WorldWideScience

Sample records for program involves study

  1. Fathers of Children in Public Preschool Programs: A Study of School Involvement and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noggle, Amy Kappel

    2012-01-01

    In this quantitative study, I examined the involvement levels of fathers of children attending public preschool programs using the Family Involvement Questionnaire; I also examined fathers' satisfaction with school contact and involvement experiences using the Parent Satisfaction with Educational Experiences scale. Additionally, I…

  2. Assessment of anxiety in adolescents involved in a study abroad program: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roitblat, Yulia; Cleminson, Ryan; Kavin, Aaron; Schonberger, Edan; Shterenshis, Michael

    2017-11-23

    Objective The aim of the study was to measure the effects on levels of anxiety in healthy teenagers caused by a temporary change of country and school during a study abroad program. Methods In a prospective study we gathered the data from six anxiety level related tests on high school participants in a study abroad program (age 15-17, n = 364, M 172, F 192). These volunteer participants were divided into two separate groups: with self-reported elevated levels of anxiety (n = 111; YES-group) and with self-reported normal levels of anxiety (n = 253; NO-group). Two control groups of schoolchildren drawn from two local schools were used for comparison (n = 100 each). Three tests were subjective, i.e. self-fill-out tests. The next three tests were objective psychological or neurophysiological tests designed to estimate reflex control, concentration and a feeling for the passage of time. Results The initial mean anxiety level score among the 364 participants was 41.5 ± 16.7 (min 16, max 80) on 5-110 scale. For the YES-group the score was 56.5 ± 15.9, and for the NO-group the score was 34.7 ± 17.4 (p = 0.05). The retesting after they had been in the same place for 7 weeks revealed that the mean anxiety level score of the participants decreased to 37.4 ± 16.9 (min 15, max 72). For the YES-group the score significantly decreased to 39.3 ± 15.5, and for the NO-group the score slightly elevated to 36.7 ± 16.4 producing similar results for both groups (p = 0.81). Conclusion A temporary change of country and school at first results in a rise in anxiety levels in about one third of participants. However, after an extended stay it falls to normal levels.

  3. Parent training education program: a pilot study, involving families of children with Prader-Willi syndrome.

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    Kodra, Yllka; Kondili, Loreta A; Ferraroni, Alessia; Serra, Maria Antonietta; Caretto, Flavia; Ricci, Maria Antonietta; Taruscio, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by severe hypotonia during the neonatal period and the first two years of life, the onset of hyperphagia with a risk of obesity during infancy and adulthood, learning difficulties and behavioral or severe psychiatric problems. This complex disease has severe consequences and difficult management issues also for patients' families. Parents of children with PWS need appropriate psychoeducational intervention in order to better manage their children with PWS. The purpose of this study was the implementation and evaluation of a PWS psychoeducational parent training program. The Italian National Center for Rare Diseases implemented a pilot parent training program offered to parents of children with PWS. The intervention's effects was evaluated using questionnaires comprised of 11 items rated on a 7 point Likert scale. The intervention was offered to 43 parents. The behavior problems management, dietary restrictions, autonomy and relationships were indicated by parents as the priority topics which needed to be addressed. Evaluations, immediately post-intervention and after 6 months, were reported by parents, fulfilling specific questionnaires. 90% of parents involved in the study, appreciated the methodology, 86% felt more informed about PWS, 47-62% felt more capable to better approach behaviour's problems, 20-25% felt better about the child's health situation and future expectations. Feeling more capable to help the child autonomy and relationships were reported in 62% and 63% of parents respectively, which decreased significantly (p < 0.05) according to the evaluation 6 months after the intervention. Younger age of parents (< 44 years of age) was significantly correlated with better understanding on how to help the child's autonomy (OR: 0.05; CI: 0.04-0.8) and to better collaborate with the child's teachers (OR: 0.02; CI: 0.001-0.9). Parent training is a promising intervention for parents of children

  4. Developing effective animal-assisted intervention programs involving visiting dogs for institutionalized geriatric patients: a pilot study.

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    Berry, Alessandra; Borgi, Marta; Terranova, Livia; Chiarotti, Flavia; Alleva, Enrico; Cirulli, Francesca

    2012-09-01

    An ever increasing interest in the therapeutic aspects of the human-animal bond has led to a proliferation of animal-assisted interventions (AAI) involving dogs. However, most of these programs lack a solid methodological structure, and basic evaluative research is needed. The purpose of this study was to test the value of dog-assisted interventions as an innovative tool to increase quality of life in the geriatric population. Nineteen patients (men and women) with a mean age of 85 years participated in the study. Interactions between patients and visiting dogs occurred either in a social situation (socialization sessions) or in a therapeutic context (physical therapy sessions). We derived and characterized a specific ethogram of elderly-dog interactions aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of visiting dogs in improving mood, catalyzing social interactions and reducing their everyday apathetic state. Cortisol levels were also measured in the saliva, and depressive state was evaluated. Overall, results show a time-dependent increase in social behaviour and spontaneous interactions with the dogs. Dog-mediated interactions affected the daily increase in cortisol levels, thus having an 'activational effect', in contrast to the apathetic state of institutionalized elderly. Dog-mediated intervention programs appear to be promising tools to improve the social skills and enrich the daily activities of the institutionalized elderly. © 2012 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2012 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  5. The Effect of the Educational Program on Iranian Fathers’ Involvement in Infant care: A Randomized Clinical Trial Study

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    Maryam Bagheri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction With the increase in women's employment and change in attitudes towards father’s role in family, father involvement in infant care can indirectly influence the physical health and well being of infant and mother. Materials and Methods This randomized clinical trial was performed on 150 qualified pregnant women and husbands. During the 35-37 weeks of pregnancy, fathers in fathers’ training group and couples in couples’ training group, participated in two training sessions of healthy infant caring. Fathers in control group received no training and mothers in all three groups received the routine pregnancy training and care. At the end of 4 and 8 weeks after birth, the involvement rate of fathers in infant care questioners were completed by mothers in all three groups. Then, the data were analyzed using Analysis of variance (ANOVA and SPSS software.  Results The total amount of involvement was calculated 55.77 for the fourth weekand 62.64 for the eigth week. The average of total involvement rate and three dimensions of direct father-child interaction, accessibility and responsibility and providing financial resources in two training groups comparing with that in control group, indicated a significant difference (p≤0.05. Conclusion Training the fathers regarding the infant care led to an increase in the fathers’ involvement dimensions in infant care. Thus, paternal training of this educational program should be considered in pregnancy care programs.

  6. Employee suggestion programs: the rewards of involvement.

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    Mishra, J M; McKendall, M

    1993-09-01

    Successful ESPs are the products of a great deal of effort by managers, administrators, teams, individuals, and reviewers, who are all striving to achieve the goals of increased profitability and enhanced employee involvement. A review of the literature indicates that there are several prescriptions that will increase the likelihood of a successful ESP (see the box). Today's American business prophets sound ceaseless calls to arms in the name of "world class performance," "global competitiveness," "total quality management," and a variety of other buzz terms. A burgeoning industry has evolved that promises, through speeches, teleconferences, seminars, and consulting contracts, to teach American organizations how to achieve excellence. In the face of a sputtering economy and unrelenting competitive pressure, today's managers must translate these laudatory ideals into hands-on reality without sacrificing the firm's profit margin to experimentation. If any idea can help an organization achieve improvement through a workable program, then that idea and that program deserve real consideration. An ESP represents an opportunity to tap the intelligence and resourcefulness of an organization's employees, and by doing so, reap significant cost savings. Those companies and managers that have an ESP program uniformly list economic advantages first when describing the benefits of their employee suggestion programs. But there is another deeper and longer term benefit inherent in an ESP. These programs allow employees to become involved in their organization; they drive deaccession to lower levels, they give employees more responsibility, they foster creative approaches to work, and they encourage creativity in pursuit of company goals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Factors Affecting Teen Involvement in Pennsylvania 4-H Programming

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    Gill, Bart E.; Ewing, John C.; Bruce, Jacklyn A.

    2010-01-01

    The study reported here determined the factors that affect teen involvement in 4-H programming. The design of the study was descriptive and correlational in nature. Using a purposive sampling procedure, a survey questionnaire was distributed to all (N=214) 4-H members attending the 4-H State Leadership Conference. The major findings of the study…

  8. Creating opportunities through mentorship, parental involvement, and safe spaces (COMPASS) program: multi-country study protocol to protect girls from violence in humanitarian settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falb, Kathryn L; Tanner, Sophie; Ward, Leora; Erksine, Dorcas; Noble, Eva; Assazenew, Asham; Bakomere, Theresita; Graybill, Elizabeth; Lowry, Carmen; Mallinga, Pamela; Neiman, Amy; Poulton, Catherine; Robinette, Katie; Sommer, Marni; Stark, Lindsay

    2016-03-05

    Violence against adolescent girls in humanitarian settings is of urgent concern given their additional vulnerabilities to violence and unique health and well-being needs that have largely been overlooked by the humanitarian community. In order to understand what works to prevent violence against adolescent girls, a multi-component curriculum-based safe spaces program (Creating Opportunities through Mentorship, Parental involvement and Safe Spaces - COMPASS) will be implemented and evaluated. The objectives of this multi-country study are to understand the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of COMPASS programming to prevent violence against adolescent girls in diverse humanitarian settings. Two wait-listed cluster-randomized controlled trials are being implemented in conflict-affected communities in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (N = 886 girls aged 10-14 years) and in refugee camps in western Ethiopia (N = 919 girls aged 13-19 years). The intervention consists of structured facilitated sessions delivered in safe spaces by young female mentors, caregiver discussion groups, capacity-building activities with service providers, and community engagement. In Ethiopia, the research centers on the overall impact of COMPASS compared to a wait-list group. In DRC, the research objective is to understand the incremental effectiveness of the caregiver component in addition to the other COMPASS activities as compared to a wait-list group. The primary outcome is change in sexual violence. Secondary outcomes include decreased physical and emotional abuse, reduced early marriage, improved gender norms, and positive interpersonal relationships, among others. Qualitative methodologies seek to understand girls' perceptions of safety within their communities, key challenges they face, and to identify potential pathways of change. These trials will add much needed evidence for the humanitarian community to meet the unique needs of adolescent girls and to promote

  9. Creating opportunities through mentorship, parental involvement, and safe spaces (COMPASS program: multi-country study protocol to protect girls from violence in humanitarian settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L. Falb

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence against adolescent girls in humanitarian settings is of urgent concern given their additional vulnerabilities to violence and unique health and well-being needs that have largely been overlooked by the humanitarian community. In order to understand what works to prevent violence against adolescent girls, a multi-component curriculum-based safe spaces program (Creating Opportunities through Mentorship, Parental involvement and Safe Spaces – COMPASS will be implemented and evaluated. The objectives of this multi-country study are to understand the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of COMPASS programming to prevent violence against adolescent girls in diverse humanitarian settings. Methods/design Two wait-listed cluster-randomized controlled trials are being implemented in conflict-affected communities in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (N = 886 girls aged 10–14 years and in refugee camps in western Ethiopia (N = 919 girls aged 13–19 years. The intervention consists of structured facilitated sessions delivered in safe spaces by young female mentors, caregiver discussion groups, capacity-building activities with service providers, and community engagement. In Ethiopia, the research centers on the overall impact of COMPASS compared to a wait-list group. In DRC, the research objective is to understand the incremental effectiveness of the caregiver component in addition to the other COMPASS activities as compared to a wait-list group. The primary outcome is change in sexual violence. Secondary outcomes include decreased physical and emotional abuse, reduced early marriage, improved gender norms, and positive interpersonal relationships, among others. Qualitative methodologies seek to understand girls’ perceptions of safety within their communities, key challenges they face, and to identify potential pathways of change. Discussion These trials will add much needed evidence for the humanitarian

  10. Consumer involvement in the health technology assessment program.

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    Royle, Jane; Oliver, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    This study aims to describe a cycle of development leading to sustainable methods for involving consumers in the management of a program commissioning health technology assessment. Staff time was dedicated to developing procedures for recruiting and briefing consumers to participate in prioritizing, commissioning, and reporting research. Resources and support were developed in light of early feedback from consumers and those working with them. These were piloted and amended before being used routinely. Over 4 years, procedures and resources have been developed to support six consumers attending seven to eight prioritization meetings a year; thirty to forty-five consumers each year commenting on research need for particular topics; thirty consumers a year commenting on research proposals, and twenty a year commenting on research reports. The procedures include clear job descriptions, induction and development days, clear briefing materials, payment for substantial tasks, and regularly seeking feedback to improve procedures. Explicit, inclusive, and reproducible methods for supporting consumer involvement that satisfy National Health Service policy recommendations for involving consumers in research require dedicated staff time to support a cycle of organizational development.

  11. Examining Understandings of Parent Involvement in Early Childhood Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, Aimee V.; Kallemeyn, Leanne; Phillips, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    The importance of parent involvement in children's development and learning is increasingly recognized in the research literature and in federal and state policies; however, no unified definition of parent involvement exists. This study examined different understandings and definitions of parent involvement in a sample of administrators of…

  12. The Parents' and Teachers' Supports Role on Students' Involvement in Scouting Program and Entrepreneurial Values--Longitudinal Studies on Students in Jombang, East Java, Indonesia

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    Prianto, Agus

    2016-01-01

    Extracurricular activities are those that fall outside the realm of the normal curriculum of school. Extracurricular activities exist for all students. And generally, benefits of extracurricular activities shall be as follows: learning time management and prioritizing; getting involved in diverse interests; learning about long term commitments;…

  13. Parent Involvement in Head Start Programs: The Role of Parent, Teacher and Classroom Characteristics

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    Castro, D.C.; Bryant, D.M.; Peisner-Feinberg, E.S.; Skinner, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the extent and types of parent involvement in Head Start programs, and to examine the relations between parent participation and family, teacher and classroom characteristics. Parents (n = 1131) and teachers (n = 59) from four Head Start programs participated. Data were gathered through volunteer logs,…

  14. The Timing Effects of Reward, Business Longevity, and Involvement on Consumers’ Responses to a Reward Program

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    Badri Munir Sukoco

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Managers could elicit customers’ repeat purchase behavior through a well-designed reward program. This study examines two extrinsic cues - business longevity and timing effects of reward – to determine the consumers’ perceived risk and intention to participate in this kind of program. Moreover, this study discusses how different levels of involvement might interact with these two cues. An experiment with a 2 (business longevity: long vs. short x 2 (timing of reward: delayed vs. immediate x 2 (involvement: high vs. low between-subject factorial design is conducted to validate the proposed research hypotheses. The results show that an immediate reward offered by an older, more established, firm for a highly-involved product, make loyalty programs less risky and consequently attract consumers to participate. Interestingly, immediate rewards that are offered by older firms for a product that customers are less involved in has the opposite effects. Managerial and academic implications are further presented in this study.

  15. Implementing a Parental Involvement Program to Improve Parents' Engagement in Their Children's Learning: An Action Research Study

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    Youssef, Saoussen S.

    2017-01-01

    Since the early 1900s, the traditional thinking about education and school role in the USA has shifted to view schools as non-isolated entities from the larger society where schooling should be re-energized with help from the society, which includes student homes and communities. This mixed approach action research study evolves around improving…

  16. Effect of a program of short bouts of exercise on bone health in adolescents involved in different sports: the PRO-BONE study protocol.

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    Vlachopoulos, Dimitris; Barker, Alan R; Williams, Craig A; Knapp, Karen M; Metcalf, Brad S; Gracia-Marco, Luis

    2015-04-11

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease associated with high morbidity, mortality and increased economic costs. Early prevention during adolescence appears to be one of the most beneficial practices. Exercise is an effective approach for developing bone mass during puberty, but some sports may have a positive or negative impact on bone mass accrual. Plyometric jump training has been suggested as a type of exercise that can augment bone, but its effects on adolescent bone mass have not been rigorously assessed. The aims of the PRO-BONE study are to: 1) longitudinally assess bone health and its metabolism in adolescents engaged in osteogenic (football), non-osteogenic (cycling and swimming) sports and in a control group, and 2) examine the effect of a 9 month plyometric jump training programme on bone related outcomes in the sport groups. This study will recruit 105 males aged 12-14 years who have participated in sport specific training for at least 3 hours per week during the last 3 years in the following sports groups: football (n = 30), cycling (n = 30) and swimming (n = 30). An age-matched control group (n = 15) that does not engage in these sports more than 3 hours per week will also be recruited. Participants will be measured on 5 occasions: 1) at baseline; 2) after 12 months of sport specific training where each sport group will be randomly allocated into two sub-groups: intervention group (sport + plyometric jump training) and sport group (sport only); 3) exactly after the 9 months of intervention; 4) 6 months following the intervention; 5) 12 months following the intervention. Body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, air displacement plethysmography and bioelectrical impedance), bone stiffness index (ultrasounds), physical activity (accelerometers), diet (24 h recall questionnaire), pubertal maturation (Tanner stage), physical fitness (cardiorespiratory and muscular), bone turnover markers and vitamin D will be measured at each visit. The PRO

  17. The "Generacion Diez" after-school program and Latino parent involvement with schools.

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    Riggs, Nathaniel R; Medina, Carmen

    2005-11-01

    The current study examines associations between participation in after-school programs and change in Latino parent involvement with schools. Hierarchical linear regression analyses demonstrated that parents of children who had higher after-school program attendance rates were significantly more likely to report increases in the quality of relationships with their children's teachers, frequency of parent-teacher contact, and engagement with their children's schooling over a two-year period. However, greater home educator contacts were related to decreases in quality and quantity of parent-school involvement. A primary implication is that attendance in school-based after-school programs may draw parents into children's regular-day school context. Editors' Strategic Implications The authors illustrate the promising practice of using after-school programs to promote parent involvement and to help integrate the often disparate family and school contexts for Latino children.

  18. A Practical Ethnic Studies Program

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    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the Asian American Studies Program at the University of Massachusetts (UMass) Boston which complements students' career tracks and engages them in the surrounding Asian American community. For many educators, large numbers of graduates are not only a bragging right, but a goal. However, those involved in the Asian American…

  19. Extent of Parental Involvement in Improving the Students' Levels in Special Education Programs in Kuwait

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    Al-Shammari, Zaid; Yawkey, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    This research study investigates the degree to which parental involvement impacts students' levels in special education programs in Kuwait. More specifically, this research discusses several scientific methods for research included within the significance of the study and research questions for this study. Research methods and results using a…

  20. Involving youth in program decision-making: how common and what might it do for youth?

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    Akiva, Thomas; Cortina, Kai S; Smith, Charles

    2014-11-01

    The strategy of sharing program decision-making with youth in youth programs, a specific form of youth-adult partnership, is widely recommended in practitioner literature; however, empirical study is relatively limited. We investigated the prevalence and correlates of youth program decision-making practices (e.g., asking youth to help decide what activities are offered), using single-level and multilevel methods with a cross-sectional dataset of 979 youth attending 63 multipurpose after-school programs (average age of youth = 11.4, 53 % female). The prevalence of such practices was relatively high, particularly for forms that involved low power sharing such as involving youth in selecting the activities a program offers. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed positive associations between youth program decision-making practices and youth motivation to attend programs. We also found positive correlations between decision-making practices and youth problem-solving efficacy, expression efficacy, and empathy. Significant interactions with age suggest that correlations with problem solving and empathy are more pronounced for older youth. Overall, the findings suggest that involving youth in program decision-making is a promising strategy for promoting youth motivation and skill building, and in some cases this is particularly the case for older (high school-age) youth.

  1. Parent Couples' Coping Resources and Involvement in their Children's Intervention Program.

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    Brand, Devora; Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Most, Tova

    2018-07-01

    Parental involvement is vital to the implementation of intervention programs for deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. The current study examined the dyadic relationships between mothers' and fathers' coping resources and their involvement in their child's intervention program. In addition, the moderating roles of parent's gender and family religiosity on the associations between coping resources and involvement were examined. Seventy Jewish couples of parents of DHH children, representing various levels of religiosity, completed questionnaires regarding involvement in their child's intervention program, child acceptance, parental self-efficacy, and perceived social support. Multilevel modeling analyses were used to test actor-partner interdependence. The findings indicated significant actor effects for child acceptance, parental self-efficacy, and social support. All were positively associated with parental involvement. Gender was found to moderate the actor effect of child acceptance. Partner effects were found only for mothers, for child acceptance, and social support. Fathers' child acceptance and social support were negatively associated with mothers' involvement. Religiosity did not moderate neither actor nor partner effects. These results have important implications for planning intervention programs that are sensitive to each of the parent's needs.

