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Sample records for programed desorption tpd

  1. Hydrogen Temperature-Programmed Desorption (H2 TPD) of Supported Platinum Catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Miller, J.T.; Meyers, B.L.; Modica, F.S.; Lane, G.S.; Vaarkamp, M.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of supported platinum catalysts, Pt/KLTL, Pt/H-LTL, Pt/K-MAZ, Pt/H-MAZ, Pt/-Al2O3, and Pt/SiO2, was performed after hydrogen reduction at 300, 450, or 650°C. For all catalysts, reversible desorption of chemisorbed hydrogen occurred at approximately

  2. New method for the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of ammonia experiment for characterization of zeolite acidity: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Miki; Katada, Naonobu

    2013-10-01

    In this review, a method for the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of ammonia experiment for the characterization of zeolite acidity and its improvement by simultaneous IR measurement and DFT calculation are described. First, various methods of ammonia TPD are explained, since the measurements have been conducted under the concepts of kinetics, equilibrium, or diffusion control. It is however emphasized that the ubiquitous TPD experiment is governed by the equilibrium between ammonia molecules in the gas phase and on the surface. Therefore, a method to measure quantitatively the strength of the acid site (∆H upon ammonia desorption) under equilibrium-controlled conditions is elucidated. Then, a quantitative relationship between ∆H and H0 function is proposed, based on which the acid strength ∆H can be converted into the H0 function. The identification of the desorption peaks and the quantitative measurement of the number of acid sites are then explained. In order to overcome a serious disadvantage of the method (i.e., no information is provided about the structure of acid sites), the simultaneous measurement of IR spectroscopy with ammonia TPD, named IRMS-TPD (infrared spectroscopy/mass spectrometry-temperature-programmed desorption), is proposed. Based on this improved measurement, Brønsted and Lewis acid sites were differentiated and the distribution of Brønsted OH was revealed. The acidity characterized by IRMS-TPD was further supported by the theoretical DFT calculation. Thus, the advanced study of zeolite acidity at the molecular level was made possible. Advantages and disadvantages of the ammonia TPD experiment are discussed, and understanding of the catalytic cracking activity based on the derived acidic profile is explained. Copyright © 2013 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. TPD IR studies of CO desorption from zeolites CuY and CuX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datka, Jerzy; Kozyra, Paweł

    2005-06-01

    The desorption of CO from zeolites CuY and CuX was followed by TPD-IR method. This is a combination of temperature programmed desorption and IR spectroscopy. In this method, the status of activated zeolite (before adsorption), the process of adsorption, and the status of adsorbed molecules can be followed by IR spectroscopy, and the process of desorption (with linear temperature increase) can be followed both by IR spectroscopy and by mass spectrometry. IR spectra have shown two kinds of Cu + sites in both CuY and CuX. Low frequency (l.f.) band (2140 cm -1 in CuY and 2130 cm -1 in CuX) of adsorbed CO represents Cu + sites for which π back donation is stronger and σ donation is weaker whereas high frequency h.f. band (2160 cm -1 in CuY and 2155 cm -1 in CuX) represent Cu + sites for which π back donation is weaker and σ donation is stronger. The TPD-IR experiments evidenced that the Cu + sites represented by l.f. band bond CO more weakly than those represented by h.f. one, indicating that σ donation has more important impact to the strength of Cu +-CO bonding. On the contrary, π back donation has bigger contribution to the activation of adsorbed molecules.

  4. Combined TPD and theoretical investigation of CO desorption from Cu-K-FER zeolite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bulánek, R.; Nachtigall, Petr; Cicmanec, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 174, č. 2 (2008), s. 895-898 ISSN 0167-2991 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/06/0324 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : zeolite * adsorption * TPD Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  5. Equilibrium adsorption data from temperature-programmed desorption measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foeth, F.; Mugge, J.M.; van der Vaart, R.; van der Vaart, Rick; Bosch, H.; Reith, T.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes a novel method that enables the calculation of a series of adsorption isotherms basically from a single Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD) experiment. The basic idea is to saturate an adsorbent packed in a fixed bed at a certain feed concentration and temperature and to

  6. Temperature-programmed desorption for membrane inlet mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketola, R.A.; Grøn, C.; Lauritsen, F.R.

    1998-01-01

    We present a novel technique for analyzing volatile organic compounds in air samples using a solid adsorbent together with temperature-programmed desorption and subsequent detection by membrane inlet mass spectrometry (TPD-MIMS). The new system has the advantage of a fast separation of compounds...... to diffuse through the membrane into the mass spectrometer in a few seconds. In this fashion we could completely separate many similar volatile compounds, for example toluene from xylene and trichloroethene from tetrachloroethene. Typical detection limits were at low or sub-nanogram levels, the dynamic range...

  7. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, James P., E-mail: james.tonks@awe.co.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Galloway, Ewan C., E-mail: ewan.galloway@awe.co.uk; King, Martin O. [AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kerherve, Gwilherm [VACGEN Ltd, St. Leonards-On-Sea, East Sussex TN38 9NN (United Kingdom); Watts, John F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  8. Ellipsometry-based combination of isothermal sorption-desorption measurement and temperature programmed desorption technique: A probe for interaction of thin polymer films with solvent vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Mikhail Yu.; Nealey, Paul F.

    2018-05-01

    An environmental chamber equipped with an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer, programmatic vapor pressure control, and variable temperature substrate holder has been designed for studying polymer coating behavior during an exposure to a solvent vapor and also for probing the residual solvent in the film afterwards. Both sorption-desorption cycle at a constant temperature and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of the residual solvent manifest themselves as a change of the film thickness. Monitoring of ellipsometric angles of the coating allows us to determine the thickness as a function of the vapor pressure or sample temperature. The solvent vapor pressure is precisely regulated by a computer-controlled pneumatics. TPD spectra are recorded during heating of the film in an oil-free vacuum. The vapor pressure control system is described in detail. The system has been tested on 6-170 nm thick polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate), and poly(2-vinyl pyridine) films deposited on silicon substrates. Liquid toluene, water, ethanol, isopropanol, cyclohexane, 1,2-dichloroethane, and chlorobenzene were used to create a vapor atmosphere. Typical sorption-desorption and TPD curves are shown. The instrument achieves sub-monolayer sensitivity for adsorption studies on flat surfaces. Polymer-solvent vapor systems with strong interaction demonstrate characteristic absorption-desorption hysteresis spanning from vacuum to the glass transition pressure. Features on the TPD curves can be classified as either glass transition related film contraction or low temperature broad contraction peak. Typical absorption-desorption and TPD dependencies recorded for the 6 nm thick polystyrene film demonstrate the possibility to apply the presented technique for probing size effects in extremely thin coatings.

  9. Nano-nitride cathode catalysts of Ti, Ta, and Nb for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Temperature-programmed desorption investigation of molecularly adsorbed oxygen at low temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Ohnishi, Ryohji; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Katayama, Masao; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2013-01-01

    -programmed desorption (TPD) of molecularly adsorbed O2 at 120-170 K from these nanoparticles was examined, and the resulting amount and temperature of desorption were key factors determining the ORR activity. The size-dependent TiN nanoparticles (5-8 and 100 nm) were

  10. Study of the chemisorption and hydrogenation of propylene on platinum by temperature-programed desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, S.; Nakamura, M.; Yoshioka, N.

    1978-01-01

    Temperature-programed desorption (TPD) chromotograms of propylene adsorbed on platinum black in the absence or presence of hydrogen preadsorbed, admitted simultaneously, or admitted later, all showed four peaks at about 260/sup 0/ (A), 380/sup 0/ (B), 570/sup 0/ (C), and higher than 720/sup 0/K (D). Peaks A and B were identified as mixtures of propylene and propane, and peaks C and D were methane formed by thermal decomposition of the chemisorbed propylene during desorption. When nitrogen rather than helium was used as the carrier gas for the TPD, only delta-hydrogen was observed; this suggested that propylene was more strongly adsorbed on the platinum than hydrogen. Studies of the reactivities with propylene of the various types of chemisorbed hydrogen previously detected by TPD showed that propylene reacted with ..gamma..-hydrogen present on the surface in the form of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on top of platinum atoms and with ..beta..-hydrogen, molecular hydrogen chemisorbed in a bridged form, but did not react with delta-hydrogen. Tables and graph.

  11. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex temperature-programmed desorption data by multivariate curve resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Reyes, Juan Carlos F.; Teplyakov, Andrew V.; Brown, Steven D.

    2010-10-01

    The substantial amount of information carried in temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments is often difficult to mine due to the occurrence of competing reaction pathways that produce compounds with similar mass spectrometric features. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) is introduced as a tool capable of overcoming this problem by mathematically detecting spectral variations and correlations between several m/z traces, which is later translated into the extraction of the cracking pattern and the desorption profile for each desorbate. Different from the elegant (though complex) methods currently available to analyze TPD data, MCR analysis is applicable even when no information regarding the specific surface reaction/desorption process or the nature of the desorbing species is available. However, when available, any information can be used as constraints that guide the outcome, increasing the accuracy of the resolution. This approach is especially valuable when the compounds desorbing are different from what would be expected based on a chemical intuition, when the cracking pattern of the model test compound is difficult or impossible to obtain (because it could be unstable or very rare), and when knowing major components desorbing from the surface could in more traditional methods actually bias the quantification of minor components. The enhanced level of understanding of thermal processes achieved through MCR analysis is demonstrated by analyzing three phenomena: i) the cryogenic desorption of vinyltrimethylsilane from silicon, an introductory system where the known multilayer and monolayer components are resolved; ii) acrolein hydrogenation on a bimetallic Pt-Ni-Pt catalyst, where a rapid identification of hydrogenated products as well as other desorbing species is achieved, and iii) the thermal reaction of Ti[N(CH 3) 2] 4 on Si(100), where the products of surface decomposition are identified and an estimation of the surface composition after the

  12. Temperature Programmed Desorption of Quench-condensed Krypton and Acetone in Air; Selective Concentration of Ultra-trace Gas Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Taku T; Sakaguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Selective concentration of ultra-trace components in air-like gases has an important application in analyzing volatile organic compounds in the gas. In the present study, we examined quench-condensation of the sample gas on a ZnO substrate below 50 K followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) (low temperature TPD) as a selective gas concentration technique. We studied two specific gases in the normal air; krypton as an inert gas and acetone as a reactive gas. We evaluated the relationship between the operating condition of low temperature TPD and the lowest detection limit. In the case of krypton, we observed the selective concentration by exposing at 6 K followed by thermal desorption at about 60 K. On the other hand, no selectivity appeared for acetone although trace acetone was successfully concentrated. This is likely due to the solvent effect by a major component in the air, which is suggested to be water. We suggest that pre-condensation to remove the water component may improve the selectivity in the trace acetone analysis by low temperature TPD.

  13. Interaction of D2 with H2O amorphous ice studied by temperature-programmed desorption experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiaud, L; Fillion, J H; Baouche, S; Dulieu, F; Momeni, A; Lemaire, J L

    2006-03-07

    The gas-surface interaction of molecular hydrogen D2 with a thin film of porous amorphous solid water (ASW) grown at 10 K by slow vapor deposition has been studied by temperature-programmed-desorption (TPD) experiments. Molecular hydrogen diffuses rapidly into the porous network of the ice. The D2 desorption occurring between 10 and 30 K is considered here as a good probe of the effective surface of ASW interacting with the gas. The desorption kinetics have been systematically measured at various coverages. A careful analysis based on the Arrhenius plot method has provided the D2 binding energies as a function of the coverage. Asymmetric and broad distributions of binding energies were found, with a maximum population peaking at low energy. We propose a model for the desorption kinetics that assumes a complete thermal equilibrium of the molecules with the ice film. The sample is characterized by a distribution of adsorption sites that are filled according to a Fermi-Dirac statistic law. The TPD curves can be simulated and fitted to provide the parameters describing the distribution of the molecules as a function of their binding energy. This approach contributes to a correct description of the interaction of molecular hydrogen with the surface of possibly porous grain mantles in the interstellar medium.

  14. Microsystem with integrated capillary leak to mass spectrometer for high sensitivity temperature programmed desorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaade, Ulrich; Jensen, Søren; Hansen, Ole

    2004-01-01

    leak minimizes dead volumes in the system, resulting in increased sensitivity and reduced response time. These properties make the system ideal for TPD experiments in a carrier gas. With CO desorbing from platinum as model system, it is shown that CO desorbing in 105 Pa of argon from as little as 0.......5 cm2 of platinum foil gives a clear desorption peak. By using the microfabricated flow system, TPD experiments can be performed in a carrier gas with a sensitivity approaching that of TPD experiments in vacuum. ©2004 American Institute of Physics...

  15. Stabilization of mercury over Mn-based oxides: Speciation and reactivity by temperature programmed desorption analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Haomiao [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ma, Yongpeng [Henan Collaborative Innovation Center of Environmental Pollution Control and Ecological Restoration, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, No. 136, Science Avenue, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Huang, Wenjun; Mei, Jian; Zhao, Songjian; Qu, Zan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yan, Naiqiang, E-mail: nqyan@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Hg-TPD method was used for speciation of mercury species. • Different elements modified MnO{sub x} have different mercury binding state. • Understanding mercury existed state was beneficial for designing novel materials. - Abstract: Mercury temperature-programmed desorption (Hg-TPD) method was employed to clarify mercury species over Mn-based oxides. The elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) removal mechanism over MnO{sub x} was ascribed to chemical-adsorption. HgO was the primary mercury chemical compound adsorbed on the surface of MnO{sub x}. Rare earth element (Ce), main group element (Sn) and transition metal elements (Zr and Fe) were chosen for the modification of MnO{sub x}. Hg-TPD results indicated that the binding strength of mercury on these binary oxides followed the order of Sn-MnO{sub x} < Ce-MnO{sub x} ∼ MnO{sub x} < Fe-MnO{sub x} < Zr-MnO{sub x}. The activation energies for desorption were calculated and they were 64.34, 101.85, 46.32, 117.14, and 106.92 eV corresponding to MnO{sub x}, Ce-MnO{sub x}, Sn-MnO{sub x}, Zr-MnO{sub x} and Fe-MnO{sub x}, respectively. Sn-MnO{sub x} had a weak bond of mercury (Hg-O), while Zr-MnO{sub x} had a strong bond (Hg≡O). Ce-MnO{sub x} and Fe-MnO{sub x} had similar bonds compared with pure MnO{sub x}. Moreover, the effects of SO{sub 2} and NO were investigated based on Hg-TPD analysis. SO{sub 2} had a poison effect on Hg{sup 0} removal, and the weak bond of mercury can be easily destroyed by SO{sub 2}. NO was favorable for Hg{sup 0} removal, and the bond strength of mercury was enhanced.

  16. Hydrogen Temperature-Programmed Desorption in Platinum Catalysts: Decomposition and Isotopic Exchange by Spillover Hydrogen of Chemisorbed Ammonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Miller, J.T.; Meyers, B.L.; Barr, M.K.; Modica, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    H{2}-TPD of Pt/alumina catalysts display multiple hydrogendesorptions. In addition to chemisorbed hydrogen (Peak I) atapproximately 175}o{C, there is a small hydrogen desorption (PeakII) at about 250}o{C and a large, irreversible hydrogen desorption(Peak III) at 450}o{C. The quantity of hydrogen

  17. Methanol Reforming over Cobalt Catalysts Prepared from Fumarate Precursors: TPD Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftichia Papadopoulou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD was employed to investigate adsorption characteristics of CH3OH, H2O, H2, CO2 and CO on cobalt-manganese oxide catalysts prepared through mixed Co-Mn fumarate precursors either by pyrolysis or oxidation and oxidation/reduction pretreatment. Pyrolysis temperature and Co/Mn ratio were the variable synthesis parameters. Adsorption of methanol, water and CO2 was carried out at room temperature. Adsorption of H2 and H2O was carried out at 25 and 300 °C. Adsorption of CO was carried out at 25 and 150 °C. The goal of the work was to gain insight on the observed differences in the performance of the aforementioned catalysts in methanol steam reforming. TPD results indicated that activity differences are mostly related to variation in the number density of active sites, which are able to adsorb and decompose methanol.

  18. Nano-nitride cathode catalysts of Ti, Ta, and Nb for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Temperature-programmed desorption investigation of molecularly adsorbed oxygen at low temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Ohnishi, Ryohji

    2013-01-10

    TiN, NbN, TaN, and Ta3N5 nanoparticles synthesized using mesoporous graphitic (mpg)-C3N4 templates were investigated for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of molecularly adsorbed O2 at 120-170 K from these nanoparticles was examined, and the resulting amount and temperature of desorption were key factors determining the ORR activity. The size-dependent TiN nanoparticles (5-8 and 100 nm) were then examined. With decreasing particle size, the density of molecularly adsorbed O2 per unit of surface area increased, indicating that a decrease in particle size increases the number of active sites. It is hard to determine the electrochemical active surface area for nonmetal electrocatalysts (such as oxides or nitrides), because of the absence of proton adsorption/desorption peaks in the voltammograms. In this study, O2-TPD for molecularly adsorbed O2 at low temperature demonstrated that the amount and strength of adsorbed O2 were key factors determining the ORR activity. The properties of molecularly adsorbed O2 on cathode catalysts are discussed against the ORR activity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  19. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Decay of 2-Methyl-, 2-Methoxy-, and 2-Ethylnaphthlene on α-Alumina during Temperature Programmed Desorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradly B. Baer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The decay of electronically excited molecular films of 2-methylnaphthalene (2-MN, 2-methoxynaphthalene (2-MeON, and 2-ethylnaphthalene (2-EN on a crystal of α-alumina was monitored as a function of temperature with temperature programmed desorption (TPD experiments. By assuming an exponential decay, the rate constants of the relaxation to the ground state were observed to have two components (±20% by laser induced fluorescence (LIF. For the 2-MeON, 2-MN, and 2-EN excimer, the longer components were 35, 25, and 23 × 106 s−1, respectively. Rate constants for the trap fluorescence for 2-MeON, 2-MN, and 2-EN were 100, 44, and 23×106 s−1, respectively. In separate experiments, the effect of a molecule that does not fluoresce and has a lower desorption temperature than the fluorophores was studied by deposition of a bilayer. 1-Chlorohexane (1-CH was chosen as the second layer to the fluorophore and the results gave clues to the complexity of the surface dynamics that occur as the surface is heated. For these bilayer systems, a second excimer formed during the TPD subsequent to the desorption of 1-CH, and their rates are given in parenthesis: for 2-MeON, 2-MN, and 2-EN, the long components were 30 (36, 25 (45, and 23 (42 × 106 s−1, respectively.

  20. Dosimeter-Type NOx Sensing Properties of KMnO4 and Its Electrical Conductivity during Temperature Programmed Desorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Moos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An impedimetric NOx dosimeter based on the NOx sorption material KMnO4 is proposed. In addition to its application as a low level NOx dosimeter, KMnO4 shows potential as a precious metal free lean NOx trap material (LNT for NOx storage catalysts (NSC enabling electrical in-situ diagnostics. With this dosimeter, low levels of NO and NO2 exposure can be detected electrically as instantaneous values at 380 °C by progressive NOx accumulation in the KMnO4 based sensitive layer. The linear NOx sensing characteristics are recovered periodically by heating to 650 °C or switching to rich atmospheres. Further insight into the NOx sorption-dependent conductivity of the KMnO4-based material is obtained by the novel eTPD method that combines electrical characterization with classical temperature programmed desorption (TPD. The NOx loading amount increases proportionally to the NOx exposure time at sorption temperature. The cumulated NOx exposure, as well as the corresponding NOx loading state, can be detected linearly by electrical means in two modes: (1 time-continuously during the sorption interval including NOx concentration information from the signal derivative or (2 during the short-term thermal NOx release.

  1. Temperature-programmed desorption study of NO reactions on rutile TiO2(110)-1×1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Boseong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Szanyi, Janos; Kay, Bruce D.; Kim, Yu Kwon

    2016-10-01

    Systematic temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies of NO adsorption and reactions on rutile TiO2(110)-1×1 surface reveal several distinct reaction channels in a temperature range of 50 – 500 K. NO readily reacts on TiO2(110) to form N2O which desorbs between 50 and 200 K (LT N2O channels), which leaves the TiO2 surface populated with adsorbed oxygen atoms (Oa) as a byproduct of N2O formation. In addition, we observe simultaneous desorption peaks of NO and N2O at 270 K (HT1 N2O) and 400 K (HT2 N2O), respectively, both of which are attributed to reaction-limited processes. No N-derived reaction product desorbs from TiO2(110) surface above 500 K or higher, while the surface may be populated with Oa’s and oxidized products such as NO2 and NO3. The adsorbate-free TiO2 surface with oxygen vacancies can be regenerated by prolonged annealing at 850 K or higher. Detailed analysis of the three N2O desorption yields reveals that the surface species for the HT channels are likely to be various forms of NO dimers.

  2. Analyses of desorbed H2O with temperature programmed desorption technique in sol-gel derived HfO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, H.; Nemoto, D.; Ikeda, M.; Nishide, T.

    2009-01-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) is a promising material for the gate insulator in highly miniaturized silicon (Si) ultra-large-scale-integration (ULSI) devices (32 nm and beyond). In the field chemistry, a sol-gel processing has been used to fabricate HfO 2 thin film with the advantages of low cost, relative simplicity, and easy control of the composition of the layers formed. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) has been used not only for analyzing adsorbed gases on the surfaces of bulk sol-gel-derived HfO 2 of sol-gel-derived HfO 2 thin film fired at 350, 450, 550 and 700 deg C in sol-gel derived HfO 2 films in air is investigated using TPD, and also the material characterization of HfO 2 thin films is evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The dielectric constant of the films was also estimated using the capacitance-voltage (C-V) method. TPD is essentially a method of analyzing desorped gases from samples heated by infra-red light as a function of temperature under vacuum conditions using a detector of quadruple mass spectroscopy (QMS). Sol-gel-derived HfO 2 films were fabricated on 76-mm-diameter Si(100) wafers as follows. Hafnia sol solutions were prepared by dissolving HfCl 4 in NH 4 OH solution, followed by the of HCOOH. (author)

  3. A TPD-MS study of glassy carbon surfaces oxidized by CO2 and O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILA D. LAUSEVIC

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-programmed desorption (TPD method combined with mass spectrometric (MS analysis has been applied to investigate the surface properties of carbon materials. The apparatus consisting of a temperature-programmed furnace and a quadrupole mass spectrometer was constructed in order to characterize the surface of differently treated glassy carbon samples. In this work, samples of glassy carbon exposed to air, CO2 and O2 were examined. The desorption of H2O, CO and CO2, as major products, indicated the presence of different oxide groups. The amount of these groups for all samples was calculated. It is concluded that oxidation affects the nature and the amount of the surface oxide groups and contributes to their increased stability.

  4. Improving of understanding of beta-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) adsorption on activated carbons by temperature-programmed desorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passé-Coutrin, Nady; Maisonneuve, Laetitia; Durimel, Axelle; Dentzer, Joseph; Gadiou, Roger; Gaspard, Sarra

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the interactions between beta-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and chemical groups at activated carbon (AC) surface, the solid samples were hydrogenated aiming to decrease the amounts of oxygenated groups. Two AC samples designated by BagH2O and BagP1.5 were prepared by water vapor activation and phosphoric acid activation, respectively, of sugarcane bagasse used as an AC precursor. A more simple molecule 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP) is used as a model of chlorinated compound. The AC were characterized by infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman resonance spectroscopies, as well as temperature-programmed desorption coupled with mass spectrometry (TPD-MS). BagP1.5 and BagH2O AC surface contained oxygenated groups. Upon hydrogenation, a decrease of most of these group amxounts was observed for both samples, while hydroxyl groups increased. On the basis of temperature-programmed desorption data obtained for AC samples contaminated with TCP or HCH, it was possible to determine the type of hydrogen bond formed between each AC and HCH.

  5. High field 27Al MAS NMR and TPD studies of active sites in ethanol dehydration using thermally treated transitional aluminas as catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Xu, Suochang; Kwak, Ja Hun; Hu, Mary Y.; Wan, Chuan; Zhao, Zhenchao; Szanyi, Janos; Bao, Xinhe; Han, Xiuwen; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2016-04-01

    High field quantitative 27Al MAS NMR and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ethanol are used to study the surface and phase transformation of gamma-Al2O3 during calcination in the temperature range of 500 to 1300 degrees C. Following ethanol adsorption, ethylene is generated during TPD with a desorption temperature > 200 degrees C. With increasing calcination temperature prior to TPD, the amount of ethylene produced decreases monotonically. Significantly, 27Al MAS NMR reveals that the amount of penta-coordinate Al3+ ions (Lewis acid sites) also decreases with increasing calcination temperature. In fact, a strong correlation between the amount of penta-coordinate Al3+ ions and the amount of strongly adsorbed ethanol molecules (i.e., the ones that convert to ethylene during TPD) is obtained. This result indicates that the penta-coordinate aluminum sites are the catalytic active sites on alumina surfaces during ethanol dehydration reaction across the entire course of gamma- to alpha-Al2O3 phase transformations.

  6. Chemistry of CCl 4 on Fe 3O 4(1 1 1)-(2 × 2) surfaces in the presence of adsorbed D 2O studied by temperature programmed desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, K.; Totir, G. G.; Fitts, J. P.; Rim, K. T.; Mueller, T.; Flynn, G. W.; Joyce, S. A.; Osgood, R. M.

    2003-07-01

    Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) was used to study surface reactions of Fe 3O 4(1 1 1)-(2 × 2) sequentially exposed, at ˜100 K, to vapor-phase D 2O and CCl 4. Previous TPD and XPS results have indicated that in the absence of D 2O, CCl 4 dissociatively adsorbs on Fe 3O 4(1 1 1) producing chemisorbed Cl and CCl 2. Subsequent heating of the surface results in abstraction of lattice iron and oxygen atoms and causes them to desorb as FeCl 2 and OCCl 2, respectively. This study shows that when this Fe 3O 4 surface is exposed only to D 2O, TPD measures a rich surface chemistry with multiple desorption events extending as high as ˜800 K, indicating dissociative adsorption of D 2O on the Fe 3O 4(1 1 1) surface. After sequential exposure to D 2O and then CCl 4, the production of FeCl 2 and OCCl 2 from adsorbed CCl 4 is suppressed, indicating that D 2O fragments block the surface reactive sites.

  7. Temperature-programmed desorption of water and ammonia on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    observed.4–8 Owing to the decomposition of the acid probe, TPD data are too complex to interpret for ... reaction with sulphated zirconia-type catalysts. Water has both ... rate of 20°C min–1 in a flow of moisture-free helium (40 ml min–1).

  8. Thermal transformation of bioactive caffeic acid on fumed silica seen by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry and quantum chemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Tetiana V; Lipkovska, Natalia O; Barvinchenko, Valentyna M; Palyanytsya, Borys B; Kazakova, Olga A; Dudik, Olesia O; Menyhárd, Alfréd; László, Krisztina

    2016-05-15

    Thermochemical studies of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and their surface complexes are important for the pharmaceutical industry, medicine and for the development of technologies of heterogeneous biomass pyrolysis. In this study, structural and thermal transformations of caffeic acid complexes on silica surfaces were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPD MS) and quantum chemical methods. Two types of caffeic acid surface complexes are found to form through phenolic or carboxyl groups. The kinetic parameters of the chemical reactions of caffeic acid on silica surface are calculated. The mechanisms of thermal transformations of the caffeic chemisorbed surface complexes are proposed. Thermal decomposition of caffeic acid complex chemisorbed through grafted ester group proceeds via three parallel reactions, producing ketene, vinyl and acetylene derivatives of 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Immobilization of phenolic acids on the silica surface improves greatly their thermal stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Interactions on External MOF Surfaces: Desorption of Water and Ethanol from CuBDC Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Alexander C; Aleksandrov, Alexandr B; Nair, Sankar; Orlando, Thomas M

    2017-10-03

    The external surfaces of metal-organic framework (MOF) materials are difficult to experimentally isolate due to the high porosities of these materials. MOF surface surrogates in the form of copper benzenedicarboxylate (CuBDC) nanosheets were synthesized using a bottom-up approach, and the surface interactions of water and ethanol were investigated by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). A method of analysis of diffusion-influenced TPD was developed to measure the desorption properties of these porous materials. This approach also allows the extraction of diffusion coefficients from TPD data. The transmission Fourier transform infrared spectra, powder X-ray diffraction patterns, and TPD data indicate that water desorbs from CuBDC nanosheets with activation energies of 44 ± 2 kJ/mol at edge sites and 58 ± 1 kJ/mol at external surface and internal and pore sites. Ethanol desorbs with activation energies of 58 ± 1 kJ/mol at internal pore sites and 66 ± 0.4 kJ/mol at external surface sites. Co-adsorption of water and ethanol was also investigated. The presence of ethanol was found to inhibit the desorption of water, resulting in a water desorption process with an activation energy of 68 ± 0.7 kJ/mol.

  10. UV-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption studies of model and bulk heterogeneous catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewell, Craig Richmond [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) have been used to investigate the surface structure of model heterogeneous catalysts in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). UV-Raman spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure of bulk model catalysts in ambient and reaction conditions. The structural information obtained through UV-Raman spectroscopy has been correlated with both the UHV surface analysis and reaction results. The present day propylene and ethylene polymerization catalysts (Ziegler-Natta catalysts) are prepared by deposition of TiCl4 and a Al(Et)3 co-catalyst on a microporous Mg-ethoxide support that is prepared from MgCl2 and ethanol. A model thin film catalyst is prepared by depositing metallic Mg on a Au foil in a UHV chamber in a background of TiCl4 in the gas phase. XPS results indicate that the Mg is completely oxidized to MgCl2 by TiCl4 resulting in a thin film of MgCl2/TiClx, where x = 2, 3, and 4. To prepare an active catalyst, the thin film of MgCl2/TiClx on Au foil is enclosed in a high pressure cell contained within the UHV chamber and exposed to ~1 Torr of Al(Et)3.

  11. Desorption of Benzene, 1,3,5-Trifluorobenzene, and Hexafluorobenzene from a Graphene Surface: The Effect of Lateral Interactions on the Desorption Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2018-05-03

    The desorption of benzene, 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene (TFB), and hexafluorobenzene (HFB) from a graphene covered Pt(111) substrate was investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). All three species have well resolved monolayer and second layer desorption peaks. The desorption spectra for submonolayer coverages of benzene and hexafluorobenzene are consistent with first order desorption kinetics. In contrast, the submonolayer TPD spectra for 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene align on a common leading-edge which is indicative of zero order desorption kinetics. The desorption behavior of the three molecules can be correlated with the strength of the quadrupole moments. Calculations (second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation and density functional theory) show that the potential minimum for coplanar TFB dimers is more than a factor of two greater than that for either benzene or HFB dimers. The calculations support the interpretation that benzene and HFB are less likely to form the two dimensional islands that are needed for submonolayer zero order desorption kinetics.

  12. Ammonia IRMS-TPD study on the distribution of acid sites in mordenite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Miki; Suzuki, Katsuki; Katada, Naonobu; Kanougi, Tomonori; Atoguchi, Takashi

    2005-10-13

    Using an IRMS-TPD (temperature programmed desorption) of ammonia, we studied the nature, strength, crystallographic location, and distribution of acid sites of mordenite. In this method, infrared spectroscopy (IR) and mass spectroscopy (MS) work together to follow the thermal behavior of adsorbed and desorbed ammonia, respectively; therefore, adsorbed species were identified, and their thermal behavior was directly connected with the desorption of ammonia during an elevation of temperature. IR-measured TPD of the NH4(+) cation was similar to MS-measured TPD, thus showing the nature of Brønsted acidity. From the behavior of OH bands, it was found that the Brønsted acid sites consisted of two kinds of OH bands at high and low wavenumbers, ascribable to OH bands situated on 12- and 8-member rings (MR) of mordenite structure, respectively. The amount and strength of these Brønsted hydroxyls were measured quantitatively based on a theoretical equation using a curve fitting method. Up to ca. 30% of the exchange degree, NH4(+) was exchanged with Na+ on the 12-MR to arrive at saturation; therefore, in this region, the Brønsted acid site was situated on the large pore of 12-MR. The NH4(+) cation was then exchanged with Na+ on 8-MR, and finally exceeded the amount on 12-MR. In the 99% NH4-mordenite, Brønsted acid sites were located predominantly on the 8-MR more than on the 12-MR. Irrespective of the NH4(+) exchange degree, the strengths deltaH of Brønsted OH were 145 and 153 kJ mol(-1) on the 12- and 8-MR, respectively; that is, the strength of Brønsted acid site on the 8-MR was larger than that on the 12-MR. A density functional theory (DFT) calculation supported the difference in the strengths of the acid sites. Catalytic cracking activity of the Brønsted acid sites on the 8-MR declined rapidly, while that on the 12-MR was remarkably kept. The difference in strength and/or steric capacity may cause such a difference in the life of a catalyst.

  13. Alloy formation and chemisorption at Zn/Pt(111) bimetallic surfaces using alkali ISS, XPD, and TPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chih-Sung; Martono, Eddie; Banerjee, Santanu; Roszell, John; Vohs, John; Koel, Bruce E

    2013-11-21

    Alloy formation and chemisorption at bimetallic surfaces formed by vapor-depositing Zn on a Pt(111) single crystal were investigated primarily by using X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low-energy alkali ion scattering spectroscopy (ALISS), low electron energy diffraction (LEED), and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). A wide range of conditions were investigated to explore whether deposition and annealing of Zn films could produce well-defined, ordered alloy surfaces, similar to those encountered for Sn/Pt(111) surface alloys. These attempts were unsuccessful, although weak, diffuse (2 × 2) spots were observed under special conditions. The particular PtZn bimetallic alloy created by annealing one monolayer of Zn on Pt(111) at 600 K, which has a Zn composition in the surface layer of about 5 at. %, was investigated in detail by using XPD and ALISS. Only a diffuse (1 × 1) pattern was observed from this surface by LEED, suggesting that no long-range, ordered alloy structure was formed. Zn atoms were substitutionally incorporated into the Pt(111) crystal to form a near-surface alloy in which Zn atoms were found to reside primarily in the topmost and second layers. The alloyed Zn atoms in the topmost layer are coplanar with the Pt atoms in the surface layer, without any "buckling" of Zn, that is, displacement in the vertical direction. This result is expected because of the similar size of Pt and Zn, based on previous studies of bimetallic Pt alloys. Zn atoms desorb upon heating rather than diffusing deep into the bulk of the Pt crystal. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) measurements show that both CO and NO have lower desorption energies on the PtZn alloy surface compared to that on the clean Pt(111) surface.

  14. Coadsorbed species explain the mechanism of methanol temperature-desorption on CeO2(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Jonathan E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Overbury, Steven H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beste, Ariana [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-24

    Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to investigate the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of methanol from CeO2(111). For the first time, low-temperature water formation and high-temperature methanol desorption are explained by our calculations. High coverages of methanol, which correspond to experimental conditions, are required to properly describe these features of the TPD spectrum. We identify a mechanism for the low-temperature formation of water involving the dissociation of two methanol molecules on the same surface O atom and filling of the resulting surface vacancy with one of the methoxy products. After water desorption, methoxy groups are stabilized on the surface and react at higher temperatures to form methanol and formaldehyde by a disproportionation mechanism. Alternatively, the stabilized methoxy groups undergo sequential C–H scission reactions to produce formaldehyde. Calculated energy requirements and methanol/formaldehyde selectivity agree with the experimental data.

  15. Oxygen Sorption and Desorption Properties of Selected Lanthanum Manganites and Lanthanum Ferrite Manganites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Skou, Eivind M.; Jacobsen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Temperature‐programmed desorption (TPD) with a carrier gas was used to study the oxygen sorption and desorption properties of oxidation catalysts and solid‐oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode materials (La0.85Sr0.15)0.95MnO3+δ (LSM) and La0.60Sr0.40Fe0.80Mn0.20O3‐δ (LSFM). The powders were characterized...... by X‐ray diffractometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and BET surface adsorption. Sorbed oxygen could be distinguished from oxygen originating from stoichiometry changes. The results indicated that there is one main site for oxygen sorption/desorption. The amount of sorbed oxygen was monitored over...... time at different temperatures. Furthermore, through data analysis it was shown that the desorption peak associated with oxygen sorption is described well by second‐order desorption kinetics. This indicates that oxygen molecules dissociate upon adsorption and that the rate‐determining step...

  16. Deuterium desorption from tungsten using laser heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Retention and desorption of hydrogenic species need to be accurately modeled to predict the tritium inventory of next generation fusion devices, which is needed both for tritium fuel recovery and for tritium safety concerns. In this paper, experiments on thermal desorption of deuterium from intrinsic polycrystalline tungsten defects using laser heating are compared to TMAP-7 modeling. The samples during deuterium plasma exposure were at a temperature of 373K for this benchmark study with ion fluence of 0.7–1.0 ×1024Dm−2. Following plasma exposure, a fiber laser (λ= 1100nm heated the samples to peak surface temperatures ranging from ∼500 to 1400K with pulse widths from 10ms to 1s, and 1 to 10 pulses applied to each sample. The remaining deuterium retention was measured using temperature programmed desorption (TPD. Results show that > 95% of deuterium is desorbed when the peak surface temperature reached ∼950K for > 1s. TMAP-7 is used to predict deuterium desorption from tungsten for a range of surface temperatures and heating durations, and is compared to previous work on desorption from beryllium codeposits.

  17. Modelling absorption and photoluminescence of TPD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vragovic, Igor [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada and Inst. Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: igor.vragovic@ua.es; Calzado, Eva M.; Diaz Garcia, Maria A.; Himcinschi, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Gisslen, L.; Scholz, R. [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    We analyse the optical spectra of N,N{sup '}-diphenyl-N,N{sup '}-bis(3-methyl-phenyl)-(1,1{sup '}-biphenyl)-4,4{sup '}-diamine (TPD) doped polystyrene films. The aim of the present paper is to give a microscopic interpretation of the significant Stokes shift between absorption and photoluminescence, which makes this material suitable for stimulated emission. The optimized geometric structures and energies of a neutral TPD monomer in ground and excited states are obtained by ab initio calculations using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory. The results indicate that the second distinct peak observed in absorption may arise either from a group of higher electronic transitions of the monomer or from the lowest optical transitions of a TPD dimer.

  18. Modelling absorption and photoluminescence of TPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vragovic, Igor; Calzado, Eva M.; Diaz Garcia, Maria A.; Himcinschi, C.; Gisslen, L.; Scholz, R.

    2008-01-01

    We analyse the optical spectra of N,N ' -diphenyl-N,N ' -bis(3-methyl-phenyl)-(1,1 ' -biphenyl)-4,4 ' -diamine (TPD) doped polystyrene films. The aim of the present paper is to give a microscopic interpretation of the significant Stokes shift between absorption and photoluminescence, which makes this material suitable for stimulated emission. The optimized geometric structures and energies of a neutral TPD monomer in ground and excited states are obtained by ab initio calculations using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory. The results indicate that the second distinct peak observed in absorption may arise either from a group of higher electronic transitions of the monomer or from the lowest optical transitions of a TPD dimer

  19. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  20. Adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption of hydrogen with dispersed platinum and platinum-gold catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.R.; Foger, K.; Breakspere, R.J.

    1979-05-01

    Adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption of hydrogen with dispersed platinum and platinum-gold catalysts was studied with 0.9-3Vertical Bar3< platinum on silica gel, aerosil, sodium and lanthanum Y zeolites, and ..gamma..-alumina, and on aerosil-supported gold-platinum alloys containing 2, 10, 24, 33, and 85Vertical Bar3< gold. Surface enrichment with gold in the alloy systems, as derived from hydrogen adsorption data and predicted from surface enrichment theory and electron microscopic measurements of particle size, were in good agreement, which indicated that equilibrium was achieved by the thermal treatment (oxygen at 573/sup 0/K, hydrogen at 620/sup 0/K, repeated cycles) used. Hydrogen spillover to gold was observed at the higher hydrogen pressures tested on the alloys with high gold content, and to the zeolite supports. The temperature-programed desorption profiles were independent of gold content, which indicated that gold acts only as diluent, and that isolated surface platinum atoms become populated with hydrogen atoms either by hydrogen atom spillover from platinum ensembles to gold and from the gold to the isolated platinum, and/or by adsorption of a molecule directly on the isolated platinum and chemisorption of one H atom at an adjacent gold atom. The distribution of surface platinum ensembles was evaluated by a computer simulation method.

  1. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwarno Suwarno

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium is reactive toward hydrogen forming metal hydride which has a potential application in      energy storage and conversion. Titanium hydride has been widely studied for hydrogen storage, thermal storage, and battery electrodes applications. A special interest is using titanium for hydrogen production in a hydrogen sorption-enhanced steam reforming of natural gas. In the present work, non-isothermal dehydrogenation kinetics of titanium hydride and kinetics of hydrogenation in gaseous flow at isothermal conditions were investigated. The hydrogen desorption was studied using temperature desorption spectroscopy (TDS while the hydrogen absorption and desorption in gaseous flow were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD. The present work showed that the path of dehydrogenation of the TiH2 is d®b®a hydride phase with possible overlapping steps occurred. The fast hydrogen desorption rate observed at the TDS main peak temperature were correlated with the fast transformation of the d-TiH1.41 to b-TiH0.59. In the gaseous flow, hydrogen absorption and desorption were related to the transformation of b-TiH0.59 Û d-TiH1.41 with 2 wt.% hydrogen reversible content. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 21st November 2016; Revised: 20th March 2017; Accepted: 9th April 2017; Available online: 27th October 2017; Published regularly: December 2017 How to Cite: Suwarno, S., Yartys, V.A. (2017. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (3: 312-317  (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.3.810.312-317

  2. Ammonia IRMS-TPD measurements and DFT calculation on acidic hydroxyl groups in CHA-type zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Katsuki; Sastre, German; Katada, Naonobu; Niwa, Miki

    2007-12-07

    Brønsted acidity of H-chabazite (CHA) zeolites (Si : Al(2) = 4.2) was investigated by means of ammonia infrared-mass spectrometry/temperature-programmed desorption (IRMS-TPD) methods and density functional calculations. Four IR bands were observed at 3644, 3616, 3575 and 3538 cm(-1), and they were ascribable to the acidic OH groups on four nonequivalent oxygen sites in the CHA structure. The absorption band at 3538 cm(-1) was attributed to the O(4)H in the 6-membered ring (MR), and ammonia adsorption energy (DeltaU) of this OH group was the lowest among the 4 kinds of OH groups. The other 3 bands were assigned to the acidic OH groups in 8MR. It was observed that the DeltaU in 8 and 6MR were 131 (+/-3) and 101 kJ mol(-1), respectively. On the other hand, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations within periodic boundary conditions yielded the adsorption energies on these OH groups in 8 and 6MR to be ca. 130 and 110 kJ mol(-1), respectively, in good agreement with the experimentally-observed values.

  3. Thermal desorption of formamide and methylamine from graphite and amorphous water ice surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabouni, H.; Diana, S.; Nguyen, T.; Dulieu, F.

    2018-04-01

    Context. Formamide (NH2CHO) and methylamine (CH3NH2) are known to be the most abundant amine-containing molecules in many astrophysical environments. The presence of these molecules in the gas phase may result from thermal desorption of interstellar ices. Aims: The aim of this work is to determine the values of the desorption energies of formamide and methylamine from analogues of interstellar dust grain surfaces and to understand their interaction with water ice. Methods: Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments of formamide and methylamine ices were performed in the sub-monolayer and monolayer regimes on graphite (HOPG) and non-porous amorphous solid water (np-ASW) ice surfaces at temperatures 40-240 K. The desorption energy distributions of these two molecules were calculated from TPD measurements using a set of independent Polanyi-Wigner equations. Results: The maximum of the desorption of formamide from both graphite and ASW ice surfaces occurs at 176 K after the desorption of H2O molecules, whereas the desorption profile of methylamine depends strongly on the substrate. Solid methylamine starts to desorb below 100 K from the graphite surface. Its desorption from the water ice surface occurs after 120 K and stops during the water ice sublimation around 150 K. It continues to desorb from the graphite surface at temperatures higher than160 K. Conclusions: More than 95% of solid NH2CHO diffuses through the np-ASW ice surface towards the graphitic substrate and is released into the gas phase with a desorption energy distribution Edes = 7460-9380 K, which is measured with the best-fit pre-exponential factor A = 1018 s-1. However, the desorption energy distribution of methylamine from the np-ASW ice surface (Edes = 3850-8420 K) is measured with the best-fit pre-exponential factor A = 1012 s-1. A fraction of solid methylamine monolayer of roughly 0.15 diffuses through the water ice surface towards the HOPG substrate. This small amount of methylamine

  4. Segregation of O2 and CO on the surface of dust grains determines the desorption energy of O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, J. A.; Diana, S.; Dulieu, F.

    2015-12-01

    Selective depletion towards pre-stellar cores is still not understood. The exchange between the solid and gas phases is central to this mystery. The aim of this paper is to show that the thermal desorption of O2 and CO from a submonolayer mixture is greatly affected by the composition of the initial surface population. We have performed thermally programmed desorption (TPD) experiments on various submonolayer mixtures of O2 and CO. Pure O2 and CO exhibit almost the same desorption behaviour, but their desorption differs strongly when mixed. Pure O2 is slightly less volatile than CO, while in mixtures, O2 desorbs earlier than CO. We analyse our data using a desorption law linking competition for binding sites with desorption, based on the assumption that the binding energy distribution of both molecules is the same. We apply Fermi-Dirac statistics in order to calculate the adsorption site population distribution, and derive the desorbing fluxes. Despite its simplicity, the model reproduces the observed desorption profiles, indicating that competition for adsorption sites is the reason for lower temperature O2 desorption. CO molecules push-out or `dislodge' O2 molecules from the most favourable binding sites, ultimately forcing their early desorption. It is crucial to consider the surface coverage of dust grains in any description of desorption. Competition for access to binding sites results in some important discrepancies between similar kinds of molecules, such as CO and O2. This is an important phenomenon to be investigated in order to develop a better understanding of the apparently selective depletion observed in dark molecular clouds.

  5. GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

    1999-01-01

    Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N 15 H 3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N 2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia

  6. Physisorption and desorption of H2, HD and D2 on amorphous solid water ice. Effect on mixing isotopologue on statistical population of adsorption sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiaud, Lionel; Fillion, Jean-Hugues; Dulieu, François; Momeni, Anouchah; Lemaire, Jean-Louis

    2015-11-28

    We study the adsorption and desorption of three isotopologues of molecular hydrogen mixed on 10 ML of porous amorphous water ice (ASW) deposited at 10 K. Thermally programmed desorption (TPD) of H2, D2 and HD adsorbed at 10 K have been performed with different mixings. Various coverages of H2, HD and D2 have been explored and a model taking into account all species adsorbed on the surface is presented in detail. The model we propose allows to extract the parameters required to fully reproduce the desorption of H2, HD and D2 for various coverages and mixtures in the sub-monolayer regime. The model is based on a statistical description of the process in a grand-canonical ensemble where adsorbed molecules are described following a Fermi-Dirac distribution.

  7. A testis-specific and testis developmentally regulated tumor protein D52 (TPD52)-like protein TPD52L3/hD55 interacts with TPD52 family proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qinhong; Chen Jie; Zhu Li; Liu Yun; Zhou Zuomin; Sha Jiahao; Wang Shui; Li Jianmin

    2006-01-01

    Tumor protein D52-like proteins (TPD52) are small coiled-coil motif bearing proteins that were first identified in breast cancer. TPD52 and related proteins have been implicated in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and vesicle trafficking. To date, three human TPD52 members had been identified, named hD52 (TPD52), hD53 (TPD52L1), and hD54 (TPD52L2). The most important characteristic of the protein family is a highly conserved coiled-coil motif that is required for homo- and heteromeric interaction with other TPD52-like proteins. Herein, we identified a novel TPD52-like sequence (TPD52L3, or hD55) in human testis using cDNA microarray. Sequence analysis of the deduced protein suggests that hD55 contains a coiled-coil motif and is highly conserved compared with other TPD52-like sequences. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down assays revealed that hD55 interacts with hD52, hD53, hD54, and itself. cDNA microarray detection found that hD55 was expressed at 5.6-fold higher levels in adult testis than in fetal testis. Additionally, the expression profile shows that hD55 is testis-specific, indicating a potential role for hD55 in testis development and spermatogenesis

  8. Growth of an Ultrathin Zirconia Film on Pt3Zr Examined by High-Resolution X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Temperature-Programmed Desorption, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, and Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Choi, Joong-Il Jake; Mayr-Schmölzer, Wernfried; Weilach, Christian; Rameshan, Christoph; Mittendorfer, Florian; Redinger, Josef; Schmid, Michael; Rupprechter, Günther

    2015-02-05

    Ultrathin (∼3 Å) zirconium oxide films were grown on a single-crystalline Pt 3 Zr(0001) substrate by oxidation in 1 × 10 -7 mbar of O 2 at 673 K, followed by annealing at temperatures up to 1023 K. The ZrO 2 films are intended to serve as model supports for reforming catalysts and fuel cell anodes. The atomic and electronic structure and composition of the ZrO 2 films were determined by synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS) (including depth profiling), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Oxidation mainly leads to ultrathin trilayer (O-Zr-O) films on the alloy; only a small area fraction (10-15%) is covered by ZrO 2 clusters (thickness ∼0.5-10 nm). The amount of clusters decreases with increasing annealing temperature. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO was utilized to confirm complete coverage of the Pt 3 Zr substrate by ZrO 2 , that is, formation of a closed oxide overlayer. Experiments and DFT calculations show that the core level shifts of Zr in the trilayer ZrO 2 films are between those of metallic Zr and thick (bulklike) ZrO 2 . Therefore, the assignment of such XPS core level shifts to substoichiometric ZrO x is not necessarily correct, because these XPS signals may equally well arise from ultrathin ZrO 2 films or metal/ZrO 2 interfaces. Furthermore, our results indicate that the common approach of calculating core level shifts by DFT including final-state effects should be taken with care for thicker insulating films, clusters, and bulk insulators.

  9. Desorption of Water from Distinct Step Types on a Curved Silver Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakrapan Janlamool

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the adsorption of H2O onto the A and B type steps on an Ag single crystal by temperature programmed desorption. For this study, we have used a curved crystal exposing a continuous range of surface structures ranging from [5(111 × (100] via (111 to [5(111 × (110]. LEED and STM studies verify that the curvature of our sample results predominantly from monoatomic steps. The sample thus provides a continuous array of step densities for both step types. Desorption probed by spatially-resolved TPD of multilayers of H2O shows no dependence on the exact substrate structure and thus confirms the absence of thermal gradients during temperature ramps. In the submonolayer regime, we observe a small and linear dependence of the desorption temperature on the A and B step density. We argue that such small differences are only observable by means of a single curved crystal, which thus establishes new experimental benchmarks for theoretical calculation of chemically accurate binding energies. We propose an origin of the observed behavior based on a “two state” desorption model.

  10. Hydrogen desorption reactions of Li-N-H hydrogen storage system: Estimation of activation free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuru; Haga, Tetsuya; Kawai, Yasuaki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2007-01-01

    The dehydrogenation reactions of the mixtures of lithium amide (LiNH 2 ) and lithium hydride (LiH) were studied under an Ar atmosphere by means of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The dehydrogenation reaction of the LiNH 2 /LiH mixture was accelerated by addition of 1 mol% Ti(III) species (k = 3.1 x 10 -4 s -1 at 493 K), and prolonged ball-milling time (16 h) further enhanced reaction rate (k = 1.1 x 10 -3 s -1 at 493 K). For the hydrogen desorption reaction of Ti(III) doped samples, the activation energies estimated by Kissinger plot (95 kJ mol -1 ) and Arrhenius plot (110 kJ mol -1 ) were in reasonable agreement. The LiNH 2 /LiH mixture without Ti(III) species, exhibited slower hydrogen desorption process and the kinetic traces deviated from single exponential behavior. The results indicated the Ti(III) additives change the hydrogen desorption reaction mechanism of the LiNH 2 /LiH mixture

  11. Deactivation of Pd particles supported on Nb 2O 5/Cu 3Au(1 0 0): SFG and TPD studies from UHV to 100 mbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höbel, Frank; Bandara, Athula; Rupprechter, Günther; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2006-02-01

    Structural changes that occur on Pd-Nb 2O 5/Cu 3Au(1 0 0) model catalysts upon thermal annealing were followed by sum frequency generation (SFG) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) using CO as probe molecule. SFG experiments were performed both under ultrahigh vacuum and mbar pressure. Heating the catalyst to temperatures above 300 K lead to an irreversible 50% decrease in the CO adsorption capacity and modified the remaining adsorption sites. Alterations of the phase between resonant and non-resonant SFG signals upon annealing indicate a change in the electronic structure of the surface, which excludes Pd sintering or migration of Nb 2O 5 over Pd particles to cause the observed effect and rather suggests the formation of "mixed Pd-NbO x" sites. The same changes in surface properties also occur during CO hydrogenation at 1 bar and high temperature, pointing to an involvement of "mixed Pd-NbO x" sites in catalytic reactions.

  12. TPD52: A Novel Vaccine Target for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Chinnaiyan AM and Rubin MA. (2006). Defining aggressive prostate cancer using a 12- gene model. Neoplasia 8: 59-68. 12. Scanlan MJ, Gout I, Gordon CM...prostate cancer cells, isolated from patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, using differential gene expression analysis of our novel paired...sera from breast cancer patients to screen a library of expressed genes from breast cancers, demonstrating that TPD52 is capable of inducing IgG

  13. Waste/Rock Interactions Technology Program: the status of radionuclide sorption-desorption studies performed by the WRIT program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Relyea, J.F.

    1982-04-01

    The most credible means for radionuclides disposed as solid wastes in deep-geologic repositories to reach the biosphere is through dissolution of the solid waste and subsequent radionuclide transport by circulating ground water. Thus safety assessment activities must consider the physicochemical interactions between radionculides present in ground water with package components, rocks and sediments since these processes can significantly delay or constrain the mass transport of radionuclides in comparison to ground-water movement. This paper focuses on interactions between dissolved radiouclides in ground water and rocks and sediments away from the near-field repository. The primary mechanism discussed is adsorption-desorption, which has been studied using two approaches. Empirical studies of adsorption-desorption rely on distribution coefficient measurements while mechanism studies strive to identify, differentiate and quantify the processes that control nuclide retardation

  14. Status of radionuclide sorption-desorption studies performed by the WRIT program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Relyea, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    This paper focuses on interactions between dissolved radionuclides in groundwater and rocks and sediments away from the nearfield repository. Two approaches were used to study the primary mechanism, adsorption-desorption. Empirical studies rely on distribution coefficient measurements, and mechanism studies strive to identify, differentiate, and quantify the processes that control nuclide retardation. The status of sorption mechanism studies is discussed, with emphasis on delineating the usefulness of ideal ion-exchange, site-binding electrical double-layer, and redox-controlled sorption constructs. Since studies to date show greater potential for site-binding electrical double-layer models, future efforts will concentrate on this construct. Laboratory studies are discussed which corroborate the importance of redox reactions in causing nuclide retardation for multivalent elements, such as Tc, Np, Pu, and U. Results suggest that both solution-mediated reduction, such as the Fe(II)-Fe(III) couple, and solid-solution heterogeneous reduction reactions, such as reduction of solution Pu(VI) at the mineral surface by structural Fe(II), occur. Coupled microscopy, microprobe, and autoradiography studies have determined actual sorption sites for radionuclides on polymineralic rocks. The studies show that it is possible for minor phases to completely dominate the mass of radionuclides adsorbed. The most active minerals are typically alternation products (clays and zeolites). Several exercises are discussed which rank radionuclides according to their potential dose hazards. In each of the analyses discussed, the top four radionuclides are I, Tc, Np, and Ra. Other elements that rank high in potential hazards are Pu, U, Am, Th, Pb, Sn, Pd, and Se

  15. The n-butyl amine TPD measurement of Brönsted acidity for solid catalysts by simultaneous TG/DTG-DTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasca, V.; Avram, Livia; Verdes, Orsina; Popa, A.

    2010-06-01

    The method for Brönsted acidity measurement based on TPD of alkyl amines desorption by gas-chromatography or thermogravimetry was adapted for simultaneous TG/DTG-DTA analysis. The acidity measurements were focused on the 12-tungstophosphoric acid (H 3PW 12O 40) and its salts, especially with Cesium since these posses the highest Brönsted acidity and they are among the most interesting catalysts. The n-butyl amine (NBA) desorption takes place in three steps for Cs xH 3- xPW 12O 40, x = 0-2, and four steps for the Cs 2.5H 0.5PW 12O 40. The steps of desorption correspond to the release of NBA molecules in stages, as NBA or butene molecules resulted from the Hofmann elimination reaction and NH 3 + H 2O formed by decomposition of ammonium salt. The quantities of desorption products, C 4H 8 and NH 3 + H 2O, corresponding to the stages with the maximum desorption rates at 400-420 °C, respectively 560-600 °C, are in the stoichiometric ratio with the Brönsted acidity.

  16. Structure–acidity correlation of supported tungsten(VI)-oxo-species: FT-IR and TPD studies of adsorbed pyridine and catalytic decomposition of 2-propanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaki, M.I., E-mail: mizaki@mu.edu.eg; Mekhemer, G.A.H.; Fouad, N.E.; Rabee, A.I.M.

    2014-07-01

    The amount of 10 wt%-WO{sub 3} was supported on alumina, titania or silica by impregnation with aqueous solution of ammonium paratungstate and subsequent calcination at 500 °C for 10 h. Tungstate-related chemical and physical changes in the calcination products were resolved by ex-situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Nature of exposed surface acid sites were probed by in-situ IR spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine (Py) molecules at room temperature (RT). The relative strength of the acid sites thus probed was gauged by combining results of temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) measurements of the RT-adsorbed Py with those communicated by in-situ IR spectra of residual Py on the surface after a brief thermoevacuation at high temperatures (100–300 °C). Reactivity of the surface acid sites was tested toward 2-propanal catalytic decomposition, and observed by in-situ IR gas phase spectra. Results obtained were correlated with predominant structures assumed by the supported tungstate species. Accordingly, polymerization of the supported tungstate into 2-/3-dimensional structures, was found to be relatively most advanced on favorable locations of titania surfaces as compared to the case on alumina or silica surfaces. Consequently, the Lewis acidity was strengthened, and strong Bronsted acidity was evolved, leading to a 2-propanol dehydration catalyst (tungstate/titania) of optimal activity and selectivity. Strong tungstate/support interfacial interactions were found to hamper the formation of the strongly acidic and catalytically active polymeric structures of the supported tungstate (i.e., the case on alumina or silica).

  17. Structure–acidity correlation of supported tungsten(VI)-oxo-species: FT-IR and TPD studies of adsorbed pyridine and catalytic decomposition of 2-propanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaki, M.I.; Mekhemer, G.A.H.; Fouad, N.E.; Rabee, A.I.M.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of 10 wt%-WO 3 was supported on alumina, titania or silica by impregnation with aqueous solution of ammonium paratungstate and subsequent calcination at 500 °C for 10 h. Tungstate-related chemical and physical changes in the calcination products were resolved by ex-situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Nature of exposed surface acid sites were probed by in-situ IR spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine (Py) molecules at room temperature (RT). The relative strength of the acid sites thus probed was gauged by combining results of temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) measurements of the RT-adsorbed Py with those communicated by in-situ IR spectra of residual Py on the surface after a brief thermoevacuation at high temperatures (100–300 °C). Reactivity of the surface acid sites was tested toward 2-propanal catalytic decomposition, and observed by in-situ IR gas phase spectra. Results obtained were correlated with predominant structures assumed by the supported tungstate species. Accordingly, polymerization of the supported tungstate into 2-/3-dimensional structures, was found to be relatively most advanced on favorable locations of titania surfaces as compared to the case on alumina or silica surfaces. Consequently, the Lewis acidity was strengthened, and strong Bronsted acidity was evolved, leading to a 2-propanol dehydration catalyst (tungstate/titania) of optimal activity and selectivity. Strong tungstate/support interfacial interactions were found to hamper the formation of the strongly acidic and catalytically active polymeric structures of the supported tungstate (i.e., the case on alumina or silica).

