WorldWideScience

Sample records for program listening session

  1. 77 FR 16074 - Notice of Listening Sessions on Implementation of Unemployment Insurance Provisions of the Middle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Employment and Training Administration Notice of Listening Sessions on Implementation of Unemployment... listening sessions. SUMMARY: This notice announces listening sessions designed to gain input from employers... requirements. Times and Dates: The listening sessions for the STC and SEA programs are as follows: Short Time...

  2. 75 FR 52760 - Medicare Program; Listening Session Regarding the Implementation of Section 10332 of the Patient...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... these entities; data elements required, and the sources and types of other data that these organizations... Act (the Affordable Care Act), which amended section 1874 of the Social Security Act: Availability of... potential stakeholders on key components of the design of the program. We are soliciting input on the types...

  3. 75 FR 46948 - Medicare Program; Listening Session Regarding Confidential Feedback Reports and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... limited to space and teleconference lines available. Background information, including the relevant... the future phases of the Physician Feedback Program as well as implementation of the value-based... inspection. Passing through a metal detector and inspection of items brought into the building. We note that...

  4. 78 FR 45494 - Plant Breeding Listening Session meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Plant Breeding Listening Session meeting ACTION: Notice of a Plant Breeding Listening Session Meeting. SUMMARY: The Office of the Chief Scientist of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) announces a Plant Breeding Listening Session stakeholder meeting for all interested plant...

  5. 78 FR 44922 - Notice of an Education Listening Session Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Notice of an Education Listening Session Meeting SUMMARY: The Education... an Education Listening Session stakeholder meeting for all interested agricultural education stakeholders. DATES: The Education Listening Session will be held August 1, 2013. The public may file written...

  6. 76 FR 55732 - Public Listening Sessions Regarding the Maritime Administration's Panama Canal Expansion Study...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... Maritime Administration Public Listening Sessions Regarding the Maritime Administration's Panama Canal Expansion Study and the America's Marine Highway Program AGENCY: Maritime Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The purpose of this notice is to announce a series of public listening sessions and...

  7. 76 FR 42112 - Specialty Crop Committee Stakeholder Listening Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ... crops'' as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits and nursery crops (including floriculture). In...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of the Secretary Specialty Crop Committee Stakeholder Listening Sessions... Department of Agriculture announces two stakeholder listening sessions of the Specialty Crop Committee, under...

  8. 75 FR 34418 - Notice of the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Listening Session AGENCY: Research, Education, and Economics, USDA. ACTION: Notice of stakeholder listening session. SUMMARY: The notice announces the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session. The... stakeholder listening session on July 21st, 2010 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Dated: June 10, 2010. Yvette Anderson...

  9. 76 FR 41278 - Cargo Security Risk Reduction; Public Listening Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Cargo Security Risk Reduction; Public Listening Sessions AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... public and private sector stakeholders, across the Security Spectrum.\\1\\ \\1\\ The Security Spectrum... progress and development of a CDC Security National Strategy to reduce risks associated with the transport...

  10. 77 FR 55860 - Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on Federal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on Federal Lands AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Indian Affairs will conduct a listening session with... session in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is the sixth in a series of listening sessions held since the beginning of...

  11. 75 FR 5169 - Listening Session Regarding Notice of Funding Availability for Applications for Credit Assistance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... interpret them. In general, these clarifications indicated the DOT's desire to give priority to projects... extended to March 1, 2010 (75 FR 506). This listening session will facilitate stakeholder feedback in a..., and we are looking to stakeholders to provide feedback on potential program improvements for...

  12. 77 FR 75491 - Entry-Level Driver Training; Public Listening Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Entry-Level Driver Training; Public Listening Session AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public listening session. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces that it will hold a public listening session to solicit ideas and information on...

  13. 77 FR 46106 - Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on Federal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-18891] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Listening Sessions...: Indian Affairs will conduct listening sessions with Indian tribes to obtain oral and written comments... tribal listening sessions. We will consider all comments received [[Page 46107

  14. 78 FR 37553 - Maternal Health Town Hall Listening Session; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... ideas in support of the National Maternal Health Initiative. The Town Hall Listening Session will serve... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Maternal Health Town Hall Listening Session; Notice of Meeting Name: Maternal Health Town Hall Listening Session. Date and Time: August 27, 2013, 2:00...

  15. 75 FR 75188 - Listening Session Regarding Improving the Accessibility of Government Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Listening Session Regarding Improving the Accessibility of Government Information AGENCY: U.S.... Council of CIOs 29 U.S.C. 794d. SUMMARY: This notice announces a listening session being conducted in... Office of Governmentwide Policy and the U.S. Access Board, is holding the second in a series of listening...

  16. 75 FR 27536 - Notice of the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ...'' as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits and nursery crops (including floriculture). In order... Office of the Secretary Notice of the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session AGENCY... Agriculture announces a stakeholder listening session of the Specialty Crop Committee, under the auspices of...

  17. 75 FR 32735 - Notice of the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ...'' as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits and nursery crops (including floriculture). In order... Office of the Secretary Notice of the Specialty Crop Committee's Stakeholder Listening Session AGENCY... Agriculture announces a stakeholder listening session of the Specialty Crop Committee, under the auspices of...

  18. 77 FR 14031 - Public Listening Sessions To Obtain Input on the Multi-Stakeholder Group Tasked With the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... Public Listening Sessions To Obtain Input on the Multi- Stakeholder Group Tasked With the Implementation.... ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of the Interior (Department) announces four public listening... Transparency Initiative (EITI). DATES: The public listening session dates and cities are: Session 1--March 19...

  19. Materials for Public Listening Session - Stakeholder Input on Public Notice for CSOs in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materials for the Public Listening Session on September 14, 2016, to obtain information from the public to help inform development of a new regulation establishing requirements for public notification of CSO discharges in the Great Lakes.

  20. 78 FR 69433 - Executive Order 13650 Improving Chemical Facility Safety and Security Listening Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ..., 2200 Dirksen Parkway, Springfield, IL 62703; and December 11, 2013, Valencia Criminal Justice Institute, 8600 Valencia College Lane, Auditorium-150, Orlando, FL 32825. Note: Previous public listening sessions..., and includes participation from the Departments of Justice, Agriculture, and Transportation. Obtaining...

  1. On the Relationship between the IELTS Listening and Listening in Academic English Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masood Khalili Sabet; Hamid Reza Babaei

    2017-01-01

    ... international tests such as IELTS and TOEFLE. The current study seeks to reconcile this challenge by drawing on the relationship between the IELTS listening and listening in academic English programs...

  2. On the Relationship between the IELTS Listening and Listening in Academic English Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Khalili Sabet

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The challenge for many teachers teaching in academic English programs is, on the one hand, to actualize the objectives of their course and on the other hand, prepare their students for the important international tests such as IELTS and TOEFLE. The current study seeks to reconcile this challenge by drawing on the relationship between the IELTS listening and listening in academic English programs. The requirements of the two domains were compared through a semi – structured interview with five participating academic English instructors from two state universities of Iran. It was found that whilst IELTS listening bears a little bit of resemblance to the one aspect of academic listening - the literal understanding, there are also some very significant differences. The findings suggests that the type of listening the IELTS requires is different from academic listening in terms of pragmatic understanding, the integration of skills, multiplicity of texts for listening, information literacy and the concept of construct irrelevant variance. The findings also indicate the overall usefulness of the IELTS preparation practices within academic English courses.

  3. Session: Program Review X Wrap-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-01-01

    This wrap-up session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of Closing Remarks by Roland R. Kessler and six NGA Industry Critique Panel presentations: ''Summary of Comments on DOE-Industry Cooperation by Geothermal Industry Panel'' by James B. Koenig, GeothermEx, Inc.; ''NGA Industry Critique of the Exploration Component'' by Joe L. Iovenitti, Weiss Associates; ''Critique of Drilling Research'' by Jerry Hamblin, UNOCAL Geothermal; ''Critique Panel Comments on Reservoir Engineering, DOE Geothermal Technology Development'' by Dennis Kaspereit, California Energy Company, Inc.; ''DOE Geothermal Program Review - Critique on Production'' by Douglas B. Jung, Two-Phase Engineering and Research; ''Comments on the DOE Hydrothermal Energy Conversion R&D Program'' by David L. Mendive, Geothermal Development Associates.

  4. The listening cube: a three dimensional auditory training program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raeve, L. de; Anderson, I.; Bammens, M.; Jans, J.; Haesevoets, M.; Pans, R.; Vandistel, H.; Vrolix, Y.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Here we present the Listening Cube, an auditory training program for children and adults receiving cochlear implants, developed during the clinical practice at the KIDS Royal Institute for the Deaf in Belgium. We provide information on the content of the program as well as guidance as to

  5. Listening and speaking ability of Thai deaf children in preschool aural rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsukprasert, Krisna; Kasemkosin, Nittaya; Cheewareungroj, Wichit; Kasemsuwan, Lalida

    2010-04-01

    An auditory-oral approach can help deaf children achieve success in oral communication. Many studies confirm that deaf children with access to sound through high-powered and appropriate hearing aids at the youngest age possible have the capability to acquire communication skills similar to their hearingpeers. Evaluate the listening and speaking progress made by 27 Thai hearing-impaired children who attended a preschool aural rehabilitation program, which was established at Audiology and Speech clinic. After hearing aids fitting, deaf children were enrolled to the preschool aural rehabilitation program after receiving their parents consent. Hearing impaired children were divided into groups of 4-6 children with approximately the same level of performance. The listening and speaking performance at the initial period were recorded. Each group participated in the 3-hour-program once a week, included auditory training, conversation (maternal reflexive method), and speech stimulation. The improvements and problems of each child were recorded at the end of session. Listening and speaking performance evaluation were recorded at six months intervals. There were 12 boys and 15 girls. The average hearing loss in the better ear was 104 dBHL, range from 83-117 dBHL, SD = 8.33. The mean age of enrollment was 2 years and 10 months. The majority gradually developed listening skills and speaking ability. There was no relationship between age of enrollment and the listening and speaking ability (p > 0.05). However, listening skills had positive relationship with length of speech (r = 0.685), number of spoken vocabulary (r = 0.665), and speech character (r = 0.598); p children to participate in hearing society.

  6. Effect of Teacher Training Sessions on Listener Perception of Voice Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGregorio, Nicholas J.; Polow, Nancy Gross

    1985-01-01

    Fifteen randomly selected public school elementary teachers participated in training sessions on voice disorders. Analysis of scores on ratings of voice disorder samples revealed that Ss made significantly fewer errors than a control group. The trained group agreed with speech pathologist judges 74 percent of the time. (CL)

  7. Listening and Literacy: Audiobooks in the Reading Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casbergue, Renee Michelet; Harris, Karen

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of listening to literature; the benefits of listening to literature beyond the primary years at both school and home; potential audiences for audiobooks; selection considerations; and utilization of audiotapes. (RS)

  8. Preferred listening levels of mobile phone programs when considering subway interior noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyaehyoung Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, people listen to music loud using personal listening devices. Although a majority of studies have reported that the high volume played on these listening devices produces a latent risk of hearing problems, there is a lack of studies on "double noise exposures" such as environmental noise plus recreational noise. The present study measures the preferred listening levels of a mobile phone program with subway interior noise for 74 normal-hearing participants in five age groups (ranging from 20s to 60s. The speakers presented the subway interior noise at 73.45 dB, while each subject listened to three application programs [Digital Multimedia Broadcasting (DMB, music, game] for 30 min using a tablet personal computer with an earphone. The participants′ earphone volume levels were analyzed using a sound level meter and a 2cc coupler. Overall, the results showed that those in their 20s listened to the three programs significantly louder with DMB set at significantly higher volume levels than for the other programs. Higher volume levels were needed for middle frequency compared to the lower and higher frequencies. We concluded that any potential risk of noise-induced hearing loss for mobile phone users should be communicated when users listen regularly, although the volume level was not high enough that the users felt uncomfortable. When considering individual listening habits on mobile phones, further study to predict total accumulated environmental noise is still needed.

  9. On the Relationship between the IELTS Listening and Listening in Academic English Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabet, Masood Khalili; Babaei, Hamid Reza

    2017-01-01

    The challenge for many teachers teaching in academic English programs is, on the one hand, to actualize the objectives of their course and on the other hand, prepare their students for the important international tests such as IELTS and TOEFL. The current study seeks to reconcile this challenge by drawing on the relationship between the IELTS…

  10. An Investigation of Classroom Practices in Teaching Listening Comprehension at English Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, Nurhafni

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate how the classroom practice in teaching listening comprehension at English Education Program of STKIP Tapanuli Selatan in 2016/2017 Academic Year is. The informants of this research were all of second semester students of STKIP Tapanuli Selatan in 2016/2017 academic year and a lecturer of listening…

  11. Type systems for distributed programs components and sessions

    CERN Document Server

    Dardha, Ornela

    2016-01-01

    In this book we develop powerful techniques based on formal methods for the verification of correctness, consistency and safety properties related to dynamic reconfiguration and communication in complex distributed systems. In particular, static analysis techniques based on types and type systems are an adequate methodology considering their success in guaranteeing not only basic safety properties, but also more sophisticated ones like deadlock or lock freedom in concurrent settings. The main contributions of this book are twofold. i) We design a type system for a concurrent object-oriented calculus to statically ensure consistency of dynamic reconfigurations. ii) We define an encoding of the session pi-calculus, which models communication in distributed systems, into the standard typed pi-calculus. We use this encoding to derive properties like type safety and progress in the session pi-calculus by exploiting the corresponding properties in the standard typed pi-calculus.

  12. Listening for the Squeaky Wheel: Designing Distance Writing Program Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Distance writing programs still struggle with assessment strategies that can evaluate student writing as well as their ability to communicate about that writing with peers at a distance. This article uses Kim, Smith and Maeng's 2008 distance education program assessment scheme to evaluate a single distance writing program at Old Dominion…

  13. Sessional teachers in a BN program: bridging the divide or widening the gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Sharon; Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Jackson, Debra; Peters, Kath; Salamonson, Yenna

    2010-07-01

    Casualisation of the academic workforce has resulted in an increase in the employment of sessional teachers in Bachelor of Nursing (BN) programs. Many of these teachers are drawn from specialty clinical areas and continue to work clinically while teaching part-time. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of sessional teachers about their perceived contribution to an undergraduate Bachelor of Nursing program in a single Australian university. Twelve sessional teachers participated in semi-structured interviews as part of a larger mixed method study exploring the issues related to sessional teaching in the Bachelor of Nursing program. Three themes emerged from the data; (1) "Bringing 'reality' to the classroom", (2) "Privileging experiential knowledge", and (3) "Establishing boundaries with students". Underpinning the narratives was a strong subtext related to the theory-practice gap. Proactive strategies to facilitate the potential of sessional staff are articulated in the paper. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 75 FR 73090 - Medicare Program; Listening Session on Development of Additional Imaging Efficiency Measures for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... imaging measures--(1) OP-8: MRI Lumbar Spine for Low Back Pain; (2) OP-9: Mammography Follow-up Rates; (3) OP- 10: Abdomen CT Use of Contrast Material; and (4) OP-11: Thorax CT Use of Contrast Material. These...

  15. Tuned In Emotion Regulation Program Using Music Listening: Effectiveness for Adolescents in Educational Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Genevieve Anita Dingle; Joseph eHodges; Ashleigh eKunde

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an effectiveness study of Tuned In, a novel emotion regulation intervention that uses participant selected music to evoke emotions in session and teaches participants emotional awareness and regulation skills. The group program content is informed by a two dimensional model of emotion (arousal, valence), along with music psychology theories about how music evokes emotional responses. The program has been evaluated in two samples of adolescents: 41 “at risk” adolescents (76...

  16. Mapping of Primary Instructional Methods and Teaching Techniques for Regularly Scheduled, Formal Teaching Sessions in an Anesthesia Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested Madsen, Matias; Macario, Alex; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    -question written survey rating the session. The most common primary instructional methods were computer slides-based classroom lectures (66%), workshops (15%), simulations (5%), and journal club (5%). The number of teaching techniques used per formal teaching session averaged 5.31 (SD, 1.92; median, 5...... formal teaching session. The overall education scores of the sessions as rated by the residents were high.......In this study, we examined the regularly scheduled, formal teaching sessions in a single anesthesiology residency program to (1) map the most common primary instructional methods, (2) map the use of 10 known teaching techniques, and (3) assess if residents scored sessions that incorporated active...

  17. 76 FR 33305 - Medicare Program; Accelerated Development Sessions for Accountable Care Organizations-June 20, 21...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... following: Incorrectly referenced the learning sessions as accelerated development sessions (ADSs) instead of accelerated development learning sessions (ADLSs). Made inadvertent errors in our description of... ``Accelerated Development Sessions'' is corrected to read ``Accelerated Development Learning Sessions''. (2) In...

  18. Tuned In Emotion Regulation Program Using Music Listening: Effectiveness for Adolescents in Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Genevieve A.; Hodges, Joseph; Kunde, Ashleigh

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an effectiveness study of Tuned In, a novel emotion regulation intervention that uses participant selected music to evoke emotions in session and teaches participants emotional awareness and regulation skills. The group program content is informed by a two dimensional model of emotion (arousal, valence), along with music psychology theories about how music evokes emotional responses. The program has been evaluated in two samples of adolescents: 41 “at risk” adolescents (76% males; Mage = 14.8 years) attending an educational re-engagement program and 216 students (100% females; Mage = 13.6 years) attending a mainstream secondary school. Results showed significant pre- to post-program improvements in measures of emotion awareness, identification, and regulation (p emotion regulation intervention for adolescents, and these findings extend an earlier study with young adults. Tuned In is a-theoretical in regard to psychotherapeutic approach and could be integrated with other program components as required. PMID:27375537

  19. Tuned In Emotion Regulation Program Using Music Listening: Effectiveness for Adolescents in Educational Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Genevieve A; Hodges, Joseph; Kunde, Ashleigh

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an effectiveness study of Tuned In, a novel emotion regulation intervention that uses participant selected music to evoke emotions in session and teaches participants emotional awareness and regulation skills. The group program content is informed by a two dimensional model of emotion (arousal, valence), along with music psychology theories about how music evokes emotional responses. The program has been evaluated in two samples of adolescents: 41 "at risk" adolescents (76% males; M age = 14.8 years) attending an educational re-engagement program and 216 students (100% females; M age = 13.6 years) attending a mainstream secondary school. Results showed significant pre- to post-program improvements in measures of emotion awareness, identification, and regulation (p emotion regulation intervention for adolescents, and these findings extend an earlier study with young adults. Tuned In is a-theoretical in regard to psychotherapeutic approach and could be integrated with other program components as required.

  20. Single session of integrated "Silver Yoga" program improves cardiovascular parameters in senior citizens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda Balayogi Bhavanani

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: There is a healthy reduction in HR, BP and derived cardiovascular indices following a single yoga session in geriatric subjects. These changes may be attributed to enhanced harmony of cardiac autonomic function as a result of coordinated breath-body work and mind-body relaxation due to an integrated and #8220;Silver Yoga and #8221; program. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(2.000: 134-137

  1. Development and Implementation of an Advising Program's Meet-and-Greet Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Lucio R; Candelario, Danielle M; Bridgeman, Mary Barna

    2015-12-25

    To describe the implementation and perceptions of an advising program's meet-and-greet session on student/faculty interactions. Student advisees and faculty advisors attended a meet-and-greet program designed to facilitate introductions. Two online surveys evaluating program perceptions were electronically distributed to participants. Twenty-eight advisors and 226 students attended; 17 faculty members and 42% (n=95) of students completed the survey. Advisors and advisees found the program valuable (100%, 85%) and recommended holding it again (100%, 93%), respectively. Most advisors agreed that the event improved success in meeting advisees while reducing time needed to schedule and meet with advisees. Students felt more comfortable contacting advisors after participating, with 83% agreeing it was more convenient than scheduling separate meeting times. An advising meet-and-greet program facilitated initial advisee/advisor meetings while reducing self-reported faculty time/resources. This activity could be implemented by other institutions seeking to promote student advising relationships.

  2. Tuned In emotion regulation program using music listening: Effectiveness for adolescents in educational settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Anita Dingle

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an effectiveness study of Tuned In, a novel emotion regulation intervention that uses participant selected music to evoke emotions in session and teaches participants emotional awareness and regulation skills. The group program content is informed by a two dimensional model of emotion (arousal, valence, along with music psychology theories about how music evokes emotional responses. The program has been evaluated in two samples of adolescents: 41 at risk adolescents (76% males; Mage = 14.8 years attending an educational re-engagement program and 216 students (100% females; Mage = 13.6 years attending a mainstream secondary school. Results showed significant pre- to post-program improvements in measures of emotion awareness, identification, and regulation (p < .01 to p = .06 in the smaller at risk sample and all p < .001 in the mainstream school sample. Participant ratings of engagement and likelihood of using the strategies learned in the program were high. Tuned In shows promise as a brief emotion regulation intervention for adolescents, and these findings extend an earlier study with young adults. Tuned In is a-theoretical in regard to psychotherapeutic approach and could be integrated with other program components as required.

  3. A Comprehensive Look into the Instruction of Listening Skill in Academic English Programs: A Case Study of Two State Universities in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    The study reported here thoroughly investigated the instruction of listening skill in academic English programs. This was researched through a semi-structured interview. In this regard, in order to obtain a picture of listening requirements across the academy, data were collected from two different state universities of Iran. To compile the data,…

  4. A Latent Variable Approach to Listening and Reading: Testing Factorial Invariance Across Two Groups of Children in the Korean/English Two-Way Immersion Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jungok; Bachman, Lyle F.

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated the factorial distinctiveness of two receptive language skills, listening and reading, and the equivalence of factor structure across two groups. Subjects were 156 students, Korean-Americans and non-Korean-Americans, in grades two through four in a two-way bilingual education program. Students were tested in listening and…

  5. Second session: operating European facilities and their programs; Session 2: Les installations Europeennes actuelles et leurs programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iracane, D. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Porracchia, A.; Fougeras, P.; Morey, J.M. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs; Loubiere, S.; Durande-Ayme, P. [CEA Saclay, Nuclear Energy Div., Reactors and Nuclear Services Deptment, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Guidez, J.; Goux, D. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire, DEN, 30 - Marcoule (France); Dupraz, R.; Brand, B. [FRAMATOME, AREVA-FANP, 69 - Lyon (France); Blanc, J.Y. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Perthuis, S. de [FRAMATOME ANP, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France); Le Rouzic, J.F. [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France)

    2005-07-01

    Most European nuclear post-irradiation examination facilities are ageing and the optimization of the remaining infrastructures may lead to connect them through a network implying consistent staff competence between countries and efficient nuclear material transport means. The second article describes the 3 very-low power research reactors operating in France: Minerve, Masurca and Eole. The Osiris reactor is presented in the third article, the author focuses on the devices available in Osiris to perform irradiation in light water reactor conditions and in high temperature reactor conditions and on the associated programs. Phenix reactor located on the Marcoule site had been performing from 1974 to 1990 the necessary technological qualifications required by the fast reactor system. An important upgrading program, led from 1994 to 2003, has allowed the reactor to begin a second life. Its investigation program encompasses research work on the transmutation of actinides and fission products and on new nuclear fuels and materials required for the future fourth generation of reactors. In Europe about 20 hot laboratories offer services to perform examination and qualification required by their national civil nuclear programs. Most are state-owned and show a large range of activities: nuclear fuels, materials, reprocessing, radio-nuclides, and radio-active sources. The last article reviews the main test loops operating in France and in neighboring countries. About 30 installations are reported and classified according to their activity fields : critical heat flux, hydro-mechanics, device testing, accidental situations, helium and severe reactor accidents. (A.C.)

  6. Factors Leading to Self-Removal from the Bariatric Surgery Program After Attending the Orientation Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Binghao; Kastanias, Patti; Wang, Wei; Okraniec, Allan; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery orientation sessions are often the first point of contact and a recommended component of pre-bariatric surgery assessment. Self-removal rates after bariatric program orientation are as high as 25 % despite the proven efficacy of this procedure. The objective of this study was to identify factors contributing to patient self-removal after orientation using a mixed method approach. Patients who attended the Toronto Western Hospital Bariatric Surgery Program orientation between 2012 and 2013 and then self-removed from the program (N = 216) were included in the study. Subjects were interviewed via telephone using a semi-structured interview guide, generating both quantitative and qualitative data. Factors leading to discontinuation were rated on a five-point Likert scale. Qualitative data was analyzed using constant comparative methodology. The response rate was 59 % with a 40.7 % completion rate (N = 88). Concerns about potential surgical risks and complications and the ability to adapt to changes in eating and drinking post-operatively were identified as the top two factors for patients' self-removal from the program. Thematic analysis uncovered 11 major themes related to patient self-removal. Unexpected themes include perceived personal suitability for the surgery, family impact of surgery, miscommunication with the family physician, and fears related to the orientation information. This is one of the first studies examining barriers to bariatric surgery in the pre-operative setting and offers new insights into the reasons patients self-remove from bariatric surgery programs. This study may inform bariatric orientation program changes resulting in improved access to this effective surgical intervention.

  7. 76 FR 50224 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, September 15th and... second Accelerated Development Learning Session (ADLS) hosted by CMS to help Accountable Care... while improving the quality of care for our beneficiaries. Through Accelerated Development Learning...

  8. 76 FR 66931 - Medicare Program; Accountable Care Organization Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Accelerated Development Learning Sessions; Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation November 17 and 18... third and final Accelerated Development Learning Session (ADLS) hosted by CMS to help Accountable Care... while improving the quality of care for beneficiaries. Through Accelerated Development Learning Sessions...

  9. A Comprehensive Look into the instruction of Listening Skill in Academic English Programs: A Case Study of two State Universities in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Babaee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study reported here thoroughly investigated the instruction of listening skill in academic English programs. This was researched through a semi-structured interview. In this regard, in order to obtain a picture of listening requirements across the academy, data were collected from two different state universities of Iran. To compile the data, five listening lecturers from these two universities were invited to participate in the study. Topics investigated through the interviews included; the importance and objectives of English as a Foreign Language (EFL listening in university study, the nature of listening in academic English programs, quantity and type of listening prescribed on courses, the integration of listening with other skills, and the evolution of changes in students’ listening requirements and practices. The analysis of the interviews revealed the two types of the courses; academic English-oriented courses and general English-oriented courses, each of them having their own perspectives regarding the various aspects of the listening. Regarding the changes in students’ practices, two types of transformations were found; transformation of the processes from bottom-up to top-down and transformation of the materials from textbook-oriented to more internet-oriented perspectives. The findings of the present study suggest some practical implications for the EFL students and teachers. In this regard, students need to equip and accustom themselves with more interpretive skills of listening and internet-oriented materials in their classes. Teachers are also required to balance between different types of skills and course materials in their classes according to their students’ needs.

  10. A randomized controlled trial of two simple mind-body programs, Kirtan Kriya meditation and music listening, for adults with subjective cognitive decline: Feasibility and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Kim E; Selfe, Terry Kit; Khalsa, Dharma Singh; Kandati, Sahiti

    2016-06-01

    In this randomized controlled trial (RCT), we assessed the feasibility and acceptability of two simple home-based relaxation programs in adults experiencing subjective cognitive decline, a strong predictor of Alzheimer's disease. Sixty participants were randomized to a beginner Kirtan Kriya meditation (KK) program or a music listening (ML) program. Participants were asked to practice 12min daily for the first 12 weeks, then as often as they liked for the following 3 months. Participants underwent assessments at baseline, 12 weeks, and 6 months to evaluate changes in key outcomes. Feasibility and acceptability were evaluated by measuring recruitment and retention rates, assessment visit attendance, practice adherence, and treatment expectancy; exit questionnaires completed at 12 weeks and 6 months provided additional data regarding participant experience with the study, perceived barriers to and facilitators of practice, reasons for drop-out, and views regarding the assigned intervention. Fifty-three participants (88%) completed the 6 month study. Adherence in both groups was excellent, with participants completing 93% (91% KK, 94% ML) of sessions on average in the first 12 weeks, and 71% (68% KK, 74% ML) during the 3 month, practice-optional, follow-up period. At week 12, over 80% of participants indicated they were likely to continue practicing following study completion. Responses to both structured and open-ended exit questionnaire items also suggested high satisfaction with both programs. Findings of this RCT of a beginner meditation practice and a simple ML program suggest that both programs were well accepted and the practices are feasible in adults with early memory loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Teaching Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtchinova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Ekaterina Nemtchinova's book "Teaching Listening" explores different approaches to teaching listening in second language classrooms. Presenting up-to-date research and theoretical issues associated with second language listening, Nemtchinova explains how these new findings inform everyday teaching and offers practical suggestions…

  12. Listening Heads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kok, I.A.

    2013-01-01

    The thesis explores individual differences in listening behavior and how these differences can be used in the development and evaluation of listener response prediction models for embodied conversational agents. The thesis starts with introducing methods to collect multiple perspectives on listening

  13. A randomised study of the effects of supplemental exercise sessions after a 7-week chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rehabilitation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan René; Rasmussen, Mathilde; Buch, Tove Fedder

    2012-01-01

    Background: Several studies have suggested that the effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) rehabilitation programs tend to attenuate with time. We aimed to investigate the effects of supplemental exercise sessions following an initial 7-week COPD rehabilitation program with regard...... to exercise capacity and disease-specific quality of life (QoL). Methods: We performed a 7-week COPD rehabilitation program in 140 COPD patients. Patients (n = 118) who completed the initial program were randomised for additional six supervised supplemental exercise sessions or three follow-up examinations...... without exercise. Both groups were followed for 12 months. Primary end-points were QoL as measured by the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire total score and exercise capacity as measured by the endurance shuttle walking time (ESWT). Results: A marked increase in ESWT (from 193 to 921 s) and a moderate...

  14. Landing Technique and Performance in Youth Athletes After a Single Injury-Prevention Program Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Hayley; Trojian, Thomas; Martinez, Jessica; Kraemer, William; DiStefano, Lindsay J

    2015-11-01

    Injury-prevention programs (IPPs) performed as season-long warm-ups improve injury rates, performance outcomes, and jump-landing technique. However, concerns regarding program adoption exist. Identifying the acute benefits of using an IPP compared with other warm-ups may encourage IPP adoption. To examine the immediate effects of 3 warm-up protocols (IPP, static warm-up [SWU], or dynamic warm-up [DWU]) on jump-landing technique and performance measures in youth athletes. Randomized controlled clinical trial. Gymnasiums. Sixty male and 29 female athletes (age = 13 ± 2 years, height = 162.8 ± 12.6 cm, mass = 37.1 ± 13.5 kg) volunteered to participate in a single session. Participants were stratified by age, sex, and sport and then were randomized into 1 protocol: IPP, SWU, or DWU. The IPP consisted of dynamic flexibility, strengthening, plyometric, and balance exercises and emphasized proper technique. The SWU consisted of jogging and lower extremity static stretching. The DWU consisted of dynamic lower extremity flexibility exercises. Participants were assessed for landing technique and performance measures immediately before (PRE) and after (POST) completing their warm-ups. One rater graded each jump-landing trial using the Landing Error Scoring System. Participants performed a vertical jump, long jump, shuttle run, and jump-landing task in randomized order. The averages of all jump-landing trials and performance variables were used to calculate 1 composite score for each variable at PRE and POST. Change scores were calculated (POST - PRE) for all measures. Separate 1-way (group) analyses of variance were conducted for each dependent variable (α .05). The Landing Error Scoring System scores improved after the IPP (change = -0.40 ± 1.24 errors) compared with the DWU (0.27 ± 1.09 errors) and SWU (0.43 ± 1.35 errors; P = .04). An IPP did not impair sport performance and may have reduced injury risk, which supports the use of these programs before sport activity.

  15. Effects of a worksite stress management training program with six short-hour sessions: a controlled trial among Japanese employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umanodan, Rino; Kobayashi, Yuka; Nakamura, Mai; Kitaoka-Higashiguchi, Kazuyo; Kawakami, Norito; Shimazu, Akihito

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multi-component worksite stress management training (SMT) program among employees belong to Japanese steel company. Five workplaces were assigned to an intervention group and two workplaces to a control group. SMT with monthly 30-min sessions were provided to the intervention group for 6 mo. Intention-to-treat analyses were conducted among respondents of the intervention (n=96) and control groups (n=53). Significant favorable intervention effects were found on knowledge (pperformance (p>0.05). However, in per-protocol analyses of those who attended all sessions, significant favorable effects were observed on psychological distress and job performance, as well as knowledge and professional efficacy (pperformance, if participants complete all sessions.

  16. 75 FR 53015 - Public Listening Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... impact highway safety? 9. How will technology affect driver behavior? What issues related to vehicle/driver interaction could affect safety performance? Issued on: August 24, 2010. Larry W. Minor, Associate...? What actions should FMCSA take to improve interactions between CMV drivers and drivers of private...

  17. PASSport to the Cloud – Results of a Peer-Assisted Study Sessions (PASS Online Pilot Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Lim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Deakin University’s online study environment continues to grow with over 12,000 students now studying in the Cloud. It is important to provide these students not only academic support, but also a sense of inclusion and community. This will improve their social engagement and from there, they will more likely succeed. In 2015, the Division of Student Life ran an online pilot based on their successful Peer-Assisted Study Sessions program. Results from the pilot were positive. Students reported greater connection with the subject and with their fellow students. The program will be expanded in 2016 based on this pilot.

  18. Maintaining the potential of a psycho-educational program: efficacy of a booster session after an intervention offered family caregivers at disclosure of a relative's dementia diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Francine; Lachance, Lise; Lévesque, Louise; Zarit, Steven Howard; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Booster sessions as a means of maintaining the benefits of psycho-educational programs have received little attention in caregiving research. Caregivers were offered a booster session following participation in a program entitled Learning to Become a Family Caregiver (LBFC) intended to facilitate transition to the caregiver role after diagnostic disclosure of dementia in a relative. The 90-minute booster session served to review program content and afforded the opportunity to discuss and practice learned skills. This study sought to test the efficacy of the booster session in maintaining or recovering program effects at six months post-program. Participants in the program were randomly assigned to a group that received the booster session (n = 31) or a group that did not (n = 29). A third control group was also formed, which continued to receive only the usual care provided in memory clinics. Eligible participants - French-speaking primary caregivers of a relative diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the past nine months - were recruited in memory clinics in Quebec (Canada). Participants were blindly assessed before randomization and six months after the booster session on outcomes associated with a healthy role transition. Prediction analyses revealed one significant positive effect of the booster session: emergence of preparedness to provide care. Moreover, with or without the booster session, the program continued to have a positive effect on psychological distress and contributed to the emergence of self-efficacy in dealing with caregiving situations. The booster session had no significant effect on knowledge of services, planning for future care needs, use of reframing as a coping strategy, perceived informal support, and family conflicts. The limited effect observed is discussed in terms of the booster session's content and intensity. Recommendations are made for designing future research on the effect of booster sessions, including the importance of including a

  19. Listening to Students: How I Came to Love My Low-Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Megan

    2009-01-01

    Finding an academic program that caters to children's literature is hard. Many people consider children's literature no more sophisticated than its audience--an arena for those who cannot hack it either as writers or as teachers of adult literature. This author, however, found a new program--a "low residency program"--at Hamline…

  20. Office of Educational Programs 2009 Summer Internship Symposium and Poster Session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White,K.; Morris, M.; Osiecki, C.; Blackburn, N.

    2009-08-06

    Brookhaven National Laboratory offers college and pre-college faculty and students many opportunities to participate in Laboratory educational programs. The programs administered by the Office of Educational Programs are primarily funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Brookhaven Science Associates, and other federal and non-federal agencies. Faculty and student research participation is welcomed in physical and life sciences, computer science and engineering, as well as in a variety of applied research areas relating to alternative energy, conservation, environmental technology, and national security. Visit our website at http://www.bnl.gov/education for application deadlines and more details. Following is a description of the programs managed by the Office of Educational Programs.

  1. A Single Session of an Integrated Yoga Program as a Stress Management Tool for School Employees: Comparison of Daily Practice and Nondaily Practice of a Yoga Therapy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosaka, Michiyo; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the daily practice of a yoga therapy program learnt during a single session of an integrated yoga intervention that was developed by us as a stress management tool for school employees. Ninety school employees. Case-control study. Three months after the intervention, the subjects were assigned to a daily practice group (case: n=43) and a nonconsecutive daily practice group (control: n=47) according to their daily practice level of the yoga therapy program. The subjects participated in a stress management education program based on an integrated yoga therapy session. The program included psychological education and counseling about stress management and yoga theories, as well as the practices of asanas, pranayama, relaxation, and cognitive structure based on Indian philosophy. Assessments were performed before and after the program using the Subjective Units of Distress for mind and body and the Two-Dimensional Mood Scale. The General Health Questionnaire 28 (GHQ28) was used to assess the mental health state before the intervention and at 3 months after the program. The subjects showed significant increases in their levels of calmness, comfort, and cheerfulness (pstress (pstress and that the mental health of school employees was promoted by the daily practice of the yoga therapy program.

  2. University HRD Programs. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on university HRD (human resource development) programs. A survey of 20 multinational corporations reported in "Determining the Labor Demand and Development Needs of HR/HRD Professionals in China" (William J. Rothwell) finds the demand for HR generalists and specialists in China is…

  3. 77 FR 30022 - U.S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Stakeholder Assessment Public Listening...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ....S. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Stakeholder Assessment Public Listening Sessions... public comment period regarding the Assessment, starting May 18, to include public listening sessions, a... Federal Register Notice. DATES: Submit written comments on or before June 29th, 2012. The public listening...

  4. Improved motor sequence retention by motionless listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, Amir; Katz, Tal; Chess, Roxanne; Saltzman, Elliot

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effect of listening to a newly learned musical piece on subsequent motor retention of the piece. Thirty-six non-musicians were trained to play an unfamiliar melody on a piano keyboard. Next, they were randomly assigned to participate in three follow-up listening sessions over 1 week. Subjects who, during their listening sessions, listened to the same initial piece showed significant improvements in motor memory and retention of the piece despite the absence of physical practice. These improvements included increased pitch accuracy, time accuracy, and dynamic intensity of key pressing. Similar improvements, though to a lesser degree, were observed in subjects who, during their listening sessions, were distracted by another task. Control subjects, who after learning the piece had listened to nonmusical sounds, showed impaired motoric retention of the piece at 1 week from the initial acquisition day. These results imply that motor sequences can be established in motor memory without direct access to motor-related information. In addition, the study revealed that the listening-induced improvements did not generalize to the learning of a new musical piece composed of the same notes as the initial piece learned, limiting the effects to musical motor sequences that are already part of the individual's motor repertoire.

  5. Multiparty Asynchronous Session Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honda, Kohei; Yoshida, Nobuko; Carbone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    . This work extends the foregoing theories of binary session types to multiparty, asynchronous sessions, which often arise in practical communication-centered applications. Presented as a typed calculus for mobile processes, the theory introduces a new notion of types in which interactions involving multiple......Communication is a central elements in software development. As a potential typed foundation for structured communication-centered programming, session types have been studied over the past decade for a wide range of process calculi and programming languages, focusing on binary (two-party) sessions...... peers are directly abstracted as a global scenario. Global types retain the friendly type syntax of binary session types while specifying dependencies and capturing complex causal chains of multiparty asynchronous interactions. A global type plays the role of a shared agreement among communication peers...