  2. The Fernald Envoy Program: How face-to-face public involvement is working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoopes, J.; Jordan, J.

    1995-01-01

    In March 1994, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), initiated the Fernald Envoy Program as a tool for strengthening public involvement in the restoration of the Fernald site, a former US Department of Energy uranium processing facility which ceased operation in 1989 and became an environmental restoration site. Based on the concept that opinion leaders play a key role in the flow of information, the Envoy Program was developed to link Fernald with opinion leaders in community groups. In February and March 1995, the University of Cincinnati Center for Environmental Communication Studies, under contract with the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation, conducted an evaluation to determine how the Envoy Program was functioning in relation to the original Envoy Plan. A quasi-experimental design was applied using telephone surveys of opinion leaders in groups with envoy representation and in groups without representation. Findings validated the effectiveness of the program and also identified areas for program improvement

  3. The Fernald Envoy Program: How face-to-face public involvement is working

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopes, J. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Hundertmark, C.A. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jordan, J. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Center for Environmental Communication Studies

    1995-12-31

    In March 1994, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), initiated the Fernald Envoy Program as a tool for strengthening public involvement in the restoration of the Fernald site, a former US Department of Energy uranium processing facility which ceased operation in 1989 and became an environmental restoration site. Based on the concept that opinion leaders play a key role in the flow of information, the Envoy Program was developed to link Fernald with opinion leaders in community groups. In February and March 1995, the University of Cincinnati Center for Environmental Communication Studies, under contract with the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation, conducted an evaluation to determine how the Envoy Program was functioning in relation to the original Envoy Plan. A quasi-experimental design was applied using telephone surveys of opinion leaders in groups with envoy representation and in groups without representation. Findings validated the effectiveness of the program and also identified areas for program improvement.

  4. The Importance of Father Involvement in Early Childhood Programs

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    Ancell, Katherine S.; Bruns, Deborah A.; Chitiyo, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Active family involvement in Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) is regarded as a beneficial factor in young children's learning and development. One definition of family involvement is the active role parents take in their child's development and the knowledge and participation they share with professionals who are part of the child's daily…

  5. The Hayden House Program: Community Involvement in the Arts.

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    Hampton, Grace

    1979-01-01

    Describes an arts and crafts program initiated at Hayden House, a low-income, racially integrated housing development in Phoenix, Arizona. The program, designed to promote pride and community cohesion, presented workshops and cultural events for both children and adults. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  6. STUDY OF CARDIAC INVOLVEMENT IN DIPHTHERIA

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    Bala Raju Gundam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diphtheria still endemic in many developing countries and is responsible for high case fatality. Myocardial involvement is a serious complication of diphtheria and diphtheria myocarditis frequently complicated by arrhythmias causes sudden death if not managed properly. So, early and adequate administration of Anti-Diphtheritic Serum (ADS and frequent monitoring particularly 24 hrs. ECG monitoring is helpful to detect any serious cardiac arrhythmias. METHODS A prospective study on patients who were culture positive diagnosed on the basis of WHO definition were treated and analysed in respect to homographic details, immunisation strategy, and clinical features with particular attention to myocarditis. RESULTS In the study, common age group affected by diphtheria was 5 to 10 years. Incidence of myocarditis more in same age group. Out of 64 patients with myocarditis, 23 patients died. CONCLUSION Incidence of diphtheria has increased in the recent years. Commonly effected age group is 5 to 10 years and most of them are presented with asymptomatic myocarditis. Symptomatic diphtheritic myocarditis has high mortality rate even with aggressive management. Patient who presented with either LBBB alone are with combination of other conduction of abnormalities has high mortality rate.

  7. Program-involvement effects on commercial attention and recall of successive and embedded advertising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moorman, M.; Willemsen, L.M.; Neijens, P.C.; Smit, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    Research on context effects has demonstrated a link between program-induced involvement and recall of commercials broadcast in breaks. However, the effect of program-induced involvement on recall of advertising embedded in the program itself has been understudied. In addition, little consideration

  8. Survey of pharmacy involvement in hospital medication reconciliation programs across the United States

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    Gregory R Stein

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to conduct a review of pertinent literature, assess pharmacy involvement in medication reconciliation, and offer insight into best practices for hospitals to implement and enhance their medication reconciliation programs. Method: Pharmacists in hospitals nationwide were asked to complete an anonymous survey via the American College of Clinical Pharmacy online database. The multiple choice survey analyzed the roles that healthcare professionals play in medication reconciliation programs at hospitals. Results: Of the survey responses received, 32/91 (35% came from pharmacists at hospitals with a pharmacy-led medication reconciliation program. Of these pharmacy-led programs, 17/32 (53% have a dedicated pharmacist or pharmacy staff to perform medication reconciliation. Conclusion: A comprehensive review of literature suggests that pharmacy involvement has the potential to reduce medication reconciliation errors and may improve patient satisfaction. Focused, full-time medication reconciliation pharmacists can help hospitals save time and money, improve outcomes, and meet higher standards issued by the Joint Commission. Data obtained in this study show the extent to which pharmacists contribute to achieving these goals in healthcare systems nationwide. This baseline study provides a strong case for hospitals to implement a pharmacy-led medication reconciliation program.

  9. The Impact of Parental Involvement on a Structured Youth Program Experience: A Qualitative Inquiry

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    Mat D. Duerden

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Parental involvement is an often proposed, but rarely researched, key element of youth programs. Questions remain regarding the impact of parental involvement on program processes and outcomes. Qualitative data were collected over a one-year period with youth participants (n=46, parents (n=26, and teachers (n=5 associated with an international immersion/service learning program for adolescents. Three main research questions guided the data analysis: (1 what role does parental involvement play in the youths’ experience in the program; (2 how does parental involvement in the program influence the parent/child relationship; and (3 what role does parental involvement play in terms of the program’s long-term impact on the youth participants? Findings suggest a relationship between parental involvement in youth programs and improved parent/child communication, bonding, and perceptions of one another. Findings also suggest that having a common ground experience prolonged the experience’s positive post-participation effects.

  10. Should Family and Friends Be Involved in Group-Based Rehabilitation Programs for Adults with Low Vision?

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    Rees, G.; Saw, C.; Larizza, M.; Lamoureux, E.; Keeffe, J.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates the views of clients with low vision and vision rehabilitation professionals on the involvement of family and friends in group-based rehabilitation programs. Both groups outlined advantages and disadvantages to involving significant others, and it is essential that clients are given the choice. Future work is…

  11. Electrophysiological studies in healthy subjects involving caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Mamede de; Marcelino, Erica; Mendonça, Alexandre de

    2010-01-01

    Copyright ©2012 IOS Press All rights reserved. We review the electrophysiological studies concerning the effects of caffeine on muscle, lower and upper motor neuron excitability and cognition. Several different methods have been used, such as electromyography, recruitment analysis, H-reflex, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electroencephalography and event-related potentials. The positive effect of caffeine on vigilance, attention, speed of reaction, information processing and arou...

  12. Electrophysiological studies in healthy subjects involving caffeine.

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    de Carvalho, Mamede; Marcelino, Erica; de Mendonça, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    We review the electrophysiological studies concerning the effects of caffeine on muscle, lower and upper motor neuron excitability and cognition. Several different methods have been used, such as electromyography, recruitment analysis, H-reflex, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electroencephalography and event-related potentials. The positive effect of caffeine on vigilance, attention, speed of reaction, information processing and arousal is supported by a number of electrophysiological studies. The evidence in favor of an increased muscle fiber resistance is not definitive, but higher or lower motor neuron excitability can occur as a consequence of a greater excitation of the descending input from the brainstem and upper motor neurons. TMS can address the influence of caffeine on the upper motor neuron. Previous studies showed that cortico-motor threshold and intracortical excitatory and inhibitory pathways are not influenced by caffeine. Nonetheless, our results indicate that cortical silent period (CSP) is reduced in resting muscles after caffeine consumption, when stimulating the motor cortex with intensities slightly above threshold. We present new data demonstrating that this effect is also observed in fatigued muscle. We conclude that CSP can be considered a surrogate marker of the effect of caffeine in the brain, in particular of its central ergogenic effect.

  13. Developing a public involvement policy for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.; Summerson, J.; Gleason, M.E.; Reyes, P.C.

    1994-01-01

    The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is entering its second decade. Given the Department of Energy's current efforts toward openness and culture change, the role of stakeholders is likely to evolve throughout the 1990s to enable greater participation by these external parties in making program decisions. Although the program has a tradition of inviting its stakeholders to review and comment on its activities, it also is known for employing on occasion what has been derisively called a open-quotes decide-announce-defendclose quotes strategy. Program efforts to involve the public have come under considerable criticism for being inadequate, inconsistent, lacking in follow-through, and offered on a sporadic and selective basis. The program is vulnerable to these criticisms because ground rules for public involvement have never been firmly established as part of the program's routine operations. This deficiency has contributed, in part, to stakeholder doubts about the program's sincerity in engaging in a meaningful dialogue with them. The program and its stakeholders both could benefit from an official public involvement policy that would serve as a guidepost for interactions between program officials and stakeholders. Such a policy, developed in concert with stakeholders, would ensure that all parties understand how stakeholder participation is to occur. This paper reviews (1) events establishing the need for a formal public involvement policy; (2) public involvement initiatives that will inform the process of developing a new policy; (3) current efforts to develop a Department of Energy public involvement policy; and (4) key elements for inclusion in a public involvement policy developed specifically for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

  14. Hotline Allegations Involving Contracts for Programmed Depot Maintenance of KC-135 Aircraft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    Introduction. We performed the audit in response to 15 allegations made to the Defense Hotline involving two contracts on the Programmed Depot Maintenance of the KC-135 Aircraft, which Oklahoma City Air logistics...

  15. DCD – a novel plant specific domain in proteins involved in development and programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerks Tobias

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of microbial pathogens by plants triggers the hypersensitive reaction, a common form of programmed cell death in plants. These dying cells generate signals that activate the plant immune system and alarm the neighboring cells as well as the whole plant to activate defense responses to limit the spread of the pathogen. The molecular mechanisms behind the hypersensitive reaction are largely unknown except for the recognition process of pathogens. We delineate the NRP-gene in soybean, which is specifically induced during this programmed cell death and contains a novel protein domain, which is commonly found in different plant proteins. Results The sequence analysis of the protein, encoded by the NRP-gene from soybean, led to the identification of a novel domain, which we named DCD, because it is found in plant proteins involved in development and cell death. The domain is shared by several proteins in the Arabidopsis and the rice genomes, which otherwise show a different protein architecture. Biological studies indicate a role of these proteins in phytohormone response, embryo development and programmed cell by pathogens or ozone. Conclusion It is tempting to speculate, that the DCD domain mediates signaling in plant development and programmed cell death and could thus be used to identify interacting proteins to gain further molecular insights into these processes.

  16. Study on Java Programming Education

    OpenAIRE

    太田, 信宏

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to consider the content and key points for inclusion in a Java programming course for beginners. The Java programming language has a variety of functions and has the largest application field of all such languages, containing many themes that are appropriate for any such programming course. The multifunctional and wide-ranging functions of Java, however, may actually act as a barrier to study for beginners. The core content of a programming class for beginners sho...

  17. The Impact of Parents’ Involvement in and Attitude toward Their Children’s Foreign Language Programs for Learning English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Hosseinpour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Since parents and their involvement and attitude have a crucial role in children’s achievement in learning English, the present study is to explore and evaluate the impact of Iranian parents’ involvement in and attitude toward their children’s foreign language programs for learning English. In other words, the effectiveness of their high level of involvement and strength of attitude will be evaluated. Besides, this study is to explore whether some factors such as parents’ gender, knowledge of English, income, and educational background are related in the parents’ involvement and attitude or not. To this end, first of all, a reliable questionnaire, checked through a pilot study, was distributed among 140 parents to find out the level of their involvement in and attitude toward the programs. Based on the normal curve and the Z score, the parents were divided into two groups, one with a higher level of involvement and more positive attitude and the other with a lower level of involvement and less positive attitude. By using a standard final achievement test of the course book among 70 primary school student in third grade and Independent T-test analysis, the impact of parents’ involvement and attitude were checked. As the results revealed those parents who have high level of involvement in and positive attitude toward their children’s English language programs made their children’s higher level of achievement in the language program. Besides, the further outcomes showed that there are significant differences between the parents’ knowledge of English, income, and educational background and their level of involvement and attitude. The aforementioned factors affect children’s achievement test scores as well.

  18. Public involvement in the dose reconstruction study: the colorado story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, Norma C.; Lockhart, Ann J.

    2000-01-01

    soil near the plant to measure the amount of plutonium and other radioactive materials present. Some sediment samples from nearby Standley Lake also were analyzed. This unique process educated and involved participants in a meaningful way. The measured plutonium concentrations, were largely consistent with the concentrations and distribution of radioactive materials found by other soil studies of the area. These public involvement activities made more citizens in communities near the plant aware of the research and also educated them about the complex processes and issues involved in reconstructing historical releases from a nuclear weapons plant. When the findings of the project were announced in August 1999, the most critical concerned citizens had a good understanding of how the work was done and what the results meant. The study team heard little public opposition for the research results at the end of the project. A proactive public involvement program allowed the team to address issues as they arose, rather than at the end of the study. (author)

  19. Leadership development at university: Comparing student leaders with different levels of involvement in a leadership education program

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, Krista Lee

    2007-01-01

    This study examined how students’ leadership behaviours are related to both their personal leadership experience and their involvement in a leadership education program. The context of the study was the University of Guelph’s Certificate in Leadership program. The Student Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) was administered to 33 student leaders who did not participate in the Leadership Certificate and 14 students who were at various levels of completion of the Certificate. No significant di...

  20. The Impact of a Collaborative Family Involvement Program on Latino Families and Children's Educational Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Julie; Kirkner, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Latino families highly value education and are committed to their children's educational success; however, Latino students often experience educational challenges. Well-designed family involvement programs can encourage Latino families, especially new immigrants or monolingual Spanish-speakers, to increase their involvement resulting in positive…

  1. 26 CFR 1.861-18 - Classification of transactions involving computer programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... property subject to trade secret protection. (f) Further classification of transfers involving copyright... fee, on a World Wide Web home page on the Internet. P, the Country Z resident, in return for payment... wishes to use Program X for a further period he must enter into a new agreement to use the program for an...

  2. Evaluating public participation in environmental decision-making: EPA's superfund community involvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Charnley; Bruce. Engelbert

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses an 8-year, ongoing project that evaluates the Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund community involvement program. The project originated as a response to the Government Performance and Results Act, which requires federal agencies to articulate program goals, and evaluate and report their progress in meeting those goals. The evaluation...

  3. The Influence of an Early Childhood Program on Parental Involvement: Perceptions of Former Head Start Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Stacey

    2017-01-01

    A key component of effective early childhood programs is collaborative relationships between schools, families, and the community (Fiese, Eckert, & Spagnola, 2005). One of these early childhood programs, Head Start, stands out among the others in its efforts to work with children, families, and communities to promote parental involvement. Some…

  4. A quality assurance program for environmental data operations involving waste management processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.; Blacker, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the 'core' elements needed in an effective Quality Program for environmental data operations involving nuclear, mixed, or non-nuclear wastes. For each core element, this paper examines the minimum components needed for an effective Quality Program for EDOs, and compares approaches to Quality Programs currently required by the U.S. DOE and the U.S. EPA. The comparison suggests how the Quality Program requirements used at DOE, and defined by NQA-1 and its supplements, and those used by EPA through its QAMS program guidance, may provide a basis for developing a harmonized Quality Program for EDOs involving any waste management processes, nuclear, non-nuclear, or mixed. (orig./DG)

  5. International Research and Studies Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The International Research and Studies Program supports surveys, studies, and instructional materials development to improve and strengthen instruction in modern foreign languages, area studies, and other international fields. The purpose of the program is to improve and strengthen instruction in modern foreign languages, area studies and other…

  6. U.S. EPA Superfund Program's Policy for Community Involvement at Radioactively Contaminated Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, Pat; Walker, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the Superfund program's statutory requirements for community involvement. It also discusses the efforts the Superfund program has made that go beyond these statutory requirements to involve communities. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) implements the Superfund program under the authority of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). From the beginning of the Superfund program, Congress envisioned a role for communities. This role has evolved and expanded during the implementation of the Superfund program. Initially, the CERCLA statute had community involvement requirements designed to inform surrounding communities of the work being done at a site. CERCLA's provisions required 1) development of a community relations plan for each site, 2) establishment of information repositories near each site where all publicly available materials related to the site would be accessible for public inspection, 3) opportunities for the public to comment on the proposed remedy for each site and 4) development of a responsiveness summary responding to all significant comments received on the proposed remedy. In recognition of the need for people living near Superfund sites to be well-informed and involved with decisions concerning sites in their communities, SARA expanded Superfund's community involvement activities in 1986. SARA provided the authority to award Technical Assistance Grants (TAGs) to local communities enabling them to hire independent technical advisors to assist them in understanding technical issues and data about the site. The Superfund Community Involvement Program has sought to effectively implement the statutory community involvement requirements, and to go beyond those requirements to find meaningful ways to involve citizens in the cleanup of sites in their communities. We've structured our program around

  7. Head Start Program Quality: Examination of Classroom Quality and Parent Involvement in Predicting Children's Vocabulary, Literacy, and Mathematics Achievement Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaoli; Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.; Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie L.; Korfmacher, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Guided by a developmental-ecological framework and Head Start's two-generational approach, this study examined two dimensions of Head Start program quality, classroom quality and parent involvement and their unique and interactive contribution to children's vocabulary, literacy, and mathematics skills growth from the beginning of Head Start…

  8. Levels of Leadership: Effects of District and School Leaders on the Quality of School Programs of Family and Community Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Joyce L.; Galindo, Claudia L.; Sheldon, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study tests key constructs of sociocultural and organizational learning theories with quantitative methods to better understand the nature and impact of district and school leadership and actions on the quality of programs of family and community involvement. Research Design: Survey data from a "nested" sample of 24 districts and 407…

  9. A Comparison of Centralized and Decentralized Inservice Education Programs: Teacher Involvement, Program Characteristics, and Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Roberto

    Inservice programs that are likely to accomplish their objectives are characterized by: (1) differentiated training experiences; (2) teachers in active roles; (3) an emphasis on demonstration, supervised trials, and feedback; (4) sharing and mutual assistance; (5) activities linked to a general effort of the school; (6) teachers who choose goals…

  10. PROGRAM EVALUATION INVOLVEMENT INDONESIAN NATIONAL ARMED FORCES (TNI ON MISSION UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS (UNPKO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gede Sumertha KY

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is constructed in order to study and to evaluate involvement TNI on mission United Nations Peacekeeping Operations (UNPKO in Lebanon program FY 2014-2015 due to achieve vision 4000 Peacekeepers. The CIPP model is using on apply the qualitative method for the research with consist of four evaluation components: (1 context; (2 input; (3 process; (4 product. The mechanism collecting data were collected through interviews, observations, questionnaires and documentation study. There are three levels of evaluation for judgment each aspect: low, moderate, and high. The summarized results and figured into case-order effect matrix was figure out of the categorization.The results of this research indicate that TNI involvement in mission UNPKO Lebanon, aspire to increase the number of peacekeepers up to 4.000 personnel in the category “high”, but still have some minor additional improvement especially on coordination among stakeholders. This is because the Results of Context Evaluation has a category of "high" with a scale of assessment "many" (75.3%; the Results of Input Evaluation has a category of "high" with a scale of assessment "moderate" (60.6%; the Results of Process Evaluation has a category of "high" with a scale of assessment "moderate" (65.3% and the Results of Product Evaluation has a category of "high" with a scale of assessment "moderate" (63.3% .

