, Egmont R; Naudé, Yvette

    2017-09-01

    The presence of micropollutants in the aquatic environment is a worldwide environmental concern. The diversity of micropollutants and the low concentration levels at which they may occur in the aquatic environment have greatly complicated the analysis and detection of these chemicals. Two sorptive extraction samplers and two thermal desorption methods for the detection of micropollutants in water were compared. A low-cost, disposable, in-house made sorptive extraction sampler was compared to SBSE using a commercial Twister sorptive sampler. Both samplers consisted of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as a sorptive medium to concentrate micropollutants. Direct thermal desorption of the disposable samplers in the inlet of a GC was compared to conventional thermal desorption using a commercial thermal desorber system (TDS). Comprehensive gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS) was used for compound separation and identification. Ten micropollutants, representing a range of heterogeneous compounds, were selected to evaluate the performance of the methods. The in-house constructed sampler, with its associated benefits of low-cost and disposability, gave results comparable to commercial SBSE. Direct thermal desorption of the disposable sampler in the inlet of a GC eliminated the need for expensive consumable cryogenics and total analysis time was greatly reduced as a lengthy desorption temperature programme was not required. Limits of detection for the methods ranged from 0.0010 ng L-1 to 0.19 ng L-1. For most compounds, the mean (n = 3) recoveries ranged from 85% to 129% and the % relative standard deviation (% RSD) ranged from 1% to 58% with the majority of the analytes having a %RSD of less than 30%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A study on adsorption and desorption behaviors of {sup 14}C from a mixed bed resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Chul; Cho, Hang Rae; Lee, Ji Hoon; Yang, Ho Yeon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., LTD, Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, O Bong [Chonbuk National University, School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering and Solar Energy Research Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Spent resin waste containing a high concentration of {sup 14}C radionuclide cannot be disposed of directly. A fundamental study on selective {sup 14}C stripping, especially from the IRN-150 mixed bed resin, was carried out. In single ion-exchange equilibrium isotherm experiments, the ion adsorption capacity of the fresh resin for non-radioactive HCO{sub 3} - ion, as the chemical form of {sup 14}C, was evaluated as 11mg-C/g-resin. Adsorption affinity of anions to the resin was derived in order of NO{sub 3} - > HCO{sub 3} - ≥ H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} -. Thus the competitive adsorption affinity of NO{sub 3} - ion in binary systems appeared far higher than that of HCO{sub 3} - or H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} -, and the selective desorption of HCO{sub 3} from the resin was very effective. On one hand, the affinity of Co{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +} for the resin remained relatively higher than that of other cations in the same stripping solution. Desorption of Cs{sup +} was minimized when the summation of the metal ions in the spent resin and the other cations in solution was near saturation and the pH value was maintained above 4.5. Among the various solutions tested, from the view-point of the simple second waste process, NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} solution was preferable for the stripping of {sup 14}C from the spent resin.

  20. Recovery of ethanol from fermentation broths using selective sorption-desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, W W; Haag, G L; Lee, D D

    1983-01-01

    Industrialized nations face a critical problem in replacing the sources of liquid fuels that traditionally have been supplied by petroleum. One solution that has gained increasing support in this country is the use of ethanol produced by fermentation of renewable biomass as an extender in, or supplement to, gasoline for transportation fuel. Distillation, the present method of separating ethanol from the fermentation broth, is an energy-intensive one and frequently uses more energy than is available from the ethanol recovered. There are many investigations under way to find alternative, less energy-intensive techniques for the ethanol-water separation. The separations method described in this article involves the use of solid materials to preferentially remove ethanol from fermentation broths. Subsequent stripping of the ethanol from the sorbent with a dry gas reduces dramatically the energy required for the separation. Three solid sorbents have been investigated experimentally. Their sorption/desorption characteristics are described, and their incorporation in an ethanol recovery process is evaluated. Three sorbents were investigated: two commercially available divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene resins in bead form (one with a nominal surface area of 300 m(2)/g, the other with 750 m(2)/g) and an experimental proprietary molecular sieve with hydrophobic properties. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms for two of the sorbents were obtained at ambient temperature (21 degrees C) for ethanol-water solutions containing up to 12 wt. % ethanol. In addition, 40 degrees C isotherms were obtained for the polystyrene sorbents. Although different, the equilibrium isotherms for the sorbents indicated that ethanol could be preferentially sorbed from a dilute solution. Column breakthrough curves indicated very favorable kinetics. Desorption of the ethanol was readily effected with warm (60-80 degrees C), dry nitrogen.

  1. Effect of solution composition on the adsorption and desorption of {sup 137}Cs on forest soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staunton, S.; Wells, C.; Shaw, G. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA), UMR Rhizosphere and Symbiose, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2004-07-01

    There is ongoing debate as to the pertinence of measurements of soil-liquid distribution coefficients in dilute suspension to the understanding and the prediction of the mobility of radionuclides in soil. This debate is particularly active in the case of radiocaesium. Several factors could cause significant discrepancies between measured and effective in situ distributions of radiocaesium. 1. Differences in solution composition, notably ionic strength and concentration in cations such as potassium and ammonium; 2. Differences in soil:solution ratio; 3. Time dependent reactions; 4. Reversibility of the adsorption reaction; 5. Concentration dependence of adsorption. We have attempted to assess the importance of some of these factors by studying {sup 137}Cs adsorption on soils sampled from different horizons of a forest soil. Kd was measured in suspension. Soil:solution ratio and initial {sup 137}Cs concentration and concentration of potassium and stable Cs in solution were varied. Adsorption and desorption Kd values were measured under similar conditions and compared. Kd values were in the lower range of values reported in the literature (5-30 1/kg). Samples from surface layers showed no concentration dependence at trace additions of {sup 137}Cs, whereas some decrease in Kd was observed with increasing {sup 137}Cs concentration on the Ea horizon. Data obtained at different soil:solution ratios all fell on the same adsorption isotherms as those obtained by varying initial {sup 137}Cs concentration. Stable caesium and, to a lesser extent, potassium inhibited {sup 137}Cs adsorption. This effect was greater in the Ea horizon than the surface soils, probably due to the mineral content. For all samples the desorption Kd was greater than the adsorption Kd in the same solution, indicating a small but significant degree of irreversibility. (author)

  2. Adsorption and desorption of heavy metals by the sewage sludge and biochar-amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz, Aleksandra; Oleszczuk, Patryk; Dobrowolski, Ryszard

    2017-11-07

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the application of biochar (BC) to the sewage sludge (SL) on the adsorption and desorption capacity of Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II). The effect of biochar contribution in the sewage sludge (2.5, 5 and 10%) was investigated. The isotherms data were fitted to the Langmiur (LM), Freundlich (FM) and Temkin (TM) models. The best fitting for kinetic study was obtained for the pseudo-second-order equation. The best fitting of the experimental data was observed for the LM in the case of SL and BC, and for the FM in the case of SL- and SL/BC-amended soil. SL was characterized by even four-order higher sorption capacity than BC. The addition of the BC to the SL and next to the soil increased the adsorption capacity of the soil and the SL-amended soil. In the case of all investigated potentially toxic elements (PTEs), the highest adsorption capacity was achieved for SL-amended soil in comparison with the control soil. In the case of other experimental variants, the adsorption capacity of metal ions was as follows: 2.5% BC > 5.0% BC > 10% BC. The negative correlation between hydrated radius of metal ions and the kinetics of sorption was observed. However, the desorption of PTEs from BC/SL-amended soil was significantly lower than for SL-amended soil (except of Cd) and non-amended soil. It can be concluded that the addition of the biochar enhanced the immobilization of PTEs and reduced their bioavailability and mobility in the soil amended by the sewage sludge.

  3. Thermal desorption mass spectrometric and x-ray photoelectron studies of etched surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, R. R.; Kelber, J. A.

    1987-12-01

    The etching of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with Na solutions is known to lead to a loss of F, a loss which is correlated with enhanced adhesion. Subsequent heating partially restores surface F with a concurrent loss of adhesion strength. We have combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and gas phase mass spectroscopy for in situ measurements of the processes that occur as the fluorocarbon is heated. An array of volatile products, which vary with the specific treatment, desorb from etched PTFE. Among these are: N 2 and low molecular weight fluorocarbons, the amounts of which monotonically decrease with increasing exposure to the etching solution (and probably result from the bulk); species such as CO and CO 2, which in part result from surface impurities; and water and acetone which result from the rinse steps following the etching process. XPS measurements show that etching produces a major loss of surface F and a gain of surface O. The latter probably results from the subsequent rinse steps. Heating produces a substantial recovery in surface F with only a small decrease in the surface O, and the gain in surface F is shown to occur at a higher temperature than the desorption of any species from the surface. Thus, desorption of products from the surface is decoupled, in terms of both the distribution of products and their relative temperatures, from the surface changes as monitored by XPS. This decoupling suggests that the increase in surface F results from diffusion of low molecular weight fluorocarbons from the bulk or a transition region, or from a rearrangement of the sponge-like surface region produced in the etching process.