  6. LISTENING COMPREHENSION AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE SKILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Інна Шимків

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reveals the basic features of listening comprehensive that are very constituent of communicative activity; listening comprehensive is analyzed, and attention is concentrated on the importance of its development in the teaching of future specialists. The nature of listening comprehension as a foreign-language skill is considered. Essential features of neuro-linguistic programming strategies used to teach listening are outlined. The system of teaching listening and its major levels are analyzed within the framework of communicative language teaching. The structural characteristics of listening comprehension on the basis of its psychophysiological mechanisms are elucidated. Listening comprehension difficulties caused by the physical settings are determined. Phonetic, lexical and grammatical problems encountered in listening are identified. It has been proved that both linguistic and non-linguistic types of knowledge, as well as various factors of communicative situation are essential for efficient listening comprehension. The characteristic features of handouts and worksheets used to overcome listening comprehension difficulties are defined. The study concludes with the integral part of listening comprehension in second language instruction and the need to improve the receptive mechanisms ensuring the efficiency of teaching listening.

  7. Effect of exercise programs with aerobic exercise sessions of similar intensity but different frequency and duration on health-related measures in overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthou, Eirini; Gill, Jason M; Malkova, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated health-related effects of exercise programs with exercise sessions of similar intensity but different frequency and duration. Thirty-four overweight women were randomized into either long-bout (LB) or short-bout (SB) exercise groups. Participants performed an 8-week supervised program, with the LB group exercising for 75 minutes twice per week, and the SB group for 30 minutes on 5 days of the week. The LB group completed 16 sessions at a heart rate (HR) of 127 ± 1 beat·min-1 and the SB group completed 40 sessions at a HR of 126 ± 1 beat·min-1. Weekly energy expenditure of exercise was not different between groups (LB group, 5.64 ± 0.34 MJ; SB group, 5.83 ± 0.23 MJ). Training significantly (P exercise training did not differ between the SB and LB groups. Health-related outcomes of exercise programs with similar energy expenditure are independent of frequency and duration of exercise sessions. This provides individuals with a degree of flexibility in exercise program planning.

  8. Pilot Evaluation of the Feasibility and Acceptability of StressOFF Strategies: A Single-Session School-Based Stress Management Program for Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Amy J.; Heath, Nancy L.; Carsley, Dana

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the pilot evaluation of the feasibility and acceptability of StressOFF Strategies, a "single-session" (45 min) adolescent-targeted, school-based psychoeducational program, which introduces cognitive behavioral techniques and mindfulness-based techniques. Five hundred and sixty-five Grade 9 students (57% female;…

  9. Breakout Sessions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Participants are split into small groups for detailed discussion on their chosen topic. To register please click on 'See details' link from the agenda and then on the link to send an email to the session for which you would like to book. Please don't change the subject line of the email.

  10. Music Listening Is Creative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratus, John

    2017-01-01

    Active music listening is a creative activity in that the listener constructs a uniquely personal musical experience. Most approaches to teaching music listening emphasize a conceptual approach in which students learn to identify various characteristics of musical sound. Unfortunately, this type of listening is rarely done outside of schools. This…

  11. The Continuum of Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rud, A. G.; Garrison, Jim

    2007-01-01

    The distinction between "apophatic" and "cataphatic" listening is defined and analyzed. "Apophatic" listening is more or less devoid of cognitivist claims, whereas "cataphatic" listening involves cognition and questioning. Many of the papers in this volume are discussed along the continuum determined by these two types of listening.…

  12. Comparison between a 13-session and one-time program on Korea elementary, middle and high school students' understanding of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok; Choi, Yoon Seok [Dept. of Education and Research, Korea Academy of Nuclear Safety, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young Khi [Dept. of Radiological Science, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    To help future generations make accurate value judgments about nuclear power generation and radiation, this study will provide an effective education plan suitable for South Korea by applying and analyzing programs for the understanding of nuclear power within the diversely operated programs in the current Korean education system. This study analyzed the difference in educational effects by operating a 13-session regular curriculum for one semester and a one-session short-term curriculum from March to July 2016. As a result of operating a 13-session model school and a one-time educational program to analyze behavior changes against the traditional learning model, it was found that all elementary, middle and high school students showed higher acceptability of nuclear power in South Korea. The variation was greater for the model school than the short-term program. To prevent future generations from making biased policy decisions stemming from fear regarding nuclear power, it is necessary to bolster their value judgments in policy decisions by acquiring sufficient information about nuclear power generation and radiation through educational programs.

  13. Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairments Show Less Driving Errors after a Multiple Sessions Simulator Training Program but Do Not Exhibit Long Term Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, Normand; Simoneau, Martin; Hudon, Lisa; Germain Robitaille, Mathieu; Moszkowicz, Thierry; Laurendeau, Denis; Bherer, Louis; Duchesne, Simon; Hudon, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The driving performance of individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is suboptimal when compared to healthy older adults. It is expected that the driving will worsen with the progression of the cognitive decline and thus, whether or not these individuals should continue to drive is a matter of debate. The aim of the study was to provide support to the claim that individuals with MCI can benefit from a training program and improve their overall driving performance in a driving simulator. Fifteen older drivers with MCI participated in five training sessions in a simulator (over a 21-day period) and in a 6-month recall session. During training, they received automated auditory feedback on their performance when an error was noted about various maneuvers known to be suboptimal in MCI individuals (for instance, weaving, omitting to indicate a lane change, to verify a blind spot, or to engage in a visual search before crossing an intersection). The number of errors was compiled for eight different maneuvers for all sessions. For the initial five sessions, a gradual and significant decrease in the number of errors was observed, indicating learning and safer driving. The level of performance, however, was not maintained at the 6-month recall session. Nevertheless, the initial learning observed opens up possibilities to undertake more regular interventions to maintain driving skills and safe driving in MCI individuals. PMID:28082883

  14. Listening: To Thine Own Self Be True

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Michael P.; McLaughlin, David S.; Allison-Roan, Valerie A.

    2014-01-01

    This collaborative self-study examines the impact of taking a listening stance in the collegial relationships and practices of three early-career teacher educators within a small, private liberal arts institution. We consider the consequences of a listening stance on students' experiences of our practices and their education program. In addition,…

  15. Music listening and the experience of surrender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole; Blom, Katarina Mårtenson

    2016-01-01

    , based on analysis of session transcripts and interviews with the participants. The literature review points to the existence of universal elements in the imagery experiences of listeners with different cutural backgrounds. The exploratory study supports the potential of specific music to facilitate......This article explores two fairly independent questions on the psychological and cultural aspects of music listening, focusing on music-evoked imagery in a therapeutic context: 1) Is imagery evoked by listening to selected classical music from the Western tradition always and only determined...... by culture, or can universal aspects of the imagery be observed and identified?; 2) Can imagery evoked by classical music from the Western tradition faciltate modes of surrender in listeners from Western cultures (in which a hypothesized universal, deeply human wish to surrender is often buried in culturally...

  16. Exploring the Causes of Listening Comprehension Anxiety from EFL Saudi Learners’ Perspectives: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Otair

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety is an important factor in foreign language learning. Very few studies have been done on English as a Foreign Language (EFL Saudi students in listening classes. Therefore, this pilot study was aimed at exploring the causes of listening comprehension anxiety from EFL Saudi learners’ perspectives at Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia. The pilot study involved two students who were selected based on the following criteria: 1 Only Saudi male undergraduate students who enrolled in Preparatory Year Program (PYP at Majmaah University would be involved in this study, 2 The students who had studied or lived in native English speaking countries would be excluded. The researcher used pseudonyms to refer to the participants as Mohammad and Ismail. This study employed a qualitative case study research design. The data were collected through Semi-structured interviews with the participants. The interview sessions were audiotaped and transcribed. The results show that the participants experienced a high level of anxiety when doing the listening comprehension tasks. Three main causes of listening comprehension anxiety emerged from this study: 1 the problematic nature of listening comprehension, 2 the classroom atmosphere, and 3 the low English proficiency of the students.

  17. Teaching for Lifelong, Intuitive Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    In general, music listening is often ignored in music programs. When it is taught, it is often in ways that require students to circle the correct answer or identify the instruments. Rather than engaging students' musical minds in intuitive ways, this approach is more a drill in deductive reasoning strictly structured by the teacher. Such learning…

  18. Does Listening to Mozart Affect Listening Ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Becki J.; Punyanunt-Carter, Narissra; Cheah, Tsui Yi; Watson, W. Joe; Rubin, Rebecca B.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable research has been conducted testing Rauscher, Shaw, and Ky's (1993) Mozart Effect (ME). This study attempts to replicate, in part, research that tested the ME on listening comprehension abilities. Also included in this study is an examination of control group issues in current day research. We hypothesized that students who listen to…

  19. Listening across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2014-01-01

    Listening as a skills objective must be emphasized throughout the curriculum of school subjects. There are a variety of learning opportunities which stress the art and skills of listening. In conversation, it might be embarrassing if the sender of the message needs to repeat content due to faulty listening habits. Or, the responder in response…

  20. Listening to Include

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veck, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to make important connections between listening and inclusive education and the refusal to listen and exclusion. Two lines of argument are advanced. First, if educators and learners are to include each other within their educational institutions as unique individuals, then they will need to listen attentively to each other.…

  1. Listening and Message Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Renee

    2011-01-01

    Message interpretation, the notion that individuals assign meaning to stimuli, is related to listening presage, listening process, and listening product. As a central notion of communication, meaning includes (a) denotation and connotation, and (b) content and relational meanings, which can vary in ambiguity and vagueness. Past research on message…

  2. Plato's Philosophy of Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroutunian-Gordon, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    In the article, Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon asks, Did Plato have a philosophy of listening, and if so, what was it? Listening is the counterpart of speaking in a dialogue, and it is no less important. Indeed, learning from the dialogue is less likely to occur as people participate unless listening as well as speaking takes place. Haroutunian-Gordon…

  3. Listening Skills in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grognet, Allene; Van Duzer, Carol

    This article examines the listening process and factors affecting listening. It also suggests general guidelines for teaching and assessing listening and gives examples of activities for practicing and developing listening skills for the workplace. Listening is a demanding process that involves the listener, speaker, message content, and…

  4. 76 FR 8802 - On Behalf of the Accessibility Committee of the Federal CIO Council (29 U.S.C. 794d); Listening...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... ADMINISTRATION On Behalf of the Accessibility Committee of the Federal CIO Council (29 U.S.C. 794d); Listening... of meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a listening session on improving the accessibility of... the first in a series of listening sessions to encourage citizens and employees to express their...

  5. Can a Single Session of a Community-Based Group Exercise Program Combining Step Aerobics and Bodyweight Resistance Exercise Acutely Reduce Blood Pressure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes Romeu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the acute effects of a single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise on blood pressure in healthy young adult women. Twentythree healthy young adult women (aged 31.57 ± 7.87 years participated in two experimental sessions (exercise and control in a crossover study design. Blood pressure was monitored before, immediately after and at 10, 20 and 30 min of recovery. The exercise session consisted of four phases: 1 a warm-up (5 min of dance aerobics; 2 aerobic exercise training (30 min of step aerobics; 3 resistance exercise training (six sets of 12 repetitions of three bodyweight exercises in a circuit mode, 10 min; and 4 a cool-down (5 min of breathing and flexibility exercises; totaling 50 min of duration. Systolic blood pressure after exercise was significantly lower compared to control at the 10th min (-10.83 ± 2.13 vs. -2.6 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009, 20th min (-11.26 ± 2.13 vs. -3.04 ± 2.13 mmHg; p = 0.009 and 30th min of recovery (-10.87 ± 2.39 vs. -0.48 ± 2.39 mmHg; p = 0.004. A single session of a community-based group exercise program combining step aerobics and bodyweight resistance exercise was effective in inducing significant post-exercise hypotension in healthy young adult women. This type of low-cost exercise interventions may have an important role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and in community health promotion.

  6. Impacts of Authentic Listening Tasks upon Listening Anxiety and Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanlioglu, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Although listening is the skill mostly used by students in the classrooms, the desired success cannot be attained in teaching listening since this skill is shaped by multiple variables. In this research we focused on listening anxiety, listening comprehension and impact of authentic tasks on both listening anxiety and listening comprehension.…

  7. Listening to Students: Modification of a Reading Program Based on the Sources of Foreign Language Reading Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belgin Aydin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the modifications implemented in a second year foreign language (FL reading program with respect to the problems students experience while reading in FL. This research draws on the sources of FL reading anxiety identified in the first year reading program with a motivation to re-design the second year program to help the students perceive reading positively free from the anxiety. This paper reports on the responses of students to the modifications implemented in the second year reading program

  8. A Study on Listening Anxiety and Listening Proficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Ju-hong

    2015-01-01

    Three instruments are adopted including the Foreign Language Listening Anxiety Scales (FLLAS), a listening metacog⁃nitive strategy-use questionnaire and a CET-4 listening test. The results indicate that a large proportion of students report experi⁃encing listening anxiety. There is significantly negative correlation between listening anxiety and listening proficiency and there is significant difference in the use of metacognitive strategies across three listening anxiety levels.

  9. Support for International Space University?s (ISU) 2003 Summer Session Program and the Theme Day on ?Living and Working in Space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finarelli, Margaret G.

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 Summer Session Program of the International Space University (ISU) was conducted at the ISU Central Campus in Strasbourg, France, July 5-September 6, 2003. Attending the Summer Session were 114 students from 27 countries including the US. The International Space University (ISU) offers its students a unique and comprehensive educational package covering all disciplines related to space programs and enterprises - space science, space engineering, systems engineering, space policy and law, business and management, and space and society. By providing international graduate students and young space professionals both an intensive interdisciplinary curriculum and also the opportunity to solve complex problems together in an intercultural environment, ISU is preparing the future leaders of the emerging global space community. Since its founding in 1988, ISU has graduated more than 2200 students from 87 countries. Together with hundreds of ISU faculty and lecturers from around the world, ISU alumni comprise an extremely effective network of space professionals and leaders that actively facilitates individual career growth, professional activities and international space cooperation. ISU's interdisciplinary Student Theme Days and Student Workshops are intended to have great educational value for the participants. Along with the interdisciplinary Core Lectures, they apprise the students of state-of-the-art activities, programs and policies in spacefaring nations. They also provide ISU students the opportunity to meet world experts in space-related subjects.

  10. A randomised comparison of two forms of a brief, group, psychoeducational program for cancer patients: weekly sessions versus a "weekend intensive".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, A J; Edmonds, C V; Jenkins, G; Lockwood, G A

    1995-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that brief group psychoeducational programs for cancer patients, offering support and some training in coping skills, may have lasting beneficial effects on mood and quality of life. To compare two different formats of a brief, group psychoeducational program for cancer patients; a standard format of six weekly two-hour sessions or a "weekend intensive," involving the same content and contact time compressed into two days. Cancer patients were randomly assigned to either the standard weekly intervention (n = 77) or the weekend program (n = 79). Two assessment measures were used: Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Functional Living Index for Cancer (FLIC). Assessments were made before and after each intervention and at a nineteen-week follow-up. While the two formats were found to be equivalent in their overall effects on mood and quality of life, there were some differences. There was a sudden, large improvement in mood by the end of the weekend version of the course (2-day time point) but this did not persist, and by the six-week point and again at nineteen-weeks, mood improvement was the same for both groups. Quality of life improvement seemed to be marginally greater with the six-weekly sessions (reaching statistical significance at the 6-week point). The two formats produced similar improvements in both mood and quality of life. We discuss the need for further studies to find optimal ways of presenting such help for different patient groups.

  11. Session Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Cherrill

    2010-02-01

    High-school teachers are amongst the most important contributors to the development of the science and technology workforce of the future. Many of the more than 23,000 US high-school physics teachers are not adequately prepared to teach the subject. Only one-third of them, for example, majored in physics or physics education. Can inadequate teacher preparation be a factor in the poor performance of US students on international assessments of their achievements in science and physics? Since 1995 the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) has been administered four times to many hundreds of thousands of students in over 60 countries. TIMSS is used to measure trends in the mathematics and science knowledge and skills of fourth- and eighth-graders. The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) has been administered three times since 2000, it focuses on 15-year-olds' capabilities in reading literacy, mathematics literacy, and science literacy. TIMSS Advanced (1995) assessed school-leaving students who have had special preparation in advanced mathematics and physics. In all these studies the US students, including the Advanced Placement physics students, scored below the international average, sometimes in the bottom third of countries! Three speakers have been invited to talk about the physics K-12 education systems in other countries, one that consistently scores at the top of the PISA (Finland) or score much higher than the USA on TIMSS ( various Northern European countries) and significantly better on recent bi-lateral comparisons (China). What can we learn from the physics teaching systems in these high-scoring countries that might be applied in the USA? There will be a panel discussion following the 3 invited talks, audience participation will be encouraged. )

  12. Voice training in teacher education: the effect of adding an individualized microteaching session of 30 minutes to the regular 6-hour voice training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, B; Coveliers, Y; Wuyts, F L; Van Looy, L

    2012-09-01

    In a previous study, we investigated the effect of a twofold voice-training module in student teachers. In the present study, the original training module of 3 hours of indirect and 3 hours of direct group training was expanded with a 30-minute individual counseling session for each participant. The main focus was on the effects of this threefold training paradigm on the voice of the participants. The subjects were 81 students at the academic teaching program at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. The trained group (n=51) received the entire voice-training program, whereas the control group (n=30) received no voice training at all. A multidimensional test battery consisting of subjective evaluation and objective measurements was applied to both the groups at the study onset and again 4 months later to assess training results. Other than an improvement in the parameter strain, no significant change was observed for the subjective judgments. Several of the objective parameters did however improve in the trained group only, most significantly in female subjects. The impact of the 30-minute individual counseling session was small and differed for males and females. However, the results support the effectiveness of this training module and favor its introduction in the education of student teachers. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Machine listening intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cella, C. E.

    2017-05-01

    This manifesto paper will introduce machine listening intelligence, an integrated research framework for acoustic and musical signals modelling, based on signal processing, deep learning and computational musicology.

  14. FOR A FREE LISTENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Kittel Pohlmann

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the free music listening, which promotes musical knowledge and listening to the widest range of music, releasing the listener, even if partially, with respect to musical repertoires publicized and praised by the mass communication media. As a theoretical foundation and starting point are considered here the works of Murray Schafer about ear cleaning and Gaston Bachelard about the notion of habit. From these authors in particular and teaching experiences reported here, are summed up here techniques and strategies to implement and encourage alternative forms of freer and mindful music listening.

  15. Listening to Students: Modification of a Reading Program Based on the Sources of Foreign Language Reading Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belgin Aydın

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the modifications implemented in a second year foreign language (FL reading program with respect to the problems students experience while reading in FL. This research draws on the sources of FL reading anxiety identified in the first year reading program with a motivation to re-design the second year program to help the students perceive reading positively free from the anxiety. This paper reports on the responses of students to the modifications implemented in the second year reading program. The participants of the study were 50 FL students who were in their second year at a state university in Turkey. All participants had already taken the first year reading course and were enrolled in the second year reading course. It was based on two qualitative research instruments. The first instrument was a semi-structured questionnaire administered to all participants. The second one was a semi-structured interview conducted with half of the participants to obtain more in depth information concerning the modifications that had been introduced. Both instruments revealed that students responded positively to the modifications introduced. The results of the study put forward that obtaining students’ opinions, giving them responsibility and involving them in decision making processes enhance their motivation, confidence and analytical skills while reading in a foreign language.

  16. RADIO WITHOUT A LISTENER: "MAYAK"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bysko Maxim V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The singularity of this article is that it is entirely based on a critical analysis of only one live musical radio program on the Mayak radio station and dedicated to the life and work of the famous British composer Andrew Lloyd Webber. In principle, the article can be considered a scientific review of the media product. Based on his analysis, the author comes to the paradoxical conclusion that the presence of a listener becomes unnecessary for modern broadcasting. This is stated by many principles of the conduct of the air, presented in the radio program, where all the information load is placed on the guest in the studio, where there is no preparatory work of the DJs, where their inability to navigate the genres of journalism violates communication norms and colloquial ethics, where an obvious deconstructive approach to the material offered for the listener. In addition, the phenomenon of being the DJs in the radio studio exclusively "for themselves" is emphasized by the sound design of the radio program, which runs counter to the logic of auditory perception (for example, the sequence of jingles, as well as the incompetent selection of musical material, which undoubtedly repels professional radio listeners-musicians.

  17. Session: Offshore wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

  18. Listening to depression and suicide risk in medical students: the Healer Education Assessment and Referral (HEAR) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Nancy; Feng, Wendy; Kirby, Brittany; McGuire, Tara; Moutier, Christine; Norcross, William; Norman, Marc; Young, Ilanit; Zisook, Sid

    2014-10-01

    A growing body of literature documents high rates of burnout, depression, and suicidal ideation among physicians and medical students. Barriers to seeking mental health treatment in this group include concerns about time, stigma, confidentiality, and potential career impact. The authors describe a 4-year trial of the Healer Education Assessment and Referral (HEAR) program, designed to increase mental health services utilization (MHSU) and decrease suicide risk (SR) as assessed by an Interactive Screening Program (ISP)at one US medical school. Over a 4-year period, medical students were engaged in face-to-face, campus-wide, educational group programs and were invited to complete an individual, online, and anonymous survey. This survey contained the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) scale to assess depression and items to identify suicidal thoughts and behaviors, substance use, distressing emotional states, and the use of mental health treatment. Students who engaged in this ISP by corresponding electronically with a counselor after completing the survey were assessed and when indicated, referred to further treatment. The HEAR program was delivered to 1,008 medical students. Thirty-four percent (343/1,008) completed the online screening portion. Almost 8 % of respondents met the criteria for high/significant SR upon analysis of the completed screens. Ten out of 13 of the students with SR who dialogued with a counselor were not already receiving mental health treatment, indicating that this anonymous ISP identified a high proportion of an untreated, at risk, and potentially suicidal population. MHSU among medical students who completed the survey was 11.5 % in year 1 and 15.0 % by year 4. SR among medical students was 8.8 % in year 1 and 6.2 % in year 4 as assessed by the ISP. This novel interventional program identified at risk, potentially suicidal medical students at one institution. Based on this single-site experience, we suggest that future

  19. Developing L2 Listening Fluency through Extended Listening-Focused Activities in an Extensive Listening Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna C-S.; Millett, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects on developing L2 listening fluency through doing extended listening-focused activities after reading and listening to audio graded readers. Seventy-six EFL university students read and listened to a total of 15 graded readers in a 15-week extensive listening programme. They were divided into three groups (Group…

  20. On Pretending to Listen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbules, Nicholas C.; Rice, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: This article is part of a series of studies carried out by the authors in this special issue on the general topic of listening and its specific relevance to teaching. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: We examine the common activity of pretending to listen and argue that thinking about it carefully reveals some…

  1. Effects of A Thai Traditional Music Listening Program on Acute Pain Alleviation and Early Ambulation among Patients during the First 48 hours after Open Abdominal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phanicha Phosida

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: To study the effects of listening to a Thai traditional music program on acute pain alleviation among patients during the first 48 hours after open abdominal surgery. Objective: A cross over research design in adult patients’ aged 18-60 years at Siriraj Hospital. Methods: The sample was selected by purposive sampling based on inclusion criteria and assigned into the following two groups by simple random sampling: the group receiving the Thai traditional music program (experimental group and the group receiving routine care (control group. This study employed a cross over design with 44 samples in a private surgical ward at Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok. Pain was assessed before and after the intervention. Data were collected by the following three sets of instruments: 1 the demographic and treatment background form; 2 the Thai Short - Form McGill Pain Questionnaire with the vital sign form and 3 the post abdominal surgery early ambulation form. Results: The patients in the experimental group had lower mean pain descriptor scores, mean present pain intensity scores and mean Visual Analog Scale scores after the Thai traditional music program than before the intervention at 48 hours after abdominal surgery with statistical significance (t = 14.11, t = 17.41 and t = 16.47 (p < .001, respectively. When compared between groups, the patients in the experimental group had lower mean pain descriptor scores, mean present pain intensity scores and mean Visual Analog Scale scores than the control group at 48 hours with statistical significance (F = 138.71, F = 170 and F = 298.97 (p < .001, respectively. Furthermore, on the first and second postoperative days as well as the sum of both days, the experimental group was also found to have better early ambulation mean scores than the control group with statistical significance (F = 10.67, p < .002, F = 41.36, p < .001, F = 44.47, p < .001, respectively. Conclusion: The findings suggest that a Thai

  2. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  3. Session: Geopressured-Geothermal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelacic, Allan J.; Eaton, Ben A.; Shook, G. Michael; Birkinshaw, Kelly; Negus-de Wys, Jane

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Overview of Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Allan J. Jelacic; ''Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market'' by Ben A. Eaton; ''Reservoir Modeling and Prediction at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir'' by G. Michael Shook; ''Survey of California Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Kelly Birkinshaw; and ''Technology Transfer, Reaching the Market for Geopressured-Geothermal Resources'' by Jane Negus-de Wys.

  4. Session: Reservoir Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

  5. Listening styles of undergraduate health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T; Boyle, M J; Williams, B; Molloy, A; McKenna, L; Palermo, C; Lewis, B; Molloy, L

    2010-11-01

    Concerns about poor communication in the medical and other healthcare professions are common in the empirical literature, with studies showing direct relationships between practitioners' effective listening and patients' satisfaction and less risk of litigation. Furthermore, people do not simply listen or not listen, rather they adopt particular listening styles, making the understanding and investigation of practitioner communication a complex topic. The objective of this study was to identify the listening styles of undergraduate health science students enrolled at one Australian university. A cross-sectional study using a paper-based version of the Listening Styles Profile (LSP-16) was administered to a cohort of students enrolled in undergraduate education programs in eight different health disciplines: emergency health (paramedics), nursing, midwifery, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, nursing/emergency health dual degree, health science and nutrition and dietetics. The LSP-16 is a validated and reliable scale that assesses participants' preferences for each of four distinct listening style constructs. There were 1459 health students eligible for inclusion in the study. Ethics approval was granted. A total of 860 students participated in the study (response rate of 58%), of whom 87.2% (n=750) were female. Across the group, a strong preference was shown for the People Listening Style (LS), which is a listening style characterised by a concern for people's feelings and emotions. Otherwise, an unexpected amount of homogeneity in preferred listening style was found within the group of health science students. Female students reported a slightly stronger preference for the People LS, whereas males reported slightly stronger preferences for the Action LS and Content LS. There were no statistical differences in preference for LS by students' age or year level of undergraduate enrolment. The health professional student participants of this study reported a

  6. Listening Journals for Extensive and Intensive Listening Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Anthony Schmidt presents results from his research on listening instruction in a second language. Schmidt reveals that throughout the history of English language teaching (ELT), most students have never been taught how to listen. It was not just listening, but the need to do this listening in conjunction with an approach that…

  7. Sessions and Session Types: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezani-Ciancaglini, Mariangiola; de'Liguoro, Ugo

    We illustrate the concepts of sessions and session types as they have been developed in the setting of the π-calculus. Motivated by the goal of obtaining a formalisation closer to existing standards and aiming at their enhancement and strengthening, several extensions of the original core system have been proposed, which we survey together with the embodying of sessions into functional and object-oriented languages, as well as some implementations.

  8. 1:1 Device Programs Best Practices in K-12 Education: Fiscal Year 2016 Report to the Legislature. As Required by Minnesota 2015 Special Session Law, House File 1, Article 6, Section 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    As required by Minnesota 2015 Special Session Law, House File 1, Article 6, Section 8, the commissioner of Education must research existing one device to one student (1:1) device programs in Minnesota and across the country to determine best practices for Minnesota schools implementing 1:1 device programs. The commissioner must develop and publish…

  9. Post-Session Authentication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jensen, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    . In this paper, we consider the case of post-session authentication, where parties authenticate each other at the end of their interactive session. This use of authentication is different from session-less authentication (e.g., in RFID) and pre-session authentication (e.g., for access control.) Post...

  10. Native listening: The flexibility dimension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.

    2012-01-01

    The way we listen to spoken language is tailored to the specific benefit of native-language speech input. Listening to speech in non-native languages can be significantly hindered by this native bias. Is it possible to determine the degree to which a listener is listening in a native-like manner?

  11. Listening in the Integrated Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2012-01-01

    The writer, serving as university supervisor of student teachers in the public schools for thirty years, assessed pupil listening quality in observational visits made. The art of listening definitely needs improvement and teachers, regardless of academic subject matter taught, must aid pupils in listening achievement. Good listening habits are…

  12. Towards a semiotics of listening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo

    2014-01-01

    A study of listening as active participation, focusing on the use of listening shots in films and piano and drums accompaniment in jazz music......A study of listening as active participation, focusing on the use of listening shots in films and piano and drums accompaniment in jazz music...

  13. Mobile Music Listening Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Detry, Lionel; Music, Digitisation, Mediation. Towards Interdisciplinary Music Studies

    2013-01-01

    This poster presents my PhD research about the appropriation of the practice of mobile music listening. Following an exploratory phase, I have described and interpreted some of the salient characteristics of that practice. It broadly shows that it is an automatic, background, unfocused listening used as an accompaniment to another activity. The music is therefore functional: it helps to relax, change mood, block unwanted sounds (or people), make non-places (Augé, 1992) more pleasant. This ban...

  14. Measuring the effect of signal-to-noise ratio on listening fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baselmans, R.; Van Schijndel, N.H.; Duisters, R.P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, by using modern means of communication, people tend to talk longer with each other. This may result in listening fatigue, which hampers cognitive performance. Twenty-four subjects listened to English texts, and answered questions about the text, in two sessions.There was background babble

  15. Hearsay: A Text for Listening. English for Special Purposes Series: Nursing Aide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Marybeth; Hubbard, Katherine E.

    This is the student handbook for the listening comprehension portion of a course in English as a second language for adult nursing aide students. Eleven units cover basic nursing skills. Each unit consists of combinations of stories, lectures, and dictations read by the teacher often with visual aids. There are "practice listening" sessions and…

  16. The Importance of Teaching Listening

    OpenAIRE

    Hattingh, Stephen

    2014-01-01

     This research paper is a review of current listening teaching practice and the support of this practice by research in second language acquisition. Current language teaching places a strong emphasis on the importance of teaching listening as compared to the minor role listening was given in previous approaches to language teaching. Furthermore, prominent researchers in language teaching are beginning to suggest that as important as developing listening as a skill is, listening for acquisitio...

  17. Influence of ambient music on perceived exertion during a pulmonary rehabilitation session: a randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reychler, Gregory; Mottart, Florian; Boland, Maelle; Wasterlain, Emmanuelle; Pieters, Thierry; Caty, Gilles; Liistro, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is a key element in the treatment of COPD. Music has been shown to have a positive effect on parameters related to a decrease in exercise tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of listening to ambient music on perceived exertion during a pulmonary rehabilitation session for COPD subjects. COPD subjects randomly performed a session of pulmonary rehabilitation with or without ambient music. Perceived exertion (Borg scales), anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety Subscale), dyspnea (visual analog scale), and cardiorespiratory parameters were compared at the end of both sessions. Forty-one subjects were analyzed. The characteristics of the COPD subjects were as follows: age, 70.5 ± 8.4 y; body mass index, 22.7 ± 3.9 kg/m(2); and FEV1, 38.6 ± 12.5 % predicted. Perceived exertion was not modified by ambient music, but anxiety was improved (P = .02). Dyspnea, fatigue and cardiorespiratory parameters were not influenced by music during a typical session of the pulmonary rehabilitation program. This study demonstrates that perceived exertion during one pulmonary rehabilitation session was not influenced by ambient music. However, a positive effect on anxiety was observed. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT01833260.). Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  18. Is it possible to improve hearing by listening training?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Karen

    2011-01-01

    to receive). Listening training methods claim to benefit a wide variety of people, e.g. people having learning disabilities, developmental delay or concentration problems. Sound therapists report about improved hearing/ listening curves following listening training programs. No independent research study has......Different listening training methods exist, which are based on the assumption that people can be trained to process incoming sound more effectively. It is often distinguished between the terms hearing (=passive reception of sound) and listening (=active process of tuning in to those sounds we wish...... confirmed these results using standardized hearing test measures. Dr. Alfred Tomatis, a French ear nose throat doctor, developed the Tomatis listening training in the 1950s. The principles of the Tomatis method are described. A literature review has been conducted to investigate, whether the Tomatis method...

  19. Speaking and Listening Skills. Make the Parent Connection! Leader Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moke, Susan, Ed.; Shermis, Michael, Ed.

    This manual is a resource book for organizers and leaders and parent groups who want to explore specific strategies to use in helping children become more articulate speakers and more attentive listeners. The guide contains material necessary to conduct a 1- or 1.5-hour session on how parents can help children develop good speaking and listening…

  20. 75 FR 54414 - On Behalf of the Accessibility Committee of the U.S. Council of CIOs; 29 U.S.C. 794d; Listening...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION On Behalf of the Accessibility Committee of the U.S. Council of CIOs; 29 U.S.C. 794d; Listening.... ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a listening session being conducted in response... Office of Governmentwide Policy and the U.S. Access Board, is holding the first in a series of listening...

  1. Active Listening Improve Your Ability to Listen and Lead

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership

    2011-01-01

    Active listening is a person's willingness and ability to hear and understand. At its core, active listening is a state of mind that involves paying full and careful attention to the other person, avoiding premature judgment, reflecting understanding, clarifying information, summarizing, and sharing. By learning and committing to the skills and behaviors of active listening, leaders can become more effective listeners and, over time, improve their ability to lead.

  2. Mindful Music Listening Instruction Increases Listening Sensitivity and Enjoyment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William Todd

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of mindful listening instruction on music listening sensitivity and music listening enjoyment. A pretest--posttest control group design was used. Participants, fourth-grade students (N = 42) from an elementary school in a large city in the Northeastern United States, were randomly assigned to two…

  3. Breakthrough Listen on MWA Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, S.; Siemion, A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Tremblay, S.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a pilot study, using the Voltage Capture System, for Breakthrough Listen on the MWA. Breakthrough Listen (BL) is a major new project that aims to dramatically improve the coverage of parameter space in the search for intelligent life beyond Earth. BL has already deployed hardware and software to the Green Bank Telescope, and will bring a similar program with the Parkes Telescope online in the second half of 2016. The low frequency sky is however currently very poorly explored. The superb capabilities of the MWA (large field of view, low frequency of operation, and location in a very radio quiet site) provide a unique opportunity for a pilot study to obtain voltage data for a SETI (Search For Extraterrestrial Intelligence) study of the Galactic Plane. We propose commensal observations, piggybacking on the proposed pulsar search of Tremblay et al. Using existing VCS software, combined with the pipeline developed for Breakthrough Listen at GBT and Parkes, we will perform a blind search for candidate signals from extraterrestrial intelligence. Although the chances of a detection are not large, particularly for a pilot study such as that proposed here, the Breakthrough Listen team plan to perform extensive testing and analysis on the data obtained which should be useful for other users of the MWA VCS. We will make the secondary SETI data products and associated documentation available as a resource to the community via the Breakthrough Listen online archive.

  4. Listen to a voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2001-01-01

    Listen to the voice of a young girl Lonnie, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 16. Imagine that she is deeply involved in the social security system. She lives with her mother and two siblings in a working class part of a small town. She is at a special school for problematic youth, and her...

  5. Embodied Music Listening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2017-01-01

    The chapter presents the receptive music therapy model "Guided Imagery of Music (GIM)" as an embodied way of music listening with documented effects on a number of physiological and psychological symptoms and problems. Relaxation, guiding and (classical) music stimulates and supports the work...

  6. Listening Is for Acting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    Interpersonal communication researchers have not only tended to ignore the role that listening plays in face-to-face interaction, they have also viewed message production and message processing as distinct processes. The message production-message processing bipolarity is belied by recent research suggesting that mirror neurons subserving speech…

  7. ACADIA 2010 konference: listener

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Karmon, Ayelet

    2010-01-01

    in the Listener project. Firstly, the paper presents the design strategy leading to the development of bespoke interfaces between parametric design and CNC based textile fabrication. Secondly, by integrating structural and actuated materials the paper presents the making of a new class of materials...

  8. Factors of the active listening of preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purić Daliborka S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Active listening is a communication skill which is crucial for the development of cooperative relationships in the group, culture of friendship and fellowship, it is also important for the development of literacy skills and talent for speaking. Furthermore, it contributes to the improvement of the level of knowledge, skills and school achievement, as well as to the development of self-confidence of children. Developing of active listening is an important task in the activities with children of preschool age. In this paper, the author, wanting to determine the importance of the factors of active listening of preschool children, examines how preschool teachers (N = 198: (a evaluate the importance of certain elements of active listening that relate to the speaker and the listener, and (b estimate their role in the process of developing active listening skills of preschool children as an essential element of successful interpersonal communication. Results of the survey show that preschool teachers attach greater importance to the factors of active listening related to the listener (attention, listening skill, interest in the subject, than to the factors related to the speaker (motivation for listening, quality of the narrative. More than two-thirds of surveyed preschool teachers (172 or 86.9% define its impact on the stimulation of active listening of children as significant. Work experience and professional qualifications as independent variables significantly influence the attitudes of preschool teachers about the importance of their impact in stimulating active listening. Preschool teacher is a key element of the training of preschool children in the area of the basic communication skills of active listening. In this sense, the results of our survey show that in the context of academic study programs for education of preschool teachers special attention is given to the communication skills and to their role in the development of active listening

  9. A Constructivist Approach to Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleson, Brant R.

    2011-01-01

    This article develops a constructivist perspective on listening skill. Listening is conceptualized as "a process that involves the interpretation of messages that others have intentionally transmitted in the effort to understand those messages and respond to them appropriately." This definition allows listening to be understood both as a mindful…

  10. Importance of Effective Listening Infomercial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2009-01-01

    This article details an activity intended for use in a course with a unit on effective listening, including listening courses, public speaking, and interpersonal communication. Students will explain the importance of effective and active listening for a target audience by producing an infomercial for a product or service which they design.

  11. AN EVALUATION OF TURKISH EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN TERMS OF LISTENING SKILLS TÜRKÇE ÖĞRETİM PROGRAMLARININ DİNLEME BECERİSİ BAKIMINDAN DEĞERLENDİRİLMESİ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat ÖZBAY

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to determine the extent to which listening skills, usually neglected in the literature, are covered in the primary and secondary school Turkish curricula from the beginning of the Republic. It is of qualitative design. In the present study the extent to which listening skills are covered in the primary and secondary level Turkish education programs is examined. In the evaluation, it has been determined that listening is "an ignored skill" as in the west; however with the 1968 program, this skill was considered within the scope of Turkish education; although the significance of listening has been recognized it is still neglected when compared with other skills. Bu çalışmanın amacı, literatürde ihmal edilmiş beceri şeklinde nitelenen dinlemeye, cumhuriyetin ilanından bugüne ilköğretim birinci ve ikinci kademede yürütülen Türkçe derslerine yönelik hazırlanan öğretim programlarında ne ölçüde yer verildiğini tespit etmektedir. Bu çalışma nitel bir araştırmadır. Çalışmada yürürlüğe konan birinci ve ikinci kademe Türkçe öğretim programlarında dinleme becerisine ne oranda yer verildiği incelenmiştir. Değerlendirmede batıda söylendiği gibi ülkemizde de dinlemenin “ihmal edilen bir beceri” olduğu ancak 1968 yılındaki programla becerinin, Türkçe eğitim ve öğretimi içinde düşünüldüğü; dinlemenin günümüzde öneminin anlaşılmasına rağmen diğer beceriler göz önüne alındığında hâlen göz ardı edildiği sonucuna ulaşılmıştır.