  18. On the nature of acidic centers in the deep oxidation of olefins over CdMoO/sub 4/: temperature-programmed desorption/Mass spectrometer investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forzatti, P. (Politec. Milano); Kotzev, N.; Gencheva, L.; Pasquon, I.; Shopov, D.; Villa, P.L.

    1980-10-01

    Propylene and 1-butene were adsorbed at room temperature on cadmium molybdate, a poorly selective catalyst for olefin oxidation Temperature-programed desorption occurred at low temperature (145/sup 0/C for propylene, 100/sup 0/C for butene) from a reversibly adsorbed species on A sites, and at high temperature (400/sup 0/C for both olefins) from B sites in dissociated form. The A-sites were apparently vacancies or surface defects, which were destroyed when the cata

  19. Adsorption site of ammonia on copper-exchanged Y-type zeolite under coexisting water vapor. Temperature-programed desorption and infrared adsorption spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasaoka, S.; Sasaoka, E.; Shiraga, T.; Ono, Y.

    1978-03-01

    Sodium Y zeolites were copper-exchanged with cupric nitrate in water, in aqueous ammonia, and in aqueous ammonia/ammonium chloride, and calcined at 500/sup 0/C. Temperature-programed desorption and IR spectroscopy showed three types of adsorption sites for 0.1-1.0% ammonia gas from nitrogen containing 0-12% water vapor: physisorption, adsorption as tetraamminocopper(II) on copper(II) sites (type 2 site), and adsorption as ammonium ion on hydroxyl sites (type 3 site). Adsorption on type 2 sites occurred only at high ammonia concentration; desorption occurred around 175/sup 0/C. Type 3 sites consisted of Cu(OH)/sup +/ and Al(OH)/sup +/, adsorbed ammonia from low concentrations, and at temperatures above 200/sup 0/C, were probably the active sites for the reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia.

  20. Isoform 1 of TPD52 (PC-1) promotes neuroendocrine transdifferentiation in prostate cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Moritz, Tom; Venz, Simone; Junker, Heike; Kreuz, Sarah; Walther, Reinhard; Zimmermann, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The tumour protein D52 isoform 1 (PC-1), a member of the tumour protein D52 (TPD52) protein family, is androgen-regulated and prostate-specific expressed. Previous studies confirmed that PC-1 contributes to malignant progression in prostate cancer

  1. Characterization of Cu+ sites in FER: Combined computational and experimental TPD study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nachtigall, Petr; Bludský, Ota; Nachtigallová, Dana; Čičmanec, P.; Drobná, H.; Bulánek, R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 158, - (2005), s. 925-932 ISSN 0167-2991 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : TPD * copper coordination * zeolite structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.307, year: 2005

  2. Ge(001):B gas-source molecular beam epitaxy: B surface segregation, hydrogen desorption, and film growth kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.; Greene, J.E. [Materials Science Department, the Coordinated Science Laboratory and the Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    1999-03-01

    Ultrahigh B-doped Ge(001) layers, with concentrations C{sub B} up to 8{times}10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}, were grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy from Ge{sub 2}H{sub 6} and B{sub 2}H{sub 6} at temperatures T{sub s}=325{degree}C (in the surface-reaction-limited regime) and 600{degree}C (in the flux-limited regime). The samples were quenched, D site exchanged for H, and D{sub 2} temperature-programed desorption (TPD) used to determine B coverages {theta}{sub B} as a function of C{sub B} and T{sub s} by comparison with B-adsorbed Ge(001) reference samples with known {theta}{sub B} values. During Ge(001):B film growth, strong surface B segregation to the second layer was observed with surface-to-bulk B concentration ratios ranging up to 6000. The TPD spectra exhibited {alpha}{sub 2} and {alpha}{sub 1} peaks associated with dideuteride and monodeuteride desorption as well as lower-temperature B-induced {alpha}{sub 2}{sup {asterisk}} and {alpha}{sub 1}{sup {asterisk}} peaks associated with deuterium desorption from Ge{sup {asterisk}} surface atoms with B backbonds. Increasing {theta}{sub B} expanded the area under {alpha}{sub 2}{sup {asterisk}} and {alpha}{sub 1}{sup {asterisk}} at the expense of {alpha}{sub 2} and {alpha}{sub 1} and decreased the total D coverage {theta}{sub D}. The TPD results were used to determine the B segregation enthalpy, {minus}0.64 eV, and to explain and model the effects of high B coverages on Ge(001) growth kinetics. At T{sub s}=325{degree}C, where B segregation is kinetically hindered, film deposition rates R{sub Ge} are not a strong function of C{sub B}, exhibiting only a small decrease at C{sub B}{approx_gt}5{times}10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. However, at T{sub s}=600{degree}C, R{sub Ge} decreases by up to 40{percent} with increasing C{sub B}{approx_gt}1{times}10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. This is due primarily to the combination of B-induced Ge dimer vacancies and the deactivation of surface dangling bonds caused by charge transfer

  3. Changes of structural and hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2 indused by ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurko Sandra V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in structural and hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2 induced by ion irradiation have been investigated. MgH2 powder samples have been irradiated with 45 keV B3+ and 120 keV Ar8+ions, with ion fluence of 1015 ions/cm2. The effects of ion irradiation are estimated by numerical calculations using SRIM package. The induced material modifications and their consequences on hydrogen dynamics in the system are investigated by XRD, particle size distribution and TPD techniques. Changes of TPD spectra with irradiation conditions suggest that there are several mechanisms involved in desorption process which depend on defect concentration and their interaction and ordering. The results confirmed that the near-surface area of MgH2 and formation of a substoichiometric MgHx (x<2 play a crucial role in hydrogen kinetics and that various concentrations of induced defects substantially influence H diffusion and desorption kinetics in MgH2. The results also confirm that there is possibility to control the thermodynamic parameters by controlling vacancies concentration in the system.

  4. Design study of a plasma-loaded CRM using TPD-II machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Kazuo

    2007-08-01

    Design study of an experiment for plasma-loaded cyclotron resonance maser (CRM) utilizing TPD-II Machine at NIFS, Japan is described in some detail. The principle of gyrotrons has been believed the CRM instability. However, all the existing linear theories of CRM instability include unphysical modes unstable at infinite values of axial wavenumber that can never be observed experimentally. To overcome the difficulty, we derive and analyze numerically an exact linear dispersion relation of a large orbit electron beam for CRM, and removed the unphysical modes. However, the relation is found to include two principles of cyclotron emission with oscillation frequencies above and below the branch of fast electron cyclotron wave. The former is CRM instability, and the latter is named Chrenkov instability in the azimuthal direction (CIAD). It is noted that the CIAD we found remains only a proposal of a new mechanism for cyclotron emission until the physical existence is verified experimentally. To verify the CIAD, the design study of a plasma-loaded CRM has been carried out. The apparatus consists of two portions installed in the TPD-II: A pair of helical wiggler windings to create a mono-energetic beam with 15 keV and pitch factor V θ /V z ≥1, and microwave circuits including a cylindrical TE 011 mode cavity with resonant frequency 3.45 GHz. For high plasma density n≥1.5x10 11 cm -3 from TPD-II, the CRM instability may be suppressed and the CIAD will take turn. The present experimental study contributes to a deeper understanding and a widened future prospect in gyrotron physics. (author)

  5. Quantum dots transparent display (QDs-TPD) using a liquid QDs layer and N2 barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Tak; Lee, Sung-Youp; Sohn, Sang Ho

    2017-07-01

    Quantum dots transparent display (QDs-TPD) was realized using a liquid QDs layer and N2 barrier discharge panel. In the N2 discharge, the 2nd+ lines of N2 in the range of 300 - 400 nm (C3Πu - B3Πg), and the 1st- lines of N2+ at 391.4 and 427.8 nm (B2Σu+ - X2 Σg+) were mainly observed, while the visible emission lines were rarely observed. This implies the N2 discharge is suitable for the excitation source of the QDs, due to the strong ultra-violet radiations and the weak visible emissions. The emission centers for red, green, and blue color in QDs-TPD were positioned at 452, 540, and 638 nm, respectively, and the N2 emission peaks were seldom observed in the visible region. The transmittance of QDs-TPD was approximately 40% in the visible region and the luminescence was about 70 cd/m2. The CIE (x, y) coordinates of red, green, and blue colors were (0.670, 0.309), (0.378, 0.640), and (0.183, 0.118), respectively, and the color gamut was 71% of a NTSC standard. Thus, the QDs-TPD is expected as a way for realizing the TPD, due to its good transparency, excellent visibility, wide viewing-angle, aesthetical design, low cost production, and good scalability to large sizes.

  6. Characterization of olive oil volatiles by multi-step direct thermal desorption-comprehensive gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry using a programmed temperature vaporizing injector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, S.; Kaal, E.; Janssen, H.-G.; van Platerink, C.; Brinkman, U.A.Th.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of a versatile system for multi-step direct thermal desorption (DTD) coupled to comprehensive gas chromatography (GC × GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOF-MS) detection is studied. As an application the system is used for the characterization of fresh versus aged olive

  7. Control of Anther Cell Differentiation by the Small Protein Ligand TPD1 and Its Receptor EMS1 in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental feature of sexual reproduction in plants and animals is the specification of reproductive cells that conduct meiosis to form gametes, and the associated somatic cells that provide nutrition and developmental cues to ensure successful gamete production. The anther, which is the male reproductive organ in seed plants, produces reproductive microsporocytes (pollen mother cells and surrounding somatic cells. The microsporocytes yield pollen via meiosis, and the somatic cells, particularly the tapetum, are required for the normal development of pollen. It is not known how the reproductive cells affect the differentiation of these somatic cells, and vice versa. Here, we use molecular genetics, cell biological, and biochemical approaches to demonstrate that TPD1 (TAPETUM DETERMINANT1 is a small secreted cysteine-rich protein ligand that interacts with the LRR (Leucine-Rich Repeat domain of the EMS1 (EXCESS MICROSPOROCYTES1 receptor kinase at two sites. Analyses of the expressions and localizations of TPD1 and EMS1, ectopic expression of TPD1, experimental missorting of TPD1, and ablation of microsporocytes yielded results suggesting that the precursors of microsporocyte/microsporocyte-derived TPD1 and pre-tapetal-cell-localized EMS1 initially promote the periclinal division of secondary parietal cells and then determine one of the two daughter cells as a functional tapetal cell. Our results also indicate that tapetal cells suppress microsporocyte proliferation. Collectively, our findings show that tapetal cell differentiation requires reproductive-cell-secreted TPD1, illuminating a novel mechanism whereby signals from reproductive cells determine somatic cell fate in plant sexual reproduction.

  8. Self irradiation effects on the thorium phosphate diphosphate dissolution (TPD): simulation by external irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamain, C.; Ozgumus, A.; Dacheux, N.; Garrido, F.; Thome, L.; Corbel, C.; Genet, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD), proposed as a ceramic for the long term immobilization of actinides, was externally irradiated with several ions and energies (but also with gamma rays) in order to simulate the self-irradiation. The influence of the electronic energy loss was first investigated. Thus, the XRD measurements have shown a complete amorphization of the material under 10 13 ions of Kr.cm -2 , while no significant structural change occurred after 5.10 13 S.cm -2 , 2.10 16 He.cm -2 or 320 kGy of dose of gamma rays. The dissolution of the raw and irradiated pellets was studied versus several parameters such as amorphized fraction, energy loss of incident ions, radiolytic species produced in situ in the leachate during irradiation (such as H 2 O 2 ), temperature and acidity. The results reveal an important increase of the dissolution kinetics for amorphized pellets compared to raw ceramic. (authors)

  9. Immobilization of tetravalent actinides in three phosphate based ceramics: britholites, TPD and monazites/brabantites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, O.; Audubert, F.; Dacheux, N.; Guy, C.; Podor, R.

    2004-01-01

    Three phosphate based ceramics were studied for the immobilization of tri- and tetravalent actinides: britholites Ca 9 Nd 1-x An x IV (PO 4 ) 5-x (SiO 4 ) 1+x F 2 , monazites/brabantites Ln 1-2x III Ca x An x IV PO 4 and Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD) Th 4-x An x IV (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 . For each material, the incorporation of Th, U(IV), or Ce(IV) in the structure was examined. This work was the early beginning of the incorporation of 239 Pu and/or 238 Pu in order to evaluate the effects of α -decay on these three crystallographic structures. The syntheses were carried out using dry chemistry methods, involving mechanical grinding then heating treatment (1100 deg C ≤ θ ≤ 1400 deg C). For britholites, we showed that the incorporation of thorium was complete for weight loading lower than 20 wt.% through the (Nd 3+ , PO 4 3- ) ↔ (Th 4+ , SiO 4 4- ) coupled substitution, leading to the preparation of solid solutions. Due to redox problems, the incorporation of uranium was limited to 5 to 8 wt.% and always led to a two-phase mixture of U-britholite and CaU 2 O 5+y . For solid solutions based on TPD and for brabantites, the syntheses dealing with the incorporation of Th and/or U(IV) were improved by dry chemistry method using three mechanical grinding-calcination cycles. For both solids, homogeneous and single phase samples of the corresponding solid solutions were obtained. Finally, dense pellets of britholites, monazites/brabantites and TAn IV PD solid solutions were prepared in order to study their chemical durability during leaching tests. (authors)

  10. Isoform 1 of TPD52 (PC-1) promotes neuroendocrine transdifferentiation in prostate cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Moritz, Tom

    2016-02-05

    The tumour protein D52 isoform 1 (PC-1), a member of the tumour protein D52 (TPD52) protein family, is androgen-regulated and prostate-specific expressed. Previous studies confirmed that PC-1 contributes to malignant progression in prostate cancer with an important role in castration-resistant stage. In the present work, we identified its impact in mechanisms leading to neuroendocrine (NE) transdifferentiation. We established for long-term PC-1 overexpression an inducible expression system derived from the prostate carcinoma cell line LNCaP. We observed that PC-1 overexpression itself initiates characteristics of neuroendocrine cells, but the effect was much more pronounced in the presence of the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Moreover, to our knowledge, this is the first report that treatment with IL-6 leads to a significant upregulation of PC-1 in LNCaP cells. Other TPD52 isoforms were not affected. Proceeding from this result, we conclude that PC-1 overexpression enhances the IL-6-mediated differentiation of LNCaP cells into a NE-like phenotype, noticeable by morphological changes and increased expression of typical NE markers, like chromogranin A, synaptophysin or beta-3 tubulin. Immunofluorescent staining of IL-6-treated PC-1-overexpressing LNCaP cells indicates a considerable PC-1 accumulation at the end of the long-branched neuron-like cell processes, which are typically formed by NE cells. Additionally, the experimentally initiated NE transdifferentiation correlates with the androgen receptor status, which was upregulated additively. In summary, our data provide evidence for an involvement of PC-1 in NE transdifferentiation, frequently associated with castration resistance, which is a major therapeutic challenge in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  11. SCIENCE TEACHERS’ INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIAL LEARNING RELATED TO IBSE IN A LARGE-SCALE, LONG- TERM, COLLABORATIVE TPD PROJECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Sillasen, Martin Krabbe

    2014-01-01

    It is acknowledged internationally that teachers’ Professional Development (TPD) is crucial for reforming science teaching. The Danish QUEST project is designed using widely agreed criteria for effective TPD: content focus, active learning, coherence, duration, collaborative activities and collec......It is acknowledged internationally that teachers’ Professional Development (TPD) is crucial for reforming science teaching. The Danish QUEST project is designed using widely agreed criteria for effective TPD: content focus, active learning, coherence, duration, collaborative activities...... and collective participation, and is organised on principles of situated learning in Professional Learning Communities (PLCs). QUEST-activities follow a rhythm of full day seminars followed by a period of collaborative inquiries locally. A major theme in the first year has been Inquiry Based Science Education......-on experiences and fewer including students’ minds-on. Teachers’ reflections indicate that many are positive towards QUEST seminars based on trying out activities directly applicable in the classroom. Case studies indicate a potentially more sustainable development, where the teachers collaboratively re...

  12. Reducibility of ceria-lanthana mixed oxides under temperature programmed hydrogen and inert gas flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, S.; Blanco, G.; Cifredo, G.; Perez-Omil, J.A.; Pintado, J.M.; Rodriguez-Izquierdo, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper deals with the preparation and characterization of La/Ce mixed oxides, with La molar contents of 20, 36 and 57%. We carry out the study of the structural, textural and redox properties of the mixed oxides, comparing our results with those for pure ceria. For this aim we use temperature programmed reduction (TPR), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), nitrogen physisorption at 77 K, X-ray diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy. The mixed oxides are more easy to reduce in a flow of hydrogen than ceria. Moreover, in an inert gas flow they release oxygen in higher amounts and at lower temperatures than pure CeO 2 . The textural stability of the mixed oxides is also improved by incorporation of lanthana. All these properties make the ceria-lanthana mixed oxides interesting alternative candidates to substitute ceria in three-way catalyst formulations. (orig.)

  13. MAL2 and tumor protein D52 (TPD52 are frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, but differentially associated with histological subtype and patient outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanayan Susan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The four-transmembrane MAL2 protein is frequently overexpressed in breast carcinoma, and MAL2 overexpression is associated with gain of the corresponding locus at chromosome 8q24.12. Independent expression microarray studies predict MAL2 overexpression in ovarian carcinoma, but these had remained unconfirmed. MAL2 binds tumor protein D52 (TPD52, which is frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, but the clinical significance of MAL2 and TPD52 overexpression was unknown. Methods Immunohistochemical analyses of MAL2 and TPD52 expression were performed using tissue microarray sections including benign, borderline and malignant epithelial ovarian tumours. Inmmunohistochemical staining intensity and distribution was assessed both visually and digitally. Results MAL2 and TPD52 were significantly overexpressed in high-grade serous carcinomas compared with serous borderline tumours. MAL2 expression was highest in serous carcinomas relative to other histological subtypes, whereas TPD52 expression was highest in clear cell carcinomas. MAL2 expression was not related to patient survival, however high-level TPD52 staining was significantly associated with improved overall survival in patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma (log-rank test, p Conclusions MAL2 is frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, and TPD52 overexpression is a favourable independent prognostic marker of potential value in the management of ovarian carcinoma patients.

  14. Study of the irradiation effects on thorium phosphate diphosphate (β-TPD): consequences on its chemical durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamain, C.

    2005-12-01

    Since Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (beta-TPD) can be considered as a potential host matrix for long-term storage in underground repository, it is necessary to study the irradiation effects on the structure of this ceramics and the consequences on its chemical durability. Sintered samples of beta-TPD and of associated solid solutions of beta-TUPD were irradiated under ion beams and then altered in aqueous solutions. Depending on the electronic LET value, beta-TPD can be completely or partly amorphized. Furthermore, the ability of recrystallization of the amorphous material by thermal annealing was also demonstrated. Some leaching tests, realized on these irradiated samples, have shown a significant effect of the amorphous fraction on the normalized dissolution rate which was increased by a factor of 10 from the crystallized to the fully amorphized material. Correlatively, the amorphous fraction also modified the delay to reach the saturation conditions associated to the thermodynamic equilibria involved. On the other hand, it exhibited no influence neither on other kinetic parameters, such as activation energy of the dissolution process or partial order related to the proton concentration, nor on the nature of the neo-formed phase formed at the saturation of the leachate and identified as Thorium Phosphate Hydrogeno-Phosphate Hydrate (TPHPH). Beta-TUPD samples were also irradiated by gamma and alpha rays during leaching tests to study the effects of radiolysis in the leaching medium on the normalized leaching rate. It appeared that the radiolytic species occurring in the dissolution mechanism were unstable, disappearing quickly when stopping the irradiation. (author)

  15. Ammonia IRMS-TPD measurements on Brønsted acidity of proton-formed SAPO-34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Katsuki; Nishio, Takuma; Katada, Naonobu; Sastre, German; Niwa, Miki

    2011-02-28

    By utilizing the advantages of a combined method of IRMS-TPD of ammonia and DFT calculations, the solid acidity of HSAPO-34 was studied. The number, strength and structure of the Brønsted OH were measured experimentally. The quantitative measurements and DFT calculations supported the identification of Brønsted OH to account for the generation model of the Brønsted OH primarily located in the edge of the Si domain (island). The acid strength of SAPO-34 was slightly weaker than that of chabazite, a zeolite with the same structure. Thus, some important insights were obtained to understand the acid site generation of SAPO-34.

  16. MAL2 and tumor protein D52 (TPD52) are frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, but differentially associated with histological subtype and patient outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, Jennifer A; Sutherland, Robert L; Fazio, Anna de; O'Brien, Philippa M; Maleki, Sanaz; Hardy, Jayne R; Gloss, Brian S; Murali, Rajmohan; Scurry, James P; Fanayan, Susan; Emmanuel, Catherine; Hacker, Neville F

    2010-01-01

    The four-transmembrane MAL2 protein is frequently overexpressed in breast carcinoma, and MAL2 overexpression is associated with gain of the corresponding locus at chromosome 8q24.12. Independent expression microarray studies predict MAL2 overexpression in ovarian carcinoma, but these had remained unconfirmed. MAL2 binds tumor protein D52 (TPD52), which is frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, but the clinical significance of MAL2 and TPD52 overexpression was unknown. Immunohistochemical analyses of MAL2 and TPD52 expression were performed using tissue microarray sections including benign, borderline and malignant epithelial ovarian tumours. Inmmunohistochemical staining intensity and distribution was assessed both visually and digitally. MAL2 and TPD52 were significantly overexpressed in high-grade serous carcinomas compared with serous borderline tumours. MAL2 expression was highest in serous carcinomas relative to other histological subtypes, whereas TPD52 expression was highest in clear cell carcinomas. MAL2 expression was not related to patient survival, however high-level TPD52 staining was significantly associated with improved overall survival in patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma (log-rank test, p < 0.001; n = 124) and was an independent predictor of survival in the overall carcinoma cohort (hazard ratio (HR), 0.498; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-0.728; p < 0.001; n = 221), and in serous carcinomas (HR, 0.440; 95% CI, 0.294-0.658; p < 0.001; n = 182). MAL2 is frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinoma, and TPD52 overexpression is a favourable independent prognostic marker of potential value in the management of ovarian carcinoma patients

  17. IR and TPD studies of the interaction of alkenes with Cu + sites in CuNaY and CuNaX zeolites of various Cu content. The heterogeneity of Cu + sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datka, J.; Kukulska-Zajaç, E.; Kozyra, P.

    2006-08-01

    Cu + ions in zeolites activate organic molecules containing π electrons by π back donation, which results in a distinct weakening of multiple bonds. In this study, we followed the activation of alkenes (ethene and propene) by Cu + ions in CuY and CuX zeolites of various Cu content. We also studied the strength of bonding of alkenes to Cu + ions. IR studies have shown that there are two kinds of Cu + sites of various electron donor properties. We suppose that they could be attributed to the presence of Cu + ions of various number of oxygen atoms surrounding the cation. IR studies have shown that Cu ions introduced into Y and X zeolites in the first-order (at low Cu content) form Cu + ions of stronger electron donor properties (i.e. activate alkenes to larger extend) than Cu ions introduced in the next order (at higher Cu content). IR and TPD studies of alkenes desorption evidenced that Cu + ions of stronger electron donor properties bond alkenes stronger than less electron donor ones. It suggests that π back donation has more important contribution to the strength of bonding alkenes to cation than π donation.

  18. Absorption/desorption in sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naimpally, A.

    1987-01-01

    This survey paper shall seek to present the present state of knowledge concerning absorption and desorption in spray chambers. The first part of the paper presents the theories and formulas for the atomization and break-up of sprays in nozzles. Formulas for the average (sauter-mean) diameters are then presented. For the case of absorption processes, the formulas for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients is in drops. The total; mass transfer is the total of the transfer in individual drops. For the case of desorption of sparingly soluble gases from liquids in a spray chamber, the mass transfer occurs in the spray just at the point of break-up of the jet. Formulas for the desorption of gases are presented

  19. Study of heterogeneous catalytic processes over cobalt, molybdenum and cobalt-molybdenum catalysts supported on alumina by temperature-programmed desorption and temperature-programmed reaction. 1. Adsorption of hydrozen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanov, V.V.; Tsao Yamin; Krylov, O.V.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on reduced, sulphidized and reoxidized specimens of molybdenum-and cobalt-molybdenum-containing catalysts applied on aluminium oxide has been studied by the method of thermal desorption (TD). Comparison of TD spectra of hydrogen and data of X-ray phase analysis of the specimens and mass-spectrometric analysis of the products desorbed from the surface of catalysts after their successive reduction sulphidizing, carbonizing and reoxidation permitted a correlation between various forms of hydrogen adsorption and certain centres on the surface of the catalysts. 12 refs., 2 figs

  20. Data compilation for particle impact desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiyama, Takashi; Nagai, Siro; Ozawa, Kunio; Takeuchi, Fujio.

    1984-05-01

    The desorption of gases from solid surfaces by incident electrons, ions and photons is one of the important processes of hydrogen recycling in the controlled thermonuclear reactors. We have surveyed the literature concerning the particle impact desorption published through 1983 and compiled the data on the desorption cross sections and desorption yields with the aid of a computer. This report presents the results obtained for electron stimulated desorption, the desorption cross sections and yields being given in graphs and tables as functions of incident electron energy, surface temperature and gas exposure. (author)

  1. Scattering, Adsorption, and Langmuir-Hinshelwood Desorption Models for Physisorptive and Chemisorptive Gas-Surface Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    quantum effects by incorporating Zero- Point Energy ( ZPE ) in the initial conditions [19; 108]. Desorption calculations, in order to be incorporated...TST Transition State Theory TTPD Threshold Temperature-Programmed Desorption UHV Ultra-High Vacuum XHV Extreme-High Vacuum ZPE Zero-Point Energy 141

  2. Study of the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced desorption on accelerator-relevant materials; Untersuchung der Mechanismen schwerioneninduzierter Desorption an beschleunigerrelevanten Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Markus

    2008-02-22

    The ion beam loss induced desorption is a performance limitation for low charge state heavy ion accelerators. If charge exchanged projectile ions get lost onto the beam pipe, desorption of gas is stimulated resulting in a pressure increase inside of the synchrotron and thus, a dramatically reduction of the beam life time. To minimize the amount of desorbed gas an experimental program has been started to measure the desorption yields (released gas molecules per incident ion) of various materials and different projectile ions. The present work is a contribution to the understanding of the physical processes behind the ion beam loss induced desorption. The yield measurements by the pressure rise method have been combined for the rst time with in situ ion beam analysis technologies such as ERDA and RBS. With this unique method the desorption behavior of a sample can be correlated to its surface and bulk properties. The performed experiments with 1,4 MeV/u Xenon-Ions show that the ion induced desorption is mainly a surface effect. Sputtered oxide layers or impurities do not contribute to the desorbed gas significantly. Nevertheless bulk properties play an important role in the desorption strength. Pure metallic samples desorb less gas than isolating materials under swift heavy ion irradiation. From the experimental results it was possible to estimate the desorption yields of various materials under ion bombardment by means of an extended inelastic thermal-spike-model. The extension is the combination of the thermal-spike's temperature map with thermal desorption. Within this model the ion induced desorption can be regarded as the release of adsorbates from a transient overheated spot on the samples surface around the ion impact. Finally a copper substrate with a gold coated surface was developed and proposed as a suitable material for a beam loss collimator with minimum desorption to ensure the performance of GSI's SIS18 in high current beam operation. (orig.)

  3. SPS Ion Induced Desorption Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    This experiment will give a study about the induced desorption from heavy ion (Indium ion run from week 45 in SPS T4-H8 area) impacting LHC type graphite collimator. 4 different samples are located in the 4 chambers 90° one to each other: pure graphite, graphite with copper coating, graphite with NEG coating, 316LN stainless steal (reference).

  4. Carbon tetrachloride desorption from activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, L.A.; Sansone, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride was desorbed from a granular activated carbon subsequent to its adsorption under various vapor exposure periods. The varied conditions of exposure resulted in a range of partially saturated carbon beds which, when followed by a constant flow rate for desorption, generated different forms of the desorbing concentration versus time curve. A method of analyzing the desorption curves is presented which permits extraction of the various desorbing rates from the different desorption and to relate this to the time required for such regeneration. The Wheeler desorption kinetic equation was used to calculate the pseudo first order desorption rate constant for the carbon. The desorption rate constant was found to increase monotonically with increasing saturation of the bed, permitting the calculation of the maximum desorption rate constant for the carbon at 100% saturation. The Retentivity Index of the carbon, defined as the dimensionless ratio of the adsorption to the desorption rate constant, was found to be 681

  5. Real-time observation of the dehydrogenation processes of methanol on clean Ru(001) and Ru(001)-p(2×2) O surfaces by a temperature-programmed electron-stimulated desorption ion angular distribution/time-of-flight system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takehiko; Itai, Yuichiro; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    1999-12-01

    Decomposition processes of methanol on clean and oxygen-precovered Ru(001) surfaces have been visualized in real time with a temperature-programmed (TP) electron-stimulated desorption ion angular distribution (ESDIAD)/time-of-flight (TOF) system. The mass of desorbed ions during temperature-programmed surface processes was identified by TOF measurements. In the case of methanol (CH 3OD) adsorption on Ru(001)-p(2×2)-O, a halo pattern of H + from the methyl group of methoxy species was observed at 100-200 K, followed by a broad pattern from the methyl group at 230-250 K and by a near-center pattern from O + ions originating from adsorbed CO above 300 K. The halo pattern is attributed to a perpendicular conformation of the CO bond axis of the methoxy species, leading to off-normal CH bond scission. On the other hand, methanol adsorbed on clean Ru(001) did not give any halo pattern but a broad pattern was observed along the surface normal, indicating that the conformation of the methoxy species is not ordered on the clean surface. Comparison between the ESDIAD images of the oxygen-precovered surface and the clean surface suggests that the precovered oxygen adatoms induce ordering of the methoxy species. Real-time ESDIAD measurements revealed that the oxygen atoms at the Ru(001)-p(2×2)-O surface have a positive effect on selective dehydrogenation of the methoxy species to CO+H 2 and a blocking effect on CO bond breaking of the methoxy species.

  6. A numerical study on the charge transport in TPD/Alq3-based organic light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K S; Hwang, Y W; Lee, H G; Won, T Y

    2014-08-01

    We report our simulation study on the charge transport characteristic of the multi-layer structure for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). We performed a numerical simulation on a multilayer structure comprising a hole transport layer (HTL), an emission layer (EML), and an electron transport layer (ETL) between both electrodes. The material of the HTL is TPD (N,N'-Bis (3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl) benzidine), and the ETL includes Alq3 (Tris (8-hyroxyquinolinato) aluminium). Here, we investigated the parameters such as recombination rates which influence the efficiency of the charge transport between layers in bilayer OLEDs. We also analyzed a transient response during the turn on/off period and the carrier transport in accordance with the variation of the injection barrier and applied voltage. In addition, our numerical simulation revealed that the insertion of the EML affects the photonic characteristics in bilayer structure and also the efficiency due to the difference in the internal barrier height.

  7. Recovery of Boron and Separation of Lithium from Uyuni Salar Brine using 2, 2, 4-Trimethyl -1, 3-Pentanediol (TPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Jyothi Rajesh; Kim, Chul-Joo; Yoon, Ho-Sung; Lee, Jin-Young; Kang, Dong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, extraction and separation possibilities have been established for boron and lithium from Uyuni salar brine. Diols were shown to be effective extraction reagents for boron. The present scientific study was developed with 2, 2, 4-trimethyl-1, 3-pentanediol (TPD) as an extractant system. For fixing the diluent system, various diluents were tested and it was found that chloroform is a better diluent for boron extraction. Further, experimental studies on the extraction equilibrium time, pH influence, and phase ratio effects on boron extraction were conducted and the conditions for boron recovery and lithium separation were optimized. The McCabe Thiele diagram was established to optimize the number of extraction stages for boron extraction. Finally, stripping studies of boron from the loaded organic phase using various salts were performed.

  8. Study of Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD) formation in nitric medium for the decontamination of high activity actinides bearing effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousselle, Jerome

    2004-01-01

    Considering several activities in the nuclear industry and research, several low-level liquids wastes (LLLW) containing actinides in nitric medium must be decontaminated before being released in the environment. These liquid wastes mainly contain significant amounts of uranium(VI), neptunium(V) and plutonium(IV). In this work, two chemical ways were studied to decontaminate LLLW then to incorporate simultaneously uranium, neptunium and plutonium in the Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD). Both ways started from a nitric solution containing thorium and the actinides considered, present at their lower stable oxidation state. The first way consisted in the initial precipitation of actinide and thorium mixed oxalate. After drying the mixture containing the powder and phosphoric acid under dried argon, a poly-phase system was obtained. It was mainly composed by a thorium-actinide oxalate-phosphate. This mixture was transformed into a TPDAn solid solution (An = U, Np and/or Pu) by heating treatment at 1200 deg. C under inert atmosphere. The second way consisted in the precipitation of a precursor of TPD, identified as the Thorium Phosphate Hydrogen Phosphate loaded with the actinides considered. The gel initially formed by mixing concentrated phosphoric acid solution with the nitric actinide solution was heated at 90 - 160 deg. C in a closed PTFE container for several weeks. It led to the TPDAn solid solutions after heating at 1100 deg. C in air or under inert argon. The efficiency of both processes was evaluated through the determination of the decontamination for each actinide considered. Considering the encouraging results obtained for both kinds of processes, some complementary studies are now required before performing the effective decontamination of real Low-Level Liquid Waste using one of the methods proposed. (author) [fr

  9. Small Molecules Derived from Thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione (TPD) and Their Use in Solution Processed Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcias-Morales, Cesar; Romero-Borja, Daniel; Maldonado, José-Luis; Roa, Arián E; Rodríguez, Mario; García-Merinos, J Pablo; Ariza-Castolo, Armando

    2017-09-30

    In this work, microwave synthesis, chemical, optical and electrochemical characterization of three small organic molecules, TPA-TPD , TPA-PT-TPD and TPA-TT-TPD with donor-acceptor structure and their use in organic photovoltaic cells are reported. For the synthesis, 5-(2-ethylhexyl)-4 H -thieno[3,4- c ]pyrrole-4,6(5 H )-dione was used as electron withdrawing fragment while the triphenylamine was used as electron donating fragment. Molecular electronic geometry and electronic distribution density were established by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and confirmed by optical and chemical characterization. These molecules were employed as electron-donors in the active layer for manufacturing bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, where [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) was used as electron-acceptor. As cathode, Field's metal (FM), an eutectic alloy (Bi/In/Sn: 32.5%, 51%, and 16.5%, respectively) with a melting point above 62 °C, was easily deposited by drop casting under vacuum-free process and at air atmosphere. Prepared devices based on TPA-TPD :PC71BM (1:4 w / w ratio) presented a large V OC = 0.97 V, with J SC = 7.9 mA/cm², a FF = 0.34, then, a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.6%.

  10. Study of the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced desorption on accelerator-relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The ion beam loss induced desorption is a performance limitation for low charge state heavy ion accelerators. If charge exchanged projectile ions get lost onto the beam pipe, desorption of gas is stimulated resulting in a pressure increase inside of the synchrotron and thus, a dramatically reduction of the beam life time. To minimize the amount of desorbed gas an experimental program has been started to measure the desorption yields (released gas molecules per incident ion) of various materials and different projectile ions. The present work is a contribution to the understanding of the physical processes behind the ion beam loss induced desorption. The yield measurements by the pressure rise method have been combined for the rst time with in situ ion beam analysis technologies such as ERDA and RBS. With this unique method the desorption behavior of a sample can be correlated to its surface and bulk properties. The performed experiments with 1,4 MeV/u Xenon-Ions show that the ion induced desorption is mainly a surface effect. Sputtered oxide layers or impurities do not contribute to the desorbed gas significantly. Nevertheless bulk properties play an important role in the desorption strength. Pure metallic samples desorb less gas than isolating materials under swift heavy ion irradiation. From the experimental results it was possible to estimate the desorption yields of various materials under ion bombardment by means of an extended inelastic thermal-spike-model. The extension is the combination of the thermal-spike's temperature map with thermal desorption. Within this model the ion induced desorption can be regarded as the release of adsorbates from a transient overheated spot on the samples surface around the ion impact. Finally a copper substrate with a gold coated surface was developed and proposed as a suitable material for a beam loss collimator with minimum desorption to ensure the performance of GSI's SIS18 in high current beam operation. (orig.)

  11. Modeling of hydrogen desorption from tungsten surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guterl, J., E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Smirnov, R.D. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Krasheninnikov, S.I. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Nuclear Research National University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Uberuaga, B.; Voter, A.F.; Perez, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 8754 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen retention in metallic plasma-facing components is among key-issues for future fusion devices. For tungsten, which has been chosen as divertor material in ITER, hydrogen desorption parameters experimentally measured for fusion-related conditions show large discrepancies. In this paper, we therefore investigate hydrogen recombination and desorption on tungsten surfaces using molecular dynamics simulations and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to analyze adsorption states, diffusion, hydrogen recombination into molecules, and clustering of hydrogen on tungsten surfaces. The quality of tungsten hydrogen interatomic potential is discussed in the light of MD simulations results, showing that three body interactions in current interatomic potential do not allow to reproduce hydrogen molecular recombination and desorption. Effects of surface hydrogen clustering on hydrogen desorption are analyzed by introducing a kinetic model describing the competition between surface diffusion, clustering and recombination. Different desorption regimes are identified and reproduce some aspects of desorption regimes experimentally observed.

  12. miR-139-5p regulates proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle of uterine leiomyoma cells by targeting TPD52

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen H

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hong Chen,1 Hong Xu,1 Yu-gang Meng,1 Yun Zhang,2 Jun-ying Chen,1 Xiao-ning Wei1 1Department of Gynaecology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi, 2Department of Gynaecology, The People’s Hospital of Suzhou High Tech District, Suzhou, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China Background: Uterine leiomyoma is one of the most common benign tumors in women. It dramatically decreases the quality of life in the affected women. However, there is a lack of effective treatment paradigms. Micro-RNAs are small noncoding RNA molecules that are extensively expressed in organisms, and they are interrelated with the occurrence and development of the tumor. miR-139-5p was found to be downregulated in various cancers, but its function and mechanism in uterine leiomyoma remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miR-139-5p and its target gene in uterine leiomyoma.Methods: By using a bioinformatic assay, it was found that TPD52 was a potential target gene of miR-139-5p. Then, expressions of miR-139-5p and TPD52 in uterine leiomyoma and adjacent myometrium tissues were evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle of uterine leiomyoma cells transfected by miR-139-5p mimics or TPD52 siRNA were determined.Results: It was observed that the expression of miR-139-5p in uterine leiomyoma tissues was significantly lower (P<0.001 than that in the adjacent myometrium tissues. Overexpression of miR-139-5p inhibited the growth of uterine leiomyoma cells and induced apoptosis and G1 phase arrest. Dual-luciferase reporter assay and Western blot validated that TPD52 is the target gene of miR-139-5p. Furthermore, downregulation of TPD52 by siRNA in uterine leiomyoma cells inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis and G1 phase arrest.Conclusion: Data suggested that miR-139-5p inhibited the proliferation of uterine leiomyoma cells

  13. Science teachers’ individual and social learning related to IBSE in the frames of a large-scale, long-term, collaborative TPD project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Sillasen, Martin

    of collaborative inquiries locally. A major theme in the first year has been Inquiry Based Science Education (IBSE) recommended as a focus to improve science education internationally. The research presented focuses on the participating teachers’ intertwined levels of individual and social learning. Data from...... repeated surveys and case studies reveal a positive attitude towards trying IBSE in the own classroom, however with the main part of the reflections focused on students’ hands-on experiences and fewer including students manipulating science ideas, like posing hypotheses. Teachers’ reflections indicate......It is acknowledged internationally that teachers’ Professional Development (TPD) is crucial for reforming science teaching. The Danish QUEST project (“Qualifying in-service Education of Science Teachers”) is designed using widely agreed criteria for effective TPD: content focus, active learning...

  14. Optical parameters of ITO/TPD/Alq3/Al luminescent structures, containing arrays of CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, I. I.; Tarasov, S. A.; Lamkin, I. A.; Tadtaev, P. O.; Kozlovich, L. I.; Solomonov, A. V.; Stepanov, E. M.

    2016-08-01

    The luminescent organic ITO/TPD/Alq3/Al structures and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QD) arrays were created. Electrical and optical properties of the samples were examined. The luminescence of the layers and QD arrays was shown in the range of wavelengths from 400 to 680 nm. Luminescent structures with phosphors corresponding to the emission standards with CRI>98 and with color temperature of 5500 K and 6504 K were created.

  15. Incorporation of tetravalent actinides in three phosphated matrices: britholite, monazite/brabandite and thorium phosphate diphosphate (β-TPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, O.

    2005-03-01

    Three phosphate based ceramics were studied for the immobilization of tri- and tetravalent actinides: britholite Ca 9 Nd 1-x An x IV (PO 4 ) 5-x (SiO 4 ) 1+x F 2 , monazite/brabantite solid solutions Ln 1-2x III Ca x An x IP O 4 and Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (β-TPD) Th 4- xAn x IV (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 . For each material, the incorporation of thorium and uranium (IV) was studied as a surrogate of plutonium. This work was the early beginning of the incorporation of 239 Pu and/or 238 Pu in order to evaluate the effects of α-decay on the three crystallographic structures. The incorporation of tetravalent cations was carried out by dry chemistry methods, using mechanical grinding to improve the reactivity of the initial mixture then the homogeneity of final solid prepared after calcination at high temperature (1200-1400 deg C). For britholites, the thorium incorporation was complete for weight loading up to 20 wt.%, leading to the preparation of homogeneous and single phase solid solutions when using the coupled substitution (Nd 3+ , PO 4 3- ) ↔ (Th 4+ , SiO 4 4- ). Due to redox problems, the incorporation of uranium was limited to 5 to 8 wt.% and always led to a two-phase mixture of U-britholite and CaU 2 O 5+y . The preparation of homogeneous solid solutions of β-TUPD and of brabantites containing thorium and uranium samples was successfully obtained using three steps of mechanical grinding/calcination. For each matrix, dense pellets were prepared prior to the study of their chemical behaviour during leaching tests. The chemical durability of brabantites and β-TUPD were found to be close to that reported in literature. The formation of neo-formed phases was also evidenced onto the surface of Th-britholite samples. (author)

  16. Photon-induced Processing of Interstellar Ices in the Laboratory. Focus on Their Non-thermal Desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Domenech, Rafael; Munoz Caro, Guillermo; Cruz-Diaz, Gustavo A.; Oberg, Karin I.

    2018-06-01

    Some of the processes that take place in the interstellar medium (ISM)can be simulated in laboratories on Earth under astrophysically relevant conditions. For example, the energetic processing of the ice mantles that accrete on top of dust grains in the coldest regions of the ISM, leading to the production of new species and their desorption to the gas phase. In particular, observation of complex organic molecules (COMs) in cold interstellar environments stress the need for not only a solid state formation but also for non-thermal desorption mechanisms that can account for the observed abundances in regions where thermal desorption is inhibited. Laboratory Astrophysics can be used to test different non-thermal desorption processes and extract yields than can be extrapolated to the astrophysical scenario with theoretical models. 0th generation COMs like CH3OH and H2CO can be formed at very low temperatures. In this talk, we present laboratory simulations of the UV photoprocessing of a binary ice mixture composed by water (the main component of astrophysical ices) and methane. Formation of CO, CO2, CH3OH and H2CO was confirmed by IR spectroscopy and subsequent TPD. At the same time, photodesorption of CO and H2CO was detected by means of a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer, with yields on the order of 10-4 and 10-5 molecules per incident photon, respectively. In general, photodesorption can take place through a direct mechanism, where the absorbing molecule (or its photofragments) are desorbed; or through an indirect mechanism where the absorbed energy is transferred to a surface molecule which is the one finally desorbing. In the case of photoproducts, the evolution of the photodesorption yield gives information on the photodesorption mechanism: a constant photodesorption yield is observed when the photoproducts are desorbed right after their formation; while an increasing yield is measured when the photoproducts are desorbed later after energy transfer from another

  17. TPD and XPS study on thermal behavior of absorbed oxygen in La sub(1-x)Sr sub(x)CoO/sub 3/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazoe, N; Teraoka, Y; Seiyama, T [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1981-12-01

    Two types of oxygen desorption from La sub(1-x)Sr sub(x)CoO/sub 3/ were revealed by the appearance of a broad desorption peak (..cap alpha..) below ca. 800/sup 0/C and a sharp one (..beta..) around 820/sup 0/C. The binding energy of O is level for absorbed oxygen was clearly different from that for lattice oxygen. Close examination shows that ..cap alpha.. is ascribable to the desorption of the absorbed oxygen while ..beta.. may be the desorption of a part of lattice oxygen.

  18. Investigating the coverage dependent behaviour of CO on Gd/Pt(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrikkeholm, Elisabeth Therese; Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    diffraction (LEED), showing that a highly ordered crystal structure had appeared. To study the molecular dynamics on this surface a detailed study of the CO adsorption on the surface was conducted using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of CO. The TPD spectra show a desorption peak shifted down...... in temperature compared to those of pure Pt(111). The shape of the desorption peak and the desorption temperature were shown to be strongly dependent on the CO coverage of the surface. A systematic investigation of CO desorption temperature as a function of coverage was consequently performed. A simple...... simulation of the TPD spectra was carried out, based on adsorption energies from density functional theory (DFT). This simulation reproduces the shift and the narrowing of the desorption spectrum from the experiments and the DFT calculations suggest that the sharp TPD feature arises from cooperative...

  19. H2S absorption and desorption system for a heavy water production plant (Gird ler-Sulphide method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, F.; Duran, O.

    1987-01-01

    A computational design for the principal equipment involved in the absorption and desorption sections of a heavy water production plant (Girdler-sulphide method) is described. the programs were developed in FORTRAN. A detailled description of transport equations for the desorption tower, which are applicable for the absorption one is included. The optimization criteria used for the equipment design were mainly economic; the results were obtained under the optimal conditions for the towers. The programs may be used in the long term, for the simulation of the absorption and desorption sections together with the isotopic exchange sectionts (author)

  20. Water-induced morphology changes in BaO/?-Al2O3 NOx storage materials: an FTIR, TPD, and time-resolved synchrotron XRD study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szanyi, Janos; Kwak, Ja Hun; Kim, Do Heui; Wang, Xianqin; Chimentao, Ricardo J.; Hanson, Jonathan; Epling, William S.; Peden, Charles HF

    2007-01-01

    The effect of water on the morphology of BaO/Al2O3-based NOx storage materials was investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, and time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques. The results of this multi-spectroscopy study reveal that, in the presence of water, surface Ba-nitrates convert to bulk nitrates, and water facilitates the formation of large Ba(NO3)2 particles. This process is completely reversible, i.e. after the removal of water from the storage material a significant fraction of the bulk nitrates re-convert to surface nitrates. NO2 exposure of a H2O-containing (wet) BaO/Al2O3 sample results in the formation of nitrites and bulk nitrates exclusively, i.e. no surface nitrates form. After further exposure to NO2, the nitrites completely convert to bulk nitrates. The amount of NOx taken up by the storage material is, however, essentially unaffected by the presence of water, regardless of whether the water was dosed prior to or after NO2 exposure. Based on the results of this study we are now able to explain most of the observations reported in the literature on the effect of water on NOx uptake on similar storage materials

  1. Solar2Fuel: XPS and TPD characterization of functionalized TiO{sub 2} surfaces for photocatalytic reduction of CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staier, Florian; Grunze, Michael; Zharnikov, Michael [Angewandte Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Heidelberg, INF 253, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The handling of CO{sub 2} produced by industrial installations and power plants has become a very important environmental issue nowadays because of it's generally accepted impact on the green house effect. In this context, a storage of CO{sub 2} or its conversation to fuel or useful chemicals are highly desirable. Along these lines, the solar2fuel project, funded by BMBF, aims on photocatalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} to methanol with a sufficient quantum efficiency which can justify and make rentable an industrial realization of the process. As the primary catalytic system TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle powder coatings are used. These particles are doped with metals to enhance their catalytic activity and functionalized with specially designed dyes which promote photocatalytic reaction and move the absorption spectrum from UV (characteristic of TiO{sub 2}) to the visible range. We present first results on characterization of these catalytic systems by several complimentary techniques as well as on temperature-programmed-desorption of CO{sub 2} and methanol from these functionalized surfaces.

  2. SnO 2 /SiO 2 Nanocomposite Catalyzed One-pot, Four-component ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -Amino-3-Cyanopyridines. ... (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR), Brunauer-Emmer-Teller (BET) surface area, and temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH3-TPD).

  3. Atomic-Scale View on the H2O Formation Reaction from H2 on O-Rich RuO2(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Yinying; Martinez, Umberto; Lammich, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    The H2O formation reaction from H-2 on O-rich RuO2(110) was studied by temperature-programmed desorption and reaction (TPD/TPR) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On the one hand, following H-2 adsorption at 270 K, our TPD/TPR me...

  4. Ionic Adsorption and Desorption of CNT Nanoropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jun Shang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method based on classical electrostatic theory. The electrostatic interactions among charged carbon atoms are calculated by using the Coulomb law. It was found here that the charged nanorope can adsorb heavy metal ions, and the adsorption and desorption can be realized by controlling the strength of applied electric field. The distance between the ions and the nanorope as well as the amount of ions have an effect on the adsorption capacity of the nanorope. The desorption process takes less time than that of adsorption. The study indicates that the CNT nanorope can be used as a core element of devices for sewage treatment.

  5. Top-Contact Pentacene-Based Organic Thin Film Transistor (OTFT) with N, N'-Bis(3-Methyl Phenyl)- N, N'-Diphenyl Benzidine (TPD)/Au Bilayer Source-Drain Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthakur, Tribeni; Sarma, Ranjit

    2018-01-01

    A top-contact Pentacene-based organic thin film transistor (OTFT) with N, N'-Bis (3-methyl phenyl)- N, N'-diphenyl benzidine (TPD)/Au bilayer source-drain electrode is reported. The devices with TPD/Au bilayer source-drain (S-D) electrodes show better performance than the single layer S-D electrode OTFT devices. The field-effect mobility of 4.13 cm2 v-1 s-1, the on-off ratio of 1.86 × 107, the threshold voltage of -4 v and the subthreshold slope of .27 v/decade, respectively, are obtained from the device with a TPD/Au bilayer source-drain electrode.

  6. STM-Induced Hydrogen Desorption via a Hole Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.

    1998-01-01

    We report STM-induced desorption of H from Si(100)-H(2 X 1) at negative sample bias. The desorption rate exhibits a power-law dependence on current and a maximum desorption rate at -7 V. The desorption is explained by vibrational heating of H due to inelastic scattering of tunneling holes...... with the Si-H 5 sigma hole resonance. The dependence of desorption rate on current and bias is analyzed using a novel approach for calculating inelastic scattering, which includes the effect of the electric field between tip and sample. We show that the maximum desorption rate at -7 V is due to a maximum...

  7. Secondary ion shadow-cone enhanced desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chechen Chang (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu (USA). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-02-01

    The incident angle dependence of the secondary particle emission process under keV ion bombardment has been investigated. The results from the full molecular dynamics calculations indicate that the flux anisotropy of the incident beam, resulting from the non-uniform impact parameters for the surface atom of a single crystal, affects the particle desorption in a systematic fashion. The enhanced desorption at certain angles of incidence corresponds to the intensive focusing of the incident beam to the near-surface atom and the extended dissipation of momentum by large-angle scattering. This observation has let us to develop a new theoretical model in which the enhanced desorption is described by the distance of closest encounter along the trajectory of the incident particle to the surface atom. The computer time for the simulation of the incident-angle-dependent emission process is significantly reduced. The results from the calculation based on this model are in good agreement both with the results from the full dynamics calculation and with the experimental results. The new model also allows a complementary evaluation of the microscopic dynamics involved in the shadow-cone enhanced desorption. (author).

  8. Exciton-Promoted Desorption From Solid Water Surfaces A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCoustra, M.R.S.; Thrower, J.D.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Desorption from solid water surfaces resulting from interaction with electromagnetic and particle radiation is reviewed in the context of the role of nonthermal desorption in astrophysical environments. Experimental observations are interpreted in terms of mechanisms sharing a common basis...

  9. Implementação da Técnica de Dessorção Térmica Programada (TPD) usando Espectrometria de Massa Quadrupolo

    OpenAIRE

    Barreto, Ana Marta Fortunato

    2011-01-01

    Dissertação apresentada na Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa para obtenção do Grau de Mestre em Engenharia Física O projecto “Implementação da Técnica de Dessorção Térmica Programada (TPD) usando Espectrometria de Massa Quadrupolo”, apresentado nesta Dissertação de Mestrado em Engenharia Física, surgiu como uma proposta de requalificação ao aparelho de análise de superfícies Multitécnica. A dessorção térmica é o fenómeno que permite a separação física de ...

  10. Molecular dynamics study of the coverage dependence of Xe desorption from Pt(111)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A.P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Mol. dynamics simulations with periodic boundary conditions are used to calc. temp.-programmed desorption spectra of Xe/Pt(111). The activation barrier is overcome by using the compensating Hamiltonian method. Monte Carlo simulations are used to correct for the finite size of the simulated system. A

  11. Data compilation for particle-impact desorption, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiyama, Takashi; Nagai, Siro; Ozawa, Kunio; Takeutchi, Fujio.

    1985-07-01

    The particle impact desorption is one of the elementary processes of hydrogen recycling in controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors. We have surveyed the literature concerning the ion impact desorption and photon stimulated desorption published through the end of 1984 and compiled the data on the desorption cross sections and yields with the aid of a computer. This report presents the results of the compilation in graphs and tables as functions of incident energy, surface temperature and surface coverage. (author)

  12. Desorption of intrinsic cesium from smectite: inhibitive effects of clay particle organization on cesium desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Keisuke; Sakai, Haruka; Itono, Taeko; Tamura, Akihiro; Arai, Shoji

    2014-09-16

    Fine clay particles have functioned as transport media for radiocesium in terrestrial environments after nuclear accidents. Because radiocesium is expected to be retained in clay minerals by a cation-exchange reaction, ascertaining trace cesium desorption behavior in response to changing solution conditions is crucially important. This study systematically investigated the desorption behavior of intrinsic Cs (13 nmol/g) in well-characterized Na-montmorillonite in electrolyte solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) under widely differing cation concentrations (0.2 mM to 0.2 M). Batch desorption experiments demonstrated that Cs(+) desorption was inhibited significantly in the presence of the environmental relevant concentrations of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (>0.5 mM) and high concentrations of K(+). The order of ability for Cs desorption was Na(+) = K(+) > Ca(2+) = Mg(2+) at the highest cation concentration (0.2 M), which is opposite to the theoretical prediction based on the cation-exchange selectivity. Laser diffraction grain-size analyses revealed that the inhibition of Cs(+) desorption coincided with the increase of the clay tactoid size. Results suggest that radiocesium in the dispersed fine clay particles adheres on the solid phase when the organization of swelling clay particles occurs because of changes in solution conditions caused by both natural processes and artificial treatments.

  13. Rapid screening of pharmaceutical drugs using thermal desorption – SALDI mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechnikov, A A; Kubasov, A E; Borodkov, A S; Georgieva, V B; Nikiforov, S M; Simanovsky, Ya O; Alimpiev, S S

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to the rapid screening of pharmaceutical drugs by surface assisted laser desorption-ionization (SALDI) mass spectrometry with the rotating ball interface coupled with temperature programmed thermal desorption has been developed. Analytes were thermally desorbed and deposited onto the surface of amorphous silicon substrate attached to the rotating ball. The ball was rotated and the deposited analytes were analyzed using SALDI. The effectiveness of coupling SALDI mass spectrometry with thermal desorption was evaluated by the direct and rapid analysis of tablets containing lidocaine, diphenhydramine and propranolol without any sample pretreatment. The overall duration of the screening procedure was 30÷40 sec. Real urine samples were studied for drug analysis. It is shown that with simple preparation steps, urine samples can be quantitatively analyzed using the proposed technique with the detection limits in the range of 0.2÷0.5 ng/ml.

  14. Adsorption and desorption of contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palumbo, A.V.; Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; DeFlaun, M.; Ensley, B.

    1994-01-01

    The microbial remediation of sites Contaminated with organics is well documented, however, there are some significant problems that remain to be solved in the areas of contaminants sorbed to soils and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination. Methods of in situ bioremediation techniques employ either the stimulation of indigenous populations by nutrient addition, or the addition of prepared bacterial cultures to the subsurface environment. Problems of contaminant sorption and NAPL's are related in that both encompass reduced contaminant bioavailability. Non-aqueous phase liquids have been identified as a priority area for research in the In situ Program due to their presence at DOE sites and the lack of adequate technology to effectively treat this contamination. Bioremediation technologies developed as a result of this project are easily transferred to industry

  15. Thermal desorption study of physical forces at the PTFE surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface was successfully employed to study the possible role of physical forces in the enhancement of metal-PTFE adhesion by radiation. The thermal desorption spectra were analyzed without assumptions to yield the activation energy for desorption over a range of xenon coverage from less than 0.1 monolayer to more than 100 monolayers. For multilayer coverage, the desorption is zero-order with an activation energy equal to the sublimation energy of xenon. For submonolayer coverages, the order for desorption from the unirradiated PTFE surface is 0.73 and the activation energy for desorption is between 3.32 and 3.36 kcal/mol; less than the xenon sublimation energy. The effect of irradiation is to increase the activation energy for desorption to as high as 4 kcal/mol at low coverage.

  16. Thermal desorption of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, A.V.; Chernikov, V.N.; Zakharov, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    By means of TDS measurements it is shown that the desorption of deuterium from Be implanted with 5 keV D ions to fluences, Φ, from 1x10 20 D/m 2 to 1x10 21 D/m 2 proceeds in one high temperature stage B, while at Φ ≥ 1.2x10 21 D/m 2 one more stage A is added. The desorption maximum A is narrow and consists of two peaks A 1 and A 2 at about 460 K and 490 K, respectively. Peak A 1 is attributed to the desorption of deuterium from the walls of opened channels formed under D ion implantation. Peak A 2 is a consequence of the opening of a part of closed bubbles/channels to the outer surface. The position of maximum B shifts noticeably and nonsteadily on the fluence in a range from 850 to 1050 K. The origin of this maximum is the liberation of D atoms bound at vacancy complexes discussed previously by Wampler. The dependence of Tm(B) on the fluence is governed by the interaction of freely migrating D atoms with partly opened or fully closed gas cavity arrangements which are created under temperature ramping, but differently in specimens implanted with D ions to different fluences

  17. Lead sorption-desorption from organic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Zaragoza, Victor M; Carrillo, Rogelio; Gutierrez Castorena, Carmen M

    2011-01-01

    Sorption and desorption are mechanisms involved in the reduction of metal mobility and bioavailability in organic materials. Metal release from substrates is controlled by desorption. The capacity of coffee husk and pulp residues, vermicompost and cow manure to adsorb Pb2+ was evaluated. The mechanisms involved in the sorption process were also studied. Organic materials retained high concentrations of lead (up to 36,000 mg L(-1)); however, the mechanisms of sorption varied according to the characteristics of each material: degree of decomposition, pH, cation exchange capacity and percentage of organic matter. Vermicompost and manure removed 98% of the Pb from solution. Lead precipitated in manure and vermicompost, forming lead oxide (PbO) and lead ferrite (PbFe4O7). Adsorption isotherms did not fit to the typical Freundlich and Langmuir equations. Not only specific and non-specific adsorption was observed, but also precipitation and coprecipitation. Lead desorption from vermicompost and cow manure was less than 2%. For remediation of Pb-polluted sites, the application of vermicompost and manure is recommended in places with alkaline soils because Pb precipitation can be induced, whereas coffee pulp residue is recommended for acidic soils where Pb is adsorbed.