  4. Deuterium thermal desorption from Ni-rich deuterated Mg thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, N.; Kale, A.; Mosaner, P.; Checchetto, R.; Miotello, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Trento, I-38050 Povo (Italy); Das, G. [Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Universita degli Studi, Magna Grecia, I-88100 Catanzaro (Italy)

    2008-02-15

    Mg-Ni multilayers and Ni-rich Mg thin films were deposited by electron gun and pulsed laser deposition, respectively. Samples were submitted to thermal treatment in deuterium or hydrogen atmosphere at 423 K and {proportional_to}10{sup 5} Pa pressure to promote the metal to hydride phase transition. The H chemical bonding in the multilayer samples, after annealing in H{sub 2} atmosphere, was examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: the obtained spectra suggest that the samples with the Mg:Ni=2:1 atomic ratio contain the Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} phase while the samples with lower Ni concentration contain both the MgH{sub 2} and the Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} phases. The effect of the Ni additive on the stability of the deuteride phase was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The TDS spectra of the single-phase Mg{sub 2}NiD{sub 4} samples show a TDS peak at 400 K. The TDS spectra of the two-phase samples show both the D{sub 2} desorption peak at 400 K and a second peak at higher temperature that we attributed to the dissociation of the MgD{sub 2} phase. The high-temperature peak shifts to lower temperatures by increasing the Ni content. It is suggested that in the two-phase samples, the lattice volumes having the Mg{sub 2}Ni structure resulting from the dissociation of the Mg{sub 2}NiD{sub 4} phase reduce the thermodynamic stability of the MgD{sub 2} phase. (author)

  5. Adsorption and desorption of glyphosate in Mollisols and Ultisols soils of Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Ortiz, Ana Maria; Okada, Elena; Costa, Jose Luis; Bedmar, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate is the most used pesticide in Argentina. About 200 million liters of its commercial product are annually applied, representing nearly 60% of the total amount of the commercialized pesticides. This massive use is attributed to the widespread adoption of no-till management combined with genetically modified crops that are glyphosate resistant (e.g. soybean, maize, cotton). In this way, the use of glyphosate has created great concern regarding the potential negative impacts it may have in the environment. The adsorption-desorption process of glyphosate was studied in three Argentinean soils (two Mollisols and one Ultisol) with contrasting properties: organic carbon (1.3-3.4%), clay (14.7-78.5%), pH (5.4-6.3), P Bray (7.6-29.6 mg/kg), total Fe (0.81-8.4%), and Al3+ (0.11-0.69 meq/100 g). Glyphosate adsorption isotherms were modeled using the Freundlich equation to estimate the adsorption coefficient (Kf). In general, glyphosate adsorption was high and the Kf values varied from 115.6 to 1612 (R2 = 0.94-0.99). The main factors controlling adsorption were clay content, total Fe, Al3+, P Bray and soil pH. Decreased hysteresis desorption was found in one of the Mollisols soils with the lowest contents of Al3+, Fe, and clay, as well as high pH and P Bray. In that soil, 12.2% of glyphosate was desorbed after three washing steps indicating a higher potential environmental risk. Results of this study contribute to the knowledge about glyphosate retention in soils and allows the identification of behavior patterns of this extensively applied herbicide in different edaphic scenarios. This is of major importance for the development of decision making tools and criteria to reduce the potential negative impacts on soil and groundwater resources.

  6. Thermal desorption remediation in relation to landfill disposal at isolated sites in northern Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, G.; Henze, M. [ATCO Electric Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Fernuik, N.; MacKinnon, B. [Thurber Environmental Consultants Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Nelson, D. [Nelson Environmental Remediation Ltd., Spruce Grove, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Thermal desorption (TD) involves the application of heat to organic-contaminated soil to release and thermally destruct contaminants using high temperatures. An overview of the technique used in the remediation of diesel-contaminated sites was presented. The paper was divided into 2 parts, the first of which provided an overview of TD at 2 electric company sites with a total of 29,000 tonnes of diesel-contaminated soil. Site contamination occurred mainly through the loading, storage and dispensing of diesel fuel. Petroleum lubricants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), glycols and metals were among the other contaminants. Remediation work was comprised of dig and dump (DD) or thermal desorption (TD) treatment of contaminated soils as well as the removal of underground facilities including concrete foundations, screw anchors, storage tanks, pipelines and grounding grids. The TD process, and productivity with both clay and sand soil types was reviewed, and an analysis of direct, indirect and total costs was presented. Issues concerning planning, production rates, practical field experience and quality control procedures were discussed, in addition to limitations such the treatment's inability to remediate metals, sensitivity to soil water content, and water demands for soil processing. The second section described the role of TD in a staged remediation for 46,000 tonnes of diesel-contaminated soil at Fox Lake, a remote northern community accessible by winter road and ice bridges. The challenges of ice bridge construction and maintenance, excavation backfilling and soil transport at low temperature were reviewed. An outline of consultation processes with First Nations was presented, as well as details of site operations and soil hauling, truck restrictions and coordination over the ice bridge, alternate backfill sources, and TD soil treatment of the contaminated soil. 2 tabs.

  7. [Adsorption and desorption of norfloxacin on four typical soils in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-qiang; Dong, Yuan-hu

    2007-09-01

    Batch equilibrium experiments were used to reveal norfloxacin (NOR) adsorption/desorption on four kinds of soils, namely Ustic Cambosols collected from Fengqiu of Henan, Ali-Perudic Ferrosols collected from Yingtan of Jiangxi, Gleyic-Stagnic Anthrosols collected from Changshu and Udic Argosols collected from Nanjing of Jiangsu. Results show that the experimental data are best described by the Freundlich and Langmuir model, but not fitted successfully by the linear model. Different sorption behaviors of NOR are observed in the four tested soils, with the Kf values varying greatly from 82.0 L/kg (Cambosols) and 432 L/kg (Argosols) to 5677 L/kg (Anthrosols) and 8790 L/kg (Ferrosols). The apparent sorption-desorption hysteresis is found, and the hysteresis index in Ali-Perudic Ferrosols is at least as five times as those in the other tested soils. Moreover, the Kf values are in a significantly negative correlation to soil pH but significantly positive correlated to the percentage of cationic NOR in solution. At the tested pH interval of 5-9, logarithm Kd values of NOR increased slightly and then decreased with the rise of pH in Ali-Perudic Ferrosols and Gleyic-Stagnic Anthrosols, while decreased linearly in Udic Argosols and Ustic Cambosols. It could be deduced that cation adsorptions is the predominant sorption mechanism of NOR on the four soils, and at low pH, NOR cation adsorption in Ali-Perudic Ferrosols and Gleyic-Stagnic Anthrosols is affected by the competitive adsorption of co-existing cations in soil solution.

  8. Ad-/desorption behavior of Sulfadiazine on soil and soil components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, N.; Lewandowski, H.; Kasteel, R.; Narres, H.-D.; Klumpp, E.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-04-01

    Sulfadiazine [4-amino-N-(2-pyrimidinyl)benzene sulfonamide, SDZ] belongs to the widely used antibacterial veterinary pharmaceuticals which reach the environment by the application of manure. Therefore the adsorption and desorption behavior of 14C labeled sulfadiazine was investigated with different inorganic soil components including Al2O3, goethite, illite and compared with air-dried topsoil. The batch sorption experiments with Al2O3and soil were performed in natural pH-values (8.2 and 7.5, negatively charged SDZ). Experiments with illite and goethite were done with pH-values of 4.2 and 6.8 (natural pH of illite and goethite, neutral and partly negatively charged SDZ) and also done in buffer solution about pH 8 for comparing the adsorption on all adsorbents in same pH range. The adsorption isotherms on all sorbents are strongly nonlinear and can be fitted well by the Freundlich equation. From the initial slope of the isotherm the partition coefficient Kd could be determined. The adsorption of SDZ on illite at pH 4.2 and on goethite at pH 6.8 has higher Kd-values than at pH 8, which demonstrates that the negative charge of SDZ obstructs the adsorption. The desorption isotherms show hysteresis effects for all adsorbents. The strong hysteresis was found for goethite and soil indicates strongly physical or chemical binding. On the other hand, the low hysteresis effect for Al2O3 and illite indicates the weak binding of the adsorbed SDZ. The properties of the inorganic matrix and especially the charges of the inorganic compounds in relation to the charge of SDZ are important parameters for the sorption process. The data could be described by modeling with different sorption rates and sites.

  9. Interdomain mobility and conformational stability of type III fibronectin domain pairs control surface adsorption, desorption and unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, P; Kelly, S M; Gellert, P R; van der Walle, C F

    2008-06-15

    The 9th-10th type III fibronectin domain pair (9-10FNIII) has found widespread use as a biomimetic surface for cell adhesion. However, the effect of mutations to 9-10FNIII on its surface adsorption characteristics have not been investigated. Here we address this issue using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) and circular dichroism spectroscopy, comparing two conformationally stable 9-10FNIII mutants against the wild type. Desorption of the 9-10FNIII mutants from the silica surface was minimal in comparison to desorption of 9-10FNIII. The extent and rate of protein desorption from silica was empirically matched by loss of secondary structure upon adsorption, with only the spectrum for 9-10FNIII showing extensive loss of the beta-sandwich fold. For the proteins adsorbed to hydrophobic surfaces, only the CD spectra for the 9-10FNIII mutant constrained via an interdomain disulphide bridge showed similarity with the corresponding solution structure. Since the binding of 9-10FNIII to integrin alpha5beta1 is highly dependent on the relative spatial arrangement of the two domains, we suggest that the observed differences in cell adhesion and spreading on wild type 9-10FNIII and mutants may in part be attributed to the extent of protein desorption and unfolding at the surface.