  11. U.S. EPA Superfund Program's Policy for Community Involvement at Radioactively Contaminated Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, K.; Walker, St.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the EPA Superfund program's statutory requirements for community involvement. It also discusses the efforts the Superfund program has made that go beyond these statutory requirements to involve communities, and what lessons have been learned by EPA when trying to conduct meaningful community involvement at sites. In addition, it discusses tools that EPA has designed to specifically enhance community involvement at radioactively contaminated Superfund sites. In summary, the Superfund program devotes substantial resources to involving the local community in the site cleanup decision making process. We believe community involvement provides us with highly valuable information that must be available to carefully consider remedial alternatives at a site. We also find our employees enjoy their jobs more. Rather than fighting with an angry public they can work collaboratively to solve the problems created by the hazardous waste sites. We have learned the time and resources we devote at the beginning of a project to developing relationships with the local community, and learning about their issues and concerns is time and resources well spent. We believe the evidence shows this up-front investment helps us make better cleanup decisions, and avoids last minute efforts to work with a hostile community who feels left out of the decision-making process. (authors)

  12. Development of a metrics dashboard for monitoring involvement in the 340B Drug Pricing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karralli, Rusol; Tipton, Joyce; Dumitru, Doina; Scholz, Lisa; Masilamani, Santhi

    2015-09-01

    An electronic tool to support hospital organizations in monitoring and addressing financial and compliance challenges related to participation in the 340B Drug Pricing Program is described. In recent years there has been heightened congressional and regulatory scrutiny of the federal 340B program, which provides discounted drug prices on Medicaid-covered drugs to safety net hospitals and other 340B-eligible healthcare organizations, or "covered entities." Historically, the 340B program has lacked a metrics-driven reporting framework to help covered entities capture the value of 340B program involvement, community benefits provided to underserved populations, and costs associated with compliance with 340B eligibility requirements. As part of an initiative by a large health system to optimize its 340B program utilization and regulatory compliance efforts, a team of pharmacists led the development of an electronic dashboard tool to help monitor 340B program activities at the system's 340B-eligible facilities. After soliciting input from an array of internal and external 340B program stakeholders, the team designed the dashboard and associated data-entry tools to facilitate the capture and analysis of 340B program-related data in four domains: cost savings and revenue, program maintenance costs, community benefits, and compliance. A large health system enhanced its ability to evaluate and monitor 340B program-related activities through the use of a dashboard tool capturing key metrics on cost savings achieved, maintenance costs, and other aspects of program involvement. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Involvement of Programmed Cell Death in Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bin; Zhou, Ting; Liu, Jia; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-11-01

    The widespread application of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) or NP-based products has increased the risk of exposure to NPs in humans. The brain is an important organ that is more susceptible to exogenous stimuli. Moreover, any impairment to the brain is irreversible. Recently, several in vivo studies have found that metallic NPs can be absorbed into the animal body and then translocated into the brain, mainly through the blood-brain barrier and olfactory pathway after systemic administration. Furthermore, metallic NPs can cross the placental barrier to accumulate in the fetal brain, causing developmental neurotoxicity on exposure during pregnancy. Therefore, metallic NPs become a big threat to the brain. However, the mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs remain unclear. Programmed cell death (PCD), which is different from necrosis, is defined as active cell death and is regulated by certain genes. PCD can be mainly classified into apoptosis, autophagy, necroptosis, and pyroptosis. It is involved in brain development, neurodegenerative disorders, psychiatric disorders, and brain injury. Given the pivotal role of PCD in neurological functions, we reviewed relevant articles and tried to summarize the recent advances and future perspectives of PCD involvement in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, with the purpose of comprehensively understanding the neurotoxic mechanisms of NPs.

  14. Undergraduate Student Involvement in International Research - The IRES Program at MAX-lab, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, William; O'Rielly, Grant; Fissum, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Undergraduate students associated with The George Washington University and UMass Dartmouth have had the opportunity to participate in nuclear physics research as a part of the PIONS@MAXLAB Collaboration performing experiments at MAX-lab at Lund University in Sweden. This project has supported thirteen undergraduate students during 2009 - 2011. The student researchers are involved with all aspects of the experiments performed at the laboratory, from set-up to analysis and presentation at national conferences. These experiments investigate the dynamics responsible for the internal structure of the nucleon through the study of pion photoproduction off the nucleon and high-energy Compton scattering. Along with the US and Swedish project leaders, members of the collaboration (from four different countries) have contributed to the training and mentoring of these students. This program provides students with international research experiences that prepare them to operate successfully in a global environment and encourages them to stay in areas of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) that are crucial for our modern, technology-dependent society. We will present the history, goals and outcomes in both physics results and student success that have come from this program. This work supported by NSF OISE/IRES award 0553467.

  15. Regional Studies Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzyck, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported on methodology studies with regard to hydrologic analysis; atmospheric transport; forest growth models; distribution of sensitive species; agricultural analysis; and environmental objectives in energy facility siting. National coal utilization assessment studies are reported with regard to technology characterization; air quality impacts; water resources; regional characterization; forest impacts; coal extraction impacts on sensitive animal species; and health impacts. The following special projects were carried out: water resource aspects of inexhaustible technology deployment; ecological constraints on the rapidly expanded use of coal; and U.S. coal and the global carbon problem

  16. 32 CFR 37.220 - How involved should the Government program official be in the project?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... official be in the project? 37.220 Section 37.220 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE... Technology Investment Agreements § 37.220 How involved should the Government program official be in the project? (a) TIAs are used to carry out cooperative relationships between the Federal Government and the...

  17. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk through Stakeholder Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William T. Hartwell

    2007-01-01

    The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Integration of a near real-time communications system, a public web site, training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs all help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS

  18. The Army Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-09

    STUDDIES BY CATEGORY STUDY TITLE SPONSOR NMtTHOO PPA ADM RE:MOTE LINK PRUG DARCOM CONTRACT ADV TECH MODEL FULL DARCON CONTRACT ARMY COMMAND ANDi CONTROL...HOUUSE NUN -RLCURRIN 1 LMANUS DARCON I"-HUSL FF-TH-hLLI TM~k ECUNLNI(. ANALYSIS DARCOM CUNTRALT FOR SFELTKUM ANALYZERS UPLRA1IUN&L FLt)AI/EKPSL TKADL...TECHNULOGY A5 AESM:NT TRADOC bUTH *TEN YEAR INSTRUMENTATIOft ANALYSkIS OCSA ot" PHASE I TERRAIN MODELS DARCOM bUTH lEST CRITLRIA FUOR NUN -IIILLL-K WEAPUN

  19. Purchase Involvement of New Car Buyers: A Descriptive Study

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Abramson; Peggy D. Brewer

    1993-01-01

    The purchase of a new automobile is often cited as the quintessence of a high involvement purchase decision; the financial risks and personal relevance of the purchase dictate that car buyers put forth much effort before making a decision. In this research such efforts as dealers shopped, brands shopped, and information sources used are studied in a large sample of new car buyers in West Virginia. The purchase behavior of respondents in this study seems more like low-involvement than high inv...

  20. Dark Skies Awareness Programs for the International Year of Astronomy: Involvement, Outcomes and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2010-01-01

    The preservation of dark skies is a growing global concern, yet it is one of the easiest environmental problems people can address on local levels. For this reason, the goal of the IYA Dark Skies Awareness Cornerstone Project is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs. These programs provide resources on light pollution for new technologies like a presence in Second Life and podcasts, for local thematic events at national parks and observatory open houses, for international thematic events like International Dark Skies Week and Earth Hour, for a program in the arts like an international photo contest, for global citizen-science programs that measure night sky brightness worldwide, and for educational materials like a kit with a light shielding demonstration. These programs have been successfully used around the world during IYA to raise awareness of the effects of light pollution on public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy. The presentation will provide an update, take a look ahead at the project's sustainability, and describe how people can be involved in the future. Information about the programs is at www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  1. The Academic Differences between Students Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs and Students Not Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N = 121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these…

  2. DMA Modern Programming Environment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    capabilities. The centers are becoming increasingly dependent upon the computer and digital data in the fulfillment of MC&G goals. Successful application...ftticrcsrccessors C140 by Herbert AlteroDigital Citmmuncaticns C141 0 Structuredl Design ’-:orkshocr by Ned Chapin KC 156o Digital Systems En17lrceriirg CC 139 o3...on a programming environment. The study, which resulted in production of a paper entitled An EXEC 8 Programming Support Libary , contends that most of

  3. SA and ROS are involved in methyl salicylate-induced programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Li Juan; Chen, Wen Li

    2011-07-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically encoded, active process that results in the death of individual cells, tissues, or whole organs, which plays an important role in the life cycles of plants and animals. Previous studies show that methyl salicylate (MeSA) is a defense signal molecular associated with systemic acquired resistance and hypersensitive reaction; however, whether MeSA can induce PCD in plant is still unknown. The morphological changes of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts exposed to MeSA were observed under fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and the induction of PCD was clearly distinguished by intense perinuclear chromatin margination, condensation of nuclear chromatin and DNA laddering after 3-h exposure of 100 μM MeSA. Our results also showed that salicylic acid (SA) was involved in MeSA-induced PCD by using a transgenic nahG Arabidopsis thaliana line, and the process was mediated by reactive oxygen species, which functioned with SA by making an amplification loop. Our study showed that MeSA could induce PCD in plant cell for the first time.

  4. The emotional involvement in the workplace: An empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Lucia-Casademunt

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In a multitude of studies, it is verified that the generation of positive attitudes for employees such as job satisfaction or job involvement, have a positive influence on productivity levels of companies. The current investigation focus on the identification of employee-profile -who is emotionally involved with their work activity- through the use of a set of individual, job related and attitudinal factors.Design/methodology: A review of the literature about the main factors that affect the job involvement particularly on its emotional dimension has been completed. For its measurement at the empirical level, various items related to psychological well being of employees included in the IV European Working Conditions Survey-2010 are used. Moreover, those items are identified in Job Involvement Questionnaire (Lodahl & Kejner, 1965. Since then, an empirical and multidimensional study is carried out by applying a logistic regression model on the sample of 11,149 employees obtained with European survey cited previously.Findings: The logistic regression model identifies the factors, which are directly related to emotional involvement at the workplace. Ultimately, is raised a definitive model that define the European employee-profile -who is emotionally involved at the workplace-: a rather aged person who has been working at his/her present place of employment for several years in a medium-sized company where possibly there exist a good working relationship between workers and their superiors –social support-. These employees are “white-collar” workers, have career advancement opportunities in the organizational hierarchy. They perform variety, flexible and complex tasks, which leads to satisfaction in terms of pay and working conditions.Research limitations/implications: Emotional involvement has been measured through self-awareness and, therefore, the corresponding bias in the key variable must be assumed. In addition, the casual

  5. The Native American Studies Program at the University of Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    2001-01-01

    Begun in 1994, the Native American Studies program at the University of Oklahoma is an interdisciplinary B.A. program with a liberal arts orientation and strong emphasis on contemporary American Indian policy. Program strengths include the number and diversity of the faculty involved, the four Native languages taught, connections to tribal…

  6. Salutogenic service user involvement in nursing research: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjøsund, Nina Helen; Vinje, Hege Forbech; Eriksson, Monica; Haaland-Øverby, Mette; Jensen, Sven Liang; Kjus, Solveig; Norheim, Irene; Portaasen, Inger-Lill; Espnes, Geir Arild

    2018-05-12

    The aim was to explore the process of involving mental healthcare service users in a mental health promotion research project as research advisors and to articulate features of the collaboration which encouraged and empowered the advisors to make significant contributions to the research process and outcome. There is an increasing interest in evaluating aspects of service user involvement in nursing research. Few descriptions exist of features that enable meaningful service user involvement. We draw on experiences from conducting research which used the methodology interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore how persons with mental disorders perceived mental health. Aside from the participants in the project, five research advisors with service user experience were involved in the entire research process. We applied a case study design to explore the ongoing processes of service user involvement. Documents and texts produced while conducting the project (2012-2016), as well as transcripts from multistage focus group discussions with the research advisors, were analysed. The level of involvement was dynamic and varied throughout the different stages of the research process. Six features: leadership, meeting structure, role clarification, being members of a team, a focus on possibilities and being seen and treated as holistic individuals, were guiding principles for a salutogenic service user involvement. These features strengthened the advisors' perception of themselves as valuable and competent contributors. Significant contributions from research advisors were promoted by facilitating the process of involvement. A supporting structure and atmosphere were consistent with a salutogenic service user involvement. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Nerve and muscle involvement in mitochondrial disorders: an electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Michelangelo; Piazza, Selina; Volpi, Leda; Orsucci, Daniele; Calsolaro, Valeria; Caldarazzo Ienco, Elena; Carlesi, Cecilia; Rocchi, Anna; Petrozzi, Lucia; Calabrese, Rosanna; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2012-04-01

    Involvement of the peripheral nervous system in mitochondrial disorders (MD) has been previously reported. However, the exact prevalence of peripheral neuropathy and/or myopathy in MD is still unclear. In order to evaluate the prevalence of neuropathy and myopathy in MD, we performed sensory and motor nerve conduction studies (NCS) and concentric needle electromyography (EMG) in 44 unselected MD patients. NCS were abnormal in 36.4% of cases, and were consistent with a sensori-motor axonal multineuropathy (multifocal neuropathy), mainly affecting the lower limbs. EMG evidence of myopathy was present in 54.5% of patients, again mainly affecting the lower limbs. Nerve and muscle involvement was frequently subclinical. Peripheral nerve and muscle involvement is common in MD patients. Our study supports the variability of the clinical expression of MD. Further studies are needed to better understand the molecular basis underlying the phenotypic variability among MD patients.

  8. Lean Customer Involvement : A Multiple Case Study on the Effects of Kanban on Customer Involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Lundheim, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Customer involvement is an important, but challenging part of software development. Delays and failures can often be attributed to a lack of customer involvement. Different development methodologies provide different strategies for customer involvement, all with their own challenges. Kanban is a new development methodology quickly gaining popularity in the software development community. This thesis aims to answer the question: How does Kanban influence customer involvement? The main prob...

  9. The California Linkages Program: Doorway to Housing Support for Child Welfare-Involved Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrade, Amy; Simon, James David; Fabella, Danna; Castillo, Lolita; Mejia, Cesar; Shuster, David

    2017-09-01

    Housing instability can complicate parents' efforts to provide for their children. Child welfare service agencies have had difficulty adequately serving parents' housing needs due to limited and constrained funding streams. This article integrates the voices of four important stakeholders to illuminate how an innovative model of service system coordination called Linkages addresses housing needs for child welfare-involved parents eligible for public assistance. Facilitated by Linkages, these parents can receive supportive housing services through programs affiliated with the California public assistance program CalWORKs. Personal narratives reflecting the diverse perspectives of stakeholders in the Linkages collaboration-the statewide program director, a child welfare services coordinator, a CalWORKs caseworker, and a parent program participant-shed light on how the collaboration assists parents in attaining case plan goals, and highlights some of the factors facilitating and hindering effective collaboration between the agencies involved. Stakeholders emphasized the value of flexible service approaches, the intensity of the efforts required, the role of advocacy, and the importance of a shared vision between agencies working together to provide housing supports. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  10. Involvement of scientists in the NASA Office of Space Science education and public outreach program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck-Winchatz, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    Since the mid-1990's NASA's Office of Space Science (OSS) has embarked on an astronomy and space science education and public outreach (E/PO) program. Its goals are to share the excitement of space science discoveries with the public, and to enhance the quality of science, mathematics and technology education, particularly at the precollege level. A key feature of the OSS program is the direct involvement of space scientists. The majority of the funding for E/PO is allocated to flight missions, which spend 1%-2% of their total budget on E/PO, and to individual research grants. This paper presents an overview of the program's goals, objectives, philosophy, and infrastructure

  11. Towards a More Meaningful Involvement of Librarians in Academic Program Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Lynne

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Using a descriptive case study approach, this paper aims to validate academic librarians' perceptions that they are marginalized by faculty during academic program reviews, and recommends ways for the two groups to collaborate more effectively to make program reviews more meaningful. Design/methodology/approach: The paper describes a case…

  12. Inspiring the Next Generation of Explorers: Scientist Involvement in the Expedition Earth and Beyond Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Paige; Stefanov, William; Willis, Kim; Runco, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Scientists, science experts, graduate and even undergraduate student researchers have a unique ability to inspire the next generation of explorers. These science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experts can serve as role models for students and can help inspire them to consider future STEM-related careers. They have an exceptional ability to instill a sense of curiosity and fascination in the minds of students as they bring science to life in the classroom. Students and teachers are hungry for opportunities to interact with scientists. They feel honored when these experts take time out of their busy day to share their science, their expertise, and their stories. The key for teachers is to be cognizant of opportunities to connect their students with scientists. For scientists, the key is to know how to get involved, to have options for participation that involve different levels of commitment, and to work with educational specialists who can help facilitate their involvement. The Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program, facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center, is an Earth and planetary science education program designed to inspire, engage, and educate teachers and students by getting them actively involved with NASA exploration, discovery, and the process of science. One of the main goals of the program is to facilitate student research in the classroom. The program uses astronaut photographs, provided through the ARES Crew Earth Observations (CEO) payload on the International Space Station (ISS) as the hook to help students gain an interest in a research topic. Student investigations can focus on Earth or involve comparative planetology. Student teams are encouraged to use additional imagery and data from Earth or planetary orbital spacecraft, or ground-based data collection tools, to augment the astronaut photography dataset. A second goal of the program is to provide

  13. Inspiring the Next Generation of Explorers: Scientist Involvement in the Expedition Earth and Beyond Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists, science experts, graduate and even undergraduate student researchers have a unique ability to inspire the next generation of explorers. These science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experts can serve as role models for students and can help inspire them to consider future STEM-related careers. They have an exceptional ability to instill a sense of curiosity and fascination in the minds of students as they bring science to life in the classroom. Students and teachers are hungry for opportunities to interact with scientists. They feel honored when these experts take time out of their busy day to share their science, their expertise, and their stories. The key for teachers is to be cognizant of opportunities to connect their students with scientists. For scientists, the key is to know how to get involved, to have options for participation that involve different levels of commitment, and to work with educational specialists who can help facilitate their involvement. The Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program, facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center, is an Earth and planetary science education program designed to inspire, engage, and educate teachers and students by getting them actively involved with NASA exploration, discovery, and the process of science. One of the main goals of the program is to facilitate student research in the classroom. The program uses astronaut photographs, provided through the ARES Crew Earth Observations (CEO) payload on the International Space Station (ISS) as the hook to help students gain an interest in a research topic. Student investigations can focus on Earth or involve comparative planetology. Student teams are encouraged to use additional imagery and data from Earth or planetary orbital spacecraft, or ground-based data collection tools, to augment the astronaut photography dataset. A second goal of the program is to provide

  14. One Model for Scientist Involvement in K-12 Education: Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meese, D.; Shipp, S. S.; Porter, M.; Bruccoli, A.

    2002-12-01

    Scientists involved in the NSF-funded Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic (TEA) Program integrate a K-12 science teacher into their polar field project. Objectives of the program include: having the science teacher immersed in the experience of research; 2) through the teacher, leveraging the research experience to better inform teaching practices; and 3) sharing the experience with the broader educational and general community. The scientist - or qualified team member - stays involved with the teacher throughout the program as a mentor. Preparation of the teacher involves a week-long orientation presented by the TEA Program, and a two week pre-expedition visit at the scientist's institution. Orientation acquaints teachers with program expectations, logistical information, and an overview of polar science. While at the scientist's institution, the teacher meets the team, prepares for the field, and strengthens content knowledge. In the field, the teacher is a team member and educational liaison, responding to questions from students and colleagues by e-mail, and posting electronic journals describing the research experience. Upon return, the teachers work closely with colleagues to bring the experience of research into classrooms through creation of activities, design of longer-term student investigations, and presentations at scientific, educational, and community meetings. Interaction with the scientific team continues with a visit by the scientist to the teacher's classrooms, collaboration on presentations at scientific meetings, and consultation on classroom activities. In some cases, the teacher may participate in future expeditions. The involvement by scientists in mentor relationships, such as those of the TEA Program, is critical to improving science education. Many teachers of science have not had the opportunity to participate in field research, which offers valuable first-hand experience about the nature of science, as well as about specific

  15. A Comparison Study of Adults with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder with and without Forensic Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, P.; Lunsky, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The current study describes and compares profiles of patients in the same specialized hospital program for patients with intellectual disability with and without forensic involvement. A retrospective chart review of 78 individuals (39 forensic and 39 non-forensic) served between 2006 and 2008 was completed. The forensic sample was more likely to…

  16. South Korean Family Caregiver Involvement in Delirium Care: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yun; Moyle, Wendy; Cooke, Marie; O'Dwyer, Siobhan

    2017-12-01

    The current study aimed to describe the effect of an educational program on RN-initiated efforts to involve family caregivers in delirium care. A descriptive qualitative study was performed. A purposive sample of 12 RNs who participated in a one group, pre-post evaluation of a delirium educational program, and a nominated sample of six family caregivers of patients who had been cared for by RNs in the program participated in individual, in-depth interviews. The qualitative findings indicated that the inclusion of a delirium brochure in ward orientation on admission, with reinforcement during shift changes, and RN-initiated engagement with family caregivers promoted family caregiver involvement in delirium prevention. Further studies in South Korea are needed to determine which family-centered nursing care interventions are culturally appropriate and most effective for RNs and family caregivers in delirium care. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(12), 44-51.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Advantages of customer/supplier involvement in the upgrade of River Bend`s IST program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Womack, R.L.; Addison, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    At River Bend Station, IST testing had problems. Operations could not perform the test with the required repeatability; engineering could not reliably trend test data to detect degradation; licensing was heavily burdened with regulatory concerns; and maintenance could not do preventative maintenance because of poor prediction of system health status. Using Energy`s Total Quality principles, it was determined that the causes were: lack of ownership, inadequate test equipment usage, lack of adequate procedures, and lack of program maintenance. After identifying the customers and suppliers of the IST program data, Energy management put together an upgrade team to address these concerns. These customers and suppliers made up the IST upgrade team. The team`s mission was to supply River Bend with a reliable, functional, industry correct and user friendly IST program. The IST program in place went through a verification process that identified and corrected over 400 individual program discrepancies. Over 200 components were identified for improved testing methods. An IST basis document was developed. The operations department was trained on ASME Section XI testing. All IST tests have been simplified and shortened, due to heavy involvement by operations in the procedure development process. This significantly reduced testing time, resulting in lower cost, less dose and greater system availability.