  18. Sorption/Desorption Interactions of Plutonium with Montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, J.; Zavarin, M.; Zhao, P.; Kersting, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    first order process. Furthermore, a pH dependence was observed, with less desorbed at pH 4 compared to pH 8. We suggest the pH dependence is likely controlled by reoxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(V) and aqueous speciation. We will present models used to describe desorption behavior and discuss the implications for Pu transport. References: Kersting, A.B.; Efurd, D.W.; Finnegan, D.L.; Rokop, D.J.; Smith, D.K.; Thompson J.L. (1999) Migration of plutonium in groundwater at the Nevada Test Site, Nature, 397, 56-59. Novikov A.P.; Kalmykov, S.N.; Utsunomiya, S.; Ewing, R.C.; Horreard, F.; Merkulov, A.; Clark, S.B.; Tkachev, V.V.; Myasoedov, B.F. (2006) Colloid transport of plutonium in the far-field of the Mayak Production Association, Russia, Science, 314, 638-641. Santschi, P.H.; Roberts, K.; Guo, L. (2002) The organic nature of colloidal actinides transported in surface water environments. Environ. Sci. Technol., 36, 3711-3719. This work was funded by U. S. DOE Office of Biological & Environmental Sciences, Subsurface Biogeochemistry Research Program, and performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-570161

  19. Structural and energetical studies of the adsorption of para and meta-isomers of xylene on pre-hydrated zeolite BaX. Characterization by neutron diffraction and temperature programmed desorption; Etude structurale et energetique de l'adsorption des isomeres para- et meta- du xylene dans la zeolithe BaX prehydratee. Caracterisation par diffraction des neutrons et thermodesorption programmee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, Ch.

    1999-10-19

    The separation of p-xylene from C{sub 8} aromatics is performed industrially by selective adsorption on zeolitic materials. FAU-type zeolites are currently used for this separation and especially the partially hydrated BaX. The aim of this work is to characterize from a structural (by low temperature neutron powder diffraction) and an energetical (by temperature programmed desorption) point of view, the adsorption of para- and meta- isomers of xylene, for different fillings, as pure substances as well as mixtures, on pre-hydrated zeolite BaX. The influence of the water pre-adsorption on xylene adsorption selectivity is carefully discussed. The crystalline structure of the zeolite BaX (framework and compensation of charge cations) and of the adsorbed phase (water, p- and m-xylene molecules) are completely characterized by neutron diffraction. The location and the distribution of water and xylene molecules on their adsorption sites is especially followed as a function of the filling of the zeolite and of the composition of the adsorbed phase. Microscopic measurements were correlated to the energetical analysis (at a macroscopic level) in order to obtain a consistent description of adsorption phenomenon and to propose a possible origin for adsorption selectivity.

  20. Sorption-desorption of samarium in Febex bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Guinart, O.; Rigol, A.; Vidal, M.; Fernandez-Poyatos, P.; Alba, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The chemical and physical nature of the clay is a key issue in the design of engineered barriers. The FEBEX bentonite is one of the clays candidates to be used in engineered barriers in deep geology repositories (DGR). Here, its performance was tested with respect to the sorption-desorption of samarium, which is a lanthanide that, besides being considered as a natural analogue of actinides, may also be present in high level radioactive waste in the form of the radioactive isotope 151 Sm. FEBEX bentonite was used in this study. This is a di-octahedral smectite, with isomorphic substitutions in tetrahedral and octahedral sheets. Its theoretical cation exchange capacity value is 1500 meq kg -1 . Sorption isotherms were obtained for Sm in the range of initial concentrations of 0.01 and 9 meq l -1 . Tests were carried out in deionized water and in a medium simulating the composition of interstitial water. Sorption tests were performed equilibrating 30 ml of the Sm solution with 0.2 g of clay. After a contact time of 24 hours, supernatants were decanted off after centrifugation. The quantification of the concentration of Sm in the initial and final solutions allowed us to quantify the Sm equilibrium concentration (C eq ), the fraction sorbed in the FEBEX bentonite (C sorb ) and to derive the sorption K d data. Desorption tests were applied to determine the desorption K d and the percentage of Sm reversibly sorbed. Desorption tests were performed with the bentonite residue from the sorption step, under the same experimental conditions, but without Sm. Powder X-ray diffractograms were obtained from 3 to 70 deg. 2θ with a step of 0.05 deg. and a counting time of 3 s. The crystalline phases were identified using the computer program X'Pert HighScore. The morphology of the samples was analyzed by SEM at 20 kV. An EDX system was fitted to the SEM equipment to perform chemical analyses of the samples using a Si/Li detector

  1. Study of the thorium phosphate-diphosphate (TPD) dissolution: kinetic aspect - thermodynamic aspect: analysis of the neo-formed phases; Etude de la dissolution du phosphate diphosphate de thorium: - aspect cinetique - aspect thermodynamique: analyse des phases neoformees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, A.Ch

    2000-10-06

    The aim of this work is to study the aqueous corrosion of the thorium phosphate-diphosphate (TPD), of the formula Th{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, in the framework of the actinides immobilization. In order to complete the anterior studies concerning solid solutions where thorium is substituted by a tetravalent ion (uranium (IV) or plutonium (IV)) in the TPD structure, compounds of thorium and neptunium phosphate-diphosphate, of formula Th{sub 4-x}Np{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, have been prepared. Furthermore, a new chemical way of synthesis has been investigated in order to sinter solids solution of thorium and uranium phosphate-diphosphate (TUPD) in good conditions. The TPD dissolution study showed two principals steps. The first one corresponds to the control of element concentration by the material dissolution whereas the second corresponds to the formation of secondary precipitates for which thermodynamic equilibrium controls the concentration of the species in solution. Leaching tests have been performed varying several independent parameters in order to determine the TPD dissolution rate. The partial orders related to the protons or to the hydroxide ions have been found between 0.35 and 0.45 whereas the apparent dissolution rate constants are in the range 1.10{sup -5} for 9.10{sup -5} g.m{sup -2}.j{sup -1} for acidic and basic media. The neo-formed phases have been characterized after the dissolution of TPD and TUPD. We found that the TPD leaching in acidic medium leads to the formation of the crystallized thorium phosphate-hydrogen-phosphate (TPHP), of formula Th{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}), x H{sub 2}O, whereas the TUPD dissolution leads to the TPHP and an other compound, of formula (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, 5 H{sub 2}O. We calculated its solubility product which is in good agreement with those found in the literature. The phases formed during the leaching of solids containing plutonium; americium or curium (Th

  2. Universal scaling for biomolecule desorption induced by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szenes, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thermal activation mechanism is proposed for the desorption of biomolecules. Good agreement is found with the experiments in a broad range of the electronic stopping power. The activation energies of desorption U are 0.33, 1.57 and 5.35 eV for positive, negative and neutral leucine molecules, respectively, and 2.05 eV for positive ergosterol molecules. The desorption of valine clusters is analyzed. The magnitude of the specific heat shows that the internal degrees of freedom are not excited up to the moment of desorption. The effect of irradiation temperature and of ion velocity on the desorption yield is discussed on the basis of the author's model. The scaling function derived in the model for the desorption of biomolecules is applied also to the sputtering of SiO 2 and U = 0.42 eV is obtained

  3. Thermal desorption and surface modification of He+ implanted into tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhang; Yoshida, N.; Iwakiri, H.; Xu Zengyu

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten divertor plates in fusion reactors will be subject to helium bombardment. Helium retention and thermal desorption is a concerned issue in controlling helium ash. In the present study, fluence dependence of thermal desorption behavior of helium in tungsten was studied at different irradiation temperatures and ion energies. Results showed that helium desorption could start at ∼400 K with increasing fluence, while no noticeable peaks were detected at low fluence. Total helium desorption reached a saturation value at high fluence range, which was not sensitive to irradiation temperature or ion energy for the conditions evaluated. Surface modifications caused by either ion irradiation or thermal desorption were observed by SEM. The relationship of surface modifications and helium desorption behavior was discussed. Some special features of elevated irradiation temperature and lower ion energy were also indicated

  4. An infrared measurement of chemical desorption from interstellar ice analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Y.; Tomaru, T.; Lamberts, T.; Kouchi, A.; Watanabe, N.

    2018-03-01

    In molecular clouds at temperatures as low as 10 K, all species except hydrogen and helium should be locked in the heterogeneous ice on dust grain surfaces. Nevertheless, astronomical observations have detected over 150 different species in the gas phase in these clouds. The mechanism by which molecules are released from the dust surface below thermal desorption temperatures to be detectable in the gas phase is crucial for understanding the chemical evolution in such cold clouds. Chemical desorption, caused by the excess energy of an exothermic reaction, was first proposed as a key molecular release mechanism almost 50 years ago1. Chemical desorption can, in principle, take place at any temperature, even below the thermal desorption temperature. Therefore, astrochemical network models commonly include this process2,3. Although there have been a few previous experimental efforts4-6, no infrared measurement of the surface (which has a strong advantage to quantify chemical desorption) has been performed. Here, we report the first infrared in situ measurement of chemical desorption during the reactions H + H2S → HS + H2 (reaction 1) and HS + H → H2S (reaction 2), which are key to interstellar sulphur chemistry2,3. The present study clearly demonstrates that chemical desorption is a more efficient process for releasing H2S into the gas phase than was previously believed. The obtained effective cross-section for chemical desorption indicates that the chemical desorption rate exceeds the photodesorption rate in typical interstellar environments.

  5. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  6. Optical detection of CO and CO2 temperature dependent desorption from carbon nanotube clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chistiakova, M V; Armani, A M

    2014-01-01

    The development of new materials relies on high precision methods to quantify adsorption/desorption of gases from surfaces. One commonly used approach is temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy. While this approach is very accurate, it requires complex instrumentation, and it is limited to performing experiments under high vacuum, thus restricting experimental scope. An alternative approach is to integrate the surface of interest directly onto a detector face, creating an active substrate. One surface that has applications in numerous areas is the carbon nanotube (CNT). As such, an active substrate that integrates a CNT surface on a sensor and is able to perform measurements in ambient environments will have significant impact. In the present work, we have developed an active substrate that combines an optical sensor with a CNT cluster substrate. The optical sensor is able to accurately probe the temperature dependent desorption of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide gases from the CNT cluster surface. This active substrate will enable a wide range of temperature dependent desorption measurements to be performed from a scientifically interesting material system. (paper)

  7. Desorption of trihalomethanes in gas liquid contactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Quesada, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    Updated studies show that gastric cancer is related with the existence of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the drinking water. The trihalomethanes are sub products from the degradation of humic acids and your reaction with chlorine and bromine used like decontaminates. The desorption process is used to eliminate the THMs with air in contact with the water. The experimental design was used in three contactors. The contactors selected were: the bubbling's column, the packed column and the shaken tank without screen. There were selected three variable: initial concentration of THMs, the residence time and the turbulence degree (measured with the Reynolds number). The concentrations were made with a gas chromatograph. The objective of this project is to do a comparison with the gas liquid contactors more used in the industrial level to determinate which ones are the best in the desorption process. The conclusion of the experimental design is that the tank is the equipment with the best capacity to eliminate THMs. Too it includes other techniques to eliminate THMs of the water and your treatment [es

  8. Molecular desorption of stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 42 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Laurent, Jean Michel; Madsen, N

    2003-01-01

    In preparation for the heavy ion program of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, accumulation and cooling tests with lead ion beams have been performed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2 MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments (glow discharges, nonevaporable getter coating) are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H/sub 2 /, CH/sub 4/, CO, Ar, and CO/sub 2/. (16 refs).

  9. Modeling Organic Contaminant Desorption from Municipal Solid Waste Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappe, D. R.; Wu, B.; Barlaz, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    Approximately 25% of the sites on the National Priority List (NPL) of Superfund are municipal landfills that accepted hazardous waste. Unlined landfills typically result in groundwater contamination, and priority pollutants such as alkylbenzenes are often present. To select cost-effective risk management alternatives, better information on factors controlling the fate of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in landfills is required. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate the effects of HOC aging time, anaerobic sorbent decomposition, and leachate composition on HOC desorption rates, and (2) to simulate HOC desorption rates from polymers and biopolymer composites with suitable diffusion models. Experiments were conducted with individual components of municipal solid waste (MSW) including polyvinyl chloride (PVC), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), newsprint, office paper, and model food and yard waste (rabbit food). Each of the biopolymer composites (office paper, newsprint, rabbit food) was tested in both fresh and anaerobically decomposed form. To determine the effects of aging on alkylbenzene desorption rates, batch desorption tests were performed after sorbents were exposed to toluene for 30 and 250 days in flame-sealed ampules. Desorption tests showed that alkylbenzene desorption rates varied greatly among MSW components (PVC slowest, fresh rabbit food and newsprint fastest). Furthermore, desorption rates decreased as aging time increased. A single-parameter polymer diffusion model successfully described PVC and HDPE desorption data, but it failed to simulate desorption rate data for biopolymer composites. For biopolymer composites, a three-parameter biphasic polymer diffusion model was employed, which successfully simulated both the initial rapid and the subsequent slow desorption of toluene. Toluene desorption rates from MSW mixtures were predicted for typical MSW compositions in the years 1960 and 1997. For the older MSW mixture, which had a

  10. Copper desorption from Gelidium algal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2007-04-01

    Desorption of divalent copper from marine algae Gelidium sesquipedale, an algal waste (from agar extraction industry) and a composite material (the algal waste immobilized in polyacrylonitrile) was studied in a batch system. Copper ions were first adsorbed until saturation and then desorbed by HNO(3) and Na(2)EDTA solutions. Elution efficiency using HNO(3) increases as pH decreases. At pH=1, for a solid to liquid ratio S/L=4gl(-1), elution efficiency was 97%, 95% and 88%, the stoichiometric coefficient for the ionic exchange, 0.70+/-0.02, 0.73+/-0.05 and 0.76+/-0.06 and the selectivity coefficient, 0.93+/-0.07, 1.0+/-0.3 and 1.1+/-0.3, respectively, for algae Gelidium, algal waste and composite material. Complexation of copper ions by EDTA occurs in a molar proportion of 1:1 and the elution efficiency increases with EDTA concentration. For concentrations of 1.4, 0.88 and 0.57 mmoll(-1), the elution efficiency for S/L=4gl(-1), was 91%, 86% and 78%, respectively, for algae Gelidium, algal waste and composite material. The S/L ratio, in the range 1-20gl(-1), has little influence on copper recovery by using 0.1M HNO(3). Desorption kinetics was very fast for all biosorbents. Kinetic data using HNO(3) as eluant were well described by the mass transfer model, considering the average metal concentration in the solid phase and the equilibrium relationship given by the mass action law. The homogeneous diffusion coefficient varied between 1.0 x 10(-7)cm(2)s(-1) for algae Gelidium and 3.0 x 10(-7)cm(2)s(-1) for the composite material.

  11. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... N2 adsorption desorption, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD).We have studied the catalytic activities, kinetics and reusability of the catalysts. 60CsTPA-ZTP is found to be an effective and re-usable catalyst for the ...

  12. New Materials for Oxygen Reduction Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Tobias Peter

    , on the other hand, a Pt overlayer was formed upon annealing in UHV. The reactivity of the Pt overlayer was tested by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of CO, which yielded a lower desorption temperature compared to Pt(111). The ORR activity of the annealed Pt3Sc sample was found to be on the same order...

  13. Mechanism and Thermochemistry of Coal Char Oxidation and Desorption of Surface Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Gianluca; Causà, Mauro; Lacovig, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the coal char combustion by a combination of thermochemical and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. Thermoanalytical methods (differential thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, and temperature-programmed desorption) are used to identify...... the key reactive steps that occur upon oxidation and heating of coal char (chemisorption, structural rearrangement and switchover of surface oxides, and desorption) and their energetics. XPS is used to reveal the chemical nature of the surface oxides that populate the char surface and to monitor...... functionalities prevail. The rearrangement of epoxy during preoxidation goes together with activation of the more stable and less reactive carbon sites. Results are in good agreement with semi-lumped kinetic models of carbon oxidation, which include (1) formation of "metastable" surface oxides, (2) complex...

  14. Initial screening of thermal desorption for soil remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yezzi, J.J. Jr.; Tafuri, A.N.; Rosenthal, S.; Troxler, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    Petroleum-contaminated soils--caused by spills, leaks, and accidental discharges--exist at many sites throughout the United States. Thermal desorption technologies which are increasingly being employed to treat these soils, have met soil cleanup criteria for a variety of petroleum products. Currently the United States Environmental Protection Agency is finalizing a technical report entitled Use of Thermal Desorption for Treating Petroleum-Contaminated Soils to assist remedial project managers, site owners, remediation contractors, and equipment vendors in evaluating the use of thermal desorption technologies for petroleum-contaminated soil applications. The report will present a three-level screening method to help a reader predict the success of applying thermal desorption at a specific site. The objective of screening level one is to determine the likelihood of success in a specific application of thermal desorption. It will take into account procedures for collecting and evaluating data on site characteristics, contaminant characteristics, soil characteristics, and regulatory requirements. This level will establish whether or not thermal desorption should be evaluated further for site remediation, whether treatment should occur on-site or off-site, and if on-site is a viable option, what system size will be most cost-effective. The scope of this paper addresses only screening level one which provides a preliminary assessment of the applicability of thermal desorption to a particular site. This topic encompasses worksheets that are an integral part of the ''user friendly'' screening process. Level one screening provides a foundation for the subsequent two levels which follow a similar ''user friendly'' worksheet approach to evaluating thermal desorption technologies and establishing costs for thermal desorption in an overall remediation project

  15. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    OpenAIRE

    Petter, Fabiano André; Ferreira, Tamara Santos; Sinhorin, Adilson Paulo; Lima, Larissa Borges de; Morais, Leidimar Alves de; Pacheco, Leandro Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula) and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1). In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorption and desorption of diu...

  16. Acoustic emission during hydrogen absorption and desorption in palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, R.; Mukhopadhyay, C.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission technique has been used to study charging and discharging of hydrogen in palladium. During charging, breaking of oxide film due to surface activation and saturation of hydrogen absorption have been identified by acoustic emission. In the discharging cycle, the desorption of hydrogen from the specimen leads to high AE activity immediately after initiation of discharging, followed by gradual decrease in the acoustic activity, which reaches a minimum upon completion of the desorption. The potential of the acoustic emission technique for studying the kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption in metals has been shown. (author)

  17. Inelastic surface collisions and the desorption of massive molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macfarlane, R D [Texas A and M Univ., College Station (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of high energy ions in the region of electronic stopping (1 MeV u/sup -1/) stimulates the desorption of massive molecular ions of biomolecules such as insulin. The experimental details of the measurements are given with some examples of application for analytical mass spectrometry. Studies on the role of the incident ion (accelerator beam experiments) are reviewed as well as the contribution of the matrix to the desorption-ionization process. How the electronic relaxation process couples to desorption-ionization is a central question in understanding the overall mechanism of the process.

  18. Modelling deuterium release during thermal desorption of D{sup +}-irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, M. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, ON, M3H 5T6 (Canada); Haasz, A.A. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, ON, M3H 5T6 (Canada)], E-mail: tonyhaasz@utias.utoronto.ca; Davis, J.W. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, ON, M3H 5T6 (Canada)

    2008-03-15

    Thermal desorption profiles were modelled based on SIMS measurements of implantation profiles and using the multi-trap diffusion code TMAP7 [G.R. Longhurst, TMAP7: Tritium Migration Analysis Program, User Manual, Idaho National Laboratory, INEEL/EXT-04-02352 (2004)]. The thermal desorption profiles were the result of 500 eV/D{sup +} irradiations on single crystal tungsten at 300 and 500 K to fluences of 10{sup 22}-10{sup 24} D{sup +}/m{sup 2}. SIMS depth profiling was performed after irradiation to obtain the distribution of trapped D within the top 60 nm of the surface. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was performed subsequently to obtain desorption profiles and to extract the total trapped D inventory. The SIMS profiles were calibrated to give D concentrations. To account for the total trapped D inventory measured by TDS, SIMS depth distributions were used in the near-surface (surface to 30 nm), NRA measurements [V.Kh. Alimov, J. Roth, M. Mayer, J. Nucl. Mater. 337-339 (2005) 619] were used in the range 1-7 {mu}m, and a linear drop in the D distribution was assumed in the intermediate sub-surface region ({approx}30 nm to 1 {mu}m). Traps were assumed to be saturated so that the D distribution also represented the trap distribution. Three trap energies, 1.07 {+-} 0.03, 1.34 {+-} 0.03 and 2.1 {+-} 0.05 eV were required to model the 520, 640 and 900 K desorption peaks, respectively. The 1.34 and 1.07 eV traps correspond to trapping of a first and second D atom at a vacancy, respectively, while the 2.1 eV trap corresponds to atomic D trapping at a void. A fourth trap energy of 0.65 eV was used to fit the 400 K desorption peak observed by Quastel et al. [A.D. Quastel, J.W. Davis, A.A. Haasz, R.G. Macaulay-Newcombe, J. Nucl. Mater. 359 (2006) 8].

  19. A new ternary magnesium-titanium hydride Mg{sub 7}TiH{sub x} with hydrogen desorption properties better than both binary magnesium and titanium hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyoi, Daisuke; Sato, Toyoto; Roennebro, Ewa; Kitamura, Naoyuki; Ueda, Atsushi; Ito, Mikio; Katsuyama, Shigeru; Hara, Shigeta; Noreus, Dag; Sakai, Tetsuo

    2004-06-09

    A magnesium based titanium doped hydride was prepared in a high-pressure anvil cell by reacting a mixture of MgH{sub 2} and TiH{sub 1.9} at 8 GPa and 873 K. The metal structure has a Ca{sub 7}Ge type structure (a=9.532(2) A, space group Fm3-barm (no. 225), Z=4, V=866.06 A{sup 3}). The refined metal atom composition Mg{sub 7}Ti was almost in line with EDS analysis. This means that the new magnesium-titanium hydride has a structure that is more related to TiH{sub 1.9} than to MgH{sub 2}. The thermal properties of the new compound were also studied by TPD analysis. The new hydride, Mg{sub 7}TiH{sub x} exhibits 5.5 mass% (x{approx}12.7) and decomposes into Mg and TiH{sub 1.9} upon releasing 4.7 mass% of hydrogen around 605 K, that is at a 130 and 220 K lower desorption temperature compared to MgH{sub 2} and TiH{sub 1.9}, respectively.

  20. Zero-Headspace Coal-Core Gas Desorption Canister, Revised Desorption Data Analysis Spreadsheets and a Dry Canister Heating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Charles E.; Dallegge, Todd A.

    2005-01-01

    Coal desorption techniques typically use the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) canister-desorption method as described by Diamond and Levine (1981), Close and Erwin (1989), Ryan and Dawson (1993), McLennan and others (1994), Mavor and Nelson (1997) and Diamond and Schatzel (1998). However, the coal desorption canister designs historically used with this method have an inherent flaw that allows a significant gas-filled headspace bubble to remain in the canister that later has to be compensated for by correcting the measured desorbed gas volume with a mathematical headspace volume correction (McLennan and others, 1994; Mavor and Nelson, 1997).

  1. Study of the irradiation effects on thorium phosphate diphosphate ({beta}-TPD): consequences on its chemical durability; Etude des effets d'irradiation sur le phosphate diphosphate de thorium ({beta}-PDT): consequences sur la durabilite chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamain, C

    2005-12-15

    Since Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (beta-TPD) can be considered as a potential host matrix for long-term storage in underground repository, it is necessary to study the irradiation effects on the structure of this ceramics and the consequences on its chemical durability. Sintered samples of beta-TPD and of associated solid solutions of beta-TUPD were irradiated under ion beams and then altered in aqueous solutions. Depending on the electronic LET value, beta-TPD can be completely or partly amorphized. Furthermore, the ability of recrystallization of the amorphous material by thermal annealing was also demonstrated. Some leaching tests, realized on these irradiated samples, have shown a significant effect of the amorphous fraction on the normalized dissolution rate which was increased by a factor of 10 from the crystallized to the fully amorphized material. Correlatively, the amorphous fraction also modified the delay to reach the saturation conditions associated to the thermodynamic equilibria involved. On the other hand, it exhibited no influence neither on other kinetic parameters, such as activation energy of the dissolution process or partial order related to the proton concentration, nor on the nature of the neo-formed phase formed at the saturation of the leachate and identified as Thorium Phosphate Hydrogeno-Phosphate Hydrate (TPHPH). Beta-TUPD samples were also irradiated by gamma and alpha rays during leaching tests to study the effects of radiolysis in the leaching medium on the normalized leaching rate. It appeared that the radiolytic species occurring in the dissolution mechanism were unstable, disappearing quickly when stopping the irradiation. (author)

  2. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  3. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Allman, S.L.; Sammartano, L.J.; Isola, N.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications

  4. Study on hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of uranium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yamawaki, Michio [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of two U-Mn intermetallic compounds, U{sub 6}Mn and UMn{sub 2}, were investigated. U{sub 6}Mn absorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen desorption pressure of U{sub 6}Mn obtained from this experiment was higher than that of U, which was considered to be the effect of alloying, whereas UMn{sub 2} was not observed to absorb hydrogen up to 50 atm at room temperature. (author)

  5. Desorption by Femtosecond Laser Pulses : An Electron-Hole Effect?

    OpenAIRE

    D. M., NEWNS; T. F., HEINZ; J. A., MISEWICH; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center; IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center

    1992-01-01

    Desorption of molecules from metal surfaces induced by femtosecond visible laser pulses has been reported. Since the lattice temperature rise is insufficient to explain desorption, an electronic mechanism is clearly responsible. It is shown that a theory based on direct coupling between the center-of-mass degree of freedom of the adsorbate and the electron-hole excitations of the substrate provides a satisfactory explanation of the various experimental findings.

  6. Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etherton, B.P.

    1980-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts which were examined by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The metal particle size and number of particles per area of catalyst increased with increasing metal loading. The particles were approx. 10 A. in diameter, cubo-octahedral shaped, and approx. 80-90% disperse. The STEM electron beam caused negligible damage to the samples. Hydrogen adsorption measurements showed that the hydrogen-iridium atom ratio was 1.2:1-1.3:1 and increased with decreasing metal loading. Temperature-programed desorption showed four types of adsorbed hydrogen desorbing at -90/sup 0/C (I), 15/sup 0/C (IV), 115/sup 0/C (II), and 245/sup 0/C (III). Types II and IV desorb from single atom sites and Types I and III from multiple atom sites. Type I is in rapid equilibrium with the gas phase. All desorption processes appear to be first order. Carbon monoxide adsorbed nondissociatively at 25/sup 0/C with approx. 0.7:1 CO/Ir atom ratio. It adsorbed primarily in linear forms at low coverage, but a bridged form appeared at high coverage.

  7. Desorption dynamics of deuterium in CuCrZr alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi Nguyen, Lan Anh; Lee, Sanghwa; Noh, S. J.; Lee, S. K.; Park, M. C.; Shu, Wataru; Pitcher, Spencer; Torcy, David; Guillermain, David; Kim, Jaeyong

    2017-12-01

    Desorption behavior of deuterium (D2) in CuCrZr alloy was investigated considering sample thickness, loading and baking temperature of deuterium followed by the ITER scopes. Cylindrical specimens of 1, 3, 5 mm thick with 4 mm diameter were exposed to deuterium at a pressure of 25 bar at 120, 240 and 350 °C for 24 h, then baked at 800 °C in a vacuum chamber maintained at a pressure lower than 10-7 Torr. Deuterium desorption characteristics such as desorption rate and amount of deuterium in the sample were estimated by analyzing the desorption peaks monitored with a residual gas analyzer (RGA), and the trapping energy of deuterium was calculated using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) results showed that deuterium atoms embedded in the sample at a depth of less than 15 μm and desorbed as low as 400 °C. All absorbed deuterium atoms in the specimen were completely retrieved by dynamic pumping at 800 °C in 15 min. The desorption rate of deuterium per unit area was inversely proportional to the increment of the thickness of the sample, and was proportional to the loading temperature. Based on the assumption that a uniform distribution of interstitial sites for deuterium follows the Femi-Dirac statistics, the result of TDS demonstrated that the CuCrZr alloy has two types of trapping energies, which were estimated to be 62 and 79 kJ/mol.

  8. Impact of neutron irradiation on thermal helium desorption from iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xunxiang, E-mail: hux1@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Taller, Stephen [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The synergistic effect of neutron irradiation and transmutant helium production is an important concern for the application of iron-based alloys as structural materials in fission and fusion reactors. In this study, we investigated the impact of neutron irradiation on thermal helium desorption behavior in high purity iron. Single crystalline and polycrystalline iron samples were neutron irradiated in HFIR to 5 dpa at 300 °C and in BOR-60 to 16.6 dpa at 386 °C, respectively. Following neutron irradiation, 10 keV He ion implantation was performed at room temperature on both samples to a fluence of 7 × 10{sup 18} He/m{sup 2}. Thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) was conducted to assess the helium diffusion and clustering kinetics by analyzing the desorption spectra. The comparison of He desorption spectra between unirradiated and neutron irradiated samples showed that the major He desorption peaks shift to higher temperatures for the neutron-irradiated iron samples, implying that strong trapping sites for He were produced during neutron irradiation, which appeared to be nm-sized cavities through TEM examination. The underlying mechanisms controlling the helium trapping and desorption behavior were deduced by assessing changes in the microstructure, as characterized by TEM, of the neutron irradiated samples before and after TDS measurements.

  9. Helium desorption in EFDA iron materials for use in nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar R, A. R.; Pinedo V, J. L.; Sanchez, F. J.; Ibarra, A.; Vila, R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the implantation with monoenergetic ions (He + ) was realized with an energy of 5 KeV in iron samples (99.9999 %) EFDA (European Fusion Development Agreement) using a collimated beam, after this a Thermal Desorption Spectrometry of Helium (THeDS) was made using a leak meter that detects amounts of helium of up to 10 - - 12 mbar l/s. Doses with which the implantation was carried out were 2 x 10 15 He + /cm 2 , 1 x 10 16 He + /cm 2 , 2 x 10 16 He + /cm 2 , 1 x 10 17 He + /cm 2 during times of 90 s, 450 s, 900 s and 4500 s, respectively. Also, using the SRIM program was calculated the depth at which the helium ions penetrate the sample of pure ion, finding that the maximum distance is 0.025μm in the sample. For this study, 11 samples of Fe EFDA were prepared to find defects that are caused after implantation of helium in order to provide valuable information to the manufacture of materials for future fusion reactors. However understand the effects of helium in the micro structural evolution and mechanical properties of structural materials are some of the most difficult questions to answer in materials research for nuclear fusion. When analyzing the spectra of THeDS was found that five different groups of desorption peaks existed, which are attributed to defects of He caused in the material, these defects are He n V (2≤n≤6), He n V m , He V for the groups I, II and IV respectively. These results are due to the comparison of the peaks presented in the desorption spectrum of He, with those of other authors who have made theoretical calculations. Is important to note that the thermal desorption spectrum of helium was different depending on the dose with which the implantation of He + was performed. (Author)

  10. Treatment of Y-12 storm sewer sediments and DARA soils by thermal desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.I.; Shealy, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    The 1992 Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) listed a number of mixed wastes, subject to land disposal restrictions (LDR), for which no treatment method had been identified, and required DOE to develop strategies for treatment and ultimate disposal of those wastes. This paper presents the results of a program to demonstrate that thermal desorption can remove both organics and mercury from two mixed wastes from the DOE Y-12 facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first waste, the Y-12 Storm Sewer Sediments (SSSs) was a sediment generated from upgrades to the plant storm sewer system. This material contained over 4 percent mercury, 2 percent uranium and 350 mg/kg polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Leachable mercury exceeded toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and LDR criteria. The second waste, the Disposal Area Remedial Action (DARA) Soils, are contaminated with uranium, mercury and PCBs. This treatability study included bench-scale testing of a thermal desorption process. Results of the testing showed that, for the SSSs, total mercury could be reduced to 120 mg/kg by treatment at 600 degrees C, which is at the high end of the temperature range for typical thermal desorption systems. Leachable TCLP mercury was less than 50 μg/L and PCBs were below 2 mg/kg. Treatment of the DARA Soils at 450 degrees C for 10 minutes resulted in residual PCBs of 0.6 to 3.0 mg/kg. This is too high (goal < 2mg/kg) and higher treatment temperatures are needed. The testing also provided information on the characteristics and quantities of residuals from the thermal desorption process

  11. Particle desorption mass spectrometric surface characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing 252 Cf-Particle Desorption Mass Spectrometry (PDMS) to characterize the surface region of solid samples has been evaluated. The PDMS experiment was adapted to an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment and was configured so as to allow the analysis of thick as well as thin samples. This apparatus included an in situ sputter cleaning/depth profiling facility. The mass resolution was variable from 300 to 200 at 133 daltons by changing the drift length from 27 cm to 20 cm. Desorbed ions were focused by using either a dual grid assembly or an einzel lens. The overall instrumental transmission efficiency with the einzel lens operative was approximately 50%. The applicability of 252 Cf-PDMS to samples that were thick and insulating was demonstrated in the analysis of geological specimens. Pollucite, Microcline, Amblygonite, and Lepidolite were analyzed without complications associated with sample thickness or charge accumulation. Substitution occurring between the alkali metals in the environment was observed by PDMS and was corroborated by SIMS, XPS, and EMP analyses. The analysis of NBM SRM glasses addressed the suitability of combining the PDMS technique was sputter etching. This application demonstrated the ability of this technique to sense changes in the chemical environment brought about by sputter cleaning. The analysis of these samples also allowed the estimation of detection limits for lithium, rubidium, and cesium in a glass matrix as 300 ppm, 400 ppm, and 400 ppm, respectively. Sputter depth profiling combined with 252 Cf-PDMS analysis of an aluminum layer on a silicon substrate established the utility of the PDMS technique in surface characterization

  12. Rotational state modification and fast ortho-para conversion of H2 trapped within the highly anisotropic potential of Pd(210)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, S.; Ivanov, D.; Ogura, S.; Wilde, M.; Arguelles, E. F.; Diño, W. A.; Kasai, H.; Fukutani, K.

    2018-02-01

    The rotational state and ortho-para conversion of H2 on a Pd(210) surface is investigated with rotational-state-selective temperature-programmed desorption (RS-TPD) and theoretical calculations. The isotope dependence of TPD shows a higher desorption energy for D2 than that for H2, which is ascribed to the rotational and zero-point vibrational energies. The RS-TPD data show that the desorption energy of H2(J =1 ) (J : rotational quantum number) is higher than that of H2(J =0 ). This is due to the orientationally anisotropic potential confining the adsorbed H2, which is in agreement with theoretical calculations. Furthermore, the H2 desorption intensity ratio in J =1 and J =0 indicates fast ortho-para conversion in the adsorption state, which we estimate to be of the order of 1 s.

  13. Adsorption and desorption dynamics of citric acid anions in soil

    KAUST Repository

    Oburger, E.

    2011-07-26

    The functional role of organic acid anions in soil has been intensively investigated, with special focus on (i) microbial respiration and soil carbon dynamics, (ii) nutrient solubilization or (iii) metal detoxification and reduction of plant metal uptake. Little is known about the interaction dynamics of organic acid anions with the soil matrix and the potential impact of adsorption and desorption processes on the functional significance of these effects. The aim of this study was to characterize experimentally the adsorption and desorption dynamics of organic acid anions in five agricultural soils differing in iron and aluminium oxide contents and using citrate as a model carboxylate. Results showed that both adsorption and desorption processes were fast in all soils, reaching a steady state within approximately 1 hour. However, for a given total soil citrate concentration (ct) the steady state was critically dependent on the starting conditions of the experiment, whether most of the citrate was initially present in solution (cl) or held on the solid phase (cs). Specifically, desorption-led processes resulted in significantly smaller steady-state solution concentrations than adsorption-led processes, indicating that hysteresis occurred. As it is not possible to distinguish between different adsorption and desorption pools in soil experimentally, a new dynamic hysteresis model that relies only on measured soil solution concentrations was developed. The model satisfactorily explained experimental data and was able to predict dynamic adsorption and desorption behaviour. To demonstrate its use, we applied the model to two relevant situations involving exudation and microbial degradation. The study highlighted the complex nature of citrate adsorption and desorption dynamics in soil. We conclude that existing models need to incorporate both temporal and hysteresis components to describe realistically the role and fate of organic acids in soil processes. © 2011 The

  14. The laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectra of some methylated xanthines and the laser desorption of caffeine and theophylline from thin layer chromatography plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kevin; Milnes, John; Gormally, John

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption/laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and xanthine are reported. These mass spectra are compared with published spectra obtained using electron impact ionization. Mass spectra of caffeine and theophylline obtained by IR laser desorption from thin layer chromatography plates are also described. The laser desorption of materials from thin layer chromatography plates is discussed.

  15. The desorption of caesium from Peach Bottom HTGR steam generator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, M.J.

    1979-03-01

    The work at Harwell on the Peach Bottom End-of-Life Program in co-operation with the General Atomic Company (U.S.A.) is described. Materials taken from the Economiser, Evaporator and Superheater Sections of the Peach Bottom Unit No. 1. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Heat Exchanger were placed in a reducing atmosphere comparable to the composition of an HTGR helium coolant gas, and the desorption of caesium isotopes measured under known conditions of flow, temperature and oxygen pressure. (author)

  16. Adsorption and desorption of radioactive inert gases in various materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butkus, D.

    1999-01-01

    Peculiarities of the 85 Kr and 133 Xe adsorption and desorption processes in active carbon and paraffin are considered in the work. During the desorption process, the distribution of 85 Kr and 133 Xe atoms in active carbon particles is uneven: atoms in narrow micropores desorb the last. It is shown that by changing adsorption conditions the presence time of radioactive inert gases in an active carbon can be prolonged. The adsorption and desorption processes change in the adsorbent, which changes its aggregation state: adsorption occurs in a liquid absorbent and desorption - in a solid absorbent. Paraffin is just such an absorbent changing its aggregation state with low energy losses. It has been obtained that 133 Xe accumulates less in liquid paraffin that in an active carbon. The absorption of 85 Kr in paraffin is larger than in an active carbon (at 18-20 degrees Celsius), while desorption is slower. The velocity of radioactive inert gas atom motion in different places of a solid paraffin sample is different - it increases approaching the borders of the sample. Prolongation of the desorption time of radioactive inert gases from adsorbents and adsorbents in many cases is of a practical importance. In this work, it has been shown by model experiments that the intensity of adsorption and desorption processes for the same sorbents can be changed. Desorption intensity changes are related to the distribution of gas atoms on the surface of particles and in micropores. Desorption velocity decreases if inert gas atoms having entered micropores are 'closed' by condensed liquids in the environment. In this case an inert gas atom diffuses within the whole particle volume or through the condensed liquid. Radioactive inert gases 85 Kr and 133 Xe are absorbed not only in liquid paraffin but in solid one as well. Therefore, after a paraffin sample is hermetically closed in a glass dish, 85 Kr (gas) having diffused from this sample is repeatedly absorbed in it. The 85 Kr

  17. Sorption-desorption behavior of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olshansky, Yaniv; Polubesova, Tamara; Vetter, Walter; Chefetz, Benny

    2011-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that are commonly found in commercial and household products. These compounds are considered persistent organic pollutants. In this study, we used 4,4'-dibromodiphenyl ether (BDE-15) as a model compound to elucidate the sorption and desorption behavior of PBDEs in soils. The organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficient (K OC ) of BDE-15 was more than three times higher for humin than for bulk soils. However, pronounced desorption hysteresis was obtained mainly for bulk soils. For humin, increasing concentration of sorbed BDE-15 resulted in decreased desorption. Our data illustrate that BDE-15 and probably other PBDEs exhibit high sorption affinity to soils. Moreover, sorption is irreversible and thus PBDEs can potentially accumulate in the topsoil layer. We also suggest that although humin is probably a major sorbent for PBDEs in soils, other humic materials are also responsible for their sequestration. - Highlights: → BDE-15 exhibited pronounced desorption hysteresis. → BDE-15 sowed higher sorption affinity to humin as compared to the bulk soils. → Sequestration of PBDEs depends on soil organic matter constitutes other than humin. - Pronounced desorption hysteresis was observed for BDE-15 in natural soils.

  18. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano André Petter

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1. In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron, total organic carbon, fulvic acid, humic acid and humin, pH and partition coefficient to organic carbon were evaluated. The Freundlich isotherm was adjusted appropriately to describe diuron sorption kinetics in all the studied treatments. The application of biochar provided increment in the sorption (Kf and reduction in the desorption of diuron in 64 and 44%, respectively. This effect is attributed to the biochar contribution to the total organic carbon and C-humin and of these to diuron through hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds. The positive correlation between the partition coefficient to organic carbon and Kf confirms the importance of soil organic compartment in the sorption of diuron. There was no competition of NPK fertilizer for the same sorption site of diuron. The increase and reduction in sorption and desorption, respectively, show that the application of biochar is an important alternative for the remediation of soil leaching of diuron, especially in sandy soils.

  19. Desorption of absorbed iron in bean root and leaf tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jooste, J.H.; De Bruyn, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of different desorption media on the amount of absorbed Fe (from a solution of FeCl 3 in 0,5 mM CaCl 2 ) retained by leaf discs and excised root tips of bean plants was investigated. Attempts were also made to determine the effect of desorption on the intracellular distribution of Fe. Desorption in water or an FeCl 3 solution had no pronounced effect on the amount of absorbed Fe retained by either the leaf or root tissues. However, Na 2 -EDTA was able to desorb a considerable portion of the absorbed Fe, especially in root tissue. This applies to Fe absorbed from solutions of FeCl 3 and Fe-EDDHA. Desorption by the chelate removed Fe from practically all the different particulate fractions of both root and leaf tissues, but desorption following the longer absorption periods resulted in an increase in the Fe content of the 'soluble' fraction. The possibility that Na 2 -EDTA causes an increased permeability of cell membranes seems likely. The view that removal of Ca by the chelate causes this increase in permeability could not be confirmed [af

  20. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F., E-mail: francois.dulieu@obspm.fr [LERMA, Université de Cergy Pontoise et Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8112 du CNRS. 5, mail Gay Lussac, 95031 Cergy Pontoise (France)

    2014-07-07

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O{sub 2}) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N{sub 2} on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  1. Sorption-desorption dynamics of radiocaesium in organic matter soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcke, E.; Cremers, A.

    1994-01-01

    A systematic study has been carried out on the radiocaesium sorption properties of 25 soils (forest, peat) covering organic matter (OM) contents in the range of 10-97%. Predictions are made for radiocaesium partitioning between micaceous Frayed Edge Sites (FES) and regular exchange sites (RES) on the basis of specific radiocaesium interception potentials of the soil and overall exchange capacity. It is shown that for soils with a very high OM content (>80%), significant fractions are present in a readily reversible form in the OM phase. In soils of low-medium OM content (<40%), only a very minor fraction is present in the OM exchange complex. Experimental findings, based on a desorption screening with a variety of desorption agents are in agreement with these predictions. On the basis of a study of sorption kinetics, some additional tools are available for identifying problem soils. In cases of very high OM content, radiocaesium adsorption is completed within hours demonstrating the involvement of the OM sites. In soils for which interception occurs in the FES, sorption continues to proceed for periods of 2-3 weeks. In conclusion, some examples are presented on radiocaesium desorption using ion exchangers as radiocaesium sinks in promoting desorption. For a peaty soil, near quantitative desorption is accomplished. For forest soils with OM contents in a range of 10-40%, fixation levels of 30-50% are demonstrated

  2. VAC*TRAX - Thermal desorption for mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElwee, M.J.; Palmer, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    The patented VAC*TRAX process was designed in response to the need to remove organic constituents from mixed waste, waste that contains both a hazardous (RCRA or TSCA regulated) component and a radioactive component. Separation of the mixed waste into its hazardous and radioactive components allows for ultimate disposal of the material at existing, permitted facilities. The VAC*TRAX technology consists of a jacketed vacuum dryer followed by a condensing train. Solids are placed in the dryer and indirectly heated to temperatures as high as 260 degrees C, while a strong vacuum (down to 50 mm Hg absolute pressure) is applied to the system and the dryer is purged with a nitrogen carrier gas. The organic contaminants in the solids are thermally desorbed, swept up in the carrier gas and into the condensing train where they are cooled and recovered. The dryer is fitted with a filtration system that keeps the radioactive constituents from migrating to the condensate. As such, the waste is separated into hazardous liquid and radioactive solid components, allowing for disposal of these streams at a permitted incinerator or a radioactive materials landfill, respectively. The VAC*TRAX system is designed to be highly mobile, while minimizing the operational costs with a simple, robust process. These factors allow for treatment of small waste streams at a reasonable cost. This paper describes the VAC*TRAX thermal desorption process, as well as results from the pilot testing program. Also, the design and application of the full-scale treatment system is presented. Materials tested to date include spiked soil and debris, power plant trash and sludge contaminated with solvents, PCB contaminated soil, solvent-contaminated uranium mill-tailings, and solvent and PCB-contaminated sludge and trash. Over 70 test runs have been performed using the pilot VAC*TRAX system, with more than 80% of the tests using mixed waste as the feed material

  3. Study of defects near molybdenum surface using thermal desorption spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, P.K.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectrometry is utilized to study the migration of atoms and defects near molybdenum surface. The thermal desorption spectra of inert gas ions (neon, argon and krypton) injected with various energies (430-1950 eV) into a polycrystalline molybdenum target with various dosages (6.4 x 10sup(12) - 3.9 x 10sup(14) ions/cmsup(2)) are investigated. Four different states of binding of the trapped atoms corresponding to the activation energies for desorption have been revealed from the spectra. The activation energies are found to be relatively insensitive to the species of the bombarding ion, incident ion energy and the dosage. The patterns of the spectra are strongly influenced by the mean projected range of the ions into the solid. The activation energies deduced are in good agreement with those reported for the migration of atoms and defects in molybdenum. (auth.)

  4. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  5. Study of the mechanisms of matrix assisted laser desorption / ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuelli, Pascal

    1995-01-01

    This research thesis aims at a better knowledge of some aspects of a complex mechanism: the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). The author first proposes a comparative analysis of results obtained by time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry and by Fourier transform mass spectrometry. He reports the study of the matrix role (notably a polymeric matrix) as a matter submitted to laser desorption. In this respect, the influence of the incident wavelength has been studied. The author also reports a comparative of ions produced by matrix laser desorption (study performed by Fourier transform mass spectrometry) and of neutral molecules (study performed by flash pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography and with mass spectrometry). Finally, results obtained on derivatives and complexes based on beta-cyclodextrins highlight benefits as well as limitations of this technique [fr

  6. Electron stimulated desorption of gases at technological surfaces of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, M.Q.; Williams, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    The release of gas by electron bombardment at aluminium alloy surfaces in vacuum -9 torr has been investigated for a range of treatments including bakeout and glow discharge cleaning. Particular attention has been given to the role of continuous electron bombardment, with current densities and electron energies of up to 1.5 mA cm -2 and 2.0 keV, respectively, over the 10 cm 2 of surface area under irradiation. The observations of desorption efficiency, defined as the number of desorbed molecules per incident electron, conform to a model involving a dynamic balance between adsorption and desorption, with contributions to adsorption from both surface and sub-surface gas. Continuous electron bombardment promotes a surface with low desorption efficiency, -5 mol/electron, however, the conditioning cycle is accelerated significantly by glow discharge treatment. There is evidence of some short-term memory when the samples are exposed to air. (author)

  7. Analysis of the technique Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) and its Application for the Characterization of Metal -Hydrogen Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental developments made to study the desorption of hydrogen from metallic samples by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS). With this technique gas desorption is stimulated by the programmed heating of the sample. To perform the study we set up a newly designed equipment and develop theoretical models of the kinetic processes involved. The equipment and the models are used to analyze the desorption process in a real system. We begin by analyzing the models developed to interpret the results of the experiments. These models consider simultaneously bulk diffusion and surface reaction processes in metal-hydrogen systems with one or two thermodynamic phases. We present numerical results, computer simulations and analytical approximations of the original models. Based on these results we analyze the main features of the spectra for the different relevant kinetic processes, and determine the changes induced in them when material parameters (activation energies, geometry) or experimental parameters (heating speed, initial concentration) are modified.We present the original equipment, designed and constructed during this work to perform the TDS experiments. We describe its main characteristics, its components, its range of operation and its sensibility. We also offer an analysis of the background spectrum. We use the Pd-H system to test the equipment and the models. The samples chosen, powders, granules, foils and wires, were previously characterized to analyze their composition, their morphology and their characteristic size. We show the results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observation, X ray diffraction (XRD) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) analysis.We then present and analyze in depth the experimental desorption spectra of the palladium powder. Based on the analysis we determine the rate limiting step for desorption and the characteristic activation energies. When the system is on the b phase (hydride) the rate

  8. Coverage dependent desorption dynamics of deuterium on Si(100) surfaces: interpretation with a diffusion-promoted desorption model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, T; Niida, T; Tsurumaki, H; Namiki, A

    2005-01-08

    We studied coverage dependence of time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of D2 molecules thermally desorbed from the D/Si(100) surface. The mean translational energies Et of desorbed D2 molecules were found to increase from 0.20+/-0.05 eV to 0.40+/-0.04 eV as the desorption coverage window was decreased from 1.0 ML> or =thetaD> or =0.9 ML to 0.2 ML> or =thetaD> or =0 ML, being consistent with the kinetics switch predicted in the interdimer mechanism. The measured TOF spectra were deconvoluted into 2H, 3H, and 4H components by a curve fitting method along the principle of detailed balance. As a result, it turned out that the desorption kinetics changes from the 4H to the 3H situation at high coverage above thetaD=0.9 ML, while the 2H desorption is dominant for a quite wide coverage region up to thetaD=0.8 ML. A dynamic desorption mechanism by which the desorption is promoted by D-atom diffusion to dangling bonds was proposed. 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Long-term desorption of trichloroethylene from flint clay using multiplexed optical detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stager, M.P.; Perram, G.P.

    1999-01-01

    The long-term desorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) from powdered flint clay was examined using a multiplexed, phase sensitive infrared technique which provided a gas phase detection limit of 0.0045 torr for continuous monitoring of the desorption process for at least 3 days. The vapor phase TCE concentrations as a function of desorption time exhibit a significant deviation from Langmuir kinetics. The desorption process is adequately described by bonding sites with a gamma distribution for the desorption rate coefficients. The mean desorption rate for powdered flint clay at 25°C is k d = 0.50 ± 0.02 h −1 . (author)

  10. Modelling of Convective Process of Water Desorption from Polystyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stakic, M.; Nikolic, A.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a mathematical model developed to evaluate the influence of structural and operational factors on convective dehydration process (desorption of liquid phase from capillary-porous material), as well as the possibility to utilize this model for the case of water desorption from polystyrene cation resin CG-8. The model accounts for unsteady one-dimensional simultaneous heat and mass transfer between the gas (air) and the solid phase (resin). The identification of effective transport properties for the considered fixed bed of material (resin CG 8) is discussed. To this purpose available data from the literature are used. (author)

  11. Sorption and desorption of diuron in Oxisol under biochar application

    OpenAIRE

    Petter,Fabiano André; Ferreira,Tamara Santos; Sinhorin,Adilson Paulo; Lima,Larissa Borges de; Morais,Leidimar Alves de; Pacheco,Leandro Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to verify the kinetics of sorption and desorption of diuron in an Oxisol under application of biochar. The samples were collected in a field experiment conducted in randomized design blocks consisted of 2 base fertilization levels (0 and 400 kg∙ha−1 NPK 00-20-20 fertilizer formula) and 3 doses of biochar (0, 8 and 16 Mg∙ha−1). In the evaluation of sorption and desorption, Batch Equilibrium method was used. The kinetics of sorpti...

  12. Counterion adsorption and desorption rate of a charged macromolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Yang, Jingfa; Zhao, Jiang

    The rate constant of counterion adsorption to and desorption from a synthetic polyelectrolyte, polystyrene sulfonate (PSS-), is measured in aqueous solution by single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that both adsorption and desorption rate of counterions have strong dependence on polymer concentration, salt concentration as well as the molecular weight of polyelectrolytes. The results clearly demonstrate that the contribution of electrostatic interaction and the translational entropy to the distribution of counterions of a polyelectrolyte molecule. The information is helpful to the understanding of polyelectrolyte physics. National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  13. Heavy-Ion-Induced Electronic Desorption of Gas from Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Molvik, A W; Mahner, E; Kireeff Covo, M; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Krämer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2007-01-01

    During heavy-ion operation in several particle accelerators worldwide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion-induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dEe/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  14. Bulk-mediated surface diffusion: non-Markovian desorption dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revelli, Jorge A; Budde, Carlos E; Prato, Domingo; Wio, Horacio S

    2005-01-01

    Here we analyse the dynamics of adsorbed molecules within the bulk-mediated surface diffusion framework, when the particle's desorption mechanism is characterized by a non-Markovian process, while the particle's adsorption as well as its motion in the bulk is governed by Markovian dynamics. We study the diffusion of particles in both semi-infinite and finite cubic lattices, analysing the conditional probability to find the system on the reference absorptive plane as well as the surface dispersion as functions of time. The results are compared with known Markovian cases showing the differences that can be exploited to distinguish between Markovian and non-Markovian desorption mechanisms in experimental situations

  15. Anomalous low-temperature desorption from preirradiated rare gas solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchenko, E.V.; Gumenchuk, G.B.; Yurtaeva, E.M.; Belov, A.G.; Khyzhniy, I.V.; Frankowski, M.; Beyer, M.K.; Smith-Gicklhorn, A.M.; Ponomaryov, A.N.; Bondybey, V.E.

    2005-01-01

    The role for the exciton-induced defects in the stimulation of anomalous low-temperature desorption of the own lattice atoms from solid Ar and Ne preirradiated by an electron beam is studied. The free electrons from shallow traps-structural defects-was monitored by the measurements of a yield of the thermally induced exoelectron emission (TSEE). The reaction of recombination of self-trapped holes with electrons is considered as a source of energy needed for the desorption of atoms from the surface of preirradiated solids. A key part of the exciton-induced defects in the phenomenon observed is demonstrated

  16. Stable Isotope Systematics of Coalbed Gas during Desorption and Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Niemann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The stable carbon isotope ratios of coalbed methane (CBM demonstrate diagnostic changes that systematically vary with production and desorption times. These shifts can provide decisive, predictive information on the behaviour and potential performance of CBM operations. Samples from producing CBM wells show a general depletion in 13C-methane with increasing production times and corresponding shifts in δ13C-CH4 up to 35.8‰. Samples from canister desorption experiments show mostly enrichment in 13C for methane with increasing desorption time and isotope shifts of up to 43.4‰. Also, 13C-depletion was observed in some samples with isotope shifts of up to 32.1‰. Overall, the magnitudes of the observed isotope shifts vary considerably between different sample sets, but also within samples from the same source. The δ13C-CH4 values do not have the anticipated signature of methane generated from coal. This indicates that secondary processes, including desorption and diffusion, can influence the values. It is also challenging to deconvolute these various secondary processes because their molecular and isotope effects can have similar directions and/or magnitudes. In some instances, significant alteration of CBM gases has to be considered as a combination of secondary alteration effects.

  17. Solid Waste Decontamination by Thermal Desorption and Catalytic Oxidation Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolcová, Olga; Topka, Pavel; Soukup, Karel; Jirátová, Květa; Váňová, H.; Kaštánek, František

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 9 (2014), s. 1279-1282 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/059 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thermal desorption * catalytic oxidation * soil decontamination Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2014

  18. Bacterial desorption from food container and food processing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEldowney, S; Fletcher, M

    1988-03-01

    The desorption ofStaphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and a coryneform from the surfaces of materials used for manufacturing food containers (glass, tin plate, and polypropylene) or postprocess canning factory conveyor belts (stainless steel and nylon) was investigated. The effect of time, pH, temperature, and adsorbed organic layers on desorption was studied.S. aureus did not detach from the substrata at any pH investigated (between pH 5 and 9).A. calcoaceticus and the coryneform in some cases detached, depending upon pH and substratum composition. The degree of bacterial detachment from the substrata was not related to bacterial respiration at experimental pH values. Bacterial desorption was not affected by temperature (4-30°C) nor by an adsorbed layer of peptone and yeast extract on the substrata. The results indicate that bacterial desorption, hence bacterial removal during cleaning or their transfer via liquids flowing over colonized surfaces, is likely to vary with the surface composition and the bacterial species colonizing the surfaces.

  19. Organic contaminants in soil : desorption kinetics and microbial degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlebaum, W.

    1999-01-01

    The availability of organic contaminants in soils or sediments for microbial degradation or removal by physical means (e.g.) soil washing or soil venting) depends on the desorption kinetics of these contaminants from the soil matrix. When the organic contaminants desorb very slow from the

  20. Influence of pre-treatments on the desorption isotherm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of pre-treatments on the desorption isotherm characteristics of plaintain. P-N T Johnson. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/gjs.v39i1.15851 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for ...

  1. Electron Stimulated Desorption of Condensed Gases on Cryogenic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tratnik, H; Hilleret, Noël

    2005-01-01

    In ultra-high vacuum systems outgassing from vacuum chamber walls and desorption from surface adsorbates are usually the factors which in°uence pressure and residual gas composition. In particular in beam vacuum systems of accelerators like the LHC, where surfaces are exposed to intense synchro- tron radiation and bombardment by energetic ions and electrons, properties like the molecular desorption yield or secondary electron yield can strongly in°uence the performance of the accelerator. In high-energy particle accelerators operating at liquid helium temperature, cold surfaces are exposed to the bombardment of energetic photons, electrons and ions. The gases released by the subsequent desorption are re-condensed on the cold surfaces and can be re-desorbed by the impinging electrons and ions. The equilibrium coverage reached on the surfaces exposed to the impact of energetic particles depends on the desorption yield of the condensed gases and can a®ect the operation of the accelerator by modifying th...

  2. Sorption and desorption of arsenate and arsenite on calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Diederik Jan; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(111)) oil calcite was investigated in a series of batch experiments in calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions covered a broad range of pH, alkalinity, calcium concentration and ionic strength. The initial arsenic...

  3. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam degradates in several agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Gonçalves Alonso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Processes regulating pesticide fate in the environment are influenced by the physicochemical properties of pesticides and soils. Sorption and desorption are important processes as they regulate the movement of pesticides in soil. Although sorption-desorption is widely studied for herbicides, studies involving their metabolites in soil are scarce. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam metabolites (indaziflam-triazinediamine (FDAT, indaziflam-triazine-indanone (ITI and indaziflam-carboxilic acid (ICA were investigated in six Brazilian (BRA soils and three United States (USA soils with different physicochemical properties. The Freundlich equation described sorption of the metabolites for all soils (R2 > 0.98; 1/n ~ 1. Sorption order (Kf was ITI > ICA > FDAT. Mean values of Kf,oc were 453, 289, and 81 (BRA and 444, 48, and 48 (USA for metabolites ITI, ICA, and FDAT respectively. Desorption was hysteretic for all metabolites in all soils. These results suggest that these metabolites fall in the classification range of mobile to moderately mobile in soils.