  10. Phenotypic identification of Porphyromonas gingivalis validated with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E; Sautter, Jacqueline D; Getreu, Adam; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    OBJECTIVE: Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major bacterial pathogen in human periodontitis. This study used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry to assess the accuracy of a rapid phenotypic identification scheme for detection of cultivable P.

  11. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION OF A THERMAL DESORPTION/UV PHOTOLYSIS PROCESS FOR DECONTAMINATING SOILS CONTAINING HERBICIDE ORANGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This treatability study report presents the results of laboratory and field tests on the effectiveness of a new decontamination process for soils containing 2,4-D/2,4,5-T and traces of dioxin. The process employs three operations, thermal desorption, condensation and absorp...

  12. Relation Between pH and Desorption of Cu, Cr, Zn, and Pb from Industrially Polluted Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Henrik K.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2009-01-01

    level, pollution origin, and soil type, the order for desorption as pH decreased was Zn > Cu > Pb. Turning to a single heavy metal in different soils, there was a huge difference in the pH at which the major desorption started. The variation was most significant for Pb where, e.g., less than 10......Desorption of Cu, Cr, Pb, and Zn from industrially polluted soils as a result of acidification is in focus. The eight soils of the investigation vary greatly in composition and heavy metal concentration/combination. Three soils had elevated concentrations of Cu, Pb, and Zn; regardless of pollution......% was desorbed at pH 2.5 from one soil, whereas in another soil 60% Pb was desorbed at this pH. Sequential extraction was made and the soils in which a high percentage of Pb was found in the residual phase (adsorbed strongest) was also the soils where less Pb was desorbed at low pH in the desorption experiments...

  13. Confirmation and 3D profiling of anabolic steroid esters in injection sites using imaging desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijke, de E.; Hooijerink, H.; Sterk, S.S.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) was applied for the confirmation and 3D profiling of anabolic steroid esters in an injection site of bovine muscle. The spatial resolution of the DESI-MSn was demonstrated by scanning hormone

  14. Staphylococcus aureus-Fibronectin Interactions with and without Fibronectin-Binding Proteins and Their Role in Adhesion and Desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Boks, N.P.; Vries, de J.; Kaper, H.J.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and residence-time-dependent desorption of two Staphylococcus aureus strains with and without fibronectin (Fn) binding proteins (FnBPs) on Fn-coated glass were compared under flow conditions. To obtain a better understanding of the role of Fn-FnBP binding, the adsorption enthalpies of Fn

  15. Effect of 1-1 electrolyte concentration on the adsorption/desorption of copper ion on synthetic birnessite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Tan, W.; Liu, F.; Feng, X.; Koopal, L.K.

    2010-01-01

    Oxides are ubiquitous in nature and play an important role in scavenging metal ions from soils and sediments. At the common pH range of the natural environment the well-studied Fe and Al oxides mostly carry a positive charge and adsorbed amounts of heavy metals, and their desorption percentages

  16. Improved adsorption-desorption extraction applied to the partial characterization of the antilisterial bacteriocin produced by Carnobacterium maltaromaticum C2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. L Tulini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins are ribosomally produced peptides useful for food biopreservation. An improved adsorption-desorption process is proposed for the partial purification of the bacteriocin produced by the fish isolate Carnobacterium maltaromaticum C2. Analyzis of extract by SDS-PAGE indicated this method may offer an alternative to improve the yield of purification of bacteriocins.

  17. Desorption of harmful hydrocarbon compounds in soil using micron-sized magnetic particles and high-frequency magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey S. Tye

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This research looks at the use of high frequency (HF magnetic fields to desorb/reduce harmful chemical compounds within gasoline and diesel that commonly leak out of underground storage tanks. Using a multi-strand coil design, measured magnetic fields of over 3 kilo-amperes per meter are generated at an optimal frequency of 117 kHz without skin-depth losses, and without the use of expensive super-conductors or liquid-cooled mechanisms. This high frequency magnetic field is successfully used in non-contact-based magnetic heating and desorption of Gasoline and Diesel mixed with sand, water and easily-dispersible, benign micrometer-sized iron filings, used as a magnetic absorber. Gas chromatography (GC tests done on magnetically-heated Gasoline-soil and Diesel-soil mixtures show desorption/reduction of gasoline and diesel by 44% and 51% respectively, but desorption/reduction of harmful BTEX compounds and other chemical irritants within Gasoline and Diesel by 28–66% after only 80 minutes of magnetic heating. Review of remediation/desorption methods show magnetic fields fare favorably in comparison to other methods that require longer treatment period or the use of secondary pollutants at reducing hydrocarbon and BTEX compounds in them. Keywords: Engineering, Applied sciences, Environmental science, Electrical engineering

  18. Effect of humic acid on the adsorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on goethite. Isotherms and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyave, Jeison Manuel; Waiman, Carolina C; Zanini, Graciela P; Avena, Marcelo J

    2016-02-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption/desorption of glyphosate (Gly) on goethite were investigated under pseudo equilibrium conditions by adsorption isotherms and under kinetic conditions by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Isotherms reveal that the attachment of Gly is almost completely inhibited by HA molecules. The opposite effect is not observed: HA adsorption is not affected by the presence of Gly. ATR-FTIR allowed the simultaneous detection of adsorbed HA and Gly during kinetic runs, revealing that HA at the surface decreases markedly the adsorption rate of Gly likely as a result of a decreased availability of sites for Gly adsorption and because of electrostatic repulsion. In addition, HA in solution increases the desorption rate of Gly. The rate law for Gly desorption could be determined giving important insights on the desorption mechanism. The herbicide is desorbed by two parallel processes: i) a direct detachment from the surface, which is first order in adsorbed Gly; and ii) a ligand exchange with HA molecules, which is first order in adsorbed Gly and first order in dissolved HA. Rate constants for both processes were quantified, leading to half-lives of 3.7 h for the first process, and 1.4 h for the second process in a 400 mg L(-1) HA solution. These data are important for modeling the dynamics of glyphosate in environmentally relevant systems, such as soils and surface waters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Desorption of 1,3,5-Trichlorobenzene from Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Impact of Solution Chemistry and Surface Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Uddin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The strong affinity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs to environmental contaminants has raised serious concern that CNTs may function as a carrier of environmental pollutants and lead to contamination in places where the environmental pollutants are not expected. However, this concern will not be realized until the contaminants are desorbed from CNTs. It is well recognized that the desorption of environmental pollutants from pre-laden CNTs varies with the environmental conditions, such as the solution pH and ionic strength. However, comprehensive investigation on the influence of solution chemistry on the desorption process has not been carried out, even though numerous investigations have been conducted to investigate the impact of solution chemistry on the adsorption of environmental pollutants on CNTs. The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of solution chemistry (e.g., pH, ionic strength and surface functionalization on the desorption of preloaded 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (1,3,5-TCB from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs. The results suggested that higher pH, ionic strength and natural organic matter in solution generally led to higher desorption of 1,3,5-TCB from MWNTs. However, the extent of change varied at different values of the tested parameters (e.g., pH 7. In addition, the impact of these parameters varied with MWNTs possessing different surface functional groups, suggesting that surface functionalization could considerably alter the environmental behaviors and impact of MWNTs.

  20. Ultrasonic desorption of CO{sub 2} - a new technology to save energy and prevent solvent degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantert, S.; Moeller, D. [Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    A central concern of future research activities in the field of carbon capture and storage is the reduction of energy demand for solvent regeneration. This also includes, besides the development of more efficient CO{sub 2} absorbents, the exploration of alternative desorption methods. The stripping process is generally regarded as the state-of-the-art in amine scrubbing, although significant amounts of heat are required for steam generation in the stripper. Against this background, a new desorption technique on the basis of pressureless amine scrubbing is under development, in which an ultrasonic field is used to accelerate the CO{sub 2} desorption. With the new ultrasound method, applied for a patent, desorption of CO{sub 2} can be performed at temperatures below 80 C. This special feature of the ultrasonic-assisted CO{sub 2} degassing can be applied advantageously together with weakly binding CO{sub 2} absorbents which are in use in connection with a high CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the raw gas. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Development of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for plant metabolite analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, Andrew R [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This thesis presents efforts to improve the methodology of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) as a method for analysis of metabolites from plant tissue samples. The first chapter consists of a general introduction to the technique of MALDI-MSI, and the sixth and final chapter provides a brief summary and an outlook on future work.

  2. Absorption and desorption mass transfer rates in chemically enhanced reactive systems. Part II : Reverse kinetic rate parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamborg, Espen S.; Versteeg, Geert F.

    2012-01-01

    The forward and reverse kinetic rate parameters have been determined for CO2 absorption and desorption mass transfer processes in aqueous 2.0 M MDEA solutions at temperatures of 298.15, 313.15, and 333.15 K and the loading of CO2 ranging from 0 to 0.8. The derived kinetic rate parameters have been

  3. Adsorption and Surfactant-Mediated Desorption of Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) on Plasma- and Piranha-Cleaned Silica Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Wiebe Matthijs; Cattoz, B.; Avery, M.P.; Cosgrove, T.; Prescott, S.W.

    2014-01-01

    Optical flow cell reflectometry was used to study the adsorption of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) to a silica surface and the subsequent surfactant adsorption and polymer desorption upon exposure to the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). We have studied these effects as a function of pH

  4. D2 dissociative adsorption on and associative desorption from Si(100): Dynamic consequences of an ab initio potential energy surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luntz, A. C.; Kratzer, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Dynamical calculations are reported for D-2 dissociative chemisorption on and associative desorption from a Si(100) surface. These calculations use the dynamically relevant effective potential which is based on an ab initio potential energy surface for the ''pre-paired'' species. Three coordinates...