  18. Advantages of customer/supplier involvement in the upgrade of River Bend's IST program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Womack, R.L.; Addison, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    At River Bend Station, IST testing had problems. Operations could not perform the test with the required repeatability; engineering could not reliably trend test data to detect degradation; licensing was heavily burdened with regulatory concerns; and maintenance could not do preventative maintenance because of poor prediction of system health status. Using Energy's Total Quality principles, it was determined that the causes were: lack of ownership, inadequate test equipment usage, lack of adequate procedures, and lack of program maintenance. After identifying the customers and suppliers of the IST program data, Energy management put together an upgrade team to address these concerns. These customers and suppliers made up the IST upgrade team. The team's mission was to supply River Bend with a reliable, functional, industry correct and user friendly IST program. The IST program in place went through a verification process that identified and corrected over 400 individual program discrepancies. Over 200 components were identified for improved testing methods. An IST basis document was developed. The operations department was trained on ASME Section XI testing. All IST tests have been simplified and shortened, due to heavy involvement by operations in the procedure development process. This significantly reduced testing time, resulting in lower cost, less dose and greater system availability

  19. Evaluating public involvement in the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The Department of Energy contracted with the Keystone Center to evaluate the effectiveness of the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program's public-involvement efforts. The Center chose six evaluators with diverse training and experience related to low-level waste management and public-participation programs. Keystone's evaluation was based on (a) observations by the evaluators who attended the National Program-sponsored strategy review meetings and fairs; (b) interviews with low-level waste generators, local government officials, state legislators, public-interest groups, and members of the general public; and (c) observations of the final National Program strategy task force meeting. The evaluators concluded that, overall, the public-participation processes yielded some very positive results - for policy development and for DOE and the EG and G staff. They judged the strategy document to be complete, concise, and helpful to public dialogue on low-level waste issues. They also made specific recommendations for improvements to the public-participation program

  20. Parental decision making involvement and decisional conflict: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Laura; Kryworuchko, Jennifer; Saarimaki, Anton; Lawson, Margaret L

    2017-06-13

    Decisional conflict is a state of uncertainty about the best treatment option among competing alternatives and is common among adult patients who are inadequately involved in the health decision making process. In pediatrics, research shows that many parents are insufficiently involved in decisions about their child's health. However, little is known about parents' experience of decisional conflict. We explored parents' perceived decision making involvement and its association with parents' decisional conflict. We conducted a descriptive survey study in a pediatric tertiary care hospital. Our survey was guided by validated decisional conflict screening items (i.e., the SURE test). We administered the survey to eligible parents after an ambulatory care or emergency department consultation for their child. Four hundred twenty-nine respondents were included in the analysis. Forty-eight percent of parents reported not being offered treatment options and 23% screened positive for decisional conflict. Parents who reported being offered options experienced less decisional conflict than parents who reported not being offered options (5% vs. 42%, p conflict after their clinical consultation. Involving parents in the decision making process might reduce their risk of decisional conflict. Evidence based interventions that support parent decision making involvement, such as shared decision making, should be evaluated and implemented in pediatrics as a strategy to reduce parents' decisional conflict.

  1. [Implementation of telemedicine programs in Spain: experience of the main actors involved in the decision-making process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtani Chugani, Vinita; Martín Fernández, Roberto Luis; Soto Pedre, Enrique; Yanes López, Virginia; Serrano Aguilar, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    To identify the main benefits and risks related to the implementation of telemedicine programs in Spain, based on the experience of the actors influencing the decision-making process. We performed a qualitative study based on audiotaped semi-structured telephone interviews. Eleven interviews were carried out, and the perspective of four physicians, three administrators, two researchers and two telecommunications industry workers were included. Theoretical sampling was used and thematic inductive analysis was performed. The following factors were identified as necessary to successfully resolve problems by using telemedicine programs: the commitment of the persons involved, technological aspects, economic and institutional support, acceptance by healthcare professionals and patients, the existence of protocols adjusted to the context, the need for information and training prior to the development of telemedicine programs, a forward-looking approach, routine use and full acceptance of telemedicine programs in the organization, and the need to defend equity for professionals and users. Successfully developing a telemedicine program requires a favorable environment in which risk can be foreseen. The main key element seems to be the human factor. The factors identified in this study should be considered when developing strategies to increase the chances of success of telemedicine programs in Spain.

  2. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk Through Stakeholder Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Hartwell

    2007-01-01

    Between 1951 and 1992, 928 nuclear tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), including 100 atmospheric and 828 underground tests. Initial public reaction to the tests was largely supportive, but by the late 1950s this began to change, largely as a result of fear of the potential for adverse health effects to be caused by exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from the tests. The nuclear power plant accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 served to heighten these fears, as well as foster a general distrust of the federal agencies involved and low public confidence in monitoring results. Modeled after a similar program that involved the public in monitoring activities around the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the NTS since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah, and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Since assuming administration of the program in 2000, DRI has accomplished significant enhancements to the network's data collection and transmission capabilities. A robust datalogging and communications system allows for the near real-time transmission of data to a platform maintained by DRI's Western Regional Climate Center, where the data are uploaded and displayed on a publicly accessible web site (http://cemp.dri.edu/). Additionally, the CEMP can serve as part of an emergency response network in the event of an unplanned radiological release from the NTS, and also provides an excellent platform for testing new environmental sensor technologies

  3. Patient Involvement in Safe Delivery: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Olfati, Forozun; Asefzadeh, Saeid; Changizi, Nasrin; Keramat, Afsaneh; Yunesian, Masud

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patient involvement in safe delivery planning is considered important yet not widely practiced. The present study aimed at identifythe factors that affect patient involvementin safe delivery, as recommended by parturient women. Methods: This study was part of a qualitative research conducted by content analysis method and purposive sampling in 2013. The data were collected through 63 semi-structured interviews in4 hospitalsand analyzed using thematic content analysis. The partic...

  4. Public involvement in the Hanford Double-Shell Tank waste disposal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, M.B.; Hunter, V.L.

    1992-06-01

    Hanford's Double-Shell Tank (DST) waste disposal program was redefined following serious challenges to the viability of the previous strategy due to increased regulatory requirements and operating expectations. Redefinition of the DST waste disposal program involved a far-reaching set of decisions and actions. A formal stakeholder involvement process was used to bring the concerns of outside groups into the definition and evaluation of altemative tank waste disposal strategies, broadening the participation and ownership of the revised pregrain. Hanford's Double-Shell Tank (DST) waste disposal strategy, calls for using B-Plant to separate the low-level and high-level portions of the DST waste. This separations step would provide feed to the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), viewed by many as the cornerstone to Site cleanup. The State of Washington strongly opposed using the 47-year-old B-Plant because it was not built to comply with current environmental regulations. Because of this and other challenges to Hanford's tank waste disposal strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) initiated efforts to redefine the strategy. To support this effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHCP) sought input from outside stakeholder groups (stakeholders are those interest groups that are affected by the outcome of the decision and have a strong desire to ensure that their concerns are addressed) through a formal stakeholder involvement and multi-attribute utility (MAU) analysis process. This paper describes that process and its results

  5. Program Director as Webmaster? Analysis of 131 Anesthesiology Department Web Sites and Program Director Web Site Involvement and Opinion Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpayeh, Negin; Lee, Howard; Berger, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The last formal review of academic anesthesiology department Web sites (ADWs) for content was conducted in 2009. ADWs have been rated as very important by medical students in researching residency training programs; however, the rapid evolution of sites require that descriptive statistics must be more current to be considered reliable. We set out to provide an updated overview of ADW content and to better understand residency program directors' (PD) role and comfort with ADWs. Two independent reviewers (ND and HL) analyzed all 131 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited ADWs. A binary system (Yes/No) was used to determine which features were present. Reviewer reliability was confirmed with inter-rater reliability and percentage agreement calculation. Additionally, a blinded electronic survey (Survey Monkey, Portland, OR) was sent to anesthesiology residency PDs via electronic mail investigating the audiences for ADWs, the frequency of updates and the degree of PD involvement. 13% of anesthesiology departments still lack a Web site with a homepage with links to the residency program and educational offerings (18% in 2009). Only half (55%) of Web sites contain information for medical students, including clerkship information. Furthermore, programs rarely contain up-to-date calendars (13%), accreditation cycle lengths (11%), accreditation dates (7%) or board pass rates (6%). The PD survey, completed by 42 of 131 PDs, noted a correlation (r = 0.36) between the number of years as PD and the frequency of Web site updates - less experienced PDs appear to update their sites more frequently (p = 0.03). Although 86% of PDs regarded a Web site as "very" important in recruitment, only 9% felt "very" comfortable with the skills required to advertise and market a Web site. Despite the overall increase in ADW content since 2009, privacy concerns, limited resources and time constraints may prevent PDs from providing the most up-to-date Web sites for

  6. Medical school accreditation in Australia: Issues involved in assessing major changes and new programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Field

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Medical Council (AMC is an independent company for quality assurance and quality improvement in medical education in Australia and New Zealand. Accreditation procedures for the 20 medical schools in these two countries are somewhat different for three different circumstances or stages of school development: existing medical schools, established courses undergoing major changes, and new schools. This paper will outline some issues involved in major changes to existing courses, and new medical school programs. Major changes have included change from a 6 year undergraduate course to a 5 year undergraduate course or 4 year graduate-entry course, introduction of a lateral graduate-entry stream, new domestic site of course delivery, offshore course delivery, joint program between two universities, and major change to curriculum. In the case of a major change assessment, accreditation of the new or revised course may be granted for a period up to two years after the full course has been implemented. In the assessment of proposals for introduction of new medical courses, six issues needing careful consideration have arisen: forward planning, academic staffing, adequate clinical experience, acceptable research program, adequacy of resources, postgraduate training program and employment.

  7. Procedures Involved in Radioecological Studies with Marine Zooplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.; Small, L.F.

    1976-01-01

    Various procedures in marine radio ecological experiments with zooplankton are considered in the light of the possibility of establishing reference methods for marine radiobiological studies. Methods for collection, handling and maintenance prior to and during experiments are suggested for various types of zooplankton. The importance of physiological and physicochemical parameters are discussed in the context of the experimental design with the aim of achieving comparable results among workers involved in this field of research. (author)

  8. Findings of an evaluation of public involvement programs associated with the development of a Land and Resource Management Plan for the Ouachita National Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holthoff, M.G. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Howell, R.E. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Federal regulations require the United States Forest Service (USFS) to integrate public input and values into decisions concerning land and resource management planning. The USFS has typically relied on traditional methods of involving the public, whereby public access and input to policy development are unilaterally controlled by the agency. Because of the highly political nature of land and resource management planning, such technocratic forms of public involvement and decision-making appear to be proving ineffective. This paper describes and evaluates two public involvement programs associated with the Ouachita National Forest`s (ONF) lengthy forest planning process. The research consisted of personal interviews with key program leaders and knowledgeable citizen participants, collection of secondary data, and a survey of citizen participants. Because of controversial planning decisions made during an initial planning process, the ONF was forced to re-enter the planning process in order to address unresolved planning issues and to conduct a more effective public involvement program. The supplemental planning process also resulted in a considerable degree of public contention. The survey revealed that although citizen participants were somewhat more satisfied with the supplemental public involvement program relative to the initial program, neither program was viewed as satisfactory. The findings of the study suggest that in order to be more effective, USFS public involvement programs should be more responsive to public concerns and conducted in adherence to principles of collaborative planning.

  9. Involvement in Community Extension Program of Business Administration Students in one Higher Education Institution in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo-Anne May A. Rubio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Conducting community service is about relationship on building communities. It is designed for personal and social development. The researchers conduct this investigation to assess the Community Extension program of the College of Business Administration (CBA in one Private Higher Education Institution in the Philippines. The descriptive method of research utilizing the normative survey technique was employed in the study. The results of the study revealed that majority of the respondents are first year level and from Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. It also shows that there are students who are not involve in any organization of the college. This study further shows that community extension program of the college was well implemented. Students were well involved in the said activities. The students can expect benefits that will help them grow to a more productive and efficient students and member of the community. Moreover, there are also some expected problems in joining this kind of activity like funds, location and the logistics. The extension programs may continue to move on and reach out for the sustainable development of the students and community.

  10. Child and Parental Outcomes Following Involvement in a Preventive Intervention: Efficacy of the PACE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begle, Angela Moreland; Dumas, Jean E.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated whether engagement (i.e., attendance and quality of participation) in the Parenting our Children to Excellence (PACE) program predicted positive child and parent outcomes. PACE in an 8-week preventive intervention aimed at parents of preschool children. The study investigated the relation of engagement to outcomes in an…

  11. A process for integrating public involvement into technical/social programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltshire, S.; Williams, C.

    1994-01-01

    Good technical/social decisions--those that are technically sound and publicly acceptable--result from a planning process that considers consulting the public a basic part of the technical program, as basic as hiring a technical consultant to advise about new ideas in computer modeling. This paper describes a specific process for making public involvement an integral part of decision-making about high-level radioactive waste management, so that important technical, social, environmental, economic, and cultural information and values can be incorporated in a meaningful way in planning and carrying out a high-level waste management program or project. The process for integration must consider: (a) the decision or task for which public interaction is needed; (b) the people who should or will want to participate in the decision or task; (c) the goals or purposes of the communication or interaction--the agency's and the public's; (d) the kinds of information the public needs and that the agency needs in order to understand the relevant technical and social issues; and (e) the types of communication or involvement that best serve to meet the agency's and the public's goals

  12. The community environmental monitoring program: a model for stakeholder involvement in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwell, William T.; Shafer, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1981, the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has involved stakeholders directly in its daily operation and data collection, as well as in dissemination of information on radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the primary location where the United States (US) conducted nuclear testing until 1992. The CEMP is funded by the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, and is administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. The CEMP provides training workshops for stakeholders involved in the program, and educational outreach to address public concerns about health risk and environmental impacts from past and ongoing NTS activities. The network includes 29 monitoring stations located across an approximately 160,000 km 2 area of Nevada, Utah and California in the southwestern US. The principal radiological instruments are pressurized ion chambers for measuring gamma radiation, and particulate air samplers, primarily for alpha/beta detection. Stations also employ a full suite of meteorological instruments, allowing for improved interpretation of the effects of meteorological events on background radiation levels. Station sensors are wired to state-of-the-art data-loggers that are capable of several weeks of on-site data storage, and that work in tandem with a communications system that integrates DSL and wireless internet, land line and cellular phone, and satellite technologies for data transfer. Data are managed through a platform maintained by the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) that DRI operates for the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The WRCC platform allows for near real-time upload and display of current monitoring information in tabular and graphical formats on a public web site. Archival data for each station are also available on-line, providing the ability to perform trending analyses or calculate site

  13. Organization and staffing barriers to parent involvement in teen pregnancy prevention programs: challenges for community partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Janet E; Montgomery, Susanne; Lee, Jerry W

    2005-09-01

    To evaluate parent involvement in a Southern California teen pregnancy prevention community partnership project. Researchers expected to find parent and family-related participation barriers similar to those described in the family support literature, which they could address with program modifications. Three phases of qualitative evaluation occurred: key informant interviews and focus groups with youth and parents; focus groups with service providers; and key informant interviews with service providers, their supervisor, and the collaborative coordinator. Theory-based, open-ended question guides directed the interviews and focus groups, and transcriptions were coded and themed using grounded theory methods. Parents and youth sought ways to improve connections and communication with each other, and parents welcomed parenting education from the project. Unexpectedly, the major obstacles to parent participation identified in this project were largely organizational, and included the assignment of parent involvement tasks to agencies lacking capacities to work effectively with parents, inadequate administrative support for staff, and the absence of an effective system for communicating concerns and resolving conflicts among collaborative partners. Youth serving agencies may not be the best partners to implement effective parent involvement or family support interventions. Collaborative leadership must identify appropriate partners, engender their cooperation, and support their staff to further the overall goals of the collaborative.

  14. Participatory Evaluation and Learning: A Case Example Involving Ripple Effects Mapping of a Tourism Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Rani; Templin, Elizabeth; Messer, Cynthia; Chazdon, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Engaging communities through research-based participatory evaluation and learning methods can be rewarding for both a community and Extension. A case study of a community tourism development program evaluation shows how participatory evaluation and learning can be mutually reinforcing activities. Many communities value the opportunity to reflect…

  15. Five case studies of multifamily weatherization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, L; Wilson, T.; Lewis, G. [Synertech Systems Corp. (United States); MacDonald, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The multifamily case studies that are the subject of this report were conducted to provide a better understanding of the approach taken by program operators in weatherizing large buildings. Because of significant variations in building construction and energy systems across the country, five states were selected based on their high level of multifamily weatherization. This report summarizes findings from case studies conducted by multifamily weatherization operations in five cities. The case studies were conducted between January and November 1994. Each of the case studies involved extensive interviews with the staff of weatherization subgrantees conducting multifamily weatherization, the inspection of 4 to 12 buildings weatherized between 1991 and 1993, and the analysis of savings and costs. The case studies focused on innovative techniques which appear to work well.

  16. Patient Involvement in Safe Delivery: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfati, Forozun; Asefzadeh, Saeid; Changizi, Nasrin; Keramat, Afsaneh; Yunesian, Masud

    2015-09-28

    Patient involvement in safe delivery planning is considered important yet not widely practiced. The present study aimed at identifythe factors that affect patient involvementin safe delivery, as recommended by parturient women. This study was part of a qualitative research conducted by content analysis method and purposive sampling in 2013.The data were collected through 63 semi-structured interviews in4 hospitalsand analyzed using thematic content analysis. The participants in this research were women before discharge and after delivery. Findings were analyzed using Colaizzi's method. Four categories of factors that could affect patient involvement in safe delivery emerged from our analysis: patient-related (true and false beliefs, literacy, privacy, respect for patient), illness-related (pain, type of delivery, patient safety incidents), health care professional-relatedand task-related factors (behavior, monitoring &training), health care setting-related (financial aspects, facilities). More research is needed to explore the factors affecting the participation of mothers. It is therefore, recommended to: 1) take notice of mother education, their husbands, midwives and specialists; 2) provide pregnant women with insurance coverage from the outset of pregnancy, especially during prenatal period; 3) form a labor pain committee consisting of midwives, obstetricians, and anesthesiologists in order to identify the preferred painless labor methods based on the existing facilities and conditions, 4) carry out research on observing patients' privacy and dignity; 5) pay more attention on the factors affecting cesarean.

  17. Factors Associated with Involvement in Bullying: A Study in Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva M. Romera

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available School bullying is one of the main problems affecting the quality of peer relationships in schools and in general the coexistence. At European level, there are scientific findings that indicate its nature, characteristics and factors related to its involvement. However, in poor and developing countries, where the problem is more serious, there is a high degree of awareness on this matter. The present study aimed to identify what factors may be influencing the occurrence of bullying in a representative sample of primary schools in the Nicaraguan capital. For this propose, 3042 students from Managua and its metropolitan area were explored with instruments comparable to those used in Europe. A multinomial logistic regression analysis indicated that being a boy, to show antisocial behaviors and attitudes and contact with drugs were the three factors most related with the role of aggressor, as well as negative relationships had a significant influence on involvement in this phenomenon, either as a victim, aggressor or victimized aggressor. Results are discussed in relation to the profiles of aggressor and victim of bullying in international studies focusing on differences in developed countries.

  18. An overview of federal government financial involvement in the Canadian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, T.W.