  4. Gas desorption properties of ammonia borane and metal hydride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    'Full text': Ammonia borane (NH 3 BH 3 ) has been of great interest owing to its ideal combination of low molecular weight and high H 2 storage capacity of 19.6 mass %, which exceeds the current capacity of gasoline. DOE's year 2015 targets involve gravimetric as well as volumetric energy densities. In this work, we have investigated thermal decomposition of ammonia borane and calcium hydride composites at different molar ratio. The samples were prepared by planetary ball milling under hydrogen gas atmosphere pressure of 1Mpa at room temperature for 2, and 10 hours. The gas desorption properties were examined by thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). The identification of phases was carried out by X-ray diffraction. The results obtain were shown in fig (a),(b),and (c). Hydrogen desorption properties were observed at all molar ratios, but the desorption temperature is significantly lower at around 70 o C at molar ratio 1:1 as shown in fig (c), and unwanted gas (ammonia) emissions were remarkably suppressed by mixing with the calcium hydride. (author)

  5. A monoenergetic electron source generated by nuclear stimulated desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelson, I.; Levy, Y.; Nir, D.; Haustein, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    A series of measurements of nuclear stimulated desorption was performed for 103 Ru, using thin ruthenium films irradiated by thermal neutrons. The magnitude, time dependence and electric charge state of the outgoing 103m Rh flux was investigated. The utilization of monoenergetic electrons accompanying the 103 Rh decay for thin film thickness measurement is considered. (Author)

  6. Water absorption and desorption in shuttle ablator and insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Smith, C. F.; Wooden, V. A.; Cothren, B. E.; Gregory, H.

    1982-01-01

    Shuttle systems ablator and insulation materials underwent water soak with subsequent water desorption in vacuum. Water accumulation in these materials after a soak for 24 hours ranged from +1.1% for orbiter tile to +161% for solid rocket booster MSA-1. After 1 minute in vacuum, water retention ranged from none in the orbiter tile to +70% for solid rocket booster cork.

  7. PAH desorption from river floodplain soils using supercritical fluid extraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, Y.; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Hofmann, T.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 156, č. 3 (2008), s. 745-752 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06156 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : pahs * slow desorption * carbonaceous materials Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.135, year: 2008

  8. Study of boric acid sorption and desorption processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czosnowska, B.; Laren, E.

    1978-01-01

    The results are given of the experimental determination of the effect on the boric acid flow and sorption and desorption efficiency of the flow rate of boric acid at different concentrations through an ion exchange column 10.2 cm 2 in cross section. The strongly alkaline VOFATIT RO ion exchanger was used. (B.S.)

  9. Experimental study on desorption characteristics of SAPO-34 and ZSM-5 zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Z. X.; Zhang, X.; Wang, W. C.; Du, C. X.; Liu, Z. B.; Chen, Y. C.

    2018-03-01

    The dynamic characteristics of SAPO-34 and ZSM-5 zeolite in the desorption process have been experimentally studied with the gravimetric method. The weight change of the test sample was recorded continually for different conditions of temperature and pressure. The curve of the desorption degree with the temperature and the pressure was obtained and discussed. With the intrinsic different micro-structure, the two zeolites showed distinguished characteristics of the desorption. In contrast to an S-shaped desorption curve of the SAPO-34, the ZSM-5 showed an exponential desorption curve. In comparison, the desorption characteristics of the ZSM-5 were better than that of the SAPO-34 in the temperature range of 40 °C 90 °C. Nevertheless, the effect of the pressure on the desorption degree was stronger for the SAPO-34 than for the ZSM-5. Further analysis revealed that the desorption speed was affected more strongly by the temperature than by the pressure.

  10. Investigating Superhydrogenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons on HOPG and their catalytic abilities of H2 formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Frederik Doktor Skødt

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and temperature programmed desorption techniques have been used to investigate adsorption and abstraction of hydrogen atoms on the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, coronene. The coronene molecules were exposed to different hydrogen fluences at a dosing temperature......). Both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) techniques have been used. Coronene monolayers were prepared on graphite and exposed to different fluences of 1000K H or D atoms. STM images show brigth spots on the coronene monolayers after hydrogenation indicating...... calcutions have also been made on desorption of H from a fully hydrogenated coronene molecule. The desorption DFT calculation reveals a favourable desorption route and stable configurations consistent with our TPD measurements[5]. References [1] Tielens, A., Reviews of Modern Physics, 85 (2013) 1021-1081 [2...

  11. Sorption and desorption of carbamazepine from water by smectite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihao; Ding, Yunjie; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Li, Hui

    2010-11-01

    Carbamazepine is a prescription anticonvulsant and mood stabilizing pharmaceutical administered to humans. Carbamazepine is persistent in the environment and frequently detected in water systems. In this study, sorption and desorption of carbamazepine from water was measured for smectite clays with the surface negative charges compensated with K+, Ca2+, NH4+, tetramethylammonium (TMA), trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) cations. The magnitude of sorption followed the order: TMPA-smectite≥HDTMA-smectite>NH4-smectite>K-smectite>Ca-smectite⩾TMA-smectite. The greatest sorption of carbamazepine by TMPA-smectite is attributed to the interaction of conjugate aromatic moiety in carbamazepine with the phenyl ring in TMPA through π-π interaction. Partitioning process is the primary mechanism for carbamazepine uptake by HDTMA-smectite. For NH4-smectite the urea moiety in carbamazepine interacts with exchanged cation NH4+ by H-bonding hence demonstrating relatively higher adsorption. Sorption by K-, Ca- and TMA-smectites from water occurs on aluminosilicate mineral surfaces. These results implicate that carbamazepine sorption by soils occurs primarily in soil organic matter, and soil mineral fractions play a secondary role. Desorption of carbamazepine from the sorbents manifested an apparent hysteresis. Increasing irreversibility of desorption vs. sorption was observed for K-, Ca-, TMA-, TMPA- and HDTMA-clays as aqueous carbamazepine concentrations increased. Desorption hysteresis of carbamazepine from K-, Ca-, NH4-smectites was greater than that from TMPA- and HDTMA-clays, suggesting that the sequestrated carbamazepine molecules in smectite interlayers are more resistant to desorption compared to those sorbed by organic phases in smectite clays. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigations into ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heise, Theodore W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) is a technique for converting large biomolecules into gas phase ions. Some characteristics of the commonly used uv matrices are determined. Solubilities in methanol range from 0.1 to 0.5 M. Solid phase absorption spectra are found to be similar to solution, but slightly red-shifted. Acoustic and quartz crystal microbalance signals are investigated as possible means of uv-MALD quantitation. Evidence for the existence of desorption thresholds is presented. Threshold values are determined to be in the range of 2 to 3 MW/cm2. A transient imaging technique based on laser-excited fluorescence for monitoring MALD plumes is described. Sensitivity is well within the levels required for studying matrix-assisted laser desorption, where analyte concentrations are significantly lower than those in conventional laser desorption. Results showing the effect of film morphology, particularly film thickness, on plume dynamics are presented. In particular, MALD plumes from thicker films tend to exhibit higher axial velocities. Fluorescent labeling of protein and of DNA is used to allow imaging of their uv-MALD generated plumes. Integrated concentrations are available with respect to time, making it possible to assess the rate of fragmentation. The spatial and temporal distributions are important for the design of secondary ionization schemes to enhance ion yields and for the optimization of ion collection in time-of-flight MS instruments to maximize resolution. Such information could also provide insight into whether ionization is closely associated with the desorption step or whether it is a result of subsequent collisions with the matrix gas (e.g., proton transfer). Although the present study involves plumes in a normal atmosphere, adaptation to measurements in vacuum (e.g., inside a mass spectrometer) should be straightforward.

  13. Nuclear stimulated desorption as a potential tool for surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nir, Dror.

    1993-03-01

    The described research work constitutes a base for an experimental method to be implemented in the study of solid surfaces. Nuclear Stimulated Desorption (NSD) is a new mode of experimentation in thin film and surface physics. It Is based on the interplay between nuclear phenomena (reactions and spontaneous decays), and atomic - scale induced effects on surfaces and very thin films. One may distinguish between two generically different relationships between the two. First, the dynamics of the nuclear reaction -primarily the recoil of the nucleus - may effect the position of the atom or molecule containing it. Second, the nuclear reaction (or decay) may serve as an analytical indicator of the whereabouts of the atom, or molecule, in question. In nuclear stimulated desorption, both thee aspects combine in an essential way. Namely, one employs a series of two consecutive decays (normally weak decays or isomeric transition) . The first of these decays causes the nucleus to desorb from a surface onto which it had been placed; the second serves to determine the position of the daughter and thereby the characteristics of the primary desorption . The essential feature in NSD is that it occurs almost exclusively from the outermost surface layer. This is because we choose to work with nuclei whose recoil energy Is of the same order of magnitude of the binding energy of the atom to the surface . Furthermore, the desorption probability and its angular (and temporal) characteristics, depend on the features (topology, morphology) of its immediate neighborhood. This work describes experiments which were designed to give relevant, phenomenological information about the outgoing flux of the radioactive daughters (for specifically chosen nuclear species) , and in particular the magnitude of the flux, its time dependence and its charged state. In addition. the basic phenomena itself is being distinguished from competing processes (thermal desorption, in particular). We will now

  14. Desorption process of hydrogen starting from the Mg2NiH4 and Mg2NiH0.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iturbe G, J.L.; Basurto S, R.; Lopez M, B.E.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the desorption velocity of H 2 was determined starting from the magnesium nickel hydride once the reaction between the intermetallic and the hydrogen was realized, the compound were analysed by means of a thermogravimetric equipment, the conditions for carrying out the analysis were: 10 C by minute in nitrogen atmosphere at a volume of 50 ml by minute, subsequently the isotherms at different times were programmed and the desorption velocity of hydrogen was determined. The results show that the desorption velocity of hydrogen depends of the temperature, using only the nitrogen flux which acts as a carrier gas. Observing that the hydrogen liberation is carried out by means of two mechanisms according to the isotherms obtained. (Author)

  15. Molecular desorption of stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 4.2  MeV/u lead ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mahner

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In preparation for the heavy ion program of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, accumulation and cooling tests with lead ion beams have been performed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2  MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments (glow discharges, nonevaporable getter coating are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H_{2}, CH_{4}, CO, Ar, and CO_{2}. Unexpected large values of molecular yields per incident ion up to 2×10^{4} molecules/ion have been observed. The reduction of the ion-induced desorption yield due to continuous bombardment with lead ions (beam cleaning has been investigated for five different stainless steel vacuum chambers. The implications of these results for the vacuum system of the future Low Energy Ion Ring and possible remedies to reduce the vacuum degradation are discussed.

  16. Adsorption-desorption and leaching of pyraclostrobin in Indian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Navakishore; Gupta, Suman; Gajbhiye, Vijay T

    2013-01-01

    Pyraclostrobin is a new broad-spectrum foliar applied and seed protectant fungicide of the strobilurin group. In this paper, adsorption-desorption of pyraclostrobin has been investigated in three different soils viz. Inceptisol (sandy loam, Delhi), Vertisol (sandy clay, Hyderabad) and Ultisol (sandy clay loam, Thrissur). Effect of organic matter and clay content on sorption was also studied in Inceptisol of Delhi. Leaching potential of pyraclostrobin as influenced by rainfall was studied in intact soil columns to confirm the results of adsorption-desorption studies. The adsorption studies were carried out at initial concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 μg mL(-1). The distribution coefficient (Kd) values in three test soils ranged from 4.91 to 18.26 indicating moderate to high adsorption. Among the three test soils, adsorption was the highest in Ultisol (Kd 18.26), followed by Vertisol (Kd 9.87) and Inceptisol (Kd 4.91). KF value was also highest for Ultisol soil (66.21), followed by Vertisol (40.88) and Inceptisol (8.59). S-type adsorption isotherms were observed in all the three test soils. Kd values in organic carbon-removed soil and clay-removed soil were 3.57 and 2.83 respectively, indicating lower adsorption than normal Inceptisol. Desorption studies were carried out at initial concentrations of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 μg mL(-1). Desorption was the greatest in Inceptisol, followed by Vertisol and Ultisol. Amounts of pyraclostrobin desorbed in three desorption cycles for different concentrations were 23.1-25.3%, 9.4-20.7% and 8.1-13.6% in Inceptisol, Vertisol and Ultisol respectively. Desorption was higher in clay fraction-removed and organic carbonremoved soils than normal Inceptisol. Desorption was slower than adsorption in all the test soils, indicating hysteresis effect (with hysteresis coefficient values varying from 0.05 to 0.20). Low values of hysteresis coefficient suggest high hysteresis effect indicating easy and strong adsorption, and slow

  17. Rate Parameter Distributions for Isobutane Dehydrogenation and Isobutene Dimerization and Desorption over HZSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor C. Brown

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Deconvolution of the evolved isobutene data obtained from temperature-programmed, low-pressure steady-state conversion of isobutane over HZSM-5 has yielded apparent activation energies for isobutane dehydrogenation, isobutene dimerization and desorption. Intrinsic activation energies and associated isobutane collision frequencies are also estimated. A combination of wavelet shrinkage denoising, followed by time-varying flexible least squares of the evolved mass-spectral abundance data over the temperature range 150 to 450 °C, provides accurate, temperature-dependent, apparent rate parameters. Intrinsic activation energies for isobutane dehydrogenation range from 86 to 235.2 kJ mol−1 (average = 150 ± 42 kJ mol−1 for isobutene dimerization from 48.3 to 267 kJ mol−1 (average = 112 ± 74 kJ mol−1 and for isobutene desorption from 64.4 to 97.8 kJ mol−1 (average = 77 ± 12 kJ mol−1. These wide ranges reflect the heterogeneity and acidity of the zeolite surface and structure. Seven distinct locations and sites, including Lewis and Brønsted acid sites can be identified in the profiles. Isobutane collision frequencies range from 10−0.4 to 1022.2 s−1 and are proportional to the accessibility of active sites, within the HZSM-5 micropores or on the external surface.

  18. Photon- and electron-stimulated desorption from laboratory models of interstellar ice grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrower, J. D.; Abdulgalil, A. G. M.; Collings, M. P.; McCoustra, M. R. S.; Burke, D. J.; Brown, W. A.; Dawes, A.; Holtom, P. J.; Kendall, P.; Mason, N. J.; Jamme, F.; Fraser, H. J.; Rutten, F. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    The nonthermal desorption of water from ice films induced by photon and low energy electron irradiation has been studied under conditions mimicking those found in dense interstellar clouds. Water desorption following photon irradiation at 250 nm relies on the presence of an absorbing species within the H 2 O ice, in this case benzene. Desorption cross sections are obtained and used to derive first order rate coefficients for the desorption processes. Kinetic modeling has been used to compare the efficiencies of these desorption mechanisms with others known to be in operation in dense clouds.

  19. Auger decay mechanism in photon-stimulated desorption of ions from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.C.

    1983-11-01

    Photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) of positive ions was studied with synchrotron radiation using an angle-integrating time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ion yields as functions of photon energy near core levels were measured from condensed gases, alkali fluorides, and other alkali and alkaline earth halides. These results are compared to bulk photoabsorption measurements with emphasis on understanding fundamental desorption mechanisms. The applicability of the Auger decay mechanism, in which ion desorption is strictly proportional to surface absorption, is discussed in detail. The Auger decay model is developed in detail to describe Na + and F + desorption from NaF following Na(1s) excitation. The major decay pathways of the Na(1s) hole leading to desorption are described and equations for the energetics of ion desorption are developed. Ion desorption spectra of H + , Li + , and F + are compared to bulk photoabsorption near the F(2s) and Li(1s) edges of LiF. A strong photon beam exposure dependence of ion yields from alkali fluorides is revealed, which may indicate the predominance of metal ion desorption from defect sites. The large role of indirect mechanisms in ion desorption condensed N 2 -O 2 multilayers is demonstrated and discussed. Ion desorption spectra from several alkali halides and alkaline earth halides are compared to bulk photoabsorption spectra. Relative ion yields from BaF 2 and a series of alkali halides are discussed in terms of desorption mechanisms

  20. Adsorption and desorption of phosphorus in ceramic capsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, J.R.F. de.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in order to analyse the capacity of adsorving P from water using ceramic capsules with 32P, in the presence and absence of water flow through the capsule. Also studied was the desorption of 32 P from the capsule in water, with and without water flow. The desorption of residual 32 P was analysed by isotopic exchange with 31 P, also with and without water flow. It was observed that, in the presence of a flow, the capsule retained 32 P from the solution, which was weakly desorbed by water but was isotopically exchanged with 31 P. In the absence of a flow, the capsule was not an efficient P adsorber. (Author) [pt

  1. Energetic particle induced desorption of water vapor cryo-condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.; Owen, L.W.; Simpkins, J.E.; Uckan, T.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    An in-vessel cryo-condensation pump is being designed for the Advanced Divertor configuration of the DIII-D tokamak. To assess the importance of possible desorption of water vapor from the cryogenic surfaces of the pump due to impingement of energetic particles from the plasma, a 77 K surface on which a thin layer of water vapor was condensed was exposed to a tenuous plasma (density = 2 x 10 10 cm -3 , electron temperature = 3 eV). Significant desorption of the condensate occurred, suggesting that impingement of energeticparticles (10 eV) at flux levels of ∼10 16 cm 2 s -1 on cryogenic surfaces could potentially induce impurity problems in the tokamak plasma. A pumping configuration is presented in which this problem is minimized without sacrificing the pumping speed

  2. Investigations on ion-beam induced desorption from cryogenic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    A central component of FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, will be the superconducting heavy ion synchrotron SIS100, which is supposed to provide reliable, high intensity beams for various applications. Its beam intensity is governed by the space charge limit, while the maximum energy is determined by the machine's magnetic rigidity. That means, ions with higher charge state can be accelerated to a higher energy, but with less intensity. For highest intensity beams, intermediate charge states have to be used instead of high charge state ions. This alleviates the issue of space charge but gives rise to dynamic vacuum effects, which also limit beam intensity: beam particles collide with residual gas particles, which leads to charge exchange and their subsequent loss. Impacting on the chamber wall, these ions release adsorbed gas particles. This process is called desorption and leads to a localized increase in pressure, which in turn causes more charge exchange. After a few rounds of self amplification, this can lead to total beam loss. This ''runaway-desorption'' is typically the main beam intensity limiting process for intermediate charge state (heavy) ion beams. The extent of this phenomenon is governed by two factors: the initial beam intensity and the desorption yield. The latter is examined within the scope of this thesis. Special emphasis is placed on the influence of the target's temperature, since the SIS100 will be a superconducting machine with cryogenic vacuum chamber walls. In order to investigate this topic, an experimental setup has been devised, built at the SIS18 and taken into commission. Based on the experience gained during operation, it has been continuously improved and extended. Another central innovation presented in this thesis is the use of gas dynamics simulations for an improved method of data analysis. Using this technique, environmental conditions like the chamber geometry and the connected

  3. Spatially resolved thermal desorption/ionization coupled with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2013-02-26

    A system and method for sub-micron analysis of a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The method includes providing a specimen for evaluation and a thermal desorption probe, thermally desorbing an analyte from a target site of said specimen using the thermally active tip to form a gaseous analyte, ionizing the gaseous analyte to form an ionized analyte, and analyzing a chemical composition of the ionized analyte. The thermally desorbing step can include heating said thermally active tip to above 200.degree. C., and positioning the target site and the thermally active tip such that the heating step forms the gaseous analyte. The thermal desorption probe can include a thermally active tip extending from a cantilever body and an apex of the thermally active tip can have a radius of 250 nm or less.

  4. Electron stimulated desorption study of oxygen adsorption on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, R.H.; Floyd, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on a polycrystalline tungsten surface at approximately 800 K has been studied by means of electron stimulated desorption (ESD). Although precision gas dosing was not employed, the initial sticking probability for dissociative adsorption appears to be essentially unity, while the variation with coverage suggests that a high degree of order exists and that precursor state kinetics are significant. A most noticeable and reproducible discontinuity in ESD parameters occurs at a fractional coverage theta approximately 0.8 (exposure approximately 1.4 X 10 15 molecules/cm 2 incident) which is interpreted as an order-disorder transition within a single (β 1 ) chemisorption state, and results in an increase in the ionic desorption cross-section by a factor of approximately 1.26. A discussion of the adsorption kinetics and the disorder transition is given in terms of current models of dissociative adsoption which include the effects of nearest neighbour lateral interactions. (Auth.)

  5. Unconventional resource's production under desorption-induced effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sina Hosseini Boosari

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a numerical model to study the effect of changes in porosity, permeability and compaction on four major U.S. shale formations considering their Langmuir isotherm desorption behavior. These resources include; Marcellus, New Albany, Barnett and Haynesville Shales. First, we introduced a model that is a physical transport of single-phase gas flow in shale porous rock. Later, the governing equations are implemented into a one-dimensional numerical model and solved using a fully implicit solution method. It is found that the natural gas production is substantially affected by desorption-induced porosity/permeability changes and geomechancis. This paper provides valuable insights into accurate modeling of unconventional reservoirs that is more significant when an even small correction to the future production prediction can enormously contribute to the U.S. economy.

  6. Desorption and ionization processes in laser mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyl, G.J.Q. van der.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis results are reported from a study on the desorption- and ionization process initiated by infra-red laser irradiation (LDMS) or ion bombardment (SIMS) of thin organic sample layers. The study is especially focused on the formation of quasimolecular ions under these conditions. Results of these investigations can be used for a better optimization of the LDMS and SIMS techniques in organic mass spectrometry. First, an overview is given of laser desorption mass spectrometry. Next, the coupling of the laser energy into the organic sample layer is investigated. It is concluded that the laser energy is primarily absorbed by the substrate material and not by the organic overlayer. The formation of quasi-molecular ions, either in the gas phase or in the substrate surface is investigated. The final section reports kinetic energy distributions for ions sputtered from organic solids and liquids. (Auth.)

  7. Hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of U2Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Tanaka, Satoru; Yamawaki, Michio

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of U 2 Ti intermetallic compound was examined over the temperature range of 298 to 973 K and at hydrogen pressures below 10 5 Pa. It absorbs hydrogen up to 7.6 atoms per F.U. (formula unit) by two step reactions and hence each desorption isotherm is separated into two plateau regions. In the first plateau, a newly-found ternary hydride is formed, where the hydrogen concentration, c H , reaches 2.4 H atoms/F.U. In the second plateau, UH 3 is formed and c H reaches 7.6 H atoms/F.U. The specimen is disintegrated into fine powder in the second plateau, while in the first plateau the ternary hydride which was identified to be UTi 2 H x (x=4.8 to 6.2) showed high durability against powdering. It is predicted that UTi 2 can be suitable material for tritium storage. (orig.)

  8. Sorption/desorption reversibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils and carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui

    2008-07-01

    Understanding sorption/desorption is an important prerequisite for the prediction of fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. During the last two decades, numerous studies have reported hysteresis phenomenon for the interaction of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) with natural organic matter (NOM). It manifests as nonsingular sorption/desorption isotherms or different rates for sorption and desorption, where during desorption a higher affinity of a compound on a given sorbent and a longer time scale for release than for sorption is observed. Other studies showed that some of the reported sorption/desorption hysteresis phenomena are due to experimental artifacts, mainly resulting from non-attainment of sorption equilibrium before desorption experiments, which result in 'pseudo-hysteresis'. Except for the hypothesis of sorbent reconfiguration, clear experimental evidence for the physical or chemical mechanisms proposed to lead to hysteresis is still lacking. In this study, sorption/desorption equilibrium and kinetics of phenanthrene sorption/desorption from two soils and three carbonaceous samples were investigated using both batch and column techniques. The main objective of this work was to monitor hysteresis phenomenon by carefully recovering the solute mass in the system and to compare sorption/desorption equilibria and kinetics thermodynamically. Nonsingular isotherms and higher desorption enthalpies as well as increased activation energies with proceeding desorption are expected if significant hysteresis exists. Sorption-desorption cycles were carried out to compare equilibrium isotherms and associated sorption/desorption enthalpies (AeH, isosteric heats). Instead of the traditional decant-and-refill batch method, the experiments were conducted using a newly designed batch protocol, which enables the determination of sorption/desorption isotherms at different temperatures using a closed batch system. This method additionally allows

  9. Sorption/desorption reversibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils and carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui

    2008-07-01

    Understanding sorption/desorption is an important prerequisite for the prediction of fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. During the last two decades, numerous studies have reported hysteresis phenomenon for the interaction of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) with natural organic matter (NOM). It manifests as nonsingular sorption/desorption isotherms or different rates for sorption and desorption, where during desorption a higher affinity of a compound on a given sorbent and a longer time scale for release than for sorption is observed. Other studies showed that some of the reported sorption/desorption hysteresis phenomena are due to experimental artifacts, mainly resulting from non-attainment of sorption equilibrium before desorption experiments, which result in 'pseudo-hysteresis'. Except for the hypothesis of sorbent reconfiguration, clear experimental evidence for the physical or chemical mechanisms proposed to lead to hysteresis is still lacking. In this study, sorption/desorption equilibrium and kinetics of phenanthrene sorption/desorption from two soils and three carbonaceous samples were investigated using both batch and column techniques. The main objective of this work was to monitor hysteresis phenomenon by carefully recovering the solute mass in the system and to compare sorption/desorption equilibria and kinetics thermodynamically. Nonsingular isotherms and higher desorption enthalpies as well as increased activation energies with proceeding desorption are expected if significant hysteresis exists. Sorption-desorption cycles were carried out to compare equilibrium isotherms and associated sorption/desorption enthalpies (AeH, isosteric heats). Instead of the traditional decant-and-refill batch method, the experiments were conducted using a newly designed batch protocol, which enables the determination of sorption/desorption isotherms at different temperatures using a closed batch system. This method additionally allows the

  10. Gas desorption during friction of amorphous carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusanov, A; Fontaine, J; Martin, J-M; Mogne, T L; Nevshupa, R

    2008-01-01

    Gas desorption induced by friction of solids, i.e. tribodesorption, is one of the numerous physical and chemical phenomena, which arise during friction as result of thermal and structural activation of material in a friction zone. Tribodesorption of carbon oxides, hydrocarbons, and water vapours may lead to significant deterioration of ultra high vacuum conditions in modern technological equipment in electronic, optoelectronic industries. Therefore, knowledge of tribodesorption is crucial for the performance and lifetime of vacuum tribosystems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are interesting materials for vacuum tribological systems due to their high wear resistance and low friction. Highly hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films are known to exhibit extremely low friction coefficient under high vacuum or inert environment, known as 'superlubricity' or 'superlow friction'. However, the superlow friction period is not always stable and then tends to spontaneous transition to high friction. It is supposed that hydrogen supply from the bulk to the surface is crucial for establishing and maintaining superlow friction. Thus, tribodesorption can serve also as a new technique to determine the role of gases in superlow friction mechanisms. Desorption of various a-C:H films, deposited by PECVD, ion-beam deposition and deposition using diode system, has been studied by means of ultra-high vacuum tribometer equipped with a mass spectrometer. It was found that in superlow friction period desorption rate was below the detection limit in the 0-85 mass range. However, transition from superlow friction to high friction was accompanied by desorption of various gases, mainly of H 2 and CH 4 . During friction transition, surfaces were heavily damaged. In experiments with DLC films with low hydrogen content tribodesorption was significant during the whole experiment, while low friction was not observed. From estimation of maximum surface temperature during sliding contact it

  11. Sample and plume luminescence in fast heavy ion induced desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuszynski, W.; Koch, K.; Hilf, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The luminescence arising in 252 Cf-fission fragment induced desorption events has been measured using the time-correlated single photon counting technique. Photons emitted from the sample have been guided from a plasma desorption ion source to a photodetector by an optical fibre. Spectra and decay functions have been obtained using thin layers of Coronene or POPOP as samples. The results are strongly dependent on the acceleration field applied for ion extraction. Approximately 10 photons per fission fragment have been produced when applying no accelerating voltage. The results clearly show that these photons come from radiative electronic relaxations of molecules in the solid sample. Considerably more photons per fission fragment have been produced when applying a positive acceleration voltage. The intensity increases almost linearly for acceleration fields below 10 kV/cm and saturates at a nearly 10-fold higher value when compared to no acceleration. The intensity is also affected by the homogeneity of the accelerating field. These additional photons are attributed to radiative electronic relaxations of desorbed neutral molecules in the plume excited by inelastic collisions with accelerated positive ions. No additional photons have been observed when extracting negative ions. The negative ions produced do obviously not hit and/or excite desorbed neutral molecules, presumably due to their specific desorption characteristics. The experimental data have been analyzed by comparing with the cw and time-resolved sample luminescence obtained by optical excitation. The findings demonstrate that valuable information on ion-solid interactions, on specific desorption quantities and on processes in the plume can be obtained by measuring and analyzing the luminescence induced by the impact of high energy primary ions. (orig.)

  12. The desorptivity model of bulk soil-water evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Available models of bulk evaporation from a bare-surfaced soil are difficult to apply to field conditions where evaporation is complicated by two main factors: rate-limiting climatic conditions and redistribution of soil moisture following infiltration. Both factors are included in the "desorptivity model', wherein the evaporation rate during the second stage (the soil-limiting stage) of evaporation is related to the desorptivity parameter, A. Analytical approximations for A are presented. The approximations are independent of the surface soil moisture. However, calculations using the approximations indicate that both soil texture and soil moisture content at depth significantly affect A. Because the moisture content at depth decreases in time during redistribution, it follows that the A parameter also changes with time. Consequently, a method to calculate a representative value of A was developed. When applied to field data, the desorptivity model estimated cumulative evaporation well. The model is easy to calculate, but its usefulness is limited because it requires an independent estimate of the time of transition between the first and second stages of evaporation. The model shows that bulk evaporation after the transition to the second stage is largely independent of climatic conditions.

  13. Modelling of discrete TDS-spectrum of hydrogen desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodchenkova, Natalia I.; Zaika, Yury V.

    2015-12-01

    High concentration of hydrogen in metal leads to hydrogen embrittlement. One of the methods to evaluate the hydrogen content is the method of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). As the sample is heated under vacuumization, atomic hydrogen diffuses inside the bulk and is desorbed from the surface in the molecular form. The extraction curve (measured by a mass-spectrometric analyzer) is recorded. In experiments with monotonous external heating it is observed that background hydrogen fluxes from the extractor walls and fluxes from the sample cannot be reliably distinguished. Thus, the extraction curve is doubtful. Therefore, in this case experimenters use discrete TDS-spectrum: the sample is removed from the analytical part of the device for the specified time interval, and external temperature is then increased stepwise. The paper is devoted to the mathematical modelling and simulation of experimental studies. In the corresponding boundary-value problem with nonlinear dynamic boundary conditions physical- chemical processes in the bulk and on the surface are taken into account: heating of the sample, diffusion in the bulk, hydrogen capture by defects, penetration from the bulk to the surface and desorption. The model aimed to analyze the dynamics of hydrogen concentrations without preliminary artificial sample saturation. Numerical modelling allows to choose the point on the extraction curve that corresponds to the initial quantity of the surface hydrogen, to estimate the values of the activation energies of diffusion, desorption, parameters of reversible capture and hydride phase decomposition.

  14. Adsorption, aggregation, and desorption of proteins on smectite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolman, Krzysztof; Makowski, Marcin M; Golriz, Ali A; Kappl, Michael; Pigłowski, Jacek; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Kiersnowski, Adam

    2014-10-07

    We report on adsorption of lysozyme (LYS), ovalbumin (OVA), or ovotransferrin (OVT) on particles of a synthetic smectite (synthetic layered aluminosilicate). In our approach we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to study the protein-smectite systems in water solutions at pH ranging from 4 to 9. The AFM provided insights into the adhesion forces of protein molecules to the smectite particles, while the QCM measurements yielded information about the amounts of the adsorbed proteins, changes in their structure, and conditions of desorption. The binding of the proteins to the smectite surface was driven mainly by electrostatic interactions, and hence properties of the adsorbed layers were controlled by pH. At high pH values a change in orientation of the adsorbed LYS molecules and a collapse or desorption of OVA layer were observed. Lowering pH to the value ≤ 4 caused LYS to desorb and swelling the adsorbed OVA. The stability of OVT-smectite complexes was found the lowest. OVT revealed a tendency to desorb from the smectite surface at all investigated pH. The minimum desorption rate was observed at pH close to the isoelectric point of the protein, which suggests that nonspecific interactions between OVT and smectite particles significantly contribute to the stability of these complexes.

  15. New perspectives in vacuum high voltage insulation. II. Gas desorption

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, W T

    1998-01-01

    An examination has been made of gas desorption from unbaked electrodes of copper, niobium, aluminum, and titanium subjected to high voltage in vacuum. It has been shown that the gas is composed of water vapor, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, the usual components of vacuum outgassing, plus an increased yield of hydrogen and light hydrocarbons. The gas desorption was driven by anode conditioning as the voltage was increased between the electrodes. The gas is often desorbed as microdischarges-pulses of a few to hundreds of microseconds-and less frequently in a more continuous manner without the obvious pulsed structure characteristic of microdischarge activity. The quantity of gas released was equivalent to many monolayers and consisted mostly of neutral molecules with an ionic component of a few percent. A very significant observation was that the gas desorption was more dependent on the total voltage between the electrodes than on the electric field. It was not triggered by field-emitted electrons but oft...

  16. Modelling of discrete TDS-spectrum of hydrogen desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodchenkova, Natalia I; Zaika, Yury V

    2015-01-01

    High concentration of hydrogen in metal leads to hydrogen embrittlement. One of the methods to evaluate the hydrogen content is the method of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). As the sample is heated under vacuumization, atomic hydrogen diffuses inside the bulk and is desorbed from the surface in the molecular form. The extraction curve (measured by a mass-spectrometric analyzer) is recorded. In experiments with monotonous external heating it is observed that background hydrogen fluxes from the extractor walls and fluxes from the sample cannot be reliably distinguished. Thus, the extraction curve is doubtful. Therefore, in this case experimenters use discrete TDS-spectrum: the sample is removed from the analytical part of the device for the specified time interval, and external temperature is then increased stepwise. The paper is devoted to the mathematical modelling and simulation of experimental studies. In the corresponding boundary-value problem with nonlinear dynamic boundary conditions physical- chemical processes in the bulk and on the surface are taken into account: heating of the sample, diffusion in the bulk, hydrogen capture by defects, penetration from the bulk to the surface and desorption. The model aimed to analyze the dynamics of hydrogen concentrations without preliminary artificial sample saturation. Numerical modelling allows to choose the point on the extraction curve that corresponds to the initial quantity of the surface hydrogen, to estimate the values of the activation energies of diffusion, desorption, parameters of reversible capture and hydride phase decomposition. (paper)

  17. Thermal desorption spectroscopy for investigating hydrogen isotope behavior in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Tirui; Yang Hongguang; Zhan Qin; Han Zhibo; He Changshui

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of hydrogen isotope generated in fusion reactor materials is the key issue for safety and economic operation of fusion reactors and becomes an interesting field. In order to investigate the mechanism of hydrogen isotope such as diffusion, release and retention, a high-sensitivity thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) in combination with a quadruple mass spectrometer (QMS) was developed. A major technical breakthrough in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), low hydrogen background, linear heating and sensitivity calibration of TDS system was made. UHV of l × 10 -7 Pa and low hydrogen background of l × 10 -9 Pa were obtained by combining turbo molecule pump and sputter ion pump. Specimens can be linearly heated up to 1173 K at the rate of 1 to 50 K/min under the MCGS PID software. Sensitivity calibration of the TDS system was accomplished using a special deuterium leak in the detector mode of QMS second electron multiplier. The desorption sensitivity coefficient and the minimum detection limit of deuterium desorption rate are 6.22 × l0 24 s -l · and l.24 × l0 -10 s -1 , respectively. The measurement was also routinely conducted on a specimen of standard, deuterium-containing Zr-4 alloy maintained in the laboratory, so as to validate the TDS method. (authors)

  18. Rapid decompression and desorption induced energetic failure in coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shugang Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, laboratory experiments are conducted to investigate the rapid decompression and desorption induced energetic failure in coal using a shock tube apparatus. Coal specimens are recovered from Colorado at a depth of 610 m. The coal specimens are saturated with the strong sorbing gas CO2 for a certain period and then the rupture disc is suddenly broken on top of the shock tube to generate a shock wave propagating upwards and a rarefaction wave propagating downwards through the specimen. This rapid decompression and desorption has the potential to cause energetic fragmentation in coal. Three types of behaviors in coal after rapid decompression are found, i.e. degassing without fragmentation, horizontal fragmentation, and vertical fragmentation. We speculate that the characteristics of fracture network (e.g. aperture, spacing, orientation and stiffness and gas desorption play a role in this dynamic event as coal can be considered as a dual porosity, dual permeability, dual stiffness sorbing medium. This study has important implications in understanding energetic failure process in underground coal mines such as coal gas outbursts.

  19. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Powell, Brian A.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time which has implications for near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption-desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethite was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.

  20. The Design and Development of Enhanced Thermal Desorption Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Humble

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This research study is based on a knowledge-transfer collaboration between The National Centre for Product Design and Development Research (PDR and Markes International Ltd. The aim of the two-year collaboration has been to implement design tools and techniques for the development of enhanced thermal desorption products. Thermal desorption is a highly-specialised technique for the analysis of trace-level volatile organic compounds. This technique allows minute quantities of these compounds to be measured; however, there is an increasing demand from customers for greater sensitivity over a wider range of applications, which means new design methodologies need to be evaluated. The thermal desorption process combines a number of disparate chemical, thermal and mechanical disciplines, and the major design constraints arise from the need to cycle the sample through extremes in temperature. Following the implementation of a comprehensive product design specification, detailed design solutions have been developed using the latest 3D CAD techniques. The impact of the advanced design techniques is assessed in terms of improved product performance and reduced development times, and the wider implications of new product development within small companies are highlighted.  

  1. Investigations on ion-beam induced desorption from cryogenic surfaces; Untersuchungen zu ionenstrahlinduzierter Desorption von kryogenen Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Christoph

    2017-07-03

    A central component of FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, will be the superconducting heavy ion synchrotron SIS100, which is supposed to provide reliable, high intensity beams for various applications. Its beam intensity is governed by the space charge limit, while the maximum energy is determined by the machine's magnetic rigidity. That means, ions with higher charge state can be accelerated to a higher energy, but with less intensity. For highest intensity beams, intermediate charge states have to be used instead of high charge state ions. This alleviates the issue of space charge but gives rise to dynamic vacuum effects, which also limit beam intensity: beam particles collide with residual gas particles, which leads to charge exchange and their subsequent loss. Impacting on the chamber wall, these ions release adsorbed gas particles. This process is called desorption and leads to a localized increase in pressure, which in turn causes more charge exchange. After a few rounds of self amplification, this can lead to total beam loss. This ''runaway-desorption'' is typically the main beam intensity limiting process for intermediate charge state (heavy) ion beams. The extent of this phenomenon is governed by two factors: the initial beam intensity and the desorption yield. The latter is examined within the scope of this thesis. Special emphasis is placed on the influence of the target's temperature, since the SIS100 will be a superconducting machine with cryogenic vacuum chamber walls. In order to investigate this topic, an experimental setup has been devised, built at the SIS18 and taken into commission. Based on the experience gained during operation, it has been continuously improved and extended. Another central innovation presented in this thesis is the use of gas dynamics simulations for an improved method of data analysis. Using this technique, environmental conditions like the chamber geometry and the connected

  2. Low-temperature thermal reduction of graphene oxide: In situ correlative structural, thermal desorption, and electrical transport measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, Alexey; Guinel, Maxime J.-F.; Muratov, Dmitry S.; Vanyushin, Vladislav O.; Wilson, Peter M.; Kolmakov, Andrei; Sinitskii, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Elucidation of the structural transformations in graphene oxide (GO) upon reduction remains an active and important area of research. We report the results of in situ heating experiments, during which electrical, mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements were carried out correlatively. The simultaneous electrical and temperature programmed desorption measurements allowed us to correlate the onset of the increase in the electrical conductivity of GO by five orders of magnitude at about 150 °C with the maxima of the rates of desorption of H2O, CO, and CO2. Interestingly, this large conductivity change happens at an intermediate level of the reduction of GO, which likely corresponds to the point when the graphitic domains become large enough to enable percolative electronic transport. We demonstrate that the gas desorption is intimately related to (i) the changes in the chemical structure of GO detected by XPS and Raman spectroscopy and (ii) the formation of nanoscopic holes in GO sheets revealed by TEM. These in situ observations provide a better understanding of the mechanism of the GO thermal reduction.

  3. Thermal desorption of toluene from Vanadium-containing catalysts coated onto various carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zheksenbaeva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The method temperature-programmed desorption has been studied the state of toluene on the surface-modified vanadium catalysts on different carriers. Among the investigated carriers the most active in the reaction of partial oxidation of toluene is anatase structural titanium dioxide. For the partial oxidation of toluene on modified vanadium-containing catalysts deposited on TiO2 was tested. It was found that on the catalyst 20%V2O5-5%MoO3-2%Sb2O3/TiO2 at a temperature of 673K, volume rate of 15 thousand hours-1 oxidation of toluene is 80% c yield of benzoic acid with a selectivity of  70% of 87.5%.

  4. Desorption Kinetics and Mechanisms of CO2 on Amine-Based Mesoporous Silica Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Teng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA-based mesoporous MCM-41 is used as the adsorbent to determine the CO2 desorption kinetics of amine-modified materials after adsorption. The experimental data of CO2 desorption as a function of time are derived by zero-length column at different temperatures (35, 50, and 70 °C and analyzed by Avrami’s fractional-order kinetic model. A new method is used to distinguish the physical desorption and chemical desorption performance of surface-modified mesoporous MCM-41. The activation energy Ea of CO2 physical desorption and chemical desorption calculated from Arrhenius equation are 15.86 kJ/mol and 57.15 kJ/mol, respectively. Furthermore, intraparticle diffusion and Boyd’s film models are selected to investigate the mechanism of CO2 desorption from MCM-41 and surface-modified MCM-41. For MCM-41, there are three rate-limiting steps during the desorption process. Film diffusion is more prominent for the CO2 desorption rates at low temperatures, and pore diffusion mainly governs the rate-limiting process under higher temperatures. Besides the surface reaction, the desorption process contains four rate-limiting steps on surface-modified MCM-41.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of various zeolites and study of dynamic adsorption of dimethyl methyl phosphate over them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanday, Waheed Ahmad; Majid, Sheikh Abdul; Chandra Shekar, S.; Tomar, Radha

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Thermal desorption pattern of DMMP over various zeolites (a) 1st desorption and (b) 2nd desorption. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Zeolite-A, MCM-22, Zeolite-X and Erionite by hydrothermal method. • Zeolites were characterized by using XRD, FTIR, BET, NH 3 -TPD, SEM and EDS techniques. • Dynamic adsorption of DMMP on zeolites was carried out using TPD plus chemisorption system. • Thermal desorption of DMMP on zeolites was carried using the same system. - Abstract: Zeolite-A, MCM-22, Zeolite-X and Erionite were synthesized successfully under hydrothermal conditions and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area analysis and thermal programmed desorption (TPD). Dynamic adsorption of dimethyl methyl phosphate (DMMP) was carried out on these zeolites. Zeolite-X having high surface area among all four zeolites shows highest adsorption capacity followed by Erionite and MCM-22 where as Zeolite-A shows the least. For all zeolites adsorption was found to be high initially and it then decreases with increase in injected volume. Then desorption pattern was analyzed which shows two types of peaks, sharp peak representing desorption of physisorbed DMMP and a broad peak representing desorption of strongly chemisorbed DMMP

  6. Modeling Adsorption-Desorption Processes at the Intermolecular Interactions Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeeva, Vera V.; Terentev, Alexey V.

    2018-01-01

    Modeling of the surface adsorption and desorption processes, as well as the diffusion, are of considerable interest for the physical phenomenon under study in ground tests conditions. When imitating physical processes and phenomena, it is important to choose the correct parameters to describe the adsorption of gases and the formation of films on the structural materials surface. In the present research the adsorption-desorption processes on the gas-solid interface are modeled with allowance for diffusion. Approaches are proposed to describe the adsorbate distribution on the solid body surface at the intermolecular interactions level. The potentials of the intermolecular interaction of water-water, water-methane and methane-methane were used to adequately modeling the real physical and chemical processes. The energies calculated by the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ method. Computational algorithms for determining the average molecule area in a dense monolayer, are considered here. Differences in modeling approaches are also given: that of the proposed in this work and the previously approved probabilistic cellular automaton (PCA) method. It has been shown that the main difference is due to certain limitations of the PCA method. The importance of accounting the intermolecular interactions via hydrogen bonding has been indicated. Further development of the adsorption-desorption processes modeling will allow to find the conditions for of surface processes regulation by means of quantity adsorbed molecules control. The proposed approach to representing the molecular system significantly shortens the calculation time in comparison with the use of atom-atom potentials. In the future, this will allow to modeling the multilayer adsorption at a reasonable computational cost.

  7. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prata Fábio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with KH2PO4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha-1 of P2O5, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L-1, with a 14C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL-1. Four steps of the desorption procedure with CaCl2 0.01 mol L-1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L-1. Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm-3. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%, and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content.

  8. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prata, Fabio; Cardinali, Vanessa Camponez do Brasil; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges; Lavorenti, Arquimedes

    2003-01-01

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh 2 PO 4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha -1 of P 2 O 5 , which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L -1 ), with a 14 C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL -1 . Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl 2 0.01 mol L -1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L -1 ). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm -3 . Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  9. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prata, Fabio [BIOAGRI Labs., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Div. de Quimica. Lab. de Radioquimica; Cardinali, Vanessa Camponez do Brasil; Tornisielo, Valdemar Luiz; Regitano, Jussara Borges [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Ciencias Exatas; Lavorenti, Arquimedes [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Secao de Toxicologia

    2003-03-01

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha{sup -1} of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L{sup -1}), with a {sup 14}C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL{sup -1}. Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl{sub 2} 0.01 mol L{sup -1} and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L{sup -1}). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm{sup -3}. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  10. Krypton-85 enrichment by adsorption-desorption process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Ramarathinam, K.

    1975-01-01

    The use of activated charcoal columns in conjunction with cryogenic distillation system for concentration of krypton-85 in fuel reprocessing process off-gas stream is reported. Dynamic adsorption of krypton on activated charcoals and its subsequent desorption by applying vacuum were studied. The possible reduction in the quantity of carrier gas to be liquified in the cryogenic system by utilising this process has been discussed on the basis of results of laboratory evaluations. The possibility of elimination of air and oxygen to avoid explosion hazards associated with radiolytic formation and concentration of ozone has also been considered. (author)

  11. Ethylene decomposition on Rh(100): theory and experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieskens, D.L.S.; Bavel, van A.P.; Curulla Ferre, D.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The decompn. of ethylene on a Rh(100) single crystal has been studied by a combination of exptl. techniques: static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SSIMS), temp.-programmed desorption (TPD), LEED, and high-resoln. electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), to gain insight into the nature of the

  12. Self Blocking of CO Dissociation on a Stepped Ruthenium Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelbo, Søren Bastholm; Johansson, Martin; Mowbray, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    The influence of steps on CO reactions has been studied on a Ru(0 1 (1) over bar 5 4) single crystal with a step density of 4%. Based on temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and oxygen titration experiments as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that the CO dissociation...

  13. Desorption of large organic molecules by laser-induced plasmon excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I.; Callcott, T.A.

    1991-01-01

    Ejection of large organic molecules from surfaces by laser-induced electronic-excited desorption has attracted considerable interest in recent years. In addition to the importance of this effect for fundamental investigations of the ejection process, this desorption technique has been applied to the study of large, fragile molecules by mass spectrometry. In this paper, we present a new method to induce electronic excitation on the metal surface for the desorption of large organic molecules. 3 refs., 3 figs

  14. Desorption of metals from Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. Lichen using solutions simulating acid rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čučulović Ana A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desorption of metals K, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ba, Zn, Mn, Cu and Sr from Cetraria islandica (L. with solutions whose composition was similar to that of acid rain, was investigated. Desorption of metals from the lichen was performed by five successive desorption processes. Solution mixtures containing H2SO4, HNO3 and H2SO4-HNO3 were used for desorption. Each solution had three different pH values: 4.61, 5.15 and 5.75, so that the desorptions were performed with nine different solutions successively five times, always using the same solution volume. The investigated metals can be divided into two groups. One group was comprised of K, Ca and Mg, which were desorbed in each of the five desorption processes at all pH values used. The second group included Al, Fe, Zn, Ba, Mn and Sr; these were not desorbed in each individual desorption and not at all pH values, whereas Cu was not desorbed at all under any circumstances. Using the logarithmic dependence of the metal content as a function of the desorption number, it was found that potassium builds two types of links and is connected with weaker links in lichen. Potassium is completely desorbed, 80% in the first desorption, and then gradually in the following desorptions. Other metals are linked with one weaker link (desorption 1-38% and with one very strong link (desorption below the metal detection limit. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009 i br. ON 172019

  15. Site Specificity in Femtosecond Laser Desorption of Neutral H Atoms from Graphite(0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigge, R.; Hoger, T.; Siemer, B.

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond laser excitation and density functional theory reveal site and vibrational state specificity in neutral atomic hydrogen desorption from graphite induced by multiple electronic transitions. Multimodal velocity distributions witness the participation of ortho and para pair states...... of chemisorbed hydrogen in the desorption process. Very slow velocities of 700 and 400  ms-1 for H and D atoms are associated with the desorption out of the highest vibrational state of a barrierless potential....

  16. Desorption of Ba and 226Ra from river-borne sediments in the Hudson estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.-H.

    1979-01-01

    The pronounced desorption of Ba and 226 Ra from river-borne sediments in the Hudson estuary can be explained quantitatively by the drastic decrease in the distribution coefficients of both elements from a fresh to a salty water medium. The desorption in estuaries can augment, at least, the total global river fluxes of dissolved Ba and 226 Ra by one and nine times, respectively. The desorption flux of 226 Ra from estuaries accounts for 17-43% of the total 226 Ra flux from coastal sediments. Two mass balance models depicting mixing and adsorption-desorption processes in estuaries are discussed. (Auth.)

  17. Cs-137 sorption and desorption in relation to properties of 17 soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerpen, W.

    1988-01-01

    For Cs-137 sorption and desorption studies material of Ap and Ah horizons from 17 soils with wide varying soil properties was selected. The soils were: Podsol, Luvisol, Chernozem, Cambisol, Phaeozem, Arenosol, Gleysol and other soils. The Cs-137 sorption and desorption experiments were carried out in aqueous solution (20 g of soil) under standardized conditions for two reasons: (1) to determine the amounts of Cs-137 sorption, desorption and remains as a function of different soils and (2) to evaluate the soil parameters which govern the sorption, desorption processes. Concerning the second point the sorption values, the amount of 137 Cs desorbed within four desorption cycles and the 137 Cs remains after four desorption cycles were correlated with pH, grain size, sorption capacity (CEC), and other soil properties. It will be shown that generally Cs-137 sorption, desorption and remains depend primarily on the pH of the soil. The middle sand proved to be an indicator for the strenght of sorption, and desorption processes. Sorption and desorption studies lead to the same results as found in biotest experiments

  18. Adsorption/desorption properties of vacuum materials for the 6 GeV synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Considerable attention must be paid to the vacuum and adsorption/desorption properties of all materials installed inside the vacuum envelope if the design goals of the 6 GeV synchrotron are to be met. Unfortunately, the data is very sparse in several key areas. Additionally, some procedures normally associated with good vacuum practice, such as air baking, may prove to be totally unsuitable on the basis of desorption properties. We present here a brief discussion of the adsorption, outgassing, electron-stimulated desorption (ESD), and photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) properties of vacuum materials as they relate to the design of a 6 GeV synchrotron

  19. Photo-stimulated desorption from water and methane clusters on the surface of solid neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa Ichiri; Matsumoto Dairo; Takekuma Shinichi; Tamura Reimi; Miura Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Photo-stimulated desorption of ions from methane and water heterocluster on the surface of solid neon was studied. The desorption yields of the variety of photo-desorbed species showed strong dependence on the composition and the size of the mother cluster. It was found that the presence of a water molecule in the cluster significantly enhanced, or was almost essential for, the desorption of any species observed. Systematic investigation of the correlation between the cluster size and the desorption yield of each ion has revealed the mother cluster which yields the each desorbed ion.

  20. A new theoretical approach to adsorption desorption behavior of Ga on GaAs surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangawa, Y.; Ito, T.; Taguchi, A.; Shiraishi, K.; Ohachi, T.

    2001-11-01

    We propose a new theoretical approach for studying adsorption-desorption behavior of atoms on semiconductor surfaces. The new theoretical approach based on the ab initio calculations incorporates the free energy of gas phase; therefore we can calculate how adsorption and desorption depends on growth temperature and beam equivalent pressure (BEP). The versatility of the new theoretical approach was confirmed by the calculation of Ga adsorption-desorption transition temperatures and transition BEPs on the GaAs(0 0 1)-(4×2)β2 Ga-rich surface. This new approach is feasible to predict how adsorption and desorption depend on the growth conditions.

  1. Electrothermal adsorption and desorption of volatile organic compounds on activated carbon fiber cloth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, H.K. [Department of Health and Environment, Kosin University, Dong Sam Dong, Young Do Gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Sivakumar, S., E-mail: ssivaphd@yahoo.com [Department of Bioenvironmental Energy, College of Natural Resource and Life Science, Pusan National University, Miryang-si, Gyeongsangnam-do 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Rood, M.J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Kim, B.J. [Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC-CERL), Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • We study the adsorption and desorption of VOCs by an activated carbon fiber cloth. • Desorption concentration was controlled via electrothermal heating. • The desorption rate was successfully equalized and controlled by this system. - Abstract: Adsorption is an effective means to selectively remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial gas streams and is particularly of use for gas streams that exhibit highly variable daily concentrations of VOCs. Adsorption of such gas streams by activated carbon fiber cloths (ACFCs) and subsequent controlled desorption can provide gas streams of well-defined concentration that can then be more efficiently treated by biofiltration than streams exhibiting large variability in concentration. In this study, we passed VOC-containing gas through an ACFC vessel for adsorption and then desorption in a concentration-controlled manner via electrothermal heating. Set-point concentrations (40–900 ppm{sub v}) and superficial gas velocity (6.3–9.9 m/s) were controlled by a data acquisition and control system. The results of the average VOC desorption, desorption factor and VOC in-and-out ratio were calculated and compared for various gas set-point concentrations and superficial gas velocities. Our results reveal that desorption is strongly dependent on the set-point concentration and that the VOC desorption rate can be successfully equalized and controlled via an electrothermal adsorption system.

  2. The Effect of the Crystalline Phase of Zirconia for the Dehydration of Iso-propanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Hye-In; Park, Jung-Hyun; Cho, Jun Hee; Ahn, Ji-Hye; Choi, Min-Seok; Shin, Chae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium hydroxide was synthesized by varying the aging time of the zirconyl chloride octahydrate at 100 .deg. C in aqueous solution and the resulting hydroxides were calcined at 700 .deg. C for 6 h to obtain the crystalline ZrO 2 . The materials used in this study were characterized by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N 2 -sorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), NH 3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH 3 -TPD), CO 2 -TPD and iso-propanol TPD analyses to correlate with catalytic activity for the dehydration of iso-propanol. The pure tetragonal ZrO 2 phase was obtained after 24 h aging of zirconium hydroxide and successive calcination at 700 .deg. C. The increase of aging time showed the production of smaller particle size ZrO 2 resulting that the higher specific surface area and total pore volume. NH 3 -TPD results revealed that the relative acidity of the catalysts increased along with the increase of aging time. On the other hand, the results of CO 2 -TPD showed the reverse trend of NH 3 -TPD results. The best catalytic activity for the dehydration of iso-propanol to propylene was shown over ZrO 2 catalyst aged for 168 h which had the highest S BET (178 m 2 g -1 ). The catalytic activity could be correlated with high surface area, relative acidity and easy desorption of iso-propanol

  3. Characterization of porosity via secondary reactions. Final technical report, 1 September 1991--30 November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calo, J.M.; Zhang, L.; Hall, P.J.; Antxustegi, M. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering

    1997-09-01

    A new approach to the study of porosity and porosity development in coal chars during gasification was investigated. This approach involves the establishment of the relationships between the amount and type of surface complexes evolved during post-activation temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and the porosity, as measured by gas adsorption and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques. With this new method, the total surface area and micropore volume can be determined by the interpretation of post-activation TPD spectra. The primary conclusion of this work is that it is possible to predict total surface area and micropore volume from TPD spectra. From the extended random pore model, additional information about the micropore surface area, the nonmicroporous surface area, and the mean micropore size development as a function of reaction time (or burn-off) can also be predicted. Therefore, combining the TPD technique and the extended random pore model provides a new method for the characterization of char porosity.

  4. Measuring hydrophobic micropore volumes in geosorbents from trichloroethylene desorption data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hefa; Reinhard, Martin

    2006-06-01

    Hydrophobic micropores can play a significant role in controlling the long-term release of organic contaminants from geosorbents. We describe a technique for quantifying the total and the hydrophobic mineral micropore volumes based on the mass of trichloroethylene (TCE) sorbed in the slow-releasing pores under dry and wet conditions, respectively. Micropore desorption models were used to differentiate the fast- and slow-desorbing fractions in desorption profiles. The micropore environment in which organic molecules were sorbed in the presence of water was probed by studying the transformation of a water-reactive compound (2,2-dichloropropane or 2,2-DCP). For sediment from an alluvial aquifer, the total and hydrophobic micropore volumes estimated using this technique were 4.65 microL/g and 0.027 microL/g (0.58% of total), respectively. In microporous silica gel A, a hydrophobic micropore volume of 0.038 microL/g (0.035% of reported total) was measured. The dehydrohalogenation rate of 2,2-DCP sorbed in hydrophobic micropores of the sediment was slower than that reported in bulk water, indicating an environment of low water activity. The results suggest that hydrolyzable organic contaminants sorbed in hydrophobic micropores react slower than in bulk water, consistent with the reported persistence of reactive contaminants in natural soils.

  5. 3rd International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Knotek, Michael

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings are the result of the third international workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions, DIET III, which took place on Shelter Island, NY, May. 20-22, 1987. The work contained in this volume is an excellent summary of the current status of the field and should be a valuable reference text for both "seasoned" researchers and newcomers in the field of DIET. Based on the success of the meeting it seems clear that interest and enthusiasm in the field is strong. It is also apparent, from the many lively discussions during the meeting, that many unanswered questions (and controversies) remain to be solved. It was particularly pleasing to see many new participants from new and rapidly advancing fields, ranging from gas phase dynamics to semiconductor processing. The resulting cross-fertilization from these separate but related fields is playing an important role in helping us understand desorption processes at solid surfaces. In general, the topics covered during the course of the worksh...

  6. 5th International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Jennison, Dwight R; Stechel, Ellen B; DIET V; Desorption induced by electronic transitions

    1993-01-01

    This volume in the Springer Series on Surface Sciences presents a recent account of advances in the ever-broadening field of electron-and photon-stimulated sur­ face processes. As in previous volumes, these advances are presented as the proceedings of the International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions; the fifth workshop (DIET V) was held in Taos, New Mexico, April 1-4, 1992. It will be abundantly clear to the reader that "DIET" is not restricted to desorption, but has for several years included photochemistry, non-thermal surface modification, exciton self-trapping, and many other phenomena that are induced by electron or photon bombardment. However, most stimulated surface processes do share a common physics: initial electronic excitation, localization of the excitation, and conversion of electronic energy into nuclear kinetic energy. It is the rich variation of this theme which makes the field so interesting and fruitful. We have divided the book into eleven parts in orde...