  5. Measurement of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xiu-Xiu; Bian, Lei; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2015-12-01

    Determination of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air is important to understand chemical communication between plants and insects and will aid the development of semiochemicals from plants for pest control. In this study, a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to measure ultra-trace levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. The desorption parameters of TD, including sorbent tube material, tube desorption temperature, desorption time, and cold trap temperature, were selected and optimized. In GC-MS analysis, the selected ion monitoring mode was used for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. This method was sufficiently sensitive to detect part-per-trillion levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. Laboratory and field evaluation revealed that the method presented high precision and accuracy. Field studies indicated that the background odor of tea plantations contained some common volatile plant compounds, such as (Z)-3-hexenol, methyl salicylate, and (E)-ocimene, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 3400 ng m(-3). In addition, the background odor in summer was more abundant in quality and quantity than in autumn. Relative to previous methods, the TD-GC-MS method is more sensitive, permitting accurate qualitative and quantitative measurements of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air.

  6. Using microwave heating to improve the desorption efficiency of high molecular weight VOC from beaded activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Shariaty, Pooya; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2015-04-07

    Incomplete regeneration of activated carbon loaded with organic compounds results in heel build-up that reduces the useful life of the adsorbent. In this study, microwave heating was tested as a regeneration method for beaded activated carbon (BAC) loaded with n-dodecane, a high molecular weight volatile organic compound. Energy consumption and desorption efficiency for microwave-heating regeneration were compared with conductive-heating regeneration. The minimum energy needed to completely regenerate the adsorbent (100% desorption efficiency) using microwave regeneration was 6% of that needed with conductive heating regeneration, owing to more rapid heating rates and lower heat loss. Analyses of adsorbent pore size distribution and surface chemistry confirmed that neither heating method altered the physical/chemical properties of the BAC. Additionally, gas chromatography (with flame ionization detector) confirmed that neither regeneration method detectably altered the adsorbate composition during desorption. By demonstrating improvements in energy consumption and desorption efficiency and showing stable adsorbate and adsorbent properties, this paper suggests that microwave heating is an attractive method for activated carbon regeneration particularly when high-affinity VOC adsorbates are present.

  7. Adsorption and Desorption of Nickel(II) Ions from Aqueous Solution by a Lignocellulose/Montmorillonite Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotao; Wang, Ximing

    2015-01-01

    A new and inexpensive lignocellulose/montmorillonite (LNC/MMT) nanocomposite was prepared by a chemical intercalation of LNC into MMT and was subsequently investigated as an adsorbent in batch systems for the adsorption-desorption of Ni(II) ions in an aqueous solution. The optimum conditions for the Ni(II) ion adsorption capacity of the LNC/MMT nanocomposite were studied in detail by varying parameters such as the initial Ni(II) concentration, the solution pH value, the adsorption temperature and time. The results indicated that the maximum adsorption capacity of Ni(II) reached 94.86 mg/g at an initial Ni(II) concentration of 0.0032 mol/L, a solution pH of 6.8, an adsorption temperature of 70°C, and adsorption time of 40 min. The represented adsorption kinetics model exhibited good agreement between the experimental data and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The Langmuir isotherm equation best fit the experimental data. The structure of the LNC/MMT nanocomposite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), whereas the adsorption mechanism was discussed in combination with the results obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses (FTIR). The desorption capacity of the LNC/MMT nanocomposite depended on parameters such as HNO3 concentration, desorption temperature, and desorption time. The satisfactory desorption capacity of 81.34 mg/g was obtained at a HNO3 concentration, desorption temperature, and desorption time of 0.2 mol/L, 60 ºC, and 30 min, respectively. The regeneration studies showed that the adsorption capacity of the LNC/MMT nanocomposite was consistent for five cycles without any appreciable loss in the batch process and confirmed that the LNC/MMT nanocomposite was reusable. The overall study revealed that the LNC/MMT nanocomposite functioned as an effective adsorbent in the detoxification of Ni

  8. Broad spectrum infrared thermal desorption of wipe-based explosive and narcotic samples for trace mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Thomas P; Staymates, Matthew; Sisco, Edward

    2017-08-07

    Wipe collected analytes were thermally desorbed using broad spectrum near infrared heating for mass spectrometric detection. Employing a twin tube filament-based infrared emitter, rapid and efficiently powered thermal desorption and detection of nanogram levels of explosives and narcotics was demonstrated. The infrared thermal desorption (IRTD) platform developed here used multi-mode heating (direct radiation and secondary conduction from substrate and subsequent convection from air) and a temperature ramp to efficiently desorb analytes with vapor pressures across eight orders of magnitude. The wipe substrate experienced heating rates up to (85 ± 2) °C s(-1) with a time constant of (3.9 ± 0.2) s for 100% power emission. The detection of trace analytes was also demonstrated from complex mixtures, including plastic-bonded explosives and exogenous narcotics, explosives, and metabolites from collected artificial latent fingerprints. Manipulation of the emission power and duration directly controlled the heating rate and maximum temperature, enabling differential thermal desorption and a level of upstream separation for enhanced specificity. Transitioning from 100% power and 5 s emission duration to 25% power and 30 s emission enabled an order of magnitude increase in the temporal separation (single seconds to tens of seconds) of the desorption of volatile and semi-volatile species within a collected fingerprint. This mode of operation reduced local gas-phase concentrations, reducing matrix effects experienced with high concentration mixtures. IRTD provides a unique platform for the desorption of trace analytes from wipe collections, an area of importance to the security sector, transportation agencies, and customs and border protection.

  9. Sorption, desorption, and degradation of (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid in representative soils of the Danubian Lowland, Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Edgar; Tatarková, Veronika; Šimonovičová, Alexandra; Bartal', Mikuláš

    2012-04-01

    Herbicide leaching through soil into groundwater greatly depends upon sorption-desorption and degradation phenomena. Batch adsorption, desorption and degradation experiments were performed with acidic herbicide MCPA and three soil types collected from their respective soil horizons. MCPA was found to be weakly sorbed by the soils with Freundlich coefficient values ranging from 0.37 to 1.03 mg(1-1/)(n) kg(-1) L(1/)(n). It was shown that MCPA sorption positively correlated with soil organic carbon content, humic and fulvic acid carbon contents, and negatively with soil pH. The importance of soil organic matter in MCPA sorption by soils was also confirmed by performing sorption experiments after soil organic matter removal. MCPA sorption in these treated soils decreased by 37-100% compared to the original soils. A relatively large part of the sorbed MCPA was released from soils into aqueous solution after four successive desorption steps, although some hysteresis occurred during desorption of MCPA from all soils. Both sorption and desorption were depth-dependent, the A soil horizons exhibited higher retention capacity of the herbicide than B or C soil horizons. Generally, MCPA sorption decreased in the presence of phosphate and low molecular weight organic acids. Degradation of MCPA was faster in the A soil horizons than the corresponding B or C soil horizons with half-life values ranging from 4.9 to 9.6 d in topsoils and from 11.6 to 23.4 d in subsoils. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluación del óxido mixto Ni/MgO-La2O3 como catalizador en la reacción de combustión de metano en presencia de NOx.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lugo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We have prepared mixed oxides of NiO/MgO-La2O3 by varying the proportions of the support through of the successive impregnation method. Different techniques were used to determine their physical-chemical properties, EDX analysis, X-ray diffraction, XRD, thermal methods, TGA-DSC, FTIR infrared spectroscopy, method BET surface area, temperature-programmed reduction, TPR-H2, temperature programmed desorption, TPD-O2 and TPD-NO. The results show that nickel oxide presents a strong interaction with the support, which mainly depends on the proportion of these components. The test showed the catalytic capacity of these solids for the combustion of methane in the presence of NOx type gases, and a good selectivity toward the CO2. It was also found that these catalysts discourage the formation of N2.

  11. Adsorption and thermal chemistry of formic acid on clean and oxygen-predosed Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yunxi; Zaera, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The thermal chemistry of formic acid on clean and oxygen-predosed Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces was studied under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Key results reported in the past were confirmed, including the partial switchover from H2 to H2O desorption upon oxygen addition on the surface and the development of a second decomposition regime at 420 K, in addition to the one observed at 460 K on the clean substrate. In addition, new observations were added, including the previously missed desorption of H2 at 420 K and the existence of a normal kinetic isotope effect in both TPD peaks. Peak fitting of the XPS data afforded the identification of an asymmetric geometry for the formate intermediate, which was established to form by 200 K, and the presence of coadsorbed molecular formic acid up to the temperatures of decomposition, probably in a second layer and held by hydrogen bonding. Quantitative analysis of the TPD data indicated a one-to-one correspondence between the increase in oxygen coverage beyond θO = 0.5 ML and a decrease in formic acid uptake that mainly manifests itself in a decrease in the decomposition seen in the 460 K TPD peak. All these observations were interpreted in terms of a simple decomposition mechanism involving hydrogen abstraction from adsorbed formate species, possibly aided by coadsorbed oxygen, and a change in reaction activation energy as a function of the structure of the oxygen overlayer, which reverts from a O-c(6 × 2) structure at high oxygen coverages to the O-(2 × 1) order seen at θO = 0.5 ML.