    1981-01-01

    The government of Canada has had a financial involvement with the nuclear industry in four areas: nuclear power development, including expenditures for research and development, prototype reactors, and regulation; uranium industry support, including the operations of Eldorado Nuclear Ltd. and the uranium stockpiling program; the financing of nuclear reactors, activities in which the federal government has acted as a banker for the sale of reactors; and heavy water production. Up to 1978-79 total federal expenditures of around $3.4 billion in current collars had been invested. Of this amount, about 56 percent was associated with nuclear power development, 2 percent with uranium industry support, 22 percent with heavy water, and 22 percent with financing reactor sales

  19. Replicating MISTERS: an epidemiological criminology framework analysis of a program for criminal justice-involved minority males in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Roberto Hugh; Akers, Timothy A; Bowman, Daniel Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Men in STD Training and Empowerment Research Study (MISTERS) program and epidemiological criminology began their development in Atlanta at about the same time. MISTERS focuses on men recently released from jail to reduce both HIV/STD and crime-related risk factors through a brief educational intervention. This article examines ways in which MISTERS and epidemiological criminology have been used to inform one another in the replication of the MISTERS program in Orange County, Florida. Data from 110 MISTERS participants during the first 10 months of operation are analyzed to examine the overlapping occurrence of health and criminal risk behaviors in the men's lives. This provides a test of core hypotheses from the epidemiological criminology framework. This article also examines application of the epidemiological criminology framework to develop interventions to address health and crime risk factors simultaneously in Criminal Justice-Involved populations in the community.

  20. Developmental Programming of Obesity and Liver Metabolism by Maternal Perinatal Nutrition Involves the Melanocortin System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Cordero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity predisposes offspring to metabolic dysfunction and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD. Melanocortin-4 receptor (Mc4r-deficient mouse models exhibit obesity during adulthood. Here, we aim to determine the influence of the Mc4r gene on the liver of mice subjected to perinatal diet-induced obesity. Female mice heterozygous for Mc4r fed an obesogenic or a control diet for 5 weeks were mated with heterozygous males, with the same diet continued throughout pregnancy and lactation, generating four offspring groups: control wild type (C_wt, control knockout (C_KO, obese wild type (Ob_wt, and obese knockout (Ob_KO. At 21 days, offspring were genotyped, weaned onto a control diet, and sacrificed at 6 months old. Offspring phenotypic characteristics, plasma biochemical profile, liver histology, and hepatic gene expression were analyzed. Mc4r_ko offspring showed higher body, liver and adipose tissue weights respect to the wild type animals. Histological examination showed mild hepatic steatosis in offspring group C_KO. The expression of hepatic genes involved in regulating inflammation, fibrosis, and immune cell infiltration were upregulated by the absence of the Mc4r gene. These results demonstrate that maternal obesogenic feeding during the perinatal period programs offspring obesity development with involvement of the Mc4r system.

  1. The involvement of Spanish older people in nondegree educational programs: reasons for and barriers to participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Celdrán, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the reasons older Spanish people participate in nondegree educational programs and the barriers they may face when they want to do so. Data were drawn from the 2007 Survey on Adults' Involvement in Learning Activities (Encuesta sobre la Participación de la Población Adulta en Actividades de Aprendizaje: EADA) and correspond to a nationally representative sample of Spanish people aged between 60 and 74 years old (n=4,559). Overall, only 8.7% of the sample participated in a nondegree educational program. Predictors of participation were being a woman, being younger, having a higher educational level, and being employed. The most frequent reason given for participation was of an intrinsic nature (e.g., interest in the topic), although instrumental motives (e.g., utility of the content for daily life) were more common than suggested by previous research. As for barriers to participation, the vast majority of older people (95.6% of those who did not participate) did not even express a desire to participate. The most frequent barriers were internal (e.g., age/health restrictions). This kind of barrier was ascribed a greater importance by older and less educated groups as well as by those who participate less in cultural activities. Policies to promote older people's participation in nonformal educational activities are discussed in light of the data.

  2. A study of muscle involvement in scrub typhus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K; Mani, Vinita E; Mahadevan, Anita; Shankar, Susrala K

    2015-01-15

    Patients with scrub typhus often complain of myalgia, but a comprehensive study on muscle dysfunction is lacking. We therefore report the clinical, electromyographic and muscle biopsy findings in patients with scrub typhus. Consecutive patients with scrub typhus were included, and their clinical and laboratory findings were noted. The patients with myalgia or weakness and elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) were considered to have muscle involvement. Electromyography (EMG) and muscle biopsy were done in some patients. Patients were treated with doxycycline 200mg daily for 7 days, and their clinical and biochemical outcome on discharge and one month were evaluated. 13 out of 33 (39.4%) patients had muscle involvement and their CK levels ranged between 287 and 3166 (859 ± 829) U/L. EMG revealed short duration polyphasic potentials, and muscle histopathology revealed evidence of vasculitis. There were significant correlations between severity of weakness and CK levels (r = -0.6; p scrub typhus. Although muscle histopathology showed evidence of vasculitis, patients responded to doxycycline. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Chelation studies involving decontamination of light lanthanides by polyaminopolycarboxylic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N.E.H.

    1985-01-01

    The present thesis constitutes chelation studies involving decontamination of light lanthanides, cobalt , and uranium with 2,2-bis-acryloyliminomethylene- acid (BAETA) using the spectrophotometric method. the work carried out aimed to clear up the effectiveness of BAETA as a decontaminating agent for radioactive nuclides from human body . the thesis includes a general introduction , outlines the aim of work and contains three main chapters . the results of the work are discussed at the end of the thesis. the first chapter deals with a comprehensive survey of the relevant literature. this includes the metabolism and toxicity of cerium, uranium, cobalt and Ln +3 elements, general methodologies of internal decontamination, choice and effectiveness of chelating agents

  4. A systematic review of neuropsychological studies involving young binge drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbia, Carina; López-Caneda, Eduardo; Corral, Montserrat; Cadaveira, Fernando

    2018-07-01

    Binge drinking (BD) is a public health concern with serious implications for brain development. This review is the first in which neuropsychological studies of healthy young BDs are synthesized following PRISMA guidelines. We conducted a literature search in PsycINFO, Web of Science, and PubMed. Articles were screened using strict inclusion criteria. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality. Of the 27 studies included, 14 (52%) were of intermediate quality, 7 (26%) of poor quality and 6 (22%) of high quality. BD is associated with deficits in verbal memory and executive functions, principally poor inhibitory control. Tentatively, BD may be related to deficits in cognitive flexibility and monitoring of information in working memory. Further studies are needed to determine potential impairments in prospective memory and decision-making. BDs do not seem to show difficulties in planning, short-term memory, attention, processing speed or visuospatial construction. The evidence does not seem to support greater vulnerability in females. Future longitudinal studies should identify the characteristics of extreme trajectories, explore recovery deficits and design intervention programs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation Use and Involvement of Internal Stakeholders: The Case of a New Non-Degree Online Program in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornachione, Edgard B., Jr.; Trombetta, Maria R.; Casa Nova, Silvia P. C.

    2010-01-01

    To what extent does the intense and direct involvement of internal stakeholders, such as program managers and staff members, play a significant role toward evaluation use? Stakeholder involvement is a key element in evaluation and evaluation use is considered within a broader sense that includes organizational knowledge, individual skills, and…

  6. Patient involvement in research programming and implementation: a responsive evaluation of the Dialogue Model for research agenda setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abma, T.A.; Pittens, C.A.C.M.; Visse, M.; Elberse, J.E.; Broerse, J.E.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Dialogue Model for research agenda-setting, involving multiple stakeholders including patients, was developed and validated in the Netherlands. However, there is little insight into whether and how patient involvement is sustained during the programming and implementation of research

  7. STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT IN HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AT NATIONAL LEVEL: A STUDY FROM IRAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdizadeh, Bahareh; Shahmoradi, Safoura; Majdzadeh, Reza; Doaee, Shila; Bazyar, Mohammad; Souresrafil, Aghdas; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the opinions of stakeholders on their roles in health technology assessment (HTA) in Iran and to determine the barriers and facilitators existing in the organizations to help increase their involvement in the HTA program. The study was conducted in two stages, semi-structured interviews, and "policy dialogue" with stakeholders. The data were analyzed through the framework approach. The interviews were held with ten stakeholder representatives from various organizations. In addition, Twenty-one representatives participated in the policy dialogue. Based on the findings, all the stakeholder organizations considered themselves as interest groups in all the stages of the HTA process; however, their tendencies and methods of involvement differed from one another. According to the participants, the most important issue to be considered in the context of HTA was that the structures, stages, and procedures of the HTA process must be made transparent. Stakeholder involvement in the HTA program cannot readily take place. Various stakeholders have different interests, responsibilities, infrastructures, and barriers. If a program does not meet these considerations, its chances of succeeding will substantially decrease. Therefore, to prevent overlooking the needs and expectations of stakeholders from the HTA process, it is essential to create opportunities in which their thoughts and ideas are taken into account.

  8. Strategies for Evaluating a Freshman Studies Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketkar, Kusum; Bennett, Shelby D.

    1989-01-01

    The study developed an economic model for the evaluation of Seaton Hall University's freshman studies program. Two techniques used to evaluate the economic success of the program are break-even analysis and elasticity coefficient. (Author/MLW)

  9. The impact of consumer involvement in research: an evaluation of consumer involvement in the London Primary Care Studies Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Katrina; Carter, Mary; Mahtani, Vinita; Barnard, Angela; Hawton, Annie; Britten, Nicky

    2008-06-01

    The value of consumer involvement in health services research is widely recognized. While there is a growing body of evidence about the principles of good consumer involvement, there is little research about the effect that involvement can have on the research. This evaluation assessed the level and impact of consumer involvement in the London Primary Care Studies Programme (LPCSP), all of whose individual projects had to demonstrate substantial involvement as a condition of funding. To evaluate consumer involvement in the LPSCP and understand what impact consumers had on the research process and outcomes. A multi-method case study approach was undertaken, using survey techniques, interviews, focus groups, observation and scrutiny of written documents. The overall data set comprised 61 questionnaires, 44 semi-structured interviews, 2 focus groups and 15 hours of observation of meetings. Eleven primary care-based research projects which together made up the LPCSP. An in-depth description of consumer involvement in the Programme was produced. Nine projects had consumers as co-applicants, four projects had been completed before the evaluation began and one was still ongoing at the time of the evaluation. Of the eight projects which have produced final reports, all met their aims and objectives. Consumers had had an additional impact in the research, in the initial design of the study, in recruitment of the research subjects, in developing data collection tools, in collecting the data, in analysis and disseminating the findings. Consumer involvement in National Health Service research is a relatively recent policy development and while there is an increasing amount of literature about how and why consumers should be involved in research, there is less evidence about the impact of such involvement. This evaluation provides evidence about the impact that consumers have not only on the research process but also on the outcomes of the research.

  10. Private sector involvement in the US program of technical assistance to IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, S.E.; Epel, L.; Maise, G.; Reisman, A.; Skalyo, J.

    1995-01-01

    The US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS) relies on technical expertise found in the U. S private and public sectors. Since 1993, the international Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) has sought to increase the role of the private sector in POTAS. ISPO maintains and continues to develop a database of US companies interested in providing technical expertise to the IAEA. This database is used by ISPO to find appropriate contractors to respond to IAEA requests for technical assistance when the assistance can be provided by the private sector. The private sector is currently providing support in the development of equipment, training, and procedure preparation. POTAS also supports the work of private consultants. This paper discusses ISPO's efforts to identify suitable vendors and discusses conditions that hinder more substantial involvement by the private sector. In addition, the paper will discuss selected projects that are currently in progress and identify common problems that impede the progress and success of tasks performed by the private sector

  11. Numerical and Experimental Study of Mechanisms Involved in Boiling Histotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahk, Ki Joo; Gélat, Pierre; Sinden, David; Dhar, Dipok Kumar; Saffari, Nader

    2017-12-01

    The aim of boiling histotripsy is to mechanically fractionate tissue as an alternative to thermal ablation for therapeutic applications. In general, the shape of a lesion produced by boiling histotripsy is tadpole like, consisting of a head and a tail. Although many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of boiling histotripsy for fractionating solid tumors, the exact mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon are not yet well understood, particularly the interaction of a boiling vapor bubble with incoming incident shockwaves. To investigate the mechanisms involved in boiling histotripsy, a high-speed camera with a passive cavitation detection system was used to observe the dynamics of bubbles produced in optically transparent tissue-mimicking gel phantoms exposed to the field of a 2.0-MHz high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer. We observed that boiling bubbles were generated in a localized heated region and cavitation clouds were subsequently induced ahead of the expanding bubble. This process was repeated with HIFU pulses and eventually resulted in a tadpole-shaped lesion. A simplified numerical model describing the scattering of the incident ultrasound wave by a vapor bubble was developed to help interpret the experimental observations. Together with the numerical results, these observations suggest that the overall size of a lesion induced by boiling histotripsy is dependent on the sizes of (i) the heated region at the HIFU focus and (ii) the backscattered acoustic field by the original vapor bubble. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental quantum annealing: case study involving the graph isomorphism problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zick, Kenneth M; Shehab, Omar; French, Matthew

    2015-06-08

    Quantum annealing is a proposed combinatorial optimization technique meant to exploit quantum mechanical effects such as tunneling and entanglement. Real-world quantum annealing-based solvers require a combination of annealing and classical pre- and post-processing; at this early stage, little is known about how to partition and optimize the processing. This article presents an experimental case study of quantum annealing and some of the factors involved in real-world solvers, using a 504-qubit D-Wave Two machine and the graph isomorphism problem. To illustrate the role of classical pre-processing, a compact Hamiltonian is presented that enables a reduced Ising model for each problem instance. On random N-vertex graphs, the median number of variables is reduced from N(2) to fewer than N log2 N and solvable graph sizes increase from N = 5 to N = 13. Additionally, error correction via classical post-processing majority voting is evaluated. While the solution times are not competitive with classical approaches to graph isomorphism, the enhanced solver ultimately classified correctly every problem that was mapped to the processor and demonstrated clear advantages over the baseline approach. The results shed some light on the nature of real-world quantum annealing and the associated hybrid classical-quantum solvers.

  13. Study of Systemic Risk Involved in Mutual Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Kishore C.; Dash, Monika

    Systemic risk, may be defined as the risk that contaminates to the whole system, consisting of many interacting agents that fail one after another. These agents, in an economic context, could be firms, banks, funds, or other financial institutions. Systemic risk is a macroscopic property of a system which emerges due to the nonlinear interaction of agents on a microscopic level. A stock market itself is a system in which there are many sub-systems, like Dowjones, Nifty, Sensex, Nasdaq, Nikkei and other market indices in global perspective. In Indian market, subsystems may be like Sensex, Nifty, BSE200, Bankex, smallcap index, midcap index, S&P CNX 500 and many others. Similarly there are many mutual funds, which have their own portfolio of different stocks, bonds etc. We have attempted to study the systemic risk involved in a fund as a macroscopic object with regard to its microscopic components as different stocks in its portfolio. It is observed that fund managers do manage to reduce the systemic risk just like we take precautions to control the spread of an epidemic.

  14. A comparative study of Swedish generation Y decision-making style between high involvement and low involvement products.

    OpenAIRE

    Pakdeejirakul, Warangkhana; Agosi, Micheal

    2013-01-01

    Title A comparative study of Swedish generation Y decision-making style between high involvement and low involvement products. Research questions  How does product involvement influence consumer decision-making styles in Generation Y of Swedish nationals for the two selected products?  To what level does the model proposed by Sproles and Kendall in 1986 now apply to the modern-day Generation Y in Sweden as they decide on both of the selected products? Purpose The purpose of this research unde...

  15. Syringe Sharing Among a Prospective Cohort of Street-Involved Youth: Implications for Needle Distribution Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinoff, Nikki; Wood, Evan; Dong, Huiru; Richardson, Lindsey; Kerr, Thomas; DeBeck, Kora

    2017-09-01

    The sharing of previously used syringes is associated with the transmission of Hepatitis C and HIV. This longitudinal study examines syringe borrowing and syringe lending within a prospective cohort of street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada. From September 2005 to May 2014, data were collected from the At-Risk Youth Study, a cohort of street-involved youth age 14-26 at enrollment, and analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Among 505 participants, 142 (28.1%) reported syringe borrowing and 132 (26.1%) reported syringe lending during the study period. In separate multivariable analyses, having difficulty finding clean needles and homelessness were significantly associated with syringe borrowing (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 2.28, 95% CI 1.66-3.12 and AOR = 1.52, CI 1.05-2.21, respectively) and syringe lending (AOR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.32-2.71 and AOR = 1.65, 95% CI 1.11-2.44, respectively) (all p values people is warranted.

  16. The Study of Male Involvement in Prenatal Care in Shahroud and Sabzevar, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi F.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Male involvement like women empowerment and maternal health is one of the main strategies in achieving millennium development goals. To prepare the theoretical grounds necessary for male involvement, this descriptive study specifically aims to understand the prevalence and the forms of male involvement in maternal health. Methods: This is a descriptive-analytic study. Subjects consisted of women hospitalized for delivery in Shahrood and Sabsevar hospitals, Iran. Inclusion criteria were alive and healthy fetus. Exclusion criteria were illegal pregnancy. The questionnaires were completed by 507 women and 420 husbands. Data were analyzed using t-test, Pearson correlation and descriptive tests.Results: 17% of men didn’t attend at the time of woman’s admission at the hospital. Low level of husband’s companionship to health centers, low male involvement in household tasks and receiving low health recommendation by husbands were reported by 25%, 33% and 61% of the women, respectively. 77% of men had a low level of knowledge concerning pregnancy complications; however, 93% of them were aware of their wives’ problems in pregnancy. Conclusion: The observed awareness of men of their wives’ problems in pregnancy and their companionship in receiving prenatal care indicates their high level of interest in pregnancy health; however, their low level of knowledge concerning pregnancy problems, women’s physical and psychological needs is an important barrier to male involvement in maternal health. Designing and providing reproductive health education programs for men seems to be necessary.

  17. Prospective studies of HTR fuel cycles involving plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.; Greneche, D.; Carre, F.; Damian, F.; Doriath, J.Y.

    2002-01-01

    High Temperature Gas Cooled reactors (HTRs) are able to accommodate a wide variety of mixtures of fissile and fertile materials without any significant modification of the core design. This flexibility is due to an uncoupling between the parameters of cooling geometry, and the parameters which characterize neutronic optimisation (moderation ratio or heavy nuclide concentration and distribution). Among other advantageous features, an HTR core has a better neutron economy than a LWR because there is much less parasitic capture in the moderator (capture cross section of graphite is 100 times less than the one of water) and in internal structures. Moreover, thanks to the high resistance of the coated particles, HTR fuels are able to reach very high burn-ups, far beyond the possibilities offered by other fuels (except the special case of molten salt reactors). These features make HTRs especially interesting for closing the nuclear fuel cycle and stabilizing the plutonium inventory. A large number of fuel cycle studies are already available today, on 3 main categories of fuel cycles involving HTRs : i) High enriched uranium cycle, based on thorium utilization as a fertile material and HEU as a fissile material; ii) Low enriched uranium cycle, where only LEU is used (from 5% to 12%); iii) Plutonium cycle based on the utilization of plutonium only as a fissile material, with (or without) fertile materials. Plutonium consumption at high burnups in HTRs has already been tested with encouraging results under the DRAGON project and at Peach Bottom. To maximize plutonium consumption, recent core studies have also been performed on plutonium HTR cores, with special emphasis on weapon-grade plutonium consumption. In the following, we complete the picture by a core study for a HTR burning reactor-grade plutonium. Limits in burnup due to core neutronics are investigated for this type of fuel. With these limits in mind, we study in some detail the Pu cycle in the special case of a

  18. Fathers' involvement in preschool programs for children with and without hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Sara; Most, Tova

    2012-01-01

    The authors compared the involvement in children's development and education of 38 fathers of preschoolers with hearing loss to the involvement of a matched group of 36 fathers of preschoolers with normal hearing, examining correlations between child, father, and family characteristics. Fathers completed self-reports regarding their parental involvement and parenting self-efficacy and reported on their family cohesion and adaptability. Mothers also reported on their husbands' involvement. Similarly high levels of involvement on the part of both groups of fathers were found. Involvement correlated positively with fathers' self-reported parenting self-efficacy, family cohesion, and adaptability, and mother-reported paternal involvement. Implications for professionals and mothers are discussed, including the need to encourage mothers' support for their husbands' involvement and to empower fathers' sense of competency in order to increase their involvement.