  12. A listening skill educational intervention for pediatric rehabilitation clinicians: A mixed-methods pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian; Servais, Michelle; Shepherd, Tracy A; Willoughby, Colleen; Bolack, Linda; Moodie, Sheila; Baldwin, Patricia; Strachan, Deborah; Knickle, Kerry; Pinto, Madhu; Parker, Kathryn; McNaughton, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    To prepare for an RCT by examining the effects of an educational intervention on the listening skills of pediatric rehabilitation clinicians, piloting study procedures, and investigating participants' learning experiences. Six experienced clinicians received the intervention, consisting of video simulations and solution-focused coaching regarding personal listening goals. Self- and observer-rated measures of listening skill were completed and qualitative information was gathered in interviews and a member checking session. Significant change on self-reported listening skills was found from pre- to post-test and/or follow-up. The pilot provided useful information to improve the study protocol, including the addition of an initial orientation to listening skills. Participants found the intervention to be a highly valuable and intense learning experience, and reported immediate changes to their clinical and interprofessional practice. The educational intervention has the potential to be an effective means to enhance the listening skills of practicing pediatric rehabilitation clinicians.

  13. Multiparty session types as coherence proofs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Marco; Montesi, Fabrizio; Montesi, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    We propose a Curry–Howard correspondence between a language for programming multiparty sessions and a generalisation of Classical Linear Logic (CLL). In this framework, propositions correspond to the local behaviour of a participant in a multiparty session type, proofs to processes, and proof nor...

  14. Intelligibility of foreign-accented speech: Effects of listening condition, listener age, and listener hearing status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sarah Hargus

    2005-09-01

    It is well known that, for listeners with normal hearing, speech produced by non-native speakers of the listener's first language is less intelligible than speech produced by native speakers. Intelligibility is well correlated with listener's ratings of talker comprehensibility and accentedness, which have been shown to be related to several talker factors, including age of second language acquisition and level of similarity between the talker's native and second language phoneme inventories. Relatively few studies have focused on factors extrinsic to the talker. The current project explored the effects of listener and environmental factors on the intelligibility of foreign-accented speech. Specifically, monosyllabic English words previously recorded from two talkers, one a native speaker of American English and the other a native speaker of Spanish, were presented to three groups of listeners (young listeners with normal hearing, elderly listeners with normal hearing, and elderly listeners with hearing impairment; n=20 each) in three different listening conditions (undistorted words in quiet, undistorted words in 12-talker babble, and filtered words in quiet). Data analysis will focus on interactions between talker accent, listener age, listener hearing status, and listening condition. [Project supported by American Speech-Language-Hearing Association AARC Award.

  15. Is it possible to improve hearing by listening training?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter Andersen, Karen

    2011-01-01

    to receive). Listening training methods claim to benefit a wide variety of people, e.g. people having learning disabilities, developmental delay or concentration problems. Sound therapists report about improved hearing/ listening curves following listening training programs. No independent research study has......Different listening training methods exist, which are based on the assumption that people can be trained to process incoming sound more effectively. It is often distinguished between the terms hearing (=passive reception of sound) and listening (=active process of tuning in to those sounds we wish...... is based on assumptions, which scientifically hold. The results of the literature study are discussed. A research study is proposed,in which the effects of the Tomatis method on hearing will be investigated using both conventional hearing threshold measurements and objective measures such as otoacoustic...

  16. The Public Poster Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine-Rasky, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    This note describes the use of a student poster session as an innovative approach to student learning. The local context for the assignment is provided, followed by a description of the course for which the poster was prepared, details about the assignment including its evaluation, and practical considerations for planning a poster session. The…

  17. Senior radio listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaakilde, Anne Leonora

    media platforms, not the least when listening to radio. The elder generation is no exception from this. Recently, for instance, the Danish public broadcast DR has carried out an exodus of programmes targeted for the senior segment. These programmes are removed from regular FM and sent to DAB receivers......Radiobroadcasting and the hardware materialization of radio have during the 20th century changed significantly, which means that senior radio listeners have travelled along with this evolution from large, impressive radio furnitures to DAB and small, wireless, mobile devices, and from grave...... and solemn radio voices to lightharted, laughing and chatting speakers. Senior radio listerners have experienced the development and refinements of technique, content and genres. It is now expected of all media users that they are capable of crossing media, combining, juggling and jumping between various...

  18. Listening to Musical Performers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron Edidin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the philosophy of music and in musicology, apart from ethnomusicology, there is a long tradition of focus on musical compositions as objects of inquiry. But in both disciplines, a body of recent work focuses on the place of performance in the making of music. Most of this work, however, still takes for granted that compositions, at least in Western art music, are the primary objects of aesthetic attention. In this paper I focus on aesthetic attention to the performing activity itself. I begin by roughly characterizing what is involved in attending to the performing activity of musical performers. I then argue that such attention is essential to the full appreciation of the central compositions of the Western art music canon. Finally, I argue that, often enough, recordings provide a suitable vehicle for this sort of attention; listeners to recordings can use them to listen to musical performance.

  19. The effectiveness of music listening in reducing depressive symptoms in adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Moon Fai; Wong, Zi Yang; Thayala, N V

    2011-12-01

    We aim to review trials of the effectiveness of music listening in reducing depressive symptoms in adults, and identify areas requiring further study. Little is known about the efficacy of music listening in the mediation of depressive symptoms. We systematically search 9 databases and reviewed 17 studies included randomized controlled and quasi-experimental trails of music listening in reducing depressive symptoms in adults. The Joanna Briggs Institute-Meta Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument was used for quality assessment of included studies. Music listening over a period of time helps to reduce depressive symptoms in the adult population. Daily intervention does not seem to be superior over weekly intervention and it is recommended that music listening session be conducted repeatedly over a time span of more than 3weeks to allow an accumulative effect to occur. All types of music can be used as listening material, depending on the preferences of the listener. So, it is recommended that the listeners are given choices over the kind of music which they listen to. There is a need to conduct more studies, which replicate the designs used in the existing studies that met the inclusion criteria, on the level of efficacy of music listening on the reduction of depressive symptoms for a more accurate meta-analysis of the findings and reflect with greater accuracy the significant effects that music has on the level of depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of High Versus Low Teacher Affect and Passive Versus Active Student Activity During Music Listening on Preschool Children's Attention, Piece Preference, Time Spent Listening, and Piece Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Wendy L.

    1986-01-01

    Small-group listening lessons and subsequent individual posttests were used to judge 94 three- through five-year-old subjects' attention, paired-comparison piece preference, time spent listening, and piece recognition. Research procedures included a modified multiple baseline design and split-screen video taping of instructional sessions.…

  1. Embodied Music Listening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2017-01-01

    The chapter presents the receptive music therapy model "Guided Imagery of Music (GIM)" as an embodied way of music listening with documented effects on a number of physiological and psychological symptoms and problems. Relaxation, guiding and (classical) music stimulates and supports the work......, underlying theories, selected research/evidence and illustrative clinical vignettes. Based on a study of cancer survivors’ GIM therapy, grounded theories of the therapeutic process and music’s role in the process are presented and discussed....

  2. What makes listening difficult? Factors affecting second language listening comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    LANGUAGE © 2010 University of Maryland. All rights reserved. June 2010 46 anaphora (e.g., Speaker 1: I hope Henry managed to catch his flight...Chang, A. C., & Read, J. (2006). The effects of listening support on the listening performance of EFL learners. TESOL Quarterly, 40(2), 375–420...Hong Kong. Chiang, C. S., & Dunkel, P. (1992). The effect of speech modification, prior knowledge, and listening proficiency on EFL lecture learning

  3. Investigating the listening construct underlying listening-to-summarize tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Rukthong, Anchana; Brunfaut, Tineke

    2016-01-01

    Integrated-test tasks, which combine receptive and productive language skills in task performance, e.g., listening-speaking or listening-reading-speaking, are increasingly being used in second language assessment, including in high-stakes English exams such as the TOEFL iBT and PTE Academic. Although recent studies (Plakans, 2008; Sawaki, Quinlan, & Lee, 2013) have found that the construct of each individual skill involved in task performance (e.g., listening, reading, and writing) is present...

  4. Outcome Evaluation of "Family Eats": An Eight-Session Web-Based Program Promoting Healthy Home Food Environments and Dietary Behaviors for African American Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Thompson, Debbe; Chen, Tzu-An

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of a randomized clinical trial evaluating the eight-session "Family Eats" web-based intervention promoting healthy home food environments for African American families. African American families (n = 126) with 8- to 12-year-old children completed online baseline questionnaires and were randomized into…

  5. Institutional computing (IC) information session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Kenneth R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lally, Bryan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-19

    The LANL Institutional Computing Program (IC) will host an information session about the current state of unclassified Institutional Computing at Los Alamos, exciting plans for the future, and the current call for proposals for science and engineering projects requiring computing. Program representatives will give short presentations and field questions about the call for proposals and future planned machines, and discuss technical support available to existing and future projects. Los Alamos has started making a serious institutional investment in open computing available to our science projects, and that investment is expected to increase even more.

  6. Newnes short wave listening handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pritchard, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Short Wave Listening Handbook is a guide for starting up in short wave listening (SWL). The book is comprised of 15 chapters that discuss the basics and fundamental concepts of short wave radio listening. The coverage of the text includes electrical principles; types of signals that can be heard in the radio spectrum; and using computers in SWL. The book also covers SWL equipment, such as receivers, converters, and circuits. The text will be of great use to individuals who want to get into short wave listening.

  7. State of the Context: Listening in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Melissa L.; Gill-Rosier, Jennifer; Tate, Jeanine; Matten, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Educational listening research in the last 80 years covers a broad spectrum. Early research investigated the amount of time spent listening. Later studies identified students' comprehension of oral material. Aspects most often researched fall into the following categories: listening elicitation, listening benefits, and listening instruction.…

  8. Instructional Improvement Listening Handbook. Secondary Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapse, Larry

    Stressing that the importance of listening carefully cannot be underestimated, this handbook describes the process of listening (including the five components--previous knowledge, listening material, physiological activity, attention, and intellectual activity), some barriers to efficient listening, and bad and good listening habits. It also…

  9. Loud Music Listening

    OpenAIRE

    Petrescu, Nicolae

    2008-01-01

    Over the past four decades, there has been increasing interest in the effects of music listening on hearing. The purpose of this paper is to review published studies that detail the noise levels, the potential effects (e.g. noise-induced hearing loss), and the perceptions of those affected by music exposure in occupational and non-occupational settings. The review employed Medline, PubMed, PsychINFO, and the World Wide Web to find relevant studies in the scientific literature. Considered in t...

  10. Effects of listening comprehension training on listening and reading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarnoutse, C.A.J.; Van den Bos, K.P.; Brand-Gruwel, S.

    1998-01-01

    In this study the effects of providing text strategy instruction in a listening mode on listening and reading comprehension of experimental and control groups of 9- to 11-year-old poor readers were examined. All students were very poor in decoding and poor in reading comprehension. In addition, half

  11. A listening test system for automotive audio - listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choisel, Sylvain; Hegarty, Patrick; Christensen, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted in order to validate an experimental procedure to perform listening tests on car audio systems in a simulation of the car environment in a laboratory, using binaural synthesis with head-tracking. Seven experts and 40 non-expert listeners rated a range...

  12. Effectiveness of Music Listening in Patients With Total Knee Replacement During CPM Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Chung; Chen, Wei-Ming; Chen, Su-Ru; Tseng, Yen-Ting; Lin, Pi-Chu

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of music listening on the anxiety, heart rate variability (HRV), and joint range of motion (ROM) of patients undergoing continuous passive motion (CPM) after total knee replacement surgery. An experimental design was used. Participants in the experimental group (n = 49) listened to music from 10 min before receiving CPM until the end of the session (25 min in total) on the first and second day following surgery, whereas participants in the control group (n = 42) did not listen to music but rested quietly in bed starting 10 min before and throughout CPM. Compared with the control group, the experimental group exhibited significantly lower anxiety levels (p Music listening can effectively reduce patient anxiety and enhance the ROM of their joints during postoperative rehabilitation. Health-care practitioners should consider including music listening as a routine practice for postoperative rehabilitation following orthopedic surgery. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. The Listening and Spoken Language Data Repository: Design and Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradham, Tamala S.; Fonnesbeck, Christopher; Toll, Alice; Hecht, Barbara F.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the Listening and Spoken Language Data Repository (LSL-DR) was to address a critical need for a systemwide outcome data-monitoring program for the development of listening and spoken language skills in highly specialized educational programs for children with hearing loss highlighted in Goal 3b of the 2007 Joint Committee…

  14. Listening in the Language Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2015-01-01

    The process of acquiring language is often depicted as a tiered process of oral development: listening and speaking; and, literacy development: reading, and writing. As infants we first learn language by listening, then speaking. That is, regardless of culture, or dialect we are first immersed in language in this oral context. It is only after one…

  15. Music Listening as Music Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Charles D.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most fundamental, ongoing debates in music education involves scholars who argue for a "performance-based" curriculum and those who promote a curriculum that is fundamentally "aesthetic-listening based." Rather than arguing for the primacy of either performance or listening as a basis for a music education curriculum, the paper attempts…

  16. L2 listening at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Charlotte

    as a corporate language, listen in Danish at work, how they handle these situations, what problems they experience, and why some situations are more difficult to listen in than others. The study makes use of qualitative research methods and theoretical aspects from psycholinguistic approaches as well as socially...

  17. Working session 3: Tubing integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, C. [Tecnatom, S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain); Strosnider, J. [NRC, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Twenty-three individuals representing nine countries (Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, France, Japan, the Slovak Republic, Spain, the UK, and the US) participated in the session on tube integrity. These individuals represented utilities, vendors, consultants and regulatory authorities. The major subjects discussed by the group included overall objectives of managing steam generator tube degradation, necessary elements of a steam generator degradation management program, the concept of degradation specific management, structural integrity evaluations, leakage evaluations, and specific degradation mechanisms. The group`s discussions on these subjects, including conclusions and recommendations, are summarized in this article.

  18. Professional musicians listen differently to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikutta, C A; Maissen, G; Altorfer, A; Strik, W; Koenig, T

    2014-05-30

    Experience-based adaptation of emotional responses is an important faculty for cognitive and emotional functioning. Professional musicians represent an ideal model in which to elicit experience-driven changes in the emotional processing domain. The changes of the central representation of emotional arousal due to musical expertise are still largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the electroencephalogram (EEG) correlates of experience-driven changes in the domain of emotional arousal. Therefore, the differences in perceived (subjective arousal via ratings) and physiologically measured (EEG) arousal between amateur and professional musicians were examined. A total of 15 professional and 19 amateur musicians listened to the first movement of Ludwig van Beethoven's 5th symphony (duration=∼7.4min), during which a continuous 76-channel EEG was recorded. In a second session, the participants evaluated their emotional arousal during listening. In a tonic analysis, we examined the average EEG data over the time course of the music piece. For a phasic analysis, a fast Fourier transform was performed and covariance maps of spectral power were computed in association with the subjective arousal ratings. The subjective arousal ratings of the professional musicians were more consistent than those of the amateur musicians. In the tonic EEG analysis, a mid-frontal theta activity was observed in the professionals. In the phasic EEG, the professionals exhibited an increase of posterior alpha, central delta, and beta rhythm during high arousal. Professionals exhibited different and/or more intense patterns of emotional activation when they listened to the music. The results of the present study underscore the impact of music experience on emotional reactions. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of captioning texts and caption ordering on L2 listening comprehension and vocabulary learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Alikhani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of captioned texts on second/foreign (L2 listening comprehension and vocabulary gains using a computer multimedia program. Additionally, it explored the caption ordering effect (i.e. captions displayed during the first or second listening, and the interaction of captioning order with the L2 proficiency level of language learners in listening comprehension and vocabulary performance. To these ends, a computer software program was designed and 200 EFL learners (100 high-intermediate and 100 low-intermediate level students were asked to participate in the experiment. They were randomly assigned into four groups: captioned (listening to texts twice with captions, noncaptioned (listening to texts twice without captions, first captioned (listening to texts first with captions and then without captions, and second captioned (listening to texts first without captions and then with captions groups. They listened to four audio texts (i.e. short stories twice and took the listening and vocabulary tests, administered through the software. Results from t-tests and two-way ANOVAs showed that the captioned stories were more effective than the non-captioned ones. Moreover, the caption ordering had no significant effect on the participants' L2 listening comprehension and vocabulary performance. Finally, L2 proficiency level differences did not affect performance derived from caption ordering.

  20. Session 7: Reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, R.; Crockford, G

    2001-07-01

    The reserve session was devoted to some issues that came up through the workshop, which were grouped into three main areas: The Global Accelerator Network, Problems of stress and how to get organized to minimize them, What should an operations group be responsible for? This paper summarizes the discussions that took place. (author)

  1. Poster Session- Extended Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack D. Alexander III; Jean Findley; Brenda K. Kury; Jan L. Beyers; Douglas S. Cram; Terrell T. Baker; Jon C. Boren; Carl Edminster; Sue A. Ferguson; Steven McKay; David Nagel; Trent Piepho; Miriam Rorig; Casey Anderson; Jeanne Hoadley; Paulette L. Ford; Mark C. Andersen; Ed L. Fredrickson; Joe Truett; Gary W. Roemer; Brenda K. Kury; Jennifer Vollmer; Christine L. May; Danny C. Lee; James P. Menakis; Robert E. Keane; Zhi-Liang Zhu; Carol Miller; Brett Davis; Katharine Gray; Ken Mix; William P. Kuvlesky Jr.; D. Lynn Drawe; Marcia G. Narog; Roger D. Ottmar; Robert E. Vihnanek; Clinton S. Wright; Timothy E. Paysen; Burton K. Pendleton; Rosemary L. Pendleton; Carleton S. White; John Rogan; Doug Stow; Janet Franklin; Jennifer Miller; Lisa Levien; Chris Fischer; Emma Underwood; Robert Klinger; Peggy Moore; Clinton S. Wright

    2008-01-01

    Titles found within Poster Session-Extended Abstracts include:Assessment of emergency fire rehabilitation of four fires from the 2000 fire season on the Vale, Oregon, BLM district: review of the density sampling materials and methods: p. 329 Growth of regreen, seeded for erosion control, in the...

  2. Summary of Session 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, J. [Universitaet Bielefeld, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Bielefeld (Germany)]. E-mail: fl@physik.uni-bielefeld.de

    2004-11-21

    In Session 3, the speakers were dealing with the following topics: Automatization of Feynman Diagram Calculations (FDC), Event generators, Analytical approaches to FDC and various Mathematical innovations related to different physical problems. A more general, 'brainstorming', talk was given by J. Vermaseren as first talk.

  3. The outreach sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trache, Livius [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2015-02-24

    These are moderator’s remarks about the outreach day in the middle of the CSSP14, and in particular about the afternoon outreach session in round table format with the announced theme: “CERN at 60 and the internationalization of science”.

  4. Enhancing Listener Strategies Using a Payoff Matrix in Speech-on-speech Masking Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-03

    quite similar at first glance, especially for color responses, except that while one listener is reporting the tar- get words ( circles ), the other... circles ), masker (M, squares), and other (O, diamonds) responses for the same-talker condition for the listener who reported the fewest (S1, open symbols... listener strategies using a payoff matrix in speech-on-speech masking experiments 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  5. Survey of college students' MP3 listening: Habits, safety issues, attitudes, and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Alicia; Krishnamurti, Sridhar

    2010-06-01

    To survey listening habits and attitudes of typical college students who use MP3 players and to investigate possible safety issues related to MP3 player listening. College students who were frequent MP3 player users (N = 428) filled out a 30-item online survey. Specific areas probed by the present survey included frequency and duration of MP3 player use, MP3 player volume levels used, types of earphones used, typical environments in which MP3 player was worn, specific activities related to safety while listening to MP3 players, and attitudes toward MP3 player use. The majority of listeners wore MP3 players for less than 2 hr daily at safe volume levels. About one third of respondents reported being distracted while wearing an MP3 player, and more than one third of listeners experienced soreness in their ears after a listening session. About one third of respondents reported occasionally using their MP3 players at maximum volume levels. Listeners indicated willingness to (a) reduce volume levels, (b) decrease listening duration, and (c) buy specialized earphones to conserve their hearing. The study found concerns regarding the occasional use of MP3 players at full volume and reduced environmental awareness among some college student users.

  6. Listening to the ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, Christopher A.

    Otoacoustic emissions demonstrate that the ear creates sound while listening to sound, offering a promising acoustic window on the mechanics of hearing in awake, listening human beings. That window is clouded, however, by an incomplete knowledge of wave reflection and transmission, both forth and back within the cochlea and through the middle ear. This thesis "does windows," addressing wave propagation and scattering on both sides of the middle ear. A summary of highlights follows. Measurements of the cochlear input impedance in cat are used to identify a new symmetry in cochlear mechanics-termed "tapering symmetry" after its geometric interpretation in simple models-that guarantees that the wavelength of the traveling wave changes slowly with position near the stapes. Waves therefore propagate without reflection through the basal turns of the cochlea. Analytic methods for solving the cochlear wave equations using a perturbative scattering series are given and used to demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, conventional cochlear models exhibit negligible internal reflection whether or not they accurately represent the tapering symmetries of the inner ear. Frameworks for the systematic "deconstruction" of eardrum and middle-ear transduction characteristics are developed and applied to the analysis of noninvasive measurements of middle-ear and cochlear mechanics. A simple phenomenological model of inner-ear compressibility that correctly predicts hearing thresholds in patients with missing or disarticulated middle-ear ossicles is developed and used to establish an upper bound on cochlear compressibility several orders of magnitude smaller than that provided by direct measurements. Accurate measurements of stimulus frequency evoked otoacoustic emissions are performed and used to determine the form and frequency variation of the cochlear traveling-wave ratio noninvasively. Those measurements are inverted to obtain the spatial distribution of mechanical

  7. The Power of the Listening Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    Communicating effectively is a skill that must be taught and practiced--and the act of listening is a large part of this skill. According to the "International Journal of Listening," listening skills are imperative to reading comprehension and are valuable enough for "38 out of the 51 government entities to include listening skills as part of…

  8. Identifying Information Focuses in Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-yan

    2011-01-01

    The study explains the process of learners' listening comprehension within Halliday's information theory in functional grammar, including the skills of identifying focuses while listening in college English teaching. Identifying information focuses in listening is proved to improve the students' communicative listening ability by the means of a…

  9. Listening Skills. Instructor/Lesson Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Carol; And Others

    This instructor/lesson guide provides instructional materials for a 4-hour course in listening skills in the workplace. Stated objectives are to help students to become more effective listeners, to assist students in obtaining an understanding of how effective they are as listeners, and to assist students in identifying bad listening habits. Two…

  10. Listening and Reading in the Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Presenting many listening activities, this paper discusses reading and listening development in elementary school. It lists five pointers to stress in developing pupils who listen well and gives a set of criteria to provide a framework to use in evaluating pupil achievement in listening. The paper lists six items teacher assistants should listen…

  11. Expanding Music Listening Experience through Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yo-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Drawing while listening to music provides an opportunity for students to imagine and associate, leading to holistic listening experience. The personal qualitative listening experience triggered by music can be revealed in their drawings. In the process of representing of the listening experience through drawing, students can also increase their…

  12. Sessions as Propositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Lindley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Wadler presented a continuation-passing translation from a session-typed functional language, GV, to a process calculus based on classical linear logic, CP. However, this translation is one-way: CP is more expressive than GV. We propose an extension of GV, called HGV, and give translations showing that it is as expressive as CP. The new translations shed light both on the original translation from GV to CP, and on the limitations in expressiveness of GV.

  13. Improvisation, Analysis, and Listening Otherwise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheehy, August

    2013-01-01

    .... Rather than placing moments of heard music within an a priori theoretical frame, which I call "idiomatic listening," analysis-as-improvisation resists the idea of stability suggested by theories of music...

  14. A Correlation Study between EFL Strategic Listening and Listening Comprehension Skills among Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Iman Abdul-Reheem; Amin, Magdy Mohammad; Aly, Mahsoub Abdul-Sadeq

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the correlation between EFL students strategic listening and their listening comprehension skills. Eighty secondary school students participated in this study. Participants' strategic listening was measured by a Strategic Listening Interview (SLI), a Strategic Listening Questionnaire (SLQ) and a…

  15. Listening to Learn: The Status of Listening Activities in Secondary Instrumental Ensemble Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the status of listening activities as part of middle and high school instrumental music instruction. Research questions addressed teachers' beliefs in the importance of listening, outcomes associated with listening, type and frequency of listening activities, presence of guided listening, and challenges…

  16. Loud music listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Nicolae

    2008-07-01

    Over the past four decades, there has been increasing interest in the effects of music listening on hearing. The purpose of this paper is to review published studies that detail the noise levels, the potential effects (e.g. noise-induced hearing loss), and the perceptions of those affected by music exposure in occupational and non-occupational settings. The review employed Medline, PubMed, PsychINFO, and the World Wide Web to find relevant studies in the scientific literature. Considered in this review are 43 studies concerning the currently most significant occupational sources of high-intensity music: rock and pop music playing and employment at music venues, as well as the most significant sources of non-occupational high-intensity music: concerts, dicotheques (clubs), and personal music players. Although all of the activities listed above have the potential for hearing damage, the most serious threat to hearing comes from prolonged exposures to amplified live music (concerts). The review concludes that more research is needed to clarify the hearing loss risks of music exposure from personal music players and that current scientific literature clearly recognizes an unmet hearing health need for more education regarding the risks of loud music exposure and the benefits of wearing hearing protection, for more hearing protection use by those at risk, and for more regulations limiting music intensity levels at music entertainment venues.

  17. Listeners as Authors in Preaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaarden, Marianne; Lorensen, Marlene Ringgaard

    2013-01-01

    Based on new empirical studies this essay explores how churchgoers listen to sermons in regard to the theological notion that “faith comes from hearing.” Through Bakhtinian theories presented by Lorensen and empirical findings presented by Gaarden, the apparently masked agency in preaching that i......) create new meaning and understanding. It is not a room that the listener or the preacher can control or occupy, but a room in which both engage....

  18. A randomized clinical trial on the effectiveness of a reintegration training program versus booster sessions after short-term inpatient psychotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Thunnissenl (Moniek); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); J.J. van Busschbach (Jan); L. van Hakkaart-van Roijen (Leona); W. van Tilburg (Willem); R. Verheul (Roel); W. Trijsburg (Wim)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAlthough several studies show symptomatic improvements in patients with personality disorders after short-term inpatient psychotherapy, reintegration remains difficult. In this study the effectiveness of a specifically designed reintegration training program is investigated. One hundred

  19. A randomized clinical trial on the effectiveness of a reintegration training program versus booster sessions after short-term inpatient psychotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thunnissen, M.; Duivenvoorden, H.; Busschbach, J.; Hakkaart-van Roijen, L.; van Tilburg, W.; Verheul, R.; Trijsburg, W.

    2008-01-01

    Although several studies show symptomatic improvements in patients with personality disorders after short-term inpatient psychotherapy, reintegration remains difficult. In this study the effectiveness of a specifically designed reintegration training program is investigated. One hundred twenty-eight

  20. The Rhythm of Language: Fostering Oral and Listening Skills in Singapore Pre-School Children through an Integrated Music and Language Arts Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Linda; Chong, Sylvia

    1998-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of a year-long integrated language and music program (the Expressive Language and Music Project) to enhance Singaporean kindergartners' English oral-language competency. Found that the natural communicative setting and creative use of resources and activities based on the Orff and Kodaly approaches facilitated language…

  1. ICALEPS 2005 : opening session

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    ICALEPCS 2005, the tenth International Conference on Accelerator and Large Experimental Physics Control Systems, will be held in Geneva, Switzerland, 10-14 Oct. 2005 at the International Conference Center Geneva (CICG). ICALEPCS 2005 thus falls in the year that UNESCO has declared the "World Year of Physics". ICALEPCS covers all aspects of control and operation of Experimental Physics facilities such as particle accelerators, particle detectors, optical telescopes, radio telescopes, nuclear fusion facilities like Tokamaks, nuclear reactors, lasers, etc .... Opening session by . A. Daneels (CERN): Introducting ICALEPCS 2005 . C.Lamprecht (Republic & State of Geneva): Welcome speech . J. Lister (EPFL): Welcome speech . J. Engelen (CERN): The machine and experiment challenges of LHC

  2. COMMUNICATIVE LISTENING IN THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nani Tiono

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Language laboratory actually is advantageous for ESL teaching-learning process. In the language lab, students can improve their language skill, especially their listening skill, since most of the activities done there deal with listening comprehension. However, ESL students often feel bored when they study at the language lab because they only do monotonous activities there. Thus, teacher should make a lively lab atmosphere through interactive listening; that is, by creating communicative listening tasks for the students. Through this communicative listening tasks, students will not only listen, but also interact with either the teacher or the other students so that they feel as if they do the real life listening. These communicative listening tasks will also help students to improve both their proficiency in language components (vocabulary and pronunciation and in language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing.

  3. Metacognition and L2 listening. Observation of university-level teaching practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Hernandez Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and empirical research offers support for explicit instruction on metacognition and cognitive strategies as an effective way to improve L2 listening skills. This study is aimed at identifying whether both metacognition and cognitive strategies are worked on in a university-level French class on a daily basis. A second-year French-class teacher and his students (n=26 were observed during five listening-based sessions over a semester. Quantitative data was collected with regard to six dimensions of explicit metacognitive instruction of listening skills, using a teacher self-evaluation questionnaire, a student questionnaire and a structured observation. The results reveal implicit cognitive work during the pre-, while- and post-listening teaching stages. Nonetheless, strategy assessment, and the explicit teaching of metacognitive strategies for planning, monitoring, controlling and problem identifying, both remain controversial.

  4. The Effect of Dictogloss on Listening Comprehension: Focus on Metacognitive Strategies and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Taheri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the effect of dictogloss on EFL learners’ listening comprehension as well as on their use of metacognitive listening strategies with a focus on the effects on male and female learners. To this end, a total number of 50 female and male Iranian EFL learners, aged between 12 and 15 years old, at the intermediate proficiency level in a private language school in Iran were selected and randomly assigned to experimental and control groups with 25 male and female learners in each group. Dictogloss was employed to teach the learners in the experimental group for an instruction period of 12 sessions. Participants’ listening comprehension was determined through a pre/posttest which was adapted from the listening section of the standard test of PET and their use of metacognitive listening strategies via the MALQ, a questionnaire developed by Vandergrift et al. (2006. The data obtained were submitted to the t-test and results revealed significant improvement in the experimental group’s listening comprehension with no significant difference between male and female learners. Finally, the results showed that the listeners in the experimental group made noticeable gains in their choice of metacognitive strategies through using the dictogloss technique.  Findings are discussed in light of recent theories of language learning and teaching.

  5. The Effects of Using Podcast on Listening Comprehension among Iranian Pre-intermediate EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam NamazianDost

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of using podcast on listening comprehension among Iranian pre-intermediate EFL learners. To fulfill the objectives of the study a Homogeneity test (Oxford Quick Placement Test was administered among 90 students at the pre-intermediate level of Poyesh language Institute and finally 60 participants were selected. Then, they were non-randomly divided into two sub­groups, namely control and experimental groups.  Before starting the treatment, a validated teacher-made listening comprehension test was administered to students as pre-test to assess the participants' listening comprehension at the beginning of the course. Then, the experimental group received the treatment, which was teaching listening comprehension through using podcasts while the control group was taught using traditional methods of teaching listening with no multimedia source. After 20 sessions of treatment, the two groups were administered the same teacher-made listening test as post-test. Data were analyzed by Paired and Independent Samples t-­test. The findings showed that the experimental group significantly performed better than the control group. Generally, the experimental groups outperformed the control groups. The results suggest that podcasts can be used in English classes to develop listening ability among Iranian EFL learners.

  6. Excerpts from Electrophysiology Sessions at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2002 - Berlin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Nabar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is prepared on the basis of presentations given at the Annual Scientific Sessions of the European Society of Cardiology 2002 in Berlin, Germany. Topics discussed are: Current clinical problems encountered with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs, Biventricular pacing - a resynchronization therapy, Post-operative Tetralogy of Fallot - is the electrophysiologist listening?

  7. A MODEL OF EFL LISTENING MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochamad Zaenuri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In oral communication, listening skill is important because communication does not take place successfully if the message stated is not understood. To master the skill, learners should learn it. Therefore, good listening materials are needed. However, English teachers often find it difficult to teach listening skills because the listening materials are not adequately available. Besides, if the materials are available, they are not appropriate with the students’ needs and the curriculum. In that case, English teachers need to develop listening materials by themselves. For this, they should have knowledge of materials development. This paper presents ideas and tips for English teachers how to develop good and applicable listening materials.

  8. A Four-Session Sleep Intervention Program Improves Sleep for Older Adult Day Health Care Participants: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer L; Song, Yeonsu; Hughes, Jaime; Jouldjian, Stella; Dzierzewski, Joseph M; Fung, Constance H; Rodriguez Tapia, Juan Carlos; Mitchell, Michael N; Alessi, Cathy A

    2017-08-01

    To test the effectiveness of a 4-week behavioral Sleep Intervention Program (SIP: sleep compression, modified stimulus control, and sleep hygiene) compared to a 4-week information-only control (IC) among older adults attending a VA Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) program in a double-blind, randomized, clinical trial. Forty-two individuals (mean age: 77 years, 93% male) enrolled in a VA ADHC program were randomized to receive SIP or IC. All completed in-person sleep and health assessments at baseline, post-treatment and 4-months follow-up that included 3 days/nights of wrist actigraphy, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Mixed repeated measures analysis was used to compare sleep outcomes at post-treatment and 4-months follow-up, with baseline values as covariates. SIP participants (n = 21) showed significant improvement on actigraphy sleep efficiency (p = .007), number of nighttime awakenings (p = .016), and minutes awake at night (p = .001) at post-treatment, compared to IC participants (n = 21). Benefits were slightly attenuated but remained significant at 4-month follow-up (all p's sleep time between groups. There was significant improvement on PSQI factor 3 (daily disturbances) at 4-month follow-up (p = .016), but no differences were observed between SIP and IC on other PSQI components or ISI scores at post-treatment or 4-month follow-up. A short behavioral sleep intervention may have important benefits in improving objectively measured sleep in older adults participating in ADHC. Future studies are needed to study implementation of this intervention into routine clinical care within ADHC.

  9. The Role of the Listener's State in Speech Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Navin

    2009-01-01

    Accounts of speech perception disagree on whether listeners perceive the acoustic signal (Diehl, Lotto, & Holt, 2004) or the vocal tract gestures that produce the signal (e.g., Fowler, 1986). In this dissertation, I outline a research program using a phenomenon called "perceptual compensation for coarticulation" (Mann, 1980) to examine this…

  10. The Application of Podcasting as a Motivational Strategy to Iranian EFL Learners of English: A View toward Listening Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Shiri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to inspect the impact of podcasts as learning and teaching tools on Iranian EFL learners’ motivation for listening as well as on their listening comprehension ability. It also investigated the learners’ perception towards podcasts. 34 intermediate learners who were homogeneous in terms of listening ability were chosen and then assigned into two groups. While the experimental group were given the treatment i.e. podcasts, the control group received the traditional practice. Data analysis results showed that the learners in the podcasting group surpassed the participants in the control group in their listening comprehension tests and in ELCMS scale as used to measure changes in the motivation of learners for listening. Students' views about the program were also elicited via podcast contribution questionnaire and individual interviews. The analysis of qualitative data showed that students perceived improvement in their listening achievement. Keywords: CALL, Listening skill, Motivation, Motivational strategies, Podcast

  11. Session Types at the Mirror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Padovani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We (redefine session types as projections of process behaviors with respect to the communication channels they use. In this setting, we give session types a semantics based on fair testing. The outcome is a unified theory of behavioral types that shares common aspects with conversation types and that encompass features of both dyadic and multi-party session types. The point of view we provide sheds light on the nature of session types and gives us a chance to reason about them in a framework where every notion, from well-typedness to the subtyping relation between session types, is semantically -rather than syntactically- grounded.

  12. Efficient Session Type Guided Distributed Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, K. C.; Nagaraj, Karthik; Ziarek, Lukasz; Eugster, Patrick

    Recently, there has been much interest in multi-party session types (MPSTs) as a means of rigorously specifying protocols for interaction among multiple distributed participants. By capturing distributed interaction as series of typed interactions, MPSTs allow for the static verification of compliance of corresponding distributed object programs. We observe that explicit control flow information manifested by MPST opens intriguing avenues also for performance enhancements. In this paper, we present a session type assisted performance enhancement framework for distributed object interaction in Java. Experimental evaluation within our distributed runtime infrastructure illustrates the costs and benefits of our composable enhancement strategies.

  13. Multiparty Session Types as Coherence Proofs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Marco; Montesi, Fabrizio; Schürmann, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    We propose a Curry-Howard correspondence between a language for programming multiparty sessions and a generalisation of Classical Linear Logic (CLL). In this framework, propositions correspond to the local behaviour of a participant in a multiparty session type, proofs to processes, and proof...... normalisation to executing communications. Our key contribution is generalising duality, from CLL, to a new notion of n-ary compatibility, called coherence. Building on coherence as a principle of compositionality, we generalise the cut rule of CLL to a new rule for composing many processes communicating...

  14. Shut-up and Listen, A Case for Listening Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, James R.

    The audio-lingual method of foreign language instruction predominant in the United States emphasizes the lingual at the expense of the aural. Language acquisition is viewed as verbal behavior. Instead of a response-oriented learning approach, a stimulus-oriented one should be used, with listening as the focal skill from which speaking would…

  15. Improving Listening Skills: Hazards Communication. Listening Skills: Portable Fire Extinguishers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Rhonda; And Others

    Developed as part of the ABCs of Construction National Workplace Literacy Project, these modules contain materials for improving listening skills that are designed to be used in conjunction with a commercial training video in a required 8-hour Occupational Safety and Health Administration safety course. The first module, which is designed to…

  16. Developing Listening Skills with Authentic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lindsay

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how to help English-as-a-Second-Language learners develop effective listening skills. Suggests a process for helping ESL learners develop their listening skills and makes suggestions for how this might be achieved with authentic materials. (VWL)

  17. Can listening to sound sequences facilitate movement? The potential for motor rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodak, Rebeka; Stewart, Lauren; Stephan, Marianne

    One of the obstacles preventing patients from effective motor recovery following stroke is low frequency of sessions. What if listening to sounds between physical rehabilitation sessions could yield motor improvement? Our study provides a stepping stone to answering that question, by first...... examining the impact of auditory exposure on the formation of new motor memories in healthy nonmusicians. Following an audiomotor mapping session, participants will be asked to listen to and memorise sequence A or sequence B in a sound-only task. Employing a congruent/incongruent crossover design...... the potential to be useful in motor rehabilitation settings where the coupling of sound and movement patterns might help patients relearn motor tasks relevant to activities of daily living, particularly when regular physical practice is not possible....