  12. Helium desorption in EFDA iron materials for use in nuclear fusion reactors; Desorcion de helio en materiales de fierro EFDA para su aplicacion en los reactores de fusion nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar R, A. R.; Pinedo V, J. L. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Sanchez, F. J.; Ibarra, A.; Vila, R., E-mail: arsr2707@hotmail.com [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Av. Complutense No. 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper the implantation with monoenergetic ions (He{sup +}) was realized with an energy of 5 KeV in iron samples (99.9999 %) EFDA (European Fusion Development Agreement) using a collimated beam, after this a Thermal Desorption Spectrometry of Helium (THeDS) was made using a leak meter that detects amounts of helium of up to 10{sup -}- {sup 12} mbar l/s. Doses with which the implantation was carried out were 2 x 10{sup 15} He{sup +} /cm{sup 2}, 1 x 10{sup 16} He{sup +} /cm{sup 2}, 2 x 10{sup 16} He{sup +} /cm{sup 2}, 1 x 10{sup 17} He{sup +} /cm{sup 2} during times of 90 s, 450 s, 900 s and 4500 s, respectively. Also, using the SRIM program was calculated the depth at which the helium ions penetrate the sample of pure ion, finding that the maximum distance is 0.025μm in the sample. For this study, 11 samples of Fe EFDA were prepared to find defects that are caused after implantation of helium in order to provide valuable information to the manufacture of materials for future fusion reactors. However understand the effects of helium in the micro structural evolution and mechanical properties of structural materials are some of the most difficult questions to answer in materials research for nuclear fusion. When analyzing the spectra of THeDS was found that five different groups of desorption peaks existed, which are attributed to defects of He caused in the material, these defects are He{sub n} V (2≤n≤6), He{sub n} V{sub m}, He V for the groups I, II and IV respectively. These results are due to the comparison of the peaks presented in the desorption spectrum of He, with those of other authors who have made theoretical calculations. Is important to note that the thermal desorption spectrum of helium was different depending on the dose with which the implantation of He{sup +} was performed. (Author)

  13. Combined effects of DOM extracted from site soil/compost and biosurfactant on the sorption and desorption of PAHs in a soil-water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Hui, E-mail: yuhui200@uregina.ca [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada); Huang Guohe, E-mail: gordon.huang@uregina.ca [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada); An Chunjiang, E-mail: an209@uregina.ca [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada); Wei Jia, E-mail: jia.wei@iseis.org [Environmental Systems Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} The combined DOM and biosurfactant significantly enhanced desorption of PAHs. {yields} Compost DOM exhibited higher desorption enhancement capacity than the soil DOM. {yields} Competition among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant for sorption site determined desorption of PAHs from soil. {yields} Formation of DOM-biosurfactant complex enhance desorption extent of PAHs. - Abstract: The combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant on the sorption/desorption behavior of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil water systems were systematically investigated. Two origins of DOMs (extracted from soil and extracted from food waste compost) and an anionic biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) were introduced. The presence of DOM in the aqueous phase could decrease the sorption of PAHs, thus influence their mobility. Desorption enhancement for both PHE and PYR in the system with compost DOM was greater than that in the soil DOM system. This is due to the differences in specific molecular structures and functional groups of two DOMs. With the co-existence of biosurfactant and DOM, partitioning is the predominant process and the desorption extent was much higher than the system with DOM or biosurfactant individually. For PHE, the desorption enhancement of combined DOM and biosurfactant was larger than the sum of DOM or biosurfactant; however desorption enhancement for PYR in the combined system was less than the additive enhancement in two individual system under low PAH concentration. This could be explained as the competition sorption among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant. The results of this study will help to clarify the transport of petroleum pollutants in the remediation of HOCs-contaminated soils.

  14. Characterisation of Dissolved Organic Carbon by Thermal Desorption - Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materić, Dušan; Peacock, Mike; Kent, Matthew; Cook, Sarah; Gauci, Vincent; Röckmann, Thomas; Holzinger, Rupert

    2017-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an integral component of the global carbon cycle. DOC represents an important terrestrial carbon loss as it is broken down both biologically and photochemically, resulting in the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. The magnitude of this carbon loss can be affected by land management (e.g. drainage). Furthermore, DOC affects autotrophic and heterotrophic processes in aquatic ecosystems, and, when chlorinated during water treatment, can lead to the release of harmful trihalomethanes. Numerous methods have been used to characterise DOC. The most accessible of these use absorbance and fluorescence properties to make inferences about chemical composition, whilst high-performance size exclusion chromatography can be used to determine apparent molecular weight. XAD fractionation has been extensively used to separate out hydrophilic and hydrophobic components. Thermochemolysis or pyrolysis Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) give information on molecular properties of DOC, and 13C NMR spectroscopy can provide an insight into the degree of aromaticity. Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a sensitive, soft ionisation method suitable for qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile and semi-volatile organic vapours. So far, PTR-MS has been used in various environmental applications such as real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from natural and anthropogenic sources, chemical composition measurements of aerosols etc. However, as the method is not compatible with water, it has not been used for analysis of organic traces present in natural water samples. The aim of this work was to develop a method based on thermal desorption PTR-MS to analyse water samples in order to characterise chemical composition of dissolved organic carbon. We developed a clean low-pressure evaporation/sublimation system to remove water from samples and thermal desorption system to introduce

  15. Developments and Applications of Electrophoresis and Small Molecule Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hui [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Ultra-sensitive native fluorescence detection of proteins with miniaturized one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was achieved with laser side-entry excitation, which provides both high excitation power and low background level. The detection limit for R-phycoerythrin protein spots in 1-D SDS-PAGE was as low as 15 fg, which corresponds to 40 thousand molecules only. The average detection limit of six standard native proteins was 5 pg per band and the dynamic range spanned more than 3 orders of magnitude. Approximately 150 protein spots from 30 ng of total Escherichia coli extraction were detected on a 0.8 cm x 1 cm gel in two-dimensional separation. Estrogen-DNA adducts as 4-OHE1(E2)-1-N3Ade and 4-OHEI(E2)-2-NacCys were hypothesized as early risk assessment of prostate and breast cancers. Capillary electrophoresis, luminescence/absorption spectroscopy and LC-MS were used to characterize and detect these adducts. Monoclonal antibodies against each individual adduct were developed and used to enrich such compounds from urine samples of prostate and breast cancer patients as well as healthy people. Adduct 4-OHE1-1-N3Ade was detected at much higher level in urine from subjects with prostate cancer patients compared to healthy males. The same adduct and 4-OHEI-2-NacCys were also detected at a much higher level in urine from a woman with breast carcinoma than samples from healthy controls. These two DNA adducts may serve as novel biomarkers for early diagnostic of cancers. The adsorption properties of R-phycoerythrin (RPE), on the fused-silica surface were studied using capillary electrophoresis (CE) and single molecule spectroscopy. The band shapes and migration times were measured in CE. Adsorption and desorption events were recorded at the single-molecule level by imaging of the evanescent-field layer using total internal reflection. The adsorbed RPE molecules on the fused-silica prism surface were

  16. Enhancement of the CO(2) retention capacity of X zeolites by Na- and Cs-treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Eva; Muñoz, Emilio; Vega, Aurelio; Ordóñez, Salvador

    2008-02-01

    Adsorption of carbon dioxide on alkaline modified X zeolites was investigated by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) analysis of these materials previously saturated with CO(2) at 50, 100 and 200 degrees C. Parent X zeolite (in its sodium form) was treated with different sodium and cesium aqueous solutions, using both carbonates and hydroxides as precursors. The resulting materials were characterised by nitrogen physisorption, XRD, and NH(3)-TPD, in order to determine their morphological, crystallographic and chemical properties. Slight desilication phenomena were observed using hydroxides as precursors, whereas the treatment with Cs salts lead to higher crystallinity losses. Several successive adsorption-desorption cycles were carried out in order to check the regenerability of the adsorbents. Cesium-treated zeolites present higher carbon dioxide retention capacities than the sodium treated and than the parent material. When working with these Cs-modified materials, the desorption takes place mainly at temperatures between 250 and 400 degrees C, results of great practical interest, since it allows the use these kinds of materials for adsorption-desorption cycles. The evolution of the retention capacity with temperature is also markedly more positive for Cs-treated zeolite, especially when carbonate is used as the precursor. These materials maintain high retention capacities at 100 degrees C (10mg g(-1)) and even at 200 degrees C (3mg g(-1)), temperatures at which the most of the adsorbents are inactive.

  17. Adsorption, polymerization and decomposition of acetaldehyde on clean and carbon-covered Rh(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Imre; Farkas, Arnold Péter; Szitás, Ádám; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiss, János

    2017-10-01

    The adsorption and dissociation of acetaldehyde were investigated on clean and carbon-covered Rh(111) single crystal surfaces by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and work function (Δφ) measurements. Acetaldehyde is a starting material for the catalytic production of many important chemicals and investigation of its reactions motivated by environmental purposes too. The adsorption of acetaldehyde on clean Rh(111) surface produced various types of adsorption forms. η1-(O)-CH3CHOa and η2-(O,C)-CH3CHOa are developing and characterized by HREELS. η1-CH3CHOa partly desorbed at Tp = 150 K, another part of these species are incorporated in trimer and linear 2D polimer species. The desorption of trimers (at amu 132) were observed in TPD with a peak maximum at Tp = 225 K. Above this temperature acetaldehyde either desorbed or bonded as a stable surface intermediate (η2-CH3CHOa) on the rhodium surface. The molecules decomposed to adsorbed products, and only hydrogen and carbon monoxide were analyzed in TPD. Surface carbon decreased the uptake of adsorbed acetaldehyde, inhibited the formation of polymers, nevertheless, it induced the Csbnd O bond scission and CO formation with 40-50 K lower temperature after higher acetaldehyde exposure.