  7. 2nd International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, Dietrich

    1985-01-01

    The second workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET II) took place October 15-17, 1984, in SchloB Elmau, Bavaria. DIET II, fol­ lowing the great success of DIET I (edited by N. H. Tolk, M. M. Traum, J. C. Tully, T. E. Madey and published in Springer Ser. Chem. Phys. , Vol. 24), again brought together over 60 workers in this exciting field. The "hard co­ re of experts" was essentially the same as in DIET I but the general overlap of participants between the two meetings was small. While DIET I had the function of an exposition of the status of the field DIET II focussed more on new developments. The main emphasis was again on the microscopic under­ standing of DIET but a number of side aspects and the application of DIET ideas to other fields such as sputtering, laser-induced desorption, fractu­ re, erosion, etc. were considered, too. New mechanisms and new refined expe­ rimental techniques were proposed and discussed at the meeting critically but with great enthusiasm. In addition t...

  8. Adsorption and desorption of 14C-chlorsulfuron in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zuyi; Cheng Wei; Mi Chunyun

    1995-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of the 4 concentrations of 14 C-chlorsulfuron in 10 soils were studied. As a result the soils had weak adsorptions of chlorsulfuron and the adsorptions varied with different type of soils tested. Adsorption rate of paddy soil (infant red earth) from Hunan and latosol red earth from Hainan was 3%∼4%; Yellow-brown earth from Nanjing and red earth from Jiangxi was 6%∼9%; black soil from Jilin, paddy soil (infant red earth) from Jiangxi and red earth from Anhui was 10%∼14%; Albic bleached soil from Jilin and yellow fluvo-aquatic soil from Jiangsu was 19%∼23%. pH value had an influence on the adsorption and organic matter had not obvious influence on the adsorption. Chlorsulfuron absorbed in soil could be desorbed through water. The relation between the adsorption and desorption was negative. The weak adsorption in soil shows that chlorsulfuron is active movable and diffusible and likely to pollute the ecological environment

  9. On factors controlling activity of submonolayer bimetallic catalysts: Nitrogen desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G., E-mail: vlachos@udel.edu [Center for Catalytic Science and Technology, Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2014-01-07

    We model N{sub 2} desorption on submonolayer bimetallic surfaces consisting of Co clusters on Pt(111) via first-principles density functional theory-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We find that submonolayer structures are essential to rationalize the high activity of these bimetallics in ammonia decomposition. We show that the N{sub 2} desorption temperature on Co/Pt(111) is about 100 K higher than that on Ni/Pt(111), despite Co/Pt(111) binding N weaker at low N coverages. Co/Pt(111) has substantially different lateral interactions than single metals and Ni/Pt. The lateral interactions are rationalized with the d-band center theory. The activity of bimetallic catalysts is the result of heterogeneity of binding energies and reaction barriers among sites, and the most active site can differ on various bimetallics. Our results are in excellent agreement with experimental data and demonstrate for the first time that the zero-coverage descriptor, used until now, for catalyst activity is inadequate due not only to lacking lateral interactions but importantly to presence of multiple sites and a complex interplay of thermodynamics (binding energies, occupation) and kinetics (association barriers) on those sites.

  10. Magnesium growth in magnesium deuteride thin films during deuterium desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchetto, R., E-mail: riccardo.checchetto@unitn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Miotello, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Mengucci, P.; Barucca, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio, Università Politecnica delle Marche, I-60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: ► Highly oriented Pd-capped magnesium deuteride thin films. ► The MgD{sub 2} dissociation was studied at temperatures not exceeding 100 °C. ► The structure of the film samples was analyzed by XRD and TEM. ► The transformation is controlled by the re-growth velocity of the Mg layers. ► The transformation is thermally activated, activation energy value of 1.3 ± 0.1 eV. -- Abstract: Pd- capped nanocrystalline magnesium thin films having columnar structure were deposited on Si substrate by e-gun deposition and submitted to thermal annealing in D{sub 2} atmosphere to promote the metal to deuteride phase transformation. The kinetics of the reverse deuteride to metal transformation was studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) while the structure of the as deposited and transformed samples was analyzed by X-rays diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). In Pd- capped MgD{sub 2} thin films the deuteride to metal transformation begins at the interface between un-reacted Mg and transformed MgD{sub 2} layers. The D{sub 2} desorption kinetics is controlled by MgD{sub 2}/Mg interface effects, specifically the re-growth velocity of the Mg layers. The Mg re-growth has thermally activated character and shows an activation energy value of 1.3 ± 0.1 eV.

  11. Investigation of polyelectrolyte desorption by single molecule force spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedsam, C; Seitz, M; Gaub, H E

    2004-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy has evolved into a powerful method for the investigation of intra- and intermolecular interactions at the level of individual molecules. Many examples, including the investigation of the dynamic properties of complex biological systems as well as the properties of covalent bonds or intermolecular transitions within individual polymers, are reported in the literature. The technique has recently been extended to the systematic investigation of desorption processes of individual polyelectrolyte molecules adsorbed on generic surfaces. The stable covalent attachment of polyelectrolyte molecules to the AFM-tip provides the possibility of performing long-term measurements with the same set of molecules and therefore allows the in situ observation of the impact of environmental changes on the adsorption behaviour of individual molecules. Different types of interactions, e.g. electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions, that determine the adsorption process could be identified and characterized. The experiments provided valuable details that help to understand the nature and the properties of non-covalent interactions, which is helpful with regard to biological systems as well as for technical applications. Apart from this, desorption experiments can be utilized to characterize the properties of surfaces or polymer coatings. Therefore they represent a versatile tool that can be further developed in terms of various aspects

  12. Hydrocarbon analysis using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred Paul Mark; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K.; Li, Anyin; Soparawalla, Santosh; Roqan, Iman S.; Cooks, Robert Graham

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the various petroleum constituents (hydronaphthalenes, thiophenes, alkyl substituted benzenes, pyridines, fluorenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) was achieved under ambient conditions without sample preparation by desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI). Conditions were chosen for the DAPCI experiments to control whether ionization was by proton or electron transfer. The protonated molecule [M+H]+ and the hydride abstracted [MH]+ form were observed when using an inert gas, typically nitrogen, to direct a lightly ionized plasma generated by corona discharge onto the sample surface in air. The abundant water cluster ions generated in this experiment react with condensed-phase functionalized hydrocarbon model compounds and their mixtures at or near the sample surface. On the other hand, when naphthalene was doped into the DAPCI gas stream, its radical cation served as a charge exchange reagent, yielding molecular radical cations (M+) of the hydrocarbons. This mode of sample ionization provided mass spectra with better signal/noise ratios and without unwanted side-products. It also extended the applicability of DAPCI to petroleum constituents which could not be analyzed through proton transfer (e.g., higher molecular PAHs such as chrysene). The thermochemistry governing the individual ionization processes is discussed and a desorption/ionization mechanism is inferred. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Modeling photo-desorption in high current storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    High luminosity flavor factories are characterized by high fluxes of synchrotron radiation that lead to thermal management difficulties. The associated photo-desorption from the vacuum chamber walls presents an additional design challenge, providing a vacuum system suitable for maintaining acceptable beam-gas lifetimes and low background levels of scattered radiation in the detector. Achieving acceptable operating pressures (1-10 nTorr) with practical pumping schemes requires the use of materials with low photodesorption efficiency operating in a radiation environment beyond that of existing storage rings. Extrapolating the existing photo-desorption data base to the design requirements of high luminosity colliders requires a physical model of the differential cleaning in the vacuum chamber. The authors present a simple phenomenological model of photodesorption that includes effects of dose dependence and diffuse photon reflection to compute the leveling of gas loads in beamlines of high current storage rings that typify heavy flavor factories. This model is also used to estimate chamber commissioning times

  14. Electron-stimulated desorption from condensed branched alkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelber, J.A.; Knotek, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Desorption of H + , CH 3+ , H 2+ , and D + have been measured as a function of electron excitation energy for solid neopentane, tetramethylsilane and two deuterated isomers of isobutane. The evidence shows that C-C (or Si-C) and C-H bonds are broken by electronic excitations localized on methyl groups, in contrast to CH 3+ production in gas-phase neopentane, and that these excitations are the final states of decay processes initiated by creation of a hole in the C2s level, or, in tetramethylsilane, the C2s/Si3s level. This is in accord with other evidence which shows that localized multi-valence hole states result in C-H, C-C, Si-C and Si-H dissociation, and that such states may be excited either directly or by shakeup, by decay from a C2s hole, or by decay for a C1s core hole. It is apparent then, that dissociation and desorption of ions from covalent materials is a multi (electron) hole mechanism, and that the means of localizing the excitation energy in such systems involves multi-hole correlation

  15. Hydrocarbon analysis using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred Paul Mark

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of the various petroleum constituents (hydronaphthalenes, thiophenes, alkyl substituted benzenes, pyridines, fluorenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) was achieved under ambient conditions without sample preparation by desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI). Conditions were chosen for the DAPCI experiments to control whether ionization was by proton or electron transfer. The protonated molecule [M+H]+ and the hydride abstracted [MH]+ form were observed when using an inert gas, typically nitrogen, to direct a lightly ionized plasma generated by corona discharge onto the sample surface in air. The abundant water cluster ions generated in this experiment react with condensed-phase functionalized hydrocarbon model compounds and their mixtures at or near the sample surface. On the other hand, when naphthalene was doped into the DAPCI gas stream, its radical cation served as a charge exchange reagent, yielding molecular radical cations (M+) of the hydrocarbons. This mode of sample ionization provided mass spectra with better signal/noise ratios and without unwanted side-products. It also extended the applicability of DAPCI to petroleum constituents which could not be analyzed through proton transfer (e.g., higher molecular PAHs such as chrysene). The thermochemistry governing the individual ionization processes is discussed and a desorption/ionization mechanism is inferred. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The programmer's task is often taken to be the construction of algorithms, expressed in hierarchical structures of procedures: this view underlies the majority of traditional programming languages, such as Fortran. A different view is appropriate to a wide class of problem, perhaps including some problems in High Energy Physics. The programmer's task is regarded as having three main stages: first, an explicit model is constructed of the reality with which the program is concerned; second, this model is elaborated to produce the required program outputs; third, the resulting program is transformed to run efficiently in the execution environment. The first two stages deal in network structures of sequential processes; only the third is concerned with procedure hierarchies. (orig.)

  17. Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, M A

    1982-01-01

    The programmer's task is often taken to be the construction of algorithms, expressed in hierarchical structures of procedures: this view underlies the majority of traditional programming languages, such as Fortran. A different view is appropriate to a wide class of problem, perhaps including some problems in High Energy Physics. The programmer's task is regarded as having three main stages: first, an explicit model is constructed of the reality with which the program is concerned; second, thi...

  18. Tritium adsorption/release behaviour of advanced EU breeder pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, Matthias H.H., E-mail: matthias.kolb@kit.edu; Rolli, Rolf; Knitter, Regina

    2017-06-15

    The tritium loading of current grades of advanced ceramic breeder pebbles with three different lithium orthosilicate (LOS)/lithium metatitanate (LMT) compositions (20–30 mol% LMT in LOS) and pebbles of EU reference material, was performed in a consistent way. The temperature dependent release of the introduced tritium was subsequently investigated by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to gain insight into the desorption characteristics. The obtained TPD data was decomposed into individual release mechanisms according to well-established desorption kinetics. The analysis showed that the pebble composition of the tested samples does not severely change the release behaviour. Yet, an increased content of lithium metatitanate leads to additional desorption peaks at medium temperatures. The majority of tritium is released by high temperature release mechanisms of chemisorbed tritium, while the release of physisorbed tritium is marginal in comparison. The results allow valuable projections for the tritium release behaviour in a fusion blanket.

  19. Tritium adsorption/release behaviour of advanced EU breeder pebbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Matthias H. H.; Rolli, Rolf; Knitter, Regina

    2017-06-01

    The tritium loading of current grades of advanced ceramic breeder pebbles with three different lithium orthosilicate (LOS)/lithium metatitanate (LMT) compositions (20-30 mol% LMT in LOS) and pebbles of EU reference material, was performed in a consistent way. The temperature dependent release of the introduced tritium was subsequently investigated by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to gain insight into the desorption characteristics. The obtained TPD data was decomposed into individual release mechanisms according to well-established desorption kinetics. The analysis showed that the pebble composition of the tested samples does not severely change the release behaviour. Yet, an increased content of lithium metatitanate leads to additional desorption peaks at medium temperatures. The majority of tritium is released by high temperature release mechanisms of chemisorbed tritium, while the release of physisorbed tritium is marginal in comparison. The results allow valuable projections for the tritium release behaviour in a fusion blanket.

  20. Carbon dioxide and water adsorption on highly epitaxial Delafossite CuFeO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, S.; Joshi, T.; Borisov, P.; Sarabia, M.; Lederman, D.; Cabrera, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    Thermal programmed desorption (TPD) of CO2 and H2O from a 200 nm thick CuFeO2 Delafossite surface was performed in a standard UHV chamber, The CuFeO2 thin film grown using Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) over an Al2O3 (0001) substrate with controlled O2 atmosphere resulted with highly epitaxial crystal structure. The adsorption/desorption of CO2 and H2O process was also monitored with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). Our results revealed that carbon dioxide interacts with CuFeO2 forming Fe carbonates compounds on its surface. Hydroxides were also formed on the surface due to water presence. Using TPD data, Arrhenius plots for CO2 and water desorption were done and activation energy for desorption was obtained. Funds FONDECyT 1130372; Thanks to P. Ferrari.

  1. Acidity, oxophilicity and hydrogen sticking probability of supported metal catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lup, A. Ng K.; Abnisa, F.; Daud, W. M. A. W.; Aroua, M. K.

    2018-03-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation is an oxygen removal process that occurs in the presence of hydrogen and catalysts. This study has shown the importance of acidity, oxophilicity and hydrogen sticking probability of supported metal catalysts in having high hydrodeoxygenation activity and selectivity. These properties are required to ensure the catalyst has high affinity for C-O or C=O bonds and the capability for the adsorption and activation of H2 and O-containing compounds. A theoretical framework of temperature programmed desorption technique was also discussed for the quantitative understanding of these properties. By using NH3-TPD, the nature and abundance of acid sites of catalyst can be determined. By using H2-TPD, the nature and abundance of metallic sites can also be determined. The desorption activation energy could also be determined based on the Redhead analysis of TPD spectra with different heating rates.

  2. Impact of activated carbon, biochar and compost on the desorption and mineralization of phenanthrene in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchal, Geoffrey; Smith, Kilian E.C.; Rein, Arno; Winding, Anne; Wollensen de Jonge, Lis; Trapp, Stefan; Karlson, Ulrich G.

    2013-01-01

    Sorption of PAHs to carbonaceous soil amendments reduces their dissolved concentrations, limiting toxicity but also potentially biodegradation. Therefore, the maximum abiotic desorption of freshly sorbed phenanthrene (≤5 mg kg −1 ) was measured in three soils amended with activated carbon (AC), biochar or compost. Total amounts of phenanthrene desorbed were similar between the different soils, but the amendment type had a large influence. Complete desorption was observed in the unamended and compost amended soils, but this reduced for biochar (41% desorbed) and AC (8% desorbed). Cumulative amounts mineralized were 28% for the unamended control, 19% for compost, 13% for biochar and 4% for AC. Therefore, the effects of the amendments in soil in reducing desorption were also reflected in the extents of mineralization. Modeling was used to analyze key processes, indicating that for the AC and charcoal treatments bacterial activity did not limit mineralization, but rather desorption into the dissolved phase. -- Highlights: •Phenanthrene desorption and mineralization compared in soils with activated carbon, charcoal or compost. •Only activated charcoal and biochar hindered both desorption and mineralization. •A linear relationship was found between the extents desorbed and mineralized. •Modelling indicated that bacterial activity was not limiting but that desorption was. -- Extraction into an exhaustive silicone sink measures the maximum phenanthrene desorption from soils with amendments, and this is reflected in the extent of mineralization

  3. Temperature suppression of STM-induced desorption of hydrogen on Si(100) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Nakayama, T.

    1999-01-01

    The temperature dependence of hydrogen (H) desorption from Si(100) H-terminated surfaces by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is reported for negative sample bias. It is found that the STM induced H desorption rate (R) decreases several orders of magnitude when the substrate temperature...

  4. Desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Sakane, Kohji; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was carried out on the desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent by the batch process. The rate of desorption of uranium with acidic eluent depended on temperature, showing an increase as the temperature was raised. But the rate of desorption with acidic eluent was less dependent on temperature than that obtained when mixed eluent of sodium carbonate-sodium hydrogencarbonate was used. The rate of desorption of uranium did not vary in the range of concentration from 0.3 to 0.5 N, and the rate of desorption with sulfuric acid was slightly higher than that obtained when hydrochloric acid was used. The amount of dissolved titanium decreased as the ratio of adsorbent to eluent (RAE) was increased. At RAE of 10 %, the percentage of dissolved titanium (DTI) was below 0.38 % with sulfuric acid, below 0.7 % with hydrochloric acid. These values were found to be higher than the ones with the carbonate eluent. The elements except uranium, which were adsorbed on the adsorbent, were eluted simultaneously with acidic eluent. The regeneration of the adsorbent after desorption, therefore, was found to be unnecessary. In a repeated test of adsorption-desorption treatment up to five times, the percentage of uranium adsorbed from natural sea water was approximately constant of 85 %. From these results, the application of column process to the desorption of uranium with acidic eluent at room temperature was proposed to be feasible. (author)

  5. Desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Sakane, Kohji; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was carried out on the desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent by the batch process. The rate of desorption of uranium with acidic eluent depended on temperature, showing an increase as the temperature was raised. But the rate of desorption with acidic eluent was less dependent on temperature than that obtained when mixed eluent of sodium carbonate-sodium hydrogencarbonate was used. The difference of the rate of desorption of uranium in the range of concentration from 0.3 to 0.5N was not found, and the rate of desorption with sulfuric acid was slightly higher than that obtained when hydrochloric acid was used. The amount of dissolved titanium decreased as the ratio of adsorbent to eluent (RAE) was increased. At RAE of 10%, the percentage of dissolved titanium (DTI) was below 0.38% with sulfuric acid, below 0.7% with hydrochloric acid. These values were found to be higher than the ones with the carbonate eluent. The elements except uranium, which were adsorbed on the adsorbent, were eluted simultaneously with acidic eluent. The regeneration of the adsorbent after desorption, therefore, was found to be unnecessary. In a repeated test of adsorption-desorption treatment up to five times, the percentage of uranium adsorbed from natural sea water was approximately constant of 85%. From these results, the application of column process to the desorption of uranium with acidic eluent at room temperature was proposed to be feasible. (author)

  6. Equilibrium moisture content (EMC) in Norway spruce during the first and second desorptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben; Engelund, Emil Tang; Thygesen, Lisbeth G.

    2011-01-01

    It is a commonly accepted notion that the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood at a given relative humidity (RH) is highest during initial desorption of green wood due to an irreversible loss of hygroscopicity during the 1st desorption. The basis for this notion is investigated by assessing...

  7. Probing the crossover in CO desorption from single crystal to nanoparticulate Ru model catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Shane; Strebel, Christian Ejersbo; Vendelbo, Søren Bastholm

    2011-01-01

    Crossover in CO desorption behavior and nanoscale structure probed with STM from ruthenium single crystals to PVD and mass-selected nanoparticles.......Crossover in CO desorption behavior and nanoscale structure probed with STM from ruthenium single crystals to PVD and mass-selected nanoparticles....

  8. Thermal desorption of deuterium from modified carbon nanotubes and its correlation to the microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.F.; Keim, Enrico G.; van den Berg, A.H.J.; Smithers, Mark A.; Smithers, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    The process of deuterium desorption from single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) modified by atomic (D) and molecular (D2) deuterium treatment was investigated in an ultrahigh vacuum environment using thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). Microstructural and chemical analyses of SWNT material,

  9. Molecular desorption of stainless steel vacuum chambers irradiated with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Laurent, Jean Michel; Madsen, N

    2003-01-01

    In preparation for the heavy ion program of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, accumulation and cooling tests with lead ion beams have been performed in the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2 MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments (glow-discharges, non-evaporable getter coating) are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H2, CH4, CO, Ar and CO2. Unexpected large values of molecular yields per incident ion up to 2 104 molecules/ion have been observed. The red...

  10. Experimental Investigation of Impact-Induced Molecular Desorption by 4.2 MeV/u Pb ions

    CERN Document Server

    Chanel, M; Laurent, Jean Michel; Madsen, N; Mahner, E

    2001-01-01

    In preparation for the heavy ion program of the LHC, accumulation and cooling test with lead ion beams have been performed in the LEAR storage ring. These tests have revealed that due to the unexpected, large outgassing of the vacuum system, the dynamic pressure of the ring could not be maintained low enough to reach the required beam intensities. To determine the actions necessary to lower the dynamic pressure rise, an experimental program has been initiated for measuring the molecular desorption yields of stainless steel vacuum chambers by the impact of 4.2 MeV/u lead ions with the charge states +27 and +53. The test chambers were exposed either at grazing or at perpendicular incidence. Different surface treatments are reported in terms of the molecular desorption yields for H2, CH4, CO and CO2. Unpexpected large values of molecular yields per incident ion up to 2x104 molecules/ion have been observed. The implications of these results for the vacuum system of the future ion accumulator ring (LEIR) and possi...

  11. Desorption of radioactive cesium by seawater from the suspended particles in river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Masaki; Kirishima, Akira; Nagao, Seiya; Takamiya, Kouichi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Daisuke; Sato, Nobuaki

    2017-10-01

    In 2011, the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant dispersed radioactive cesium throughout the environment, contaminating the land, rivers, and sea. Suspended particles containing clay minerals are the transportation medium for radioactive cesium from rivers to the ocean because cesium is strongly adsorbed between the layers of clay minerals, forming inner sphere complexes. In this study, the adsorption and desorption behaviors of radioactive cesium from suspended clay particles in river water have been investigated. The radioactive cesium adsorption and desorption experiments were performed with two kinds of suspended particulate using a batch method with 137 Cs tracers. In the cesium adsorption treatment performed before the desorption experiments, simulated river water having a total cesium concentration ([ 133+137 Cs + ] total ) of 1.3 nM (10 -9  mol/L) was used. The desorption experiments were mainly conducted at a solid-to-liquid ratio of 0.17 g/L. The desorption agents were natural seawater collected at 10 km north of the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant, artificial seawater, solutions of NaCl, KCl, NH 4 Cl, and 133 CsCl, and ultrapure water. The desorption behavior, which depends on the preloaded cesium concentration in the suspended particles, was also investigated. Based on the cesium desorption experiments using suspended particles, which contained about 1000 ng/g loaded cesium, the order of cesium desorption ratios for each desorption agent was determined as 1 M NaCl (80%) > 470 mM NaCl (65%) > 1 M KCl (30%) ≈ seawater (natural seawater and Daigo artificial seawater) > 1 M NH 4 Cl (20%) > 1 M 133 CsCl (15%) ≫ ultrapure water (2%). Moreover, an interesting result was obtained: The desorption ratio in the 470 mM NaCl solution was much higher than that in seawater, even though the Na + concentrations were identical. These results indicate that the cesium desorption mechanism is not a simple ion exchange reaction

  12. Experimental Study on Methane Desorption from Lumpy Coal under the Action of Hydraulic and Thermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Moisture and thermal are the key factors for influencing methane desorption during CBM exploitation. Using high-pressure water injection technology into coalbed, new fractures and pathways are formed to transport methane. A phenomenon of water-inhibiting gas flow existed. This study is focused on various water pressures impacted on gas-adsorbed coal samples, and then the desorption capacity could be revealed under different conditions. And the results are shown that methane desorption capacity was decreased with the increase in water pressure at room temperature and the downtrend would be steady until water pressure was large enough. Heating could promote gas desorption capacity effectively, with the increasing of water injection pressures, and the promotion of thermal on desorption became more obvious. These results are expected to provide a clearer understanding of theoretical efficiency of heat water or steam injection into coalbed, and they can provide some theoretical and experimental guidance on CBM production and methane control.

  13. Study of adsorption and desorption of water on Li4SiO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, V.; Schumacher, G.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH

    1989-01-01

    Lithium orthosilicate is one of the candidate materials for tritium breeding in a fusion reactor blanket. The release of tritium from this material depens on diffusion in the bulk and on desorption from the surface of the material which is usually covered by adsorbed water. Adsorption and desorption of water was examined to gain an insight into the release of tritium from the surface. Temperature controlled desorption experiments with lithium orthosilicate powder show desorption peaks which are assigned to the desorption of physisorbed water. At temperatures above 390 K and partial pressures up to 1.6 mbar water is absorbed in the first layer on the surface only. Immersion experiments gave much too high values of the heat of immersion for spray dried powder but reasonable 82 kJ/mol of water for spheres of 0.5 mm diameter produced from molten orthosilicate. (orig.)

  14. Radiotracer experiments on the desorption of iodine from paddy soil with and without rice plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Uchida, Shigeo; Yoshida, Satoshi

    1991-01-01

    In order to assess the behavior of radioiodine in rice fields, we have performed laboratory experiments, using 125 I tracer, on the desorption phenomena of iodine from soil during rice cultivation. Most of the 125 I added to the soil was adsorbed by the soil solid phase at the beginning of the experiment. However, the iodine started to desorb into the soil solution with the growth of rice plants. The highest desorption rate of iodine was found around the flowering period, i.e. nearly 30% of the 125 I was desorbed from Ando soil into the soil solution. In contrast to this, no particular increase in the iodine desorption was observed from the uncultivated flooded soil. It was suggested that rice plants had some influence upon iodine desorption from soil and the desorption also depended on the soil types. (author)

  15. Sorption and desorption of insecticides in Brazilian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchini, L.C.; Lord, K.A.; Ruegg, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    The sorption from aqueous solution of ten Brazilian soil types of four organochlorine, two organophosphorus and one carbamate insecticide was determined in the laboratory using gas chromatographic and radiometric techniques. Measurements showed that soils richest in organic matter, sorbed all substances except aldrin more strongly than the other soils. DDT was the most and aldrin the least sorbed organochlorine pesticide, being dieldrin sorbed two to four times more strongly than aldrin. Sorption of lindane varied in different soils. The organophosphate insecticides malathion and parathion were strongly sorbed in the soils richest in organic matter and weakly sorbed in the poorest soils heing moderately sorbed by the other soils. Sorption of carbaryl by all soils is small. Lindane was desorbed from the soil richest in organic matter and the extent of desorption was dependent on the sorption time. (Author) [pt

  16. Sorption-desorption of radiocesium interception potential in tropical soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roque, Mario L.; Boaretto, Rodrigo M.; Boaretto, Antonio E.; Smolders, Erik E.T.

    2000-01-01

    A study of sorption of radiocaesium in soils of tropical climate (Brazil) was carried. The values of definitive fixation of the radiocaesium were determined by analytic methodology of sorption-desorption and the availability to plants were calculated by the determination of radiocesium interception potential (RIP). The values of sorption varied from 1,2 to 74,8% and the fixation varied from 3,2% to 32,2%. The results shown that the radiocaesium did remain adsorbed mainly to the frayed edge site. The low values of interception potential and definitive fixation demonstrated high capacity of the tropical soils in disposal the radionuclide for the solution and, consequently, to plants. (author)

  17. Probe-Substrate Distance Control in Desorption Electrospray Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarger, Tyler J.; Yuill, Elizabeth M.; Baker, Lane A.

    2018-03-01

    We introduce probe-substrate distance (Dps)-control to desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and report a systematic investigation of key experimental parameters. Examination of voltage, flow rate, and nebulizing gas pressure suggests as Dps decreases, the distance-dependent spray current increases, until a critical point. At the critical point the relationship inverts, and the spray current decreases as the probe moves closer to the surface due to constriction of solution flow by the nebulizing gas. Dps control was used to explore the use of spray current as a signal for feedback positioning, while mass spectrometry imaging was performed simultaneously. Further development of this technique is expected to find application in study of structure-function relationships for clinical diagnostics, biological investigation, and materials characterization. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Light-induced atomic desorption and related phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchianti, A; Bogi, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Moi, L [CNISM and Physics Department, University of Siena, 53100 Siena (Italy)], E-mail: burchianti@unisi.it

    2009-07-15

    We review some recent studies on light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) from dielectric surfaces. Alkali-metal atoms adsorbed either on organic films or on porous glass are released into the vapor phase under illumination. The measurements were performed in Pyrex resonance cells either coated with siloxane films or containing a porous glass sample. In both cases, the experimental results show that LIAD can be used to produce atomic densities suitable for most atomic physics experiments. Moreover, we find that photoinduced effects, correlated with LIAD, produce reversible formation and evaporation of alkali-metal clusters in porous glass. These processes depend on the light frequency, making the porous glass transmittance controllable by light.

  19. Study of the radium sorption/desorption on goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassot, S.; Stammose, D.; Mallet, C.; Lefebvre, C.; Ferreux, J.-M.

    2000-01-01

    The oxi-hydroxides, present at trace level in uranium mill tailings, are responsible of about 70% of the 226 radium sorption, half being fixed on crystallized forms. This radionuclide (half time=1622y), present at high level (50 to 100kBq.kg -1 ), can be released in groundwater, involving a possible contamination of the food chain (actual concentration limit=0.37Bq.1 -1 ). So, it is very important to point out the mechanisms of the radium sorption/desorption on crystallized oxi-hydroxides as a function of chemical conditions of the system. The radium sorption on synthetic goethite α-FeOOH has been studied as a function of contact time, initial radium activity, pH, sodium and calcium concentrations. The results show that, after one hour of contact time (necessary to reach equilibrium), the radium sorption increases widely in a pH range 6-7. The increase of Na + concentration is without influence on the radium sorption, indicating the low interactions between sodium and surface sites. At the opposite, the presence of calcium in solution decreases widely the radium sorption, that indicates a competition between calcium and radium for the same kind of sorption sites of the oxi-hydroxide surface. The percentage of radium desorbed increases widely with time, from 1 to 120h and becomes constant at a time higher than 120h. This long equilibrium time for desorption in comparison with sorption one can be explain by a local evolution of the sorption sites of the solid, which become less accessible for the solution in contact. (author)

  20. Laser induced desorption as hydrogen retention diagnostic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlobinski, Miroslaw

    2016-07-15

    Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is a diagnostic method to measure the hydrogen content in the surface of a material exposed to a hydrogen isotope (H,D,T) plasma. It is developed mainly to monitor hydrogen retention in the walls of magnetic fusion devices that have to limit the amount of their fuel tritium mainly due to safety reasons. The development of fusion increasingly focusses on plasma-wall interactions for which in situ diagnostics like LIDS are required that work during plasma operation and without tile removal. The method has first been developed for thin amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H < 500 nm) layers successfully and is studied in the present work on thick (15 μm) layers, carbon fibre composites (CFCs), bulk tungsten (W), W fuzz and mixed C/W materials. In LID a 3 ms Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser pulse heats a spot of diameter 3 mm with 500 {sup MW}/{sub m{sup 2}} on W to 1800 K at the surface and thus above 1300 K within ca. 0.2 mm depth. On C materials (graphite, CFC, a-C:H) this temperature guarantees a nearly complete (>95%) desorption already within 1.5 ms pulse duration. The retained hydrogen atoms are desorbed locally, recombine to molecules and migrate promptly to the surface via internal channels like pores and grain boundaries. Whereas, in W the retained hydrogen atoms have to diffuse through the bulk material, which is a relatively slow process also directed into the depth. The desorbed hydrogen fraction can thus be strongly reduced to 18-91% as observed here. This fraction is measured by melting the central part of a previously heated spot ca. 40 μm deep with a diameter 2 mm, 3 ms laser pulse, releasing the remaining hydrogen. W samples exposed to different plasmas in TEXTOR, Pilot-PSI, PSI-2, PADOS and PlaQ show that the desorption fraction of LID mainly decreases due to higher sample temperature during plasma exposure. The heat causes deeper hydrogen diffusion and/or stronger hydrogen trapping due to creation of traps with higher

  1. Laser induced desorption as hydrogen retention diagnostic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlobinski, Miroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is a diagnostic method to measure the hydrogen content in the surface of a material exposed to a hydrogen isotope (H,D,T) plasma. It is developed mainly to monitor hydrogen retention in the walls of magnetic fusion devices that have to limit the amount of their fuel tritium mainly due to safety reasons. The development of fusion increasingly focusses on plasma-wall interactions for which in situ diagnostics like LIDS are required that work during plasma operation and without tile removal. The method has first been developed for thin amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H < 500 nm) layers successfully and is studied in the present work on thick (15 μm) layers, carbon fibre composites (CFCs), bulk tungsten (W), W fuzz and mixed C/W materials. In LID a 3 ms Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser pulse heats a spot of diameter 3 mm with 500 MW / m 2 on W to 1800 K at the surface and thus above 1300 K within ca. 0.2 mm depth. On C materials (graphite, CFC, a-C:H) this temperature guarantees a nearly complete (>95%) desorption already within 1.5 ms pulse duration. The retained hydrogen atoms are desorbed locally, recombine to molecules and migrate promptly to the surface via internal channels like pores and grain boundaries. Whereas, in W the retained hydrogen atoms have to diffuse through the bulk material, which is a relatively slow process also directed into the depth. The desorbed hydrogen fraction can thus be strongly reduced to 18-91% as observed here. This fraction is measured by melting the central part of a previously heated spot ca. 40 μm deep with a diameter 2 mm, 3 ms laser pulse, releasing the remaining hydrogen. W samples exposed to different plasmas in TEXTOR, Pilot-PSI, PSI-2, PADOS and PlaQ show that the desorption fraction of LID mainly decreases due to higher sample temperature during plasma exposure. The heat causes deeper hydrogen diffusion and/or stronger hydrogen trapping due to creation of traps with higher binding energy

  2. The use of angle resolved electron and photon stimulated desorption for the determination of molecular structure at surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madey, T.E.; Stockbauer, R.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review of recent data related to the use of angle-resolved electron stimulated desorption and photon stimulated desorption in determining the structures of molecules at surfaces is made. Examples include a variety of structural assignments based on ESIAD (electron stimulated desorption ion angular distributions), the observation of short-range local ordering effects induced in adsorbed molecules by surface impurities, and the application of photon stimulated desorption to both ionic and covalent adsorbate systems. (Author) [pt

  3. Surface desorption and bulk diffusion models of tritium release from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, R.E., E-mail: ravila@cchen.c [Departamento de Materiales Nucleares, Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Cas. 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Pena, L.A.; Jimenez, J.C. [Departamento de Produccion y Servicios, Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Cas. 188-D, Santiago (Chile)

    2010-10-30

    The release of tritium from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebbles, in batch experiments, is studied by means of temperature programmed desorption. Data reduction focuses on the analysis of the non-oxidized and oxidized tritium components in terms of release limited by diffusion from the bulk of ceramic grains, or by first or second order surface desorption. By analytical and numerical methods the in-furnace tritium release is deconvoluted from the ionization chamber transfer functions, for which a semi-empirical form is established. The release from Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} follows second order desorption kinetics, requiring a temperature for a residence time of 1 day (T{sub 1dRes}) of 620 K, and 603 K, of the non-oxidized, and the oxidized components, respectively. The release from Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} appears as limited by either diffusion from the bulk of the ceramic grains, or by first order surface desorption, the first possibility being the more probable. The respective values of T{sub 1dRes} for the non-oxidized component are 661 K, according to the first order surface desorption model, and 735 K within the bulk diffusion limited model.

  4. Adsorption and desorption for dynamics transport of hexavalent chromium Cr(Ⅵ) in soil column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, J.

    2017-12-01

    Batch experiments have been carried out to study the adsorption of heavy metals in soils, and the migration and transformation of hexavalent chromium Cr(Ⅵ) in the soil of a vegetable base were studied by dynamic adsorption and desorption soil column experiments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of initial concentration and pH value on the adsorption process of Cr(Ⅵ). Breakthrough curve were used to evaluate the capacity of Cr(Ⅵ) adsorption in soil columns. The results show that the higher the initial concentration, the worse the adsorption capacity of Cr(Ⅵ). The adsorption of Cr(Ⅵ) was strongly sensitive to pH value. The capacity of Cr(Ⅵ) adsorption is maximized at very low pH value. This may be due to changes in pH that cause a series of complex reactions in Cr(Ⅵ). In a strongly acidic environment, the reaction of Cr(Ⅵ) with hydrogen ions is accompanied by the formation of Cr3+, which reacts with the soil free iron-aluminum oxide to produce hydroxide in the soil. The results of the desorption experiments indicate that Cr(Ⅵ) is more likely to leach from this soil, but if the eluent is strong acid solution, the leaching process will be slow and persistent. The program CXTFIT was used to fit the breakthrough curve to estimate parameters. The results of the calculation of the dispersion coefficient (D) can be obtained by this program. The two-site model fit the breakthrough curve data of Cr(Ⅵ) well, and the parameters calculated by CXTFIT can be used to explain the behavior of Cr(Ⅵ) migration and transformation in soil columns. When pH=2, the retardation factor (R) reach at 79.71 while the value of the R is generally around 10 in other experiments. The partitioning coefficient β shows that more than half of the adsorption sites are rate-limited in this adsorption process and non-equilibrium effects the Cr(Ⅵ) transport process in this soil.

  5. Preparación y caracterización de las propiedades fisicoquímicas del óxido mixto NiO/MgO-La2O3. Efecto de la variación de la composición del soporte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lugo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mixed oxide catalysts of NiO/MgO-La2O3 varying the proportions support were synthesized through the Lunsford method, successive impregnation. Different techniques were used to determine their physicochemical properties., EDX analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, XRD, thermal methods, TGA, DSC, BET surface area method, temperature programmed reduction, TPR-H2, temperature programmed desorption, TPD-O2 and TPD-NO. The results show that nickel oxide displays a strong interaction with support, depending mainly on the proportion of these components.

  6. Hydrogen desorption kinetics from zirconium hydride and zirconium metal in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride is important in many nuclear design and safety applications. In this paper, a coordinated experimental and modeling study has been used to explicitly demonstrate the applicability of existing kinetic theories for hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride and α-zirconium. A static synthesis method was used to produce δ-zirconium hydride, and the crystallographic phases of the zirconium hydride were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Three obvious stages, involving δ-zirconium hydride, a two-phase region, and α-zirconium, were observed in the hydrogen desorption spectra of two zirconium hydride specimens with H/Zr ratios of 1.62 and 1.64, respectively, which were obtained using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). A continuous, one-dimensional, two-phase moving boundary model, coupled with the zero- and second-order kinetics of hydrogen desorption from δ-zirconium hydride and α-zirconium, respectively, has been developed to reproduce the TDS experimental results. A comparison of the modeling predictions with the experimental results indicates that a zero-order kinetic model is valid for description of hydrogen flux away from the δ-hydride phase, and that a second-order kinetic model works well for hydrogen desorption from α-Zr if the activation energy of desorption is optimized to be 70% of the value reported in the literature

  7. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl (U(VI)) desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments

  8. Desorption isotherms of cementitious materials: study of an accelerated protocol and estimation of RVE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qier

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of French radioactive waste management and storage, the durability evaluation and prediction of concrete structures requires the knowledge of desorption isotherm of concrete. The aim of the present study is to develop an accelerated experimental method to obtain desorption isotherm of cementitious materials more quickly and to estimate the Representative Volume Element (RVE) size related to the desorption isotherm of concrete. In order to ensure that experimental results can be statistically considered representative, a great amount of sliced samples of cementitious materials with three different thicknesses (1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm) have been de-saturated. The effect of slice thickness and the saturation condition on the mass variation kinetics and the desorption isotherms is analyzed. The influence of the aggregate distribution on the water content and the water saturation degree is also analyzed. A method based on statistical analysis of water content and water saturation degree is proposed to estimate the RVE for water desorption experiment of concrete. The evolution of shrinkage with relative humidity is also followed for each material during the water desorption experiment. A protocol of cycle of rapid desaturation-re-saturation is applied and shows the existence of hysteresis between desorption and adsorption. (author)

  9. Non-isothermal desorption and nucleate boiling in a water-salt droplet LiBr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura Sergey Ya.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental data on desorption and nucleate boiling in a droplet of LiBr-water solution were obtained. An increase in salt concentration in a liquid-layer leads to a considerable decrease in the rate of desorption. The significant decrease in desorption intensity with a rise of initial mass concentration of salt has been observed. Evaporation rate of distillate droplet is constant for a long time period. At nucleate boiling of a water-salt solution of droplet several characteristic regimes occur: heating, nucleate boiling, desorption without bubble formation, formation of the solid, thin crystalline-hydrate film on the upper droplet surface, and formation of the ordered crystalline-hydrate structures during the longer time periods. For the final stage of desorption there is a big difference in desorption rate for initial salt concentration, C0, 11% and 51%. This great difference in the rate of desorption is associated with significantly more thin solution film for C0 = 11% and higher heat flux.

  10. Desorption behaviors of BDE-28 and BDE-47 from natural soils with different organic carbon contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenxin; Cheng Fangfang; Li Weibo; Xing Baoshan; Tao Shu

    2012-01-01

    Desorption kinetic and isothermal characteristics of BDE-28 and BDE-47 were investigated using natural soils with different organic carbon fractions. The results indicated that a two-compartment first-order model with dominant contribution of slow desorption could adequately describe the released kinetics of studied PBDEs. Desorption isotherms of different samples could be fitted well by linear distribution model or nonlinear Freundlich model. Moreover, most desorption procedures roughly exhibited hysteresis with respect to preceding sorption ones. At the statistically significant level of 0.05 or 0.1, total organic carbon content (f OC ) exhibited significant correlations with the fitted parameters by the isothermal models. The correlations of f OC and SOM fractions (e.g., fulvic acid and humin) with the single point desorption coefficients at lower aqueous concentrations of studied PBDEs were significant; while at higher aqueous concentrations, the relationships were less significant or insignificant. Our findings may facilitate a comprehensive understanding on behaviors of PBDEs in soil systems. - Highlights: ► A two-compartment first-order kinetic model for the PBDEs studied was established. ► Isotherm was fitted well by a linear distribution or a nonlinear Freundlich model. ► Desorption commonly exhibited somewhat hysteresis relative to sorption. ► Soil organic carbon fractions showed close correlations with the model parameters. - Two-compartment first-order model, and linear distribution model or nonlinear Freundlich model could well elucidate desorption kinetics and isotherms of PBDEs in natural soils, respectively.

  11. Positron-annihilation-induced ion desorption from TiO2(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, T.; Hirayama, T.; Nagashima, Y.

    2014-05-01

    We have investigated the positron-stimulated desorption of ions from a TiO2(110) surface. Desorbed O+ ions were detected in coincidence with the emission of annihilation γ rays. The energy dependence of the ion yields shows that the O+ ions were detected at energies much lower than the previously reported threshold for electron impact desorption corresponding to the excitation energy of Ti(3p) core electrons. These results provide evidence that core-hole creation by positron annihilation with electrons in the core levels leads to ion desorption.

  12. First-principles calculations of helium and neon desorption from cavities in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddin, A Charaf; Pizzagalli, L

    2012-01-01

    Combining density functional theory, the nudged elastic band technique, and the ultradense fluid model, we investigated the desorption process of He and Ne in silicon. Our results show that the internal surfaces of gas-filled bubbles are not a limiting factor during desorption experiments, since the surface reconstruction opens diffusion paths easier than in the bulk. We show that the vibrational contribution to the energy of helium in the bulk has to be considered in order to determine realistic pressures in the bubbles, when comparing experiments and simulations. At the maximum of desorption, an average pressure of 1-2 GPa is computed. (paper)

  13. Silver nanostructures in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekuła, Justyna; Nizioł, Joanna; Rode, Wojciech; Ruman, Tomasz

    2015-09-21

    Silver nanoparticles have been successfully applied as a matrix replacement for the laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-ToF-MS). Nanoparticles, producing spectra with highly reduced chemical background in the low m/z region, are perfectly suited for low-molecular weight compound analysis and imaging. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can efficiently absorb ultraviolet laser radiation, transfer energy to the analyte and promote analyte desorption, but also constitute a source of silver ions suitable for analyte cationisation. This review provides an overview of the literature on silver nanomaterials as non-conventional desorption and ionization promoters in LDI-MS and mass spectrometry imaging.

  14. Desorption dynamics of deuterium molecules from the Si(100)-(3×1) dideuteride surface

    OpenAIRE

    Niida, T; Tsurumaki, Hiroshi; Namiki, Akira

    2006-01-01

    We measured polar angle ()-resolved time-of-flight spectra of D2 molecules desorbing from the Si(100)-(3×1) dideuteride surface. The desorbing D2 molecules exhibit a considerable translational heating with mean desorption kinetic energies of 0.25 eV, which is mostly independent of the desorption angles for 0°30°. The observed desorption dynamics of deuterium was discussed along the principle of detailed balance to predict their adsorption dynamics onto the monohydride Si surface.

  15. Desorption of H atoms from graphite (0001) using XUV free electron laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemer, B.; Olsen, Thomas; Hoger, T.

    2010-01-01

    The desorption of neutral H atoms from graphite with femtosecond XUV pulses is reported. The velocity distribution of the atoms peaks at extremely low kinetic energies. A DFT-based electron scattering calculation traces this distribution to desorption out of specific adsorption sites on graphite......, and identifies the highest vibrational state in the adsorbate potential as a major source for the slow atoms. It is evident that multiple electron scattering processes are required for this desorption. A direct electronic excitation of a repulsive hydrogen-carbon bond seems not to be important....

  16. High throughput reaction screening using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wleklinski, Michael; Loren, Bradley P; Ferreira, Christina R; Jaman, Zinia; Avramova, Larisa; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Thompson, David H; Cooks, R Graham

    2018-02-14

    We report the high throughput analysis of reaction mixture arrays using methods and data handling routines that were originally developed for biological tissue imaging. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is applied in a continuous on-line process at rates that approach 10 4 reactions per h at area densities of up to 1 spot per mm 2 (6144 spots per standard microtiter plate) with the sprayer moving at ca. 10 4 microns per s. Data are analyzed automatically by MS using in-house software to create ion images of selected reagents and products as intensity plots in standard array format. Amine alkylation reactions were used to optimize the system performance on PTFE membrane substrates using methanol as the DESI spray/analysis solvent. Reaction times can be screening of processes like N -alkylation and Suzuki coupling reactions as reported herein. Products and by-products were confirmed by on-line MS/MS upon rescanning of the array.

  17. PAHs soil decontamination in two steps: desorption and electrochemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, M Teresa; Gómez, Jose; Pazos, Marta; Sanromán, M Angeles

    2009-07-15

    The presence of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils poses a potential threat to human health if exposure levels are too high. Nevertheless, the removal of these contaminants presents a challenge to scientists and engineers. The high hydrophobic nature of PAHs enables their strong sorption onto soil or sediments. Thus, the use of surfactants could favour the release of sorbed hydrophobic organic compounds from contaminated soils. In this work, five surfactants, namely Brij 35, Tergitol NP10, Tween 20, Tween 80 and Tyloxapol, are evaluated on the desorption of PAHs [benzanthracene (BzA), fluoranthene (FLU), and pyrene (PYR), single and in mixture] from a model sample such as kaolin. In all cases, the best results were obtained when Tween 80 was employed. In order to obtain the global decontamination of PAHs, their electrochemical degradation is investigated. It is concluded that the order of increasing degradation for single compounds is BzA>FLU>PYR when they are subject to the same electrochemical treatment. In addition, there is a direct relationship between the ionization potential and the electrochemical degradation of PAH.

  18. Sustainable remediation of mercury contaminated soils by thermal desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, María J; Millán, Rocio; López, Félix A; Alguacil, Francisco J; Cañadas, Inmaculada

    2016-03-01

    Mercury soil contamination is an important environmental problem that needs the development of sustainable and efficient decontamination strategies. This work is focused on the application of a remediation technique that maintains soil ecological and environmental services to the extent possible as well as search for alternative sustainable land uses. Controlled thermal desorption using a solar furnace at pilot scale was applied to different types of soils, stablishing the temperature necessary to assure the functionality of these soils and avoid the Hg exchange to the other environmental compartments. Soil mercury content evolution (total, soluble, and exchangeable) as temperature increases and induced changes in selected soil quality indicators are studied and assessed. On total Hg, the temperature at which it is reduced until acceptable levels depends on the intended soil use and on how restrictive are the regulations. For commercial, residential, or industrial uses, soil samples should be heated to temperatures higher than 280 °C, at which more than 80 % of the total Hg is released, reaching the established legal total Hg level and avoiding eventual risks derived from high available Hg concentrations. For agricultural use or soil natural preservation, conversely, maintenance of acceptable levels of soil quality limit heating temperatures, and additional treatments must be considered to reduce available Hg. Besides total Hg concentration in soils, available Hg should be considered to make final decisions on remediation treatments and potential future uses. Graphical Abstract Solar energy use for remediation of soils affected by mercury.

  19. Solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapala, Markus; Teppo, Jaakko; Ollikainen, Elisa; Kiiski, Iiro; Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-03-17

    A new ambient mass spectrometry method, solvent jet desorption capillary photoionization (DCPI), is described. The method uses a solvent jet generated by a coaxial nebulizer operated at ambient conditions with nitrogen as nebulizer gas. The solvent jet is directed onto a sample surface, from which analytes are extracted into the solvent and ejected from the surface in secondary droplets formed in collisions between the jet and the sample surface. The secondary droplets are directed into the heated capillary photoionization (CPI) device, where the droplets are vaporized and the gaseous analytes are ionized by 10 eV photons generated by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) krypton discharge lamp. As the CPI device is directly connected to the extended capillary inlet of the MS, high ion transfer efficiency to the vacuum of MS is achieved. The solvent jet DCPI provides several advantages: high sensitivity for nonpolar and polar compounds with limit of detection down to low fmol levels, capability of analyzing small and large molecules, and good spatial resolution (250 μm). Two ionization mechanisms are involved in DCPI: atmospheric pressure photoionization, capable of ionizing polar and nonpolar compounds, and solvent assisted inlet ionization capable of ionizing larger molecules like peptides. The feasibility of DCPI was successfully tested in the analysis of polar and nonpolar compounds in sage leaves and chili pepper.

  20. Temperature dependences in electron-stimulated desorption of neutral europium

    CERN Document Server

    Ageev, V N; Madey, T E

    2003-01-01

    The electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) yield for neutral europium (Eu) atoms from Eu layers adsorbed on oxygen-covered tungsten surfaces has been measured as a function of electron energy, europium coverage and degree of oxidation of tungsten, with an emphasis on effects of substrate temperature. The measurements have been carried out using a time-of-flight method and surface ionization detector. We expand on an earlier report, and compare ESD of multivalent Eu with ESD of monovalent alkali atoms, studied previously. The Eu atom ESD is a complicated function of Eu coverage, electron energy and substrate temperature. In the coverage range 0.05-0.35 monolayer (ML), overlapping resonant-like Eu atom yield peaks are observed at electron energies E sub e of 36 and 41 eV that might be associated with Eu or W shallow core level excitations. Additional resonant-like peaks are seen at E sub e of 54 and 84 eV that are associated with W 5p and 5s level excitations. The Eu atom yield peaks at 36 and 41 eV are seen only...

  1. Deuterium depth profiles in metals using imaging field desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panitz, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Depth profiles of 80 eV deuterium ions implanted in-situ into (110) tungsten have been measured by Imaging, Field-Desorption Mass Spectrometry. The relative abundance of deuterium was measured from the surface to a depth of 300A with less than 3A depth resolution by controlled field-evaporation of the specimen, and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. The position of the depth distribution maximum (57 +- 3A from the surface) is shown to be in close agreement with that predicted theoretically for low energy deuterium implants using an amorphous-solid model. Structure in the distribution is attributed to surface morphology and channeling phenomena in the near surface region. Implanted impurity species from the ion source and tungsten surface have also been observed. For C + , C 2+ and 0 + , penetration is limited to less than 30A, with abundance decreasing exponentially from the surface. These results are interpreted in the context of the CTR first-wall impurity problem, and are used to suggest a novel method for in-situ characterization of low energy plasma species in operating CTR devices

  2. Selective adsorption-desorption method for the enrichment of krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuasa, Y.; Ohta, M.; Watanabe, A.; Tani, A.; Takashima, N.

    1975-01-01

    Selective adsorption-desorption method has been developed as an effective means of enriching krypton and xenon gases. A seriesof laboratory-scale tests were performed to provide some basic data of the method when applied to off-gas streams of nuclear power plants. For the first step of the enrichment process of the experiments, krypton was adsorbed on solid adsorbents from dilute mixtures with air at temperatures ranging from -50 0 C to -170 0 C. After the complete breakthrough was obtained, the adsorption bed was evacuated at low temperature by a vacuum pump. By combining these two steps krypton was highly enriched on the adsorbents, and the enrichment factor for krypton was calculated as the product of individual enrichment factors of each step. Two types of adsorbents, coconut charcoal and molecular sieves 5A, were used. Experimental results showed that the present method gave the greater enrichment factor than the conventional method which used selective adsorption step only. (U.S.)

  3. Thermal desorption treatability test conducted with VAC*TRAX Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act, requiring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment standards. In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity, where off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed waste with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of mixed waste. DOE-AL manages nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment units (MTUs) to treat waste at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed wastes must remove the hazardous component (i.e., meet RCRA treatment standards) and contain the radioactive component in a form that will protect the worker, public, and environment. On the basis of the recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) include thermal desorption (TD), evaporative oxidation, and waste water evaporation

  4. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for fast DNA analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.H.; Ch`ang, L.Y.; Taranenko, N.I.; Allman, S.L.; Tang, K.; Matteson, K.J.

    1995-09-01

    During the past few years, major effort has been directed toward developing mass spectrometry to measure biopolymers because of the great potential benefit to biomedical research. Hellenkamp and his co-workers were the first to report that large polypeptide molecules can be ionized and detected without significant fragmentation when a greater number of nicotinic acid molecules are used as a matrix. This method is now well known as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Since then, various groups have reported measurements of very large proteins by MALDI. Reliable protein analysis by MALDI is more or less well established. However, the application of MALDI to nucleic acids analysis has been found to be much more difficult. Most research on the measurement of nucleic acid by MALDI were stimulated by the Human Genome Project. Up to now, the only method for reliable routine analysis of nucleic acid is gel electrophoresis. Different sizes of nucleic acids can be separated in gel medium when a high electric field is applied to the gel. However, the time needed to separate different sizes of DNA segments usually takes from several minutes to several hours. If MALDI can be successfully used for nucleic acids analysis, the analysis time can be reduced to less than I millisecond. In addition, no tagging with radioactive materials or chemical dyes is needed. In this work, we will review recent progress related to MALDI for DNA analysis.

  5. Thermal Desorption Analysis of Effective Specific Soil Surface Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagin, A. V.; Bashina, A. S.; Klyueva, V. V.; Kubareva, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    A new method of assessing the effective specific surface area based on the successive thermal desorption of water vapor at different temperature stages of sample drying is analyzed in comparison with the conventional static adsorption method using a representative set of soil samples of different genesis and degree of dispersion. The theory of the method uses the fundamental relationship between the thermodynamic water potential (Ψ) and the absolute temperature of drying ( T): Ψ = Q - aT, where Q is the specific heat of vaporization, and a is the physically based parameter related to the initial temperature and relative humidity of the air in the external thermodynamic reservoir (laboratory). From gravimetric data on the mass fraction of water ( W) and the Ψ value, Polyanyi potential curves ( W(Ψ)) for the studied samples are plotted. Water sorption isotherms are then calculated, from which the capacity of monolayer and the target effective specific surface area are determined using the BET theory. Comparative analysis shows that the new method well agrees with the conventional estimation of the degree of dispersion by the BET and Kutilek methods in a wide range of specific surface area values between 10 and 250 m2/g.

  6. Evaluation of contaminated soil remediation by low temperature thermal desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, L.; Punt, M.

    1993-01-01

    Soil contaminated with diesel and aviation fuels has been excavated and stored at a Canadian Forces Base in Ontario. Because of the volatile nature of this contamination, it was determined that low temperature thermal desorption (LTTD) would be an effective method of remediating this soil. A full scale evaluation of LTTD technology was conducted at the base to determine its acceptability for other sites. In the LTTD process, soil enters a primary treatment unit and is heated to a sufficiently high temperature to volatilize the hydrocarbon contaminants. Offgases are treated in a secondary combustion chamber. Primary treatment kiln temperature was maintained at 260 degree C for each test during the evaluation. The LTTD unit was evaluated for two sets of operating conditions: two levels of inlet soil total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations and two feed rates (16,000 and 22,000 kg/h). Emissions from the LTTD unit were monitored continuously for volatile organics, moisture, and gas velocity. Results of the tests and emissions analyses are presented. Outlet soil hydrocarbon concentration requirements of 100 ppM were not exceeded during the evaluation. Air hydrocarbon emissions only exceeded 100-ppM limits under upset conditions, otherwise virturally no total hydrocarbon content was observed in the stack gas. 5 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs

  7. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Pesticide sorption and desorption from soils having different land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Madrigal Monárrez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out within the framework of a multidisciplinary project for evaluating buffer zones for combating pesticide contamination of surface water. Such areas are effective in removing pesticides transported by run-off; however, little information is available about the fate of the pesticides so intercepted. Two herbicides having contrasting properties (isoproturon, moderately hydrophobic (log Kow = 2.5, diflufenican, strongly hydrophobic (log K ow = 4.9 and isopropylaniline (an isoproturon metabolite were used for characterising sorption and desorption from soil having three different land uses: grass buffer strip, woodland and cultivated plot. The experiments were carried out in controlled laboratory conditions using isoproturon labelled with 14C in the benzene ring. The results demonstrated that diflufenican and isopropilaniline retention was more significant than isoproturon in three soils. The three molecules’ Kd values revealed that isoproturon and diflufenicanil retention was more important in woodland soil where carbon content was more significant (ZB 0-2: Kd IPU = 15.1 Ls kg-1; Kd DFF = 169.2 Ls kg-1. Isopropilanilina Kd was higher in grass buffer strip soil (BE 0-2: Kd IPA = 53.1 L kg-1. These differences were related to different organic matter content and nature according to the type of land use.

  10. Kinetics of Surfactant Desorption at an Air–Solution Interface

    KAUST Repository

    Morgan, C. E.

    2012-12-18

    The kinetics of re-equilibration of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate at the air-solution interface have been studied using neutron reflectivity. The experimental arrangement incorporates a novel flow cell in which the subphase can be exchanged (diluted) using a laminar flow while the surface region remains unaltered. The rate of the re-equilibration is relatively slow and occurs over many tens of minutes, which is comparable with the dilution time scale of approximately 10-30 min. A detailed mathematical model, in which the rate of the desorption is determined by transport through a near-surface diffusion layer into a diluted bulk solution below, is developed and provides a good description of the time-dependent adsorption data. A key parameter of the model is the ratio of the depth of the diffusion layer, H c, to the depth of the fluid, Hf, and we find that this is related to the reduced Péclet number, Pe*, for the system, via Hc/Hf = C/Pe*1/2. Although from a highly idealized experimental arrangement, the results provide an important insight into the "rinse mechanism", which is applicable to a wide variety of domestic and industrial circumstances. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. Temperature dependence of CO desorption kinetics at a novel Pt-on-Au/C PEM fuel cell anode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitois, A.; Pilenga, A.; Pfrang, A.

    2010-01-01

    techniques. The temperature dependence of the CO desorption process on this system has been investigated using isotopic exchange experiments. The CO desorption kinetics have been studied as a function of temperature and flow rate. Desorption rate constants have been measured for a temperature range between...... degrees C. The dependence in temperature of the desorption rate constants for the novel Pt-on-Au/C system is however much lower than that observed for the Pt/C system. This suggests that the nature of the substrate has a significant influence on the catalyst surface properties. It shows that, in surface...... 25 and 150 degrees C. These desorption rate constants have been compared with the benchmarking desorption rate data obtained for the commercial Pt/C catalyst under similar experimental conditions. A comparable desorption rate constant for the Pt-on-Au/C and Pt/C systems has been obtained at 25...

  12. Sorption/ desorption studies of some radionuclides between disposal soil fractions and ground water. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Reefy, S.A.; Ali, A.