  18. Effective Listening: Five Lessons from the Best.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kittie W

    For many nurses, especially when workloads are high, it can be difficult to listen carefully to patients. Federally mandated Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys that help determine insurance reimbursement are asking patients how carefully their nurses listened. For Christian nurses, effective listening demonstrates the compassion, understanding, and care modeled by Jesus. An exploration of Jesus' responses reveals five ways Christ effectively listened to people that can guide nurses.

  19. Strategy Use, Listening Problems, and Motivation of High- and Low-Proficiency Chinese Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kit-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Building on previous listening strategy research, the author aimed to explore the differences between Chinese high-proficiency listeners (HLs) and low-proficiency listeners (LLs) on their strategy use, problems, and motivation in native language (L1) listening. It involved 1,290 Grade 7 and 1,515 Grade 9 students. Both quantitative and qualitative…

  20. Speech Understanding in Complex Listening Environments by Listeners Fit with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Michael F.; Gifford, Rene H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to summarize recent published and unpublished research from our 2 laboratories on improving speech understanding in complex listening environments by listeners fit with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: CI listeners were tested in 2 listening environments. One was a simulation of a restaurant with multiple,…

  1. Developing an Instrument for Iranian EFL Learners' Listening Comprehension Problems and Listening Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozi, Sara Sara; Sim, Tam Shu; Nimehchisalem, Vahid; Zareian, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    In the body of literature on listening strategies to EFL learners, what seems to be lacking is that the focus is on teaching listening strategies to learners with little attention to their listening comprehension problems. No local research has been conducted on the nature of the Iranian tertiary level students' EFL listening comprehension…

  2. Should we listen to gossip?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castledine, George

    1994-09-22

    Getting back into the swing of things after the summer holidays is very difficult. In order to find out what has been happening in your absence you usually read the mail, scan the nursing press and, of course, listen to the latest gossip.

  3. Listeners Remember Music They Like

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalinski, Stephanie M.; Schellenberg, E. Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Emotions have important and powerful effects on cognitive processes. Although it is well established that memory influences liking, we sought to document whether liking influences memory. A series of 6 experiments examined whether liking is related to recognition memory for novel music excerpts. In the general method, participants listened to a…

  4. Two Types of Interpersonal Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Leonard J.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: Although the concept of listening had been neglected by philosophers of education, it has received focused attention since 2003, when Sophie Haroutunian-Gordon addressed it in her presidential address to the Philosophy of Education Society. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: Haroutunian-Gordon offered a…

  5. Listening from the Inside Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Elizabeth G.

    1984-01-01

    Examines studies in brain research which are closely related to language learning. Discusses Asher's Total Physical Response and Lozanov's Suggestopedia as approaches which activate the right brain hemisphere and involve it in the language learning process. Discusses practical applications for what is currently known about listening. (SED)

  6. Listening Natively across Perceptual Domains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langus, Alan; Seyed-Allaei, Shima; Uysal, Ertugrul; Pirmoradian, Sahar; Marino, Caterina; Asaadi, Sina; Eren, Ömer; Toro, Juan M.; Peña, Marcela; Bion, Ricardo A. H.; Nespor, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Our native tongue influences the way we perceive other languages. But does it also determine the way we perceive nonlinguistic sounds? The authors investigated how speakers of Italian, Turkish, and Persian group sequences of syllables, tones, or visual shapes alternating in either frequency or duration. We found strong native listening effects…

  7. Understanding Speaker-Listener Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heylen, Dirk K.J.

    2009-01-01

    We provide an eclectic generic framework to understand the back and forth interactions between participants in a conversation highlighting the complexity of the actions that listeners are engaged in. Communicative actions of one participant implicate the “other��? in many ways. In this paper, we try

  8. Listening: The Ignored Skill in EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulum, Ömer Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Listening is clearly the weakest skill of EFL students who encounter different kinds of listening problems. It is the most underestimated skill in EFL context, though. This study seeks to examine the listening problems faced by a group of first year university students whose English proficiency level is elementary. 50 EFL students from three…

  9. Empirical Validation of Listening Proficiency Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Troy L.; Clifford, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Because listening has received little attention and the validation of ability scales describing multidimensional skills is always challenging, this study applied a multistage, criterion-referenced approach that used a framework of aligned audio passages and listening tasks to explore the validity of the ACTFL and related listening proficiency…

  10. Investigation of Turkish Teacher Candidates Listening Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagöz, Beytullah; Iscan, Adem; Baskin, Sami; Irsi, Aysegül

    2017-01-01

    As a basic skill of language, listening is an essential process at interpretation surroundings. Today listening is necessary in many cases such as school life, interfamilial communication, etc. Thanks to listening, people acquire comprehension skills and expressing themselves in all areas. 2005 and 2015 Turkish Course Syllabus include special…

  11. Toward an Aristotelian Conception of Good Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    In this essay Suzanne Rice examines Aristotle's ideas about virtue, character, and education as elements in an Aristotelian conception of good listening. Rice begins by surveying of several different contexts in which listening typically occurs, using this information to introduce the argument that what should count as "good listening" must be…

  12. Teaching Listening: Voices from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Nikki, Ed.; Tran, Anh, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Listening is the most important of the four language skills and is used most often in everyday communication. Teachers need innovative ways to address the particular listening problems emerging in their own contexts. "Teaching Listening: Voices From the Field" shares successful practices employed by teachers at different levels of education around…

  13. Making Listening Instruction Meaningful: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Jennifer R.; Mishra, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Listening to, analyzing, and describing music, is perhaps the most difficult standard to present effectively in allotted classroom time. The purpose of this literature review is to better understand what constitutes effective listening instruction by examining students' listening practices, receptiveness, attentiveness, and activities that lead to…

  14. Using Listening Journals in Math Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Shelly Sheats; Wachenheim, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this teacher action research was twofold: to learn more about preservice teachers' preconceived notions related to listening and to investigate how a listening journal assignment impacted preservice teachers' views of listening as an important aspect of discourse. The participants were enrolled in a mathematics methods course for…

  15. Balancing Openness and Interpretation in Active Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topornycky, Joseph; Golparian, Shaya

    2016-01-01

    Active listening is an important communication skill in a variety of disciplines and professions, including the profession of Educational Development. In our roles as educational developers, we engage in a variety of processes, all of which rely heavily on the practice of active listening. Emerging strategies of active listening praxis have…

  16. The Art of Listening in an Educational Perspective—Listening reception in the mother tongue

    OpenAIRE

    Adelmann, Kent

    2012-01-01

    The purpose is to contribute to the theory and practice of listening reception as one of the four language arts in Swedish as a school subject. The object of inquiry is The Art of Listening (Adelmann 2009) as a Swedish example from a Scandinavian context, compared to mainstream listening research in the USA. The problem explored is: How can we, as researchers and teachers, handle some of the problems within international listening research and adapt listening research to a Scandinavian contex...

  17. Listening to music – with professional ears. A study of orchestral musicians’ ways of listening

    OpenAIRE

    Reitan, Inger Elise

    2013-01-01

    The training of listening skills in higher music education is a central part of the aural training discipline, often called aural analysis or structural hearing. Listening here refers to active, conscious attention paid to the music and its elements through the combination of perceptual and cognitive skills, and understanding. Theories about listening suggest various categories and types of listeners and of listening, mainly along the analytical-emotional spectrum. How do professional musicia...

  18. Wyoming: "A Net Positive Session"

    OpenAIRE

    Schuhmann, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Wyoming’s general legislative session concluded March 6, 2015 with the passage of 185 bills and nearly $285 million in new spending.[1] Because this was a general session rather than a budget session, very few budget issues were addressed. However, key budgetary matters this year included: (1) addressing a $222 million shortfall brought about by falling oil prices and (2) several new capital construction projects spread across the state and at the University of Wyoming. Wyoming democrats in t...

  19. Session Types at the Mirror

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Padovani

    2009-01-01

    We (re)define session types as projections of process behaviors with respect to the communication channels they use. In this setting, we give session types a semantics based on fair testing. The outcome is a unified theory of behavioral types that shares common aspects with conversation types and that encompass features of both dyadic and multi-party session types. The point of view we provide sheds light on the nature of session types and gives us a chance to reason about them in a framework...

  20. Caffeinating the PBL return session: Curriculum innovations to engage students at two medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korin, Tatum; Thode, Joan Brumbaugh; Kakar, Seema; Blatt, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    At the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, authors observed that problem-based learning (PBL) return sessions for first- and second-year medical students often lacked the energy and engagement of first sessions. Unlike in first sessions, where students took on the physician's role and actively problem solved, in return sessions students spent much of their time passively, listening to research reports on learning objectives. Time spent listening to reports dilutes return session impact, with the patient receding from view as the level of abstraction increases and learning issues take center stage. In this Perspective, the authors present innovations, developed separately at their respective medical schools between 2009 and 2012, designed to reenergize the return session.To frame the discussion of the return session slump and their innovations in response to it, the authors used self-determination theory (SDT) and active learning theory (ALT), both of which are supported by a considerable body of evidence. SDT provides understanding of how to maximize PBL learners' motivation, and ALT sheds light on how to promote PBL learners' incorporation of concepts into long-term memory. As motivation and memory are key factors in learning, both theories are appropriate tools to help understand and maximize the effectiveness of PBL. Finally, guided by these theories, the authors present reflections on future directions for the development of PBL.

  1. Listening Competence in Initial Interactions I: Distinguishing between What Listening Is and What Listeners Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodie, Graham D.; St. Cyr, Kellie; Pence, Michelle; Rold, Michael; Honeycutt, James

    2012-01-01

    The impressions we form of others during initial interactions are powerful. These impressions are a product of various implicit theories--mental representations of people and actions. This article investigates the structure of implicit theories of listening used when forming impressions of others after an initial encounter. Specifically, three…

  2. ASSESSING LISTENING IN THE LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristanti Ayuanita

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of listening in language learning can hardly be overestimated. In classrooms, students always do more listening than speaking. Listening competence is universally “larger” than other competence. Listening is not a oneway street. It is not merely the process of a unidirectional receiving of audible symbols one facet – the first step – 0f listening comprehension is the psychomotor process of receiving sound waves through the ear and transmitting nerve impulses to the brain. Every classroom lesson involves some form of assessment, whether it is in the form of informal, unplanned, and intuitive teacher processing and feedback, or in formal, prepared, scored tests.

  3. Familiarity mediates the relationship between emotional arousal and pleasure during music listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Iris; Salimpoor, Valorie N.; Zatorre, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Emotional arousal appears to be a major contributing factor to the pleasure that listeners experience in response to music. Accordingly, a strong positive correlation between self-reported pleasure and electrodermal activity (EDA), an objective indicator of emotional arousal, has been demonstrated when individuals listen to familiar music. However, it is not yet known to what extent familiarity contributes to this relationship. In particular, as listening to familiar music involves expectations and predictions over time based on veridical knowledge of the piece, it could be that such memory factors plays a major role. Here, we tested such a contribution by using musical stimuli entirely unfamiliar to listeners. In a second experiment we repeated the novel music to experimentally establish a sense of familiarity. We aimed to determine whether (1) pleasure and emotional arousal would continue to correlate when listeners have no explicit knowledge of how the tones will unfold, and (2) whether this could be enhanced by experimentally-induced familiarity. In the first experiment, we presented 33 listeners with 70 unfamiliar musical excerpts in two sessions. There was no relationship between the degree of experienced pleasure and emotional arousal as measured by EDA. In the second experiment, 7 participants listened to 35 unfamiliar excerpts over two sessions separated by 30 min. Repeated exposure significantly increased EDA, even though individuals did not explicitly recall having heard all the pieces before. Furthermore, increases in self-reported familiarity significantly enhanced experienced pleasure and there was a general, though not significant, increase in EDA. These results suggest that some level of expectation and predictability mediated by prior exposure to a given piece of music play an important role in the experience of emotional arousal in response to music. PMID:24046738

  4. Familiarity mediates the relationship between emotional arousal and pleasure during music listening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris eVan Den Bosch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Emotional arousal appears to be a major contributing factor to the pleasure that listeners experience in response to music. Accordingly, a strong positive correlation between self-reported pleasure and electrodermal activity (EDA, an objective indicator of emotional arousal, has been demonstrated when individuals listen to familiar music. However, it is not yet known to what extent familiarity contributes to this relationship. In particular, as listening to familiar music involves expectations and predictions over time based on veridical knowledge of the piece, it could be that such memory factors plays a major role. Here, we tested such a contribution by using musical stimuli entirely unfamiliar to listeners. In a second experiment we repeated the novel music to experimentally establish a sense of familiarity. We aimed to determine whether (1 pleasure and emotional arousal would continue to correlate when listeners have no explicit knowledge of how the tones will unfold, and (2 whether this could be enhanced by experimentally-induced familiarity. In the first experiment, we presented 33 listeners with 70 unfamiliar musical excerpts in two sessions. There was no relationship between the degree of experienced pleasure and emotional arousal as measured by EDA. In the second experiment, 7 participants listened to 35 unfamiliar excerpts over two sessions separated by 30 minutes. Repeated exposure significantly increased EDA, even though individuals did not explicitly recall having heard all the pieces before. Furthermore, increases in self-reported familiarity significantly enhanced experienced pleasure and there was a general, though not significant, increase in EDA. These results suggest that some level of expectation and predictability mediated by prior exposure to a given piece of music play an important role in the experience of emotional arousal in response to music.

  5. Stormwater Discussion Session - Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur, Jon

    2006-01-01

    The Stormwater panel addressed water quality impacts on the Wakulla springshed stemming from stormwater discharge into the basin; correlation of discharge with precipitation; relationship between land use and the quantity and quality of runoff and use of Florida's stormwater program and BMP's to address these impacts; nutrient loading; local efforts to reduce stormwater pollution; and, the role of phosphorus vs. nitrate concentrations as triggers to eutrophication and Hydrilla and algal growt...

  6. How do location and control over the music influence listeners' responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Amanda E; North, Adrian C

    2017-04-01

    This study uses Mehrabian and Russell's () Pleasure-Arousal-Dominance (PAD) model to consider how responses to both the music heard and overall in-situ listening experience are influenced by the listener's degree of control over music selected for a particular listening episode and the location in which the listening takes place. Following recruitment via campus advertisements and a university research participation program, 216 individuals completed a background questionnaire and music listening task in a 3 (location) × 2 (experimenter- or participant-selected music) design. After the listening task, participants completed a short questionnaire concerning the music they heard and the overall in-situ listening experience. Results demonstrated that there was a positive relationship between control and liking for the music and episode, whether the former was considered in terms of: (1) whether the music was self-selected or experimenter-selected or (2) overt ratings of perceived control. Furthermore, the location and liking for the music were related to people's judgments of their enjoyment of the overall experience. This research indicates that the PAD model is a useful framework for understanding everyday music listening and supports the contention that, in a musical context, dominance may be operationalized as control over the music. © 2017 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Redesigning the Way We Listen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper is based on a research project-in-progress investigating curatorial practice as methodology for creating responsive interfaces to sound art practices. Sound art is a transdisciplinary practice. As such, it creates new domains that may be used for redesign-purposes. Not only do experien......This paper is based on a research project-in-progress investigating curatorial practice as methodology for creating responsive interfaces to sound art practices. Sound art is a transdisciplinary practice. As such, it creates new domains that may be used for redesign-purposes. Not only do...... experiences of sound alter; the way we listen to sound is transforming as well. Thus, the paper analyses and discusses two responsive sound interfaces and claim that curating as a transdisciplinary practice may frame what is termed in the paper as a domain-game redesigning the way the audience listens...

  8. Listening to Mothers: Take Two

    OpenAIRE

    Lothian, Judith A.

    2006-01-01

    Listening to Mothers II: Report of the Second National U.S. Survey of Women's Childbearing Experiences (Declercq, Sakala, Corry, & Applebaum, 2006) is essential reading for the childbirth educator. Birth continues to be “intervention intensive” in the United States, and less than 2% of women have births characterized by the six care practices that promote, protect, and support normal birth. Only a little more than half of the women surveyed attended childbirth education classes, and only 4% r...

  9. FM Radio and Youth: Listeners or Users?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Mučalo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A survey conducted in the spring of 2013, says that Zagreb’s high school students are not regular listeners to FM radio programs. The dominant media is the Internet, which is used a few hours a day, mostly for Facebook. Despite the expressed need for music, the linear and passive nature of FM radio, does not correspond to the individual requirements of young and networked users. The Internet is the most popular daily source for music, with ability to download, while smartphones are becoming devices for storage and playback. However, this survey has shown that students are interested in web radio sites. Changes in media preferences and habits caused by the Internet show us the importance of information literacy, as a basic skill for participation in a networked society.

  10. An Erlang Implementation of Multiparty Session Actors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Fowler

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available By requiring co-ordination to take place using explicit message passing instead of relying on shared memory, actor-based programming languages have been shown to be effective tools for building reliable and fault-tolerant distributed systems. Although naturally communication-centric, communication patterns in actor-based applications remain informally specified, meaning that errors in communication are detected late, if at all. Multiparty session types are a formalism to describe, at a global level, the interactions between multiple communicating entities. This article describes the implementation of a prototype framework for monitoring Erlang/OTP gen_server applications against multiparty session types, showing how previous work on multiparty session actors can be adapted to a purely actor-based language, and how monitor violations and termination of session participants can be reported in line with the Erlang mantra of "let it fail". Finally, the framework is used to implement two case studies: an adaptation of a freely-available DNS server, and a chat server.

  11. Everyday Listening to Music and Emotion Among College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Junko

    2013-01-01

    This study attempted to reveal the relationship between everyday listening to music and emotion among col-lege students. Participants were 13 female and 2 male college students who were given booklets to record the following over an 8-day period: dates and times of their everyday experiences of listening to music, duration of listening, locations and contexts of listening, active or passive listening, emotions before and after listening, and tiles and artists to which they listened. Results i...

  12. Encouraging Students to Enhance Their Listening Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez-Ocampo Sonia Patricia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Spanish-speaking students constantly complain about the difficulty they have comprehending spoken English. It seems teachers do not often provide them with strategies to alleviate that. This article reports on a pedagogical experience carried out at a Colombian university to help pre-service teachers at an intermediate level of English to improve their aural comprehension. The students were given the task of designing listening activities to be worked on as micro-teaching sessions and were asked to describe their experience by answering a survey. The results showed that students developed the ability to think critically since they needed to make the best decisions regarding the audio level and the design of the activities. They also appeared to have become more autonomous as they realized they could be responsible for their improvement in listening. Additionally, there were evident changes in the teachers’ roles.Es común que los hablantes de español se quejen de su comprensión oral en inglés. Parece que los profesores no siempre dan a sus estudiantes estrategias para mejorar al respecto. En este artículo se describe la experiencia pedagógica desarrollada en una universidad colombiana con el propósito de ayudar a los estudiantes de inglés intermedio de una licenciatura a mejorar su comprensión auditiva. Se pidió a los estudiantes desarrollar actividades de escucha para ser trabajadas en sesiones de microenseñanza y describir su experiencia, contestando una encuesta. Los resultados evidenciaron que los estudiantes desarrollaron su pensamiento crítico en la medida que necesitaban tomar decisiones con respecto al nivel de dificultad del audio y al diseño de las actividades mismas. También se mostraron más autónomos por cuanto se hicieron conscientes de su responsabilidad en el mejoramiento de su comprensión oral. Adicionalmente, se dieron cambios en los papeles del profesor.

  13. Department of Energy PEIS scoping session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badar, L

    1992-12-10

    This is the second programmatic environmental impact statement scoping session held in Durango, Colorado. The purpose was: to present the ground water program so as to build some familiarity and understanding about the issue involved; and to get Durango community's input. Scoping is the collection of information and getting everyone involved and really making a team out of coming up with a proposed action. This report contains the presentations made by the project manager for the Uranium Mill Tailings (UMTRA) program, site manager for the Durango UMTRA site, manager of ground water hydrology, and include comments made by local residents.

  14. Reversible Multiparty Sessions with Checkpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangiola Dezani-Ciancaglini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Reversible interactions model different scenarios, like biochemical systems and human as well as automatic negotiations. We abstract interactions via multiparty sessions enriched with named checkpoints. Computations can either go forward or roll back to some checkpoints, where possibly different choices may be taken. In this way communications can be undone and different conversations may be tried. Interactions are typed with global types, which control also rollbacks. Typeability of session participants in agreement with global types ensures session fidelity and progress of reversible communications.

  15. Perception of English vowels by bilingual Chinese-English and corresponding monolingual listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Fox, Robert A

    2014-06-01

    This study compares the underlying perceptual structure of vowel perception in monolingual Chinese, monolingual English and bilingual Chinese-English listeners. Of particular interest is how listeners' spatial organization of vowels is affected either by their L1 or their experience with L2. Thirteen English vowels, /i, I, e, epsilon, ae, u, omega, o, (see symbol), alpha, (see symbol)I, alphaI, alphaomega/, embedded in /hVd/ syllable produced by an Ohio male speaker were presented in pairs to three groups of listeners. Each listener rated 312 vowel pairs on a nine-point dissimilarity scale. The responses from each group were analyzed using a multidimensional scaling program (ALSCAL). Results demonstrated that all three groups of listeners used high/low and front/back distinctions as the two most important dimensions to perceive English vowels. However, the vowels were distributed in clusters in the perceptual space of Chinese monolinguals, while they were appropriately separated and located in that of bilinguals and English monolinguals. Besides the two common perceptual dimensions, each group of listeners utilized a different third dimension to perceive these English vowels. English monolinguals used high-front offset. Bilinguals used a dimension mainly correlated to the distinction of monophthong/diphthong. Chinese monolinguals separated two high vowels, /i/ and /u/, from the rest of vowels in the third dimension. The difference between English monolinguals and Chinese monolinguals evidenced the effect of listeners' native language on the vowel perception. The difference between Chinese monolinguals and bilingual listeners as well as the approximation of bilingual listeners' perceptual space to that of English monolinguals demonstrated the effect of L2 experience on listeners' perception of L2 vowels.

  16. 26th May 2011 -Delegate to CERN Open Council sessions and European Commission Head of Unit for Joint Programming European Research Area, DG Research and Innovation R. Lečbychová visiting the CERN Control Centre with M. Pojer, accompanied by CERN S. Stavrev.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    26th May 2011 -Delegate to CERN Open Council sessions and European Commission Head of Unit for Joint Programming European Research Area, DG Research and Innovation R. Lečbychová visiting the CERN Control Centre with M. Pojer, accompanied by CERN S. Stavrev.

  17. Session 6: Infant nutrition: future research developments in Europe EARNEST, the early nutrition programming project: EARly Nutrition programming - long-term Efficacy and Safety Trials and integrated epidemiological, genetic, animal, consumer and economic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewtrell, M S

    2007-08-01

    Increasing evidence from lifetime experimental studies in animals and observational and experimental studies in human subjects suggests that pre- and postnatal nutrition programme long-term health. However, key unanswered questions remain on the extent of early-life programming in contemporary European populations, relevant nutritional exposures, critical time periods, mechanisms and the effectiveness of interventions to prevent or reverse programming effects. The EARly Nutrition programming - long-term Efficacy and Safety Trials and integrated epidemiological, genetic, animal, consumer and economic research (EARNEST) consortium brings together a multi-disciplinary team of scientists from European research institutions in an integrated programme of work that includes experimental studies in human subjects, modern prospective observational studies and mechanistic animal work including physiological studies, cell-culture models and molecular techniques. Theme 1 tests early nutritional programming of disease in human subjects, measuring disease markers in childhood and early adulthood in nineteen randomised controlled trials of nutritional interventions in pregnancy and infancy. Theme 2 examines associations between early nutrition and later outcomes in large modern European population-based prospective studies, with detailed measures of diet in pregnancy and early life. Theme 3 uses animal, cellular and molecular techniques to study lifetime effects of early nutrition. Biomedical studies are complemented by studies of the social and economic importance of programming (themes 4 and 5), and themes encouraging integration, communication, training and wealth creation. The project aims to: help formulate policies on the composition and testing of infant foods; improve the nutritional value of infant formulas; identify interventions to prevent and reverse adverse early nutritional programming. In addition, it has the potential to develop new products through industrial

  18. Active listening in medical consultations: development of the Active Listening Observation Scale (ALOS-global).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassaert, T.; Dulmen, S. van; Schellevis, F.; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Active listening is a prerequisite for a successful healthcare encounter, bearing potential therapeutic value especially in clinical situations that require no specific medical intervention. Although generally acknowledged as such, active listening has not been studied in depth. This

  19. EFFECTS OF COOPERATIVE LEARNING METHOD ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF LISTENING COMPREHENSION AND LISTENING SKILLS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdülkadir

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effect of the learning together technique, which is one of the cooperative learning methods, on the development of the listening comprehension and listening skills of the secondary...

  20. Prior exposure to a reverberant listening environment improves speech intelligibility in adult cochlear implant listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Nirmal Kumar; Tobey, Emily A; Loizou, Philipos C

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate whether prior exposure to reverberant listening environment improves speech intelligibility of adult cochlear implant (CI) users. Six adult CI users participated in this study. Speech intelligibility was measured in five different simulated reverberant listening environments with two different speech corpuses. Within each listening environment, prior exposure was varied by either having the same environment across all trials (blocked presentation) or having different environment from trial to trial (unblocked). Speech intelligibility decreased as reverberation time increased. Although substantial individual variability was observed, all CI listeners showed an increase in the blocked presentation condition as compared to the unblocked presentation condition for both speech corpuses. Prior listening exposure to a reverberant listening environment improves speech intelligibility in adult CI listeners. Further research is required to understand the underlying mechanism of adaptation to listening environment.

  1. THE TECHNIQUES IN TEACHING LISTENING SKILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayah Nor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Listening is very important skill in language because by listening students can produce language like speaking and writing by vocabulary that they get from listening. The English teacher of MAN 3 Banjarmasin used some techniques in teaching listening using the facilities in language laboratory such as tape cassette, television, and VCD/DVD. This research described the techniques in teaching listening skill of the Islamic high school students. The subjects of this study were an English teacher and 48 students of the tenth grade at MAN 3 Banjarmasin in Academic Year 2009/2010. To collect the data, it was used some techniques such as observation, interview, and documentary. Then all data were analyzed using descriptive method qualitatively and quantitatively, by concluding inductively. The result indicates that the techniques in teaching listening applied by the English teacher of the tenth grade students at MAN 3 Banjarmasin in Academic Year 2009/2010 are: Information Transfer, Paraphrasing and Translating, Answering Questions, Summarizing, Filling in Blanks, and Answering to Show Comprehension of Messages. The students’ ability of listening comprehension using six techniques is categorized in very high, high, and average levels. Keywords: listening techniques, teaching listening skill

  2. Improving Students’ Listening Skill Through Shadowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukminatus Zuhriyah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Listening is the first part of language skills that everyone gets when learning a language. It comes before speaking, reading, and writing. Meanwhile, most of the students get difficulty to learn listening of a foreign language, especially English. That is why shadowing was applied in the listening class as one of the solutions to make the learners of English listening easy to understand what the speaker says. This collaborative classroom action research was generally to know whether or not shadowing could improve the students listening skill. It was also specifically to know: (1 the lecturer’s activities, (2 the students’ activities, and (3 the students’ responses during the implementation of shadowing in the listening class. The subjects were 18 students of the third semester of English department of education faculty of Hasyim Asy’ari university (UNHASY Tebuireng Jombang in the academic year of 2016/2017. The data were obtained from the observations got from the notes written by the collaborator and the listening test. The students’ listening skill improved after the implementation of shadowing. It could be seen in the improvement of mean score, from 74.2 in cycle one to 75 in cycle two. Then, the precentage of students passing the minimum mastery criteria also improved, from 61% in cycle one to 77.8% in cycle two. Thus, it can be concluded that shadowing could improve students’ listening skill.

  3. Can We Teach Effective Listening? An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspersz, Donella; Stasinska, Ania

    2015-01-01

    Listening is not the same as hearing. While hearing is a physiological process, listening is a conscious process that requires us to be mentally attentive (Low & Sonntag, 2013). The obvious place for scholarship about listening is in communication studies. While interested in listening, the focus of this study is on effective listening.…

  4. Extensive Listening 2.0 with Foreign Language Podcasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alm, Antonie

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the use of podcasts for out-of-class listening practice. Drawing on Vandergrift and Goh's metacognitive approach to extensive listening, it discusses their principles for listening projects in the context of podcast-based listening. The study describes a class of 28 intermediate German students, who listened to…

  5. Improving Students' Listening Skills. Idea Paper No. 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Terry

    Although listening has been shown to be the most frequent communication activity, and students desperately need listening training, the educational system usually ignores listening. After citing 10 bad listening habits which interfere with good aural communication and describing the characteristics of effective listeners, this paper offers 12…

  6. The Impact of Mobile Learning on Listening Anxiety and Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mehrak; Soleymani, Elham

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the impact of mobile learning on EFL learners' listening anxiety and listening comprehension. Fifty students of two intermediate English courses were selected and sampled as the experimental (n = 25) and control (n = 25) groups. Students' entry level of listening anxiety was assessed by foreign language listening…

  7. Listening Diary in the Digital Age: Students' Material Selection, Listening Problems, and Perceived Usefulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheryl Wei-yu

    2016-01-01

    The current study reports on a group of Taiwanese college students' first-person diary accounts of their private, transactional listening activities outside the classroom. Issues related to students' material selection, listening problems, and perceived usefulness of keeping a listening diary were explored. It was found that most students chose…

  8. The Role of Task and Listener Characteristics in Second Language Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunfaut, Tineke; Révész, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between second language (L2) listening and a range of task and listener characteristics. More specifically, for a group of 93 nonnative English speakers, the researchers examined the extent to which linguistic complexity of the listening task input and response, and speed and explicitness of the input, were…

  9. The Effect of a Listening Education Course on the Listening Behaviors of Prospective Turkish Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytan, Talat

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of a listening education course on the listening behaviors of prospective Turkish teachers. The participants of the study are 45 prospective teachers who are studying at a state university in Istanbul and taking a listening education course. The study is an experimental study in the model of "one group…

  10. Complex Listening: Supporting Students to Listen as Mathematical Sense-Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Allison; Tyson, Kersti

    2015-01-01

    Participating in reform-oriented mathematical discussion calls on teachers and students to listen to one another in new and different ways. However, listening is an understudied dimension of teaching and learning mathematics. In this analysis, we draw on a sociocultural perspective and a conceptual framing of three types of listening--evaluative,…

  11. Pre-listening stage and teaching listening from the adult learner’s perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ždímalová, Hana; Anýžová, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 /supplementary issue/ (2012), s. 23-38 ISSN 1210-0196. [New Ways to Teaching and Learning. Hrade Králové, 14.09.2012-15.09.2012] Institutional support: RVO:68378092 Keywords : listening comprehension * listening instruction * communicative competence * pre-listening stage Subject RIV: AI - Linguistics

  12. Foreign Language Listening Anxiety and Listening Performance: Conceptualizations and Causal Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian

    2013-01-01

    This study used structural equation modeling to explore the possible causal relations between foreign language (English) listening anxiety and English listening performance. Three hundred participants learning English as a foreign language (FL) completed the foreign language listening anxiety scale (FLLAS) and IELTS test twice with an interval of…

  13. Teaching Listening Skills to Young Learners through "Listen and Do" Songs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevik, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the use of songs to improve the listening skills of young learners. He first provides a theoretical discussion about listening skills and YLs, and about songs and YLs in general; second, he provides a sample lesson for what can be called "Listen and Do" songs for YLs at the beginning level. These are the songs…

  14. The Effect of Mindful Listening Instruction on Listening Sensitivity and Enjoyment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William Todd

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Mindful Listening Instruction on Music Listening Sensitivity and Music Listening Enjoyment. The type of mindfulness investigated in this study was of the social-psychological type, which shares both commonalities with and distinctions from meditative mindfulness. Enhanced context awareness,…

  15. Federal Food Programs-1975. Hearings before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Fourth Congress, First Session. Part 8--Administrative Failure of Food Stamp Program. Hearings held Detroit, Michigan, Februrary 6, 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    These hearings before the Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs focused on the Food Stamp Programs problems in Detroit, Michigan. Testimony was heard from such witnesses as the following: Coleman Young, Mayor of the City of Detroit; Eleanor Josatis, Chairwoman; Mayor-Common Council's Task Force on Hunger and Malnutrition; Muriel…

  16. Looking is not seeing and listening is not hearing: effect of an intervention to enhance auditory skills of graduate-entry nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellico, Linda Honan; Duffy, Thomas C; Fennie, Kristopher P; Swan, Katharine A

    2012-01-01

    Inspection/observation and listening/auscultation are essential skills for health care providers. Given that observational and auditory skills take time to perfect, there is concern about accelerated students' ability to attain proficiency in a timely manner. This article describes the impact of music auditory training (MAT) for nursing students in an accelerated master's entry program on their competence in detecting heart, lung, and bowel sounds. During the first semester, a two-hour MAT session with focused attention on pitch, timbre, rhythm, and masking was held for the intervention group; a control group received traditional instruction only. Students in the music intervention group demonstrated significant improvement in hearing bowel, heart, and lung sounds (p < .0001). The ability to label normal and abnormal heart sounds doubled; interpretation of normal and abnormal lung sounds improved by 50 percent; and bowel sounds interpretation improved threefold, demonstrating the effect of an adult-oriented, creative, yet practical method for teaching auscultation.

  17. Poster Session A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    carboxyl-groups. Support for this work was provided by the Bio-Organic Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Resource at UCSF (A. L. Burlingame, Director) through the Biomedical Research Technology Program of the NIH National Center for Research Resources, NIH NCRR P41RR001614. References 1. Good, D. M., Wirtala, M., McAlister, G. C., and Coon, J. J. (2007) Performance characteristics of electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 6, 1942–1951. A.6 Enrichment and Characterization of Secreted Glycopeptides Bearing SA1-0Galβ1-3GalNAcα Structures Z. Darula1, and K. F. Medzihradszky1,2 1Proteomics Research Group, Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, Hungary; 2Mass Spectrometry Facility, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA The lack of consensus sequence, common core structure, and universal endoglycosidase for the release of O-linked oligosaccharides makes O-glycosylation more difficult to tackle than N-glycosylation. Structural elucidation by mass spectrometry is usually inconclusive as the CID spectra of most glycopeptides are dominated by carbohydrate-related fragments. In addition, O-linked structures also undergo a gas-phase rearrangement reaction that eliminates the sugar without leaving a telltale sign at its former attachment site. In the present study we used electron-transfer dissociation for the characterization of intact glycopeptides affinity-enriched from bovine serum. Some glycopeptide-containing fractions were analyzed also after exoglycosidase treatment. Reducing the size of the carbohydrate chain aided the identification of multiply modified species. We report the unambiguous identification of 21 novel glycosylation sites. We also detail the limitations of the current methods. This work was supported by Hungarian Science Foundation grants OTKA T60283 (to KFM) and by NIH grant NCRR P41RR001614 to the UCSF MS Facility (Director, A. L. Burlingame). A.7

  18. 78 FR 21607 - Stakeholder Listening Session in Preparation for the 66th World Health Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ...'s Office of Global Affairs prepare for the World Health Assembly by taking full advantage of the... discussed at the 66th World Health Assembly http://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_files/WHA66/A66_1-en.pdf . RSVP...

  19. 77 FR 19666 - Stakeholder Listening Session in Preparation for the 65th World Health Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... for the World Health Assembly by taking full advantage of the knowledge, ideas, feedback, and... Health Assembly http://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_files/WHA65/A65_1-en.pdf . RSVP Due to security...

  20. 76 FR 11980 - Stakeholder Input: Listening Session to Provide Information and Solicit Suggestions for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... aquatic environments through the discharge of encrusting organisms from boat hulls, boat trailers, fishing..., enhanced turbidity, and introduce pathogenic organisms to the surrounding water. Coatings used to deter organism growth on vessel hulls can release heavy metals and/or other biocides, which can lead to acute or...

  1. 75 FR 66757 - Stakeholder Input; Listening Session Seeking Suggestions for Improving the Next National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) General Permit for Discharges Incidental to the Normal Operation of... an ``anonymous access'' system, which means EPA will not know your identity or contact information... fishing vessels, tankers, and ferries. B. What Should I Consider as I Prepare My Comments for EPA? 1...

  2. Effective techniques for teaching listening in English classes

    OpenAIRE

    BAIMBETOVA ZHAZIRA USIPBEKKYZY

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the importance of teaching listening in English classes. Teaching listening is one of the key points in teaching English. Effective methods can be beneficial for learning listening.

  3. Exploring the listening experiences during guided imagery and music therapy of outpatients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Mei-Hsien; Lin, Mei-Feng

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to explore the listening experiences of outpatient depression sufferers who underwent guided imagery and music therapy (GIM). A purposive sampling method was performed at the psychiatric outpatient clinic of a medical center in southern Taiwan from April 2003 to June 2004. The five subjects in this study all underwent a total of eight sessions of individual GIM therapy. The researcher invited a therapist to implement the GIM therapy sessions. Researchers conducted a semi-structured, in-depth telephone interview with each subject within 24 to 48 hours after each therapy session. Eight interviews were accomplished and transcribed for each case, and then subject to content analysis. The results showed a total of 55 important listening episodes, which could be categorized into the following 5 themes: (1) leisurely wandering in very natural sceneries; (2) creation of surreal virtual surroundings; (3) recollection of past life experiences; (4) submersion in thematic music melodies; and (5) experiencing various physical relaxation events. The triggering effect represented a combination of multiple factors, including music, the individual, the therapist and environment. The theme of each patient's imagery episode was a result of the effect of the four factors, with music having the greatest impact. This study hopes to present the listening experiences of depression sufferers in GIM therapy; to make suggestions for future investigations into subsequent impacts and changes that GIM has on patients; and to, perhaps, serve as references for future clinical practice or studies.

  4. Toward a Pedagogy of Materially Engaged Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVecchia, Christina M.

    2017-01-01

    As writing teachers increasingly engage students with audio media, it has become crucial to coach listening explicitly in the classroom, activities that students may otherwise approach passively. In this article I suggest that a rhetorical approach applicable to (or derived from) print texts is not enough to help students listen actively, and…

  5. Listening Effort With Cochlear Implant Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pals, Carina; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Başkent, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Fitting a cochlear implant (CI) for optimal speech perception does not necessarily optimize listening effort. This study aimed to show that listening effort may change between CI processing conditions for which speech intelligibility remains constant. Method: Nineteen normal-hearing

  6. Instructor Active Empathic Listening and Classroom Incivility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Harry

    2018-01-01

    Instructor listening skill is an understudied area in instructional communication research. This study looks at teachers' active empathic listening behavior association with student incivility. Scholars recognize student incivility as a growing problem and have called for research that identifies classroom behaviors that can affect classroom…

  7. Perception and Knowledge: Teachers' Views on Listening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study surveyed, by means of a questionnaire, teachers' knowledge and perception of listening comprehension and its teaching in some junior secondary schools in Gaborone, Botswana. The findings are that the teachers, in the schools surveyed, perceive listening comprehension as important; understand the stages ...