  18. Thermal desorption gas chromatography with mass spectrometry study of outgassing from polymethacrylimide foam (Rohacell®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Correa, Enrique J; Herrero-Martínez, José M; Consuegra, Lina; Ramis-Ramos, Guillermo; Sanz, Rafael Mata; Martínez, Benito Gimeno; Esbert, Vicente E Boria; García-Baquero, David Raboso

    2015-09-01

    Polymethacrylimide foams are used as light structural materials in outer-space devices; however, the foam closed cells contain volatile compounds that are outgassed even at low temperatures. These compounds ignite as plasmas under outer-space radiation and the intense radio-frequency fields used in communications. Since plasmas may cause spacecraft fatal events, the conditions in which they are ignited should be investigated. Therefore, qualitative and quantitative knowledge about polymethacrylimide foam outgassing should be established. Using thermogravimetric analysis, weight losses reached 3% at ca. 200°C. Thermal desorption gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection was used to study the offgassed compounds. Using successive 4 min heating cycles at 125°C, each one corresponding to an injection, significant amounts of nitrogen (25.3%), water (2.6%), isobutylene (11.3%), tert-butanol (2.9%), 1-propanol (11.9%), hexane (25.3%), propyl methacrylate (1.4%), higher hydrocarbons (11.3%), fatty acids (2.2%) and their esters (1.3%), and other compounds were outgassed. Other compounds were observed during the main stage of thermal destruction (220-280°C). A similar study at 175°C revealed the extreme difficulty in fully outgassing polar compounds from polymethacrylimide foams by baking and showed the different compositions of the offgassed atmosphere that can be expected in the long term. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Temperature dependent field emission performances of carbon nanotube arrays: Speculation on oxygen desorption and defect annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Jianhua; Yang Yumei; Zheng Ruiting [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of the Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Cheng Guoan, E-mail: gacheng@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of the Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2012-07-01

    We report here a systematic study of the field emission (FE) properties of highly ordered carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays at different temperatures. The FE characteristics of the CNT arrays are significantly improved with temperature increasing from 298 K to 473 K, as evidenced by the decreases of turn-on electric field at 10 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} from 1.064 to 0.774 V/{mu}m and threshold field at 10 mA/cm{sup 2} from 1.628 to 1.418 V/{mu}m, respectively. Moreover, the stability behavior of the CNT arrays is ameliorated at or after suffering to temperatures. Raman, EDS, XPS, and photoelectron spectrometer were employed to characterize the CNT arrays before and after the FE-Temperature measurements for comparison. Our results demonstrate that the oxygen desorption induced work function decrease (from 4.89 to 4.68 eV) of the CNT arrays after longtime exposure to temperature is responsible for the improved FE behavior, while the annealing of defects on CNTs is the main reason for the improved FE stability, which provides an effective approach to stabilizing emitters by temperature processing.

  20. Matrix assisted laser desorption time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeletti, Silvia

    2017-07-01

    The microbiological management of patients with suspected bacterial infection includes the identification of the pathogen and the determination of the antibiotic susceptibility. These traditional approaches, based on the pure culture of the microorganism, require at least 36-48h. A new method, Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), has been recently developed to profile bacterial proteins from whole cell extracts and obtain a bacterial fingerprint able to discriminate microorganisms from different genera and species. By whole cell-mass spectrometry, microbial identification can be achieved within minutes from cultured isolate, rather than traditional phenotypic or genotypic characterizations. From the year 2009 an explosion of applications of this technology has been observed with promising results. Several studies have been performed and showed that MALDI-TOF represents a reliable alternative method for rapid bacteria and fungi identification in clinical setting. A future area of expansion is represented by the application of MALDI-TOF technology to the antibiotic susceptibility test. In conclusion, the revision of the literature available up to date demonstrated that MALDI-TOF MS represents an innovative technology for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial and fungal isolates in clinical settings. By an earlier microbiological diagnosis, MALDI-TOF MS contributes to a reduced mortality and hospitalization time of the patients and consequently has a significant impact on cost savings and public health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. On the Primary Ionization Mechanism(s in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Molin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism is proposed for the first step of ionization occurring in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, leading to protonated and deprotonated matrix (Ma molecules ([Ma+H]+ and [Ma-H]- ions. It is based on observation that in solid state, for carboxyl-containing MALDI matrices, the molecules form strong hydrogen bonds and their carboxylic groups can act as both donors and acceptors. This behavior leads to stable dimeric structures. The laser irradiation leads to the cleavage of these hydrogen bonds, and theoretical calculations show that both [Ma+H]+ and [Ma-H]- ions can be formed through a two-photon absorption process. Alternatively, by the absorption of one photon only, a heterodissociation of one of the O–H bonds can lead to a stable structure containing both cationic and anionic sites. This structure could be considered an intermediate that, through the absorption of a further photon, leads to the formation of matrix ions. Some experiments have been performed to evaluate the role of thermal ionization and indicate that its effect is negligible. Some differences have been observed for different matrices in the formation of analyte molecule (M ion [M+H]+, [M-H]-, M+•, and [M-2H]-•, and they have been explained in terms of ionization energies, pKa values, and thermodynamic stability.

  2. Modeling the supercritical desorption of orange essential oil from a silica-gel bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva E.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important byproducts of the orange juice industry is the oil phase. This is a mixture of terpenes, alcohols, and aldehydes, dissolved in approximately 96% limonene. To satisfactorily use oil phase as an ingredient in the food and cosmetics industries separation of the limonene is required. One possibility is to use a fixed bed of silica gel to remove the light or aroma compounds from the limonene. The aroma substances are then extracted from the bed of silica gel using supercritical carbon dioxide. This work deals with the modeling of the desorption step of the process using mass balance equations coupled with the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm. Data taken from the literature for the overall extraction curves were used together with empirical correlations to calculate the concentration profile of solute in the supercritical phase at the bed outlet. The system of equations was solved by the finite volume technique. The overall extraction curves calculated were in good agreement with the experimental ones.

  3. Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hirose, Atsushi; Motai, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Cesium adsorption/desorption experiments for various clay minerals, considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima, were conducted using the 137Cs radioisotope and an autoradiography using imaging plates (IPs). A 50 μl solution containing 0.185 ~ 1.85 Bq of 137Cs (10-11 ~ 10-9 molL-1 of 137Cs) was dropped onto a substrate where various mineral particles were arranged. It was found that partially-vermiculitized biotite, which is termed “weathered biotite” (WB) in this study, from Fukushima sorbed 137Cs far more than the other clay minerals (fresh biotite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, halloysite, allophane, imogolite) on the same substrate. When WB was absent on the substrate, the amount of 137Cs sorbed to the other clay minerals was considerably increased, implying that selective sorption to WB caused depletion of radiocesium in the solution and less sorption to the coexisting minerals. Cs-sorption to WB continued for about one day, whereas that to ferruginous smectite was completed within one hour. The sorbed 137Cs in WB was hardly leached with hydrochloric acid at pH 1, particularly in samples with a longer sorption time. The presence/absence of WB sorbing radiocesium is a key factor affecting the dynamics and fate of radiocesium in Fukushima.

  4. High throughput volatile fatty acid skin metabolite profiling by thermal desorption secondary electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Helen J; Reynolds, James C; Riazanskaia, Svetlana; Thomas, C L Paul

    2014-09-07

    The non-invasive nature of volatile organic compound (VOC) sampling from skin makes this a priority in the development of new screening and diagnostic assays. Evaluation of recent literature highlights the tension between the analytical utility of ambient ionisation approaches for skin profiling and the practicality of undertaking larger campaigns (higher statistical power), or undertaking research in remote locations. This study describes how VOC may be sampled from skin and recovered from a polydimethylsilicone sampling coupon and analysed by thermal desorption (TD) interfaced to secondary electrospray ionisation (SESI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) for the high throughput screening of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from human skin. Analysis times were reduced by 79% compared to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods (GC-MS) and limits of detection in the range 300 to 900 pg cm(-2) for VFA skin concentrations were obtained. Using body odour as a surrogate model for clinical testing 10 Filipino participants, 5 high and 5 low odour, were sampled in Manilla and the samples returned to the UK and screened by TD-SESI-MS and TD-GC-MS for malodour precursors with greater than >95% agreement between the two analytical techniques. Eight additional VFAs were also identified by both techniques with chains 4 to 15 carbons long being observed. TD-SESI-MS appears to have significant potential for the high throughput targeted screening of volatile biomarkers in human skin.

  5. Neutralization effects in the electron-stimulated desorption of molecules covalently bonded to metal oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Todd R.; Evans, John F.