    1996-01-01

    The radioactive waste management program in egypt includes shallow land disposal area for waste package disposal. The proposed site is located to the east of the Hot laboratory centre at Inchas. Assessment of the efficiency of the different sediments and rocks found in this area as a barrier against release of radioactive nuclide to the environment is of major importance. This study is related to evaluate the migration of Cs, Co, and Am within the environment of this site. In this concern, seven soil fractions were taken from a digging well from the proposed disposal site at different depths down to the basalt sheets. A column was constructed containing the soil fractions representing the stratigraphic successions taken from the site. The radionuclides; Cs-137, Co-60, and Am-241 were in this investigation representatives for mono, di- and tri-valent elements and also represented the radionuclides which are mostly associated with radioactive wastes. The sorption/ desorption studies of these radionuclides with the different soil fractions and ground water from the proposed disposal site were carried out. The results obtained were used to predict the migration pathways of these radionuclides within the disposal environment. 2 figs., 1 tab

  13. Document authentication at molecular levels using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Jia, Bin; Ding, Liying; Hong, Feng; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Chen, Rui; Zhou, Shumin; Chen, Huanwen; Fang, Xiang

    2013-09-01

    Molecular images of documents were obtained by sequentially scanning the surface of the document using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (DAPCI-MS), which was operated in either a gasless, solvent-free or methanol vapor-assisted mode. The decay process of the ink used for handwriting was monitored by following the signal intensities recorded by DAPCI-MS. Handwritings made using four types of inks on four kinds of paper surfaces were tested. By studying the dynamic decay of the inks, DAPCI-MS imaging differentiated a 10-min old from two 4 h old samples. Non-destructive forensic analysis of forged signatures either handwritten or computer-assisted was achieved according to the difference of the contour in DAPCI images, which was attributed to the strength personalized by different writers. Distinction of the order of writing/stamping on documents and detection of illegal printings were accomplished with a spatial resolution of about 140 µm. A Matlab® written program was developed to facilitate the visualization of the similarity between signature images obtained by DAPCI-MS. The experimental results show that DAPCI-MS imaging provides rich information at the molecular level and thus can be used for the reliable document analysis in forensic applications. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Operable Unit 7-13/14 in situ thermal desorption treatability study work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.; Nickelson, D.; Hyde, R.

    1999-01-01

    This Work Plan provides technical details for conducting a treatability study that will evaluate the application of in situ thermal desorption (ISTD) to landfill waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). ISTD is a form of thermally enhanced vapor vacuum extraction that heats contaminated soil and waste underground to raise its temperature and thereby vaporize and destroy most organics. An aboveground vapor vacuum collection and treatment system then destroys or absorbs the remaining organics and vents carbon dioxide and water to the atmosphere. The technology is a byproduct of an advanced oil-well thermal extraction program. The purpose of the ISTD treatability study is to fill performance-based data gaps relative to off-gas system performance, administrative feasibility, effects of the treatment on radioactive contaminants, worker safety during mobilization and demobilization, and effects of landfill type waste on the process (time to remediate, subsidence potential, underground fires, etc.). By performing this treatability study, uncertainties associated with ISTD as a selected remedy will be reduced, providing a better foundation of remedial recommendations and ultimate selection of remedial actions for the SDA

  15. Sorption/ desorption studies of some radionuclides between disposal soil fractions and ground water. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Reefy, S A; Ali, A [Hot Lab. Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The radioactive waste management program in egypt includes shallow land disposal area for waste package disposal. The proposed site is located to the east of the Hot laboratory centre at Inchas. Assessment of the efficiency of the different sediments and rocks found in this area as a barrier against release of radioactive nuclide to the environment is of major importance. This study is related to evaluate the migration of Cs, Co, and Am within the environment of this site. In this concern, seven soil fractions were taken from a digging well from the proposed disposal site at different depths down to the basalt sheets. A column was constructed containing the soil fractions representing the stratigraphic successions taken from the site. The radionuclides; Cs-137, Co-60, and Am-241 were in this investigation representatives for mono, di- and tri-valent elements and also represented the radionuclides which are mostly associated with radioactive wastes. The sorption/ desorption studies of these radionuclides with the different soil fractions and ground water from the proposed disposal site were carried out. The results obtained were used to predict the migration pathways of these radionuclides within the disposal environment. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Review of Heavy-ion Induced Desorption Studies for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E

    2008-01-01

    During high-intensity heavy-ion operation of several particle accelerators worldwide, large dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were caused by lost beam ions that impacted under grazing angle onto the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced desorption, observed, for example, at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion intensity, luminosity, and beam lifetime of the accelerator. For the heavyion program at CERN's Large Hadron Collider collisions between beams of fully stripped lead (208Pb82+) ions with a beam energy of 2.76 TeV/u and a nominal luminosity of 10**27 cm**-2 s**-1 are foreseen. The GSI future project FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) aims at a beam intensity of 10**12 uranium (238U28+) ions per second to be extracted from the synchrotron SIS18. Over the past years an experimental effort has been made to study the observed dynamic vacuum degradations, which are important to understand and overcome for present and future particle accelerators. The paper reviews the resu...

  17. Sorption and desorption of tritiated water vapor on piping materials of nuclear fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Satoru; Ohmori, Rumi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Sorption and desorption of D{sub 2}O on Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiO, SS316 powders were studied at ambient temperature. When D{sub 2}O were contacted with samples after drying at 303K, broad peak was observed at 2100-2700cm{sup -1} on Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO. Sorption and desorption rate depended on wave numbers. Isotope exchange rate with H{sub 2}O vapor was faster than dry desorption rate. By heating pretreatment, sorption amount and desorption rate for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO decreased. For SS316, broad peak was observed only after heating pretreatment at 673K. (author)

  18. Catalitic effect of Co on hydrogen desorption form nanostucturated magnesium hydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matović Ljiljana Lj.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the influence of 3d transition metal addition on desorption kinetics of MgH2 ball milling of MgH2-Co blends was performed under Ar. Microstructural and morphological characterization, performed by XRD and SEM, show a huge correlation with thermal stability and hydrogen desorption properties investigated by DSC. A complex desorption behavior is correlated with the dispersion of the metal additive particles on hydride matrix. The activation energy for H2 desorption from MgH2-Co composite was calculated from both non-isothermal and isothermal methods to be 130 kJ/mol which means that mutually diffusion and nucleation and growth of new phase control the dehydration process.

  19. Low energy electron stimulated desorption from DNA films dosed with oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Massey, Sylvain; Sanche, Leon [Groupe en sciences des radiations, Faculte de medecine et des sciences de la sante, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2012-06-21

    Desorption of anions stimulated by 1-18 eV electron impact on self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of single DNA strands is measured as a function of film temperature (50-250 K). The SAMs, composed of 10 nucleotides, are dosed with O{sub 2}. The OH{sup -} desorption yields increase markedly with exposure to O{sub 2} at 50 K and are further enhanced upon heating. In contrast, the desorption yields of O{sup -}, attributable to dissociative electron attachment to trapped O{sub 2} molecules decrease with heating. Irradiation of the DNA films prior to the deposition of O{sub 2} shows that this surprising increase in OH{sup -} desorption, at elevated temperatures, arises from the reaction of O{sub 2} with damaged DNA sites. These results thus appear to be a manifestation of the so-called 'oxygen fixation' effect, well known in radiobiology.

  20. Desorption of organic molecules with fast incident atomic and polyatomic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.E.; Salehpour, M.; Fishel, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    In 1974, Macfarlane and coworkers introduced a new mass spectrometric technique based on desorption-ionization of sample molecules from solid targets by the impact of fast heavy ions (fission fragments) from 252 Cf. The process of ion-induced desorption of molecular ions from surfaces is not yet fully understood, although a large amount of experimental data related to the mechanism has been published. This paper concerns the use of fast incident polyatomic ions to induce desorption of secondary molecular ions of valine and chlorophyll from surfaces. Polyatomic ions are unique in that they are a collection of temporally and spatially correlated atoms. The main finding in this study is that incident polyatomic ions produce drastic enhancements in the secondary ion yields over atomic ions. Also, two types of nonlinear effects in desorption have been observed and will be discussed

  1. Thermic and thermodynamic properties of desorption process of essential oil of Hyssopus seravshanicus from bentonite clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukaniev, M.A.; Badalov, A.B.; Sharopov, F.S.

    2004-01-01

    It shown, that desorption process of essential oil of Hyssopus seravshanicus from bentonite clays include by four parts (lines) and the nature between essential oil of Hyssopus seravshanicus from bentonite clays is physical and chemical sorption

  2. The direct determination of HgS by thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coufalík, Pavel; Zvěřina, O.; Komárek, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 118, APR (2016), s. 1-5 ISSN 0584-8547 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : mercury * HgS * thermal desorption Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.241, year: 2016

  3. Desorption of acetone from alkaline-earth exchanged Y zeolite after propane selective oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Mojet, Barbara; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2004-01-01

    The desorption of products from a series of alkaline-earth exchanged Y zeolites after room-temperature propane selective oxidation was investigated by in situ infrared and mass spectroscopy. The intermediate product, isopropylhydroperoxide (IHP), did not desorb during

  4. Kinetic behaviour of the adsorption and desorption of phosphorus-32 on aluminium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, E.M.G.

    1993-01-01

    Great amount of phosphate fertilizers are used in agriculture. Soil fertility have been studied using fertilizer labelled with phosphorus 32 to improve agronomic practices by increasing the efficient use of phosphate fertilizer. Previous research work have been published suggesting the potential use of kinetics parameters to characterize phosphorus in soil and to diagnosis the phosphate level. In this work the kinetic behaviour of the absorption and desorption of phosphorus-32 on a synthetic aluminium hydroxide was studied attempting to detect the formation of a precipitated phase on the hydroxide surface. The kinetic data for adsorption was adjusted with the Elovich and Fardeau equations for isotopic exchange. It was verified a change in the kinetic behaviour when the surface was approximately 80% saturated. This change suggested the formation of a precipitate. The kinetic data for desorption was fitted with the Fardeau equation, and it was verified the desorption kinetics slower than the desorption. (B.C.A.). 40 refs, 17 figs, 5 tabs

  5. Rapid detection of nicotine from breath using desorption ionisation on porous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, T M; Abdelmaksoud, H; Voelcker, N H

    2017-05-04

    Desorption ionisation on porous silicon (DIOS) was used for the detection of nicotine from exhaled breath. This result represents proof-of-principle of the ability of DIOS to detect small molecular analytes in breath including biomarkers and illicit drugs.

  6. Kinetics Study of Gas Pollutant Adsorption and Thermal Desorption on Silica Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Silica gel is a typical porous desiccant material. Its adsorption performance for gaseous air pollutants was investigated to determine its potential contribution to reducing such pollutants. Three gaseous air pollutants, toluene, carbon dioxide, and methane, were investigated in this paper. A thermogravimetric analyzer was used to obtain the equilibrium adsorption capacity of gases on single silica gel particles. The silica gel adsorption capacity for toluene is much higher than that for carbon dioxide and methane. To understand gas pollutant thermal desorption from silica gel, the thermogravimetric analysis of toluene desorption was conducted with 609 ppm toluene vapor at 313 K, 323 K, and 333 K. The overall regeneration rate of silica gel was strongly dependent on temperature and the enthalpy of desorption. The gas pollutant adsorption performance and thermal desorption on silica gel material may be used to estimate the operating and design parameters for gas pollutant adsorption by desiccant wheels.

  7. Effect of pH on desorption of CO2 from alkanolamine - rich solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Min

    2017-08-01

    Adipic acid was used as a pH regulator, which was added to 0.4 mol/L MEA, DEA and MDEA solvents during CO2 desorption process. It is found that when pH value of the solvents swing between 8-10, CO2 desorption rate enhanced, and energy consumption has declined obviously. This research may have reference significance on optimization of alkanolamine CO2 capture process.

  8. The Absorption-Desorption of Hydrogen by 1.5 g Depleted Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sunmi; Paek, Seungwoo; Lee, Minsoo; Kim, Si-Hyung; Kim, Kwang-Rag; Ahn, Do-Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Soon Hwan; Song, Kyu Min [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    The form of metal tritides is one of the most popular methods for the storage of hydrogen isotopes. Particularly when metal is in a powder form, the storage capacity of hydrogen isotopes become the maximum value. Here, a 1.5g depleted uranium metal was decrepitated into a powder upon an absorption and desorption of hydrogen gas. The conditions for an activation, absorption-desorption of the hydrogen were defined.

  9. The Absorption-Desorption of Hydrogen by 1.5 g Depleted Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sunmi; Paek, Seungwoo; Lee, Minsoo; Kim, Si-Hyung; Kim, Kwang-Rag; Ahn, Do-Hee; Sohn, Soon Hwan; Song, Kyu Min

    2008-01-01

    The form of metal tritides is one of the most popular methods for the storage of hydrogen isotopes. Particularly when metal is in a powder form, the storage capacity of hydrogen isotopes become the maximum value. Here, a 1.5g depleted uranium metal was decrepitated into a powder upon an absorption and desorption of hydrogen gas. The conditions for an activation, absorption-desorption of the hydrogen were defined

  10. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherwitzl, Boris, E-mail: b.scherwitzl@tugraz.at; Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf [Institute of Solid State Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2014-05-14

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  11. Enhanced desorption of cesium from collapsed interlayer regions in vermiculite by hydrothermal treatment with divalent cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Xiangbiao, E-mail: yin.x.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Wang, Xinpeng [College of Resources and Metallurgy, Guangxi University, 100 Daxue East Road, Nanning 530004 (China); Wu, Hao; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Takeshita, Kenji [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Desorption of Cs{sup +} fixed in collapsed interlayer region of vermiculite was studied. • Monovalent cations readily induced interlayer collapse inhibiting Cs{sup +} desorption. • Larger hydrous ionic radii of divalent cations greatly prevented Cs{sup +} desorption. • Effect of divalent cation on Cs{sup +} desorption changes depending on thermal treatment. • ∼100% removal of saturated Cs{sup +} was achieved by hydrothermal treatment at 250 °C. - Abstract: Adsorption of cesium (Cs) on phyllosilicates has been intensively investigated because natural soils have strong ability of immobilizing Cs within clay minerals resulting in difficulty of decontamination. The objectives of present study are to clarify how Cs fixation on vermiculite is influenced by structure change caused by Cs sorption at different loading levels and how Cs desorption is affected by various replacing cations induced at different treating temperature. As a result, more than 80% of Cs was readily desorbed from vermiculite with loading amount of 2% saturated Cs (5.49 × 10{sup −3} mmol g{sup −1}) after four cycles of treatment of 0.01 M Mg{sup 2+}/Ca{sup 2+} at room temperature, but less than 20% of Cs was desorbed from saturated vermiculite. These distinct desorption patterns were attributed to inhibition of Cs desorption by interlayer collapse of vermiculite, especially at high Cs loadings. In contrast, elevated temperature significantly facilitated divalent cations to efficiently desorb Cs from collapsed regions. After five cycles of treatment at 250 °C with 0.01 M Mg{sup 2+}, ∼100% removal of saturated Cs was achieved. X-ray diffraction analysis results suggested that Cs desorption was completed through enhanced diffusion of Mg{sup 2+} cations into collapsed interlayer space under hydrothermal condition resulting in subsequent interlayer decollapse and readily release of Cs{sup +}.

  12. Multisample matrix-assisted laser desorption source for molecular beams of neutral peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupulescu, C.; Abd El Rahim, M.; Antoine, R.; Barbaire, M.; Broyer, M.; Dagany, X.; Maurelli, J.; Rayane, D.; Dugourd, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    We developed and tested a multisample laser desorption source for producing stable molecular beams of neutral peptides. Our apparatus is based on matrix-assisted laser desorption technique. The source consists of 96 different targets which may be scanned by a software control procedure. Examples of molecular beams of neutral peptides are presented, as well as the influence of the different source parameters on the jet

  13. Desorption of Furfural from Bimetallic Pt-Fe Oxides/Alumina Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Lourdes Dimas-Rivera; Javier Rivera de la Rosa; Carlos J. Lucio-Ortiz; José Antonio De los Reyes Heredia; Virgilio González González; Tomás Hernández

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the desorption of furfural, which is a competitive intermediate during the production of biofuel and valuable aromatic compounds, was studied using pure alumina, as well as alumina impregnated with iron and platinum oxides both individually and in combination, using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The bimetallic sample exhibited the lowest desorption percentage for furfural. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging revealed the intimate connection betwe...

  14. Various causes behind the desorption hysteresis of carboxylic acids on mudstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasamimanana, S; Lefèvre, G; Dagnelie, R V H

    2017-02-01

    Adsorption desorption is a key factor for leaching, migration and (bio)degradation of organic pollutants in soils and sediments. Desorption hysteresis of apolar organic compounds is known to be correlated with adsorption/diffusion into soil organic matter. This work focuses on the desorption hysteresis of polar organic compounds on a natural mudstone sample. Acetic, citric and ortho-phthalic acids displayed adsorption-desorption hysteresis on Callovo-Oxfordian mudstone. The non-reversible behaviours resulted from three different mechanisms. Adsorption and desorption kinetics were evaluated using 14C- and 3H-labelled tracers and an isotopic exchange method. The solid-liquid distribution ratio of acetate decreased using a NaN 3 bactericide, indicating a rapid bacterial consumption compared with negligible adsorption. The desorption hysteresis of phthalate was apparent and suppressed by the equilibration of renewal pore water with mudstone. This confirms the significant and reversible adsorption of phthalate. Finally, persistent desorption hysteresis was evidenced for citrate. In this case, a third mechanism should be considered, such as the incorporation of citrate in the solid or a chemical perturbation, leading to strong desorption resilience. The results highlighted the different pathways that polar organic pollutants might encounter in a similar environment. Data on phthalic acid is useful to predict the retarded transport of phthalate esters and amines degradation products in sediments. The behaviour of citric acid is representative of polydentate chelating agents used in ore and remediation industries. The impact of irreversible adsorption on solid/solution partitioning and transport deserves further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Desorption dynamics of deuterium molecules from the Si(100)-(3x1) dideuteride surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niida, T; Tsurumaki, H; Namiki, A

    2006-01-14

    We measured polar angle (theta)-resolved time-of-flight spectra of D2 molecules desorbing from the Si(100)-(3x1) dideuteride surface. The desorbing D2 molecules exhibit a considerable translational heating with mean desorption kinetic energies of approximately 0.25 eV, which is mostly independent of the desorption angles for 0 degreesdynamics of deuterium was discussed along the principle of detailed balance to predict their adsorption dynamics onto the monohydride Si surface.

  16. Treating high-mercury-containing lamps using full-scale thermal desorption technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T C; You, S J; Yu, B S; Chen, C M; Chiu, Y C

    2009-03-15

    The mercury content in high-mercury-containing lamps are always between 400 mg/kg and 200,000 mg/kg. This concentration is much higher than the 260 mg/kg lower boundary recommended for the thermal desorption process suggested by the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. According to a Taiwan EPA survey, about 4,833,000 cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs), 486,000 ultraviolet lamps and 25,000 super high pressure mercury lamps (SHPs) have been disposed of in the industrial waste treatment system, producing 80, 92 and 9 kg-mercury/year through domestic treatment, offshore treatment and air emissions, respectively. To deal with this problem we set up a full-scale thermal desorption process to treat and recover the mercury from SHPs, fluorescent tube tailpipes, fluorescent tubes containing mercury-fluorescent powder, and CCFLs containing mercury-fluorescent powder and monitor the use of different pre-heating temperatures and desorption times. The experimental results reveal that the average thermal desorption efficiency of SHPs and fluorescent tube tailpipe were both 99.95%, while the average thermal desorption efficiencies of fluorescent tubes containing mercury-fluorescent powder were between 97% and 99%. In addition, a thermal desorption efficiency of only 69.37-93.39% was obtained after treating the CCFLs containing mercury-fluorescent powder. These differences in thermal desorption efficiency might be due to the complexity of the mercury compounds contained in the lamps. In general, the thermal desorption efficiency of lamps containing mercury-complex compounds increased with higher temperatures.

  17. Thermal desorption (TD) study of heterogeneous catalytic reactions--4. Nonuniformity of Pt/. gamma. -Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, V V [Inst. Chem. Phys. Acad. Sci. U.S.S.R.; Sklyarov, A V; Gland, J

    1979-10-01

    Programed TD of n-heptane adsorbed on 0.6-3% by wt Pt/..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ laboratory catalysts with different dispersities of the metallic phase showed the formation of toluene at 160/sup 0/-260/sup 0/C with spectral maxima at about 200/sup 0/ and 230/sup 0/C and a benzene desorption maxima at 300/sup 0/C. The desorption of both benzene and the high-temperature form of toluene decreased with decreased dispersity of the catalyst and was not observed with the catalyst characterized by an average Pt particle size of 1000 A. Toluene adsorbed on the same catalysts showed a TD peak of benzene at 300/sup 0/C. With commercial Pt/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ reforming catalysts, up to five toluene desorption peaks were observed at 200/sup 0/-360/sup 0/C, suggesting the presence of active sites with different activities and concentrations on the catalyst surface. Experiments on TD of deuterated n-heptane suggested different reaction mechanisms associated with different types of active sites and the formation of low- and high-temperature forms of toluene. Only the latter had a maximum coinciding with a TD peak of D/sub 2/ (240/sup 0/C), probably formed by dehydrogenation of adsorbed diene or olefin intermediates.

  18. Desorption modeling of hydrophobic organic chemicals from plastic sheets using experimentally determined diffusion coefficients in plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwang; Byun, Da-Eun; Kim, Ju Min; Kwon, Jung-Hwan

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate rate of migration from plastic debris, desorption of model hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) from polyethylene (PE)/polypropylene (PP) films to water was measured using PE/PP films homogeneously loaded with the HOCs. The HOCs fractions remaining in the PE/PP films were compared with those predicted using a model characterized by the mass transfer Biot number. The experimental data agreed with the model simulation, indicating that HOCs desorption from plastic particles can generally be described by the model. For hexachlorocyclohexanes with lower plastic-water partition coefficients, desorption was dominated by diffusion in the plastic film, whereas desorption of chlorinated benzenes with higher partition coefficients was determined by diffusion in the aqueous boundary layer. Evaluation of the fraction of HOCs remaining in plastic films with respect to film thickness and desorption time showed that the partition coefficient between plastic and water is the most important parameter influencing the desorption half-life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of an electron beam on adsorption and desorption of ammonia on ruthenium (0001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, L.R.; Dresser, M.J.; Donaldson, E.E.; Sandstrom, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of an electron beam on ammonia adsorption and desorption on Ru(0001) have been investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and thermal flash desorption. Appreciable adsorption at room temperature occurred only on the area of the Ru crystal which had been bombarded by an electron beam during dosing. The adsorption rate was a function of beam current density and ammonia pressure, and an apparent (2x2) diffraction pattern appeared in the area bombarded by the electron beam. Electron bombardment of the molecular γ states of ammonia followed by flash desorption showed that less ammonia and more hydrogen and nitrogen were desorbed as the bombardment time increased. An analysis of this process based on electron-induced dissociation of the ammonia molecule yielded an effective initial dissociation cross section of 3x10 -6 cm 2 . Hydrogen flash desorption spectra after bombardment of the γ states obeying first order kinetics with desorption energies of 0.78 and 1.0 eV. Electron bombardment of the γ states for short times produced the same effects on the ammonia flash desorption spectra as preadsorption of hydrogen. (Auth.)

  20. Enhanced desorption of persistent organic pollutants from microplastics under simulated physiological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Microplastics have the potential to uptake and release persistent organic pollutants (POPs); however, subsequent transfer to marine organisms is poorly understood. Some models estimating transfer of sorbed contaminants to organisms neglect the role of gut surfactants under differing physiological conditions in the gut (varying pH and temperature), examined here. We investigated the potential for polyvinylchloride (PVC) and polyethylene (PE) to sorb and desorb 14 C-DDT, 14 C-phenanthrene (Phe), 14 C-perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and 14 C-di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). Desorption rates of POPs were quantified in seawater and under simulated gut conditions. Influence of pH and temperature was examined in order to represent cold and warm blooded organisms. Desorption rates were faster with gut surfactant, with a further substantial increase under conditions simulating warm blooded organisms. Desorption under gut conditions could be up to 30 times greater than in seawater alone. Of the POP/plastic combinations examined Phe with PE gave the highest potential for transport to organisms. Highlights: • PVC and PE (200–250 μm) were able to sorb phenanthrene, DDT, PFOA and DEHP. • Desorption rates were faster using a gut surfactant compared to seawater alone. • Desorption rates were further enhanced at lower pH and higher temperature. • Plastic-POPs were ranked according to their potential to cause “harm”. -- Desorption rates of sorbed POPs from plastics were substantially enhanced under gut conditions specific of warm blooded organisms, suggesting potential transfer following ingestion

  1. Sorption – desorption of imidacloprid insecticide on Indian soils of five different locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Singh Chauhan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sorption-desorption processes govern the movement of all chemicals including pesticides in soils. The present investigation was undertaken to study the sorption-desorption of imidacloprid, using a batch method, on soils of five different location of India. Sorption data were fitted to Freundlich isotherm. The log K value was the highest for loam type soil (1.830 and the lowest for clay type soil (1.661. The value of 1/n was the maximum for silt loam soil (0.909 but minimum for loam soil (0.723. Simple correlation analysis indicated that among soil properties only electrical conductivity showed a higher but marginally non-significant negative correlation with log K (r = -0.826 indicating that higher concentration of solutes solutes are conducive to low sorption capacity of soil. The desorption data conformed to two surfaces Freundlich desorption isotherm. The values of 1/n1' corresponding to easily desorbed fraction of imidacloprid showed significant negative correlation with soil pH (r = -0.886, significant at p ≤0.05 but significant positive correlation with clay content (r = 0.980, significant at p ≤0.01. The desorption index for easily desorbed fraction of imidacloprid (n1’/n also had significant negative correlation with soil pH (r = 0.953, significant at p ≤0.05. From cumulative desorption data, it appeared that bioavailability of imidacloprid would be lower in neutral soil than acidic or alkaline soils.

  2. Desorption of a methamphetamine surrogate from wallboard under remediation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppendieck, Dustin; Morrison, Glenn; Corsi, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Thousands of homes in the United States are found to be contaminated with methamphetamine each year. Buildings used to produce illicit methamphetamine are typically remediated by removing soft furnishings and stained materials, cleaning and sometimes encapsulating surfaces using paint. Methamphetamine that has penetrated into paint films, wood and other permanent materials can be slowly released back into the building air over time, exposing future occupants and re-contaminating furnishings. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of two wallboard remediation techniques for homes contaminated with methamphetamine: 1) enhancing desorption by elevating temperature and relative humidity while ventilating the interior space, and 2) painting over affected wallboard to seal the methamphetamine in place. The emission of a methamphetamine surrogate, N-isopropylbenzylamine (NIBA), from pre-dosed wallboard chambers over 20 days at 32 °C and two values of relative humidity were studied. Emission rates from wallboard after 15 days at 32 °C ranged from 35 to 1400 μg h-1 m-2. Less than 22% of the NIBA was removed from the chambers over three weeks. Results indicate that elevating temperatures during remediation and latex painting of impacted wallboard will not significantly reduce freebase methamphetamine emissions from wallboard. Raising the relative humidity from 27% to 49% increased the emission rates by a factor of 1.4. A steady-state model of a typical home using the emission rates from this study and typical residential building parameters and conditions shows that adult inhalation reference doses for methamphetamine will be reached when approximately 1 g of methamphetamine is present in the wallboard of a house.

  3. Mercury speciation during in situ thermal desorption in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Min, E-mail: cmpark80@gmail.com; Katz, Lynn E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Impact of soil conditions on distribution and phase transitions of Hg was identified. • Metallic Hg was slowly transformed to Hg{sup 0} gas until the temperature reached 358.15 K. • Phase change of HgCl{sub 2(s)} completely occurred without decomposition at 335.15 K. • HgS remained solid in dry soil sharply decreased in the narrow temperature range. • Hg gas can be easily captured with higher vapor pressures of soil compositions. - Abstract: Metallic mercury (Hg{sup 0}) and its compounds are highly mobile and toxic environmental pollutants at trace level. In situ thermal desorption (ISTD) is one of the soil remediation processes applying heat and vacuum simultaneously. Knowledge of thermodynamic mercury speciation is imperative to understand the fate and transport of mercury during thermal remediation and operate the treatment processes in a cost-effective manner. Hence, speciation model for inorganic mercury was developed over a range of environmental conditions to identify distribution of dissolved mercury species and potential transformations of mercury at near source environment. Simulation of phase transitions for metallic mercury, mercury(II) chloride and mercury sulfide with temperature increase showed that complete vaporization of metallic mercury and mercury(II) chloride were achieved below the boiling point of water. The effect of soil compositions on mercury removal was also evaluated to better understand thermal remediation process. Higher vapor pressures expected both from soil pore water and inorganic carbonate minerals in soil as well as creation of permeability were significant for complete vaporization and removal of mercury.

  4. Mercury speciation during in situ thermal desorption in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Min; Katz, Lynn E.; Liljestrand, Howard M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Impact of soil conditions on distribution and phase transitions of Hg was identified. • Metallic Hg was slowly transformed to Hg"0 gas until the temperature reached 358.15 K. • Phase change of HgCl_2_(_s_) completely occurred without decomposition at 335.15 K. • HgS remained solid in dry soil sharply decreased in the narrow temperature range. • Hg gas can be easily captured with higher vapor pressures of soil compositions. - Abstract: Metallic mercury (Hg"0) and its compounds are highly mobile and toxic environmental pollutants at trace level. In situ thermal desorption (ISTD) is one of the soil remediation processes applying heat and vacuum simultaneously. Knowledge of thermodynamic mercury speciation is imperative to understand the fate and transport of mercury during thermal remediation and operate the treatment processes in a cost-effective manner. Hence, speciation model for inorganic mercury was developed over a range of environmental conditions to identify distribution of dissolved mercury species and potential transformations of mercury at near source environment. Simulation of phase transitions for metallic mercury, mercury(II) chloride and mercury sulfide with temperature increase showed that complete vaporization of metallic mercury and mercury(II) chloride were achieved below the boiling point of water. The effect of soil compositions on mercury removal was also evaluated to better understand thermal remediation process. Higher vapor pressures expected both from soil pore water and inorganic carbonate minerals in soil as well as creation of permeability were significant for complete vaporization and removal of mercury.

  5. Structure, tritium depth profile and desorption from ‘plasma-facing’ beryllium materials of ITER-Like-Wall at JET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Pajuste

    2017-08-01

    Experimental results revealed that > 95% of the tritium was localized in the top 30 – 45µm of the ‘plasma-facing’ surface, however, possible tritium presence up to 100µm cannot be excluded. During temperature programmed desorption at 4.8K/min in the flow of purge gas He+ 0.1% H2 the tritium release started below 475K, the most intense release occurred at 725 – 915K and the degree of detritiation of > 91% can be obtained upon reaching 1075K. The total tritium activity in the samples was in range of 2 – 32kilo Becquerel per square centimetre of the plasma-facing surface area.

  6. Fate and transport with material response characterization of green sorption media for copper removal via desorption process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Lin, Kuen-Song; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple adsorption and desorption cycles are required to achieve the reliable operation of copper removal and recovery. A green sorption media mixture composed of recycled tire chunk, expanded clay aggregate, and coconut coir was evaluated in this study for its desorptive characteristics as a companion study of the corresponding adsorption process in an earlier publication. We conducted a screening of potential desorbing agents, batch desorption equilibrium and kinetic studies, and batch tests through 3 adsorption/desorption cycles. The desorbing agent screening revealed that hydrochloric acid has good potential for copper desorption. Equilibrium data fit the Freundlich isotherm, whereas kinetic data had high correlation with the Lagergren pseudo second-order model and revealed a rapid desorption reaction. Batch equilibrium data over 3 adsorption/desorption cycles showed that the coconut coir and media mixture were the most resilient, demonstrating they could be used through 3 or more adsorption/desorption cycles. FE-SEM imaging, XRD, and EDS analyses supported the batch adsorption and desorption results showing significant surface sorption of CuO species in the media mixture and coconut coir, followed by partial desorption using 0.1 M HCl as a desorbing agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization and kinetic modeling of cadmium desorption from citrus peels: A process for biosorbent regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njikam, Eloh; Schiewer, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Cadmium was completely and quickly desorbed from grapefruit peels using 0.01 M HNO 3 . The kinetics followed a novel 1st or 2nd order kinetic model, related to the remaining metal bound as the rate-determining reactant concentration. For 0.001 M HNO 3 , desorption was incomplete and the model fit less perfect. Highlights: ► Metal desorption was over 90% complete within 50 min for most desorbents. ► Models for biosorbent desorption kinetics were developed. ► Desorption kinetics best fit a novel first-order model related to remaining metal bound. ► Cd uptake after desorption by HNO 3 was similar to the original uptake. ► The optimal desorbent was 0.1 or 0.01 M acid, being fast, efficient and cheap. - Abstract: Citrus peel biosorbents are efficient in removing heavy metals from wastewater. Heavy metal recovery and sorbent regeneration are important for the financial competitiveness of biosorption with other processes. The desorbing agents HNO 3 , NaNO 3 , Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , EDTA, S, S-EDDS, and Na-Citrate were studied at different concentrations to optimize cadmium elution from orange or grapefruit peels. In most cases, desorption was fast, being over 90% complete within 50 min. However sodium nitrate and 0.001 M nitric acid were less efficient. Several new models for desorption kinetics were developed. While zero-, first- and second-order kinetics are commonly applied for modeling adsorption kinetics, the present study adapts these models to describe desorption kinetics. The proposed models relate to the number of metal-filled binding sites as the rate-determining reactant concentration. A model based on first order kinetics with respect to the remaining metal bound performed best. Cd bound in subsequent adsorption after desorption was similar to the original amount bound for desorption by nitric acid, but considerably lower for calcium nitrate as the desorbent. While complexing agents were effective desorbents, their cost is higher than that

  8. Review of the Vortec soil remediation demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patten, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    The principal objective of the METC/Vortec program is to develop and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Vortec CMS in remediating soils contaminated with hazardous materials and/or low levels of radionuclides. To convincingly demonstrate the CMS's capability, a Demonstration Plant will be constructed and operated at a DOE site that has a need for the remediation of contamination soil. The following objectives will be met during the program: (1) establish the glass chemistry requirements to achieve vitrification of contaminated soils found at the selected DOE site; (2) complete the design of a fully integrated soil vitrification demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (3) establish the cost of a fully integrated soil demonstration plant with a capacity to process 25 TPD of soil; (4) construct and operate a fully integrated demonstration plant; (5) analyze all influent and effluent streams to establish the partitioning of contaminants and to demonstrate compliance with all applicable health, safety, and environmental requirements; (6) demonstrate that the CMS technology has the capability to produce a vitrified product that will immobilize the hazardous and radionuclide materials consistent with the needs of the specific DOE waste repositories

  9. Reactive Desorption of CO Hydrogenation Products under Cold Pre-stellar Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Qasim, D.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2018-02-01

    The astronomical gas-phase detection of simple species and small organic molecules in cold pre-stellar cores, with abundances as high as ∼10‑8–10‑9 n H, contradicts the generally accepted idea that at 10 K, such species should be fully frozen out on grain surfaces. A physical or chemical mechanism that results in a net transfer from solid-state species into the gas phase offers a possible explanation. Reactive desorption, i.e., desorption following the exothermic formation of a species, is one of the options that has been proposed. In astronomical models, the fraction of molecules desorbed through this process is handled as a free parameter, as experimental studies quantifying the impact of exothermicity on desorption efficiencies are largely lacking. In this work, we present a detailed laboratory study with the goal of deriving an upper limit for the reactive desorption efficiency of species involved in the CO–H2CO–CH3OH solid-state hydrogenation reaction chain. The limit for the overall reactive desorption fraction is derived by precisely investigating the solid-state elemental carbon budget, using reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and the calibrated solid-state band-strength values for CO, H2CO and CH3OH. We find that for temperatures in the range of 10 to 14 K, an upper limit of 0.24 ± 0.02 for the overall elemental carbon loss upon CO conversion into CH3OH. This corresponds with an effective reaction desorption fraction of ≤0.07 per hydrogenation step, or ≤0.02 per H-atom induced reaction, assuming that H-atom addition and abstraction reactions equally contribute to the overall reactive desorption fraction along the hydrogenation sequence. The astronomical relevance of this finding is discussed.

  10. Pt/MOx/SiO2, Pt/MOx/TiO2, and Pt/MOx/Al2O3 Catalysts for CO Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Qin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional supported Pt catalysts have often been prepared by loading Pt onto commercial supports, such as SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and carbon. These catalysts usually have simple metal-support (i.e., Pt-SiO2 interfaces. To tune the catalytic performance of supported Pt catalysts, it is desirable to modify the metal-support interfaces by incorporating an oxide additive into the catalyst formula. Here we prepared three series of metal oxide-modified Pt catalysts (i.e., Pt/MOx/SiO2, Pt/MOx/TiO2, and Pt/MOx/Al2O3, where M = Al, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ba, La for CO oxidation. Among them, Pt/CoOx/SiO2, Pt/CoOx/TiO2, and Pt/CoOx/Al2O3 showed the highest catalytic activities. Relevant samples were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, CO temperature-programmed desorption (CO-TPD, O2 temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD, and CO2 temperature-programmed desorption (CO2-TPD.

  11. Hydrogenation of Phenylacetylene to Styrene on Pre-C_xH_y- and C-Covered Cu(111) Single Crystal Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Young Ku; Wei, Wei; White, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal hydrogenation of phenylacetylene (PA, C_8H_6) to styrene (C_8H_8) on pre-C_xH_y- and C-covered Cu(111) single crystal substrates has been studied using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) mass spectrometry. Chemisorbed PA with an acetylene group has been proved to be associated with hydrogen of pre-adsorbed C_xH_y to form styrene (104 amu) on Cu surface. For the parent (PA) mass (102 amu) TPD profile, the TPD peaks at 360 K and 410 K are assigned to chemisorbed vertically aligned PA and flat-lying cross-bridged PA, respectively (J. Phys. Chem. C 2007, 111, 5101). The relative I_3_6_0_K/I_4_1_0_K TPD ratio dramatically increases with increasing pre-adsorbed C_xH_y before dosing PA, while the ratio does not increase for pre-C-covered surface. For PA on pre-C_xH_y-covered Cu(111) surface, styrene desorption is enhanced relative to the parent PA desorption, while styrene formation is dramatically quenched on pre-C-covered (lack of adsorbed hydrogen nearby) surface. It appears that only cross-bridged PA associates with adsorbed hydrogen to form styrene that promptly desorbs at 410 K, while vertically aligned PA is less likely to participate in forming styrene

  12. Hydrogenation of Phenylacetylene to Styrene on Pre-C{sub x}H{sub y}- and C-Covered Cu(111) Single Crystal Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Ku [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Wei, Wei; White, John M. [The University of Texas at Austin, Texas (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Thermal hydrogenation of phenylacetylene (PA, C{sub 8}H{sub 6}) to styrene (C{sub 8}H{sub 8}) on pre-C{sub x}H{sub y}- and C-covered Cu(111) single crystal substrates has been studied using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) mass spectrometry. Chemisorbed PA with an acetylene group has been proved to be associated with hydrogen of pre-adsorbed C{sub x}H{sub y} to form styrene (104 amu) on Cu surface. For the parent (PA) mass (102 amu) TPD profile, the TPD peaks at 360 K and 410 K are assigned to chemisorbed vertically aligned PA and flat-lying cross-bridged PA, respectively (J. Phys. Chem. C 2007, 111, 5101). The relative I{sub 360K}/I{sub 410K} TPD ratio dramatically increases with increasing pre-adsorbed C{sub x}H{sub y} before dosing PA, while the ratio does not increase for pre-C-covered surface. For PA on pre-C{sub x}H{sub y}-covered Cu(111) surface, styrene desorption is enhanced relative to the parent PA desorption, while styrene formation is dramatically quenched on pre-C-covered (lack of adsorbed hydrogen nearby) surface. It appears that only cross-bridged PA associates with adsorbed hydrogen to form styrene that promptly desorbs at 410 K, while vertically aligned PA is less likely to participate in forming styrene.

  13. Sorption and desorption of glyphosate in Mollisols and Ultisols soils of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Ortiz, Ana Maria; Okada, Elena; Bedmar, Francisco; Costa, José Luis

    2017-10-01

    In Argentina, glyphosate use has increased exponentially in recent years as a result of the widespread adoption of no-till management combined with genetically modified glyphosate-resistant crops. This massive use of glyphosate has created concern about its potential environmental impact. Sorption-desorption of glyphosate was studied in 3 Argentinean soils with contrasting characteristics. Glyphosate sorption isotherms were modeled using the Freundlich equation to estimate the sorption coefficient (K f ). Glyphosate sorption was high, and the K f varied from 115.6 to 1612 mg 1-1/n L 1/n /kg. Cerro Azul soil had the highest glyphosate sorption capacity as a result of a combination of factors such as higher clay content, cation exchange capacity, total iron, and aluminum oxides, and lower available phosphorus and pH. Desorption isotherms were also modeled using the Freundlich equation. In general, desorption was very low (glyphosate strongly sorbs to the soils and that it is almost an irreversible process. Anguil soil had a significantly higher desorption coefficient (K fd ) than the other soils, associated with its lower clay content and higher pH and phosphorus. Glyphosate high sorption and low desorption to the studied soils may prevent groundwater contamination. However, it may also affect its bioavailability, increasing its persistence and favoring its accumulation in the environment. The results of the present study contribute to the knowledge and characterization of glyphosate retention in different soils. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2587-2592. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  14. Desorption isotherms of heavy (AZOBE, EBONY) and light heavyweight tropical woods (IROKO, SAPELLI) of Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsouandélé, J. L.; Tamba, J. G.; Bonoma, B.

    2018-04-01

    This work is centered on the study of the desorption isotherms of heavy (Azobe, Ebony) and heavyweight (Iroko, Sapelli) tropical woods, which contribute in the determination of drying and storage of tropical plank woods. Desorption isotherms of tropical woods were experimentally determined under different temperatures in this study using the gravimetric method. The determination of Henderson's model isotherms parameters of desorption were obtained for temperatures of 20 °C, 30 °C, 40 °C, and 50 °C. The mean relative deviation between theoretical and experimental moisture contents was calculated and fitted well with the desorption models of tropical woods. We noticed that Henderson models fitted much better with experimental ones for 95% of relative humidity. The sigmoid shapes of results are satisfactory. Hysteresis phenomenon was observed for desorption isotherms of heavy (Azobe, Ebony) and heavyweight (Iroko, Sapelli) tropical woods. Results showed the difference between the stability and use of heavy and heavyweight tropical wood. These results help in the estimation of water content at equilibrium of tropical woods in relative humidity from experimented ones. Hygroscopic equilibrium humidity of heavy tropical woods varied between 0% and 50% while those of heavyweight varied between 0% and 25%. Therefore, these woods can be used in an opened environment; woodwork and decoration.

  15. On the Formation of Nanobubbles in Vycor Porous Glass during the Desorption of Halogenated Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, A. C.; Stefanopoulos, K. L.; Favvas, E. P.; Vansant, E.; Hankins, N. P.

    2015-06-01

    Vycor porous glass has long served as a model mesoporous material. During the physical adsorption of halogenated hydrocarbon vapours, such as dibromomethane, the adsorption isotherm exhibits an hysteresis loop; a gradual ascent is observed at higher pressures during adsorption, and a sharp drop is observed at lower pressures during desorption. For fully wetting fluids, an early hypothesis attributed the hysteresis to mechanistic differences between capillary condensation (adsorption) and evaporation (desorption) processes occurring in the wide bodies and narrow necks, respectively, of ‘ink-bottle’ pores. This was later recognized as oversimplified when the role of network percolation was included. For the first time, we present in-situ small angle x-ray scattering measurements on the hysteresis effect which indicate nanobubble formation during desorption, and support an extended picture of network percolation. The desorption pattern can indeed result from network percolation; but this can sometimes be initiated by a local cavitation process without pore blocking, which is preceded by the temporary, heterogeneous formation of nanobubbles involving a change in wetting states. The capacity of the system to sustain such metastable states is governed by the steepness of the desorption boundary.

  16. Surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry techniques for application in forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Taryn; Kirkbride, Paul; Pigou, Paul E; Ronci, Maurizio; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent analytical technique for the rapid and sensitive analysis of macromolecules (>700 Da), such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and synthetic polymers. However, the detection of smaller organic molecules with masses below 700 Da using MALDI-MS is challenging due to the appearance of matrix adducts and matrix fragment peaks in the same spectral range. Recently, nanostructured substrates have been developed that facilitate matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI), contributing to an emerging analytical paradigm referred to as surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) MS. Since SALDI enables the detection of small organic molecules, it is rapidly growing in popularity, including in the field of forensics. At the same time, SALDI also holds significant potential as a high throughput analytical tool in roadside, work place and athlete drug testing. In this review, we discuss recent advances in SALDI techniques such as desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS), nano-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) and nano assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI™) and compare their strengths and weaknesses with particular focus on forensic applications. These include the detection of illicit drug molecules and their metabolites in biological matrices and small molecule detection from forensic samples including banknotes and fingerprints. Finally, the review highlights recent advances in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using SALDI techniques. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of chemical oxidation on sorption and desorption of PAHs in typical Chinese soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Hou Lei; Luo Xiaoli; Zhu Lingyan

    2009-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation is a commonly applied soil and groundwater remediation technology, but can have significant effects on soil properties, which in turn might affect fate and transport of organic contaminants. In this study, it was found that oxidation treatment resulted mainly in breakdown of soil organic matter (SOM) components. Sorption of naphthalene and phenanthrene to the original soils and the KMnO 4 -treated soils was linear, indicating that hydrophobic partitioning to SOM was the predominant mechanism for sorption. Desorption from the original and treated soils was highly resistant, and was well modeled with a biphasic desorption model. Desorption of residual naphthalene after treating naphthalene-contaminated soils with different doses of KMnO 4 also followed the biphasic desorption model very well. It appears that neither changes of soil properties caused by chemical oxidation nor direct chemical oxidation of contaminated soils had a noticeable effect on the nature of PAH-SOM interactions. - Chemical oxidation of soils had little effect on the mechanisms controlling sorption and desorption of PAHs.

  18. Investigation of hydrogen-deformation interactions in β-21S titanium alloy using thermal desorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tal-Gutelmacher, E.; Eliezer, D.; Boellinghaus, Th.

    2007-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the investigation of the combined influence of hydrogen and pre-plastic deformation on hydrogen's absorption/desorption behavior, the microstructure and microhardness of a single-phased β-21S alloy. In this study, thermal desorption analyses (TDS) evaluation of various desorption and trapping parameters provide further insight on the relationships between hydrogen absorption/desorption processes and deformation, and their mutual influence on the microstructure and the microhardness of β-21S alloy. TDS spectra were supported by other experimental techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, hydrogen quantity analyses and microhardness tests. Pre-plastic deformation, performed before the electrochemical hydrogenation of the alloy, increased significantly the hydrogen absorption capacity. Its influence was also evident on the notably expanded lattice parameter of β-21S alloy after hydrogenation. However, no hydride precipitation was observed. An interesting softening effect of the pre-deformed hydrogenated alloy was revealed by microhardness tests. TDS demonstrated the significant effect of pre-plastic deformation on the hydrogen evolution process. Hydrogen desorption temperature and the activation energy for hydrogen release increased, additional trap states were observed and the amount of desorbed hydrogen decreased

  19. A Holistic Approach to Understanding the Desorption of Phosphorus in Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Zhang, Hao; Stutter, Marc; Giles, Courtney D; Darch, Tegan; George, Timothy S; Shand, Charles; Lumsdon, David; Blackwell, Martin; Wearing, Catherine; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Haygarth, Philip M

    2016-04-05

    The mobility and resupply of inorganic phosphorus (P) from the solid phase were studied in 32 soils from the UK. The combined use of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT), diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) and the "DGT-induced fluxes in sediments" model (DIFS) were adapted to explore the basic principles of solid-to-solution P desorption kinetics in previously unattainable detail. On average across soil types, the response time (Tc) was 3.6 h, the desorption rate constant (k-1) was 0.0046 h(-1), and the desorption rate was 4.71 nmol l(-1) s(-1). While the relative DGT-induced inorganic P flux responses in the first hour is mainly a function of soil water retention and % Corg, at longer times it is a function of the P resupply from the soil solid phase. Desorption rates and resupply from solid phase were fundamentally influenced by P status as reflected by their high correlation with P concentration in FeO strips, Olsen, NaOH-EDTA and water extracts. Soil pH and particle size distribution showed no significant correlation with the evaluated mobility and resupply parameters. The DGT and DET techniques, along with the DIFS model, were considered accurate and practical tools for studying parameters related to soil P desorption kinetics.

  20. Measurements of VOC adsorption/desorption characteristics of typical interior building materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Y.; Zhang, J.S.; Shaw, C.Y.

    2000-07-01

    The adsorption/desorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on interior building material surfaces (i.e., the sink effect) can affect the VOC concentrations in a building, and thus need to be accounted for an indoor air quality (IAQ) prediction model. In this study, the VOC adsorption/desorption characteristics (sink effect) were measured for four typical interior building materials including carpet, vinyl floor tile, painted drywall, and ceiling tile. The VOCs tested were ethylbenzene, cyclohexanone, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, benzaldehyde, and dodecane. These five VOCs were selected because they are representative of hydrocarbons, aromatics, ketones, aldehydes, and chlorine substituted compounds. The first order reversible adsorption/desorption model was based on the Langmuir isotherm was used to analyze the data and to determine the equilibrium constant of each VOC-material combination. It was found that the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant, which is a measure of the sink capacity, increased linearly with the inverse of the VOC vapor pressure. For each compound, the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant, and the adsorption rate constant differed significantly among the four materials tested. A detailed characterization of the material structure in the micro-scale would improve the understanding and modeling of the sink effect in the future. The results of this study can be used to estimate the impact of sink effect on the VOC concentrations in buildings.

  1. The impact of vegetation on sedimentary organic matter composition and PAH desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Elizabeth Guthrie [North Carolina State University, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, 2800 Faucette Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)], E-mail: elizabeth_nichols@ncsu.edu; Gregory, Samuel T.; Musella, Jennifer S. [North Carolina State University, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, 2800 Faucette Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Relationships between sedimentary organic matter (SOM) composition and PAH desorption behavior were determined for vegetated and non-vegetated refinery distillate waste sediments. Sediments were fractionated into size, density, and humin fractions and analyzed for their organic matter content. Bulk sediment and humin fractions differed more in organic matter composition than size/density fractions. Vegetated humin and bulk sediments contained more polar organic carbon, black carbon, and modern (plant) carbon than non-vegetated sediment fractions. Desorption kinetics of phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene, and C{sub 3}-phenanthrene/anthracenes from humin and bulk sediments were investigated using Tenax beads and a two-compartment, first-order kinetic model. PAH desorption from distillate waste sediments appeared to be controlled by the slow desorbing fractions of sediment; rate constants were similar to literature values for k{sub slow} and k{sub veryslow}. After several decades of plant colonization and growth (Phragmites australis), vegetated sediment fractions more extensively desorbed PAHs and had faster desorption kinetics than non-vegetated sediment fractions. - Plants alter sediment organic matter composition and PAH desorption behavior.

  2. The impact of vegetation on sedimentary organic matter composition and PAH desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Elizabeth Guthrie; Gregory, Samuel T.; Musella, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    Relationships between sedimentary organic matter (SOM) composition and PAH desorption behavior were determined for vegetated and non-vegetated refinery distillate waste sediments. Sediments were fractionated into size, density, and humin fractions and analyzed for their organic matter content. Bulk sediment and humin fractions differed more in organic matter composition than size/density fractions. Vegetated humin and bulk sediments contained more polar organic carbon, black carbon, and modern (plant) carbon than non-vegetated sediment fractions. Desorption kinetics of phenanthrene, pyrene, chrysene, and C 3 -phenanthrene/anthracenes from humin and bulk sediments were investigated using Tenax beads and a two-compartment, first-order kinetic model. PAH desorption from distillate waste sediments appeared to be controlled by the slow desorbing fractions of sediment; rate constants were similar to literature values for k slow and k veryslow . After several decades of plant colonization and growth (Phragmites australis), vegetated sediment fractions more extensively desorbed PAHs and had faster desorption kinetics than non-vegetated sediment fractions. - Plants alter sediment organic matter composition and PAH desorption behavior

  3. Extrapolation studies on desorption of thorium and uranium at different solution compositions on contaminated soil sediments (Malaysia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Hakimi Sakuma

    2000-01-01

    By means of batch desorption experiments, the thorium and uranium desorption properties of contaminated soil sediments are investigated as a function of the effect of cations present in the groundwater. A phenomenological correlation between the desorption coefficient and the concentration of Ca and Mg in the water is determined. Kd Thorium -0.15849 ± 0.03237 log (Ca + Mg) + 5.06715 ± 0.09106; Kd Uranium = -0.11984 ± 0.03237 log (Ca + Mg) + 2.99909 ± 0.09105. By these models the sorption/desorption behaviour of soils can be predicted phenomenologically as function of the groundwater composition. (author)

  4. Investigation of Catalytic Effects and Compositional Variations in Desorption Characteristics of LiNH2-nanoMgH2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sesha S. Srinivasan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available LiNH2 and a pre-processed nanoMgH2 with 1:1 and 2:1 molar ratios were mechano-chemically milled in a high-energy planetary ball mill under inert atmosphere, and at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Based on the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA experiments, 2LiNH2-nanoMgH2 demonstrated superior desorption characteristics when compared to the LiNH2-nanoMgH2. The TGA studies also revealed that doping 2LiNH2-nanoMgH2 base material with 2 wt. % nanoNi catalyst enhances the sorption kinetics at lower temperatures. Additional investigation of different catalysts showed improved reaction kinetics (weight percentage of H2 released per minute of the order TiF3 > nanoNi > nanoTi > nanoCo > nanoFe > multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT, and reduction in the on-set decomposition temperatures of the order nanoCo > TiF3 > nanoTi > nanoFe > nanoNi > MWCNT for the base material 2LiNH2-nanoMgH2. Pristine and catalyst-doped 2LiNH2-nanoMgH2 samples were further probed by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopies, thermal programmed desorption and pressure-composition-temperature measurements to better understand the improved performance of the catalyst-doped samples, and the results are discussed.

  5. Sorption, desorption and extraction of uranium from some sands under dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palagyi, S.; Laciok, A.

    2006-01-01

    Sorption, desorption and extraction behavior of uranium in various fluvial sands of domestic origin were investigated in continuous dynamic column experiments. For the sorption of U(VI) an aqueous 10 -4 M UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 solution was used at a flow rate of about 0.3 cm 3 /min. Desorption was carried out with demineralized water, and the extraction with 10 -2 M Na 2 CO 3 solution following desorption. The retardation coefficients (R) and hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients (D d ), were determined using an ADE equation. From the experimentally determined values of R, bulk density and porosity, the distribution coefficients (K d ) of the UO 2 2+ species have been calculated for the respective processes. The extent of U sorption in sands, as well as the proportion of desorbed and extracted U from these sands, was also calculated. (author)

  6. The feasibility of desorption on Zeolite-water pair using dry gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktariani, E.; Nakashima, K.; Noda, A.; Xue, B.; Tahara, K.; Nakaso, K.; Fukai, J.

    2018-04-01

    The increase in temperature, reduction in partial pressure, reduction in concentration, purging with an inert fluid, and displacement with a more strongly adsorbing species are the basic things that occur in the practical method of desorption. In this study, dry gas at constant temperature and pressure was employed as the aid to reduce the partial pressure in the water desorption on the zeolite 13X. The objective of this study is to confirm the feasibility of desorption using dry gas experimentally and numerically. The implication of heat and mass transfers were numerically investigated to find the most influential. The results of numerical simulation agree with the experimental ones for the distribution of local temperature and average water adsorbed in the packed bed.

  7. Thermal desorption of deuterium from polycrystalline nickel pre-implanted with helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, S.Q.; Abramov, E.; Thompson, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal desorption technique has been used to study the trapping of deuterium atoms in high-purity polycrystalline nickel pre-implanted with helium for 1 x 10 19 to 5 x 10 20 ions/m 2 . The effect of post-implantation annealing at 703 K and 923 K on the desorption behavior was investigated. Measured values of the total amount of detrapped deuterium (Q T ) and helium concentration were used in a computer simulation of the desorption curve. It was found that the simulation using one or two discrete trap energies resulted in an inadequate fit between the simulated and the measured data. Both experimental and simulation results are explained using a stress-field trapping model. The effective binding energy, E b eff , was estimated to be in the range of 0.4-0.6 eV. Deuterium charging was found to stimulate a release of helium at a relatively low temperature

  8. WATER ADSORPTION AND DESORPTION ISOTHERMS ON MILK POWDER: II. WHOLE MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar M. Soteras

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was the determination of adsorption and desorption isotherms of cow whole milk powder. The experiments have been carried out at 15, 25 and 40 ºC, in ranges of moisture and water activity characteristic of normal conditions in which the processes of drying, packaging and storage are developed. By studying the influence of the temperature on the experimental plots, the isosteric adsorption heat was determined. Experimental data were correlated to the referential model of Guggenheim, Anderson and Boer (GAB. For both, adsorption and desorption, a good model fit was observed. The isotherms showed very similar shapes between them and, by comparing adsorption and desorption isotherms, the phenomenon of hysteresis was confirmed.

  9. A novel experimental system of high stability and lifetime for the laser-desorption of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherkhani, Mehran; Riese, Mikko; BenYezzar, Mohammed; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus

    2010-06-01

    A novel laser desorption system, with improved signal stability and extraordinary long lifetime, is presented for the study of jet-cooled biomolecules in the gas phase using vibrationally resolved photoionization spectroscopy. As a test substance tryptophane is used to characterize this desorption source. A usable lifetime of above 1 month (for a laser desorption repetition rate of 20 Hz) has been observed by optimizing the pellets (graphite/tryptophane, 3 mm diameter and 6 mm length) from which the substance is laser-desorbed. Additionally, the stability and signal-to-noise ratio has been improved by averaging the signal over the entire sample pellet by synchronizing the data acquisition with the rotation of the sample rod. The results demonstrate how a combination of the above helps to produce stable and conclusive spectra of tryptophane using one-color and two-color resonant two-photon ionization studies.

  10. ε-Polylysine-based thermo-responsive adsorbents for immunoglobulin adsorption-desorption under mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Masashi; Shibuya, Keisuke

    2017-08-22

    Thermo-responsive adsorbents for immunoglobulin G (IgG) employing ε-polylysine (EPL) as a polymer backbone were developed. The introduction of mercaptoethylpyridine (MEP) as an IgG-binding ligand and hydrophobization of side chains afforded thermo-responsive IgG adsorbents, whose thermo-responsive IgG desorption ratio was up to 88% (EPL/MEP derivative 3m). The changes in surface densities of active MEP groups, which are caused by thermal conformational changes of the adsorbents, play key roles for IgG desorption. Although a trade-off of IgG adsorption capacity and IgG desorption ratio was observed, the present study offers a novel molecular design for thermo-responsive adsorbents with high synthetic accessibility and potentially low toxicity.

  11. Kinetics of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline adsorption and desorption on two acid soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to quantify retention/release of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline on two soils, paying attention to sorption kinetics and to implications of the adsorption/desorption processes on transfer of these pollutants to the various environmental compartments...... tetracycline > oxytetracycline > chlortetracycline in soil 1, with similar values for the three antibiotics and the sequence tetracycline > chlortetracycline > oxytetracycline in soil 2. The desorption sequences were oxytetracycline > tetracycline > chlortetracycline in soil 1 and oxytetracycline...... > chlortetracycline > tetracycline in soil 2. In conclusion, the SFC technique has yielded new kinetic data regarding tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline adsorption/desorption on soils, indicating that it can be used to shed further light on the retention and transport processes affecting antibiotics...