  8. "Listening Silence" and Its Discursive Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applebaum, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    While researchers have studied how white silence protects white innocence and white ignorance, in this essay Barbara Applebaum explores a form of white silence that she refers to as "listening silence" in which silence protects white innocence but does not necessarily promote resistance to learning. White listening silence can appear to…

  9. The Effect of Age on Listening Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeest, Sofie; Keppler, Hannah; Corthals, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of age on listening effort. Method: A dual-task paradigm was used to evaluate listening effort in different conditions of background noise. Sixty adults ranging in age from 20 to 77 years were included. A primary speech-recognition task and a secondary memory task were performed…

  10. Impacts of Captioned Movies on Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janfaza, Abusaied; Jelyani, Saghar Javidi; Soori, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of technology, the implication of authentic multimedia-based teaching materials are using widely in language classrooms. Technology can be in service of teaching different skills such as listening, reading, speaking and writing. Among these skills listening comprehension is a skill in which the learners have problems to master.…

  11. Listening in the General Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolvin, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Research supports the point that listening skills play an important role in 21st century personal, academic, and professional success. This article argues that educators should include listening, a critical communication competency, in the oral communication course in the general education curriculum. (Contains 1 table.)

  12. Empathic Listening as a Transferable Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Gritten

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This text responds to Deniz Peters' argument with three things: a broad context for empathic listening based on its value as a transferable skill; a comment on the relationship between musical empathy and "social empathy via music"; and a comment on the "indeterminacy" at the beginning of empathic listening.

  13. Listening Ability: Check It or Wreck It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, Alan

    Listening is an integral element of the curricular goals of all modern foreign language classrooms because it is: (1) a motivator and facilitator, (2) a reliable predictor of language learning success, and (3) a skill contributing to success in many endeavors in life. A variety of classroom teaching and testing procedures based on listening skills…

  14. Strategy-based listening and pragmatic comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corsetti, Cristiane Ruzicki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the role of strategy-based listening as an alternative methodological approach to develop pragmatic comprehension in L2 contexts. Pragmatic comprehension refers to the understanding of speech acts and conversational implicatures. Listening comprehension comprises both bottom-up and top-down processes. Strategy-based listening encompasses the activation of pragmatic knowledge through pre-listening activities and the development of specific listening micro-skills. An empirical project which included a classroom project carried out with a group of eight learners preparing for the IELTS examination in 2009 corroborated the following assumptions: in order to achieve listening proficiency, learners need practice in making inferences as semantic and pragmatic inferences are embedded in verbal communication; semantic and pragmatic aspects affecting the meaning of utterances can be highlighted via comprehension activities focusing on specific listening subskills. The results of the classroom project suggested that strategy-based listening is potentially capable of directly enhancing pragmatic comprehension but were inconclusive with regards to pragmatic production

  15. Optimizing Visually-Assisted Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Ahmad Sabouri; Sajjadi, Samad; Sohrabi, Mohammad Reza; Younespour, Shima

    2011-01-01

    The fact that visual aids such as pictures or graphs can lead to greater comprehension by language learners has been well established. Nonetheless, the order of presenting visuals to listeners is left unattended. This study examined listening comprehension from a strategy of introducing visual information, either prior to or during an audio…

  16. Visual Cues and Listening Effort: Individual Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picou, Erin M.; Ricketts, Todd A; Hornsby, Benjamin W. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of visual cues on listening effort as well as whether predictive variables such as working memory capacity (WMC) and lipreading ability affect the magnitude of listening effort. Method: Twenty participants with normal hearing were tested using a paired-associates recall task in 2 conditions (quiet and noise) and…

  17. Listening as an Act of Composing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald, Katharine; Roskelly, Hephzibah

    The fact that students have not learned to listen may be the reason some of them cannot write. Listening is an active process requiring the same skills of prediction, hypothesizing, checking, revising, and generalization that reading and writing demand. The following three exercises were designed to make students conscious of themselves as active…

  18. Culture and Listeners' Gaze Responses to Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is frequently observed that listeners demonstrate gaze aversion to stuttering. This response may have profound social/communicative implications for both fluent and stuttering individuals. However, there is a lack of empirical examination of listeners' eye gaze responses to stuttering, and it is unclear whether cultural background…

  19. A Survey of Iranian EFL Teachers’ and Learners’ Perceptions Toward Authentic Listening Materials at University Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mahdavi Zhafarghandi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to deal with attitudes of teachers and learners toward authentic listening materials at pre- intermediate level. Studies have indicated the positive effect of authentic listening materials on motivation and listening comprehension ability in learners of English as a foreign language (Nuttall, 1996; Peacock, 1997; Miller, 2005; Field, 2008. It focused on EFL teachers and students at pre intermediate proficiency level. Participants included 60 students, from both gender; male and female university students studying at Rodaki Higher Institute Education in the fields of: Accounting, Computer Engineering and Commercial Management and also 30 teachers who taught listening at Rodaki Higher Institute Education. The students were randomly selected and assigned to two groups. Then, Oxford Placement test as a standard test was administered to the participant in order to determine their proficiency level. Then, the participants were divided into two groups of control and experiment. The experiment group received the listening materials taken from UK radio program whereas the other group received simplified listening materials taken from the authentic listening materials. Afterwards, to be sure that they know what authentic materials are, they were exposed to both of related materials, then the questionnaire was distributed among them, the results taken from the questionnaire showed that the participants of this study prefer authentic materials and have positive attitudes toward using them. By the same token, the analysis of teachers’ questionnaire also showed their satisfaction with authentic listening materials. These findings can have implications for language learning/teaching, and curriculum development paving the way for educational policy makers, teachers and learners to introduce authentic listening materials to EFL learners at pre- intermediate proficiency level.

  20. IMC9 Edinburgh Nomenclature Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvell, Lorelei L; Hawksworth, David L; Petersen, Ronald H; Redhead, Scott A

    2010-12-01

    The proceedings of the 3-5 August 2010, IMC9 Edinburgh Nomenclature Sessions are briefly summarized. The final resolution approved by the General Assembly endorses the recommendations by the Nomenclature Sessions regarding transfer of the governance of fungal nomenclature from botanical to mycological congresses, mandatory pre-publication deposit of nomenclatural information for valid publication of new fungal names, and the acceptability of English as an alternative to Latin in the valid publication of fungal names. Complete results from the IMC9 nomenclature questionnaire are also provided.

  1. A method of conducting therapeutic sessions with MDMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, G R; Tolbert, R

    1998-01-01

    A method for preparing clients and conducting therapeutic sessions with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is described, with emphasis on the need for careful attention to the mental set of therapists and clients and the setting of the session. The therapists' belief was that MDMA inhibited the fear response to a perceived emotional threat, allowing the client to place the emotional sequelae of past experiences into a more realistic perspective in their current emotional lives and relationships. Clients were carefully screened and prepared until they had a clear purpose for the session, including a willingness to experience and to learn from anything that might happen. Sympathomimetic effects of MDMA determined the medical contraindications, and clients with histories of serious functional psychiatric impairments were excluded. Total doses of 75-150 mg, plus 50 mg if requested later, were administered, followed by clients lying down and listening to music with eyeshades and headphones during the peak MDMA effect. Screening and follow-up questionnaires were utilized. Two case histories are presented: a man achieving relief of pain from multiple myeloma, and a woman finding relief from problems as the daughter of Holocaust survivors. Use of consciousness-altering drugs in other contexts is discussed.

  2. A Comparative Evaluation of Minimal Therapist Contact and 15-Session Treatment for Female Orgasmic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morokoff, Patricia J.; LoPiccolo, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    Compared a four-session minimal therapist contact (MTC) program for treatment of lifelong global orgasmic dysfunction in women to a 15-session full therapist contact (FTC) program. Both programs were effective in producing female orgasm and in improving satisfaction with the sexual relationship and, for women in MTC treatment, happiness in…

  3. Secure Sessions for Web Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhargavan, K.; Corin, R.J.; Fournet, C.; Gordon, A.D.

    2004-01-01

    WS-Security provides basic means to secure SOAP traffic, one envelope at a time. For typical web services, however, using WS-Security independently for each message is rather inefficient; besides, it is often important to secure the integrity of a whole session, as well as each message. To this end,

  4. 40 Listening Effectively For Results in an ESL/EFL Classroom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    could be an empathic listening, listening for enjoyment, or precision listening. These could be achieved through active listening and critical listening. Active Listening. To get the best of what is being said, one should be an active listener not a passive one. An active listener makes a mental outline of important points, thinks ...

  5. Second and foreign language listening: unraveling the construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafaghodtari, Marzieh H; Vandergrift, Larry

    2008-08-01

    Identifying the variables which contribute to second and foreign language (L2) listening ability can provide a better understanding of the listening construct. This study explored the degree to which first language (L1) listening ability, L2 proficiency, motivation and metacognition contribute to L2 listening comprehension. 115 Persian-speaking English as a Foreign Language (EFL) university students completed a motivation questionnaire, the Language Learning Motivation Orientation Scale, a listening questionnaire, the Metacognitive Awareness Listening Questionnaire, and an English-language proficiency measure, as well as listening tests in English and Persian. Scores from all measures were subjected to descriptive, inferential, and correlational analyses. The results support the hypothesis that variability in L2 listening cannot be explained by either L2 proficiency or L1 listening ability; rather, a cluster of variables including L2 proficiency, L1 listening ability, metacognitive knowledge and motivation orientations can better explain variability in L2 listening ability.

  6. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN STUDENTS’ FREQUENCY OF LISTENING TO ENGLISH SONGS AND THEIR LISTENING ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Rosyida M. R.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at investigating whether there is a significant correlation between students’ frequency of listening to English songs and their listening achievement This study was conducted at the first year students of State Senior High School 9 Bandarlampung, Lampung. A descriptive quantitative was employed in this study which used ex-post facto design and the data were taken from questionnaire, semi-structured interview, and listening test. The data were analyzed by using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS version 16.0. The hypothesis was tested by using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient. The test result showed that there is a significant correlation between students’ frequency of listening to English songs and their listening achievement. From the result of interview, it showed that most of the students believe that by having high frequency of listening to English songs, it helps them in recognizing the spoken language and get high score in listening ability.Keywords: listening to English song, listening ability, frequency of listening

  7. An Investigation of the Effect of Transcribing Listening on Iranian EFL Learners’ Listening Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Shafiee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Some studies have shown that transcription of listening sections in EFL situations improves the listening skill dramatically. Some teachers at language institutes have examined this method of listening improvement and at the end of the term discerned the outstanding progress in learners’ listening skill. This paper takes two fifteen-learner advanced EFL classes into consideration to find out the extent to which learners’ listening skill can be affected by listening parts they transcribed during the term. In one the classrooms, before listening to the listening sections, learners transcribed them at home beforehand and left a blank for words they couldn’t understand. Then they took those transcriptions to the classroom for revision and filling the blanks. Findings of this study exhibited that those learners who did the job of transcribing during the term could improve their listening skill much more than those who didn’t. This method also helps learners improve their concentration during the listening, their speed of writing, and finally their spelling.

  8. Impacts of Captioned Movies on Listening Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abusaied Janfaza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of technology, the implication of authentic multimedia-based teaching materials are using widely in language classrooms. Technology can be in service of teaching different skills such as listening, reading, speaking and writing. Among these skills listening comprehension is a skill in which the learners have problems to master. Regarding this issue, utilizing captions for the education purposes has been a good motivation for conducting some research on the effects of captions of listening skills. However, it seems that there is a gap in the literature whether to use captioned movies in the classroom and whether they are effective in improving listening comprehension. Many studies have been conducted on this issue. However, their findings are conclusive. While some studies refer to the effectiveness of using captions, others revel that they are not so effective for improving the learner’s language skills. Hence, the present study is a review of the effects of captioned movies on the improvement of listening skill. In this case, the findings of this study can clarify the role of using captioned movies in improving the listening skill Keywords: captioned movie, technology, listening comprehension, instruction

  9. Using Dictation to Promote the Use of Grammar Knowledge in Reconstructing Listening Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesthi Herusatoto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the findings of the implementation of full dictation and partial dictation in improving the awareness of using grammar knowledge in reconstructing listening texts among the EFL students at STBA (School of Foreign Languages LIA Yogyakarta. Three groups participated in the study, i.e. two experimental groups (Group A and B and a control group (Group C. A pre-test on listening to lectures was administered to the three groups. Over 9 sessions, Group C did the listening exercises in their textbook using dicto-comp technique, while in addition to the listening exercises which applied dicto-comp, the students in Group A was given full dictation exercises and Group B received partial dictation exercises. A post-test was given to the three groups after the ninth session. In addition to the post-test, a 5-point Likert-scale questionnaire assessing the students responses to the dictation exercises was given to the experimental groups. Results of paired-samples tests indicated that there was a significant difference between each groups pre- and post-test. The mean gain score of Group B was higher than Group A showing that Group B had better improvement in the post-test. Furthermore, Group B had better grammar points in their post-test compared to Group A. Group C also increased their scores but they still got their teachers assistance to point out their grammatical mistakes in their notes. This suggests that the dictations given to the experimental groups improved the students awareness in applying their grammar knowledge to reproduce a listening text they heard.

  10. Aspen Global Change Institute Summer Science Sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzenberger, John; Kaye, Jack A

    2006-10-01

    The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) successfully organized and convened six interdisciplinary meetings over the course of award NNG04GA21G. The topics of the meetings were consistent with a range of issues, goals and objectives as described within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan and more broadly by the US Global Change Research Program/Our Changing Planet, the more recent Climate Change Program Strategic Plan and the NSF Pathways report. The meetings were chaired by two or more leaders from within the disciplinary focus of each session. 222 scholars for a total of 1097 participants-days were convened under the auspices of this award. The overall goal of each AGCI session is to further the understanding of Earth system science and global environmental change through interdisciplinary dialog. The format and structure of the meetings allows for presentation by each participant, in-depth discussion by the whole group, and smaller working group and synthesis activities. The size of the group is important in terms of the group dynamics and interaction, and the ability for each participant's work to be adequately presented and discussed within the duration of the meeting, while still allowing time for synthesis

  11. Effects of Listening to Music versus Environmental Sounds in Passive and Active Situations on Levels of Pain and Fatigue in Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadíe, Lolita; Mick, Gérard; Guétin, Stéphane; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    In fibromyalgia, pain symptoms such as hyperalgesia and allodynia are associated with fatigue. Mechanisms underlying such symptoms can be modulated by listening to pleasant music. We expected that listening to music, because of its emotional impact, would have a greater modulating effect on the perception of pain and fatigue in patients with fibromyalgia than listening to nonmusical sounds. To investigate this hypothesis, we carried out a 4-week study in which patients with fibromyalgia listened to either preselected musical pieces or environmental sounds when they experienced pain in active (while carrying out a physical activity) or passive (at rest) situations. Concomitant changes of pain and fatigue levels were evaluated. When patients listened to music or environmental sounds at rest, pain and fatigue levels were significantly reduced after 20 minutes of listening, with no difference of effect magnitude between the two stimuli. This improvement persisted 10 minutes after the end of the listening session. In active situations, pain did not increase in presence of the two stimuli. Contrary to our expectations, music and environmental sounds produced a similar relieving effect on pain and fatigue, with no benefit gained by listening to pleasant music over environmental sounds. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Beam instability Workshop - plenary sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to provide a review of the mechanisms of limiting beam instabilities, their cures, including feedback, and beam measurement for synchrotron radiation light sources. 12 plenary sessions took place whose titles are: 1) challenging brilliance and lifetime issues with increasing currents; 2) limiting instabilities in multibunch; 3) experience from high currents in B factories; 4) longitudinal dynamics in high intensity/bunch; 5) Transverse instabilities for high intensity/bunch; 6) working group introduction from ESRF experience; 7) impedance modelling: simulations, minimization; 8) report on the broadband impedance measurements and modelling workshop; 9) feedback systems for synchrotron light sources; 10) beam instabilities diagnostics; 11) harmonic cavities: the pros and cons; and 12) experimental study of fast beam-ion instabilities at PLS. This document gathers the 12 articles that were presented during these sessions.

  13. The Relationship Between Listening Strategy Performance and Critical Listening Ability of Indonesian Students

    OpenAIRE

    Arono Arono

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that students’ critical listening ability can be improved through proper listening strategy performance. This action research (Fraenkel & Wallen, 2007) was conducted in line with the assumption that students of Indonesia Literature and Language Education, Bengkulu University and Bengkulu Muhammadiyah University could reach proficient level provided that they were taught properly. The goal of this research was to reveal listening strategy performance related to students’ cri...

  14. The different patterns of group climate critical incidents in high and low cohesion sessions of group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, L J

    1990-10-01

    The total data set for this study consisted of 958 critical incidents from high and low cohesion sessions in person-centered group psychotherapy. These incidents were typically noted on a group climate questionnaire at the end of each session. Altogether 211 clients and students participated in twenty-six groups. The high cohesion sessions were dominated by the following cohesion dimensions in rank order: self-disclosure and feedback (24.0%); attraction and bonding (20.2%); listening and empathy (20.0%); process performance and goal attainment (15.0%); and support and caring (10.6%). The corresponding rank order for the low cohesion sessions was strikingly different: avoidance and defensiveness (43.5%); conflict and rebellion (22.2%); and self-disclosure and feedback (8.9%). Apparently then, there are very different patterns of critical incidents in high and low cohesion sessions of group psychotherapy.

  15. Understanding Listening Competency: A Systematic Review of Research Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Peter C.; Cohen, Steven D.; Wolvin, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand what constitutes listening competency, we perform a systematic review of listening scales. Our goal was twofold: to determine the most commonly appearing listening traits and to determine if listening scales are similar to one other. As part of our analysis, we identified 53 relevant scales and analyzed the scales…

  16. Rethinking Conceptual Approaches to the Study of "Listening"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    Theory about listening has been strongly affected by methodological orientations and institutional pressures. It would help if researchers spent more time on the objects of study rather than method. Traditional listening research has confused listening with general cognitive abilities, such as IQ. Studying listening as memory is a tempting…

  17. The Forgotten Aspect of Communication: Principals' Listening Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Jerry; Shoho, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated principals' self-perceptions and teachers' perceptions of principals' listening skills. An instrument measuring perception of listening skills was developed on the basis of four listening factors: attending, empathy, response, and trustworthiness. Factor analysis confirmed the structure of the new listening instrument, and…

  18. John Dewey on Listening and Friendship in School and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Leonard J.

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Leonard Waks examines John Dewey's account of listening, drawing on Dewey's writings to establish a direct connection in his work between listening and democracy. Waks devotes the first part of the essay to explaining Dewey's distinction between one-way or straight-line listening and transactional listening-in-conversation, and to…

  19. Teaching Listening as a Communicative Skill in Military English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likaj, Manjola

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with teaching listening in English for Specific Purposes and more specifically in Military English. There are presented different approaches on listening and ways on teaching it in ESP. Active listening it is seen as one of the most productive and applicable approach in teaching ESP students how to master the skill of listening.…

  20. Second Language Learners' Perceptions of Listening Strategy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Much research regarding listening strategies has focused on assembling lists of reported strategies and gaining better understanding of differences in strategy usage between less- and more-skilled listeners. Less attention has been given to how the accumulating knowledge based on listening strategies informs listening strategy instruction as…

  1. Engagement beyond Interruption: A Performative Perspective on Listening and Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Chris; Nainby, Keith

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an understanding of listening as a performative and pedagogical act. Moving beyond existing theories of listening in communication and education studies that frame listening as a selective and incremental act, this article considers listening in terms of a performance studies and critical education studies perspective. An…

  2. Risky music-listening behaviors and associated health-risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Ineke; van de Looij-Jansen, Petra M; Mieloo, Cathelijne L; Burdorf, Alex; de Waart, Frouwkje

    2012-06-01

    To examine, among adolescents and emerging adults attending inner-city lower education, associations between risky music-listening behaviors (from MP3 players and in discotheques and at pop concerts) and more traditional health-risk behaviors: substance use (cigarettes, alcohol, cannabis, and hard drugs) and unsafe sexual intercourse. A total of 944 students in Dutch inner-city senior-secondary vocational schools completed questionnaires about their music-listening and traditional health-risk behaviors. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to examine associations between music-listening and traditional health-risk behaviors. Risky MP3-player listeners used cannabis more often during the past 4 weeks. Students exposed to risky sound levels during discotheque and pop concert attendance used cannabis less often during the past 4 weeks, were more often binge drinkers, and reported inconsistent condom use during sexual intercourse. The coexistence of risky music-listening behaviors with other health-risk behaviors provides evidence in support of the integration of risky music-listening behaviors within research on and programs aimed at reducing more traditional health-risk behaviors, such as substance abuse and unsafe sexual intercourse.

  3. Hypertension—Listen to Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Hypertension —Listen to Your Heart Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... G. Nabel Why should Americans be concerned about high blood pressure? Hypertension—or high blood pressure—is a serious ...

  4. Music evokes vicarious emotions in listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Why do we listen to sad music? We seek to answer this question using a psychological approach. It is possible to distinguish perceived emotions from those that are experienced. Therefore, we hypothesized that, although sad music is perceived as sad, listeners actually feel (experience) pleasant emotions concurrent with sadness. This hypothesis was supported, which led us to question whether sadness in the context of art is truly an unpleasant emotion. While experiencing sadness may be unpleasant, it may also be somewhat pleasant when experienced in the context of art, for example, when listening to sad music. We consider musically evoked emotion vicarious, as we are not threatened when we experience it, in the way that we can be during the course of experiencing emotion in daily life. When we listen to sad music, we experience vicarious sadness. In this review, we propose two sides to sadness by suggesting vicarious emotion. PMID:24910621

  5. Dutch listeners' perception of Korean stop triplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates Dutch listeners' perception of Korean stop triplets. Whereas Dutch distinguishes prevoiced and voiceless unaspirated stops, Korean distinguishes fortis, lenis, and aspirated stops. Here, perception of fortis, lenis, and aspirated bilabial (/pp/-/p/-/ph/), alveolar

  6. Interpretive Listening: An Alternative to Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John

    1983-01-01

    Outlines an alternative interpretive approach to listening which is grounded in the hermeneutic phenomenologies of Heidegger, Gadamer, and Ricoeur. Explains four features of this alternative: openness, linguisticality, play, and the fusion of horizons. Discusses conceptual and pedagogical implications. (PD)

  7. Developing an Instrument for Iranian EFL Learners’ Listening Comprehension Problems and Listening Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Noroozi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the body of literature on listening strategies to EFL learners, what seems to be lacking is that the focus is on teaching listening strategies to learners with little attention to their listening comprehension problems. No local research has been conducted on the nature of the Iranian tertiary level students' EFL listening comprehension problems or strategies. Therefore, no instrument is available to investigate these constructs. This paper reports the findings of a study that made an attempt to develop and test an instrument that will aid researchers identify students’ specific listening problems and listening strategy repertoire. The instrument was developed by integrating and validating the available instruments in the related literature. The two developed questionnaires were: the Listening Comprehension Problems Questionnaire (LCPQ and the Listening Strategy Use Questionnaire (LSUQ. Problems related to designing and testing this instrument is shared and the modifications made to it are presented. The instrument is expected to be useful for researchers interested to study the area of EFL listening in a similar setting.

  8. Psychophysiological Responses to Group Exercise Training Sessions: Does Exercise Intensity Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Vandoni

    Full Text Available Group exercise training programs were introduced as a strategy for improving health and fitness and potentially reducing dropout rates. This study examined the psychophysiological responses to group exercise training sessions. Twenty-seven adults completed two group exercise training sessions of moderate and vigorous exercise intensities in a random and counterbalanced order. The %HRR and the exertional and arousal responses to vigorous session were higher than those during the moderate session (p<0.05. Consequently, the affective responses to vigorous session were less pleasant than those during moderate session (p<0.05. These results suggest that the psychophysiological responses to group exercise training sessions are intensity-dependent. From an adherence perspective, interventionists are encouraged to emphasize group exercise training sessions at a moderate intensity to maximize affective responses and to minimize exertional responses, which in turn may positively affect future exercise behavior.

  9. USING FUN ACTIVITIES TO IMPROVE LISTENING SKILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Andyani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the researcher’s experience in teaching English at MTsN Mojokerto, there are three problems dealing with the teaching of listening especially for the third year students: 1 most of the students’ scores on listening test are still under the minimum passing criterion (KKM, which is 60; 2 most students are not very enthusiastic in listening activities; 3 it is difficult for students to understand native speech in a tape recorder. Based on the problems, the main purpose of the study is to improve the ninth grade students’ listening skill using Fun Activity in the form of Games at MTsN Mojokerto. The design of this study was Classroom Action Research. The instruments were the listening tests, observation checklist and questionnaires. With the implementation of the games, the criteria of success were successfully achieved in Cycle 2. 74% of the total number of the students could get the scores more than 60 and 90% have positive responses on the implementation of games. Keywords: tic tac toe game, running dictation game, whispering game, listening skill

  10. The Relationship between Listening Strategies Used by Egyptian EFL College Sophomores and Their Listening Comprehension and Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Hassan M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored listening strategy use among a group of Egyptian EFL college sophomores (N = 84). More specifically, it aimed to identify 1) the strategies used more often by participants, 2) the relationship between listening strategy use, and listening comprehension and self-efficacy, and 3) differences in listening comprehension and…

  11. Improving Speaking by Listening Cultivating English Thinking and Expression--Probe into the Teaching of "Business English Listening"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wencheng

    2009-01-01

    The comprehensive listening curriculum occupies an important position in elementary teaching stage for English major. How could we arrange the listening class better? Considering the characteristics of comprehensive listening curriculum for English major, teachers can help students improve speaking by listening, cultivating their thinking and…

  12. Listening: important to the stuff of a life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkers, Sandra Schmidt

    2015-04-01

    The author presents ideas from Parse's humanbecoming paradigm, including living quality as the stuff of a life. The following question is explored: In what way could listening be important to living the core knowings of living quality? Three ways of viewing listening as connected to living quality are presented: listening as silence, listening as dialogue, and listening as ethics. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. The Investigation of Authentic vs. Pedagogical Tape Scripts on Listening Comprehension Ability of Tourism Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayda Rahmani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study is an attempt to investigate the effects of authentic vs. pedagogical tape scripts on Iranian EFL learners' listening comprehension ability. For this purpose an OPT (Oxford Placement Test was administered to a total of 78 Iranian EFL learners. Then, 40 of them who were considered as intermediate learners were selected. The participants were randomly divided into two groups i.e. an experimental group and a control group. Both groups were pretested prior to the study. Then, the experimental group received the treatment in the form of listening to authentic or real English i.e. the real conversations by native speakers of English; while, the control group was exposed to pedagogical listening skills that were specially recorded for EFL learners of foreigners After ten sessions, both groups were post tested. Then the results of the posttests were subjects of statistical analysis (paired-samples t-test and independent-samples t-test. The results indicated that the experimental group did better than the control group and there is a significant difference between the mean scores of the experimental group who were exposed to authentic tape scripts and the control group who received a normal practice of listening proficiency i.e. a placebo.

  14. Music Listening modulates Functional Connectivity and Information Flow in the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmonik, Christof; Brandt, Anthony; Anderson, Jeff; Brooks, Forrest; Lytle, Julie; Silverman, Elliott; Frazier, Jeff T

    2016-07-27

    Listening to familiar music has recently been reported to be beneficial during recovery from stroke. A better understanding of changes in functional connectivity and information flow is warranted in order to further optimize and target this approach through music therapy. Twelve healthy volunteers listened to seven different auditory samples during an fMRI scanning session: a musical piece chosen by the volunteer that evokes a strong emotional response (referred to as: "self-selected emotional"), two unfamiliar music pieces (Invention #1 by J. S. Bach* and Gagaku - Japanese classical opera, referred to as "unfamiliar"), the Bach piece repeated with visual guidance (DML: Directed Music Listening) and three spoken language pieces (unfamiliar African click language, an excerpt of emotionally charged language, and an unemotional reading of a news bulletin). Functional connectivity and betweenness (BTW) maps, a measure for information flow, were created with a graph-theoretical approach. Distinct variation in functional connectivity was found for different music pieces consistently for all subjects. Largest brain areas were recruited for processing self-selected music with emotional attachment or culturally unfamiliar music. Maps of information flow correlated significantly with fMRI BOLD activation maps (p<0.05). Observed differences in BOLD activation and functional connectivity may help explain previously observed beneficial effects in stroke recovery, as increased blood flow to damaged brain areas stimulated by active engagement through music listening may have supported a state more conducive to therapy.

  15. Practical Session: Simple Linear Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Two exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. The first one is based on the famous Galton's data set on heredity. We use the lm R command and get coefficients estimates, standard error of the error, R2, residuals …In the second example, devoted to data related to the vapor tension of mercury, we fit a simple linear regression, predict values, and anticipate on multiple linear regression. This pratical session is an excerpt from practical exercises proposed by A. Dalalyan at EPNC (see Exercises 1 and 2 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_4.pdf).

  16. "Listening Is an Act of Love": Learning Listening through StoryCorps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Nathaniel; Tenzek, Kelly E.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of listening continues to be reinforced within professional, personal, and popular cultural contexts. Despite the attention employers, teachers, scholars, and various popular outlets attend to listening, engaging students in activities that practice such skills remain challenging. Understanding that interpersonal competence requires…

  17. Listening is my bugbear: Why Iranian L2 learners keep underperforming in the listening module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novid Armiun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper shares the results of a study into the way Iranian TEF or TEFAQ candidates treat the listening comprehension as a skill as well as their awareness and exploitation of metacognitive strategies while listening to an audio document. A Persian translation of the Metacognitive Awareness Listening Questionnaire (MALQ was used in addition to another questionnaire specifically developed for this research in order to gage how important candidates think listening in L2 is compared to the other skills, how much time they spent on practicing listening, and how often they take advantage of authentic documents to improve their listening. Not only did the results show an underestimation of the listening comprehension skill by the majority of Iranian L2 learners, but they also pointed to significant differences in the way men and women exercised their ears and treated the incoming audio stream. The paper concludes that learners’ awareness of listening strategies needs to be raised through classroom instruction and frequent exploitation of authentic documents outside the classroom setting should be encouraged.

  18. ENGLISH LISTENING BLENDED LEARNING: THE IMPLEMENTATION OF BLENDED LEARNING IN TEACHING LISTENING TO UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Puji Permana Aji

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As one of the English skills, listening needs more than one instance in hearing because it is not only hearing but also understanding and interpreting the meaning of the conversation. Therefore, to make the students interested and easy to understand in listening, the lecturer applied blended learning. The primary focus of this research is to observe the implementation of blended learning in teaching listening. This is a qualitative research of which the subject is the students in one class. There are 28 students, 9 males and 19 females. The data were collected by interviewing the listening lecturer, observing the activities in the classroom and giving the questionnaire to the students. The result of the research showed that the implementation of blended learning in teaching listening at university was able to improve the students’ listening skill. In summary, this study demonstrated that the use of blended learning in teaching listening offered ways for lecturers to be more effective in the teaching and learning process and brought positive outcomes for the students.   Keywords: Blended learning, listening, teaching

  19. Learning to Listen: Teaching an Active Listening Strategy to Preservice Education Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, David; Hamlin, Dawn; McCarthy, John; Head-Reeves, Darlene; Schreiner, Mary

    2008-01-01

    The importance of parent-teacher communication has been widely recognized; however, there is only limited research on teaching effective listening skills to education professionals. In this study, a pretest-posttest control group design was used to examine the effect of instruction on the active listening skills of preservice education…

  20. Effects of Cooperative Learning Method on the Development of Listening Comprehension and Listening Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirbas, Abdulkadir

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effect of the learning together technique, which is one of the cooperative learning methods, on the development of the listening comprehension and listening skills of the secondary school eighth grade students was investigated. Regarding the purpose of the research, experimental and control groups consisting of 75 students from,…

  1. Listening in a Multilingual World: The Challenges of Second Language (L2) Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Research into language acquisition and oral language use was examined in order to identify key factors that contribute to the successful acquisition of second language (L2) listening ability. The factors were grouped into three major domains: affective, cognitive, and interpersonal. It is claimed that in each domain, proficient L2 listeners have…

  2. (Criative Listening: proposals for the development of music listening in basic education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Lopes da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the years 2015 and 2016 we coordinated a research entitled Mediated and expanded listening for high school music classes: Dialogues between Murray Schafer and Luciano Berio, which proposed structuring methodological approaches to develop and expand the musical listening of young people who are at school having as a start point the dialogue between listening strategies proposed by Murray Schafer and the work of Luciano Berio. For the construction of a pedagogical-musical approach centered on listening the teaching strategies to expand the listening proposed by Schafer (2011 were mapped as well as four musical pieces by the composer Luciano Berio were analyzed. Our hypothesis was that the use of the teaching strategies proposed by Schafer for the active appreciation of Berio repertoire could enhance the development of a renewed musical listening, which would require from the students and the teacher an extension or a expansion of concepts of what they understand by «music». The results showed that the young participants expressed interest in the contemporary repertoire as they were being instrumentalized by the developed mediation activities. Mediation was carried out through active listening proposals through creative action on the sounds around us and on the selected repertoire. The experience of listening to music is a creative activity and has intensive demands on your exercise. It is an inner process of knowledge and discovery that should be considered central in the training of music teachers.

  3. Listening Comprehension Performance Viewed in the Light of Emotional Intelligence and Foreign Language Listening Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Alavinia, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    The researchers in the current study were after probing the potential relationship between emotional intelligence, foreign language listening anxiety (FLLA), and listening comprehension performance of Iranian EFL learners. To this end, 233 participants, studying English language and literature at three different Universities in Urmia, were…

  4. Relationship among Iranian EFL Students' Foreign Language Anxiety, Foreign Language Listening Anxiety and Their Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraj, Samaneh; Noordin, Noreen Bt.

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety is an influential factor in a foreign language learning domain and plays a crucial role in language learners' performance. The following study was conducted to explore the possible impact of Foreign Language Anxiety and Foreign Language Listening Anxiety on language learners' listening skill. The researcher was interested to know the…

  5. The Listening and Spoken Language Data Repository: Design and Project Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradham, Tamala S; Fonnesbeck, Christopher; Toll, Alice; Hecht, Barbara F

    2018-01-09

    The purpose of the Listening and Spoken Language Data Repository (LSL-DR) was to address a critical need for a systemwide outcome data-monitoring program for the development of listening and spoken language skills in highly specialized educational programs for children with hearing loss highlighted in Goal 3b of the 2007 Joint Committee on Infant Hearing position statement supplement. The LSL-DR is a multicenter, international data repository for recording and tracking the demographics and longitudinal outcomes achieved by children who have hearing loss who are enrolled in private, specialized programs focused on supporting listening and spoken language development. Since 2010, annual speech-language-hearing outcomes have been prospectively obtained by qualified clinicians and teachers across 48 programs in 4 countries. The LSL-DR has been successfully implemented, bringing together the data collection efforts of these programs to create a large and diverse data repository of 5,748 children with hearing loss. Due to the size and diversity of the population, the range of assessments entered, and the demographic information collected, the LSL-DR will provide an unparalleled opportunity to examine the factors that influence the development of listening in spoken language in this population.

  6. An envisioning about the caring in listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Camilla A-L; Lindström, Unni Å

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to make visible further dimensions and uncover an envisioning about the caring in listening in the field of caring science, which may improve the care for the suffering human being, the patient. Eriksson's caritative theory of caring constitutes the starting point for this search for knowledge, while the research method is realised by a hermeneutic reading based on the philosopher of hermeneutics, Gadamer's thought. The research is realised by a reading of Fyodor Dostoyevsky's literary works. The literary characters Sonia in Crime and Punishment and Alyosha in The Brothers Karamazov, uncovers patterns of meaning-bearing units towards the caring and the interpretation of a more profound envisioning about the caring in listening. The uncovering and interpretation show that patients in their suffering long to meet a caregiver who listens without the least condemnation in their eyes and demeanour. Patients need a listening caregiver who shows compassion and who has the courage to remain in the struggle of suffering and to carry the patients through insupportable pain, guilt and shame. Through listening, it is possible to reawaken a numb heart, to take individuals who have gone through a good deal of suffering, from darkness, degradation, unendurable pain to the light and to awaken their zest for life and joy to live. Listening renews, delivers and transforms human beings so that they can begin to find a new direction in life and start living a life in accordance with their own fundamental order, purpose, essential decision and individuality. Listening takes patients out of their loneliness and unbearable suffering into communion and a life worth living. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Working session 1: Tubing degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharshafdjian, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Turluer, G. [IPSN, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    1997-02-01

    A general introductory overview of the purpose of the group and the general subject area of SG tubing degradation was given by the facilitator. The purpose of the session was described as to {open_quotes}develop conclusions and proposals on regulatory and technical needs required to deal with the issues of SG tubing degradation.{close_quotes} Types, locations and characteristics of tubing degradation in steam generators were briefly reviewed. The well-known synergistic effects of materials, environment, and stress and strain/strain rate, subsequently referred to by the acronym {open_quotes}MESS{close_quotes} by some of the group members, were noted. The element of time (i.e., evolution of these variables with time) was emphasized. It was also suggested that the group might want to consider the related topics of inspection capabilities, operational variables, degradation remedies, and validity of test data, and some background information in these areas was provided. The presentation given by Peter Millet during the Plenary Session was reviewed; Specifically, the chemical aspects and the degradation from the secondary side of the steam generator were noted. The main issues discussed during the October 1995 EPRI meeting on secondary side corrosion were reported, and a listing of the potential SG tube degradations was provided and discussed.

  8. Precise subtyping for synchronous multiparty sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangiola Dezani-Ciancaglini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The notion of subtyping has gained an important role both in theoretical and applicative domains: in lambda and concurrent calculi as well as in programming languages. The soundness and the completeness, together referred to as the preciseness of subtyping, can be considered from two different points of view: operational and denotational. The former preciseness has been recently developed with respect to type safety, i.e. the safe replacement of a term of a smaller type when a term of a bigger type is expected. The latter preciseness is based on the denotation of a type which is a mathematical object that describes the meaning of the type in accordance with the denotations of other expressions from the language. The result of this paper is the operational and denotational preciseness of the subtyping for a synchronous multiparty session calculus. The novelty of this paper is the introduction of characteristic global types to prove the operational completeness.

  9. Peer Assisted Study Sessions for Postgraduate International Students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccagnini, Melissa; Verenikina, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Peer Assisted Study Sessions (PASS), a peer led academic support program that has multiple documented academic, social, and transition benefits, is increasingly being utilised in Australian institutions. Whilst PASS has been evaluated from multiple angles in regard to the undergraduate cohort, there is limited research regarding the benefits of…

  10. Impact of Awareness Raising about Listening Micro-Skills on the Listening Comprehension Enhancement: An Exploration of the Listening Micro-Skills in EFL Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Amir; Hashim, Fatimah

    2013-01-01

    It is common practice in the classes that teachers focus on the outcome of listening rather than the listening process itself. Based on the interventionist view of language teaching, one of the ways proposed for teaching listening is to break it into smaller micro-skills and give learners awareness about them. But before giving awareness, it is…

  11. Uudised : Depeche Mode'i maailmaturnee peaaegu välja müüdud. Easy Listening esitleb : Villu Tamme diskorina

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Ans. Depeche Mode maailmaturnee "Exciter" Euroopa ja Ameerika kontserdid on peaaegu välja müüdud. 11. mail KuKu klubis toimuval muusikapeol sarjas 'The Easy Listening Sessions' astub diskorina üles V.Tamme

  12. The link between systematc planned listening to a chosen musical programme and autism spectrum disorders and moderate mental development disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Škrlj Trošt, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The results of the research carried out so far show that a systematically planned listening program stimulates different parts of the brain and enables their synchronic interaction. It also stimulates and improves certain thinking functions and processes in the brain, which are connected to some cognitive abilities which may seem unrelated. These results encouraged us to study if music activities with the emphasis on systematically planned listening programme help a child with autism spectrum...