  19. Stakeholder involvement in the design of a patient-centered comparative effectiveness trial of the "On the Move" group exercise program in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brach, Jennifer S; Perera, Subashan; Gilmore, Sandra; VanSwearingen, Jessie M; Brodine, Deborah; Wert, David; Nadkarni, Neelesh K; Ricci, Edmund

    2016-09-01

    Group exercise programs for older adults often exclude the timing and coordination of movement. Stakeholder involvement in the research process is strongly encouraged and improves the relevance and adoption of findings. We describe stakeholder involvement in the design of a clinical trial of a group-based exercise program that incorporates timing and coordination of movement into the exercises. The study was a cluster randomized, single-blind intervention trial to compare the effects on function, disability and mobility of a standard group exercise program and the "On the Move" group exercise program in older adults residing in independent living facilities and senior apartment buildings, and attending community centers. Exercise classes were twice weekly for 12weeks delivered by study exercise leaders and facility activity staff personnel. The primary outcomes function, disability and mobility were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Function and disability were assessed using the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument, and mobility using the Six-Minute Walk Test and gait speed. Patient and provider stakeholders had significant input into the study aims, design, sample, intervention, outcomes and operational considerations. A community-based exercise program to improve walking can be developed to address both investigator identified missing components in current exercise to improve walking and stakeholder defined needs and interest for the activity program. Involvement of stakeholders substantially improves the relevance of research questions, increases the transparency of research activities and may accelerate the adoption of research into practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A systematic review of ethical issues in vaccine studies involving pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Jennifer A; Lambach, Philipp; Fulton, T Roice; Narayanan, Divya; Ortiz, Justin R; Omer, Saad B

    2016-08-02

    Immunization during pregnancy can provide protection for mother and child. However, there have been only a limited number of studies documenting the efficacy and safety of this strategy. To determine the extent and nature of subject matter related to ethics in maternal immunization by systematically documenting the spectrum of ethical issues in vaccine studies involving pregnant women. We conducted a systematic literature review of published works pertaining to vaccine and therapeutic studies involving pregnant women through searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Database, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We selected literature meeting the inclusion criteria published between 1988 and June 2014. We systematically abstracted subject matter pertaining to ethical issues in immunization studies during pregnancy. Immunization-specific ethical issues were matched and grouped into major categories and subcategories. Seventy-seven published articles met the inclusion criteria. Published articles reported findings on data that had been collected in 26 countries, the majority of which were classified as high-income or upper-middle-income nations according to World Bank criteria. Review of these publications produced 60 immunization-specific ethical issues, grouped into six major categories. Notably, many studies demonstrated limited acknowledgment of key ethical issues including the rights and welfare of participants. Additionally, there was no discussion pertaining to the ethics of program implementation, including integration of maternal immunization programs into existing routine immunization programs. This review of ethical issues in immunization studies of pregnant women can be used to help inform future vaccine trials in this important population. Consistent documentation of these ethical issues by investigators will facilitate a broader and more nuanced discussion of ethics in immunization of pregnant women - offering new and valuable insights for programs

  1. Role of male partner involvement in ART retention and adherence in Malawi's Option B+ program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesevich, Austin; Mtande, Tiwonge; Saidi, Friday; Cromwell, Elizabeth; Tweya, Hannock; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Hoffman, Irving; Miller, William C; Rosenberg, Nora E

    2017-11-01

    Malawi's Option B+ program provides all HIV-infected pregnant women free lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART), but challenges remain regarding retention and ART adherence, potentially due to male partner barriers. We explored relationships between male partner involvement and Option B+ retention and adherence. In 2014, a randomized controlled trial in Malawi compared male recruitment strategies for couple HIV testing and counseling (cHTC) at an antenatal clinic. This secondary analysis was conducted among the entire cohort (N = 200) of women, irrespective of randomization status. We assessed whether cHTC attendance, early disclosure of HIV-positive status, and partner ART reminders were associated with retention and adherence at one month after starting treatment. Retention was defined as attending HIV clinic follow-up within one day of running out of pills. Adherence was defined as taking ≥95% of ARTs by pill count. We used binomial regression to calculate adjusted risk ratios (aRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Median female age was 26 years. Most women (79%) were retained; of these, 68% were adherent. Receiving cHTC was associated with improved retention (aRR 1.33, 95% CI 1.12, 1.59). Receiving male partner ART reminders was weakly associated with retention (aRR 1.16, 95% CI 0.96, 1.39). Disclosure within one day was not associated with retention (aRR 1.08, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.28). Among those who were retained, these three behaviors were not associated with improved 95% adherence. CHTC could play an important role in improving Option B+ retention. Increasing cHTC participation and enhancing adherence-related messages within cHTC are important.

  2. A Comparative Study of Involvement and Motivation among Casino Gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choong-Ki; Lee, Bongkoo; Bernhard, Bo Jason; Lee, Tae Kyung

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate three different types of gamblers (which we label "non-problem", "some problem", and "probable pathological gamblers") to determine differences in involvement and motivation, as well as differences in demographic and behavioral variables. The analysis takes advantage of a unique opportunity to sample on-site at a major casino in South Korea, and the resulting purposive sample yielded 180 completed questionnaires in each of the three groups, for a total number of 540. Factor analysis, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan tests, and Chi-square tests are employed to analyze the data collected from the survey. Findings from ANOVA tests indicate that involvement factors of importance/self-expression, pleasure/interest, and centrality derived from the factor analysis were significantly different among these three types of gamblers. The "probable pathological" and "some problem" gamblers were found to have similar degrees of involvement, and higher degrees of involvement than the non-problem gamblers. The tests also reveal that motivational factors of escape, socialization, winning, and exploring scenery were significantly different among these three types of gamblers. When looking at motivations to visit the casino, "probable pathological" gamblers were more likely to seek winning, the "some problem" group appeared to be more likely to seek escape, and the "non-problem" gamblers indicate that their motivations to visit centered around explorations of scenery and culture in the surrounding casino area. The tools for exploring motivations and involvements of gambling provide valuable and discerning information about the entire spectrum of gamblers.

  3. A Comparative Study of Involvement and Motivation among Casino Gamblers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choong-Ki; Lee, BongKoo; Bernhard, Bo Jason

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this paper is to investigate three different types of gamblers (which we label "non-problem", "some problem", and "probable pathological gamblers") to determine differences in involvement and motivation, as well as differences in demographic and behavioral variables. Methods The analysis takes advantage of a unique opportunity to sample on-site at a major casino in South Korea, and the resulting purposive sample yielded 180 completed questionnaires in each of the three groups, for a total number of 540. Factor analysis, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan tests, and Chi-square tests are employed to analyze the data collected from the survey. Results Findings from ANOVA tests indicate that involvement factors of importance/self-expression, pleasure/interest, and centrality derived from the factor analysis were significantly different among these three types of gamblers. The "probable pathological" and "some problem" gamblers were found to have similar degrees of involvement, and higher degrees of involvement than the non-problem gamblers. The tests also reveal that motivational factors of escape, socialization, winning, and exploring scenery were significantly different among these three types of gamblers. When looking at motivations to visit the casino, "probable pathological" gamblers were more likely to seek winning, the "some problem" group appeared to be more likely to seek escape, and the "non-problem" gamblers indicate that their motivations to visit centered around explorations of scenery and culture in the surrounding casino area. Conclusion The tools for exploring motivations and involvements of gambling provide valuable and discerning information about the entire spectrum of gamblers. PMID:20046388

  4. Analysis of brand personality to involve event involvement and loyalty: A case study of Jakarta Fashion Week 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, A. H.; Rachmawan, Y. A.

    2018-04-01

    Fashion trend in the world changed extremely fast. Fashion has become the one of people’s lifestyle in the world. Fashion week events in several areas can be a measurement of fahion trend nowadays. There was a fashion week event in Indonesia called Jakarta Fashion Week (JFW) aims to show fashion trend to people who want to improve their fashion style. People will join some events if the event has involvement to them, hence they will come to that event again and again. Annually and continuously event is really important to create loyalty among people who are involved in it, in order to increase positive development towards the organizer in organizing the next event. Saving a huge amount from the marketing budget, and creating a higher quality event. This study aims to know the effect of 5 brand personality dimension to event involvement and loyalty in Jakarta Fashion Week (JFW). This study use quantitative confirmative method with Structural Equation Model (SEM) analysis technique. The sample of this study is 150 respondents who became a participant of Jakarta Fashion Week 2017. Result show that there was significant effect of 5 brand personality dimension to 3 dimension of event involvement and loyalty. Meanwhile, there was one dimension of event involvement called personal self-expression that has not effect to loyalty.

  5. Public involvement and risk communiction for the Rocky Flats health studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoda, S.M.; Lockhart, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    In 1990, the State of Colorado and the U.S. Department of Energy entered into an Agreement in Principle that provides funding for state studies and monitoring of the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant. The Colorado Department of Health initiated a two-phase study to identify releases of radioactive and other contaminants from the year 1952, when Rocky Flats opened, through 1989, and to estimate the potential offsite exposures and health effects. Because one of the main goals for the study is to answer citizen questions about past operations and impacts from the Rocky Flats Plant, the Department of Health designed an open study process featuring a multi-faceted program for public involvement and two-way communication. To provide independent scientific oversight and increase public accountability, Governor Roy Romer appointed a 12-member Health Advisory Panel that includes local and national technical experts and community members. This paper describes the study process and the public involvement and risk communication program designed to address citizen concerns, foster understanding and build credibility

  6. An experimental study of steam explosions involving CORIUM melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millington, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    An experimental programme to investigate molten fuel coolant interactions involving 0.5 kg thermite-generated CORIUM melts and water has been carried out. System pressures and initial coolant subcoolings were chosen to enhance the probability of steam explosions. Yields and efficiencies of the interactions were found to be very close to those obtained from similar experiments using molten UO 2 generated from a Uranium/Molybdenum Trioxide thermite. (author)

  7. Fostering Culture Change in an Undergraduate Business Program: "Nudging" Students towards Greater Involvement in Extra-Curricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    A report on a successfully implemented program to increase student participation in extra-curricular activities in an undergraduate business program with a high percentage of first-generation college students. A market-research study offered insight as to why students were not participating before the program was launched. Greater participation in…

  8. Bibliography of Ethnic Heritage Studies Program Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Greta; And Others

    The Ethnic Heritage Studies Program was designed to teach students about the nature of their heritage and to study the contributions of the cultural heritage of other ethnic groups. This is a bibliography of materials developed by projects which received Federal Ethnic Heritage Studies Program grants during fiscal year 1974-75 and 1975-76.…

  9. Keys to success: Ten case studies of effective weatherization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Kolb, J.O.; White, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F.; Wilson, T. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    In 1990, DOE initiated a nationwide evaluation of its Weatherization Program, with assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an advisory group of 40 weatherization professionals, program managers, and researchers. The evaluation is comprised of three impact studies covering the Program`s major market segments: Single-family homes, mobile homes, and dwellings in small (2 to 4-unit) multifamily buildings (the Single-Family Study), Single-family homes heated primarily with fuel oil (the Fuel-Oil Study), and Dwellings in buildings with five or more units (the Multifamily Study). The Single-Family Study, the subject of this report, is a critical part of this coordinated evaluation effort. Its focus on single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and dwellings in small multifamily buildings covers 83% of the income-eligible population and 96% of the dwellings weatherized during Program Year 1989. The first phase of the Single-Family Study involved the analysis of a massive data base of information collected from 368 local weatherization agencies and 543 electric and gas utilities. This analysis resulted in energy-saving and cost-effectiveness estimates for the Weatherization Program and the identification of a set of ten high-performing agencies located throughout the country. The second phase, which is the subject of this report, involves a ``process`` evaluation of these ten high performers, aimed at identifying those weatherization practices that explain their documented success.

  10. Study on radiosterilization of crude drug pill involving bezoar bovis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Syojiro; Sasaki, Masahiro; Kondo, Yuichi; Jo, Hisanobu; Kanbashi, Toshitaka.

    1981-01-01

    Radiolysis of bilirubin and cholic acids (cholic acid, desoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid) in hydrous pellet have been investigated with following parameters, which were hydrous content, radiation dose and the dose rate, to discuss the application of gamma -irradiation for sterilization of crude drug pill involving bezoar bovis. At 774 C/kg(3.0MR) irradiation for 5% and 10% hydrous contents pellets, the radiolysis percent of those components were less than 5%. However, the higher hydrous pellet, the radiolysis percents of those are more increase. At the same irradiated condition for 20% hydrous contents pellets, the radiolysis percents of those were 15--22%. The hydrous percent of commercial crude drug pill involving bezoar bovis are about 9%, so that the radiolysis of those components will be less than 5% on the sterilization. The radiolysis percent of bilirubin are constant to variation of radiation dose rate between 51.6--722.5C/kg.hr(0.2--2.8MR/hr). But, the values of cholic acids don't definite such as that of bilirubin, because of larger analitycal error. (author)

  11. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Terranova

    Full Text Available Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development.

  12. Public/stakeholder involvement at two Department of Energy sites: Case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts to communicate the results of environmental studies and involve the public in environmental decisions have increased nationwide. Outreach efforts at two US Department of Energy sites (i.e., the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State and the Pantex Plant in the Texas Panhandle) have used a broad spectrum of communications media, including technical articles (open literature and symposium publications, annual and topical reports); information brochures and fact sheets; video productions; interactive exhibits, presentations at scientific, technical, civic, and other public meetings; and proactive interactions with the news media and with local, state, federal, and other agencies. In addition, representatives of local communities now operate offsite environmental monitoring stations and Native Americans are involved in studying cultural resources, fisheries, and other issues at Hanford and a program to obtain environmental samples from neighbor's property is underway at the Pantex Plant. All major environmental programs, such as the multi-year effort to reconstruct past radiological doses to offsite human populations at Hanford, are now conducted with open public participation

  13. Public/stakeholder involvement at two Department of Energy sites: Case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, R.H. [Battelle Pantex, Amarillo, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Efforts to communicate the results of environmental studies and involve the public in environmental decisions have increased nationwide. Outreach efforts at two US Department of Energy sites (i.e., the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State and the Pantex Plant in the Texas Panhandle) have used a broad spectrum of communications media, including technical articles (open literature and symposium publications, annual and topical reports); information brochures and fact sheets; video productions; interactive exhibits, presentations at scientific, technical, civic, and other public meetings; and proactive interactions with the news media and with local, state, federal, and other agencies. In addition, representatives of local communities now operate offsite environmental monitoring stations and Native Americans are involved in studying cultural resources, fisheries, and other issues at Hanford and a program to obtain environmental samples from neighbor`s property is underway at the Pantex Plant. All major environmental programs, such as the multi-year effort to reconstruct past radiological doses to offsite human populations at Hanford, are now conducted with open public participation.

  14. Caregiver Involvement in the Education of Youth in Foster Care: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisse, Kay; Tyre, Ashli

    2013-01-01

    This study was an exploratory investigation of caregiver involvement in the education of youth in foster care. In this study, foster caregivers reported that they are involved in the education of children in their care and participate in at-home involvement activities more often than at-school involvement activities. Caregivers in this study…

  15. Clinic-based intervention projects: STD and family planning programs get involved. Intervention model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, W R

    1991-06-01

    The sexually transmitted disease (STD) program in Udorn, a popular Thai tourist city, has worked closely with 750 prostitutes for 15 years, incorporating the concerns of brothel managers and prostitutes into service delivery. The program in Udorn is part of a nationwide network of STD clinics. The level of person-to-person interaction was increased once it was determined by 1989 that HIV had infected 6% of prostitutes in the city's brothels. Outreach educators were recruited and trained to ensure that all prostitutes in Udorn had the basic facts about HIV and AIDS. Over the last 2 years, the STD program has trained outreach educators to work in 8 brothels, started a local AIDS prevention foundation supported by local businessmen, and taken other steps to incorporate AIDS prevention into its clinic structure. Such clinic-based programs are an important way of targeting groups at high risk of HIV transmission.

  16. Assessing parent education programs for families involved with child welfare services: evidence and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michelle; Stone, Susan; Lou, Christine; Ling, Jennifer; Claassen, Jennette; Austin, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Parent education programs may be offered or mandated at various stages of the child welfare services continuum. However, little is known regarding their efficacy in addressing the parenting problems that bring families to the attention of child welfare services. This article synthesizes outcome data generated from 58 parenting programs with families determined to be at-risk of child maltreatment and/or abusive or neglectful. It places parent education programs within the broader context of research on effective parenting as well as the leading etiological models of child maltreatment to assess the evaluations of these programs with regard to methodological rigor as well as theoretical salience. Practical and theoretical implications are presented along with recommendations for future research.

  17. Newspapers in Science Education: A Study Involving Sixth Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-San; Wang, Yun-Fei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the learning performance of sixth grade elementary school students using newspapers in science teaching. A quasi-experimental design with a single group was used in this study. Thirty-three sixth grade elementary school students participated in this study. The research instruments consisted of three…

  18. A screening tool to enhance clinical trial participation at a community center involved in a radiation oncology disparities program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Julian W; Martz, Elaine; Schenken, Larry L; Rainville, Rebecca; Marlowe, Ursula

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a screening tool to enhance clinical trial participation at a community radiation oncology center involved in a National Cancer Institute-funded disparities program but lacking on-site clinical trials personnel. The screening form was pasted to the front of the charts and filled out for all new patients over the 9-month period of the study, during which time five external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) trials and a patient perception study were open for accrual. Patient consent was obtained by assorted personnel at several different sites. Patients potentially eligible for a trial were identified and approached by one of the clinic staff. Patients who were under- or uninsured, age > 80 years, members of an racial/ethnic minority, or recipients of medical assistance were identified as at risk for health care disparities and were offered patient navigator services. Of 196 patients consulted during the study, 144 were treated with EBRT. Of the 24 patients eligible for EBRT trials, 23 were approached (one had an incomplete screening form), and 15 accepted. Of 77 patients eligible for a patient perception trial, 72 were approached (five had incomplete forms), and 45 accepted. The eligibility and acceptance rates for EBRT trials were similar for disparities and nondisparities patients. Screening was completed for 96 patients (67%). When completed, the screening tool ensured clinical trial accrual. The major factor limiting overall accrual was a shortage of available trials.

  19. Meeting the Demand for Accountability: Case Study of a Teacher Education Program in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Cheung CHAN

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available To meet the demand for accountability, a teacher education program in a university located in South China has established processes at the college, the program, and the faculty levels to assure its program quality. Highlights of the processes are: involvement of stakeholders and the examination of program effectiveness. Although much has been done to help program candidates succeed, more effort is needed in the areas of program assessment and continuous improvement to assure program quality. An accountability implementation plan, a beginning teacher mentoring program, and a comparative study of beginning teacher performance were recommended to further enforce its strategies toward program accountability.

  20. Trasax '90: An integrated transportation emergency response exercise program involving transuranic waste shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouba, S.; Everitt, J.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last five years, the US Department of Energy (DOE), and several states and numerous local governments have been preparing for the transportation of transuranic (TRU) waste to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico, near Carlsbad. Seven western states, represented by the Western Governors' Association (WGA), submitted a report to the US Congress that discussed the concerns of their constituents related to the transportation of TRU waste through their communities. One of the three major concerns identified was emergency preparedness. Initial funding to resolve concerns identified in the WGA report to Congress was provided by the US Department of Transportation. Upon receiving funding, lead states were assigned responsibilities to devise programs aimed at increasing public confidence in the areas of most concern. The responsibility for emergency response readiness, as demonstrated through a program of training and responding to simulated accident scenarios, was accepted by the state of Colorado. The state of Colorado laid out an exercise program which expanded upon the DOE training programs already offered to emergency responders along Colorado's designated TRU-waste transportation corridor. The ongoing program included a full-scale field exercise staged in Colorado Springs and dubbed, ''TRANSAX '90.''

  1. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: Results of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vale Claire L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs, meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Methods Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009 were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Results Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86% were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31% had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Conclusions Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development

  2. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Claire L; Thompson, Lindsay C; Murphy, Claire; Forcat, Silvia; Hanley, Bec

    2012-01-13

    We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs), meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009) were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86%) were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31%) had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG) [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development of a unit policy on consumer involvement, to guide future

  3. Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language Program provides funds to institutions of higher education, a consortia of such institutions, or partnerships between nonprofit organizations and institutions of higher education to plan, develop, and implement programs that strengthen and improve undergraduate instruction in…

  4. Campus Involvement as a Predictor for Durable Leadership Development in Conjunction with Leadership Program Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, David M.; Stephens, Clinton M.