  12. Desorption of Furfural from Bimetallic Pt-Fe Oxides/Alumina Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lourdes Dimas-Rivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the desorption of furfural, which is a competitive intermediate during the production of biofuel and valuable aromatic compounds, was studied using pure alumina, as well as alumina impregnated with iron and platinum oxides both individually and in combination, using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The bimetallic sample exhibited the lowest desorption percentage for furfural. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM imaging revealed the intimate connection between the iron and platinum oxide species on the alumina support. The mechanism of furfural desorption from the Pt-Fe/Al2O3 0.5%-0.5% sample was determined using physisorbed furfural instead of chemisorbed furfural; this mechanism involved the oxidation of the C=O group on furfural by the catalyst. The oxide nanoparticles on γ-Al2O3 support helped to stabilize the furfural molecule on the surface.

  13. Biosorption and desorption of Cd2+ from wastewater by dehydrated shreds of Cladophora fascicularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liping; Zhu, Xiaobin; Su, Yingying; Su, Hua; Wang, Xinting

    2008-02-01

    The adsorption and desorption of algae Cladophora fascicularis and their relation with initial Cd2+ concentration, initial pH, and co-existing ions were studied. Adsorption equilibrium and biosorption kinetics were established from batch experiments. The adsorption equilibrium was adequately described by the Langmuir isotherm, and biosorption kinetics was in pseudo-second order model. The experiment on co-existing ions showed that the biosorption capacity of biomass decreased with an increasing concentration of competing ions. Desorption experiments indicated that EDTA was efficient desorbent for recovery from Cd2+. With high capacities of metal biosorption and desorption, the biomass of Cladophora fascicularis is promising as a cost-effective biosorbent for the removal of Cd2+ from wastewater.

  14. X-ray induced gas desorption within a prototype LEP vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E.M.; Le Normand, F.; Hilleret, N.; Dominichini, G.

    1982-12-01

    The present report is concerned with an experimental simulation of the process of photon induced desorption within an aluminium vacuum chamber of the same basic form as proposed for the LEP accelerator. The objectives in the work can be described in the following three-fold manner: Firstly, to establish the levels of photon induced desorption efficiency for identified gas species. Secondly, to examine the contribution of surface treatments as bakeout and glow discharge cleaning, and to correlate these responses with changes in surface activity induced by beam cleaning. Thirdly, to gain insight into the energy dependence of the desorption process so as to provide a reasonable basis for predicting conditions at the levels of critical energy in excess of 100 keV which are applicable at the full design energy of the LEP accelerator. (orig./HSI)

  15. Coupling laser desorption with gas chromatography and ion mobility spectrometry for improved olive oil characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Sascha; Seifert, Luzia; Ahlmann, Norman; Hariharan, Chandrasekhara; Franzke, Joachim; Vautz, Wolfgang

    2018-07-30

    The investigation of volatile compounds in the headspace of liquid samples can often be used for detailed and non-destructive characterisation of the sample. This has great potential for process control or the characterisation of food samples, such as olive oil. We investigated, for the first time, the plume of substances released from olive oil droplets by laser desorption in a feasibility study and applied ion mobility spectrometry coupled to rapid GC pre-separation to enhance selectivity. Our investigation demonstrated that significantly more substances can be detected and quantified via laser desorption than in the usual headspace, enabling a rapid (5-10 min), sensitive (low ng/g range) and comprehensive analysis of the sample, with the potential for quality control and fraud identification. Therefore, laser desorption provides a useful sampling tool for characterising liquids in many applications, requiring only a few µL of sample. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of the technique Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) and its Application for the Characterization of Metal -Hydrogen Systems; Analisis de la Tecnica Espectroscopia de Desorcion Termica (TDS) y su Applicacion para la Caracterizacion de Sistemas Metal-Hydrogeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, F J [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental developments made to study the desorption of hydrogen from metallic samples by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS). With this technique gas desorption is stimulated by the programmed heating of the sample. To perform the study we set up a newly designed equipment and develop theoretical models of the kinetic processes involved. The equipment and the models are used to analyze the desorption process in a real system. We begin by analyzing the models developed to interpret the results of the experiments. These models considersimultaneously bulk diffusion and surface reaction processes in metal-hydrogen systems with one or two thermodynamic phases. We present numerical results, computer simulations and analytical approximations of the original models. Based on these results we analyze the main features of the spectra for the different relevant kinetic processes, and determine the changes induced in them when material parameters (activation energies, geometry) or experimental parameters (heating speed, initial concentration) are modified.We present the original equipment, designed and constructed during this work to perform the TDS experiments. We describe its main characteristics, its components, its range of operation and its sensibility. We also offer an analysis of the background spectrum. We use the Pd-H system to test the equipment and the models. The samples chosen, powders, granules, foils and wires, were previously characterized to analyze their composition, their morphology and their characteristic size. We show the results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observation, X ray diffraction (XRD) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) analysis.We then present and analyze in depth the experimental desorption spectra of the palladium powder. Based on the analysis we determine the rate limiting step for desorption and the characteristic activation energies. When the system is on the b phase (hydride) the rate

  17. Sorption and desorption kinetics of diuron, fluometuron, prometryn and pyrithiobac sodium in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, S; Kennedy, I R

    1999-11-01

    The sorption and desorption characteristics of four herbicides (diuron, fluometuron, prometryn and pyrithiobac-sodium) in three different cotton growing soils of Australia was investigated. Kinetics and equilibrium sorption and desorption isotherms were determined using the batch equilibrium technique. Sorption was rapid (> 80% in 2 h) and sorption equilibrium was achieved within a short period of time (ca 4 h) for all herbicides. Sorption isotherms of the four herbicides were described by Freundlich equation with an r2 value > 0.98. The herbicide sorption as measured by the distribution coefficient (Kd) values ranged from 3.24 to 5.71 L/kg for diuron, 0.44 to 1.13 L/kg for fluometuron, 1.78 to 6.04 L/kg for prometryn and 0.22 to 0.59 L/kg for pyrithiobac-sodium. Sorption of herbicides was higher in the Moree soil than in Narrabri and Wee Waa soils. When the Kd values were normalised to organic carbon content of the soils (Koc), it suggested that the affinity of the herbicides to the organic carbon increased in the order: pyrithiobac-sodium diuron. The desorption isotherms were also adequately described by the Freundlich equation. For desorption, all herbicides exhibited hysteresis and the hysteresis was stronger for highly sorbed herbicides (diuron and prometryn) than the weakly sorbed herbicides (fluometuron and pyrithiobac-sodium). Hysteresis was also quantified as the percentage of sorbed herbicides which is not released during the desorption step (omega = [nad/nde - 1] x 100). Soil type and initial concentration had significant effect on omega. The effect of sorption and desorption properties of these four herbicides on the off-site transport to contaminate surface and groundwater are also discussed in this paper.

  18. Impact of equilibrating time on phosphate adsorption and desorption behaviour in some selected saline sodic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Q.U.; HAN; Khan, M.J.; Rehman, S.; Khan, S.U.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of equilibrating time on phosphate adsorption and desorption on saline sodic soils a study was carried using three soil series from Dera Ismail Khan (Pakistan) district, namely Zindani, Tikken and Gishkori. These soils are alkaline calcareous in nature with greater Electrical Conductivity (EC) and Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR) values which classify them as saline sodic soils. The equilibrating time for the adsorption study was 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 48 and 72 hours for two levels (5 mg L/sup -1/ and 100 mg L/sup -1/). For desorption study 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours after 24 hours for low and high dilution. Adsorption and desorption isotherms of phosphate were developed for these soils. The Gishkori soil showed the greatest rate of adsorption as compared with the other two soils. Applying Langmuir and Freundlich models to P adsorption data revealed that Freundlich equation (R2 = 0.99) showed a better fit over the Langmuir equation (R2 =0. 97) in the three soils. The desorption curves varied similarly from each other. The amount of P adsorbed was different from that released back to the soil solution. The amount of adsorption increased with the time. Statistical analysis showed that the rate of adsorption for both 5 and 100 mg P L/sup -1/ was significantly different at P<0.05 at 16 and 20 hours and at P<0.01 beyond 20 hours. However, the rate of desorption was not significantly influenced by the equilibrating time as compared with the theoretical values of the three series. As the P - desorption curve did not coincide the P - adsorption curve, hence the availability of P to plant was adversely affected on its application. (author)

  19. Coalbed gas desorption in canisters: Consumption of trapped atmospheric oxygen and implications for measured gas quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hui; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Mastalerz, Maria; Pope, James; Moore, Tim A.

    2010-01-01

    Desorption canisters are routinely employed to quantify coalbed gas contents in coals. If purging with inert gas or water flooding is not used, entrapment of air with ∝ 78.08 vol.% nitrogen (N 2 ) in canisters during the loading of coal results in contamination by air and subsequent overestimates of N 2 in desorbed coalbed gas. Pure coalbed gas does not contain any elemental oxygen (O 2 ), whereas air contamination originally includes ∝ 20.95 vol.% O 2 and has a N 2 /O 2 volume ratio of ∝ 3.73. A correction for atmospheric N 2 is often attempted by quantifying O 2 in headspace gas and then proportionally subtracting atmospheric N 2 . However, this study shows that O 2 is not a conservative proxy for air contamination in desorption canisters. Time-series of gas chromatographic (GC) compositional data from several desorption experiments using high volatile bituminous coals from the Illinois Basin and a New Zealand subbituminous coal document that atmospheric O 2 was rapidly consumed, especially during the first 24 h. After about 2 weeks of desorption, the concentration of O 2 declined to near or below GC detection limits. Irreversible loss of O 2 in desorption canisters is caused by biological, chemical, and physical mechanisms. The use of O 2 as a proxy for air contamination is justified only immediately after loading of desorption canisters, but such rapid measurements preclude meaningful assessment of coalbed gas concentrations. With increasing time and progressive loss of O 2 , the use of O 2 content as a proxy for atmospheric N 2 results in overestimates of N 2 in desorbed coalbed gas. The indicated errors for nitrogen often range in hundreds of %. Such large analytical errors have a profound influence on market choices for CBM gas. An erroneously calculated N 2 content in CBM would not meet specifications for most pipeline-quality gas. (author)

  20. Comparison of biomolecule desorption yields for low and high energy primary ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamensky, I.; Hakansson, P.; Sundqvist, B.; McNeal, C.J.; MacFarlane, R.

    1982-01-01

    Ion induced desorption yields of molecular ions from samples of cesium iodide, glycylglycine, ergosterol, bleomycin and a trinucleoside diphosphate have been studied using primary beams of 54 MeV 63 Cu 9+ and 3 keV 133 Cs + . Mass analysis was performed with a time-of-flight technique. Each sample was studied with the same spectrometer for both low and high energy primary ions and without opening of the vacuum chamber in between the measurements. The results show that fast heavy ions give larger yields for all samples studied and that the yield ratios for high to low energy desorption increase with the mass of the sample molecule. (orig.)

  1. Dynamic Moisture Sorption and Desorption in Fumed Silica-filled Silicone Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautschold, Olivia Carol [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-02

    Characterizing dynamic moisture sorption and desorption in fumed silica-filled silicone foam is necessary for determining material compatibilities and life predictions, particularly in sealed environments that may be exposed to a range of environmental conditions. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) were performed on S5470 fumed silica-filled silicone foam to determine the weight percent of moisture at saturation. Additionally, TGA was used to determine the time, temperature, and relative humidity levels required for sorption and desorption of physisorbed moisture in S5470.

  2. Impact of activated carbon, biochar and compost on the desorption and mineralization of phenanthrene in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchal, Geoffrey; Smith, Kilian E.C.; Rein, Arno

    2013-01-01

    ), biochar or compost. Total amounts of phenanthrene desorbed were similar between the different soils, but the amendment type had a large influence. Complete desorption was observed in the unamended and compost amended soils, but this reduced for biochar (41% desorbed) and AC (8% desorbed). Cumulative...... amounts mineralized were 28% for the unamended control, 19% for compost, 13% for biochar and 4% for AC. Therefore, the effects of the amendments in soil in reducing desorption were also reflected in the extents of mineralization. Modeling was used to analyze key processes, indicating that for the AC...

  3. Desorption of organophosphorous pesticides from soil with wastewater and surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Soriano, M. C.; Mingorance, M. D.; Pena, A.

    2009-01-01

    Surfactants can be introduced in the environment by wastewater discharge, point-charge pollution or deliberate action, e. g. to remediate contaminated soil or groundwater. The irrigation of soil with wastewater containing surfactants may modify pesticide desorption from soil, thus affecting their affecting their environmental fate. Desorption from soil of the plain of Granada (South-eastern Spain) of two organophosphorous pesticides, diazinon and dimethoate, differing in solubility and hydrophobicity, has been evaluated in the presence of different surfactant aqueous solutions and municipal wastewater. (Author)

  4. Summary of Adsorption/Desorption Experiments for the European Database on Indoor Air Pollution Sources in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Ulla Dorte; Tirkkonen, T.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental data for adsorption/desorption in building materials. Contribution to the European Database on Indoor Air Pollution Sources in buildings.......Experimental data for adsorption/desorption in building materials. Contribution to the European Database on Indoor Air Pollution Sources in buildings....

  5. Comparing the desorption and biodegradation of low concentrations of phenanthrene sorbed to activated carbon, biochar and compost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchal, Geoffrey; Smith, Kilian E.C.; Rein, Arno

    2013-01-01

    can be degraded at all, the desorption and biodegradation of low concentrations of 14C-labelled phenanthrene (⩽5μgL−1) freshly sorbed to suspensions of the pure soil amendments activated carbon (AC), biochar (charcoal) and compost were compared. Firstly, the maximum abiotic desorption of phenanthrene...

  6. Retention of Nickel in Soils: Sorption-Desorption and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption and desorption of heavy metals in soils are primary factors that influence their bioavailability and mobility in the soil profile. To examine the characteristics of nickel (Ni) adsorption-desorption in soils, kinetic batch experiments were carried out followed by Ni re...

  7. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of cryogenic surfaces bombarded with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Evans, L; Kollmus, H; Küchler, D; Scrivens, R; Severin, D; Wengenroth, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy-Ion Accelerator LINAC 3, has been used to study the dynamic outgassing of cryogenic surfaces. Two different targets, bare and goldcoated copper, were bombarded under perpendicular impact with 4.2 MeV/u Pb54+ ions. Partial pressure rises of H2, CH4, CO, and CO2 and effective desorption yields were measured at 300, 77, and 6.3 K using single shot and continuous ion bombardment techniques. We find that the heavy-ion-induced desorption yield is temperature dependent and investigate the influence of CO gas cryosorbed at 6.3 K. The gain in desorption yield reduction at cryogenic temperature vanishes after several monolayers of CO are cryosorbed on both targets. In this paper we describe the new cryogenic target assembly, the temperature-dependent pressure rise, desorption yield, and gas adsorption measurements.

  8. Enhanced desorption of Cs from clays by a polymeric cation-exchange agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Woo, E-mail: park85@gmail.com [Decontamination & Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo Hyun [Decontamination & Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung [Decontamination & Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kune-Woo, E-mail: nkwlee@kaeri.re.kr [Decontamination & Decommissioning Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • A cationic polyelectrolyte has excellent ability to desorb Cs bound strongly to clay. • The polycation desorbed significantly more Cs from the clay than did single cations. • Additional NH{sub 4}{sup +} treatment following the polycation treatment enhanced desorption of Cs. • The reaction yielded efficient desorption (95%) of an extremely low concentration of Cs-137 in the clay. - Abstract: We report on a new approach to increase the removal of cesium from contaminated clays based on the intercalation of a cationic polyelectrolyte into the clay interlayers. A highly charged cationic polyelectrolyte, polyethyleneimine (PEI), was shown to intercalate into the negatively charged interlayers and readily replaced Cs ions adsorbed on the interlayers of montmorillonite. The polycation desorbed significantly more Cs strongly bound to the clay than did single cations. Moreover, additional NH{sub 4}{sup +} treatment following the PEI treatment enhanced desorption of Cs ions that were less accessible by the bulky polyelectrolyte. This synergistic effect of PEI with NH{sub 4}{sup +} yielded efficient desorption (95%) of an extremely low concentration of radioactive {sup 137}Cs in the clay, which is very difficult to remove by simple cation-exchange methods due to the increased stability of the binding of Cs to the clay at low Cs concentrations.

  9. The desorption of ammonia and carbon dioxide from multicomponent solutions: I. Model description and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jotanović Milovan B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of the desorption process based on the synthesised technological topology of the regeneration process gas components NH3 and CO2, was developed. The logical principle methodology of the mathematical modelling of desorption processes was worked out in detail. The mathematical model of the process, including the following: - The synthesized technological scheme of the desorption of components NH3 and CO2, with all the necessary requirements and limitations of the mathematical model; - The relevant multicomponent systems which exist in the process were defined in which the interphase transformation occurs; - The considered units (aparatus are defined which make up the basic technological topology of the process; - Desorption processes in towers with different types of trays were defined and mathematically described; - The cooling process and condensation of gas phase in a complex multicomponent system was of the gas phase in a complex multicomponent system was defined and mathematically described. Many variants of the process were analyzed by using developed model with the aim of determining the relevant functional dependences between some basic parameters of the process. They will be published in the second part of this study.

  10. Surface Structures and Thermal Desorption Behaviors of Cyclopentanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers on Au(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hun Gu; Kim, You Young; Park, Tae Sun; Noh, Jae Geun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joon B. [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Ito, Eisuke; Hara, Masahiko [RIKEN-HYU Collaboration Center, Saitama (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    The surface structures, adsorption conditions, and thermal desorption behaviors of cyclopentanethiol (CPT) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). STM imaging revealed that although the adsorption of CPT on Au(111) at room temperature generates disordered SAMs, CPT molecules at 50 .deg. C formed well-ordered SAMs with a (2√3 x √5)R41{sup .}deg. packing structure. XPS measurements showed that CPT SAMs at room temperature were formed via chemical reactions between the sulfur atoms and gold surfaces. TDS measurements showed two dominant TD peaks for the decomposed fragments (C{sub 5}H{sub 9} {sup +}, m/e = 69) generated via C-S bond cleavage and the parent molecular species (C{sub 5}H{sub 9}SH{sup +}, m/e = 102) derived from a recombination of the chemisorbed thiolates and hydrogen atoms near 440 K. Interestingly, dimerization of sulfur atoms in n-alkanethiol SAMs usually occurs during thermal desorption and the same reaction did not happen for CPT SAMs, which may be due to the steric hindrance of cyclic rings of the CPT molecules. In this study, we demonstrated that the alicyclic ring of organic thiols strongly affected the surface structure and thermal desorption behavior of SAMs, thus providing a good method for controlling chemical and physical properties of organic thiol SAMs.

  11. Surface Structures and Thermal Desorption Behaviors of Cyclopentanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers on Au(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hun Gu; Kim, You Young; Park, Tae Sun; Noh, Jae Geun; Park, Joon B.; Ito, Eisuke; Hara, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    The surface structures, adsorption conditions, and thermal desorption behaviors of cyclopentanethiol (CPT) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). STM imaging revealed that although the adsorption of CPT on Au(111) at room temperature generates disordered SAMs, CPT molecules at 50 .deg. C formed well-ordered SAMs with a (2√3 x √5)R41".deg. packing structure. XPS measurements showed that CPT SAMs at room temperature were formed via chemical reactions between the sulfur atoms and gold surfaces. TDS measurements showed two dominant TD peaks for the decomposed fragments (C_5H_9 "+, m/e = 69) generated via C-S bond cleavage and the parent molecular species (C_5H_9SH"+, m/e = 102) derived from a recombination of the chemisorbed thiolates and hydrogen atoms near 440 K. Interestingly, dimerization of sulfur atoms in n-alkanethiol SAMs usually occurs during thermal desorption and the same reaction did not happen for CPT SAMs, which may be due to the steric hindrance of cyclic rings of the CPT molecules. In this study, we demonstrated that the alicyclic ring of organic thiols strongly affected the surface structure and thermal desorption behavior of SAMs, thus providing a good method for controlling chemical and physical properties of organic thiol SAMs

  12. Charging-assisted desorption of deuterium films by keV electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2009-01-01

    m. The initial film thickness and the mass loss as result of desorption were monitored by the QCM. The electron beam current was kept at about or below 100 nA to avoid beam-induced evaporation. Secondary electron emission was suppressed to a value below 0.01-0.03 electrons/electron by a repeller...

  13. Electron-stimulated desorption of lithium ions from lithium halide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowski, Leszek

    2007-01-01

    Electron-stimulated desorption of positive lithium ions from thin layers of lithium halides deposited onto Si(1 1 1) are investigated by the time-of-flight technique. The determined values of isotope effect of the lithium ( 6 Li + / 7 Li + ) are 1.60 ± 0.04, 1.466 ± 0.007, 1.282 ± 0.004, 1.36 ± 0.01 and 1.33 ± 0.01 for LiH, LiF, LiCl, LiBr and LiI, respectively. The observed most probable kinetic energies of 7 Li + are 1.0, 1.9, 1.1, 0.9 and 0.9 eV for LiH, LiF, LiCl, LiBr and LiI, respectively, and seem to be independent of the halide component mass. The values of lithium ion emission yield, lithium kinetic energy and lithium isotope effect suggest that the lattice relaxation is only important in the lithium ion desorption process from the LiH system. In view of possible mechanisms and processes involved into lithium ion desorption the obtained results indicate that for LiH, LiCl, LiBr and LiI the ions desorb in a rather classical way. However, for LiF, ion desorption has a more quantum character and the modified wave packet squeezing model has to be taken into account

  14. Desorption isotherms, drying characteristics and qualities of glace tropical fruits undergoing forced convection solar drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamradloedluk, Jindaporn; Wiriyaumpaiwong, Songchai [Mahasarakham Univ. Khamriang, Kantarawichai, Mahasarakham (Thailand)

    2008-07-01

    Solar energy, a form of sustainable energy, has a great potential for a wide variety of applications because it is abundant and accessible, especially for countries located in the tropical region. Drying process is one of the prominent techniques for utilization of solar energy. This research work proposes a forced convection solar drying of osmotically pretreated fruits viz. mango, guava, and pineapple. The fruit cubes with a dimension of 1cm x 1cm x 1cm were immersed in 35% w./w. sucrose solution prior to the drying process. Drying kinetics, color and hardness of the final products obtained from solar drying were investigated and compared with those obtained from open air-sun drying. Desorption isotherms of the osmosed fruits were also examined and five mathematical models were used to fit the desorption curves. Experimental results revealed that solar drying provided higher drying rate than natural sun drying. Color of glace fruit processed by solar drying was more intense, indicated by lower value of lightness and higher value of yellowness, than that processed by sun drying. Hardness of the products dehydrated by both drying methods, however, was not significantly different (p>0.05). Validation of the mathematical models developed showed that the GAB model was most effective for describing desorption isotherms of osmotically pretreated mango and pineapple whereas Peleg's model was most effective for describing desorption isotherms of osmotically pretreated guava. (orig.)

  15. Desorption isotherms and isosteric heat of 'cajuzinho-do-cerrado' achenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine F. Barbosa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to determine the desorption isotherms of 'cajuzinho-do-cerrado' achenes (Anacardium humile St. Hil. in various conditions of temperature and water activity, as well as to select the one that best represents the phenomenon and to determine the isosteric heat of desorption. The fruits were collected at the Emas National Park, in the municipality of Mineiros-GO, Brazil, pulped and then subjected to drying in silica gel at temperature of 25 ± 2 °C until the moisture contents of 17.6, 13.6, 11.1, 8.7 and 5.3 (d.b.%. After drying, the desorption isotherms were determined by the indirect static method. The water activity (Aw was determined at different temperatures, and the achenes were placed in a B.O.D. chamber, regulated at 10, 20, 30 and 40 °C. Data of hygroscopic equilibrium moisture content were fitted to different mathematical models through non-linear regression analysis, using the Gauss-Newton method. The Copace model was the one that best represented the hygroscopicity of 'cajuzinho-do-cerrado' achenes, while the integral isosteric heat of desorption of 'cajuzinho-do-cerrado' achenes for the moisture content range of 4.51 to 13.40 (% d.b. varied from 2,734.82 to 2,548.49 kJ kg-1.

  16. Sorption-desorption of antimony species onto calcined hydrotalcite: Surface structure and control of competitive anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Leonel Vinicius; Quirino, Juliana Nunes; Abrão, Taufik; Parreira, Paulo Sérgio; Urbano, Alexandre; Santos, Maria Josefa

    2018-02-15

    Calcined hydrotalcite can be applied to remove anionic contaminants from aqueous systems such as antimony species due to its great anion exchange capacity and high surface area. Hence, this study evaluated antimonite and antimonate sorption-desorption processes onto calcined hydrotalcite in the presence of nitrate, sulfate and phosphate. Sorption and desorption experiments of antimonite and antimonate were carried out in batch equilibrium and the post-sorption solids were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). Sorption data were better fitted by dual-mode Langmuir-Freundlich model (R 2 >0.99) and desorption data by Langmuir model. High maximum sorption capacities were found for the calcined hydrotalcite, ranging from 617 to 790meqkg -1 . The competing anions strongly affected the antimony sorption. EDXRF analysis and mathematical modelling showed that sulfate and phosphate presented higher effect on antimonite and antimonate sorption, respectively. High values for sorption efficiency (SE=99%) and sorption capacity were attributed to the sorbent small particles and the large surface area. Positive hysteresis indexes and low mobilization factors (MF>3%) suggest very low desorption capacity to antimony species from LDH. These calcined hydrotalcite characteristics are desirable for sorption of antimony species from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Nano-desorption electrospray and kinetic method in chiral analysis of clinical samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ranc, V.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Bednář, P.; Lemr, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 6 (2008), s. 411-417 ISSN 1469-0667 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR GA203/07/0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : nano-desorption electrospray * mass spectrometry * kinetic method Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.167, year: 2008

  18. Sorption and desorption of 17α-ethinylestradiol onto sediments affected by rhamnolipidic biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan-Ping; Hu, Yong-You; Lin, Hui; Ou, Xue-Lian

    2018-02-15

    Many studies have addressed the desorption and mobilization performances of sorbed contaminants affected by different rhamnolipidic biosurfactants. Study results have been mixed and complicated. Rhamnolipids are always microbial produced with variable homologues. In this study, two representative rhamnolipidic fractions (i.e., RL-F1 and RL-F2, which are mono- and di-rhamnolipids, respectively) were investigated and compared to determine their influence on 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) distribution within sediment-water sorption and desorption systems. In general, the coexistence of RL-F1 and EE2 enhanced EE2 sorption in a wider monorhamnolipidic dosage range when freshly treated sorbate was used. The sorbed EE2 concentration decreased as the RL-F1 dosage increased in the aged sorbate desorption systems. However, RL-F2 facilitated EE2 mobilization in both sorption and desorption processes. Experimental data were estimated using a conceptual model that considered the sorbed rhamnolipids and aqueous micelles for organic partitioning. The model results indicated that the rhamnolipid type is an important factor influencing organic distribution, in addition to sorbate aging process and sediment characteristics. The use of a rhamnolipidic mixture containing both mono- and di-rhamnosyl components may not achieve the desired effect when the biosurfactant-enhanced mobilization or immobilization approach is selected. These results are significant for selecting and applying rhamnolipids to remediate contaminants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Adsorption and desorption behavior of herbicide diuron on various Chinese cultivated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihua; Xu, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xiaoguang; Gui, Wenjun; Zhu, Guonian

    2010-06-15

    The adsorption-desorption behaviors of diuron were investigated in six cultivated soils of China. The effect of system pH and temperature were also studied. The data fitted the Freundlich equation very well. The adsorption K(F) values indicated the adsorption of diuron in the six soils was in the sequence of black soil (D)>yellow earth (F)>paddy soil (B)>yellow-brown soil (C)>yellow-cinnamon soil (A)>lateritic red earth (E). The adsorption K(F) and Freundlich exponents n were decreased when temperature was increased from 298 K to 318 K. However, the Gibb's free energy values were found less negative with the increasing temperature. Meanwhile, the extent of diuron adsorption on soil was at rather high level under low pH value conditions and decreased with increasing pH value. In addition, the desorption behavior of diuron in the six soils was in the sequence of lateritic red earth (E)>yellow-cinnamon soil (A)>paddy soil (B)>yellow earth (F)>yellow-brown soil (C)>black soil (D). At the same time, desorption hysteresis of diuron were observed in all of the tested soils. And the soil organic matter content may play an important role in the adsorption-desorption behavior. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA adsorption and desorption on mica surface studied by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lanlan; Zhao Dongxu; Zhang Yue; Xu Fugang; Li Zhuang

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of DNA molecules on mica surface and the following desorption of DNA molecules at ethanol-mica interface were studied using atomic force microscopy. By changing DNA concentration, different morphologies on mica surface have been observed. A very uniform and orderly monolayer of DNA molecules was constructed on the mica surface with a DNA concentration of 30 ng/μL. When the samples were immersed into ethanol for about 15 min, various desorption degree of DNA from mica (0-99%) was achieved. It was found that with the increase of DNA concentration, the desorption degree of DNA from the mica at ethanol-mica interface decreased. And when the uniform and orderly DNA monolayers were formed on the mica surface, almost no DNA molecule desorbed from the mica surface in this process. The results indicated that the uniform and orderly DNA monolayer is one of the most stable DNA structures formed on the mica surface. In addition, we have studied the structure change of DNA molecules after desorbed from the mica surface with atomic force microscopy, and found that the desorption might be ascribed to the ethanol-induced DNA condensation.

  1. Thin-Layer Chromatography/Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry of Lipids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Vaikkinen, A.; Haapala, M.; Kauppila, T. J.; Kostiainen, R.; Cvačka, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 24 (2016), s. 12279-12286 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/12/0750 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization * thin-layer chromatography * lipids Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 6.320, year: 2016

  2. Glyphosate sorption/desorption on biochars – Interactions of physical and chemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Biochar, a carbon-rich product of biomass pyrolysis, could limit glyphosate transport in soil and remediate contaminated water. The present study investigates the sorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on biochars prepared from different hardwoods at temperatures ranging from 350°C t...

  3. Characterisation of bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation and electrospray mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, B.L.M. van

    2000-01-01

    Chemical analysis for the characterisation of micro-organisms is rapidly evolving, after the recent advent of new ionisation methods in mass spectrometry (MS): electrospray (ES) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI). These methods allow quick characterisation of micro-organisms,

  4. Description of the phosphorus sorption and desorption processes in lowland peaty clay soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoumans, O.F.

    2013-01-01

    To determine phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land to surface water, information is needed about the behavior of P in soils. In this study, the sorption and desorption characteristics of lowland peaty clay soils are described based on experimental laboratory studies. The maximum P sorption

  5. Desorption, partitioning, and dechlorination characteristics of PCBs in sediments in interaction with reactive activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeok; Lawal, Wasiu; Al-Abed, Souhail R

    2015-04-28

    Sediment (WHS) in Waukegan Harbor, Illinois, heavily contaminated and aged with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was treated with reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles. Lab test proceeded in a direct mixing configuration of RAC and WHS. A compartment configuration, where RAC was physically separated from WHS, was also designed to trace the sequential transport and fate of PCBs, including desorption, adsorption, dechlorination, and re-partitioning. PCBs, once desorbed from WHS, were immediately sequestrated to RAC and subject to dechlorination. Direct mixing of WHS with RAC was one-order of magnitude more effective for dechlorination than compartment configuration. Compared to their desorption-followed by-adsorption route, direct physical contact of RAC with PCBs bound to WHS exhibited negligible contribution to the availability of PCBs for dechlorination reaction. Addition of RAC even in compartment configuration facilitated PCBs desorption from WHS. However, slow desorption of PCBs limited overall performance, resulting in a five-order of magnitude lower dechlorination yield when compared with treatment of purely aqueous PCBs. The low dechlorination yield reflected real world complexities in treating 3.19% organic carbon-containing WHS aged with PCBs for 40 years. These observations were further supported when compared with results on clean Cesar Creek sediment spiked with 2-chlorinated biphenyls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  7. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for high-throughput DNA analysis and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Golovlev, Valeri V.; Taranenko, N. I.; Allman, S. L.; Isola, Narayana R.; Potter, N. T.; Matteson, K. J.; Chang, Linus Y.

    1999-05-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been developed for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and DNA fingerprinting for forensic applications. With LDMS, the speed of DNA analysis can be much faster than conventional gel electrophoresis. No dye or radioactive tagging to DNA segments for detection is needed. LDMS is emerging as a new alternative technology for DNA analysis.

  8. Sorption and desorption studies of chromium(VI) from nonviable cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, V.K.; Rastogi, A.

    2008-01-01

    This communication presents results pertaining to the sorptive and desorptive studies carried out on chromium(VI) removal onto nonviable freshwater cyanobacterium (Nostoc muscorum) biomass. Influence of varying the conditions for removal of chromium(VI), such as the pH of aqueous solution, the dosage of biosorbent, the contact time with the biosorbent, the temperature for the removal of chromium, the effect of light metal ions and the adsorption-desorption studies were investigated. Sorption interaction of chromium on to cyanobacterial species obeyed both the first and the second-order rate equation and the experimental data showed good fit with both the Langmuir and freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity was 22.92 mg/g at 25 o C and pH 3.0. The adsorption process was endothermic and the values of thermodynamic parameters of the process were calculated. Various properties of the cyanobacterium, as adsorbent, explored in the characterization part were chemical composition of the adsorbent, surface area calculation by BET method and surface functionality by FTIR. Sorption-desorption of chromium into inorganic solutions and distilled water were observed and this indicated the biosorbent could be regenerated using 0.1 M HNO 3 and EDTA with upto 80% recovery. The biosorbents were reused in five biosorption-desorption cycles without a significant loss in biosorption capacity. Thus, this study demonstrated that the cyanobacterial biomass N. muscorum could be used as an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of chromium(VI) bearing wastewater

  9. Effect of biochar amendment on tylosin adsorption-desorption and transport in two different soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Yoon Jeong; Jim J. Wang; Syam K. Dodla; Thomas L. Eberhardt; Les Groom

    2012-01-01

    The role of biochar as a soil amendment on the adsorption¨C desorption and transport of tylosin, a macrolide class of veterinary antibiotic, is little known. In this study, batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics and transport of tylosin in forest and agricultural corn field soils amended with hardwood and softwood biochars....

  10. DNA adsorption and desorption on mica surface studied by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Lanlan [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Graduate school of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Renmin Street 5625, Changchun 130022 (China); Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16 East Nan-Hu Road, Open Economic Zone, Changchun 130033 (China); Zhao Dongxu [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 16 East Nan-Hu Road, Open Economic Zone, Changchun 130033 (China); Zhang Yue; Xu Fugang [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Graduate school of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Renmin Street 5625, Changchun 130022 (China); Li Zhuang, E-mail: zli@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Graduate school of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Renmin Street 5625, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2011-05-15

    The adsorption of DNA molecules on mica surface and the following desorption of DNA molecules at ethanol-mica interface were studied using atomic force microscopy. By changing DNA concentration, different morphologies on mica surface have been observed. A very uniform and orderly monolayer of DNA molecules was constructed on the mica surface with a DNA concentration of 30 ng/{mu}L. When the samples were immersed into ethanol for about 15 min, various desorption degree of DNA from mica (0-99%) was achieved. It was found that with the increase of DNA concentration, the desorption degree of DNA from the mica at ethanol-mica interface decreased. And when the uniform and orderly DNA monolayers were formed on the mica surface, almost no DNA molecule desorbed from the mica surface in this process. The results indicated that the uniform and orderly DNA monolayer is one of the most stable DNA structures formed on the mica surface. In addition, we have studied the structure change of DNA molecules after desorbed from the mica surface with atomic force microscopy, and found that the desorption might be ascribed to the ethanol-induced DNA condensation.

  11. Beneficial effect of carbon on hydrogen desorption kinetics from Mg–Ni–In alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermak, J.; Kral, L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Beneficial effect of graphitic carbon was observed. ► The effect is optimal up to c opt . ► Above c opt , phase decomposition occurs. ► Indium in studied Mg–Ni-based alloys prevents oxidation. - Abstract: In the present paper, hydrogen desorption kinetics from hydrided Mg–Ni–In–C alloys was investigated. A chemical composition that substantially accelerates hydrogen desorption was found. It was observed that carbon improves the hydrogen desorption kinetics significantly. Its beneficial effect was found to be optimum close to the carbon concentration of about c C ≅ 5 wt.%. With this composition, stored hydrogen can be desorbed readily at temperatures down to about 485 K, immediately after hydrogen charging. This can substantially shorten the hydrogen charging/discharging cycle of storage tanks using Mg–Ni-based alloys as hydrogen storage medium. For higher carbon concentrations, unwanted phases precipitated, likely resulting in deceleration of hydrogen desorption and lower hydrogen storage capacity.

  12. Bioaerosol detection by aerosol TOF-mass spectrometry: Application of matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuijckhuijse, A.L. van; Stowers, M.A.; Kientz, Ch.E.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Scarlett, B.

    2000-01-01

    In previous publications the use of an aerosol time of flight mass spectrometer was reported for the on-line measurements of aerosols (Weiss 1997, Kievit 1995). The apparatus is capable of measuring the size as well as the chemical composition, by the use of Laser Desorption/Ionisation (LDI), of an

  13. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1985-01-01

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs.

  14. Peak quantification in surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization by using mixture models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Martijn; Roelofsen, Han; Vonk, Roel J.; Jansen, Ritsert C.

    2006-01-01

    Surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI) time of flight (TOF) is a mass spectrometry technology for measuring the composition of a sampled protein mixture. A mass spectrum contains peaks corresponding to proteins in the sample. The peak areas are proportional to the measured

  15. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the analysis of chemical food contaminants in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.W.F.; Hooijerink, H.; Zomer, P.; Mol, J.G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Since its introduction, desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) has been mainly applied in pharmaceutical and forensic analysis. We expect that DESI will find its way in many different fields, including food analysis. In this review, we summarize DESI developments aimed at

  16. Application of silicon nanowires and indium tin oxide surfaces in desorption electrospray ionization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pól, Jaroslav; Novák, Petr; Volný, Michael; Kruppa, G. H.; Kostiainen, R.; Lemr, Karel; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 6 (2008), s. 391-399 ISSN 1469-0667 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : mass spectrometry * desorption electrospray ionization * nanowires Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.167, year: 2008

  17. Kinetics of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline adsorption and desorption on two acid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Fernández-Sanjurjo, Maria J; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to quantify retention/release of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline on two soils, paying attention to sorption kinetics and to implications of the adsorption/desorption processes on transfer of these pollutants to the various environmental compartments. We used the stirred flow chamber (SFC) procedure to achieve this goal. All three antibiotics showed high affinity for both soils, with greater adsorption intensity for soil 1, the one with the highest organic matter and Al and Fe oxides contents. Desorption was always  oxytetracycline > chlortetracycline in soil 1, with similar values for the three antibiotics and the sequence tetracycline > chlortetracycline > oxytetracycline in soil 2. The desorption sequences were oxytetracycline > tetracycline > chlortetracycline in soil 1 and oxytetracycline > chlortetracycline > tetracycline in soil 2. In conclusion, the SFC technique has yielded new kinetic data regarding tetracycline, oxytetracycline, and chlortetracycline adsorption/desorption on soils, indicating that it can be used to shed further light on the retention and transport processes affecting antibiotics on soils and other media, thus increasing knowledge on the behavior and evolution of these pharmaceutical residues in the environment.

  18. Water desorption kinetics of polymer composites with cellulose fibers as filler

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacková, Taťana; Kroisová, D.; Špatenka, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2009), s. 68-76 ISSN 0022-2348 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymer composites * water desorption kinetics * thermoplastic matrix Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.716, year: 2009

  19. Studies of iodine adsorption and desorption on HTGR coolant circuit materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, M.F.; Compere, E.L.; de Nordwall, H.J.

    1976-04-01

    Safety studies of the HTGR system indicate that radioactive iodine, released from the fuel to the helium coolant, may pose a problem of concern if no attenuation of the amount of iodine released occurs in the coolant circuit. Since information on iodine behavior in this system was incomplete, iodine adsorption on HTGR materials was studied in vacuum as a function of iodine pressure and of adsorber temperature. Iodine coverages on Fe 3 O 4 and Cr 2 O 3 approached maxima of about 2 x 10 14 and 1 x 10 14 atoms/cm 2 , respectively, whereas the iodine coverage on graphite under similar conditions was found to be less by a factor of about 100. Iodine desorption from the same materials into vacuum or flowing helium was investigated, on a limited basis, as a function of iodine coverage, of adsorber temperature, and of dry vs wet helium. The rate of vacuum desorption from Fe 3 O 4 was related to the spectrum of energies of the adsorption sites. A small amount of water vapor in the helium enhanced desorption from iron powder but appeared to have less effect on desorption from the metal oxides

  20. Microwave-Enhanced Thermal Desorption of Polyhalogenated Biphenyls from Contaminated Soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaštánek, P.; Kaštánek, František; Hájek, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 3 (2010), s. 295-300 ISSN 0733-9372 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : microwave * experiments * desorption Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.117, year: 2010

  1. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, A.A.

    1985-07-02

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs. 3 figs.

  2. Thermal desorption spectroscopy of boron/carbon films after keV deuterium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaki, T.; Gotoh, Y.; Ando, T.; Jimbou, R.; Ogiwara, N.; Saidoh, M.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) of D 2 and CD 4 was done on boron/carbon films (B/(B+C)=0-74%), after 3 keV D 3 + irradiation to 4.5x10 17 D/cm 2 at 473 K. The D 2 desorption peaks were observed at 1050, 850 and 650 K. For a sputter B/C film (0%), only the 1050 K peak was observed. With increasing boron concentration to 3%, a sharp peak appeared at 850 K, the intensity of which was found to increase with increasing boron concentration to 23%, and then to decrease at 74%. The 650 K shoulder, which was observed for high boron concentration specimens, was speculated to be deuterium trapped by boron atoms in the boron clusters. The relative amount of CD 4 desorption was found to decrease with increasing boron concentration, which was attributed to the decrease in the trapped deuterium concentration in the implantation layer at temperatures at which CD 4 desorption proceeds. ((orig.))

  3. Fast profiling of anthocyanins in wine by desorption nano-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartmanová, L.; Ranc, V.; Papoušková, B.; Bednář, P.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Lemr, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1217, č. 25 (2010), s. 4223-4228 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/07/0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Mass spectrometry * Desorption nano-electrospray * Liquid chromatography Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.194, year: 2010

  4. Hot-electron-mediated desorption rates calculated from excited-state potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Gavnholt, Jeppe; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for desorption induced by (multiple) electronic transitions [DIET (DIMET)] based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on variou...

  5. Organic solvents improve hydrocarbon desorption and biodegradation in highly contaminated weathered soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rivero, M. [Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Ecatepec, Mexico City (Mexico); Saucedo-Casteneda, G.; Gutierrez-Rojas, M. [Autonoma Metropolitan Univ., Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. of Biotechnology

    2007-07-15

    A toluene-based microbial slurry phase system was used to remediate hydrocarbons (HC) in highly contaminated soil samples collected from a site next to a working refinery in Mexico. Initial HC concentrations of the samples were 237.2 {+-} 16,6 g kg{sup -1} in dry soil. The microbial consortium consisted of 10 different strains in a mineral solution. Non-polar solvents used in the phase system included hexane, benzene, and toluene. Polar solvents included n-butanol, acetone, and methanol. The bioavailability of the HCs was increased using both polar and nonpolar solvents in order to promote desorption from the soil and to enhance overall HC biodegradation. HC desorption was analyzed in an abiotic system. Respiration and residual HCs were examined after a period of 30 days in order to compare the effects of the 2 solvents. The biodegradation extracts were then fractionated in a silica gel column to determine if the solvents actually enhanced the biodegradation of specific HC fractions. The study showed that induced dipole interactions forces resulted when nonpolar molecules were dissolved into a nonpolar solvent. Results for desorption and solubility varied among the 6 solvents. Higher dielectric constants resulted in higher solubility and desorption of HCs for nonpolar solvents, while the opposite effect was observed for polar solvents. It was concluded that toluene produced better biodegradation results than any of the milder solvents. 34 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  6. Adsorption and desorption of phosphate on limestone in experiments simulating seawater intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The absorption and desorption of phosphorus on a large block of limestone was investigated using deionized water (DIW) and seawater. The limestone had a high affinity to adsorb phosphorus in DIW. Phosphate adsorption was significantly less in seawater, and more phosphorus was desorbed in the seawate...

  7. Adsorption and desorption of cadmium by synthetic and natural organo-clay complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, R.; Francis, C.W.; Oak Ridge National Lab., Tenn.

    1976-01-01

    Tracer levels of 109 Cd were used to study the adsorption and desorption of Cd by synthetic and natural organo-clay complexes. Synthetic organo-clay complexes were made by adsorbing humic acid extracted from soil to various forms of 3 ) 2 showed that Cd was adsorbed more tenaciously to the sesquioxides than organo-clay fractions

  8. Decomposition of thin titanium deuteride films: thermal desorption kinetics studies combined with microstructure analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisowski, W.F.; Keim, Enrico G.; Kaszkur, Zbigniew; Smithers, M.A.; Smithers, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal evolution of deuterium from thin titanium films, prepared under UHV conditions and deuterated in situ at room temperature, has been studied by means of thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS) and a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy

  9. Adlayer structure dependent ultrafast desorption dynamics in carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pd (111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung-Young; Camillone, Nina R.; Camillone, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas@bnl.gov [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Xu, Pan [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); White, Michael G. [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    We report our ultrafast photoinduced desorption investigation of the coverage dependence of substrate–adsorbate energy transfer in carbon monoxide adlayers on the (111) surface of palladium. As the CO coverage is increased, the adsorption site population shifts from all threefold hollows (up to 0.33 ML), to bridge and near bridge (>0.5 to 0.6 ML) and finally to mixed threefold hollow plus top site (at saturation at 0.75 ML). We show that between 0.24 and 0.75 ML this progression of binding site motifs is accompanied by two remarkable features in the ultrafast photoinduced desorption of the adsorbates: (i) the desorption probability increases roughly two orders magnitude, and (ii) the adsorbate–substrate energy transfer rate observed in two-pulse correlation experiments varies nonmonotonically, having a minimum at intermediate coverages. Simulations using a phenomenological model to describe the adsorbate–substrate energy transfer in terms of frictional coupling indicate that these features are consistent with an adsorption-site dependent electron-mediated energy coupling strength, η{sub el}, that decreases with binding site in the order: three-fold hollow > bridge and near bridge > top site. This weakening of η{sub el} largely counterbalances the decrease in the desorption activation energy that accompanies this progression of adsorption site motifs, moderating what would otherwise be a rise of several orders of magnitude in the desorption probability. Within this framework, the observed energy transfer rate enhancement at saturation coverage is due to interadsorbate energy transfer from the copopulation of molecules bound in three-fold hollows to their top-site neighbors.

  10. Desorption, partitioning, and dechlorination characteristics of PCBs in sediments in interaction with reactive activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyeok; Lawal, Wasiu; Al-Abed, Souhail R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Problematic aged real PCBs-contaminated sediment (WHS) was examined. • Performance of reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with Pd–ZVI was tested. • Fate and transport of PCBs bound to WHS in the presence of RAC was fully traced. • Direct mixing configuration was compared with compartment configuration. • Results reflected real world complexities associated with slow desorption of PCBs. - Abstract: Sediment (WHS) in Waukegan Harbor, Illinois, heavily contaminated and aged with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was treated with reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles. Lab test proceeded in a direct mixing configuration of RAC and WHS. A compartment configuration, where RAC was physically separated from WHS, was also designed to trace the sequential transport and fate of PCBs, including desorption, adsorption, dechlorination, and re-partitioning. PCBs, once desorbed from WHS, were immediately sequestrated to RAC and subject to dechlorination. Direct mixing of WHS with RAC was one-order of magnitude more effective for dechlorination than compartment configuration. Compared to their desorption-followed by-adsorption route, direct physical contact of RAC with PCBs bound to WHS exhibited negligible contribution to the availability of PCBs for dechlorination reaction. Addition of RAC even in compartment configuration facilitated PCBs desorption from WHS. However, slow desorption of PCBs limited overall performance, resulting in a five-order of magnitude lower dechlorination yield when compared with treatment of purely aqueous PCBs. The low dechlorination yield reflected real world complexities in treating 3.19% organic carbon-containing WHS aged with PCBs for 40 years. These observations were further supported when compared with results on clean Cesar Creek sediment spiked with 2-chlorinated biphenyls

  11. Mechanisms of desorption of 134Cs and 85Sr aerosols deposited on urban surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real, J.; Persin, F.; Camarasa-Claret, C.

    2002-01-01

    The radioactive isotopes of cesium and strontium may be deposited on urban surfaces in the case of an accidental atmospheric discharge from a nuclear facility and thus imply a health hazard. In order to handle the decontamination of these surfaces, we have carried out experiments under controlled conditions on tiles and concrete and we have studied the physical and chemical mechanisms at the solid-liquid interface. The deposition of radionuclides was carried out in the form of aerosols indicating an accidental source term. Their desorption by rainwater is low in all cases, of the order of 5-6% for cesium for any material and 29 and 12% for strontium on tile and concrete, respectively. The low desorption values of cesium may be explained by the strong bonding that occurs with the silicates constituting the tile due to virtually irreversible processes of exchange of ions and by the formation of insoluble complexes with the C-S-H gel of concrete. The strontium-tile bonds are weaker, while strontium precipitates with the carbonates of concrete in the form of SrCO 3 . In view of these characteristics, washing solutions with high concentrations of chloride and oxalate of ammonium chosen for their ion-exchanging and sequestering properties were tested on these surfaces. The desorption of cesium improved strongly since it reached 70% on tile and 90% on concrete after 24 h of contact, which is consistent with our knowledge of the bonds between this element and the surfaces. Strontium, given the greater complexity of physical and chemical forms that it may take is less well desorbed. The ammonium chloride improves the desorption (50% and 40%, for tile and concrete, respectively) but the oxalate, while it does not affect desorption on the tiles, decreases that on the concrete since by strongly etching the concrete, it causes the release of carbonate ions that precipitate with strontium

  12. Desorption kinetics of ciprofloxacin in municipal biosolids determined by diffusion gradient in thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, E; Starnes, D

    2016-12-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a commonly-prescribed antibiotic that is largely excreted by the body, and is often found at elevated concentrations in treated sewage sludge (biosolids) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. When biosolids are applied to soils, they could release CIP to surface runoff, which could adversely affect growth of aquatic organisms that inhabit receiving water bodies. The hazard risk largely depends on the amount of antibiotic in the solid phase that can be released to solution (labile CIP), its diffusion coefficient, and sorption/desorption exchange rates in biosolids particles. In this study, these processes were evaluated in a Class A Exceptional Quality Biosolids using a diffusion gradient in thin films (DGT) sampler that continuously removed CIP from solution, which induced desorption and diffusion in biosolids. Mass accumulation of antibiotic in the sampler over time was fit by a diffusion transport and exchange model available in the software tool 2D-DIFS to derive the distribution coefficient of labile CIP (K dl ) and sorption/desorption rate constants in the biosolids. The K dl was 13 mL g -1 , which equated to 16% of total CIP in the labile pool. Although the proportion of labile CIP was considerable, release rates to solution were constrained by slow desorption kinetics (desorption rate constant = 4 × 10 -6 s -1 ) and diffusion rate (effective diffusion coefficient = 6 × 10 -9  cm 2  s -1 . Studies are needed to investigate how changes in temperature, water content, pH and other physical and chemical characteristics can influence antibiotic release kinetics and availability and mobility in biosolid-amended soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Desorption, partitioning, and dechlorination characteristics of PCBs in sediments in interaction with reactive activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeok, E-mail: hchoi@uta.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Texas at Arlington, 416 Yates Street, Arlington, TX 76019-0308 (United States); Environmental and Earth Sciences Program, The University of Texas at Arlington, 500 Yates Street, Arlington, TX 76019-0049 (United States); Lawal, Wasiu [Environmental and Earth Sciences Program, The University of Texas at Arlington, 500 Yates Street, Arlington, TX 76019-0049 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R. [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • Problematic aged real PCBs-contaminated sediment (WHS) was examined. • Performance of reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with Pd–ZVI was tested. • Fate and transport of PCBs bound to WHS in the presence of RAC was fully traced. • Direct mixing configuration was compared with compartment configuration. • Results reflected real world complexities associated with slow desorption of PCBs. - Abstract: Sediment (WHS) in Waukegan Harbor, Illinois, heavily contaminated and aged with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was treated with reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles. Lab test proceeded in a direct mixing configuration of RAC and WHS. A compartment configuration, where RAC was physically separated from WHS, was also designed to trace the sequential transport and fate of PCBs, including desorption, adsorption, dechlorination, and re-partitioning. PCBs, once desorbed from WHS, were immediately sequestrated to RAC and subject to dechlorination. Direct mixing of WHS with RAC was one-order of magnitude more effective for dechlorination than compartment configuration. Compared to their desorption-followed by-adsorption route, direct physical contact of RAC with PCBs bound to WHS exhibited negligible contribution to the availability of PCBs for dechlorination reaction. Addition of RAC even in compartment configuration facilitated PCBs desorption from WHS. However, slow desorption of PCBs limited overall performance, resulting in a five-order of magnitude lower dechlorination yield when compared with treatment of purely aqueous PCBs. The low dechlorination yield reflected real world complexities in treating 3.19% organic carbon-containing WHS aged with PCBs for 40 years. These observations were further supported when compared with results on clean Cesar Creek sediment spiked with 2-chlorinated biphenyls.

  14. Competitive adsorption-desorption reactions of two hazardous heavy metals in contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Masoud; Rahnemaie, Rasoul; Homaee, Mehdi

    2015-09-01

    Investigating the interactions of heavy metals is imperative for sustaining environment and human health. Among those, Cd is toxic for organisms at any concentration. While Ni acts as a micronutrient at very low concentration but is hazardous toxic above certain threshold value. In this study, the chemical adsorption and desorption reactions of Ni and Cd in contaminated soils were investigated in both single and binary ion systems. Both Ni and Cd experimental data demonstrated Langmuir type adsorption. In the competitive systems, an antagonistic effect was observed, implying that both ions compete for same type of adsorption sites. Adverse effect of Cd on Ni adsorption was slightly stronger than that of opposite system, consistent with adsorption isotherms in single ion systems. Variation in ionic strength indicated that Ca, a much weaker adsorbate, could also compete with Cd and Ni for adsorption on soil particles. Desorption data indicated that Cd and Ni are adsorbed very tightly such that after four successive desorption steps, less than 0.5 % of initially adsorbed ions released into the soil solution. This implies that Ca, at concentration in equilibrium with calcite mineral, cannot adequately compete with and replace adsorbed Ni and Cd ions. This adsorption behavior was led to considerable hysteresis between adsorption and desorption in both single and binary ion systems. In the binary ion systems, desorption of Cd and Ni was increased by increase in both equilibrium concentration of adsorbed ion and concentration of competitor ion. The overall results obtained in this research indicate that Cd and Ni are strongly adsorbed in calcareous soil and Ca, the major dissolved ion, insignificantly influences metal ions adsorption. Consequently, the contaminated soils by Ni and Cd can simultaneously be remediated by environmentally oriented technologies such as phytoremediation.

  15. Promotion Effect of CaO Modification on Mesoporous Al2O3-Supported Ni Catalysts for CO2 Methanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalysts Ni/Al2O3 and CaO modified Ni/Al2O3 were prepared by impregnation method and applied for methanation of CO2. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, temperature-programmed reduction of H2 (H2-TPR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and temperature-programmed desorption of CO2 and H2 (CO2-TPD and H2-TPD techniques, respectively. TPR and XRD results indicated that CaO can effectively restrain the growth of NiO nanoparticles, improve the dispersion of NiO, and weaken the interaction between NiO and Al2O3. CO2-TPD and H2-TPD results suggested that CaO can change the environment surrounding of CO2 and H2 adsorption and thus the reactants on the Ni atoms can be activated more easily. The modified Ni/Al2O3 showed better catalytic activity than pure Ni/Al2O3. Ni/CaO-Al2O3 showed high CO2 conversion especially at low temperatures compared to Ni/Al2O3, and the selectivity to CH4 was very close to 1. The high CO2 conversion over Ni/CaO-Al2O3 was mainly caused by the surface coverage by CO2-derived species on CaO-Al2O3 surface.

  16. Investigating Superhydrogenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as catalysts for Interstellar H2 formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Frederik Doktor Skødt

    2016-01-01

    Temperature programmed desorption has been used to investigate adsorption and abstraction of hydrogen atoms on the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, coronene. The coronene molecules were exposed to different hydrogen fluences at a dosing temperature of 1000K. Large fluences of hydrogen leave...... large abundances, alongside H2[2]. To investigate the the abstraction and adsoption patterns of hydrogen/deuterium on coronene, C24H12 (a PAH), we used temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Coronene monolayers were prepared on graphite and exposed to different fluences of 1000 K H or D atoms...

  17. Desorption process of hydrogen starting from the Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} and Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 0.3}; Proceso de desorcion de hidrogeno a partir del hidruro intermetalico Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} y Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 0.3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iturbe G, J.L.; Basurto S, R.; Lopez M, B.E. [Departamento de Quimica, ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    In this work the desorption velocity of H{sub 2} was determined starting from the magnesium nickel hydride once the reaction between the intermetallic and the hydrogen was realized, the compound were analysed by means of a thermogravimetric equipment, the conditions for carrying out the analysis were: 10 C by minute in nitrogen atmosphere at a volume of 50 ml by minute, subsequently the isotherms at different times were programmed and the desorption velocity of hydrogen was determined. The results show that the desorption velocity of hydrogen depends of the temperature, using only the nitrogen flux which acts as a carrier gas. Observing that the hydrogen liberation is carried out by means of two mechanisms according to the isotherms obtained. (Author)

  18. Laser desorption and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Fundamentals .Applications; Desorption laser et spectrometrie de masse par temps de vol. Aspects fondamentaux. Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaurand, P

    1994-11-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a very powerful technique for the analysis of heavy molecular ions (100 000 u and more). The ejection in the gas phase and the ionization of these molecules is now possible through the MALDI technique (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization). This technique consists in mixing the heavy molecules to be analysed with a organic matrix which absorbs at the wavelength of the laser. The necessary irradiance are of the order of 10{sup 6} W/cm{sup 2}. In these conditions we have shown that the mass resolutions are optimum and that the relative mass accuracies are of the order of 10{sup -4}. We have also demonstrated that the emission angle of the molecular ions in MALDI depends on the incident angle of the laser light. During the desorption process, the molecular ions are emitted in the opposite direction of the incident laser light. This effect is particularly important for the design of the accelerating stage of the time-of-flight spectrometers. Problems relative to the detection of these heavy molecular ions have been studied in details between 0.5 10{sup 4} m/s and 10{sup 5} m/s. The velocity threshold of the electronic emission is lower than the value of 0.5 10{sup 4} m/s. The relation between the electronic emission and the projectile velocity is complex. Finally, examples on mass identification of C{sub 60} molecules and derivated C{sub 60} are presented. Desorption methods are compared. (author). 32 refs., 34 figs.

  19. Preparación y caracterización de la zeolita MCM-22 y de su precursor laminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pergher Sibele B. C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The layered precursor of MCM-22 was prepared with different Si/Al ratios: 15, 25, 50, 100 and ¥. Upon heat treatment these precursors form MCM-22 zeolite. Both layered precursor and MCM-22 zeolite were characterized by several techniques: Chemical Analysis by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, Thermo-gravimetric Analysis (TGA, Pore Analysis by N2 and Ar adsorption, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Infrared Spectroscopy (IR and Temperature Programmed Desorption of ammonium (TPD.