  13. Religious Ecstatics, "Deep Listeners," and Musical Emotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Penman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to begin to provide an explanation for the worldwide linkage of music and ecstatic religious ceremonies. The basic hypothesis is that the physiological ability to respond to musical stimuli with strong emotional responses is one of the pre-conditions for the propulsion into ecstasy. A second hypothesis is that a sub-set of the music-loving community, the "deep listeners" who are profoundly moved (chills, tears by musical listening will have emotional reactions similar to those of religious ecstatics. 60 participants, divided into five groups, were tested using galvanic skin response and heart rate measurements. The results seem to support the hypotheses by demonstrating 1 a correlation between being a religious ecstatic and having a strong GSR while listening to favorite music, in comparison with control groups, and 2 a correlation between being a secular "deep listener" and having a similarly strong GSR listening to favorite music, in comparison with control groups.

  14. Listeners' attitude toward people with dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ofer; Levine-Yundof, Reut

    2013-07-01

    The human voice provides extensive information about the speaker, in addition to the intended linguistic message. Therefore, voice is an essential component in the process of forming an initial attitude toward the speaker. People with communication disorders are typically judged by listeners more negatively than those speaking normally. This trend, however, was not reported consistently regarding voice disorders. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine listeners' attitude toward dysphonic speakers. In addition, the impact of speaker's and listener's gender on these attitudes was also examined. Seventy-four naive listeners evaluated recorded voice samples of six dysphonic and six nondysphonic speakers. Evaluation was performed using a semantic differential scale with 12 bipolar items. In addition, factor analysis was performed to validate listeners' attitudes and allow generalization of the results. Statistically significant negative attitudes toward dysphonic speakers were found at all 12 scales (Pattitude toward speakers (P>0.05). These results were further enhanced and supported by a factor analysis performed based on the original attitude rating scores. Our findings provide empirical evidence for the negative attitudes with which dysphonic speakers are faced; demonstrating how women are affected by these attitudes more than men and highlight the importance of addressing and relating to these facets in the diagnostic and therapeutic process. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Talker intelligibility: Child and adult listener performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Duncan; Hazan, Valerie

    2002-05-01

    In a study of talker intelligibility, 45 voices (adults, 11-12 year old children) were presented to 135 listeners (adults, 11-12, and 7-8 year olds). Word materials were presented in a ``single-word'' condition, and in a ``triplet'' condition, where a ``normalizing'' precursor sentence preceded three keywords. In both conditions, voices were randomized, with no consecutive presentations from the same speaker. The specially designed word-set consisted of 124 words chosen to maximize consonant confusions. Adult female speakers were significantly more intelligible than other groups, as predicted by previous research, but the difference was small. The error rates for 7-8 year olds were slightly but significantly higher than those for the older children and adults. The effect of presentation condition, however, was not significant for any listener group. Across all listener groups, rankings of speakers by error rates were strikingly consistent, with a distinct cluster of eight low-intelligibility speakers common to all listener groups. This suggests that speaker intelligibility is little influenced by listener-related factors. In terms of their perception of speaker characteristics, children aged seven and above are showing similar patterns of behavior to adults, even though the younger children showed marginally higher error rates. [Work funded by the Wellcome Trust.

  16. Prior listening in rooms improves speech intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandewie, Eugene; Zahorik, Pavel

    2010-07-01

    Although results from previous studies have demonstrated that the acoustic effects of a single reflection are perceptually suppressed after repeated exposure to a particular configuration of source and reflection, the extent to which this dynamic echo suppression might generalize to speech understanding in room environments with multiple reflections and reverberation is largely unknown. Here speech intelligibility was measured using the coordinate response measure corpus both with and without prior listening exposure to a reverberant room environment, which was simulated using virtual auditory space techniques. Prior room listening exposure was manipulated by presenting either a two-sentence carrier phrase that preceded the target speech, or no carrier phrase within the room environment. Results from 14 listeners indicate that with prior room exposure, masked speech reception thresholds were on average 2.7 dB lower than thresholds without exposure, an improvement in intelligibility of over 18 percentage points on average. This effect, which is shown to be absent in anechoic space and greatly reduced under monaural listening conditions, demonstrates that prior binaural exposure to reverberant rooms can improve speech intelligibility, perhaps due to a process of perceptual adaptation to the acoustics of the listening room.

  17. The psychological functions of music listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Thomas; Sedlmeier, Peter; Städtler, Christine; Huron, David

    2013-01-01

    Why do people listen to music? Over the past several decades, scholars have proposed numerous functions that listening to music might fulfill. However, different theoretical approaches, different methods, and different samples have left a heterogeneous picture regarding the number and nature of musical functions. Moreover, there remains no agreement about the underlying dimensions of these functions. Part one of the paper reviews the research contributions that have explicitly referred to musical functions. It is concluded that a comprehensive investigation addressing the basic dimensions underlying the plethora of functions of music listening is warranted. Part two of the paper presents an empirical investigation of hundreds of functions that could be extracted from the reviewed contributions. These functions were distilled to 129 non-redundant functions that were then rated by 834 respondents. Principal component analysis suggested three distinct underlying dimensions: People listen to music to regulate arousal and mood, to achieve self-awareness, and as an expression of social relatedness. The first and second dimensions were judged to be much more important than the third—a result that contrasts with the idea that music has evolved primarily as a means for social cohesion and communication. The implications of these results are discussed in light of theories on the origin and the functionality of music listening and also for the application of musical stimuli in all areas of psychology and for research in music cognition. PMID:23964257

  18. The psychological functions of music listening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eSchäfer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Why do people listen to music? Over the past several decades, scholars have proposed numerous functions that listening to music might fulfill. However, different theoretical approaches, different methods, and different samples have left a heterogeneous picture regarding the number and nature of musical functions. Moreover, there remains no agreement about the underlying dimensions of these functions. Part one of the paper reviews the research contributions that have explicitly referred to musical functions. It is concluded that a comprehensive investigation addressing the basic dimensions underlying the plethora of functions of music listening is warranted. Part two of the paper presents an empirical investigation of hundreds of functions that could be extracted from the reviewed contributions. These functions were distilled to 129 non-redundant functions that were then rated by 834 respondents. Principal component analysis suggested three distinct underlying dimensions: People listen to music to regulate arousal and mood, to achieve self-awareness, and as an expression of social relatedness. The first and second dimensions were judged to be much more important than the third – a result that contrasts with the idea that music has evolved primarily as a means for social cohesion and communication. The implications of these results are discussed in light of theories on the origin and the functionality of music listening and also for the application of musical stimuli in all areas of psychology and for research in music cognition.

  19. Short-term auditory effects of listening to an MP3 player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, Hannah; Dhooge, Ingeborg; Maes, Leen; D'haenens, Wendy; Bockstael, Annelies; Philips, Birgit; Swinnen, Freya; Vinck, Bart

    2010-06-01

    To determine the output levels of a commercially available MPEG layer-3 (MP3) player and to evaluate changes in hearing after 1 hour of listening to the MP3 player. First, A-weighted sound pressure levels (measured in decibels [dBA]) for 1 hour of pop-rock music on an MP3 player were measured on a head and torso simulator. Second, after participants listened to 1 hour of pop-rock music using an MP3 player, changes in hearing were evaluated with pure-tone audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions. Twenty-one participants were exposed to pop-rock music in 6 different sessions using 2 types of headphones at multiple preset gain settings of the MP3 player. Output levels of an MP3 player and temporary threshold and emission shifts after 1 hour of listening. The output levels at the full gain setting were 97.36 dBA and 102.56 dBA for the supra-aural headphones and stock earbuds, respectively. In the noise exposure group, significant changes in hearing thresholds and transient-evoked otoacoustic emission amplitudes were found between preexposure and postexposure measurements. However, this pattern was not seen for distortion product otoacoustic emission amplitudes. Significant differences in the incidence of significant threshold or emission shifts were observed between almost every session of the noise exposure group compared with the control group. Temporary changes in hearing sensitivity measured by audiometry and otoacoustic emissions indicate the potential harmful effects of listening to an MP3 player. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term risk of cumulative noise exposure on the auditory system of adolescents and adults.

  20. Review of Child Nutrition Programs. Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Nutrition of the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, United States Senate, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session (April 15 and 17, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry.

    The Hearings presented in this publication review the current state of federal child nutrition programs. Much of the testimony focuses on (1) the Women Infants and Children (WIC) program, which serves exclusively low income, pregnant women, nursing mothers and their children; and (2) the Nutrition Education and Training (NET) program. Most…

  1. Session: Discussion of Research Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    anon.

    2004-09-01

    This final session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was lead by a facilitator who asked participants for their overall reaction to the research that had been presented during the workshop. Questions addressed by workshop participants included: how do you develop trust and confidence in the research, what are some of the specific gaps in our understanding of wind energy's impact on birds and bats; how do we prioritize and proceed with closing the data/research gaps; how do we connect the dots and bring various research and mapping efforts together; given gaps in the data, what are the critical questions we need to answer to make project decisions now; and, how do we track/influence the policies that will shape wind energy development. Conclusions reached regarding these questions are included in summary form.

  2. Working session 2: Tubing inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, J. [Tecnatom, S.A. San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain); Tapping, R.L. [AECL, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-02-01

    This session was attended by delegates from 10 countries, and four papers were presented. A wide range of issues was tabled for discussion. Realizing that there was limited time available for more detailed discussion, three topics were chosen for the more detailed discussion: circumferential cracking, performance demonstration (to focus on POD and sizing), and limits of methods. Two other subsessions were organized: one dealt with some challenges related to the robustness of current inspection methods, especially with respect to leaving cracked tubes in service, and the other with developing a chart of current NDE technology with recommendations for future development. These three areas are summarized in turn, along with conclusions and/or recommendations. During the discussions there were four presentations. There were two (Canada, Japan) on eddy current probe developments, both of which addressed multiarray probes that would detect a range of flaws, one (Spain) on circumferential crack detection, and one (JRC, Petten) on the recent PISC III results.

  3. On Reducing Students' Anxiety in English Listening through Cooperative Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄国芬

    2012-01-01

    Listening is an important means by which English learners can obtain information and communicate with others.Therefore,listening is an important skill of English learning and listening training is an indispensible part of language learning.However,listening can easily be affected by anxiety.Anxiety,an obvious psychological phenomenon in listening and speaking,has negative effect on language input,process and output.Although anxiety has negative influence on English listening,it can be overcome by Cooperative Learning (CL).CL can reduce anxiety,improve communication ability and strengthen learners' confidence,etc.

  4. Stepping Back to Listen to Jeff: Conversations with a 2-Year-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Alison

    2009-01-01

    As part of a research project, the author spent several months in a child care program talking with and listening to young children-and one in particular, Jeff. Her central focus was on children's indirect learning-the "hidden curriculum." She discusses the insights and false assumptions that came to light during her time with Jeff, and tells…

  5. The Implementation of Interactive Multimedia Learning Materials in Teaching Listening Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampa, Andi Tenri

    2015-01-01

    One of the factors that may affect the success of the learning process is the use of learning media. Therefore, this research aimed to implement and evaluate the interactive multimedia learning materials using Wondershare Quizcreator program and audio materials in teaching "English listening skills". The research problem was whether or…

  6. Tape Recorders, Role Plays, and Turn-Taking in Large EFL Listening and Speaking Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haozhang, Xiao

    1997-01-01

    Describes a program for teaching oral communication in large English-as-a-Foreign-Language classes that focuses on the link between listening and speaking; accuracy, fluency, interaction, and meaning; authentic language use; feedback and correction; opportunities to initiate oral communication; development of speaking strategies, and motivating…

  7. Culture through comparison: creating audio-visual listening materials for a CLIL course

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhyrun, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    ... of audio-visual materials design for listening comprehension taking into consideration educational and cultural contexts, course content, and language learning outcomes of the program. In addition, it discusses advantages and limitations of created audio-visual materials by contrasting them with authentic materials of similar type foun...

  8. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Gillian; Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-06-25

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning.

  9. Modeling Speech Intelligibility in Hearing Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheidiger, Christoph; Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    speech, e.g. phase jitter or spectral subtraction. Recent studies predict SI for normal-hearing (NH) listeners based on a signal-to-noise ratio measure in the envelope domain (SNRenv), in the framework of the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM, [20, 21]). These models have shown good...... agreement with measured data under a broad range of conditions, including stationary and modulated interferers, reverberation, and spectral subtraction. Despite the advances in modeling intelligibility in NH listeners, a broadly applicable model that can predict SI in hearing-impaired (HI) listeners...... is not yet available. As a firrst step towards such a model, this study investigates to what extent eects of hearing impairment on SI can be modeled in the sEPSM framework. Preliminary results show that, by only modeling the loss of audibility, the model cannot account for the higher speech reception...

  10. The Impact of Videos Presenting Speakers’ Gestures and Facial Clues on Iranian EFL Learners’ Listening Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Karbalaie Safarali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The current research sought to explore the effectiveness of using videos presenting speakers’ gestures and facial clues on Iranian EFL learners’ listening comprehension proficiency. It was carried out at Ayandeh English Institute among 60 advanced female learners with the age range of 17-30 through a quasi-experimental research design. The researcher administered a TOEFL test to determine the homogeneity of the participants regarding both their general English language proficiency level and listening comprehension ability. Participants were randomly assigned into two groups. After coming up with the conclusion that the two groups were homogeneous,  during 10 sessions of treatment, they received two different listening comprehension techniques, i.e. audio-visual group watching the video was equipped with the speaker’s gestures and facial clues, while the audio-only group could just listen to speaker’s voice and no additional clue was presented. Meanwhile, the participants were supposed to answer the questions related to each video. At the end of the treatment, both groups participated in the listening comprehension test of the Longman TOEFL test as the post-test. A t-test was used to compare the mean scores of the two groups, the result of which showed that the learners’ mean score in the audio-visual group was significantly higher than the learners’ mean score in the audio-only group. In conclusion, the result of this study suggests that foreign language pedagogy, especially for adult English learners, would benefit from applying videos presenting speakers’ gestures and facial clues.

  11. Preferred listening levels of personal listening devices in young teenagers: self reports and physical measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchnik, Chava; Amir, Noam; Shabtai, Ester; Kaplan-Neeman, Ricky

    2012-04-01

    To assess the potential risk of hearing loss to young listeners, due to the use of personal listening devices (PLDs). The study included two parts: (1) A self-report questionnaire on music listening habits, and (2) Physical measurements of preferred listening levels, in quiet and in everyday background noise. Young teenagers aged 13 to 17 years. Part 1 included 289 participants with mean age of 14 years. Part 2 included 11 and 74 participants (2A and 2B) with a mean age of 15 years. Eleven listened to PLDs in quiet conditions (2A) and 74 in everyday background noise (2B). Questionnaire main findings indicated that most of the participants reported high or very high volume settings and demonstrated low awareness towards loud music listening consequences. Physical measurements corrected for diffuse field indicated mean preferred listening levels of: 82 (SD = 9) dBA in quiet, and 89 (SD = 9) dBA in the presence of background noise. The potential risk to hearing of PLDs users was calculated using the 8 hour equivalent level. More than 25% of the participants in the noisy condition were found to be at risk according to occupational damage risk criteria NIOSH, 1998.

  12. The effect of background music on episodic memory and autonomic responses: listening to emotionally touching music enhances facial memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proverbio, Alice Mado; Mado Proverbio, C A Alice; Lozano Nasi, Valentina; Alessandra Arcari, Laura; De Benedetto, Francesco; Guardamagna, Matteo; Gazzola, Martina; Zani, Alberto

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate how background auditory processing can affect other perceptual and cognitive processes as a function of stimulus content, style and emotional nature. Previous studies have offered contrasting evidence, and it has been recently shown that listening to music negatively affected concurrent mental processing in the elderly but not in young adults. To further investigate this matter, the effect of listening to music vs. listening to the sound of rain or silence was examined by administering an old/new face memory task (involving 448 unknown faces) to a group of 54 non-musician university students. Heart rate and diastolic and systolic blood pressure were measured during an explicit face study session that was followed by a memory test. The results indicated that more efficient and faster recall of faces occurred under conditions of silence or when participants were listening to emotionally touching music. Whereas auditory background (e.g., rain or joyful music) interfered with memory encoding, listening to emotionally touching music improved memory and significantly increased heart rate. It is hypothesized that touching music is able to modify the visual perception of faces by binding facial properties with auditory and emotionally charged information (music), which may therefore result in deeper memory encoding.

  13. The effect of background music on episodic memory and autonomic responses: listening to emotionally touching music enhances facial memory capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mado Proverbio, C.A. Alice; Lozano Nasi, Valentina; Alessandra Arcari, Laura; De Benedetto, Francesco; Guardamagna, Matteo; Gazzola, Martina; Zani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how background auditory processing can affect other perceptual and cognitive processes as a function of stimulus content, style and emotional nature. Previous studies have offered contrasting evidence, and it has been recently shown that listening to music negatively affected concurrent mental processing in the elderly but not in young adults. To further investigate this matter, the effect of listening to music vs. listening to the sound of rain or silence was examined by administering an old/new face memory task (involving 448 unknown faces) to a group of 54 non-musician university students. Heart rate and diastolic and systolic blood pressure were measured during an explicit face study session that was followed by a memory test. The results indicated that more efficient and faster recall of faces occurred under conditions of silence or when participants were listening to emotionally touching music. Whereas auditory background (e.g., rain or joyful music) interfered with memory encoding, listening to emotionally touching music improved memory and significantly increased heart rate. It is hypothesized that touching music is able to modify the visual perception of faces by binding facial properties with auditory and emotionally charged information (music), which may therefore result in deeper memory encoding. PMID:26469712

  14. The Impact of Word-Recognition Practice on the Development of the Listening Comprehension of Intermediate-Level EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Navidinia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at examining the effect of word-recognition practice on EFL students’ listening comprehension. The participants consisted of 30 intermediate EFL learners studying in a language institute in Birjand City, Iran. They were assigned randomly to two equal groups, control and experimental. Before starting the experiment, the listening section of IELTS was given to all of the students as the pretest. Then, during the experiment, the experimental group was asked to transcribe the listening sections of their course book while in the control group, the students did not transcribe. After 25 sessions (2 hours each of instruction, another test of listening (IELTS proficiency test was given to both groups as the post-test. The results of the two tests were then analyzed and compared using one way ANCOVA test. The results indicated that the experimental group outperformed the control group (p<0.05. Therefore, it was concluded that word-recognition practice is an effective way for the improvement of EFL learners’ listening comprehension. The overall results of the study are discussed and the implications for further research and practitioners are made.

  15. Listeners' and performers' shared understanding of jazz improvisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Schober

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the extent to which a large set of musically experienced listeners share understanding with a performing saxophone-piano duo, and with each other, of what happened in three improvisations on a jazz standard. In an online survey, 239 participants listened to audio recordings of three improvisations and rated their agreement with 24 specific statements that the performers and a jazz-expert commenting listener had made about them. Listeners endorsed statements that the performers had agreed upon significantly more than they endorsed statements that the performers had disagreed upon, even though the statements gave no indication of performers' levels of agreement. The findings show some support for a more-experienced-listeners-understand-more-like-performers hypothesis: Listeners with more jazz experience and with experience playing the performers' instruments endorsed the performers' statements more than did listeners with less jazz experience and experience on different instruments. The findings also strongly support a listeners-as-outsiders hypothesis: Listeners' ratings of the 24 statements were far more likely to cluster with the commenting listener's ratings than with either performer's. But the pattern was not universal; particular listeners even with similar musical backgrounds could interpret the same improvisations radically differently. The evidence demonstrates that it is possible for performers' interpretations to be shared with very few listeners, and that listeners’ interpretations about what happened in a musical performance can be far more different from performers’ interpretations than performers or other listeners might assume.

  16. A listening test system for automative audio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Søren; Gulbol, Mehmet-Ali; Martin, Geoff

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes two listening tests that were performed to provide initial validation of an auralisation system (see Part 1) to mimic the acoustics of a car interior. The validation is based on a comparison of results from an in-car listening test and another test using the auralisation system...... and recordings of the stimuli used for the in-car test. The music samples for the test were chosen from a database of various CODEC examples from a previous extensive ITU test to validate the ITU-R BS.1387-1 standard....

  17. The Mediating Effect of Listening Metacognitive Awareness between Test-Taking Motivation and Listening Test Score: An Expectancy-Value Theory Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated test-taking motivation in L2 listening testing context by applying Expectancy-Value Theory as the framework. Specifically, this study was intended to examine the complex relationships among expectancy, importance, interest, listening anxiety, listening metacognitive awareness, and listening test score using data from a large-scale and high-stakes language test among Chinese first-year undergraduates. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the mediating effect of listening metacognitive awareness on the relationship between expectancy, importance, interest, listening anxiety, and listening test score. According to the results, test takers’ listening scores can be predicted by expectancy, interest, and listening anxiety significantly. The relationship between expectancy, interest, listening anxiety, and listening test score was mediated by listening metacognitive awareness. The findings have implications for test takers to improve their test taking motivation and listening metacognitive awareness, as well as for L2 teachers to intervene in L2 listening classrooms.

  18. AAS Special Session: Policy Making in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelli, J. A.; Massa, D.

    1995-12-01

    The professional astronomical community today is more diverse than at any time in its history. Individuals participating in creative research programs can be found in a wide range of positions. This type of diversity, which mixes research, education, and service (e.g. contract) work, represents the strength of contemporary astronomy. While recognizing the unavoidable reductions in funding and restructuring of organizations like NASA, it is imperative that the significance of the current diversity be considered during these processes. Creative ideas are one of the cornerstones of quality research, and they can originate anywhere. Consequently, it is essential that adequate research resources remain available for free and open competition by all astronomers. Our goal in this session is to bring together officials from the AAS, NASA, and the NSF to discuss how the policy and decision making process operates and whether it should be changed to better serve the general needs of the professional astronomical community. Examples of the issues we believe are important include: In establishing new policy, how can the needs of the average research astronomer be better addressed? How could input from such astronomers be provided to those who craft NASA/NSF policy? How can/should the AAS serve as an interface between policy/decision making bodies and its membership? Should the AAS membership become more actively/effectively involved in the decision making process and, if so, how? More information on this session and related issues can be found at the Association of Research Astronomers Home Page: http://www.phy.vill.edu/astro/faculty/ara/ara_home.htm

  19. Effects of caffeine on session ratings of perceived exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, L G; Green, J M; O'Neal, E K; McIntosh, J R; Hornsby, J; Coates, T E

    2013-03-01

    This study examined effects of caffeine on session ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) following 30 min constant-load cycling. Individuals (n = 15) of varying aerobic fitness completed a [Formula: see text] max trial and two 30 min cycling bouts (double-blind, counterbalanced) following ingestion of 6 mL/kg of caffeine or matched placebo. RPE overall, legs and breathing were estimated every 5 min and session RPE was estimated 30 min post-exercise using the OMNI pictorial scale. Session RPE for caffeine and placebo trails were compared using paired t test. Between-trial comparisons of HR, RPE overall, RPE legs and RPE breathing were analyzed using an independent 2 (trial) × 6 (time point) repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) for each dependent variable. Caffeine resulted in a significantly lower session RPE (p < 0.05) for caffeine (6.1 ± 2.2) versus placebo (6.8 ± 2.1). Acute perceptual responses were significantly lower for caffeine for RPE overall (15, 20, 25, and 30 min), RPE breathing (15, 20, 25, and 30 min) and RPE legs (20 and 30 min). Survey responses post-exercise revealed greater feelings of nervousness, tremors, restlessness and stomach distress following caffeine versus placebo. Blunted acute RPE and survey responses suggest participants responded to caffeine ingestion. Caffeine decreased acute RPE during exercise which could partially account for lower session RPE responses. However, decreased session RPE could also reveal a latent analgesic affect of caffeine extending into recovery. Extending the understanding of session RPE could benefit coaches in avoiding overtraining when adjusting training programs.

  20. Hearing, listening, action: Enhancing nursing practice through aural awareness education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Anita; Vanderheide, Rebecca; McKenna, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Noise overload within the clinical environment has been found to interfere with the healing process for patients, as well as nurses' ability to assess patients effectively. Awareness and responsibility for noise production begins during initial nursing training and consequently a program to enhance aural awareness skills was designed for graduate entry nursing students in an Australian university. The program utilized an innovative combination of music education activities to develop the students' ability to distinguishing individual sounds (hearing), appreciate patients' experience of sounds (listening) and improve their auscultation skills and reduce the negative effects of noise on patients (action). Using a mixed methods approach, students reported heightened auscultation skills and greater recognition of both patients' and clinicians' aural overload. Results of this pilot suggest that music education activities can assist nursing students to develop their aural awareness and to action changes within the clinical environment to improve the patient's experience of noise.

  1. Synchrony in Dyadic Psychotherapy Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    Synchrony is a multi-faceted concept used in diverse domains such as physics, biology, and the social sciences. This chapter reviews some of the evidence of nonverbal synchrony in human communication, with a main focus on the role of synchrony in the psychotherapeutic setting. Nonverbal synchrony describes coordinated behavior of patient and therapist. Its association with empathy, rapport and the therapeutic relationship has been pointed out repeatedly, yet close evaluation of empirical studies suggests that the evidence remains inconclusive. Particularly in naturalistic studies, research with quantitative measures of synchrony is still lacking. We introduce a new empirical approach for the study of synchrony in psychotherapies under field conditions: Motion Energy Analysis (MEA). This is a video-based algorithm that quantifies the amount of movement in freely definable regions of interest. Our statistical analysis detects synchrony on a global level, irrespective of the specific body parts moving. Synchrony thus defined can be considered as a general measure of movement coordination between interacting individuals. Data from a sequence of N = 21 therapy sessions taken from one psychotherapy dyad shows a high positive relationship between synchrony and the therapeutic bond. Nonverbal synchrony can thus be considered a promising concept for research on the therapeutic alliance. Further areas of application are discussed.

  2. Children's Television Programming. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Telecommunications, Consumer Protection, and Finance of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session on H.R. 3216.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    H.R. 3216, the Children's Television Act of 1985--a bill to amend the Communications Act of 1934 to increase the availability of educational and informational television programs for children, deals with establishing a quantifiable children's programming guideline. This bill would establish substantial burdens under the license renewal process for…

  3. Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Third Congress, First Session. Federal Food Programs--1973. Part 2--Hunger in 1973. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., June 4, 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    The "Hunger-1973" committee report, details the continuing hunger problem in the country. The report shows that the administration and participation of the Food Stamp and Surplus Food Program vary widely across the country. It shows that the benefits available under both programs are being severely restricted by the current food cost…

  4. Listening to the Shape of a Drum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Listening to the Shape of a Drum. 1. The Mathematics of Vibrating Drums. S Kesavan is with the. Institute of. Mathematical Sciences,. Chennai and has ..... If n were the unit circle in the plane (the familiar circular drum!), the eigenfunctions involve more complicated expres- sions called Bessel functions. It must be mentioned, ...

  5. Listening to the Shape of a Drum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 10. Listening to the Shape of a Drum - You Cannot Hear the Shape of a Drum! S Kesavan. General Article Volume 3 Issue 10 October 1998 pp 49-58. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. Listening to the Shape of a Drum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 9. Listening to the Shape of a Drum - The Mathematics of Vibrating Drums. S Kesavan. General Article Volume 3 Issue 9 September 1998 pp 26-34. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Practical Tips for Increasing Listening Practice Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Learning a language--like learning to dance ballet, weaving carpets, or playing the saxophone--takes time and practice. In general, it is safe to say that the more practice one gets, the better one will become. This article will help teachers of English reconsider how to think about listening tasks. It will provide guidance for increasing…

  8. Speaking and Listening in Content Area Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Oral language development facilitates print literacy. In this article, we focus on the ways in which teachers can ensure students' speaking and listening skills are developed. We provide a review of some time-tests classroom routines as well as some that can be enhanced with technology.

  9. The Breakthrough Listen Search for Intelligent Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Steve; Siemion, Andrew; De Boer, David; Enriquez, J. Emilio; Foster, Griffin; Gajjar, Vishal; Hellbourg, Greg; Hickish, Jack; Isaacson, Howard; Lebofsky, Matt; MacMahon, David; Price, Daniel; Werthimer, Dan

    2018-01-01

    The $100M, 10-year philanthropic "Breakthrough Listen" project is driving an unprecedented expansion of the search for intelligent life beyond Earth. Modern instruments allow ever larger regions of parameter space (luminosity function, duty cycle, beaming fraction, frequency coverage) to be explored, which is enabling us to place meaningful physical limits on the prevalence of transmitting civilizations. Data volumes are huge, and preclude long-term storage of the raw data products, so real-time and machine learning processing techniques must be employed to identify candidate signals as well as simultaneously classifying interfering sources. However, the Galaxy is now known to be a target-rich environment, teeming with habitable planets.Data from Breakthrough Listen can also be used by researchers in other areas of astronomy to study pulsars, fast radio bursts, and a range of other science targets. Breakthrough Listen is already underway in the optical and radio bands, and is also engaging with facilities across the world, including Square Kilometer Array precursors and pathfinders. I will give an overview of the technology, science goals, data products, and roadmap of Breakthrough Listen, as we attempt to answer one of humanity's oldest questions: Are we alone?

  10. LISTENING FOR EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION: A STUDY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    2016-07-01

    Jul 1, 2016 ... paying attention to sound sequences as a means of getting meaning from speech acts.” Out of four language skills, listening is an act most people engage in for the greater part of the day. Percentage of time devoted to various communication skills as presented by Hybels and Weaver (107-108) shows that ...

  11. The Listening Log: Motivating Autonomous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    When learners spend a period of time in the L2 community, as students on exchange programmes, as immigrants, or even on holiday, they are surrounded by listening opportunities that are far more varied and numerous than those of the classroom. Drawing on learner data from Erasmus and Study Abroad students on placement at a UK university, this paper…

  12. Listen in: Audiobooks about Childhood Struggles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, T. Gail; Sunal, Cynthia Szymanski; Hawkins, Amy; Moore, Elizabeth; Thompson, Jaime Snider

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how audiobooks can be used in the classroom; different settings where audiobooks can be used; and the advantages of listening to audiobooks instead of silent reading. Provides a list of eight audiobooks that can be used for a social studies unit to find a creative solution to childhood struggles. (CMK)

  13. Benefiting from Listening in Vocabulary Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Berker; Karasakaloglu, Nuri

    2017-01-01

    In this research, the effect of active listening training given to fourth grade students on their vocabulary was examined. Pre-test--post-test control group trial model, which is one of the semi-experimental trial models, was used. Besides, "Vocabulary Test" developed by the researcher was applied to experimental and control groups…

  14. Listening in first and second language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farrell, J.; Cutler, A.; Liontas, J.I.

    2018-01-01

    Listeners' recognition of spoken language involves complex decoding processes: The continuous speech stream must be segmented into its component words, and words must be recognized despite great variability in their pronunciation (due to talker differences, or to influence of phonetic context, or to

  15. Extending the Conceptualization of Listening Fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch-Hauser, Margaret; Powers, William G.; O'Brien, Kelley; Hanson, Scott

    2007-01-01

    An exploration of variables potentially related to Listening Fidelity (LF) was conducted through two separate studies. Study 1 indicated that when the potential fidelity of the stimulus message was varied as a function of the number of words and time length, the message with lowest potential fidelity produced significantly lower LF than either the…

  16. Speed Bumps for Authentic Listening Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinardi, Marty

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates whether authentic native speaker (NS) to NS speech can be made available to the learner listener through the use of a novel slow-down tool. Results from various preliminary tests seem to indicate that the use of a slow-down algorithm in many cases, and in particular in samples with a higher speed rate and word count,…

  17. A listening test system for automotive audio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Flemming; Martin, Geoff; Minnaar, Pauli

    2005-01-01

    A selection procedure was devised in order to select listeners for experiments in which their main task will be to judge multi-channel reproduced sound. 91 participants filled in a web-based questionnaire. 78 of them took part in an assessment of their hearing thresholds, their spatial hearing, a...

  18. A listening test system for automotive audio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Flemming; Geoff, Martin; Minnaar, Pauli

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a system for simulating automotive audio through headphones for the purposes of conducting listening experiments in the laboratory. The system is based on binaural technology and consists of a component for reproducing the sound of the audio system itself and a component...

  19. Radio Listening, Television Viewing and Comprehension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reading comprehension is the basic foundation for functional literacy and scholastic achievement. However, most school children spend a great deal of their time watching television or listening to radio than in reading. The research effort was thus; set out to investigate the effects of television and radio programmes to the ...

  20. Music Listening Preferences of Macau Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Wanfong Viny

    2009-01-01

    This is a pioneer study of Macau's music education focusing on music listening preference. Adopting models from Western cultures, the study, launched in 2006, aimed to explore the factors of age and gender in regard to music preference. The subjects ranged from fourth-graders to university students (N=2495) (15 missing). Participants rated their…

  1. Web-Based CALL to Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Mei; Zhang, Ruiming

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated effectiveness of Web-based CALL on listening comprehension. Both students' academic performance and attitudes were examined. T-tests were used to analyze the results of students' academic performance. Descriptive statistics interpreted students' attitudes toward this learning. Students' participation was also recorded.…

  2. Authentic Listening Materials for Business English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Christine Uber

    Authentic listening materials are appropriate and desirable for instruction in English as a second language (ESL) for business purposes for several reasons: they have high interest, leading to enhanced motivation and increased opportunity for learning; they contain many natural redundancies and repetitions that facilitate comprehension; and they…

  3. Beyond the hearing aid: Assistive listening devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Alice E.

    2003-04-01

    Persons with hearing loss can obtain great benefit from hearing aids but there are many situations that traditional amplification devices will not provide enough help to ensure optimal communication. Assistive listening and signaling devices are designed to improve the communication of the hearing impaired in instances where traditional hearing aids are not sufficient. These devices are designed to help with problems created by listening in noise or against a competing message, improve distance listening, facilitate group conversation (help with problems created by rapidly changing speakers), and allow independence from friends and family. With the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990, assistive listening devices (ALDs) are becoming more accessible to the public with hearing loss. Employers and public facilities must provide auxiliary aids and services when necessary to ensure effective communication for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing. However many professionals and persons with hearing loss are unaware of the various types and availability of ALDs. An overview of ALDs along with a discussion of their advantages and disadvantages will be given.

  4. A Critical Ethnography of Democratic Music Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Marissa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this critical ethnography was to investigate how music educators can approach the development of students' music listening abilities democratically in order to deepen students' musical understandings and, by teaching through music, create pathways for student-teacher transactions that are inclusive, educative, ethical and…

  5. A Deweyan Theory of Democratic Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Jim

    1996-01-01

    This paper develops a theory of listening in democratic dialogs inspired by the work of Hans-Georg Gadamer and John Dewey. The theory requires the acknowledgement of a prominent role for risking and reconstructing social habits in open dialogs across gender, racial, and ethnic differences. (SM)

  6. Pierre Schaeffer and his theory of listening

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Igor Reis Reyner

    2011-01-01

    .... It shows the mechanics of his theory of listening, following in the author’s footsteps to highlight the creation of concepts by accumulation, a procedure he takes to extremes in the notion of quatre fonctions de l’écoute...

  7. BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE AND SOCIAL MEDIA LISTENING

    OpenAIRE

    Tsvetta Kaleynska

    2015-01-01

    Business intelligence has been completely revamped over the past decade. After the arrival of social media, all brands realized that the organic insights and business intelligence lays in the conversation online. With that, the present and future of business can be found in social media listening.

  8. A study of listening habits in adolescents: Correlating stated loudness preferences with actual listening levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Laura; Warren, Jean; Cheenne, Dominique

    2004-05-01

    Evidence suggests that children are damaging their hearing in substantial numbers [Niskar et al., J. Am. Med. Assoc. (1998)]. Conventional thinking would suggest that cultural norms and attitudes contribute to a desire in children to model what they have seen in the media, thus implying that they would be listening to music at levels that are considered harmful. Our study focused on a gender-balanced group of 316 elementary-age students and aimed at assessing a correlation between an attitudinal survey related to loud music and the children's own listening levels. The study was broader in scope and in sample size than previous work [Fucci, 138th ASA Meeting, 11/99]. Findings were both surprising and encouraging, citing that a majority of children who expressed favoritism towards loud music listened to the presented samples at lower levels than expected. The study also proposes a set of listening level distribution curves that may prove useful for future studies with older participants.

  9. Research into Practice: Listening Strategies in an Instructed Classroom Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers research and practice relating to listening in instructed classroom settings, limiting itself to what might be called unidirectional listening (Macaro, Graham & Vanderplank 2007)--in other words, where learners listen to a recording, a TV or radio clip or lecture, but where there is no communication back to the speaker(s).…

  10. Listen: When words don't come easy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Listening is at the very heart of communication in healthcare, but largely ignored in research and teaching. This paper presents different perspectives on listening within the context of healthcare and its implications for goal-directed communication. METHODS: The assets of listening are

  11. Listen: when words don't come easy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Listening is at the very heart of communication in healthcare, but largely ignored in research and teaching. This paper presents different perspectives on listening within the context of healthcare and its implications for goal-directed communication. Methods: The assets of listening

  12. Prospective EFL Teachers' Perceptions of Listening Comprehension Problems in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Ekrem; Altay, Firat

    2014-01-01

    Listening skill has been called as the "Cinderella Skill" which is overlooked by its elder sister speaking in language learning. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to reemphasize the importance of listening skill in ELT context and to determine prospective English teachers' perceptions of listening comprehension problems. The study…

  13. Active Listening Strategies of Academically Successful University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canpolat, Murat; Kuzu, Sekvan; Yildirim, Bilal; Canpolat, Sevilay

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: In formal educational environments, the quality of student listening affects learning considerably. Students who are uninterested in a lesson listen reluctantly, wanting time to pass quickly and the class to end as soon as possible. In such situations, students become passive and, though appearing to be listening, will not use…

  14. Using Dictogloss as an Interactive Method of Teaching Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibir-Daura, Ramlatu

    2013-01-01

    Listening is one of the important language skills. Traditionally, listening skills have been taught in isolation or it is sometimes combined with speaking tasks. Dictogloss is an interactive method which promotes cooperative learning and can assist in the development of both the teacher and students' listening skills. Unlike in the traditional…

  15. Morality, Relationality, and Listening Pedagogy in Language Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurain, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    Listening pedagogy in language education treats listening proficiency almost exclusively as a function or skill, the purpose of which is to generate products or outcomes desired by language users. Though listening is rhetorically acknowledged to be an active and complex process of making meanings within contexts and relationships, in practice…

  16. Electroacoustical simulation of listening room acoustics for project ARCHIMEDES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Søren

    1989-01-01

    the influence of listening room acoustics on the timbre of reproduced sound. For simulation of the acoustics of a standard listening room, an electroacoustic setup has been built in an anechoic chamber. The setup is based on a computer model of the listening room, and it consists of a number of loudspeakers...