    1985-08-01

    TiO 2 and SiO 2 surfaces were chemically modified via covalent attachment of a variety of organosilane molecules, and electron stimulated desorption from these surfaces was examined. The study focussed on, but was not limited to, bound trimethylsilyl and tri(methyl-d 3)silyl groups. Relative parent and fragment secondary ion yields are strongly dependent upon the substrate material. The significantly lower ion yields found in the case of modified TiO 2 are explained by the relative positions of the TiO 2 valence band and the ionization potentials of (CH 3) 3Si. and CH 3. radicals, such that resonance neutralization of near-surface (CH 3) 3Si + ions is energetically favorable. Such neutralization processes are energetically unfavorable at the SiO 2 surface. Total dissociation cross sections (1.0 keV electron bombardment) were measured for trimethylsilyl groups bound to these surfaces. The cross section was found to be a factor of 3.7 lower for modified TiO 2 than for modified SiO 2. This difference does not appear to be explicable in terms of differences between the secondary electron yields of the two substrates, but may instead be an indication that "recapture" (neutralization processes involving bond reformation) occurs with significant probability at the tiO 2 surface.

  6. Rapid screening of clenbuterol in urine samples by desorption electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ziqing; Zhang, Sichun; Zhao, Mengxia; Yang, Chengdui; Chen, Depu; Zhang, Xinrong

    2008-06-01

    Rapid screening of clenbuterol in urine was performed by combining desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Optimization experiments were carried out including the selection of substrates, spray solutions, nebulizing gas pressures, high-voltage power supplies and flow rates of spray solution. The limit of detection (LOD), defined as the lowest quantity that can be detected, was 5.0 pg for the pure compound. Using DESI coupled with solid-phase extraction (SPE), the linear response range was from 10 to 400 ng/mL (R(2) = 0.993) and the concentration LOD for urine sample was 2.0 ng/mL. The analysis for one spiked urine sample was achieved within 4 min. In addition to the fast analysis speed, MS/MS provided structural information for the confirmation of clenbuterol. Urine samples from different people were investigated and the recoveries were within 100 +/- 20%. The developed method can potentially be used for screening of clenbuterol in doping control.

  7. Iron oxide nanomatrix facilitating metal ionization in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obena, Rofeamor P; Lin, Po-Chiao; Lu, Ying-Wei; Li, I-Che; del Mundo, Florian; Arco, Susan dR; Nuesca, Guillermo M; Lin, Chung-Chen; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2011-12-15

    The significance and epidemiological effects of metals to life necessitate the development of direct, efficient, and rapid method of analysis. Taking advantage of its simple, fast, and high-throughput features, we present a novel approach to metal ion detection by matrix-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle (matrix@MNP)-assisted MALDI-MS. Utilizing 21 biologically and environmentally relevant metal ion solutions, the performance of core and matrix@MNP against conventional matrixes in MALDI-MS and laser desorption ionization (LDI) MS were systemically tested to evaluate the versatility of matrix@MNP as ionization element. The matrix@MNPs provided 20- to >100-fold enhancement on detection sensitivity of metal ions and unambiguous identification through characteristic isotope patterns and accurate mass (potentials (IP), we formulated a metal ionization mechanism model, alluding to the role of exciton pooling in matrix@MNP-assisted MALDI-MS. Moreover, the detection of Cu in spiked tap water demonstrated the practicability of this new approach as an efficient and direct alternative tool for fast, sensitive, and accurate determination of trace metal ions in real samples.

  8. Light desorption from an yttrium neutralizer for Rb and Fr magneto-optical trap loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppolaro, V.; Papi, N.; Khanbekyan, A.; Marinelli, C.; Mariotti, E.; Marmugi, L.; Moi, L.; Corradi, L.; Dainelli, A.; Arikawa, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Sakemi, Y.; Calabrese, R.; Mazzocca, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Ricci, L.

    2014-10-01

    We present here the first evidence of photodesorption induced by low-intensity non-resonant light from an yttrium thin foil, which works as a neutralizer for Rb and Fr ions beam. Neutral atoms are suddenly ejected from the metal surface in a pulsed regime upon illumination with a broadband flash light and then released in the free volume of a pyrex cells. Here atoms are captured by a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), which is effectively loaded by the photodesorption. Loading times of the order of the flash rise time are measured. Desorption is also obtained in the continuous regime, by exploiting CW visible illumination of the metallic neutralizer surface. We demonstrate that at lower CW light intensities vacuum conditions are not perturbed by the photodesorption and hence the MOT dynamics remains unaffected, while the trap population increases thanks to the incoming desorbed atoms flux. Even with the Y foil at room temperature and hence with no trapped atoms, upon visible illumination, the number of trapped atoms reaches 105. The experimental data are then analyzed by means of an analytical rate equation model, which allows the analysis of this phenomenon and its dynamics and allows the determination of critical experimental parameters and the test of the procedure in the framework of radioactive Francium trapping. In this view, together with an extensive investigation of the phenomenon with 85Rb, the first demonstration of the photodesorption-aided loading of a 210Fr MOT is shown.

  9. Light desorption from an yttrium neutralizer for Rb and Fr magneto-optical trap loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppolaro, V.; Papi, N.; Khanbekyan, A.; Marinelli, C.; Mariotti, E., E-mail: emilio.mariotti@unisi.it; Marmugi, L.; Moi, L. [DSFTA and CNISM, University of Siena, via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Corradi, L.; Dainelli, A. [INFN – Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Arikawa, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Sakemi, Y. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Calabrese, R.; Mazzocca, G.; Tomassetti, L. [University of Ferrara and INFN, via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Ricci, L. [Physics Department, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo (Italy)

    2014-10-07

    We present here the first evidence of photodesorption induced by low-intensity non-resonant light from an yttrium thin foil, which works as a neutralizer for Rb and Fr ions beam. Neutral atoms are suddenly ejected from the metal surface in a pulsed regime upon illumination with a broadband flash light and then released in the free volume of a pyrex cells. Here atoms are captured by a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), which is effectively loaded by the photodesorption. Loading times of the order of the flash rise time are measured. Desorption is also obtained in the continuous regime, by exploiting CW visible illumination of the metallic neutralizer surface. We demonstrate that at lower CW light intensities vacuum conditions are not perturbed by the photodesorption and hence the MOT dynamics remains unaffected, while the trap population increases thanks to the incoming desorbed atoms flux. Even with the Y foil at room temperature and hence with no trapped atoms, upon visible illumination, the number of trapped atoms reaches 10{sup 5}. The experimental data are then analyzed by means of an analytical rate equation model, which allows the analysis of this phenomenon and its dynamics and allows the determination of critical experimental parameters and the test of the procedure in the framework of radioactive Francium trapping. In this view, together with an extensive investigation of the phenomenon with {sup 85}Rb, the first demonstration of the photodesorption-aided loading of a {sup 210}Fr MOT is shown.

  10. Matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry applied to multiple forms of lipases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, H C; Isobe, K; Stahl, B; Nokihara, K; Kordel, M; Schmid, R D; Karas, M; Hillenkamp, F; Spener, F

    1993-06-01

    Matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry was used to investigate heterogeneous patterns and molecular masses of microbial lipases from Penicillium camembertii, Geotrichum candidum, and Pseudomonas sp. Mass spectral peaks of the native, glycosylated lipases from P. camembertii and G. candidum were broader than those of the corresponding deglycosylated enzymes, indicative of heterogeneous glycosylations. The broader peaks in the mass spectra were caused by an overlapping of unresolved peaks, derived from single glycoprotein species. Molecular masses determined for the deglycosylated proteins were in excellent agreement with those deduced from amino acid composition and sequence data, whereas with conventional biochemical methods (gelfiltration, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) only very rough estimations of molecular masses were possible. By mass spectrometric analysis of the four fractions of chromatographically separated P. camembertii lipase molecular masses of 29,990, 34,030, 31,990, and 32,140 Da were found before and 29,960, 29,980, 29,990 and 30,010 Da, respectively, after deglycosylation. Thus from the four native fractions of P. camembertii lipase three were glycoproteins. G. candidum lipase showed an average molecular mass of 63,500 Da for the heterogeneously deglycosylated native form and a molecular mass of 59,650 Da for the deglycosylated enzyme. For the Pseudomonas lipase, which could only be isolated with lipids firmly attached, a molecular mass of 32,890 Da was determined, in close agreement with that derived from the cDNA sequence.

  11. GoAmazon 2014/15 Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, JN [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) deployment to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, was motivated by two main scientific objectives of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014/15 field campaign. 1) Study the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions by determining important molecular species in ambient nanoparticles. To address this, TDCIMS data will be combined with coincident measurements such as gas-phase sulfuric acid to determine the contribution of sulfuric acid condensation to nucleation and growth. We can then compare that result to TDCIMS-derived nanoparticle composition to determine the fraction of growth that can be attributed to the uptake of organic compounds. The molecular composition of sampled particles will also be used to attribute specific chemical species and mechanisms to growth, such as the condensation of low-volatility species or the oligomerization of α-dicarbonyl compounds. 2) Determine the source of new ambient nanoparticles in the Amazon. The hypothesis prior to measurements was that potassium salts formed from the evaporation of primary particles emitted by fungal spores can provide a unique and important pathway for new particle production in the Amazon basin. To explore this hypothesis, the TDCIMS recorded the mass spectra of sampled ambient particles using a protonated water cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Laboratory tests performed using potassium salts show that the TDCIMS can detect potassium with high sensitivity with this technique.