    2017-01-01

    Postsecondary educators have long been faced with the challenge of developing the leadership capacity of their students. This research investigated the following research question: To what degree do formal opportunities for involvement predict durable growth in leadership capacity in students who participate in a formal leadership development…

  5. Economic Impacts and Program Involvement in Agricultural Mechanics Competition Projects in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanagriff, Roger D.; Rayfield, John; Briers, Gary; Murphy, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) is a well-documented, valuable, and integral part of agricultural education programs (Bryant, 2003; Cheek, Arrington, Carter, & Randall, 1994; Deyoe, 1953; Dyer & Osborne, 1996; Moore, 1988; Roberts & Harlin, 2007). Cole and Connell (1993) found that there was little research regarding the…

  6. The chemical stockpile intergovernmental consultation program: Lessons for HLW public involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the appropriateness of the US Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program's (CSDP) Intergovernmental Consultation and Coordination Boards (ICCBs) as models for incorporating public concerns in the future siting of HLW repositories by DOE. ICCB structure, function, and implementation are examined, along with other issues relevant to the HLW context. 27 refs

  7. Possible stakeholder concerns regarding volatile organic compound in arid soils integrated demonstration technologies not evaluated in the stakeholder involvement program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds in Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) supported the demonstration of a number of innovative technologies, not all of which were evaluated in the integrated demonstration's stakeholder involvement program. These technologies have been organized into two categories and the first category ranked in order of priority according to interest in the evaluation of the technology. The purpose of this report is to present issues stakeholders would likely raise concerning each of the technologies in light of commentary, insights, data requirements, concerns, and recommendations offered during the VOC-Arid ID's three-year stakeholder involvement, technology evaluation program. A secondary purpose is to provide a closeout status for each of the technologies associated with the VOC-Arid ID. This report concludes with a summary of concerns and requirements that stakeholders have for all innovative technologies

  8. Study of personnel monitoring programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, Aline B.; Lorenzini, Fabiane; Carlos, Janaina; Bernasiuk, Maria E.B.; Rizzatti, Mara R.; Fuentefria, Jose L.B.

    1996-01-01

    Surveillance of several health institutions who use ionizing radiation sources, as well as data from the state of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil) are studied concerning the use of personnel dosimeters. The results show that several institutions do not provide them and those which provide do not know how to use them

  9. Reflective processes and competencies involved in teaching practice at university: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caetano da Costa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Founded on practical rationality, this qualitative case study aimed to explore the teaching practice at university, focusing on teacher's reflections and competencies. To this end, teaching practices were described, analyzed, and interpreted. These interactions with students on a course in the pharmacy program, brought about situations involving dilemmas and learning opportunities for problem-solving and decision-making skills. Throughout the study, students were encouraged to use knowledge-in-action, reflection-in-action, and reflection-on-action, and these processes were also experienced by the teacher. Analysis of the records from classroom observation and the interviews with students and the teacher showed the fundamental role of such reflective processes, which led to attainment of the intended objectives. In this sense, the teacher's reflective practice was essential for supporting the application of each curricular component of the course.

  10. Studying creativity training programs: A methodological analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsdóttir, Dagný; Onarheim, Balder

    2017-01-01

    Throughout decades of creativity research, a range of creativity training programs have been developed, tested, and analyzed. In 2004 Scott and colleagues published a meta‐analysis of all creativity training programs to date, and the review presented here sat out to identify and analyze studies...... published since the seminal 2004 review. Focusing on quantitative studies of creativity training programs for adults, our systematic review resulted in 22 publications. All studies were analyzed, but comparing the reported effectiveness of training across studies proved difficult due to methodological...... inconsistencies, variations in reporting of results as well as types of measures used. Thus a consensus for future studies is called for to answer the question: Which elements make one creativity training program more effective than another? This is a question of equal relevance to academia and industry...

  11. Gastric involvement in systemic sclerosis: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, I; Levesque, H; Ducrotté, P; Denis, P; Hellot, M F; Benichou, J; Cailleux, N; Courtois, H

    2001-01-01

    This study aims to assess the prevalence of gastric electrical activity dysfunction with cutaneous electrogastrography (EGG), disturbances of gastric emptying function using radiopaque pellets, and gastric endoscopic abnormalities in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). We also investigate for an association between EGG and gastric-emptying data with clinical manifestations and esophageal motor disturbances. Fasting and postprandial gastric electrical activity was studied in 22 consecutive patients with SSc (17 with and 5 without clinical gastric manifestations) and 22 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Gastric emptying of radiopaque pellets and gastroscopy were also performed in SSc patients. The prevalence of EGG disturbances was as high as 81.82% in SSc patients. SSc patients exhibited, compared with controls, higher median percentage of dominant frequency in bradygastria during the fasting period and lower median values for postprandial electrical power and postprandial to fasting ratio for electrical power. Gastric emptying of radiopaque pellets was delayed in 11 SSc patients, and gastroscopy demonstrated "watermelon stomach" in 3 SSc patients. No correlation was found between the severity of gastric impairment and clinical presentation, SSc duration and subsets, and esophageal manometric impairment. Our study underlines the high frequency of gastric dysfunction in SSc patients. It suggests the usefulness of EGG in SSc in noninvasively detecting disorders of gastric electrical activity at an early stage and symptomatic patients with gastroparesis (because there was a correlation between values of postprandial to fasting ratio for electrical power of watermelon stomach diagnosis should be excluded in SSc patients presenting with gastrointestinal hemorrhage or with anemia related to iron deficiency.

  12. Fusion Studies Program. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Continuation of work in two areas, impurity control and transient electromagnetics, is proposed. In the tokamak impurity control area, an innovative supplemental mechanism, NB-driven impurity flow reversal, has been developed partly under this contract; and the proposed effort is aimed at completing this development, verifying the methodology by comparison with experiment and evaluating its potential in future tokamak experiments. In the tokamak transient electromagnetics area, the proposed effort is aimed at developing a new and more efficient methodology for calculating the currents and resulting magnetic fields in the torus structure and coil systems, which will allow a detailed representation of the latter that can be coupled to the distributed-current plasma model that was implemented for vertical stability and disruption control studies in previous work under this contract; and the application of this methodology to study the control of vertical instabilities and disruptions

  13. Study of the mechanisms involved in reactive silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boinski, Frederic; Khouchaf, Lahcen; Tuilier, Marie-Helene

    2010-01-01

    The microstructure of a heterogeneous SiO 2 submitted to a depolymerisation process is studied using Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Environmental SEM (ESEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). With ESEM the formation of micro domain induced by the dissolution phenomena is shown. XRD shows the formation of a halo that is associated with the formation of amorphous phase. The parameters 'position and FWHM' of the halo, enabled us to show the evolution of the disorderly phase when the reaction progresses. The hypothesis of formation of nanoparticles with different structural states was confirmed by the TEM.

  14. Study of the mechanisms involved in reactive silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boinski, Frederic [Univ Lille Nord of France, Ecole des Mines, 941, rue Charles Bourseul, BP 838, 59508 Douai (France); Khouchaf, Lahcen, E-mail: lahcenkho@live.fr [Univ Lille Nord of France, Ecole des Mines, 941, rue Charles Bourseul, BP 838, 59508 Douai (France); Tuilier, Marie-Helene [Universite de Haute-Alsace, LPMT (EA CNRS 4365), Universite de Haute Alsace, 61 rue Albert Camus, F-68093 Mulhouse (France)

    2010-07-01

    The microstructure of a heterogeneous SiO{sub 2} submitted to a depolymerisation process is studied using Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Environmental SEM (ESEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). With ESEM the formation of micro domain induced by the dissolution phenomena is shown. XRD shows the formation of a halo that is associated with the formation of amorphous phase. The parameters 'position and FWHM' of the halo, enabled us to show the evolution of the disorderly phase when the reaction progresses. The hypothesis of formation of nanoparticles with different structural states was confirmed by the TEM.

  15. An experimental study of steam explosions involving chemically reactive metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, D.H.; Armstrong, D.R.; Gunther, W.H.; Basu, S.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study of molten zirconium-water explosions was conducted. A 1-kg mass of zirconium melt was dropped into a column of water. Explosions took place only when an external trigger was used. In the triggered tests, the extent of oxidation of the zirconium melt was very extensive. However, the explosion energetics estimated were found to be very small compared to the potential chemical energy available from the oxidation reaction. Zirconium is of particular interest, since it is a component of the core materials of the current nuclear power reactors. This paper describes the test apparatus and summarizes the results of four tests conducted using pure zirconium melt

  16. Prospective randomized clinical studies involving reirradiation. Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, Carsten; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Guckenberger, Matthias; Grosu, Anca L.

    2016-01-01

    Reirradiation is a potentially useful option for many patients with recurrent cancer. The purpose of this study was to review all recently published randomized trials in order to identify methodological strengths and weaknesses, comment on the results, clinical implications and open questions, and give advice for the planning of future trials. Systematic review of trials published between 2000 and 2015 (databases searched were PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science). We reviewed 9 trials, most of which addressed reirradiation of head and neck tumours. The median number of patients was 69. Trial design, primary endpoint and statistical hypotheses varied widely. The results contribute mainly to decision making for reirradiation of nasopharynx cancer and bone metastases. The trials with relatively long median follow-up confirm that serious toxicity remains a concern after high cumulative total doses. Multi-institutional collaboration is encouraged to complete sufficiently large trials. Despite a paucity of large randomized studies, reirradiation has been adopted in different clinical scenarios by many institutions. Typically, the patients have been assessed by multidisciplinary tumour boards and advanced technologies are used to create highly conformal dose distributions. (orig.) [de

  17. Involving Medical Students in Informed Consent: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Costanza; Meyer, Frank; Jannasch, Olof; Arndt, Stephan; Stübs, Patrick; Bruns, Christiane J

    2015-09-01

    Studies have reported that patients often sign consent documents without understanding the content. Written paperwork, audio-visual materials, and decision aids have shown to consistently improve patients' knowledge. How informed consent should be taken is not properly taught at most universities in Germany. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated how much information about their procedure our patients retain. In particular, it should be elucidated whether an additional conversation between patients and properly prepared medical students shortly before surgery as an adjunct to informed consent can be introduced as a new teaching unit aimed to increase the understanding of surgery by patients and students. Informed consent of all patients had been previously obtained by three surgical residents 1-3 days in advance. All patients had received a copy of their consent form. The same residents developed assessment forms for thyroidectomy, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, umbilical hernia repair, and Lichtenstein procedure for inguinal hernia, respectively, containing 3-4 major common complications (e.g., bile duct injury, hepatic artery injury, stone spillage, and retained stones for laparoscopic cholecystectomy) and briefed the medical students before seeing the patients. Structured one-to-one interviews between students (n = 9) and patients (n = 55) based on four different assessment forms were performed and recorded by students. Both patients and students were asked to assess the new teaching unit using a short structured questionnaire. Although 100% of patients said at the beginning of their interview to have understood and memorized the risks of their imminent procedure, 5.8% (3/55) were not even able to indicate the correct part of the body where the incision would take place. Only 18.2% (10/55) of the patients were able to mention 2 or more complications, and 45.3% (25/55) could not even recall a single one. 96.4% (53/55) of the patients and 100% (9/9) of the

  18. Prospective randomized clinical studies involving reirradiation. Lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Langendijk, Johannes A. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Groningen (Netherlands); Guckenberger, Matthias [University Hospital Zuerich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Grosu, Anca L. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Reirradiation is a potentially useful option for many patients with recurrent cancer. The purpose of this study was to review all recently published randomized trials in order to identify methodological strengths and weaknesses, comment on the results, clinical implications and open questions, and give advice for the planning of future trials. Systematic review of trials published between 2000 and 2015 (databases searched were PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science). We reviewed 9 trials, most of which addressed reirradiation of head and neck tumours. The median number of patients was 69. Trial design, primary endpoint and statistical hypotheses varied widely. The results contribute mainly to decision making for reirradiation of nasopharynx cancer and bone metastases. The trials with relatively long median follow-up confirm that serious toxicity remains a concern after high cumulative total doses. Multi-institutional collaboration is encouraged to complete sufficiently large trials. Despite a paucity of large randomized studies, reirradiation has been adopted in different clinical scenarios by many institutions. Typically, the patients have been assessed by multidisciplinary tumour boards and advanced technologies are used to create highly conformal dose distributions. (orig.) [German] Eine Rebestrahlung kann fuer viele Patienten mit rezidivierenden Malignomen eine nuetzliche Option bieten. Der Zweck dieser Studie bestand darin, alle in der juengeren Vergangenheit publizierten randomisierten Studien zu beurteilen, da deren methodische Staerken und Schwaechen, Ergebnisse und resultierende Implikationen bzw. offene Fragen die Planung kuenftiger Studien wesentlich beeinflussen koennen. Systematische Uebersicht aller zwischen 2000 und 2015 veroeffentlichten Studien (Literatursuche ueber PubMed, Scopus und Web of Science). Ausgewertet wurden 9 Studien, in die vor allem Patienten mit Kopf-Hals-Tumoren eingeschlossen waren. Im Median hatten 69 Patienten teilgenommen. Das

  19. Spaces for Citizen Involvement in Healthcare: An Ethnographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renedo, Alicia; Marston, Cicely

    2015-06-01

    This ethnographic study examines how participatory spaces and citizenship are co-constituted in participatory healthcare improvement efforts. We propose a theoretical framework for participatory citizenship in which acts of citizenship in healthcare are understood in terms of the spaces they are in. Participatory spaces consist of material, temporal and social dimensions that constrain citizens' actions. Participants draw on external resources to try to make participatory spaces more productive and collaborative, to connect and expand them. We identify three classes of tactics they use to do this: 'plotting', 'transient combination' and 'interconnecting'. All tactics help participants assemble to a greater or lesser extent a less fragmented participatory landscape with more potential for positive impact on healthcare. Participants' acts of citizenship both shape and are shaped by participatory spaces. To understand participatory citizenship, we should take spatiality into account, and track the ongoing spatial negotiations and productions through which people can improve healthcare.

  20. Spaces for Citizen Involvement in Healthcare: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Cicely

    2015-01-01

    This ethnographic study examines how participatory spaces and citizenship are co-constituted in participatory healthcare improvement efforts. We propose a theoretical framework for participatory citizenship in which acts of citizenship in healthcare are understood in terms of the spaces they are in. Participatory spaces consist of material, temporal and social dimensions that constrain citizens’ actions. Participants draw on external resources to try to make participatory spaces more productive and collaborative, to connect and expand them. We identify three classes of tactics they use to do this: ‘plotting’, ‘transient combination’ and ‘interconnecting’. All tactics help participants assemble to a greater or lesser extent a less fragmented participatory landscape with more potential for positive impact on healthcare. Participants’ acts of citizenship both shape and are shaped by participatory spaces. To understand participatory citizenship, we should take spatiality into account, and track the ongoing spatial negotiations and productions through which people can improve healthcare. PMID:26038612

  1. Cycle for fuel elements. Uranium production, programs for nuclear power stations and capital expenditure involved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriot, J.; Gaussens, J.

    1958-01-01

    A number of different possible programs for nuclear power stations of various types are presented in this survey. These programs are established in relation to the use of uranium and thorium in amounts similar to those that shall probably be produced in France during the next fifteen years. As it is possible to draw plans for nuclear power stations in which several processes exist simultaneously, an unlimited number of variations being thinkable, this survey is limited to successive analysis of the results obtained by use of only one of each of the following three systems: - system natural uranium-graphite, - system natural uranium-heavy water, -system enriched uranium-pressurised light water. All schemes are considered as assemblages of these three simple systems. The effects of plutonium recycling are also considered for each system. The electric power installed and the capacity of stations situated up-stream and down-stream have been calculated by this method and an attempt has been made to establish the sum to be invested during the fifteen years necessary for the launching of the programs scheduled. A table of timing for the investments groups the results obtained. Considering the fact that French availabilities in capital shall not be unlimited during the coming years, this way of presenting the results seems to be interesting. (author) [fr

  2. Deciphering early events involved in hyperosmotic stress-induced programmed cell death in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monetti, Emanuela; Kadono, Takashi; Tran, Daniel; Azzarello, Elisa; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Briand, Joël; Kawano, Tomonori; Mancuso, Stefano; Bouteau, François

    2014-03-01

    Hyperosmotic stresses represent one of the major constraints that adversely affect plants growth, development, and productivity. In this study, the focus was on early responses to hyperosmotic stress- (NaCl and sorbitol) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) increase, ion fluxes, and mitochondrial potential variations, and on their links in pathways leading to programmed cell death (PCD). By using BY-2 tobacco cells, it was shown that both NaCl- and sorbitol-induced PCD seemed to be dependent on superoxide anion (O2·(-)) generation by NADPH-oxidase. In the case of NaCl, an early influx of sodium through non-selective cation channels participates in the development of PCD through mitochondrial dysfunction and NADPH-oxidase-dependent O2·(-) generation. This supports the hypothesis of different pathways in NaCl- and sorbitol-induced cell death. Surprisingly, other shared early responses, such as [Ca(2+)]cyt increase and singlet oxygen production, do not seem to be involved in PCD.

  3. Theoretical Study of Triatomic Systems Involving Helium Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suno, H.; Hiyama, E.; Kamimura, M.

    2013-01-01

    The triatomic 4 He system and its isotopic species 4 He 2 3 He are theoretically investigated. By adopting the best empirical helium interaction potentials, we calculate the bound state energy levels as well as the rates for the three-body recombination processes: 4 He + 4 He + 4 He → 4 He 2 + 4 He and 4 He + 4 He + 3 He → 4 He 2 + 3 He. We consider not only zero total angular momentum J = 0 states, but also J > 0 states. We also extend our study to mixed helium-alkali triatomic systems, that is 4 He 2 X with X = 7 Li, 23 Na, 39 K, 85 Rb, and 133 Cs. The energy levels of all the J ≥ 0 bound states for these species are calculated as well as the rates for three-body recombination processes such as 4 He + 4 He + 7 Li → 4 He 2 + 7 Li and 4 He + 4 He + 7 Li → 4 He 7 Li + 4 He. In our calculations, the adiabatic hyperspherical representation is employed but we also obtain preliminary results using the Gaussian expansion method. (author)

  4. Case study: an ethical dilemma involving a dying patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacsi, Alsacia L

    2008-01-01

    Nursing often deals with ethical dilemmas in the clinical arena. A case study demonstrates an ethical dilemma faced by healthcare providers who care for and treat Jehovah's Witnesses who are placed in a critical situation due to medical life-threatening situations. A 20-year-old, pregnant, Black Hispanic female presented to the Emergency Department (ED) in critical condition following a single-vehicle car accident. She exhibited signs and symptoms of internal bleeding and was advised to have a blood transfusion and emergency surgery in an attempt to save her and the fetus. She refused to accept blood or blood products and rejected the surgery as well. Her refusal was based on a fear of blood transfusion due to her belief in Bible scripture. The ethical dilemma presented is whether to respect the patient's autonomy and compromise standards of care or ignore the patient's wishes in an attempt to save her life. This paper presents the clinical case, identifies the ethical dilemma, and discusses virtue ethical theory and principles that apply to this situation.

  5. Multiple Study of Case Involving Implementation of Lean Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delvio Venanzi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to show some factors that can cause companies to succeed or fail in their attempts to use lean manufacturing, by performing a multiple case study which presents two successful cases and three conditions of failure, in a survey of five large companies, all belonging to the metal-mechanical sector, located in Campinas and Sorocaba, both in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The data were collected using exploratory research between the periods of January 2013 and February 2015. The results show that successful cases of lean manufacturing implementation are the result of a more organized work environment, standardization of production and service areas, employee satisfaction, productivity results and quality of the final product. Unsuccessful deployments result from poor execution and faulty planning, that has no benefit and ultimately decrease the morale of its employees, creating more distrust and frustration directly influencing the results and productivity. In other words, lean manufacturing implementation requires hard and continuous work and these procedures should be aligned with the mission and goals of companies and mainly focus on the maintenance result by using tools to monitor and track the process systematically and also making investments to eliminate waste.

  6. Residential family treatment for parents with substance use disorders who are involved with child welfare: two perspectives on program design, collaboration, and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Gretchen Clark; McGlone, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the service design, implementation, and evaluation findings of two residential family treatment programs: Wayside House (MN) and OnTrack (OR). Both programs specialize in family-centered services for adults with substance use disorders (SUD) who are involved with child welfare. Information on program design, services offered, and key collaborations are detailed. Implications for program sustainability are provided.