  17. "Not" Just Wanna Have Fun: Teaching Listening Skills with Songs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Amalia Qistina

    2013-01-01

    Teaching listening skills is very challenging to ESL teachers. It involves active participation from both teachers and students to ensure the objectives of teaching listening skills can be achieved. Hence, this presentation provides interesting and exciting strategies to teach listening skills using selected songs. It is hoped that this would…

  18. Improving listening skills of tertiary level students for effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Listening is essential to the leaming process. Students in tertiary institutions of learning need to acquire effective listening and note-taking skiils in order to benefit from lectures. This paper focused on factors militating against effective listening during lectures such as poor rate of presentation, poor communication skills, ...

  19. Go With the Flow : When Listeners use Music as Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demetriou, A.M.; Larson, M.A.; Liem, C.C.S.

    Music has been shown to have a profound effect on lis-teners' internal states as evidenced by neuroscience research. Listeners report selecting and listening to music with specific intent, thereby using music as a tool to achieve desired psychological effects within a given context. In light of

  20. EFFECTS OF COOPERATIVE LEARNING METHOD ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF LISTENING COMPREHENSION AND LISTENING SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdülkadir

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of the learning together technique, which is one of the cooperative learning methods, on the development of the listening comprehension and listening skills of the secondary school eighth grade students was investigated. Regarding the purpose of the research, experimental and control groups consisting of 75 students from, Yakutiye district Şair Nef'i Secondary School and Palandöken District, Alparslan Secondary School of Erzurum province were selected. Socio-economic statuses and success rates were taken into consideration when selecting the experimental and control groups. 'Listening-Comprehension Achievement Test' was applied to measure the listening skills of the experimental and control groups. In terms of pre-test scores, it was determined that the listening skills of the experiment and control group were similar. The selected experimental groups were taught by the learning together technique of cooperative learning method for seven weeks and the control group was taught in the traditional way. As a result of the research, the 'Listening-Comprehension Achievement Test', which was applied as the pre-test to the experimental and control groups, was applied again as the final test. When the findings obtained from the research were examined, it was determined that the students in the experimental group were more successful than the students in the control group in terms of post - test achievement scores. When the results of the study are examined, it can be said that the learning together technique, which is one of the cooperative learning methods, is more effective than the traditional learning method in improving the listening comprehension and the listening skills of the eighth grade students in Turkish class.

  1. The Effect of Music Listening on Pain, Heart Rate Variability, and Range of Motion in Older Adults After Total Knee Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Chung; Chen, Su-Ru; Lee, Pi-Hsia; Lin, Pi-Chu

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects that listening and not listening to music had on pain relief, heart rate variability (HRV), and knee range of motion in total knee replacement (TKR) patients who underwent continuous passive motion (CPM) rehabilitation. We adopted a single-group quasi-experimental design. A sample of 49 TKR patients listened to music for 25 min during one session of CPM and no music during another session of CPM the same day for a total of 2 days. Results indicated that during CPM, patients exhibited a significant decrease in the pain level ( p < .05), an increase in the CPM knee flexion angle ( p < .05), a decrease in the low-frequency/high-frequency ratio (LF/HF) and normalized LF (nLF) of the HRV ( p < .01), and an increase in the normalized HF (nHF) and standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN; p < .01) when listening to music compared with no music. This study demonstrated that listening to music can effectively decrease pain during CPM rehabilitation and improve the joint range of motion in patients who underwent TKR surgery.

  2. Evaluating a Pre-Session Homework Exercise in a Standalone Information Literacy Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Joseph E.; Barber, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, researchers evaluate a homework exercise assigned before a standalone information literacy session. Students in a Master of Education program completed a worksheet using the ERIC database thesaurus. The researchers conducted pre- and posttests within a single library session to assess student learning, using a control group for…

  3. Irvin Yalom's Experiment Revisited: Applying Robert Langs's Listening Process to a Psychotherapy Classic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard L

    2017-06-01

    In a case now famous for its unconventionality, Irvin Yalom had his financially strapped patient submit written reports of the experience of her therapy sessions rather than pay a monetary fee. He also wrote reports of each session, and the two of them shared royalties from the book, Every Day Gets a Little Closer, eventually produced. The arrangement yielded enough process detail to warrant examination through Robert Langs's method of listening and formulating. From that perspective, it seems Yalom did not understand the encoded messages from his patient in reaction to the frame deviations, which resulted in a deterioration of the communicative field and treatment alliance. Yalom did help his patient to become more appropriately assertive, but her inner fragmentation was untouched.

  4. Maintenance Sessions Prolong Cigarette Abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Thomas H.; And Others

    Recent smoking treatment programs have shifted emphasis from initial cessation rates to long-term abstinence, with aversion therapy and coping response training having had the most success. A smoking cessation treatment consisting of rapid smoking and behavioral counseling was supplemented with two maintenance treatments. After completing the…

  5. Speech perception with tactile support in adverse listening conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drullman, Rob; Bronkhorst, Adelbert W.

    2002-05-01

    Since long, different methods of vibrotactile stimulation have been used as an aid for speech perception by some people with severe hearing impairment. The fact that experiments have shown (limited) benefits proves that tactile information can indeed give some support. In our research program on multimodal interfaces, we wondered if normal hearing listeners could benefit from tactile information when speech was presented in adverse listening conditions. Therefore, we set up a pilot experiment with a male speaker against a background of one, two, four or eight competing male speakers or speech noise. Sound was presented diotically to the subjects and the speech-reception threshold (SRT) for short sentences was measured. The temporal envelope (0-30 Hz) of the speech signal was computed in real time and led to the tactile transducer (MiniVib), which was fixed to the index finger. First results show a significant drop in SRT of about 3 dB when using tactile stimulation in the condition of one competing speaker. In the other conditions no significant effects were found, but there is a trend of a decrease of the SRT when tactile information is given. We will discuss the results of further experiments.

  6. The Impact of Task Types on Listening Comprehension of Iranian Intermediate EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooshang Khoshsima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the difference of five task types applied in Task-Based Instruction (TBI on intermediate-level EFL learners’ listening comprehension ability. To this end, 31 intermediate EFL learners were given five task types of matching, selecting, role-playing, note-taking and completing. Their proficiency and listening homogeneity was ensured using an institutional TOEFL test and the listening paper of FCE. Then, they enjoyed TBI through implementing the task types for about ten 20-minute sessions. The results of the different tasks were analyzed to find out what task was the most effective. The results indicated that the learners outperformed in the two tasks of note-taking and completing than in the first three tasks of matching, selecting and role-playing, but there was no significant difference among the three tasks of matching, selecting and role-playing (p > 0.05, neither was there any significant difference between the two tasks of note-taking and completing (p > 0.05.

  7. Listening to music during shock wave lithotripsy decreases anxiety, pain, and dissatisfaction : A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Ozgur; Cimen, Sertac; Tarhan, Huseyin; Ekin, Rahmi Gokhan; Akarken, Ilker; Ulker, Volkan; Celik, Orcun; Yucel, Cem; Kisa, Erdem; Ergani, Batuhan; Cetin, Taha; Kozacioglu, Zafer

    2017-05-17

    We analyzed the effects of music on pain, anxiety, and overall satisfaction in patients undergoing a shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) procedure. A total of 200 patients scheduled to undergo SWL were included in this study. Group 1 consisted of 95 patients who listened to music during the SWL session while group 2 included 105 patients who did not listen music during the procedure. State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used to assess state and trait anxiety (STAI-S/T). A visual analog scale (VAS) was used at the end of the session in order to assess pain, willingness to repeat the procedure, and overall patient satisfaction. Hemodynamic parameters including systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded before and after the session. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of stone characteristics, SWL parameters, pre-SWL STAI-T/S scores, and pre-SWL hemodynamic parameters. Post-SWL STAI-S scores were found to be lower in patients who listened to music (p = 0.006). At the end of the SWL, VAS scores of pain, satisfaction, and willingness to repeat procedure were significantly different in favor of the music group (p = 0.007, p = 0.001, p = 0.015, respectively). SBP, DBP, and HR were significantly higher in patients who did not listen to music (p = 0.002, p = 0.024, p = 0.001, respectively). Music can be an ideal adjunctive treatment modality for patients undergoing SWL treatment. It has the potential to enhance patient compliance and treatment satisfaction by reducing the procedure-related anxiety and pain perception.

  8. Session Types in Abelian Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Hirai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There was a PhD student who says "I found a pair of wooden shoes. I put a coin in the left and a key in the right. Next morning, I found those objects in the opposite shoes." We do not claim existence of such shoes, but propose a similar programming abstraction in the context of typed lambda calculi. The result, which we call the Amida calculus, extends Abramsky's linear lambda calculus LF and characterizes Abelian logic.

  9. Effects of a structured 20-session slow-cortical-potential-based neurofeedback program on attentional performance in children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: retrospective analysis of an open-label pilot-approach and 6-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Johanna S; Bubenzer-Busch, Sarah; Gallien, Anne; Knospe, Eva Lotte; Gaber, Tilman J; Zepf, Florian D

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this approach was to conduct a structured electroencephalography-based neurofeedback training program for children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) using slow cortical potentials with an intensive first (almost daily sessions) and second phase of training (two sessions per week) and to assess aspects of attentional performance. A total of 24 young patients with ADHD participated in the 20-session training program. During phase I of training (2 weeks, 10 sessions), participants were trained on weekdays. During phase II, neurofeedback training occurred twice per week (5 weeks). The patients' inattention problems were measured at three assessment time points before (pre, T0) and after (post, T1) the training and at a 6-month follow-up (T2); the assessments included neuropsychological tests (Alertness and Divided Attention subtests of the Test for Attentional Performance; Sustained Attention Dots and Shifting Attentional Set subtests of the Amsterdam Neuropsychological Test) and questionnaire data (inattention subscales of the so-called Fremdbeurteilungsbogen für Hyperkinetische Störungen and Child Behavior Checklist/4-18 [CBCL/4-18]). All data were analyzed retrospectively. The mean auditive reaction time in a Divided Attention task decreased significantly from T0 to T1 (medium effect), which was persistent over time and also found for a T0-T2 comparison (larger effects). In the Sustained Attention Dots task, the mean reaction time was reduced from T0-T1 and T1-T2 (small effects), whereas in the Shifting Attentional Set task, patients were able to increase the number of trials from T1-T2 and significantly diminished the number of errors (T1-T2 & T0-T2, large effects). First positive but very small effects and preliminary results regarding different parameters of attentional performance were detected in young individuals with ADHD. The limitations of the obtained preliminary data are the rather small sample size, the

  10. Parasympathetic activation is involved in reducing epileptiform discharges when listening to Mozart music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Chiang, Ching-Tai; Lee, Mei-Wen; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Hui-Chuan; Tsai, Chin-Lin; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2013-08-01

    Listening to Mozart K.448 has been demonstrated to improve spatial task scores, leading to what is known as the Mozart effect. Our previous work revealed the positive effects of Mozart K.448 in reducing epileptiform discharges in children with epilepsy. However, the mechanism remains unclear. parasympathetic activation has been shown to help seizure control in many studies. In this study, we investigated the effect of Mozart music on epileptiform discharges and autonomic activity. Sixty-four epileptic children with epileptiform discharges were included. They all received electroencephalogram and electrocardiogram examinations simultaneously before, during, and after listening to Mozart K.448 or K.545. The total number of epileptiform discharges during each session (before, during, and after music) were divided by the duration (in minutes) of the session and then compared. Heart rate variability including time and frequency domain analysis was used to represent the autonomic function. The results showed that epileptiform discharges were significantly reduced during and right after listening to Mozart music (33.3 ± 31.1% reduction, pMozart K.448 and 38.6 ± 43.3% reduction, pMozart K.545) (28.1 ± 43.2% reduction, pMozart K.448 and 46.0 ± 40.5% reduction, pMozart K.545). No significant difference was noticed between the two pieces of music. The reduction was greatest in patients with generalized seizures and discharges. Significant increases in high-frequency (HF), the square root of the mean squared differences of successive RR intervals (RMSSD), the standard deviation of differences between adjacent RR intervals (SDSD), and a decrease in mean beats per minute (bpm) were found during listening to Mozart music. Most of the patients with reduced epileptiform discharges also showed a decreased LF/HF ratio, low-frequency normalized units (LF nu), mean bpm, and an increased high-frequency normalized units (HF nu). Listening to Mozart music decreased epileptiform

  11. Classroom listening assessment: strategies for speech-language pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cheryl DeConde

    2012-11-01

    Emphasis on classroom listening has gained importance for all children and especially for those with hearing loss and special listening needs. The rationale can be supported from trends in educational placements, the Response to Intervention initiative, student performance and accountability, the role of audition in reading, and improvement in hearing technologies. Speech-language pathologists have an instrumental role advocating for the accommodations that are necessary for effective listening for these children in school. To identify individual listening needs and make relevant recommendations for accommodations, a classroom listening assessment is suggested. Components of the classroom listening assessment include observation, behavioral assessment, self-assessment, and classroom acoustics measurements. Together, with a strong rationale, the results can be used to implement a plan that results in effective classroom listening for these children. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Language Skill-Task Corollary: The Effect of Decision-Making vs. Jigsaw Tasks on Developing EFL Learners’ Listening and Speaking Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Abbasian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Task-based language Teaching (TBLT has occupied the pertinent literature for some long years. However, the role of specific task type in developing specific skill type seems to be amongst the intact issues in the literature. To shed more light on this issue, the present study was conducted to compare the effect of jigsaw and decision-making tasks on improving listening and speaking abilities of EFL learners. To this end, 75 female Iranian EFL learners, assumed homogenous based on their performance on the Nelson Test, were employed as the participants. Their listening and speaking abilities were also measured both before and after the treatment based on the listening and speaking subtests of the PET. Then, they were assigned to two groups of experimental A and B. The experimental group A received decision-making-based listening and speaking instruction for 12 sessions of 45 minutes, and the experimental group B received jigsaw-based listening and speaking instruction. In order to analyze the data, descriptive statistics and multiple inferential statistical analyses were conducted. The results revealed that those participants who experienced jigsaw listening and speaking tasks outperformed those who received decision-making-based instruction. The findings, then, bear certain theoretical implications for stakeholders.

  13. bilateral single session ureteroscopy for ureteral calculi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the feasibility, safety and success rate of bilateral single session rigid retrograde ureteroscopy (URS) for bilateral ureteral calculi. Patients and Methods: Thirty-five patients underwent bilateral single session ureteroscopic calculus removal. Results: Out of 70 renal units in 35 patients treated, ...

  14. Client Introversion and Counseling Session Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocita, Andrew; Stiles, William B.

    1986-01-01

    Examined impact of counseling sessions as a function of clients' personality characteristics. Results indicated introverted clients rated their sessions as uncomfortable, unpleasant, tense, rough, and difficult and rated their postsession mood as relatively unfriendly, uncertain, sad, angry, and afraid. Conversely, extroverted clients rated their…

  15. Oversight of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s oil pipeline regulatory program. Hearing before the Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, August 1, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The hearing addresses oversight of The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) oil pipeline regulatory program which was viewed as deficient. The primary focus is competition and market share among petroleum pipeline segments. Statements of government and industry officials are included along with documents submitted for the record.

  16. Educational Technology. Hearing of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session, on Examining Legislation Authorizing Funds for the Elementary Secondary Education Act, Focusing on Education Technology Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.

    This hearing before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions on examining legislation authorizing funds for the Elementary Secondary Education Act, focusing on educational technology programs, contains statements by: James M Jeffords, Chairman, Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions; Barbara Means, Assistant…

  17. EPA's Administration of the Asbestos in Schools Program. Hearing before the Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session (September 24, 1991).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U. S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Government Operations.

    Proceedings of a hearing concerning the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) administration of the Asbestos in School Program are presented in this report. Specifically, the hearing's purpose was to examine the EPA's progress in implementing the Asbestos Hazardous Emergency Response Act (AHERA), wherein the agency was responsible for…

  18. The Senior Community Service Employment Program: Its History and Evolution. A Report by the National Council on the Aging to the Chairman of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP)--now Title V of the Older Americans Act--evolved from Operation Mainstream, a pilot project established under Title II of the Economic Opportunity Act. Operation Mainstream, which was first funded in 1965, provided jobs for chronically unemployed, poor adults in a wide range of activities to…

  19. High Performance Computing and Communications Program. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Science of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session (October 26, 1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

    This hearing explores how the High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCC) relates to the technology needs of industry. Testimony and prepared statements from the following witnesses on future effects of computing and networking technologies on their companies are included: (1) F. Brett Berlin, president, Brett Berlin Associates,…

  20. Medical Evaluation of the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children. Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs, United States Senate, Ninety-Fourth Congress, 2d Session. Committee Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    This paper reports a medical evaluation of a federal program providing funds for special nutritious food supplements to low income pregnant and lactating women, infants, and children up to four years of age who are nutritional risks. Growth, dietary intake, and biochemical measures were obtained for study infants at the time of enrollment in the…

  1. Non-expert listeners show decreased heart rate and increased blood pressure (fear bradycardia) in response to atonal music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proverbio, Alice M; Manfrin, Luigi; Arcari, Laura A; De Benedetto, Francesco; Gazzola, Martina; Guardamagna, Matteo; Lozano Nasi, Valentina; Zani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that listening to different types of music may modulate differently psychological mood and physiological responses associated with the induced emotions. In this study the effect of listening to instrumental classical vs. atonal contemporary music was examined in a group of 50 non-expert listeners. The subjects' heart rate and diastolic and systolic blood pressure values were measured while they listened to music of different style and emotional typologies. Pieces were selected by asking a group of composers and conservatory professors to suggest a list of the most emotional music pieces (from Renaissance to present time). A total of 214 suggestions from 20 respondents were received. Then it was asked them to identify which pieces best induced in the listener feelings of agitation, joy or pathos and the number of suggested pieces per style was computed. Atonal pieces were more frequently indicated as agitating, and tonal pieces as joyful. The presence/absence of tonality in a musical piece did not affect the affective dimension of pathos (being touching). Among the most frequently cited six pieces were selected that were comparable for structure and style, to represent each emotion and style. They were equally evaluated as unfamiliar by an independent group of 10 students of the same cohort) and were then used as stimuli for the experimental session in which autonomic parameters were recorded. Overall, listening to atonal music (independent of the pieces' emotional characteristics) was associated with a reduced heart rate (fear bradycardia) and increased blood pressure (both diastolic and systolic), possibly reflecting an increase in alertness and attention, psychological tension, and anxiety. This evidence fits with the results of the esthetical assessment showing how, overall, atonal music is perceived as more agitating and less joyful than tonal one.

  2. Non-expert listeners show decreased heart rate and increased blood pressure (fear bradycardia) in response to atonal music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proverbio, Alice M.; Manfrin, Luigi; Arcari, Laura A.; De Benedetto, Francesco; Gazzola, Martina; Guardamagna, Matteo; Lozano Nasi, Valentina; Zani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that listening to different types of music may modulate differently psychological mood and physiological responses associated with the induced emotions. In this study the effect of listening to instrumental classical vs. atonal contemporary music was examined in a group of 50 non-expert listeners. The subjects’ heart rate and diastolic and systolic blood pressure values were measured while they listened to music of different style and emotional typologies. Pieces were selected by asking a group of composers and conservatory professors to suggest a list of the most emotional music pieces (from Renaissance to present time). A total of 214 suggestions from 20 respondents were received. Then it was asked them to identify which pieces best induced in the listener feelings of agitation, joy or pathos and the number of suggested pieces per style was computed. Atonal pieces were more frequently indicated as agitating, and tonal pieces as joyful. The presence/absence of tonality in a musical piece did not affect the affective dimension of pathos (being touching). Among the most frequently cited six pieces were selected that were comparable for structure and style, to represent each emotion and style. They were equally evaluated as unfamiliar by an independent group of 10 students of the same cohort) and were then used as stimuli for the experimental session in which autonomic parameters were recorded. Overall, listening to atonal music (independent of the pieces’ emotional characteristics) was associated with a reduced heart rate (fear bradycardia) and increased blood pressure (both diastolic and systolic), possibly reflecting an increase in alertness and attention, psychological tension, and anxiety. This evidence fits with the results of the esthetical assessment showing how, overall, atonal music is perceived as more agitating and less joyful than tonal one. PMID:26579029

  3. Non-expert listeners show decreased heart rate and increased blood pressure (fear bradycardia in response to atonal music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Mado eProverbio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggested that listening to different types of music may modulate differently psychological mood and physiological responses associated with the induced emotions. In this study the effect of listening to instrumental classical vs. atonal contemporary music was examined in a group of 50 non-expert listeners. The subjects’ heart rate and diastolic and systolic blood pressure values were measured while they listened to music of different style and emotional typologies. Pieces were selected by asking a group of composers and conservatory professors to suggest a list of the most emotional music pieces (from Renaissance to present time. A total of 214 suggestions from 20 respondents was received. Then it was asked them to identify which pieces best induced in the listener feelings of agitation, joy or pathos and the number of suggested pieces per style was computed. Atonal pieces were more frequently indicated as agitating, and tonal pieces as joyful. The presence/absence of tonality in a musical piece did not affect the affective dimension of pathos (being touching. Among the most frequently cited six pieces were selected that were comparable for structure and style, to represent each emotion and style. They were equally evaluated as unfamiliar by an independent group of 10 students of the same cohort and were then used as stimuli for the experimental session in which autonomic parameters were recorded. Overall, listening to atonal music (independent of the pieces’ emotional characteristics was associated with a reduced heart rate (fear bradycardia and increased blood pressure (both diastolic and systolic, possibly reflecting an increase in alertness and attention, psychological tension, and anxiety. This evidence fits with the results of the aesthetical assessment showing how, overall, atonal music is perceived as more agitating and less joyful than tonal one.

  4. The Impact of Listening to Music During a High-Intensity Exercise Endurance Test in People With COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Annemarie L; Dolmage, Thomas E; Rhim, Matthew; Goldstein, Roger S; Brooks, Dina

    2017-12-16

    In people with COPD, dyspnea is the primary symptom limiting exercise tolerance. One approach to reducing dyspnea during exercise is through music listening. A constant speed endurance test reflects a high-intensity aerobic exercise training session, but whether listening to music affects endurance time is unknown. This study aimed to determine the effects of listening to music during a constant speed endurance test in COPD. Participants with COPD completed two endurance walk tests, one with and one without listening to self-selected music throughout the test. The primary outcome was the difference in endurance time between the two conditions. Heart rate, percutaneous oxygen saturation, dyspnea, and rate of perceived exertion were measured before and after each test. Nineteen participants (mean [SD]: age, 71 [8] years; FEV1, 47 [19] % predicted) completed the study. Endurance time was greater (1.10 [95% CI, 0.41-1.78] min) while listening to music (7.0 [3.1] min) than without (5.9 [2.6] min), and reduced end-test dyspnea (1.0 [95% CI, -2.80 to -1.80] units) (with music, 4.6 [1.7] units; vs without music, 5.6 [1.4] units, respectively). There was not a significant difference in heart rate, percutaneous oxygen saturation, or leg fatigue. There were no adverse events under either condition. In COPD, dyspnea was less while listening to music and was accompanied by an increased tolerance of high-intensity exercise demonstrated by greater endurance time. Practically, the effect was modest but may represent an aid for exercise training of these patients. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry; No. ACTRN12617001217392. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. DEVELOPING LISTENING MATERIALS FOR THE TENTH GRADERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Lukman Syafi’i

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The needs survey shows that English listening skill of the students in the tenth graders of Indonesian Islamic High School or Madrasah Aliyah is not well developed. Consequently, the listening instructional materials based on standard of content 2006 used in the classes need to be advanced. The researcher used only one try out of the product, second revision in this study was the seventh step of Borg and Gall model operational product revision. This was done based on the result of the try out, and the final product (the production of the new materials. The development used in this study consists of needs survey, developing the materials, experts and teacher‟s validation, revision, try out, second revision and the final product. The product is found acceptable for the tenth grade students.

  6. Design and evaluation of interprofessional cross-cultural communication sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Poirier, Therese; Butler, Lakesha; Comrie, Rhonda; Pailden, Junvie

    2015-01-01

    The 2013 National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) call for healthcare professionals to provide quality care and services that are responsive to diverse cultural health beliefs and practices. Accreditation organizations for health professional programs require their curriculum to adequately prepare future practitioners for serving culturally and linguistically diverse populations. Another common curricular need of health professional programs is interprofessional education (IPE). This study presents data that evaluates two IPE culturally competent communication sessions designed for pharmacy and nursing students. Teams of nursing and pharmacy students (n = 160) engaged in case studies focused on developing cross-cultural communication skills, using the LEARN model. Quantitative survey data collected pre-test and post-test measured cultural competency (including subscales of perceived skills, perceived knowledge, confidence in encounter, and attitude) and knowledge related to culturally competent communication. Univariate ANOVA results indicate that actual knowledge as measured by the test and all four Clinical Cultural Competency Questionnaire (CCCQ) subscales significantly increased after the IPE sessions. Pharmacy students scored higher than nursing students on the knowledge pre-test, and nursing students had a more positive attitude at pre-test. The IPE sessions effectively addressed all learning outcomes and will continue in future course offerings. Using cross-cultural communication as a thematic area for IPE program development resulted in educational benefits for the students. To further strengthen nursing and pharmacy students' interprofessional practice, additional IPE opportunities are to be explored.

  7. COMMENTARY: LEARNER-BASED LISTENING AND TECHNOLOGICAL AUTHENTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Robin

    2007-02-01

    materials in which L2 listeners are guided in listening strategies but are not encouraged to make use of technological innovations that native listeners are coming to use on a regular basis.A brief survey of the available user-directed modifications to online scripts leads one to the idea that in the immediate future — the next five to ten years — the frontier in language learning and technology will not be found in what program does what better, but rather which students use off-the-shelf technology to best facilitate their own learning in their own learning style. Just as we began to teach metacognitive acquisition strategies, such as the use of background knowledge and prediction in the 1980s (see Nunan, 1999; Omaggio-Hadley, 2001; and Ur, 1984 for summaries of research and practice then and now, we should now teach meta-technical skills to language learners, rather than setting them out on a closed loop. Others have come to the same conclusion that technological literacy is an essential component of the language acquisition strategic toolbox (Godwin-Jones, 2000; Hubbard, 2004; LeLoup & Ponterio, 2000; Richards, 2000;. Effective users of raw electronic resources, such as easily repeatable video clips, captions, and even translation bots will bring a wider variety of input at the proper level for a broader range of learning styles than could possibly be made available in any pre-packaged closed-track program.In listening comprehension, attention over the last twenty-five years has turned from adapted scripts to authentic audio and video in which we scaffold "real media" with remediated tasks (pre- and post-script activities instead of changing the media itself. Yet despite the scaffolding, authentic materials, particularly where they involve a non-interactive flow of speech such as radio, TV, and movies, remain a challenge, especially in the beginning stages of language learning. The audio is too fast. Or acoustically difficult. Or too heavily culturally referenced

  8. Testing Selective Transmission with Low Power Listening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Tranberg; Arroyo-Valles, Rocio; Cid-Sueiro, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Selective transmission policies allow nodes in a sensor network to autonomously decide between transmitting or discarding packets depending on the importance of the information content and the energetic cost of communications. The potential benefits of these policies depend on the capability...... of nodes to estimate its current energy consumption patterns. As a case study, this paper tests the performance of a particular selective transmission algorithm over a simple network using a low power listening MAC protocol on real sensor node hardware....

  9. Understanding and the listener: Conflicting views

    OpenAIRE

    Schoneberger, Ted

    1990-01-01

    Skinner's (1957, 1974) distinction between three senses of the term understanding is presented. For Skinner, a listener understands if she (a) can repeat back to the speaker what he has said; or (b) can respond appropriately; or (c) knows about the controlling variables. Next, a critique of Skinner's view by Parrott (1984; now L.J. Hayes) is presented. Parrott criticizes the first sense of understanding for simplifying a complex activity; the second for equating understanding with reinforceme...

  10. Project Listen Compute Show (LCS) - Marine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT NATICK/TR-04/010 APA ^QO^U PROJECT LISTEN, COMPUTE, SHOW (LCS) - MARINE by Victor Zue* John Wroclawski* and Michael Bolotski...Voice Communication Strategy 37 6.3 Adaptive Channel Multiplexing 38 6.4 Web Performance and the Cache Information Protocol 41 7. Handheld Device...view of the BB-4 stack. The digital board is at the top. Most of the area is the large FPGA and the two frame buffer memories 61 Figure 14

  11. [A listening support group for nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    The feedback from a consultant nurse in a listening support group for health professionals shows that, for hospital nursing staff, the phenomenon of suffering in the workplace is a reality. In addition to providing help to professionals who request it, the missions of such a group are to promote discussion around psycho-social risks in the framework of a policy of compassionate care for staff. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic Alliances Predict Session by Session Drinking Behavior in the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Gerard J.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Schlauch, Robert C.; Dearing, Ronda L.; Prince, Mark A.; Duerr, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The therapeutic alliance is recognized as an important contributor to treatment outcomes. In this study, the session-to-session interplay of the alliance (as perceived by the patient) and alcohol involvement (drinking days and heavy drinking days between successive treatment sessions) was examined. The analyses also tested the extent to which pretreatment changes in drinking altered these interrelationships. Method Participants (N = 63) seeking treatment for an alcohol use disorder received 12-weeks of CBT for alcohol dependence and completed weekly assessments of the alliance. Results Higher session alliance scores at a given session significantly predicted lower alcohol involvement (both drinking days and heavy drinking days) in the period until the next treatment session, controlling for previous alcohol involvement. This relationship was further moderated by pretreatment change (changes in drinking prior to the first treatment session). Among those who demonstrated low pretreatment change, alliances continued to predict alcohol involvement. In contrast, alliances were not associated with alcohol involvement among those who significantly reduced their drinking prior to the first treatment session (high pretreatment changers). Finally, alcohol involvement during the period preceding a treatment session did not significantly predict alliance ratings. Conclusions These data demonstrate that more positive patient ratings of the alliance at any given treatment session are associated with less alcohol involvement during the period until the next treatment session, most particularly among patients who have not initiated reductions in their drinking prior to the first treatment session. For such patients, efforts to maximize therapeutic alliances may be warranted and productive. PMID:27548032

  13. Session-RPE for quantifying the load of different youth basketball training sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate youth basketball training, verifying the reliability of the session-RPE method in relation to session duration (< and ≥ 80 minutes and workout typology (reduced and high warm-up, conditioning, technical, tactical, game portions within a single session categories. Six male youth basketball players (age, 16.5±0.5 years; height, 195.5±6.75 cm; body mass, 93.9±10.9 kg; and body mass index, 23.6±2.8 kg.m-2 were monitored (HR, type and duration of workouts during 15 (66 individual training sessions (80±26 minutes. Edwards’ HR method was used as a reference measure of internal training load (ITL; the CR-10 RPE scale was administered 30 minutes after the end of each session. The results obtained showed that all comparisons between different session durations and workout portions revealed effects in term of Edwards’ ITLs except for warm-up portions. Moderate to strong relationships between Edwards’ and session- RPE methods emerged for all sessions (r = .85, P < .001, player’s sessions (r range = .79 - .95, P < .001, session durations (< 80 minutes: r = .67, P < .001; ≥ 80 minutes: r = .75, P < .001, and workout portions (r range = .78 - .89, P range = .002 - < .001. The findings indicated that coaches of youth basketball players can successfully use session-RPE to monitor the ITL, regardless of session durations and workout portions.

  14. Session-RPE for quantifying the load of different youth basketball training sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessitore, A; Gasperi, L; Gomez, MAR

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate youth basketball training, verifying the reliability of the session-RPE method in relation to session duration (< and ≥ 80 minutes) and workout typology (reduced and high warm-up, conditioning, technical, tactical, game portions within a single session) categories. Six male youth basketball players (age, 16.5±0.5 years; height, 195.5±6.75 cm; body mass, 93.9±10.9 kg; and body mass index, 23.6±2.8 kg.m-2) were monitored (HR, type and duration of workouts) during 15 (66 individual) training sessions (80±26 minutes). Edwards’ HR method was used as a reference measure of internal training load (ITL); the CR-10 RPE scale was administered 30 minutes after the end of each session. The results obtained showed that all comparisons between different session durations and workout portions revealed effects in term of Edwards’ ITLs except for warm-up portions. Moderate to strong relationships between Edwards’ and session- RPE methods emerged for all sessions (r = .85, P < .001), player’s sessions (r range = .79 - .95, P < .001), session durations (< 80 minutes: r = .67, P < .001; ≥ 80 minutes: r = .75, P < .001), and workout portions (r range = .78 - .89, P range = .002 - < .001). The findings indicated that coaches of youth basketball players can successfully use session-RPE to monitor the ITL, regardless of session durations and workout portions. PMID:28416891

  15. Listening to music reduces eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Thomas; Fachner, Jörg

    2015-02-01

    Listening to music can change the way that people visually experience the environment, probably as a result of an inwardly directed shift of attention. We investigated whether this attentional shift can be demonstrated by reduced eye movement activity, and if so, whether that reduction depends on absorption. Participants listened to their preferred music, to unknown neutral music, or to no music while viewing a visual stimulus (a picture or a film clip). Preference and absorption were significantly higher for the preferred music than for the unknown music. Participants exhibited longer fixations, fewer saccades, and more blinks when they listened to music than when they sat in silence. However, no differences emerged between the preferred music condition and the neutral music condition. Thus, music significantly reduces eye movement activity, but an attentional shift from the outer to the inner world (i.e., to the emotions and memories evoked by the music) emerged as only one potential explanation. Other explanations, such as a shift of attention from visual to auditory input, are discussed.

  16. Flexible session management in a distributed environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Zach; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Bradley, Dan; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Tannenbaum, Todd; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Sfiligoi, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Many secure communication libraries used by distributed systems, such as SSL, TLS, and Kerberos, fail to make a clear distinction between the authentication, session, and communication layers. In this paper we introduce CEDAR, the secure communication library used by the Condor High Throughput Computing software, and present the advantages to a distributed computing system resulting from CEDAR's separation of these layers. Regardless of the authentication method used, CEDAR establishes a secure session key, which has the flexibility to be used for multiple capabilities. We demonstrate how a layered approach to security sessions can avoid round-trips and latency inherent in network authentication. The creation of a distinct session management layer allows for optimizations to improve scalability by way of delegating sessions to other components in the system. This session delegation creates a chain of trust that reduces the overhead of establishing secure connections and enables centralized enforcement of system-wide security policies. Additionally, secure channels based upon UDP datagrams are often overlooked by existing libraries; we show how CEDAR's structure accommodates this as well. As an example of the utility of this work, we show how the use of delegated security sessions and other techniques inherent in CEDAR's architecture enables US CMS to meet their scalability requirements in deploying Condor over large-scale, wide-area grid systems.

  17. Listening Niches across a Century of Popular Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, Carol Lynne

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the contexts, or “listening niches”, in which people hear popular music. The study spanned a century of popular music, divided into 10 decades, with participants born between 1940 and 1999. It asks about whether they know and like the music in each decade, and their emotional reactions. It also asks whether the music is associated with personal memories and, if so, with whom they were listening, or whether they were listening alone. Finally, it asks what styles of music they were listening to, and the music media they were listening with, in different periods of their lives. The results show a regular progression through the life span of listening with different individuals (from parents to children) and with different media (from records to streaming services). A number of effects found in previous studies were replicated, but the study also showed differences across the birth cohorts. Overall, there was a song specific age effect with preferences for music of late adolescence and early adulthood; however, this effect was stronger for the older participants. In general, music of the 1940s, 1960s, and 1980s was preferred, particularly among younger participants. Music of these decades also produced the strongest emotional responses, and the most frequent and specific personal memories. When growing up, the participants tended to listen to the older music on the older media, but rapidly shifted to the new music technologies in their late teens and early 20s. Younger listeners are currently listening less to music alone than older listeners, suggesting an important role of socially sharing music, but they also report feeling sadder when listening to music. Finally, the oldest listeners had the broadest taste, liking music that they had been exposed to during their lifetimes in different listening niches. PMID:28424637

  18. Listening Niches across a Century of Popular Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, Carol Lynne

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the contexts, or "listening niches", in which people hear popular music. The study spanned a century of popular music, divided into 10 decades, with participants born between 1940 and 1999. It asks about whether they know and like the music in each decade, and their emotional reactions. It also asks whether the music is associated with personal memories and, if so, with whom they were listening, or whether they were listening alone. Finally, it asks what styles of music they were listening to, and the music media they were listening with, in different periods of their lives. The results show a regular progression through the life span of listening with different individuals (from parents to children) and with different media (from records to streaming services). A number of effects found in previous studies were replicated, but the study also showed differences across the birth cohorts. Overall, there was a song specific age effect with preferences for music of late adolescence and early adulthood; however, this effect was stronger for the older participants. In general, music of the 1940s, 1960s, and 1980s was preferred, particularly among younger participants. Music of these decades also produced the strongest emotional responses, and the most frequent and specific personal memories. When growing up, the participants tended to listen to the older music on the older media, but rapidly shifted to the new music technologies in their late teens and early 20s. Younger listeners are currently listening less to music alone than older listeners, suggesting an important role of socially sharing music, but they also report feeling sadder when listening to music. Finally, the oldest listeners had the broadest taste, liking music that they had been exposed to during their lifetimes in different listening niches.

  19. Metacognitive Strategy Instruction as a Means to Improve Listening SelfEfficacy among Iranian Undergraduate Learners of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rahimirad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metacognitive strategy instruction (MetSI has been shown to have a strong impact on various aspects of English as a second/foreign language instruction. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of MetSI on the improvement of listening selfefficacy among English-as-a-foreign-language (EFL learners. A group of sixty female undergraduate learners of English literature at a state-run university in Iran consented to take part in this study. After homogenizing the participants' English proficiency level using a sample section of the British Council IELTS test, 40 learners were selected whose English proficiency fell within intermediate to upperintermediate level. A listening self-efficacy questionnaire (borrowed from Rahimi and Abedini, 2009 was used to measure the participants’ level of listening selfefficacy in the pre and post-test phases of the study. The participants were randomly assigned to treatment (n=20 and control (n=20 groups. The treatment group received 8 hours of MetSI during eight sessions based on the model proposed by Vandergrift (2003 while the control group didn't receive any explicit MetSI. The control group received the usual training in listening instead.

  20. Sessions and Separability in Security Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Marco; Guttman, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    uncompromised subset of the participants are still guar- anteed that their interaction will respect sessions. A protocol transfor- mation turns any protocol into a session-respecting protocol. We do this via a general theory of separability. Our main theorem ap- plies to different separability requirements......, and characterizes when we can separate protocol executions sufficiently to meet a particular require- ment. This theorem also gives direct proofs of some old and new protocol composition results. Thus, our theory of separability appears to cover protocol composition and session-like behavior within a uniform frame...