  12. Desorption isotherms and mathematical modeling of thin layer drying kinetics of tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belghith, Amira; Azzouz, Soufien; ElCafsi, Afif

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there is an increased demand on the international market of dried fruits and vegetables with significant added value. Due to its important production, consumption and nutrient intake, drying of tomato has become a subject of extended and varied research works. The present work is focused on the drying behavior of thin-layer tomato and its mathematical modeling in order to optimize the drying processes. The moisture desorption isotherms of raw tomato were determined at four temperature levels namely 45, 50, 60 and 65 °C using the static gravimetric method. The experimental data obtained were modeled by five equations and the (GAB) model was found to be the best-describing these isotherms. The drying kinetics were experimentally investigated at 45, 55 and 65 °C and performed at air velocities of 0.5 and 2 m/s. In order to investigate the effect of the exchange surface on drying time, samples were dried into two different shapes: tomato halves and tomato quarters. The impact of various drying parameters was also studied (temperature, air velocity and air humidity). The drying curves showed only the preheating period and the falling drying rate period. In this study, attention was paid to the modeling of experimental thin-layer drying kinetics. The experimental results were fitted with four different models.

  13. Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of protein tryptic digests on nanostructured silicon plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Mathieu; Coffinier, Yannick; Boukherroub, Rabah; Cantel, Sonia; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2012-04-03

    We report on the simple application of a new nanostructured silicon (NanoSi) substrate as laser desorption/ionization (LDI)-promoting surface for high-throughput identification of protein tryptic digests by a rapid MS profiling and subsequent MS/MS analysis. The NanoSi substrate is easily prepared by chemical etching of crystalline silicon in NH(4)F/HNO(3)/AgNO(3) aqueous solution. To assess the LDI performances in terms of sensitivity, repeatability and robustness, the detection of small synthetic peptides (380-1700Da) was investigated. Moreover, peptide sequencing was tackled. Various tryptic synthetic peptide mixtures were first characterized in MS and MS/MS experiments carried out on a single deposit. Having illustrated the capability to achieve peptide detection and sequencing on these ionizing surfaces in the same run, protein tryptic digests from Cytochrome C, β-Casein, BSA and Fibrinogen were then analyzed in the femtomolar range (from 50 fmol for Cytochrome C down to 2 fmol for Fibrinogen). Comparison of the NanoSi MS and MS/MS data with those obtained with sample conditioned in organic matrix demonstrated a great behavior for low mass responses. We demonstrated the capability of LDI on NanoSi to be a complementary method to MALDI peptide mass fingerprinting ensuring determination of peptide molecular weights and sequences for more efficient protein database searches. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Towards Better Understanding of Pea Seed Dormancy Using Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Cechová

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Seed coats of six pea genotypes contrasting in dormancy were studied by laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS. Multivariate statistical analysis discriminated dormant and non-dormant seeds in mature dry state. Separation between dormant and non-dormant types was observed despite important markers of particular dormant genotypes differ from each other. Normalized signals of long-chain hydroxylated fatty acids (HLFA in dormant JI64 genotype seed coats were significantly higher than in other genotypes. These compounds seem to be important markers likely influencing JI64 seed imbibition and germination. HLFA importance was supported by study of recombinant inbred lines (JI64xJI92 contrasting in dormancy but similar in other seed properties. Furthemore HLFA distribution in seed coat was studied by mass spectrometry imaging. HLFA contents in strophiole and hilum are significantly lower compared to other parts indicating their role in water uptake. Results from LDI-MS experiments are useful in understanding (physical dormancy (first phases of germination mechanism and properties related to food processing technologies (e.g., seed treatment by cooking.

  15. Properties of matrix-assisted laser desorption. Measurements with a time-to-digital converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ens, W; Mao, Y; Mayer, F; Standing, K G

    1991-03-01

    Some properties of matrix-assisted laser desorption have been studied using single-ion-counting methods and a time-to-digital converter. The methods allow examination of the process for irradiances near the reported threshold for observation with a transient recorder. All measurements were made using bovine insulin as a test compound. We present direct evidence that an irradiance threshold near 10(6) W cm-2 exists for ion production, and that the process is a collective effect, either involving a large number of molecular ions (approximately 10(4) in a successful event or none at all. Above the threshold, the yield is found to scale with a high power (4th to 6th) of the irradiance. Measurements of initial velocity distributions indicate an axial velocity spread corresponding to approximately 50 eV and a radial velocity spread corresponding to approximately 2.4 eV. Thus the ejection or extraction mechanism appears to be strongly asymmetric.

  16. Direct Laser Desorption Ionization of Endogenous and Exogenous Compounds from Insect Cuticles: Practical and Methodologic Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Joanne Y.; Soltwisch, Jens; Pirkl, Alexander; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2011-07-01

    We recently demonstrated that ultraviolet laser desorption ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UV-LDI o-TOF MS) could be used for the matrix-free analysis of cuticular lipids (unsaturated aliphatic and oxygen-containing hydrocarbons and triacylglycerides) directly from individual Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies (Yew, J. Y.; Dreisewerd, K.; Luftmann, H.; Pohlentz, G.; Kravitz, E. A., Curr. Biol. 2009, 19, 1245-1254). In this report, we show that the cuticular hydrocarbon, fatty acid, and triglyceride profiles of other insects and spiders can also be directly analyzed from intact body parts. Mandibular pheromones from the jaw of a queen honey bee are provided as one example. In addition, we describe analytical features and examine mechanisms underlying the methodology. Molecular ions of lipids can be generated by direct UV-LDI when non-endogenous compounds are applied to insect wings or other body parts. Current sensitivity limits are in the 10 pmol range. We show also the dependence of ion signal intensity on collisional cooling gas pressure in the ion source, laser wavelength (varied between 280-380 nm and set to 2.94 μm for infrared LDI), and laser pulse energy.

  17. Determining the adsorption and desorption behavior of thiabendazole fungicide for five different agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghazal Zahra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Thiabendazole 2-(4'-thiazolylbenzimidazole (TBZ is a Benzimidazole fungicide. In the present study adsorption and desorption of TBZ was investigated through batch equilibrium method involving UV-Visible spectrophotometer and High-performance liquid chromatography. Linear and Freundlich coefficients and kinetics of TBZ was studied in different agricultural soils of Pakistan. 9.8µgml-1 and 12.09µgml-1 were highest values of Kd ads and Kd des respectively. Kf ads values ranged from 6.6 to 8µgml-1 whereas values of Kf des followed the range of 1.5µgml-1 to 9.8µgml-1. Most of the samples depict negative hysteresis as their 1/ndes was more than 1/nads. Gibbs or free energy change (∆G and hysteresis vividly proved physical and reversible adsorption process. The values of K om and Koc were indicated medium mobility group of TBZ in selected soils. However all kinetic values varied significantly from sample to sample depending on their physicochemical parameters.

  18. A study on metal organic framework (MOF-177) synthesis, characterization and hydrogen adsorption -desorption cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viditha, V.; Venkateswer Rao, M.; Srilatha, K.; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally, Hyderabad-500 085, A.P. (India); Yerramilli, Anjaneyulu [Director, TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen has long been considered to be an ideal alternative to fossil-fuel systems and much work has now been done on its storage. There are four main methods of hydrogen storage: as a liquid; as compressed hydrogen; in the form of metal hydrides; and by physisorption. Among all the materials metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are considered to have desirable properties like high porosity, pore volume and high thermal stability. MOF-177 is considered to be an ideal storage material. In this paper we study about its synthesis and hydrogen storage capacities of MOF-177 at different pressures ranging from 25, 50, 75 and 100 bar respectively. The obtained samples are characterized by XRD, BET and SEM. The recorded results show that the obtained hydrogen capacity is 1.1, 2.20, 2.4 and 2.80 wt%. The desorption capacity is 0.9, 2.1, 2.37 and 2.7 wt% at certain temperatures like 373 K.

  19. An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Heath, Brandi S.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-10-02

    An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours. This is achieved by controlling the distance between the sample and the probe by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage and defining the tilt of the sample plane. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MS/MS experiments enabled identification of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. In addition, high dynamic range and sensitivity of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. High-spatial resolution image acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealed the spatial distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, in the white and gray matter that is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  20. Effect of biosurfactants on crude oil desorption and mobilization in a soil system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuyukina, M.S.; Ivshina, I.B. [Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Perm (Russian Federation). Institute of Ecology and Genetics of Microorganisms; Makarov, S.O.; Litvinenko, L.V. [Perm State University, Perm (Russian Federation); Cunningham, C.J. [University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Contaminated Land Assessment and Remediation Research Centre; Philp, J.C. [Napier University, Edinburgh (United Kingdom). School of Life Sciences

    2005-02-01

    Microbially produced biosurfactants were studied to enhance crude oil desorption and mobilization in model soil column systems. The ability of biosurfactants from Rhodococcus ruber to remove the oil from the soil core was 1.4-2.3 times greater than that of a synthetic surfactant of suitable properties, Tween 60. Biosurfactant-enhanced oil mobilization was temperature-related, and it was slower at 15{sup o}C than at 22-28{sup o}C. Mathematical modelling using a one-dimensional filtration model was applied to simulate the process of oil penetration through a soil column in the presence of (bio)surfactants. A strong positive correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.99) was found between surfactant penetration through oil-contaminated soil and oil removal activity. Biosurfactant was less adsorbed to soil components than synthetic surfactant, thus rapidly penetrating through the soil column and effectively removing 65-82% of crude oil. Chemical analysis showed that crude oil removed by biosurfactant contained a lower proportion of high-molecular-weight paraffins and asphaltenes, the most nonbiodegradable compounds, compared to initial oil composition. This result suggests that oil mobilized by biosurfactants could be easily biodegraded by soil bacteria. Rhodococcus biosurfactants can be used for in situ remediation of oil-contaminated soils. (author)