  20. Comparative study of the active sites in zeolites by different probe molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINE AUROUX

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes some of the recently published results concerning the acid sites in the zeolites ZSM-5 and Y studied by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD and adsorption calorimetry using different probe molecules NH3, CO, N2O and n-hexane. For the first time it has been shown that the acid sites in hydrated zeolites are accessible for n-hexane adsorption

  1. Desorption, dissociation and orientation of oxygen admolecules on a reconstructed platinum(110)(1x2) surface studied by thermal desorption and near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yuichi; Matsushima, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Shin-ichiro; Kamada, Masao

    1993-01-01

    The desorption, dissociation and orientation of oxygen admolecules on a reconstructed Pt(110)(1x2) were studied by means of TDS combined with isotope tracer, NEXAFS, and angle-resolved TDS. The admolecules below half a monolayer lie on the bottom of the trough, being oriented along it. The molecules adsorbed additionally are lying on declining terraces. The desorption flux of the former species shows a simple cosine distribution, suggesting that the molecule is not localized on the bottom in the desorption event. (author)

  2. Coalbed gas desorption in canisters: Consumption of trapped atmospheric oxygen and implications for measured gas quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hui; Schimmelmann, Arndt [Indiana University, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Bloomington, IN 47405-1405 (United States); Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana University, Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, IN 47405-2208 (United States); Pope, James [CRL Energy Ltd., 123 Blenheim Road, Christchurch (New Zealand); University of Canterbury, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Christchurch (New Zealand); Moore, Tim A. [University of Canterbury, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Christchurch (New Zealand); P.T. Arrow Energy Indonesia, Wisma Anugraha, Jl. Taman Kemang No. 32B, Jakarta Selatan (Indonesia)

    2010-01-07

    Desorption canisters are routinely employed to quantify coalbed gas contents in coals. If purging with inert gas or water flooding is not used, entrapment of air with {proportional_to} 78.08 vol.% nitrogen (N{sub 2}) in canisters during the loading of coal results in contamination by air and subsequent overestimates of N{sub 2} in desorbed coalbed gas. Pure coalbed gas does not contain any elemental oxygen (O{sub 2}), whereas air contamination originally includes {proportional_to} 20.95 vol.% O{sub 2} and has a N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} volume ratio of {proportional_to} 3.73. A correction for atmospheric N{sub 2} is often attempted by quantifying O{sub 2} in headspace gas and then proportionally subtracting atmospheric N{sub 2}. However, this study shows that O{sub 2} is not a conservative proxy for air contamination in desorption canisters. Time-series of gas chromatographic (GC) compositional data from several desorption experiments using high volatile bituminous coals from the Illinois Basin and a New Zealand subbituminous coal document that atmospheric O{sub 2} was rapidly consumed, especially during the first 24 h. After about 2 weeks of desorption, the concentration of O{sub 2} declined to near or below GC detection limits. Irreversible loss of O{sub 2} in desorption canisters is caused by biological, chemical, and physical mechanisms. The use of O{sub 2} as a proxy for air contamination is justified only immediately after loading of desorption canisters, but such rapid measurements preclude meaningful assessment of coalbed gas concentrations. With increasing time and progressive loss of O{sub 2}, the use of O{sub 2} content as a proxy for atmospheric N{sub 2} results in overestimates of N{sub 2} in desorbed coalbed gas. The indicated errors for nitrogen often range in hundreds of %. Such large analytical errors have a profound influence on market choices for CBM gas. An erroneously calculated N{sub 2} content in CBM would not meet specifications for most pipeline

  3. Development of a kinetic model of hydrogen absorption and desorption in magnesium and analysis of the rate-determining step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yuta; Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2018-05-01

    Mg is promising as a new light-weight and low-cost hydrogen-storage material. We construct a numerical model to represent the hydrogen dynamics on Mg, comprising dissociative adsorption, desorption, bulk diffusion, and chemical reaction. Our calculation shows a good agreement with experimental data for hydrogen absorption and desorption on Mg. Our model clarifies the evolution of the rate-determining processes as absorption and desorption proceed. Furthermore, we investigate the optimal condition and materials design for efficient hydrogen storage in Mg. By properly understanding the rate-determining processes using our model, one can determine the design principle for high-performance hydrogen-storage systems.

  4. The importance of environmental factors and matrices in the adsorption, desorption, and toxicity of butyltins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Liping; Xu, Cuihong; Li, Ji

    2017-01-01

    detrimental effects on humans and aquatic organisms. This work provides a critical review of recent studies on the adsorption, desorption, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of BTs that can notably influence the distribution of BTs in the environment. Influence of environmental factors (e.g., pH and salinity......Butyltins (BTs) are considered as a group of the most important organometallic compounds in industry and agriculture. Due to their widespread use, large amounts of BTs including tributyltin (TBT), dibutyltin (DBT), and monobutyltin (MBT) have entered into the environment, and subsequently causing......) and adsorbents in the matrices (e.g., minerals, organic carbons, and quartz) on the adsorption, desorption, and toxicity of BTs is particularly addressed....

  5. The role of electron-stimulated desorption in focused electron beam induced deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dorp, Willem F.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of our study about the deposition rate of focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) as a function of the substrate temperature with the substrate being an electron-transparent amorphous carbon membrane. When W(CO)6 is used as a precursor it is observed that the growt......, the majority desorbs from the surface rather than dissociates to contribute to the deposit. It is important to take this into account during FEBIP experiments, for instance when determining fundamental process parameters such as the activation energy for desorption....... experiments compared to literature values is consistent with earlier findings by other authors. The discrepancy is attributed to electron-stimulated desorption, which is known to occur during electron irradiation. The data suggest that, of the W(CO)6 molecules that are affected by the electron irradiation...

  6. Organometallics and quaternary ammonium salts affect calcium ion desorption from lecithin liposome membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kral, T.E.; Kuczera, J.; Przestalski, S.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to compare the effects of groups of tin and lead organometallic compounds and their mixtures with amphiphilic quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) on the process of calcium ion desorption from lecithin liposome membranes, as dependent on the properties of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts of QAS. In the investigations the method of radioactive labels was applied. Synergism and antagonism in the action of both groups of compounds were found. The effectiveness of the cooperation depended more on chain length of QAS compounds than on the size and polarity of their hydrophobic parts. The most effective of all compounds studied was a the mixture of benzyldimethylammonium chloride in a mixture with tripropyltin. Since the rate of calcium desorption proved to be a good measure of efficacy of biologically active surfactants, it seems that the conclusions reached in this paper may be useful for choosing compounds which are able to decontaminate the environment polluted with heavy metals. (orig.)

  7. Silver nanoparticles as matrix for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Lin; Chen Jianrong; Ge Liya; Tan, Swee Ngin

    2007-01-01

    Silver nanoparticle synthesized from chemical reduction has been successfully utilized as a matrix in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) of peptides. Acting as a substrate to adsorb analytes, as well as a transmission medium for UV laser, silver nanoparticle was found to assist in the desorption/ionization of peptides with little or no induced fragmentation. The size of the nanoparticle was typically in the range of 160 ± 20 nm. One of the key advantages of silver nanoparticle for peptides analysis is its simple step for on-probe sample preparation. In addition, it also minimizes the interferences of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant background signal, resulting in cleaner mass spectra and more sensitive signal, when compared to α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CCA) matrix

  8. Effect of drying on the desorption of diuron and terbuthylazine from natural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartz, Bernd; Louchart, Xavier

    2007-03-01

    This work was initiated to study the effects of climate induced soil water status variations which can reach extreme values under natural conditions on the sorption process of hydrophobic organic compounds. Based on the classical slurry batch methodology an approach is developed that allows the fast and careful complete drying of soil suspensions (microwave technique). Classical adsorption experiments were followed by three desorption steps with and without drying cycles. Drying and re-wetting enhanced the sorption-desorption hysteresis and Freundlich adsorption coefficients increased from 5.9 to 16 and 5.2 to 21 over three drying cycles for diuron and terbuthylazine respectively. Assuming the validity of a dual stage adsorption process, model evaluation suggests that drying is as a shrinking-like process leading to conformational changes of the dominant sorbent (soil organic matter) which restrict the intra-micro-particle diffusion. Rewetting only leads to a partial recovery of the diffusional pore space.

  9. Electron Stimulated Molecular Desorption of a NEG St 707 at Room Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Le Pimpec, F; Laurent, Jean Michel

    2001-01-01

    Electron stimulated molecular desorption (ESD) from a NEG St 707 (SAES GettersTM) sample after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide2,13C18O, has been studied on a laboratory setup. Measurements were performed using an electron beam of 300 eV kinetic energy, with an average electron intensity of 1.6 1015 electrons s-1. The electrons were impinging on the 15 cm2 target surface at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields h (molecules/electron) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide) for a fully activated NEG as well as for a NEG fully saturated with 13C18O are lower than for OFHC copper baked at 120oC. A small fraction only of the gas which is required to saturate the getter surface can be re-desorbed and thus appears to be accessible to ESD.

  10. Hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of UZr0.29 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuai Maobing; Su Yongjun; Wang Zhenhong; Zhang Yitao

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of UZr 0.29 alloy are investigated in detail at hydrogen pressures up to 0.4 MPa and over the temperature range of 300 to 723 K. It absorbs hydrogen up to 2.3 H atoms per F.U. (formula unit) by only one-step reaction and hence each desorption isotherm has a single plateau over nearly the whole hydrogen composition range. The enthalpy and entropy changes of the dissociation reaction are of -78.9 kJ·mol -1 H 2 and 205.3 J·(K·mol H 2 ) -1 , respectively. The alloy shows high durability against powdering upon hydrogenation and may have good heat conductivity. It is predicted that UZr 0.29 alloy may be a suitable material for tritium treatment and storage

  11. Direct pathway for sticking/desorption of H2 on Si(100)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kratzer, Peter; Hammer, Bjørk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1995-01-01

    The energetics of H2 interacting with the Si(100) surface is studied by means of ab initio total-energy calculations within the framework of density-functional theory. We find a direct desorption pathway from the monohydride phase that is compatible with experimental activation energies and demon......The energetics of H2 interacting with the Si(100) surface is studied by means of ab initio total-energy calculations within the framework of density-functional theory. We find a direct desorption pathway from the monohydride phase that is compatible with experimental activation energies...... and demonstrate the importance of substrate relaxation for this process. Both the transition state configuration and the barrier height depend crucially on the degree of buckling of the Si dimers on the Si(100) surface. The adsorption barrier height on the clean surface is governed by the buckling via its...

  12. In situ measurements of fuel retention by laser induced desorption spectroscopy in TEXTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobinski, M.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Huber, A.; Stoschus, H.; Brezinsek, S.; Samm, U.; TEXTOR Team

    2011-12-01

    In future fusion devices such as ITER tritium retention due to tritium co-deposition in mixed material layers can be a serious safety problem. Laser induced desorption spectroscopy (LIDS) can measure the hydrogen content of hydrogenic carbon layers locally on plasma-facing components, while hydrogen is used as a tritium substitute. For several years, this method has been applied in the TEXTOR tokamak in situ during plasma operation to monitor the hydrogen content in space and time. This work shows the LIDS signal reproducibility and studies the effects of different plasma conditions, desorption distances from the plasma and different laser energies using a dedicated sample with constant hydrogen amount. Also the LIDS signal evaluation procedure is described in detail and the detection limits for different conditions in the TEXTOR tokamak are estimated.

  13. Theoretical study of simultaneous water and VOCs adsorption and desorption in a silica gel rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, G.; Zhang, Y.F.; Fang, Lei

    2008-01-01

    One-dimensional partial differential equations were used to model the simultaneous water and VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) adsorption and desorption in a silica gel rotor which was recommended for indoor air cleaning. The interaction among VOCs and moisture in the adsorption and desorption...... process was neglected in the model as the concentrations of VOC pollutants in typical indoor environment were much lower than that of moisture and the adsorbed VOCs occupied only a minor portion of adsorption capacity of the rotor. Consequently VOC transfer was coupled with heat and moisture transfer only...... by the temperatures of the rotor and the air stream. The VOC transfer equations were solved by discretizing them into explicit up-wind finite differential equations. The model was validated with experimental data. The calculated results suggested that the regeneration time designed for dehumidification may...

  14. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of lindane, carbofuran and methyl parathion on various Indian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rama Krishna, K.; Philip, Ligy

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption and desorption characteristics of three insecticides on four Indian soils were studied. Insecticides used were representative of organochlorine, organophosphate, and carbomate groups. The order of adsorption of pesticides on soils was: lindane > methyl parathion > carbofuran. Compost soil had shown the maximum adsorption capacity. The order of adsorption capacity of various soils were: compost soil > clayey soil > red soil > sandy soil. Adsorption isotherms were better fitted to Freundlich model and K f values increased with increase in organic matter content of the soils. Thermodynamic parameters indicated favorable adsorption of all the three pesticides in four different soils. Adsorption was exothermic in nature. Distilled water desorbed 30-60% of adsorbed pesticides whereas; organic solvents were able to affect 50-80% of sorbed pesticides. Clay content and organic matter played a significant role in pesticide adsorption and desorption processes. Hysteresis effect was observed in red, clayey and compost soils. Hysteresis effect increased with increase in organic matter and clay content of the soils

  15. Cell adsorption and selective desorption for separation of microbial cells by using chitosan-immobilized silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Munehiro; Matsui, Masayoshi; Chiku, Hiroyuki; Kasashima, Nobuyuki; Shimojoh, Manabu; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2005-12-01

    Cell adsorption and selective desorption for separation of microbial cells were conducted by using chitosan-immobilized silica (CIS). When chitosan was immobilized onto silica surfaces with glutaraldehyde, bacterial cells adsorbed well and retained viability. Testing of the adsorption and desorption ability of CIS using various microbes such as Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Lactobacillus casei, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus salivarius, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces ludwigii, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe revealed that most microbes could be adsorbed and selectively desorbed under different conditions. In particular, recovery was improved when L-cysteine was added. A mixture of two bacterial strains adsorbed onto CIS could also be successfully separated by use of specific solutions for each strain. Most of the desorbed cells were alive. Thus, quantitative and selective fractionation of cells is readily achievable by employing chitosan, a known antibacterial material.

  16. Toposelective electrochemical desorption of thiol SAMs from neighboring polycrystalline gold surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tencer, Michal; Berini, Pierre

    2008-11-04

    We describe a method for the selective desorption of thiol self-assembled monolayers from gold surfaces having micrometer-scale separations on a substrate. In an electrolyte solution, the electrical resistance between the adjacent areas can be much lower than the resistance between a surface and the counter electrode. Also, both reductive and oxidative thiol desorption may occur. Therefore, the potentials of the surfaces must be independently controlled with a multichannel potentiostat and operating windows for a given thiol/electrolyte system must be established. In this study operating windows were established for 1-dodecanethiol-based SAMs in phosphate buffer, phosphate-buffered saline, and sodium hydroxide solution, and selective SAM removal was successfully performed in a four-electrode configuration.

  17. Uranium removal by chitosan impregnated with magnetite nanoparticles: adsorption and desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stopa, Luiz Claudio Barbosa; Yamaura, Mitiko

    2009-01-01

    A magnetic biosorbent composed of nanoparticles of magnetite covered with chitosan, denominated magnetic chitosan, was prepared. The magnetic chitosan has showed a magnetic response of intense attraction in the presence of a magnetic field without however to become magnetic, a typical behavior of superparamagnetic material. Its adsorption performance was evaluated by the adsorption isotherm models of Langmuir and Freundlich for uranium ions and the desorption behavior using carbonate and oxalate ions was investigated. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted well to the Langmuir model, being the maximum adsorption capacity equal 42 mg g -1 . In the desorption studies, 94% of recovered UO 2 2+ with carbonate ion were verified under the conditions studied. The chitosan, available as a byproduct of marine food processing, is environmentally safe and can be a low cost adsorbent for U removal from waterwaste. The magnetic chitosan as adsorbent of U to treat radioactive waterwaste is a sustainable technology. (author)

  18. Interlaboratory determinations of isotopically enriched metals by field desorption mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, U.; Schulten, H.R.; Achenbach, C.; Ziskoven, R.

    1982-01-01

    The isotopic distribution of stable isotopes in six enriched metals (calcium, copper, barium, rubidium, strontium and thallium) has been determined by field desorption mass spectrometry. A first evaluation of the interlaboratory reproducibility of the application of this method for trace determination of metals was made using three different types of mass spectrometers in three different laboratories. The standard deviations for the most abundant isotopes of the metals investigated are between +-0.1 and +-0.5%. Within these standard deviations, the values obtained by the three mass spectrometry groups are the same. To support the accuracy of our quantification, thermal ionization mass spectrometry has been employed and confirms the results of the field desorption method. (orig.) [de

  19. Sorption/desorption of Cs on clay and soil fractions from various regions of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erten, H.N.

    1988-01-01

    The sorption/desorption behaviour of Cs ion in the concentration region of 10 -8 to 10 -4 meqml -1 have been studied using clay and soil fractions from various regions of Turkey. The sorption curves for all the material studied show similar behaviour indicating at least two different sorption processes. One with high and the other with low distribution coefficients. The results of desorption studies indicate that Cs cation is to a large extent attached to the solid material in a reversible manner. The adsorption isotherms were found to be nonlinear in all cases. The increase of R D values with decreasing particle size in most cases, suggests that sorption and/or exchange is primarily a surface phenomenon in the clay and soil fractions studied. 14 figs.; 4 tabs

  20. Energetic Mapping of Ni Catalysts by Detailed Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørgum, Erlend; Chen, De; Bakken, Mari G.

    2005-01-01

    Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO has been performed on supported and unsupported nickel catalysts. The unsupported Ni catalyst consists of a Ni(14 13 13) single crystal which has been studied under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The desorption energy for CO at low CO surface coverage...... was found to be 119 kJ/mol, and the binding energy of C to the Ni(111) surface of the crystal was 703 kJ/mol. The supported catalysts consist of nickel supported on hydrotalcite-like compounds with three different Mg2+/Al3+ ratios. The experimental results show that for the supported Ni catalysts TPD of CO...... precursor seems to result in more steplike sites, kinks, and defects for carbon monoxide dissociation. A detailed kinetic modeling of the TPO results based on elementary reaction steps has been conducted to give an energetic map of supported Ni catalysts. Experimental results from the ideal Ni surface fit...

  1. Methanol Adsorption and Reaction on Samaria Thin Films on Pt(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hao Jhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the adsorption and reaction of methanol on continuous and discontinuous films of samarium oxide (SmOx grown on Pt(111 in ultrahigh vacuum. The methanol decomposition was studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS, while structural changes of the oxide surface were monitored by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED. Methanol dehydrogenates to adsorbed methoxy species on both the continuous and discontinuous SmOx films, eventually leading to the desorption of CO and H2 which desorbs at temperatures in the range 400–600 K. Small quantities of CO2 are also detected mainly on as-prepared Sm2O3 thin films, but the production of CO2 is limited during repeated TPD runs. The discontinuous film exhibits the highest reactivity compared to the continuous film and the Pt(111 substrate. The reactivity of methanol on reduced and reoxidized films was also investigated, revealing how SmOx structures influence the chemical behavior. Over repeated TPD experiments, a SmOx structural/chemical equilibrium condition is found which can be approached either from oxidized or reduced films. We also observed hydrogen absence in TPD which indicates that hydrogen is stored either in SmOx films or as OH groups on the SmOx surfaces.

  2. Automation and Control of an Imaging Internal Laser Desorption Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometer (I2LD-FTMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McJunkin, Timothy R; Tranter, Troy Joseph; Scott, Jill Rennee

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the automation of an imaging internal source laser desorption Fourier transform mass spectrometer (I2LD-FTMS). The I2LD-FTMS consists of a laser-scanning device [Scott and Tremblay, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 2002, 73, 1108–1116] that has been integrated with a laboratory-built FTMS using a commercial data acquisition system (ThermoFinnigan FT/MS, Bremen, Germany). A new user interface has been developed in National Instrument's (Austin, Texas) graphical programming language LabVIEW to control the motors of the laser positioning system and the commercial FTMS data acquisition system. A feature of the FTMS software that allows the user to write macros in a scripting language is used creatively to our advantage in creating a mechanism to control the FTMS from outside its graphical user interface. The new user interface also allows the user to configure target locations. Automation of the data analysis along with data display using commercial graphing software is also described.

  3. Design and construction of thermal desorption measurement system for tritium contained materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, M.; Hatano, Y.; Calderoni, P.; Shimada, M.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-mode thermal desorption analysis system was designed and built in Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to examine the evolution of the hydrogen isotope gas from materials. The system is equipped with a mass spectrometer for stable hydrogen isotopes and an ionization chamber for tritium components. The performance of the system built was tested with using tritium contained materials. The evolution of tritiated gas species from contaminated materials was measured successfully by using the system. (author)

  4. Laser desorption/ionization from nanostructured surfaces: nanowires, nanoparticle films and silicon microcolumn arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yong; Luo Guanghong; Diao Jiajie; Chornoguz, Olesya; Reeves, Mark; Vertes, Akos

    2007-01-01

    Due to their optical properties and morphology, thin films formed of nanoparticles are potentially new platforms for soft laser desorption/ionization (SLDI) mass spectrometry. Thin films of gold nanoparticles (with 12±1 nm particle size) were prepared by evaporation-driven vertical colloidal deposition and used to analyze a series of directly deposited polypeptide samples. In this new SLDI method, the required laser fluence for ion detection was equal or less than what was needed for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) but the resulting spectra were free of matrix interferences. A silicon microcolumn array-based substrate (a.k.a. black silicon) was developed as a new matrix-free laser desorption ionization surface. When low-resistivity silicon wafers were processed with a 22 ps pulse length 3xω Nd:YAG laser in air, SF 6 or water environment, regularly arranged conical spikes emerged. The radii of the spike tips varied with the processing environment, ranging from approximately 500 nm in water, to ∼2 μm in SF 6 gas and to ∼5 μm in air. Peptide mass spectra directly induced by a nitrogen laser showed the formation of protonated ions of angiotensin I and II, substance P, bradykinin fragment 1-7, synthetic peptide, pro14-arg, and insulin from the processed silicon surfaces but not from the unprocessed areas. Threshold fluences for desorption/ionization were similar to those used in MALDI. Although compared to silicon nanowires the threshold laser pulse energy for ionization is significantly (∼10x) higher, the ease of production and robustness of microcolumn arrays offer complementary benefits

  5. The Marangoni convection induced by acetone desorption from the falling soap film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yong; Li, Zhangyun; Wang, Yongyi; Huang, Jiali

    2012-05-01

    By means of the falling soap film tunnel and the Schlieren optical method, the Marangoni convection were observed directly in the immediate interfacial neighborhood during the desorption process of acetone from the falling soap film. Moreover, the hydraulic characteristics of the falling soap film tunnel, the acetone concentration, the surface tension of the soap liquid and the mass transfer has been investigated in details through the experimental or theoretical method.

  6. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  7. Moisture sorption–desorption characteristics and the corresponding thermodynamic properties of carvedilol phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikiran Allada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Carvedilol phosphate (CDP is a nonselective beta-blocker used for the treatment of heart failures and hypertension. In this work, moisture sorption–desorption characteristics and thermodynamic properties of CDP have been investigated. Materials and Methods: The isotherms were determined using dynamic vapor sorption analyzer at different humidity conditions (0%–90% relative humidity and three pharmaceutically relevant temperatures (20°C, 30°C, and 40°C. The experimental sorption data determined were fitted to various models, namely, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller; Guggenheim-Anderson-De Boer (GAB; Peleg; and modified GAB. Isosteric heats of sorption were evaluated through the direct use of sorption isotherms by means of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Statistical Analysis Used: The sorption model parameters were determined from the experimental sorption data using nonlinear regression analysis, and mean relative percentage deviation (P, correlation (Correl, root mean square error, and model efficiency were considered as the criteria to select the best fit model. Results: The sorption–desorption isotherms have sigmoidal shape – confirming to Type II isotherms. Based on the statistical data analysis, modified GAB model was found to be more adequate to explain sorption characteristics of CDP. It is noted that the rate of adsorption and desorption is specific to the temperature at which it was being studied. It is observed that isosteric heat of sorption decreased with increasing equilibrium moisture content. Conclusions: The calculation of the thermodynamic properties was further used to draw an understanding of the properties of water and energy requirements associated with the sorption behavior. The sorption–desorption data and the set of equations are useful in the simulation of processing, handling, and storage of CDP and further behavior during manufacture and storage of CDP formulations.

  8. WATER ADSORPTION AND DESORPTION ISOTHERMS ON MILK POWDER: II. WHOLE MILK

    OpenAIRE

    Edgar M. Soteras; Julio Gil; Paola Yacanto; Silvana Muratona; Clidia Abaca; María G. Sustersic

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was the determination of adsorption and desorption isotherms of cow whole milk powder. The experiments have been carried out at 15, 25 and 40 ºC, in ranges of moisture and water activity characteristic of normal conditions in which the processes of drying, packaging and storage are developed. By studying the influence of the temperature on the experimental plots, the isosteric adsorption heat was determined. Experimental data were correlated to the referential model ...

  9. Determination and modeling of desorption isotherms of Maria biscuits from different brands

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, DFC; Correia, PMR; Guiné, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Biscuits (sweet, strongly sweet, semi-sweet biscuits, crackers, wafers) are characterized by a low moisture content in the final product and high levels of fat and sugar [1]. Dehydrated foods, such as biscuits, are very sensitive to gain moisture from the surrounding atmosphere, resulting in a consequent deterioration. When, at constant temperature, the product's moisture increases from the atmosphere, is obtained the adsorption isotherm and when it loses moisture is obtained the desorption i...

  10. Desorption of cadmium from a natural Shanghai clay using citric acid industrial wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yingying; Yeung, Albert T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → CAIW is very effective in desorbing cadmium from soil particle surfaces at soil mixture pHs of lower than 5. → The cadmium desorption efficiency of CAIW also depends on the initial sorbed concentration of cadmium on soil particle surfaces. → Complexions of cadmium with citric acid and acetic acid are the dominant mechanisms for cadmium desorption in the soil mixture pH range of 4-8. → CAIW may be a promising enhancement agent for the remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils. - Abstract: The sorption/desorption characteristics of heavy metals onto/from soil particle surfaces are the primary factors controlling the success of the remediation of heavy-metal contaminated soils. These characteristics are pH-dependent, chemical-specific, and reversible; and can be modified by enhancement agents such as chelates and surfactants. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using citric acid industrial wastewater (CAIW) to desorb cadmium from a natural clay from Shanghai, China at different soil mixture pHs. It can be observed from the results that the proportion of cadmium desorbed from the soil using synthesized CAIW is generally satisfactory, i.e., >60%, when the soil mixture pH is lower than 6. However, the proportion of desorbed cadmium decreases significantly with increase in soil mixture pH. The dominant cadmium desorption mechanism using CAIW is the complexion of cadmium with citric acid and acetic acid in CAIW. It is concluded that CAIW can be a promising enhancement agent for the remediation of cadmium-contaminated natural soils when the environmental conditions are favorable. As a result, CAIW, a waste product itself, can be put into productive use in soil remediation.

  11. Desorption of cadmium from a natural Shanghai clay using citric acid industrial wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Yingying, E-mail: guyong99hg@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, China University of Petroleum (East China), 66 West Changjiang Road, Qingdao 266555 (China); Yeung, Albert T., E-mail: yeungat@hku.hk [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: {yields} CAIW is very effective in desorbing cadmium from soil particle surfaces at soil mixture pHs of lower than 5. {yields} The cadmium desorption efficiency of CAIW also depends on the initial sorbed concentration of cadmium on soil particle surfaces. {yields} Complexions of cadmium with citric acid and acetic acid are the dominant mechanisms for cadmium desorption in the soil mixture pH range of 4-8. {yields} CAIW may be a promising enhancement agent for the remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils. - Abstract: The sorption/desorption characteristics of heavy metals onto/from soil particle surfaces are the primary factors controlling the success of the remediation of heavy-metal contaminated soils. These characteristics are pH-dependent, chemical-specific, and reversible; and can be modified by enhancement agents such as chelates and surfactants. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using citric acid industrial wastewater (CAIW) to desorb cadmium from a natural clay from Shanghai, China at different soil mixture pHs. It can be observed from the results that the proportion of cadmium desorbed from the soil using synthesized CAIW is generally satisfactory, i.e., >60%, when the soil mixture pH is lower than 6. However, the proportion of desorbed cadmium decreases significantly with increase in soil mixture pH. The dominant cadmium desorption mechanism using CAIW is the complexion of cadmium with citric acid and acetic acid in CAIW. It is concluded that CAIW can be a promising enhancement agent for the remediation of cadmium-contaminated natural soils when the environmental conditions are favorable. As a result, CAIW, a waste product itself, can be put into productive use in soil remediation.

  12. Sorption and desorption studies of chromium(VI) from nonviable cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V.K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)], E-mail: vinodfcy@iitr.ernet.in; Rastogi, A. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2008-06-15

    This communication presents results pertaining to the sorptive and desorptive studies carried out on chromium(VI) removal onto nonviable freshwater cyanobacterium (Nostoc muscorum) biomass. Influence of varying the conditions for removal of chromium(VI), such as the pH of aqueous solution, the dosage of biosorbent, the contact time with the biosorbent, the temperature for the removal of chromium, the effect of light metal ions and the adsorption-desorption studies were investigated. Sorption interaction of chromium on to cyanobacterial species obeyed both the first and the second-order rate equation and the experimental data showed good fit with both the Langmuir and freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity was 22.92 mg/g at 25 {sup o}C and pH 3.0. The adsorption process was endothermic and the values of thermodynamic parameters of the process were calculated. Various properties of the cyanobacterium, as adsorbent, explored in the characterization part were chemical composition of the adsorbent, surface area calculation by BET method and surface functionality by FTIR. Sorption-desorption of chromium into inorganic solutions and distilled water were observed and this indicated the biosorbent could be regenerated using 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} and EDTA with upto 80% recovery. The biosorbents were reused in five biosorption-desorption cycles without a significant loss in biosorption capacity. Thus, this study demonstrated that the cyanobacterial biomass N. muscorum could be used as an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of chromium(VI) bearing wastewater.

  13. Approach for predicting P sorption/desorption behaviour of potentially eroded topsoil in watercourses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borovec, Jakub; Jan, Jiří

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 624, May (2018), s. 1316-1324 ISSN 0048-9697 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04021342; GA MZe QI102A265; GA MŠk(CZ) EF16_013/0001782 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : erosion * Mehlich 3 * sorption/desorption Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality OBOR OECD: Water resources Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2016

  14. Desorption of Cs+ ions with fast incident atomic and molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehpour, M.; Hunt, J.E.; Tou, L.C.; Hedin, A.; Sundqvist, B.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results on desorption yield measurements of secondary Cs + ions, desorbed as a result of the impact of C + , O + , CO + , O 2 + , CO 2 + and C 4 H 9 + incident ions, in the energy range of 950 keV--3.5 MeV are presented. Molecular beams are found to give high yields of secondary Cs + as a result of impact of O 2 + compared to O + incident ions, indicate no ''collective'' molecular effects. 23 refs., 1 fig

  15. Behavior of sorption and thermal desorption of fission products from loaded metal oxide exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerck, J.

    1986-08-01

    A new sublimation method for the concentration and purification of 99 Mo, produced by the fission of 235 U with thermal neutrons, has been developed to replace the present final decontamination steps in the various well established 99 Mo separation processes. A distinct simplification and shortening of the actual procedure is obtained by combining the chromatographic sorption on the SnO 2 -exchanger with the direct thermal desorption of the Mo product from the oxide. (orig./PW) [de

  16. Mechanical desorption of immobilized proteins using carbon dioxide aerosols for reusable biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Renu; Hong, Seongkyeol [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jaesung, E-mail: jjang@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Immobilized proteins were removed using carbon dioxide aerosols. • We observed high removal efficiencies due to the aerosol treatment. • We confirmed the removal with FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • This CO{sub 2} aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization. • This technique is a fast and damage-free method to reuse a sensor surface. - Abstract: Reusability of a biosensor has recently received considerable attention, and it is closely related with the effective desorption of probe molecules. We present a novel mechanical desorption technique to reuse biosensors by using periodic jets of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) aerosols (a mixture of solid and gaseous CO{sub 2}), and demonstrate its feasibility by removing physically adsorbed and covalently bonded fluorescent proteins i.e., Escherichia coli fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody and bovine serum albumin (E. coli FITC–Ab and FITC–BSA) from silicon chips. The proteins on the chip surfaces were measured by fluorescent images before and after applying the aerosols. The removal efficiency of the aerosol treatment was measured for various concentrations (1–20 μg mL{sup −1}) of E. coli FITC–Ab and FITC–BSA with two different removal cycles (5 and 11 cycles; each cycle: 8 s). We observed high removal efficiencies (>93.5% for physically adsorbed Ab and >84.6% for covalently bonded Ab) at 11 cycle aerosol treatment. This CO{sub 2} aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization, which was confirmed by the fluorescent images of FITC–Abs for fresh and reused chips. Desorption of the immobilized layers was validated by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses. We also conducted an experiment on the regeneration of E. coli sensing chips using this aerosol treatment, and the chips were re-used 5 times successfully. This mechanical desorption technique is a highly effective and novel strategy for reusable biosensors.

  17. Sorption and desorption of the industrial chemical MCHM into polymer pipes, liners and activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Ahart, Megan Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Polyethylene pipes and epoxy or polyurethane linings are increasingly used in drinking water infrastructure. As a recent introduction to the water industry, there are still many unknowns about how polymers will behave in the distribution system specifically relating to sorption and desorption of chemical contaminants. This study is in response to a spill of 4-methylcyclohexane methanol (MCHM) that occurred in January 2014 contaminating the drinking water of nine counties in West Virginia. Thi...

  18. Trapping hydropyrolysates on silica and their subsequent desorption to facilitate rapid fingerprinting by GC-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meredith, W.; Russell, C.A.; Cooper, M.; Snape, C.E. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Fuel and Energy Centre; Love, G.D. [Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences; Fabbri, D. [Universita di Bologna, Ravenna (Italy). Lab. di Chimica Ambientale; Vane, C.H. [British Geological Society, Keyworth (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    Analytical hydropyrolysis performed under high hydrogen gas pressure (>10 MPa) has been demonstrated to possess the unique ability to release high yields of biomarker hydrocarbons covalently bound within the non-hydrocarbon macromolecular fraction of crude oils and source rocks. This study describes the development of the experimental procedure for trapping the product oils (hydropyrolysates) on silica to facilitate more convenient recovery than conventional collection and to allow analysis by thermal desorption-GC-MS without any prior work-up. Conventionally, the trap has consisted of a stainless steel coil, cooled with dry ice from which the products are recovered in organic solvents. Replacing this with a system in which the hydropyrolysates are adsorbed on a small mass of silica greatly reduces the turn-around time between tests, and aids the recovery and separation of the products. This method has been developed using an oil shale and an oil asphaltene fraction, with the silica trap producing very similar biomarker profiles to that from the conventional trap. The quantitative recovery of hydrocarbons from a light crude oil desorbed from silica under hydropyrolysis conditions demonstrates no significant loss of the high molecular weight n-alkanes (>n-C{sub 10}) for both trapping methods. The use of liquid nitrogen as the trap coolant results in significantly improved recovery of the lower molecular mass constituents. The silica trapping method allows for the hydropyrolysates to be characterised by thermal desorption-GC-MS, which has been investigated both on- and off-line. The oils undergo relatively little cracking during desorption, with similar n-alkane and biomarker profiles being obtained as with normal work-up and GC-MS analysis. Thus, in terms of fingerprinting geomacromolecules, ''hypy-thermal desorption-GC-MS'' appears to have the potential to be developed as an attractive alternative to traditional py-GC-MS. (author)

  19. Non-thermal desorption from interstellar dust grains via exothermic surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrod, R. T.; Wakelam, V.; Herbst, E.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:The gas-phase abundance of methanol in dark quiescent cores in the interstellar medium cannot be explained by gas-phase chemistry. In fact, the only possible synthesis of this species appears to be production on the surfaces of dust grains followed by desorption into the gas. Yet, evaporation is inefficient for heavy molecules such as methanol at the typical temperature of 10 K. It is necessary then to consider non-thermal mechanisms for desorption. But, if such mechanisms are considered for the production of methanol, they must be considered for all surface species. Methods: Our gas-grain network of reactions has been altered by the inclusion of a non-thermal desorption mechanism in which the exothermicity of surface addition reactions is utilized to break the bond between the product species and the surface. Our estimated rate for this process derives from a simple version of classical unimolecular rate theory with a variable parameter only loosely constrained by theoretical work. Results: Our results show that the chemistry of dark clouds is altered slightly at times up to 106 yr, mainly by the enhancement in the gas-phase abundances of hydrogen-rich species such as methanol that are formed on grain surfaces. At later times, however, there is a rather strong change. Instead of the continuing accretion of most gas-phase species onto dust particles, a steady-state is reached for both gas-phase and grain-surface species, with significant abundances for the former. Nevertheless, most of the carbon is contained in an undetermined assortment of heavy surface hydrocarbons. Conclusions: The desorption mechanism discussed here will be better constrained by observational data on pre-stellar cores, where a significant accretion of species such as CO has already occurred.

  20. Study on the adsorption and desorption of fertilizer phosphates by the soil suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puspodikoro, S.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of fertilizer phosphate by soil suspensions were studied with the purpose to improve the efficiency of the use of phosphate fertilizer in rice growing countries. Experiments have shown that the applied phosphate fertilizer was quickly adsorbed by the soil and that the bulk of the fertilizer phosphate got bound to the soil complex. These bound fertilizer phosphates could readily be desorbed by flooding of the soil up to a certain amount. (author)

  1. A Filtering Method to Reveal Crystalline Patterns from Atom Probe Microscopy Desorption Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-26

    reveal crystalline patterns from atom probe microscopy desorption maps Lan Yao Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann...reveal the crystallographic information present in Atom Probe Microscopy (APM) data is presented. Themethod filters atoms based on the time difference...between their evaporation and the evaporation of the previous atom . Since this time difference correlates with the location and the local structure of

  2. Adsorption - desorption equilibria of some radionuclides in sediment - sea water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Assy, N.B.; Fattah, A.T.A.; El-Shinawy, R.M.K.; Essa, M.W.A.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical and physical properties of Suez Canal bottom sediments (SCBS) and sea water at port Tawfeek area, the south entrance of Suez canal, have been studied. The SCBS was separated into its size fractions (natural sediment, sand, silt and clay). These different sediment fractions were allowed to be in equilibrium with 89 Sr, 60 Co and 134 Cs solutions. Desorption studies were carried out on these contaminated sediments. (author) 16 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  3. Mechanical desorption of immobilized proteins using carbon dioxide aerosols for reusable biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Renu; Hong, Seongkyeol; Jang, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Immobilized proteins were removed using carbon dioxide aerosols. • We observed high removal efficiencies due to the aerosol treatment. • We confirmed the removal with FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • This CO 2 aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization. • This technique is a fast and damage-free method to reuse a sensor surface. - Abstract: Reusability of a biosensor has recently received considerable attention, and it is closely related with the effective desorption of probe molecules. We present a novel mechanical desorption technique to reuse biosensors by using periodic jets of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) aerosols (a mixture of solid and gaseous CO 2 ), and demonstrate its feasibility by removing physically adsorbed and covalently bonded fluorescent proteins i.e., Escherichia coli fluorescein isothiocyanate antibody and bovine serum albumin (E. coli FITC–Ab and FITC–BSA) from silicon chips. The proteins on the chip surfaces were measured by fluorescent images before and after applying the aerosols. The removal efficiency of the aerosol treatment was measured for various concentrations (1–20 μg mL −1 ) of E. coli FITC–Ab and FITC–BSA with two different removal cycles (5 and 11 cycles; each cycle: 8 s). We observed high removal efficiencies (>93.5% for physically adsorbed Ab and >84.6% for covalently bonded Ab) at 11 cycle aerosol treatment. This CO 2 aerosol treatment did not undermine re-functionalization, which was confirmed by the fluorescent images of FITC–Abs for fresh and reused chips. Desorption of the immobilized layers was validated by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses. We also conducted an experiment on the regeneration of E. coli sensing chips using this aerosol treatment, and the chips were re-used 5 times successfully. This mechanical desorption technique is a highly effective and novel strategy for reusable biosensors

  4. Study on the desorption yield for natural botanic sample induced by energetic heavy ions

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, J M; Du, G H; Yan, S; Zhao, W J

    2002-01-01

    The dependence of desorption yield for the natural botanic sample bombarded with heavy ion on the electronic stopping power (S sub e) and dose has been measured by weighing sample mass before and after irradiation. Primary ions including 50 keV N sup + , 1.5 MeV F sup + , 3.0 MeV F sup 2 sup + , 4.0 MeV F sup 2 sup + and 3.0 MeV Si sup 2 sup + were used in the experiment. Three megaelectron volts of F sup 2 sup + with doses ranging from 4x10 sup 1 sup 5 to 4x10 sup 1 sup 6 ions/cm sup 2 were used in order to investigate the influence of ion dose. A mass spectrum from the sample bombarded with 3 MeV Si sup 2 sup + was also taken for a better understanding of the desorption process. Results show that the natural botanic sample is very easily to be desorpted. The yield of MeV heavy ions can be as high as thousands CH sub 2 O/ion, and significantly depends on both the S sub e and dose. The measured yields increase quickly with S sub e , but drop down with increasing ion dose. These results fit roughly with the pr...

  5. Study on the desorption yield for natural botanic sample induced by energetic heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, J.M.; Wang, Y.G.; Du, G.H.; Yan, S.; Zhao, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    The dependence of desorption yield for the natural botanic sample bombarded with heavy ion on the electronic stopping power (S e ) and dose has been measured by weighing sample mass before and after irradiation. Primary ions including 50 keV N + , 1.5 MeV F + , 3.0 MeV F 2+ , 4.0 MeV F 2+ and 3.0 MeV Si 2+ were used in the experiment. Three megaelectron volts of F 2+ with doses ranging from 4x10 15 to 4x10 16 ions/cm 2 were used in order to investigate the influence of ion dose. A mass spectrum from the sample bombarded with 3 MeV Si 2+ was also taken for a better understanding of the desorption process. Results show that the natural botanic sample is very easily to be desorpted. The yield of MeV heavy ions can be as high as thousands CH 2 O/ion, and significantly depends on both the S e and dose. The measured yields increase quickly with S e , but drop down with increasing ion dose. These results fit roughly with the prediction of the pressure pulse model

  6. Effect of Pinus radiata derived biochars on soil sorption and desorption of phenanthrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Honghua; Lin Kunde; Wang Hailong; Gan, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Biochars are anthropogenic carbonaceous sorbent and their influences on the sorption of environmental contaminants need to be characterized. Here we evaluated the effect of Pinus radiata derived biochars on soil sorption and desorption of phenanthrene. Two biochars separately produced at 350 o C and 700 o C and three soils were tested. Biochar amendment generally enhanced the soil sorption of phenanthrene. The biochar produced at 700 o C generally showed a greater ability at enhancing a soil's sorption ability than that prepared at 350 o C. The single-step desorption measurement showed an apparent hysteresis in biochar-amended soils. After 28 d equilibration, the sorptive capacity of biochar-amended soil (with an organic carbon content of 0.16%) significantly decreased. This study clearly suggested that biochar application enhanced soil sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds, but the magnitude of enhancement depended on the preparation of biochars, the indigenous soil organic carbon levels, and the contact time between soil and biochar. - Pinus radiata derived biochars influence soil sorption and desorption of phenanthrene.

  7. Sorption of nitrate onto amine-crosslinked wheat straw: characteristics, column sorption and desorption properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xu; Gao, Bao-Yu; Zhong, Qian-Qian; Yue, Qin-Yan; Li, Qian

    2011-02-15

    The nitrate removal process was evaluated using a fixed-bed column packed with amine-crosslinked wheat straw (AC-WS). Column sorption and desorption characteristics of nitrate were studied extensively. Solid-state (13)C NMR and zeta potential analysis validated the existence of crosslinked amine groups in AC-WS. Raman shift of the nitrate peaks suggested the electrostatic attraction between the adsorbed ions and positively charged amine sites. The column sorption capacity (q(ed)) of the AC-WS for nitrate was 87.27 mg g(-1) in comparison with the raw WS of 0.57 mg g(-1). Nitrate sorption in column was affected by bed height, influent nitrate concentration, flow rate and pH, and of all these, influent pH demonstrated an essential effect on the performance of the column. In addition, desorption and dynamic elution tests were repeated for several cycles, with high desorption rate and slight losses in its initial column sorption capacity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Competitive sorption and desorption of heavy metals by individual soil components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covelo, E.F.; Vega, F.A.; Andrade, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of sorption and desorption of heavy metals by individual soil components should be useful for modelling the behaviour of soils of arbitrary composition when contaminated by heavy metals, and for designing amendments increasing the fixation of heavy metals by soils polluted by these species. In this study the competitive sorption and desorption of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn by humified organic matter, Fe and Mn oxides, kaolinite, vermiculite and mica were investigated. Due to the homogeneity of the sorbents, between-metal competition for binding sites led to their preferences for one or another metal being much more manifest than in the case of whole soils. On the basis of k d100 values (distribution coefficients calculated in sorption-desorption experiments in which the initial sorption solution contained 100 mg L -1 of each metal), kaolinite and mica preferentially sorbed and retained chromium; vermiculite, copper and zinc; HOM, Fe oxide and Mn oxide, lead (HOM and Mn oxide also sorbed and retained considerable amounts of copper). Mica only retained sorbed chromium, Fe oxide sorbed cadmium and lead, and kaolinite did not retain sorbed copper. The sorbents retaining the greatest proportions of sorbed metals were vermiculite and Mn oxide, but the ratios of k d100 values for retention and sorption suggest that cations were least reversibly bound by Mn oxide, and most reversibly by vermiculite

  9. Sorption and desorption behaviors of diuron in soils amended with charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang-Yang; Ying, Guang-Guo; Kookana, Rai S

    2006-11-01

    Charcoal derived from the partial combustion of vegetation is ubiquitous in soils and sediments and can potentially sequester organic contaminants. To examine the role of charcoal in the sorption and desorption behaviors of diuron pesticide in soil, synthetic charcoals were produced through carbonization of red gum (Eucalyptus spp.) wood chips at 450 and 850 degrees C (referred to as charcoals BC450 and BC850, respectively, in this paper). Pore size distribution analyses revealed that BC850 contained mainly micropores (pores approximately 0.49 nm mean width), whereas BC450 was essentially not a microporous material. Short-term equilibration (diuron in a soil amended with various amounts of charcoals of both types. The sorption coefficients, isotherm nonlinearity, and apparent sorption-desorption hysteresis markedly increased with increasing content of charcoal in the soil, more prominently in the case of BC850, presumably due to the presence of micropores and its relatively higher specific surface area. The degree of apparent sorption-desorption hystersis (hysteresis index) showed a good correlation with the micropore volume of the charcoal-amended soils. This study indicates that the presence of small amounts of charcoal produced at high temperatures (e.g., interior of wood logs during a fire) in soil can have a marked effect on the release behavior of organic compounds. Mechanisms of this apparent hysteretic behavior need to be further investigated.

  10. Glyphosate sorption/desorption on biochars - interactions of physical and chemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kathleen E; Spokas, Kurt A; Gamiz, Beatriz; Cox, Lucia; Papiernik, Sharon K; Koskinen, William C

    2018-05-01

    Biochar, a carbon-rich product of biomass pyrolysis, could limit glyphosate transport in soil and remediate contaminated water. The present study investigates the sorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on biochars prepared from different hardwoods at temperatures ranging from 350 to 900 °C to elucidate fundamental mechanisms. Glyphosate (1 mg L -1 ) sorption on biochars increased with pyrolysis temperature and was highest on 900 °C biochars; however, total sorption was low on a mass basis (glyphosate in soils, did not alter biochar sorption capacities. Glyphosate did not desorb from biochar with CaCl 2 solution; however, up to 86% of the bound glyphosate was released with a K 2 HPO 4 solution. Results from this study suggest a combined impact of surface chemistry and physical constraints on glyphosate sorption/desorption on biochar. Based on the observed phosphate-induced desorption of glyphosate, the addition of P-fertilizer to biochar-amended soils can remobilize the herbicide and damage non-target plants; therefore, improved understanding of this risk is necessary. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Adsorption-Desorption Characteristics of Plutonium and Americium with Sediment Particles in the Estuarine Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, C.N.; Fukai, R.

    1976-01-01

    The particle formation of plutonium and americium, their adsorption onto fresh water sediments and the desorption from the sediments in sea water were studied in the Laboratory under simulated river-estuary conditions, using γ-emitting plutonium-237 and americium-241. The results of the experiments show that the particle formation of plutonium depends on its valence states, on pH and on the salinity of the medium. For river water at pH4, some 25%, 20% and 30% of the added 237 Pu was in particulate form, larger than 0.45pm, for Pu (III), Pu (IV) and Pu (VI), respectively, while 65%, 90% and 50% of the respective valence states was associated with particles at pH 8. In sea water the general pattern remains similar, although Pu (VI) is more soluble in sea water owing to higher ligand concentrations for carbonate and bicarbonate complexes. The pH-dependency of particle formation of Am (III) is more steep than that of plutonium and seems to be influenced by colloidal substances occurring in the experimental media. The adsorption-desorption characteristics of plutonium and americium with the sediment in river water as well as sea water reflect the characteristics of their particle formation, being dependent upon such properties as valence states, the pH and salinity of the medium. A sewage effluent added to the media has small but measurable effects on the adsorption-desorption processes of plutonium. (author)

  12. Laser desorption and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Fundamentals .Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaurand, P.

    1994-11-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a very powerful technique for the analysis of heavy molecular ions (100 000 u and more). The ejection in the gas phase and the ionization of these molecules is now possible through the MALDI technique (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization). This technique consists in mixing the heavy molecules to be analysed with a organic matrix which absorbs at the wavelength of the laser. The necessary irradiance are of the order of 10 6 W/cm 2 . In these conditions we have shown that the mass resolutions are optimum and that the relative mass accuracies are of the order of 10 -4 . We have also demonstrated that the emission angle of the molecular ions in MALDI depends on the incident angle of the laser light. During the desorption process, the molecular ions are emitted in the opposite direction of the incident laser light. This effect is particularly important for the design of the accelerating stage of the time-of-flight spectrometers. Problems relative to the detection of these heavy molecular ions have been studied in details between 0.5 10 4 m/s and 10 5 m/s. The velocity threshold of the electronic emission is lower than the value of 0.5 10 4 m/s. The relation between the electronic emission and the projectile velocity is complex. Finally, examples on mass identification of C 60 molecules and derivated C 60 are presented. Desorption methods are compared. (author). 32 refs., 34 figs

  13. Coffee-ring effects in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie-Bi; Chen, Yu-Chie; Urban, Pawel L

    2013-03-05

    This report focuses on the heterogeneous distribution of small molecules (e.g. metabolites) within dry deposits of suspensions and solutions of inorganic and organic compounds with implications for chemical analysis of small molecules by laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Taking advantage of the imaging capabilities of a modern mass spectrometer, we have investigated the occurrence of "coffee rings" in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) sample spots. It is seen that the "coffee-ring effect" in MALDI/SALDI samples can be both beneficial and disadvantageous. For example, formation of the coffee rings gives rise to heterogeneous distribution of analytes and matrices, thus compromising analytical performance and reproducibility of the mass spectrometric analysis. On the other hand, the coffee-ring effect can also be advantageous because it enables partial separation of analytes from some of the interfering molecules present in the sample. We report a "hidden coffee-ring effect" where under certain conditions the sample/matrix deposit appears relatively homogeneous when inspected by optical microscopy. Even in such cases, hidden coffee rings can still be found by implementing the MALDI-MS imaging technique. We have also found that to some extent, the coffee-ring effect can be suppressed during SALDI sample preparation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Phosphorus Adsorption and Desorption Properties of Minnesota Basalt Lunar Simulant and Lunar Glass Simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Brad; Hossner, Lloyd R.; Ming, Douglas W.

    1996-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) adsorption and desorption characteristics of Minnesota Basalt Lunar Simulant (MBLS) and Lunar Glass Simulant (LGS) were evaluated. Results of P interactions with lunar simulants indicated that mineral and glass components adsorbed between 50 and 70% of the applied P and that between 85 and 100% of the applied P was desorbed. The Extended Freundlich equation best described the adsorption data (r(sup 2) = 0.92), whereas the Raven/Hossner equation best described the desorption data ((r(sup 2) = 0.97). Kinetic desorption results indicated that MBLS and LGS released most of their P within 15 h. The expanded Elovich equation fit the data best at shorter times while t/Q(sub DT) equation had a better fit at longer times. These results indicate that P does not strongly adsorb to the two simulants and that any P that was adsorbed was readily desorbed in the presence of anion exchange resin. This work suggests that multiple small applications of P (10-20 mg P/kg) should be added to the simulants to ensure adequate solution P for plant uptake and efficient use of P fertilizer.

  15. Laser-induced desorption of organic molecules from front- and back-irradiated metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinovev, Alexander V.; Veryovkin, Igor V.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the Single Photon Ionization (SPI) method combined with time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOF MS), desorbed flux in LIAD was examined and compared to that from direct laser desorption (LD). Molecules of various organic dyes were used in experiments. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than the direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. The results of our experiments indicate that the LIAD phenomenon cannot be described in terms of a simple mechanical shake-off nor the direct laser desorption. Rather, they suggest that multi-step energy transfer processes are involved. Possible qualitative mechanism of LIAD that are based on formation of non-equilibrium energy states in the adsorbate-substrate system are proposed and discussed.

  16. Processes of adsorption/desorption of iodides and cadmium cations onto/from Ag(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR D. JOVIĆ

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the adsorption/desorption processes of iodides and cadmium cations in the presence of iodides onto/from Ag(111 were investigated. It was shown that both processes were complex, characterized by several peaks on the cyclic voltammograms (CVs. By PeakFit analysis of the recorded CVs and subsequent fitting of the obtained peaks by the Frumkin adsorption isotherm, the interaction parameter (f and the Gibbs energy of adsorption (DGads for each adsorbed phase were determined. In the case of iodide adsorption, four peaks were characterized by negative values of f, indicating attractive lateral interaction between the adsorbed anions, while two of them possessed value of f < –4, indicating phase transition processes. The adsorption/desorption processes of cadmium cations (underpotential deposition – UPD of cadmium in the presence of iodide anions was characterized by two main peaks, each of them being composed of two or three peaks with negative values of f. By the analysis of charge vs. potential dependences obtained either from the CVs or current transients on potentiostatic pulses, it was concluded that adsorbed iodides did not undergo desorption during the process of Cd UPD, but became replaced by Cd ad-atoms and remained adsorbed on top of a Cd layer and/or in between Cd the ad-atoms.

  17. Desorption/ablation of lithium fluoride induced by extreme ultraviolet laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blejchař Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The availability of reliable modeling tools and input data required for the prediction of surface removal rate from the lithium fluoride targets irradiated by the intense photon beams is essential for many practical aspects. This study is motivated by the practical implementation of soft X-ray (SXR or extreme ultraviolet (XUV lasers for the pulsed ablation and thin film deposition. Specifically, it is focused on quantitative description of XUV laser-induced desorption/ablation from lithium fluoride, which is a reference large band-gap dielectric material with ionic crystalline structure. Computational framework was proposed and employed here for the reconstruction of plume expansion dynamics induced by the irradiation of lithium fluoride targets. The morphology of experimentally observed desorption/ablation craters were reproduced using idealized representation (two-zone approximation of the laser fluence profile. The calculation of desorption/ablation rate was performed using one-dimensional thermomechanic model (XUV-ABLATOR code taking into account laser heating and surface evaporation of the lithium fluoride target occurring on a nanosecond timescale. This step was followed by the application of two-dimensional hydrodynamic solver for description of laser-produced plasma plume expansion dynamics. The calculated plume lengths determined by numerical simulations were compared with a simple adiabatic expansion (blast-wave model.

  18. Competitive metal sorption and desorption onto Kappaphycus alvarezii, seaweed waste biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K O; Ramli, Nazaruddin; Said, Mamot; Ahmad, Musa [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, selangor (Malaysia); Yasir, Suhaimi Mohd [School of Sciences and Technology, Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS), Sabah (Malaysia); Arbakariya Ariff, E-mail: naza@ukm.my [Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular science, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-07-15

    Competitive metal sorption and desorption onto Kappaphycus alvarezii waste biomass were investigated. Metal sorption capacities were 0.82 mg Cr (III)/ g, 0.73 mg Ni (II)/ g, 0.67 mg Cd (II)/ g, 0.65 mg Cu( II)/ g and 0.64 mg Zn (II)/ g in multi metal system. Whereas, desorption efficiencies were 66.08 %, 71.50 % and 80.44 % using 0.1 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.1 M HCl and 0.1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, respectively. The metal sorption sequence were Cr(III) > Ni(II) > Cd(II) > Cu(II) > Zn(II), while metal desorption sequence were Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Cu(II) > Ni(II) > Cr(III). Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique was used to characterize the seaweed waste biomass. FTIR analysis shown that carbonyl (-C-O) and nitrile (-C{identical_to}N) groups interact with the metal ions. The experiments result revealed that Kappaphycus alvarezii waste biomass represent an attractive candidate to remove multi metal ions. (author)

  19. Characterization of Rhodamine Self-Assembled Films Using Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ruixia; Na, Na; Jiang, Fubin; Ouyang, Jin

    2013-06-01

    Growth process information and molecular structure identification are very important for characterization of self-assembled films. Here, we explore the possible application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) that provides the assembled information of rhodamine B (Rh B) and rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) films. With the help of lab-made DESI source, two characteristic ions [Rh B]+ and [Rh 123]+ are observed directly in the open environment. To evaluate the reliability of this technique, a comparative study of ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and our method is carried out, and the result shows good correlation. According to the signal intensity of characteristic ions, the layer-by-layer adsorption process of dyes can be monitored, and the thicknesses of multilayer films can also be comparatively determined. Combining the high sensitivity, selectivity, and speed of mass spectrometry, the selective adsorption of similar structure molecules under different pH is recognized easily from extracted ion chronograms. The variation trend of dyes signalling intensity with concentration of polyelectrolyte is studied as well, which reflects the effect of surface charge on dyes deposition. Additionally, the desorption area, surface morphology, and thicknesses of multilayer films are investigated using fluorescence microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Because the desorption area was approximately as small as 2 mm2, the distribution situation of organic dyes in an arbitrary position could be gained rapidly, which means DESI-MS has advantages on in situ analysis.

  20. Competitive metal sorption and desorption onto Kappaphycus alvarezii, seaweed waste biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.O.; Nazaruddin Ramli; Mamot Said; Musa Ahmad; Suhaimi Mohd Yasir; Arbakariya Ariff

    2011-01-01

    Competitive metal sorption and desorption onto Kappaphycus alvarezii waste biomass were investigated. Metal sorption capacities were 0.82 mg Cr (III)/ g, 0.73 mg Ni (II)/ g, 0.67 mg Cd (II)/ g, 0.65 mg Cu( II)/ g and 0.64 mg Zn (II)/ g in multi metal system. Whereas, desorption efficiencies were 66.08 %, 71.50 % and 80.44 % using 0.1 M HNO 3 , 0.1 M HCl and 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 , respectively. The metal sorption sequence were Cr(III) > Ni(II) > Cd(II) > Cu(II) > Zn(II), while metal desorption sequence were Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Cu(II) > Ni(II) > Cr(III). Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique was used to characterize the seaweed waste biomass. FTIR analysis shown that carbonyl (-C-O) and nitrile (-C≡N) groups interact with the metal ions. The experiments result revealed that Kappaphycus alvarezii waste biomass represent an attractive candidate to remove multi metal ions. (author)