  1. "Listen and Understand What I Am Saying": Church-Listening as a Challenge for Non-Native Listeners of English in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This article uses computer-assisted analysis to study the listening environment provided by Bible readings and preaching during church services. It focuses on the vocabulary size needed to comprehend 95% and 98% of the running words of the input (lexical coverage levels indicating comprehension in connection with listening) and on the place of…

  2. Brain substrates underlying auditory speech priming in healthy listeners and listeners with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C; Zheng, Y; Li, J; Wu, H; She, S; Liu, S; Ning, Y; Li, L

    2017-04-01

    Under 'cocktail party' listening conditions, healthy listeners and listeners with schizophrenia can use temporally pre-presented auditory speech-priming (ASP) stimuli to improve target-speech recognition, even though listeners with schizophrenia are more vulnerable to informational speech masking. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, this study searched for both brain substrates underlying the unmasking effect of ASP in 16 healthy controls and 22 patients with schizophrenia, and brain substrates underlying schizophrenia-related speech-recognition deficits under speech-masking conditions. In both controls and patients, introducing the ASP condition (against the auditory non-speech-priming condition) not only activated the left superior temporal gyrus (STG) and left posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG), but also enhanced functional connectivity of the left STG/pMTG with the left caudate. It also enhanced functional connectivity of the left STG/pMTG with the left pars triangularis of the inferior frontal gyrus (TriIFG) in controls and that with the left Rolandic operculum in patients. The strength of functional connectivity between the left STG and left TriIFG was correlated with target-speech recognition under the speech-masking condition in both controls and patients, but reduced in patients. The left STG/pMTG and their ASP-related functional connectivity with both the left caudate and some frontal regions (the left TriIFG in healthy listeners and the left Rolandic operculum in listeners with schizophrenia) are involved in the unmasking effect of ASP, possibly through facilitating the following processes: masker-signal inhibition, target-speech encoding, and speech production. The schizophrenia-related reduction of functional connectivity between the left STG and left TriIFG augments the vulnerability of speech recognition to speech masking.

  3. HELPING ESL STUDENTS BECOME MOTIVATED LISTENER : USING FILMS TO DEVELOP LEARNERS’ MOTIVATION IN LISTENING CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmawati Sukmaningrum

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on an experiments conducted within 5 classes of ESL Listening classrooms in IKIP PGRI Semarang. It takes a very broad look at some theories relating to language learning (especially in listening skill and motivation. Listening is a receptive skill, and receptive skills give way to productive skills. If we have our students produce something, the teaching will be more communicative. Lack of sociocultural, factual, and contextual knowledge of the target language can present an obstacle to listening comprehension and hence decrease students’ motivation to learn. In order to teach listening skills, a teacher should firstly state the difficulties, find the solution to overcome the difficulties and then help the students to maintain their motivation in the classroom. The article then illustrates the possible solutions with a practical example of how movies may be employed in the classroom in a manner which both facilitates language learning and further encourages students’ motivation. In conducting the experiment, four steps were taken with each purposive reason. The activities given stimulated learners with a clear goal that is achievable; there are no right or wrong answers, as long as the script fits the scene. Learners are encouraged to use the linguistic tools they have to solve an immediate problem/question. The activities also practice both extensive and intensive listening skills of the learners and allow them to use the non-verbal clues which make video such a rich medium for language learning. In this case, the group has expressed an interest in watching movies in English. The teacher's task is to manipulate this enthusiasm in a way that develops a positive attitude towards language learning. The challenge is obvious; if learners can tackle tasks related to a full-length movie then their confidence and self-esteem will be raised.

  4. Session-RPE for quantifying the load of different youth basketball training sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, C; Tessitore, A; Gasperi, L; Gomez, Mar

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate youth basketball training, verifying the reliability of the session-RPE method in relation to session duration (training sessions (80±26 minutes). Edwards' HR method was used as a reference measure of internal training load (ITL); the CR-10 RPE scale was administered 30 minutes after the end of each session. The results obtained showed that all comparisons between different session durations and workout portions revealed effects in term of Edwards' ITLs except for warm-up portions. Moderate to strong relationships between Edwards' and session- RPE methods emerged for all sessions (r = .85, P < .001), player's sessions (r range = .79 - .95, P < .001), session durations (< 80 minutes: r = .67, P < .001; ≥ 80 minutes: r = .75, P < .001), and workout portions (r range = .78 - .89, P range = .002 - < .001). The findings indicated that coaches of youth basketball players can successfully use session-RPE to monitor the ITL, regardless of session durations and workout portions.

  5. First session: needs for experimental programs; Session 1: Les besoins et programmes experimentaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waeckel, N.; Beguin, S.; Delbecq, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France); Assedo, R.; Hittner, D. [AREVA/FRAMATOME, 92 - La Defense (France); Carre, F.; Renault, C. [CEA Saclay, Dir. du Developpement et de l' Innovation Nucleares (DEN/DDIN/DPSF), 91 - Gif Sur Yvette (France); Bardelay, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN/DSRE), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2005-07-01

    Adequate experimental facilities for material irradiation or material / system qualification must be available, first for the development of the current PWR-type reactor concerning the extension of its operating life, the optimization of its nuclear fuel and its capacity to fit the power demand, secondly for the development of the fourth generation of reactors which implies important experimental research work particularly in the fields of: - new nuclear fuels particularly nitrides and carbides, - materials able to sustain high and very high temperatures, - high temperature helium cooling systems, or - feasibility studies for a completely closed fuel cycle inside the reactor core allowing both a complete recycling and the separation of actinides. (A.C.)

  6. A Correlational Study Between Habit in Listening to English Songs, Vocabulary Mastery, and Listening Skill

    OpenAIRE

    Meutia, Zara Firsty; Asib, Abdul; Rais, Ahmad Dahlan

    2014-01-01

    The study is aimed to find out the correlation between habit in listening to English songs, vocabulary mastery, and listening skill of the tenth grade students of SMA Negeri 3 Surakarta in the academic year of 2012/2013; both partially and simultaneously. This study used a test and a questionnaire. The population of the study is all of the tenth grade students while the sample is 30 students taken by cluster random sampling technique. The techniques used to analyze the data are simple and mul...

  7. Communication skills of heads of departments: verbal, listening, and feedback skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Yadollah; Barati, Majid

    2011-11-04

    Managers' communication skills are one of the most important topics in educational sector of universities of medical sciences and may have considerable effect on faculty members and employees. This study was per-formed to determine the level of communication skills (verbal, listening, feed-back) of the heads of department of faculties and its relation with some demo-graphic variables. This cross-sectional study was conducted from June 2009 to January 2010. We enrolled all of the heads of departments (N=60) in Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, western Iran. The participants received a self-administered 24-item questionnaire in Likert format (six general items and 18 items related to communication skills). Data were analyzed with SPSS software using Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. The average scores of verbal, listening and feedback communication were 22.5, 16.1 and 21.1, respectively. Accordingly, 78.3% of participants in verbal communication, 16.7% in listening communication and 73.3% in feedback communication had high status. There were significant differences between the average score of listening skills and age (P=0.013) as well as gender (P=0.042). In addition, there was a significant statistical difference between verbal skills and gender (P=0.021). The overall communication skills of more than half of the heads of departments were moderate. This needs designing some programs for improving department managers' communication skills.

  8. Session 1: strategies to engage pharma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frank, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Presentations Participants in this panel and in the discussion sessions that followed outlined key challenges in satisfying the needs of pharmaceutical companies in molecular imaging, addressing, among other topics...

  9. POWERLIFTING SESSIONS PROMOTE SIGNIFICANT POST-EXERCISE HYPOTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Allegretti João

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Powerlifting (PWL is a worldwide method, frequently used in resistance training programs. However, the relationship between cardiovascular responses and PWL is still unclear in the literature. Objective: To evaluate acute cardiovascular overload and post-exercise hypotension (PEH after acute powerlifting exercise session in subjects with experience in the modality. Methods: Nine powerlifting athletes (34 ± 5 years participated voluntarily in this study. The following exercises were used in the session: squat, bench press and deadlift (95% of 1 RM, 2 to 5 repetitions. The anthropometric parameters and blood pressure (systolic, diastolic and mean were evaluated immediately, 5', 10', 30', 60' and 24 hours after the exercise session with a non-invasive automatic pressure monitor. Results: Significant differences (p<0.05 were found between rest and immediately after exercise on systolic (135 ± 6 vs. 153 ± 10 mmHg and mean (102 ± 3 vs. 108 ± 3 mmHg blood pressures, but no difference was found at diastolic (85 ± 3 vs. 85 ± 4 mmHg blood pressure. Additionally, the increase in systolic pressure did not reach values considered as a risk of cardiovascular overload. Significant PEH was found after 60 minutes (systolic: -12 ± 12%, diastolic: -5 ± 6% and mean: -7 ± 5% and 24 hours after PWL session (systolic: -5 ± 4%, diastolic: -8 ± 4% and mean: -7 ± 3%. Conclusion: Our data demonstrated that a PWL session does not increase systolic blood pressure up to the risk range and promotes PEH after 60 minutes of exercise and that this cardiovascular response persisted after 24 hours post-exertion in powerlifting athletes.

  10. The anatomy of free paper sessions.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsakraklides, V G; Tsakraklides, E K; Kotsis, L K; Sotiropoulos, S S; Patedakis, G; Grivas, T; Pektasides, E; Lykoudis, S.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction between speakers, audience, and chairmen was studied by 13 investigators during a medical meeting at which 356 free papers were given before a total audience of 2483 in 48 sessions. A protocol was used to score 21 questions relating to the presentation, 15 to the chairman of the session, and nine to the audience. Many speakers made technical faults in presentation and their use of slides. Most chairmen failed to comply with simple rules of procedure and with the expectations o...

  11. Headphone listening habits and hearing thresholds in swedish adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E Widen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported hearing and portable music listening habits, measured hearing function and music exposure levels in Swedish adolescents. The study was divided into two parts. Materials and Methods: The first part included 280 adolescents, who were 17 years of age and focused on self-reported data on subjective hearing problems and listening habits regarding portable music players. From this group, 50 adolescents volunteered to participate in Part II of the study, which focused on audiological measurements and measured listening volume. Results: The results indicated that longer lifetime exposure in years and increased listening frequency were associated with poorer hearing thresholds and more self-reported hearing problems. A tendency was found for listening to louder volumes and poorer hearing thresholds. Women reported more subjective hearing problems compared with men but exhibited better hearing thresholds. In contrast, men reported more use of personal music devices, and they listen at higher volumes. Discussion: Additionally, the study shows that adolescents listening for ≥3 h at every occasion more likely had tinnitus. Those listening at ≥85 dB LAeq, FF and listening every day exhibited poorer mean hearing thresholds, reported more subjective hearing problems and listened more frequently in school and while sleeping. Conclusion: Although the vast majority listened at moderate sound levels and for shorter periods of time, the study also indicates that there is a subgroup (10% that listens between 90 and 100 dB for longer periods of time, even during sleep. This group might be at risk for developing future noise-induced hearing impairments.

  12. An EEG study on music listening with ICA approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qi; Yoshimine, Norikazu

    2017-01-01

    Music listening is one of the most popular and convenient entertainment method for human beings. When listening to music, people can get relaxed by soothing music or become excited by rock music. As we know that mental feelings are generated by the human brain, studying the human brain activities when they are listening to music may reveal the mechanism of mental processes for generating these feelings. In this paper, we conducted experiments to measure the brain activities when the subjects ...

  13. Toward a taxonomic model of attention in effortful listening

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel J. Strauss; Alexander L. Francis

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in studying listening effort. Research on listening effort intersects with the development of active theories of speech perception and contributes to the broader endeavor of understanding speech perception within the context of neuroscientific theories of perception, attention, and effort. Due to the multidisciplinary nature of the problem, researchers vary widely in their precise conceptualization of the catch-all term listening effort. Ver...

  14. Headphone listening habits and hearing thresholds in swedish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widen, Stephen E; Båsjö, Sara; Möller, Claes; Kähäri, Kim

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported hearing and portable music listening habits, measured hearing function and music exposure levels in Swedish adolescents. The study was divided into two parts. The first part included 280 adolescents, who were 17 years of age and focused on self-reported data on subjective hearing problems and listening habits regarding portable music players. From this group, 50 adolescents volunteered to participate in Part II of the study, which focused on audiological measurements and measured listening volume. The results indicated that longer lifetime exposure in years and increased listening frequency were associated with poorer hearing thresholds and more self-reported hearing problems. A tendency was found for listening to louder volumes and poorer hearing thresholds. Women reported more subjective hearing problems compared with men but exhibited better hearing thresholds. In contrast, men reported more use of personal music devices, and they listen at higher volumes. Additionally, the study shows that adolescents listening for ≥3 h at every occasion more likely had tinnitus. Those listening at ≥85 dB LAeq, FF and listening every day exhibited poorer mean hearing thresholds, reported more subjective hearing problems and listened more frequently in school and while sleeping. Although the vast majority listened at moderate sound levels and for shorter periods of time, the study also indicates that there is a subgroup (10%) that listens between 90 and 100 dB for longer periods of time, even during sleep. This group might be at risk for developing future noise-induced hearing impairments.

  15. Personal music listening: modelling emotional outcomes through mobile experience sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Randall, William Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Personal music listening is a private and flexible means of musical engagement, which is rapidly growing as a central component of everyday music use. This unique style of listening has unprecedented potential for the deliberate manipulation of emotional states, and the impact it has on emotional health and well-being is largely unknown. The current thesis therefore aimed to determine the emotional outcomes of personal music listening. To achieve this, a new methodology was developed, designe...

  16. Mathematics Intensive Summer Session (MISS). Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This final technical report appears in two parts: the report for the 1995 summer MISS program and the report for the 1996 summer MISS program. Copies of the US Department of Energy Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program 1995 Entry Form and 1996 Entry Form completed by all participants were sent to the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education in the fall of 1995 and 1996 respectively. Those forms are on file should they be needed. Attached also is a copy of the Summary of ideas for panel discussions, problem-solving sessions, or small group discussions presented at the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program Project Directors Meeting held in San Antonio, TX, November 12--14, 1995.

  17. [Survey on the harmfulness of listening to music with headphones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffe, P; Cudennec, Y F; Ben Azzouz, M; Bassoumi, T; Ferron, J J

    1986-01-01

    A survey conducted in 52,000 young male subjects evaluated the influence of listening to music with stereophonic headphones on perception hypacusis leading to exemption from National Service. Also investigated were noise level output from promenaders as well as temporary auditory loss two minutes after listening for one hour. Findings suggested relative innocuity of listening at moderate intensity for less than seven hours weekly. Users exceeding these optimal factors develop professional type deafness for which similar preventive measures are required. Particular mention is made of the effect of strolling listeners on vigilance and on sound pollution of industrialized countries.

  18. Toward a taxonomic model of attention in effortful listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Daniel J; Francis, Alexander L

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in studying listening effort. Research on listening effort intersects with the development of active theories of speech perception and contributes to the broader endeavor of understanding speech perception within the context of neuroscientific theories of perception, attention, and effort. Due to the multidisciplinary nature of the problem, researchers vary widely in their precise conceptualization of the catch-all term listening effort. Very recent consensus work stresses the relationship between listening effort and the allocation of cognitive resources, providing a conceptual link to current cognitive neuropsychological theories associating effort with the allocation of selective attention. By linking listening effort to attentional effort, we enable the application of a taxonomy of external and internal attention to the characterization of effortful listening. More specifically, we use a vectorial model to decompose the demand causing listening effort into its mutually orthogonal external and internal components and map the relationship between demanded and exerted effort by means of a resource-limiting term that can represent the influence of motivation as well as vigilance and arousal. Due to its quantitative nature and easy graphical interpretation, this model can be applied to a broad range of problems dealing with listening effort. As such, we conclude that the model provides a good starting point for further research on effortful listening within a more differentiated neuropsychological framework.

  19. The listener in music historiography, 1776-1928

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessel, Jan Andreas

    of issues arises when “the listener” merges into various transpersonal categories, like an age, a people, a religion and so on. The aim of my investigation has been to map how these two levels interact and form different constellations in the music historical literature. My study positions itself within......). There are a number of different issues that converge on the figure of the listener. Apart from the activity of listening, the listener also provides the focal point of ideas on musical effect, taste, judgment etc., all of which, in different ways, refer to the relation between listener and music. Another set...

  20. Pragmatics in ESL classroom: its importance in listening skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Presotto, Leticia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at discussing the importance of Pragmatics in ESL classroom, more specifically in listening tasks. In order to base our study, we present an overview of some pragmatic theories which relies on the notion of inference, like Grice (1975 and Sperber and Wilson (1995. Then, we discuss about the importance of Pragmatics among language teaching and listening skill. In this section, we highlight some important aspects that have to be considered in teaching a second language focusing in listening activities. Finally, we analyze the listening section of TOEFL exam. Here, we show how Pragmatics is present and its importance to the students who take this specific test

  1. Academic Listening in the 21st Century: Reviewing a Decade of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Tony

    2011-01-01

    This review article extends the conventional notion of academic listening to include reciprocal (two-way) listening events in academic settings, as well as (one-way) listening to lectures. The introductory section highlights the comparatively low profile of listening in EAP research, due in part to the inherent complexity of listening and its…

  2. Eye Movements and Reading Comprehension While Listening to Preferred and Non-Preferred Study Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Roger; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Mossberg, Frans; Lindgren, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    In the present study 24 university students read four different texts in four conditions: (1) while listening to music they preferred to listen to while studying; (2) while listening to music they did not prefer to listen to while studying; (3) while listening to a recording of noise from a cafe; and finally (4) in silence. After each text they…

  3. Learners' Listening Comprehension Difficulties in English Language Learning: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilakjani, Abbas Pourhosein; Sabouri, Narjes Banou

    2016-01-01

    Listening is one of the most important skills in English language learning. When students listen to English language, they face a lot of listening difficulties. Students have critical difficulties in listening comprehension because universities and schools pay more attention to writing, reading, and vocabulary. Listening is not an important part…

  4. Cumulative and Synergistic Effects of Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use Physical Oceanography Component: Soundscapes Under Sea Ice: Can We Listen for Open Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use Physical Oceanography Component: Soundscapes Under Sea Ice: Can we listen for... Soundscapes Under Sea Ice: Can we listen for open water? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...the source. These different sounds can be described as “ soundscapes ”, and graphically represented by comparing two or more features of the sound

  5. Auditory Training Effects on the Listening Skills of Children With Auditory Processing Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Jenny Hooi Yin; Rosen, Stuart; Bamiou, Doris-Eva

    2016-01-01

    Children with auditory processing disorder (APD) typically present with "listening difficulties,"' including problems understanding speech in noisy environments. The authors examined, in a group of such children, whether a 12-week computer-based auditory training program with speech material improved the perception of speech-in-noise test performance, and functional listening skills as assessed by parental and teacher listening and communication questionnaires. The authors hypothesized that after the intervention, (1) trained children would show greater improvements in speech-in-noise perception than untrained controls; (2) this improvement would correlate with improvements in observer-rated behaviors; and (3) the improvement would be maintained for at least 3 months after the end of training. This was a prospective randomized controlled trial of 39 children with normal nonverbal intelligence, ages 7 to 11 years, all diagnosed with APD. This diagnosis required a normal pure-tone audiogram and deficits in at least two clinical auditory processing tests. The APD children were randomly assigned to (1) a control group that received only the current standard treatment for children diagnosed with APD, employing various listening/educational strategies at school (N = 19); or (2) an intervention group that undertook a 3-month 5-day/week computer-based auditory training program at home, consisting of a wide variety of speech-based listening tasks with competing sounds, in addition to the current standard treatment. All 39 children were assessed for language and cognitive skills at baseline and on three outcome measures at baseline and immediate postintervention. Outcome measures were repeated 3 months postintervention in the intervention group only, to assess the sustainability of treatment effects. The outcome measures were (1) the mean speech reception threshold obtained from the four subtests of the listening in specialized noise test that assesses sentence perception in

  6. The effect of hearing aid technologies on listening in an automobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Stangl, Elizabeth; Bentler, Ruth A; Stanziola, Rachel W

    2013-06-01

    Communication while traveling in an automobile often is very difficult for hearing aid users. This is because the automobile/road noise level is usually high, and listeners/drivers often do not have access to visual cues. Since the talker of interest usually is not located in front of the listener/driver, conventional directional processing that places the directivity beam toward the listener's front may not be helpful and, in fact, could have a negative impact on speech recognition (when compared to omnidirectional processing). Recently, technologies have become available in commercial hearing aids that are designed to improve speech recognition and/or listening effort in noisy conditions where talkers are located behind or beside the listener. These technologies include (1) a directional microphone system that uses a backward-facing directivity pattern (Back-DIR processing), (2) a technology that transmits audio signals from the ear with the better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to the ear with the poorer SNR (Side-Transmission processing), and (3) a signal processing scheme that suppresses the noise at the ear with the poorer SNR (Side-Suppression processing). The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of (1) conventional directional microphones and (2) newer signal processing schemes (Back-DIR, Side-Transmission, and Side-Suppression) on listener's speech recognition performance and preference for communication in a traveling automobile. A single-blinded, repeated-measures design was used. Twenty-five adults with bilateral symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss aged 44 through 84 yr participated in the study. The automobile/road noise and sentences of the Connected Speech Test (CST) were recorded through hearing aids in a standard van moving at a speed of 70 mph on a paved highway. The hearing aids were programmed to omnidirectional microphone, conventional adaptive directional microphone, and the three newer schemes. CST sentences were presented

  7. [A longitudinal (3 years) study of the development of four children with autism without mental retardation after 90 sessions of social skills training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liratni, M; Blanchet, C; Pry, R

    2016-12-01

    socialization and communication domains (VABS, P=0.00). From a symptomatic point of view (ADOS), we clinically observe better conversation skills and more social initiatives. About socialization and communication behaviors, parents reported (VABS): better listening, better verbal expression, more social relationships and a start of friendship for most of the children. This three-year longitudinal follow-up is the first known study about the evolution of children with autistic disorders after a great number of sessions of social skills training. It shows that it is possible to adapt social skills training to young children. In addition, our program and our results (VABS) show clear examples of generalization which is targeted as a weakness in the specialized studies. However, the absence of a control group and of a base line strongly limit our results in terms of effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Listening effort and speech intelligibility in listening situations affected by noise and reverberation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennies, Jan; Schepker, Henning; Holube, Inga; Kollmeier, Birger

    2014-11-01

    This study compared the combined effect of noise and reverberation on listening effort and speech intelligibility to predictions of the speech transmission index (STI). Listening effort was measured in normal-hearing subjects using a scaling procedure. Speech intelligibility scores were measured in the same subjects and conditions: (a) Speech-shaped noise as the only interfering factor, (b) + (c) fixed signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of 0 or 7 dB and reverberation as detrimental factors, and (d) reverberation as the only detrimental factor. In each condition, SNR and reverberation were combined to produce STI values of 0.17, 0.30, 0.43, 0.57, and 0.70, respectively. Listening effort always decreased with increasing STI, thus enabling a rough prediction, but a significant bias was observed indicating that listening effort was lower in reverberation only than in noise only at the same STI for one type of impulse responses. Accordingly, speech intelligibility increased with increasing STI and was significantly better in reverberation only than in noise only at the same STI. Further analyses showed that the broadband reverberation time is not always a good estimate of speech degradation in reverberation and that different speech materials may differ in their robustness toward detrimental effects of reverberation.

  9. The Congruity/Incongruity of EFL Teachers' Beliefs about Listening Instruction and Their Listening Instructional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mohammad Nabi; Nazari, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    While research on EFL teachers' beliefs and the realization of these beliefs in their classroom practices has recently gained momentum in the field of applied linguistics, the study of teachers' beliefs as they relate to listening has received insufficient attention in the literature. This study was conducted to investigate Iranian EFL teachers'…

  10. The Effects of YouTube Listening/Viewing Activities on Taiwanese EFL Learners' Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Li-Li

    2009-01-01

    Declared the year of YouTube, 2007 was hailed as bringing a technological revolution in relation to pedagogy, one that may provide more convenient access to materials for language input, such as auditory, visual, and other types of authentic resources in order to promote advancement in all four language learning skills--listening, speaking,…

  11. Effects of Captions and Subtitles on the Listening Process: Insights from EFL Learners' Listening Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosogoshi, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Captions and subtitles as a form of scaffolding for audiovisual materials has gained much attention in second or foreign language (L2) learning in recent years and various studies report their positive effects on learners' listening comprehension. However, few attempts have been made to investigate how textual information specifically affects the…

  12. E-Priming the Listener: Sensitizing Students to Listening for Verbal Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Sally O.

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues that the concept of E-Prime (E') holds practical benefits to effective listening for students of interpersonal communication. In advancing this argument, the paper includes a concise review of relevant literature on E-Prime, defensiveness, and conflict, with particular emphasis on verbal aggression. The literature demonstrates…

  13. Social and Emotional Function of Music Listening: Reasons for Listening to Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgen, Elif Tekin

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: The reasons that people listen to music have been investigated for many years. Research results over the past 50 years have showed that individual musical preference is influenced by multiple factors. Many studies have shown throughout that music has been used to induce emotional states, express, activate, control emotions,…

  14. Listening Cloze Meets Info-Gap: A Hybrid Activity to Exploit Listening Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Juan Pablo Zúñiga

    2015-01-01

    In twenty-first-century language teaching, the class should be student-centered and provide learners with skills that empower them in real-life situations. In this regard, it is commonly said that practice makes perfect. It therefore makes sense for teachers to ask themselves how much their listening activities demand from students and to evaluate…

  15. Proform-Antecedent Linking in Listeners with Language Impairments and Unimpaired Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Samantha Michelle

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation explores how listeners extract meaning from personal and reflexive pronouns in spoken language. To be understood, words like her and herself must be linked to a prior element in the speech stream (or antecedent). This process draws on syntactic knowledge and verbal working memory processes. I present two original research studies…

  16. Exploring Juror's Listening Processes: The Effect of Listening Style Preference on Juror Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Debra L.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the relationship between listening style preference and jurors' assignment of negligence and damages. Notes that 90 men and 84 women drawn from introductory communication courses viewed videotaped attorney presentations and the judge's instructions from an actual court case. Indicates that participants with a people-oriented listening…

  17. A model for gossip-mediated evolution of altruism with various types of false information by speakers and assessment by listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Motohide; Nakamaru, Mayuko

    2016-10-21

    Indirect reciprocity is considered to be important for explaining altruism among humans. The evolution of altruism has been modeled using several types of reputational scores, most of which were assumed to be updated immediately after each game session. In this study, we introduce gossip sessions held between game sessions to capture the spread of reputation and examine the effects of false information intentionally introduced by some players. Analytical and individual-based simulation results indicated that the frequent exchange of gossip favored the evolution of altruism when no players started false information. In contrast, intermediate repetitions of gossip sessions were favored when the population included liars or biased gossipers. In addition, we found that a gossip listener's strategy of incorporating any gossip regardless of speakers usually worked better than an alternative strategy of not believing gossip from untrustworthy players. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Faculty Development Session or Resident as Teacher Session for Didactic and Clinical Teaching Techniques; Part 1 of 2: Engaging Learners with Effective Didactic Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen-Osborn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This workshop is intended for faculty members in an emergency medicine (or other residency program, but is also appropriate for chief residents and medical student educators, including basic science faculty. Introduction: Faculty development sessions are required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and enhance the learning environment within residency programs. Resident as teacher sessions are important in helping residents transition from junior learners to supervisors of medical students and junior residents. Part I of this two-part workshop introduces learners to effective techniques to engaging learners during didactic sessions. Objectives: By the end of this workshop, the learner will: 1 describe eight teaching techniques that encourage active learning during didactic sessions; 2 plan a didactic session using at least one of eight new teaching techniques for didactic instruction. Methods: This educational session is uses several blended instructional methods, including team-based learning (classic and modified, the flipped classroom, audience response systems, pause procedures in order to demonstrate effective didactic teaching techniques.

  19. Shut Up and Listen: Teaching Writing that Counts in Urban Schools. Black Studies and Critical Thinking, Volume 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Less than fifty percent of African American students graduate from high school. Their educational failure is built into the racial structure of curriculum, standardized testing, teacher preparation programs, and even teacher recruitment pathways. "Shut Up and Listen" argues that African American students should be taught to navigate and resist the…

  20. Affective Processes in Therapy Sessions in relation to adaptive Affect Expression Between Sessions

    OpenAIRE

    Holmboe, Alexander Christian

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary data from the Intensive Mapping of Psychotherapy Process project (PROCMAP) at Modum Bad were used in this study. The aim was to investigate the relationship between affective processes inside therapy and affect expression between sessions. Affect expression outside therapy, also called new learning, is a relatively unexplored concept. Method: Activating affect, inhibitory affect (in session) and new learning (between sessions) were rated using Achievement of Therapeutic Objecti...

  1. Teachers' Support in Using Computers for Developing Students' Listening and Speaking Skills in Pre-Sessional English Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Many computer-assisted language learning (CALL) studies have found that teacher direction can help learners develop language skills at their own pace on computers. However, many teachers still do not know how to provide support for students to use computers to reinforce the development of their language skills. Hence, more examples of CALL…

  2. Effects of a structured 20-session slow-cortical-potential-based neurofeedback program on attentional performance in children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: retrospective analysis of an open-label pilot-approach and 6-month follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht JS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Johanna S Albrecht,1–3 Sarah Bubenzer-Busch,1,2 Anne Gallien,1,4 Eva Lotte Knospe,1,2 Tilman J Gaber,1,2,5 Florian D Zepf1,2,6,7 1Clinic for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, 2JARA Translational Brain Medicine, Aachen & Jülich, 3Center for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine Elisabeth Hospital Rheydt, Mönchengladbach, 4Clinic for Neurology, Medical Center City Region Aachen, Würselen, 5NeuroCare Group, Munich, Germany; 6Centre and Discipline of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, School of Paediatrics and Child Health & School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Western Australia, 7Department of Health in Western Australia, Specialised Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, Perth, WA, Australia Objective: The aim of this approach was to conduct a structured electroencephalography-based neurofeedback training program for children and adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD using slow cortical potentials with an intensive first (almost daily sessions and second phase of training (two sessions per week and to assess aspects of attentional performance. Patients and methods: A total of 24 young patients with ADHD participated in the 20-session training program. During phase I of training (2 weeks, 10 sessions, participants were trained on weekdays. During phase II, neurofeedback training occurred twice per week (5 weeks. The patients’ inattention problems were measured at three assessment time points before (pre, T0 and after (post, T1 the training and at a 6-month follow-up (T2; the assessments included neuropsychological tests (Alertness and Divided Attention subtests of the Test for Attentional Performance; Sustained Attention Dots and Shifting Attentional Set subtests of the Amsterdam Neuropsychological Test and questionnaire data

  3. Dissecting the role of sessional anatomy teachers: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Danielle; Fogg, Quentin A; Lazarus, Michelle D

    2017-12-04

    Worldwide there is a growing reliance on sessional teachers in universities. This has impacted all disciplines in higher education including medical anatomy programs. The objective of this review was to define the role and support needs of sessional anatomy teachers by reporting on the (1) qualifications, (2) teaching role, (3) training, and (4) performance management of this group of educators. A systematic literature search was conducted on the 27 July 2017 in Scopus, Web of Science, and several databases on the Ovid, ProQuest and EBSCOhost platforms. The search retrieved 5,658 articles, with 39 deemed eligible for inclusion. The qualifications and educational distance between sessional anatomy teachers and their students varied widely. Reports of cross-level, near-peer and reciprocal-peer teaching were identified, with most institutes utilizing recent medical graduates or medical students as sessional teachers. Sessional anatomy teachers were engaged in the full spectrum of teaching-related duties from assisting students with cadaveric dissection, to marking student assessments and developing course materials. Fourteen institutes reported that training was provided to sessional anatomy teachers, but the specific content, objectives, methods and effectiveness of the training programs were rarely defined. Evaluations of sessional anatomy teacher performance primarily relied on subjective feedback measures such as student surveys (n = 18) or teacher self-assessment (n = 3). The results of this systematic review highlight the need for rigorous explorations of the use of sessional anatomy teachers in medical education, and the development of evidence-based policies and training programs that regulate and support the use of sessional teachers in higher education. Anat Sci Educ. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  4. PBL wrap up sessions: an approach to enhance generic skills in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Zubia; Ahsin, Sadia

    2011-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) tutorials are being used in various medical schools world wide. Students' active participation is a must for the success of a teaching program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PBL Wrap-up sessions in an integrated modular medical curriculum in enhancing the generic skills of medical students. This study was conducted on 100 students of 2nd year MBBS who had been taking PBL sessions since 1 1/2 years. Each session concluded with a wrap-up session where students demonstrated their acquired knowledge in the form of PowerPoint presentations, concept maps, skits, models etc. A questionnaire based survey was conducted to find out overall effectiveness of PBL sessions including wrap-up sessions. The questionnaire comprised of 15 questions. Students were asked to rate all those sessions on a likert scale of 1 to 5. Student's responses showed 'Moderate improvement' in 8 out of 15 skills like communication with peers and teachers, presentation skills, self confidence, application of acquired knowledge, using internet and other resources and understanding group dynamics. Improvement in abilities like problem solving, time management, creativity, motivation in studies and self-directed learning was 'Minimal'. In addition students recommended continuation of PBL in the same way for future classes. PBL with wrap-up sessions contributed in bringing moderate enhancement of generic learning skills in students which were not properly addressed in the traditional curriculum and are therefore recommended for future implementation.

  5. Intersections and Unions of Session Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coşku Acay

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior work has extended the deep, logical connection between the linear sequent calculus and session-typed message-passing concurrent computation with equi-recursive types and a natural notion of subtyping. In this paper, we extend this further by intersection and union types in order to express multiple behavioral properties of processes in a single type. We prove session fidelity and absence of deadlock and illustrate the expressive power of our system with some simple examples. We observe that we can represent internal and external choice by intersection and union, respectively, which was previously suggested by Padovani for a different language of session types motivated by operational rather than logical concerns.

  6. Instruments for documentation of music therapy sessions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    It is an important part of the clinical music therapy work to document the daily sessions. For the clinician it is necessary to have a brief overview of each session in order to assess the methods and the process, and not least to be able to give clear reports of these issues to other health care...... professionals at staff meetings, conferences, etc. For music therapists with many clients there is not time enough during a working day to provide comprehensive process descriptions in the music therapy log. Therefore instruments that help the clinician in reducing and structuring this information are needed....... Danish and Norwegian music therapist have collaborated on developing a one page sheet with a structured form where they after each music therapy session document their use of methods and techniques in individual music therapy with persons with dementia. With this instrument therapists have easy access...

  7. Communication with Alzheimer's Patients: An Analysis of Caregiver Listening Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohling, Hollis R.

    1991-01-01

    Examined caregiver listening responses as they occurred in conversations with an Alzheimer's patient. Videotaped 26 episodes of conversations between caregivers and patients in adult day health care setting. Found that sensitive listening and partial entry into the patient's frame (reality) may be effective response to prevent behavior and…

  8. The Impact of (In)effective Listening on Interpersonal Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedesco, Heather Noel

    2015-01-01

    On average, people spend between 45% and 70% of their day listening to others (Johnson, 1996). Despite the frequency with which people engage in this activity, its importance in interpersonal interactions may go overlooked. Individuals can typically identify that listening is a valued communication skill (Bambacas & Patrickson, 2008; Papa,…

  9. Metacognitive Listening Strategies Used by Saudi EFL Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaison, Eid

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the metacognitive listening strategies among Saudi EFL medical students. The participants were 104 males and females, randomly selected to fill in the Metacognitive Awareness Listening Questionnaire (MALQ), developed and validated Vandergrift Goh, Mareschal, and Tafaghodtari (2006). The results revealed that…

  10. Fostering and Assessing Critical Listening Skills in the Speech Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari-Bridgers, Franca; Vogel, Rosanne; Lynch, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present the results of two listening assessments conducted in spring 2013 and fall 2013. Our primary goal is of a pedagogical nature and is concerned with the design and the testing of a tool that could measure students' critical listening skill improvement during the span of a semester. A total of N = 370 students participated…

  11. Listening in the Business Context: Reviewing the State of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jan; Valikoski, Tuula-Riitta; Grau, Jennie

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, business professionals and some researchers have held that effective listening is a highly desirable workplace skill (Cooper, 1997; Husband, Cooper, & Monsour, 1988; Nichols & Stevens, 1957; Rogers & Rothlisberger, 1952; Sypher, 1984). However, listening as an organizational variable continues to be seen as a "soft" skill…

  12. What Have You Listened to in School Today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Margarete

    2008-01-01

    Listening is the one language activity which is used most during the day. The empirical basis for this statement has some problems, as some of it dates back a long time or is based on self-report data which may not be accurate as far as the objective proportion of time, in which listening is expected, is concerned. The current study uses classroom…

  13. Developing Listening Bodies in the Dance Technique Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enghauser, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This article provides a practical framework for infusing a body-listening or somatic approach into the dance class. Although the concept of body listening is not revolutionary or ground breaking, it has been underemphasized in the dance technique class and needs revisiting. From reflection on current research, as well as from several years of…

  14. Children's Listening with Cleft Lip and Palate in the School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel, Rosana Ribeiro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A great similarity between the patients with cleft lip and palate' behavior and those with auditory processing disorder are related by parents and professors. Objective: To verify the listening in children with cleft lip and palate in six conditions of listening. Method: Professors of 224 students (7 to 11 years old with cleft completed a questionnaire aiming to judge the student listening in the noise, ideal condition, with multiple stimulus, in the silence, when it is solicited to remember the listened information and during a lengthy period of listening, comparing it to the other of the same age and listening condition, without cleft. A Prospective Study. Results: The mean of the trial (-0, 08, standard deviation of 0,27 of the students with cleft, performed by professor was about the "same difficulty" (zero, when compared with the student without cleft. It was not found statistical significance to anyone conditions, neither to the total value of the questionnaire, considering the gender nor the school year level. Conclusion: The listening characteristics of the students with cleft lip and palate were similar to the other without this craniofacial deformity of the same age and similar listening condition. In the noise, the conditions more difficult occurred when the memory and the auditory attention were required.

  15. Pseudo-homophony in non-native listening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.; Otake, T.

    2004-01-01

    Pseudo-homophony may result when non-native listeners cannot distinguish phonemic contrasts. Thus Dutch listeners have difficulty distinguishing the vowels of English cattle versus kettle, because this contrast is subsumed by a single Dutch vowel category; in consequence, both words may be activated

  16. Effects of Two Listening Strategies for Melodic Dictation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonviri, Nathan O.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine effects of two listening strategies on melodic dictation scores. Fifty-four undergraduate music majors completed short tonal melodic dictations in a within-subjects design with three conditions: (a) no specified strategy in the instructions, (b) required listening before writing, and (c) required writing…

  17. Promoting Process-Oriented Listening Instruction in the ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong; Abbott, Marilyn L.

    2016-01-01

    When teaching listening, second language instructors tend to rely on product-oriented approaches that test learners' abilities to identify words and answer comprehension questions, but this does little to help learners improve upon their listening skills (e.g., Vandergrift & Goh, 2012). To address this issue, alternative approaches that guide…

  18. Using Video in Web-Based Listening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Ballester, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    With sophisticated multimedia technology, there is a renewed interest in the relationship between visual and auditory channels in assessing listening comprehension (LC). Research on the use of visuals in assessing listening has emerged with inconclusive results. Some learners perform better on tests which include visual input (Wagner, 2007) while…

  19. Psychometric Evaluation and Discussions of English Language Learners' Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Daeryong; Taherbhai, Husein; Frantz, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The importance of listening in the context of English language acquisition is gaining acceptance, but its unique attributes in language performance, while substantively and qualitatively justifiable, are generally not psychometrically defined. This article psychometrically supports listening as a distinct domain among the three other domains of…

  20. The effect of listening comprehension skills on students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the report of a study that investigated the effects of listening comprehension skill training on students' performance in Oral English Test. To investigate the effects that the teaching of listening comprehension skills would have on the performance in Oral English test, 82 Senior Secondary School 2 ...