  7. Institutional Oversight of Occupational Health and Safety for Research Programs Involving Biohazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Melissa C; Carpenter, Calvin B; Colby, Lesley A

    2017-06-01

    Research with hazardous biologic materials (biohazards) is essential to the progress of medicine and science. The field of microbiology has rapidly advanced over the years, partially due to the development of new scientific methods such as recombinant DNA technology, synthetic biology, viral vectors, and the use of genetically modified animals. This research poses a potential risk to personnel as well as the public and the environment. Institutions must have appropriate oversight and take appropriate steps to mitigate the risks of working with these biologic hazards. This article will review responsibilities for institutional oversight of occupational health and safety for research involving biologic hazards.

  8. Study of atmospheric emission trading programs in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A detailed review and evaluation was conducted of federal and state atmospheric emission trading programs in the USA to identify the factors critical to a successful program. A preliminary assessment was also made of the feasibility of such a program for NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the lower Fraser Valley in British Columbia. To date, experience in the USA with atmospheric emissions trading has primarily involved trades of emission reduction credits pursuant to the 1977 Clean Air Act amendments. Most trades occur under netting provisions which allow expansion of an existing plant without triggering the stringent new-source review process. Six case studies of emissions trading are described from jurisdictions in California, New Jersey, and Kentucky and from the national SO 2 allowance trading program. Estimates of cost savings achieved by emissions trading are provided, and factors critical to a successful program are summarized. These factors include clearly defined goals, participation proportional to problem contribution, an emissions inventory of satisfactory quality, a comprehensive permit system, a credible enforcement threat, efficient and predictable administration, location of the program in an economic growth area, and support by those affected by the program. In the Fraser Valley, it is concluded that either an emissions reduction credit or an allowance trading system is feasible for both NOx and VOC, and recommendations are given for implementation of such a program based on the factors determined above. 1 fig., 8 tabs

  9. Exact solutions to robust control problems involving scalar hyperbolic conservation laws using Mixed Integer Linear Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yanning

    2013-10-01

    This article presents a new robust control framework for transportation problems in which the state is modeled by a first order scalar conservation law. Using an equivalent formulation based on a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, we pose the problem of controlling the state of the system on a network link, using boundary flow control, as a Linear Program. Unlike many previously investigated transportation control schemes, this method yields a globally optimal solution and is capable of handling shocks (i.e. discontinuities in the state of the system). We also demonstrate that the same framework can handle robust control problems, in which the uncontrollable components of the initial and boundary conditions are encoded in intervals on the right hand side of inequalities in the linear program. The lower bound of the interval which defines the smallest feasible solution set is used to solve the robust LP (or MILP if the objective function depends on boolean variables). Since this framework leverages the intrinsic properties of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation used to model the state of the system, it is extremely fast. Several examples are given to demonstrate the performance of the robust control solution and the trade-off between the robustness and the optimality. © 2013 IEEE.

  10. Exact solutions to robust control problems involving scalar hyperbolic conservation laws using Mixed Integer Linear Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yanning; Canepa, Edward S.; Claudel, Christian G.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a new robust control framework for transportation problems in which the state is modeled by a first order scalar conservation law. Using an equivalent formulation based on a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, we pose the problem of controlling the state of the system on a network link, using boundary flow control, as a Linear Program. Unlike many previously investigated transportation control schemes, this method yields a globally optimal solution and is capable of handling shocks (i.e. discontinuities in the state of the system). We also demonstrate that the same framework can handle robust control problems, in which the uncontrollable components of the initial and boundary conditions are encoded in intervals on the right hand side of inequalities in the linear program. The lower bound of the interval which defines the smallest feasible solution set is used to solve the robust LP (or MILP if the objective function depends on boolean variables). Since this framework leverages the intrinsic properties of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation used to model the state of the system, it is extremely fast. Several examples are given to demonstrate the performance of the robust control solution and the trade-off between the robustness and the optimality. © 2013 IEEE.

  11. Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress Programs Expression of Genes Involved in Appetite Control and Energy Expenditure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, E. L.; Al-Shayeb, B.; Baer, L. A.; Ronca, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to stress in the womb shapes neurobiological and physiological outcomes of offspring in later life, including body weight regulation and metabolic profiles. Our previous work utilizing a centrifugation-induced hyper-gravity demonstrated significantly increased (8-15%) body mass in male, but not female, rats exposed throughout gestation to chronic 2-g from conception to birth. We reported a similar outcome in adult offspring exposed throughout gestation to Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress (UVPS). Here we examine gene expression changes and the plasma of animals treated with our UVPS model to identify a potential role for prenatal stress in this hypergravity programming effect. Specifically we focused on appetite control and energy expenditure pathways in prenatally stressed adult (90-day-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats.

  12. Career aspirations of undergraduates studying at some strategic occupational programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkova N.V.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to classify career aspirations by identifying career anchors and self-monitoring for a second-year undergraduates studying at two top of range universities in St. Petersburg. The participants major in strategical professions. The study involved 202 people from the following bachelor programs: «Logistics and Supply chain management» (n=98, «Sociology» (n=92 and «Human Resource Management» (n=22. The findings illustrate that peculiarities of undergraduates’ career aspirations are possible to estimate using career anchors developed by Schein and level of self-monitoring developed by Snyder which are varied for students studying at different educational programs. The results also indicate the significant differences of career aspirations between young girls and young men at each bachelor’s program. The male groups, having the same level of self-monitoring with female ones, demonstrate some differences in career anchors.

  13. A Preliminary Study of Library Programs Related to American Indian Studies Programs in Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Charles

    The presence of library programs and their relationship to academic programs of Native American Studies were surveyed in 27 institutions of higher education. Institutions surveyed were those with (1) a program for recruiting American Indians, (2) a distinct staff devoted to American Indians, and (3) some course about American Indians offered in a…

  14. Program Plan: field radionuclide migration studies in Climax granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Coles, D.; Stone, R.

    1980-01-01

    This Program Plan describes the field radionuclide migration studies we plan to conduct in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site. Laboratory support studies are included to help us understand the geochemical and hydrologic processes involved in the field. The Program Plan begins with background information (Section 1) on how this program fits into the National Waste Terminal Storage Program Plan and discusses the needs for field studies of this type. The objectives stated in Section 2 are in direct response to these needs, particularly the need to determine whether laboratory studies accurately reflect actual field conditions and the need for field testing to provide a data base for verification of hydrologic and mass transport models. The technical scope (Section 3) provides a work breakdown structure that integrates the various activities and establishes a base for the technical approach described in Section 4. Our approach combines an interactive system of field and laboratory migration experiments with the use of hydrologic models for pre-test predictions and data interpretation. Section 5 on program interfaces identifies how information will be transferred to other related DOE projects. A schedule of activities and major milestones (Section 6) and the budget necessary to meet the project objectives (Section 7) are included in the Program Plan. Sections 8 and 9 contain brief descriptions of how the technical and program controls will be established and maintained and an outline of our quality assurance program. This program plan is an initial planning document and provides a general description of activities. An Engineering Test Plan containing detailed experimental test plans, an instrumentation plan and equipment design drawings will be published as a separate document

  15. An assessment of opportunities and challenges for public sector involvement in the maternal health voucher program in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okal, Jerry; Kanya, Lucy; Obare, Francis; Njuki, Rebecca; Abuya, Timothy; Bange, Teresah; Warren, Charlotte; Askew, Ian; Bellows, Ben

    2013-10-18

    Continued inequities in coverage, low quality of care, and high out-of-pocket expenses for health services threaten attainment of Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in many sub-Saharan African countries. Existing health systems largely rely on input-based supply mechanisms that have a poor track record meeting the reproductive health needs of low-income and underserved segments of national populations. As a result, there is increased interest in and experimentation with results-based mechanisms like supply-side performance incentives to providers and demand-side vouchers that place purchasing power in the hands of low-income consumers to improve uptake of facility services and reduce the burden of out-of-pocket expenditures. This paper describes a reproductive health voucher program that contracts private facilities in Uganda and explores the policy and implementation issues associated with expansion of the program to include public sector facilities. Data presented here describes the results of interviews of six district health officers and four health facility managers purposefully selected from seven districts with the voucher program in southwestern Uganda. Interviews were transcribed and organized thematically, barriers to seeking RH care were identified, and how to address the barriers in a context where voucher coverage is incomplete as well as opportunities and challenges for expanding the program by involving public sector facilities were investigated. The findings show that access to sexual and reproductive health services in southwestern Uganda is constrained by both facility and individual level factors which can be addressed by inclusion of the public facilities in the program. This will widen the geographical reach of facilities for potential clients, effectively addressing distance related barriers to access of health care services. Further, intensifying ongoing health education, continuous monitoring and evaluation, and integrating the voucher

  16. Stakeholder involvement in redefining Hanford's Double-Shell Tank Waste Disposal Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, M.B.; Hunter, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    Hanford's Double-Shell Tank (DST) waste disposal strategy, outlined in the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington calls for using B-Plant to separate the low-level and high-level portions of the DST waste. This separations step would provide feed to the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), viewed by many as the cornerstone to Site cleanup. The State of Washington strongly opposed using the 47-year old B-Plant because it was not built to comply with current environmental regulations. Because of this and other challenges to Hanford's tank waste disposal strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) initiated efforts to redefine the strategy. To support this effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company, (WHC) and sought input from outside stakeholder (stakeholders are those interest groups that are affected by the outcome of the decision and have a strong desire to ensure that their concerns are addressed) groups through a formal stakeholder involvement and multiattribute utility (MAU) analysis process

  17. Evaluating public involvement in the national low-level radioactive-waste-management program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    An extensive public involvement approach has been developed to obtain the views and assistance of state and local governments, citizen groups, industry, professional societies and other organizations in the preparation and review of a national strategy document on low-level radioactive wastes. Six evaluators who have a wide diversity of backgrounds were selected to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach. This final report presents findings discussed under the headings: Introduction to the Recent History of Low-level Waste Policy Development (LLWMP) and the Role of Public Participation; Public Participation Mechanisms Employed in Preparing the National Strategy Document; the Keystone's Evaluation Process; and Findings. The overall evaluation of the process was very positive. It was clear that the LLWMP staff was seriously committed to building a credible public participation process. The evaluation team was provided rough cost figures for the various components of the LLWMP effort and concluded that, in its opinion, the public participation process provided benefits to the federal government that exceeded its costs. Moreover, the costs of the individual components were not out of line with each one's usefulness and contribution to the overall effort

  18. The WIPP institutional program for states' involvement in WIPP transportation planning, and operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, R.

    1991-01-01

    The Supplemental Stipulated Agreement of 1982 between the state of New Mexico and the Department of Energy (DOE) committed the DOE to emergency response training in New Mexico. In 1988, the state of New Mexico and the DOE entered into a two-year agreement providing $203,017 for financial assistance and $67,000 for equipment to enhance the state's emergency response capability. In 1990, this agreement was extended for an additional two years providing $226,088 for financial assistance and $39,000 for emergency response equipment. Also, in 1988 an agreement between the Western Governors' Association and the United States Department of Transportation provided $1.0 million to seven western states (Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming) to identify and implement programs to help ensure the safe transportation of transuranic waste from western points of origin to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). As part of this process, the Western Governors' Association and the seven states prepared the Report to Congress, Transport of Transuranic Wastes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: State Concerns and Proposed Solutions. In July 1990, a five-year cooperative agreement between the Western Governors' Association and the DOE was signed providing $1.515 million in funding to seven states along the Hanford/WIPP route. This continued the work started under the Department of Transportation's cooperative agreement

  19. The European climate change program. An evaluation of stakeholder involvement and policy achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxian Rusche, Tim

    2010-01-01

    In order to step up its efforts in reducing climate change, the European Commission (hereafter: the Commission) has launched in June 2000 its European climate change program (hereafter: ECCP). This wide-ranging stakeholder consultation aimed at identifying and developing all elements necessary for a European climate change strategy. The ECCP formally came to a close in April 2003. This paper analyses the inner workings of ECCP, and how ECCP has delivered with regard to its objectives. Special attention is paid to ECCP's Working Group 1, 'Flexible Mechanisms', which developed the foundations for the European emission trading scheme (hereafter: EU ETS). The paper draws on documents published on the Commission's ECCP web-site, on academic literature, on press releases from stakeholders and on interviews with four participants in the ECCP process. Using this method, the paper offers important insights as to how the consensus-building for establishing the world's biggest carbon-trading scheme has started long time before the formal legislative process. (author)

  20. A Phenomenological Study of Parental Involvement and the Undergraduate College Student Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, David Michael

    2013-01-01

    Parents highly involved in the academic lives of their college-going children have become increasingly common and yet the effect of such involvement on students is poorly understood by student services administrators and faculty. The purpose of this study was to better define the phenomenon of parental involvement in college through an…

  1. Instigating involvement through consumer-based brand equity : an attitudinal study of consumer-based brand equity and consumer involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Bredberg, David; Holmquist, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Recent research on links between dimensions of consumer-based brand equity, as well as links to consumer involvement, has shown that it is a significant predictor of purchase behavior. The purpose of this dissertation is to explore the affect brands have on consumer involvement. We attempt to investigate how consumer-based brand equity affects the level of consumer involvement. Based on consumer behavior theory and previous research of these areas, gathered primary data (an empirical investig...

  2. Proposed training program for construction personnel involved in remedial action work at sites contaminated by naturally occurring radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berven, B.A.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.; Schiager, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    Many sites used during the early days of the US atomic energy program are contaminated with radionuclides of the primordial decay chains (uranium, thorium, and actinium series). This contamination consists of residues resulting from refining and processing uranium and thorium. Preparation of these sites for release to unrestricted private use will involve the assistance of construction workers, many of whom have limited knowledge of the hazards associated with radioactive materials. Therefore, there is a need to educate these workers in the fundamentals of radioactive material handling to minimize exposures and possible spread of contamination. This training should disseminate relevant information at an appropriate educational level and should instill a cautious, common-sense attitude toward the handling of radioactive materials. The training should emphasize basic information concerning environmental radiation within a context of relative risk. A multi-media format, including colorful visual aids, demonstration, and discussion, should be used to maximize motivation and retention. A detailed, proposed training program design is presented

  3. The Impact of Early Involvement in a Postdischarge Support Program for Ostomy Surgery Patients on Preventable Healthcare Utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Rojanasarot, Sirikan

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the impact of a postdischarge ostomy support program as an adjunct to nurse-led ostomy care on preventable healthcare utilization. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: A postdischarge support program offered by an ostomy product's manufacturer provides persons living with an ostomy with patient-centered and easily accessible assistance. Individuals who underwent ostomy surgery within 18 months prior to the survey date were selected from an ostomy patient...

  4. Association between Organizational Capacity and Involvement in Chronic Disease Prevention Programming among Canadian Public Health Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusaik, Nancy; Sabiston, Catherine M.; Kishchuk, Natalie; Maximova, Katerina; O'Loughlin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the emerging field of public health services and systems research, this study (i) tested a model of the relationships between public health organizational capacity (OC) for chronic disease prevention, its determinants (organizational supports for evaluation, partnership effectiveness) and one possible outcome of OC (involvement…

  5. ANALISIS KESIAPAN PROGRAM STUDI DALAM PRODUCTION BASED EDUCATION: STUDI PADA PROGRAM STUDI D3 AKUNTANSI POLINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Noor Ardiansah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been no clear studies to identify, verify and analyze readiness program resources in order to study the implementation of PBE resulted in initial position (existing point is not clear that the priority programs and activities that are carried out per year tend to be responsive and not directed priorities. These conditions resulted in analysis of resource readiness courses in the management of production-based learning pattern PBE draw conducted This study aims to identify and verify and analyze readiness resources management courses in the pattern of production based learning, particularly in the Accounting Studies Program. This research is expected to be used to increase the effectiveness of learning and vocational education to improve the quality and relevance of polytechnic graduates. Total score was 33 the existence of resources from the scale of 12-60. The average score is 2.75. The average score was shown the position of Prodi's resources have been used, but its role is unclear (repeatable tend to have clearly defined functions, communicated and documented (defined. Resources have been managed, monitored and evaluated well (managed are: curriculum resources, networking courses, lab facilities, ISO-based management. Resources have been used but not optimal role: resources module practice, the formulation of an internship, practice material / TA, the performance of IC-based lecturer

  6. ANALISIS KESIAPAN PROGRAM STUDI DALAM PRODUCTION BASED EDUCATION: STUDI PADA PROGRAM STUDI D3 AKUNTANSI POLINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Noor Ardiansah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been no clear studies to identify, verify and analyze readiness program resources in order to study the implementation of PBE resulted in initial position (existing point is not clear that the priority programs and activities that are carried out per year tend to be responsive and not directed priorities. These conditions resulted in analysis of resource readiness courses in the management of production-based learning pattern PBE draw conducted This study aims to identify and verify and analyze readiness resources management courses in the pattern of production based learning, particularly in the Accounting Studies Program. This research is expected to be used to increase the effectiveness of learning and vocational education to improve the quality and relevance of polytechnic graduates. Total score was 33 the existence of resources from the scale of 12-60. The average score is 2.75. The average score was shown the position of Prodi's resources have been used, but its role is unclear (repeatable tend to have clearly defined functions, communicated and documented (defined. Resources have been managed, monitored and evaluated well (managed are: curriculum resources, networking courses, lab facilities, ISO-based management. Resources have been used but not optimal role: resources module practice, the formulation of an internship, practice material / TA, the performance of IC-based lecturer

  7. Assisted reproduction involving gestational surrogacy: an analysis of the medical, psychosocial and legal issues: experience from a large surrogacy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Shir; Lazer, Tal; Swanson, Sonja; Silverman, Jan; Wasser, Cindy; Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Sojecki, Agata; Librach, Clifford L

    2015-02-01

    What are the medical, psychosocial and legal aspects of gestational surrogacy (GS), including pregnancy outcomes and complications, in a large series? Meticulous multidisciplinary teamwork, involving medical, legal and psychosocial input for both the intended parent(s) (IP) and the gestational carrier (GC), is critical to achieve a successful GS program. Small case series have described pregnancy rates of 17-50% for GS. There are no large case series and the medical, legal and psychological aspects of GS have not been addressed in most of these studies. To our knowledge, this is the largest reported GS case series. A retrospective cohort study was performed. Data were collected from 333 consecutive GC cycles between 1998 and 2012. There were 178 pregnancies achieved out of 333 stimulation cycles, including fresh and frozen transfers. The indications for a GC were divided into two groups. Those who have 'failed to carry', included women with recurrent implantation failure (RIF), recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) and previous poor pregnancy outcome (n = 96; 132 cycles, pregnancy rate 50.0%). The second group consisted of those who 'cannot carry' including those with severe Asherman's syndrome, uterine malformations/uterine agenesis and maternal medical diseases (n = 108, 139 cycles, pregnancy rate 54.0%). A third group, of same-sex male couples and single men, were analyzed separately (n = 52, 62 cycles, pregnancy rate 59.7%). In 49.2% of cycles, autologous oocytes were used and 50.8% of cycles involved donor oocytes. The 'failed to carry' group consisted of 96 patients who underwent 132 cycles at a mean age of 40.3 years. There were 66 pregnancies (50.0%) with 17 miscarriages (25.8%) and 46 confirmed births (34.8%). The 'cannot carry pregnancy' group consisted of 108 patients who underwent 139 cycles at a mean age of 35.9 years. There were 75 pregnancies (54.0%) with 15 miscarriages (20.0%) and 56 confirmed births (40.3%). The pregnancy, miscarriage and live birth

  8. Damage analysis and fundamental studies program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.; Farrar, H. IV; Goland, A.N.

    1978-01-01

    The Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) Task Group has been formed by the Office of Fusion Energy to develop procedures for applying data obtained in various irradiation test facilities to projected fusion environments. A long-range program plan has been prepared and implementation has begun. The plan and technical status are briefly described

  9. Global Studies: Hurdles to Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Patricia J.; Masters, Paul E.; Goolsby, Amy

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we examine a new global studies program that departs from the traditional state-centric approach and uses a geocentric, or earth-centered, approach that emphasizes the roles of individuals, grassroots organizations, cultural groups, and international organizations in an attempt to help students conceptualize global events and…

  10. Probabilistic studies for a safety assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, S.S.; Davis, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The adequate supply of energy is always a matter of concern for any country. Nuclear power has played, and will continue to play an important role in supplying this energy. However, safety in nuclear power production is a fundamental prerequisite in fulfilling this role. This paper outlines a program to ensure safe operation of a nuclear power plant utilizing the Probabilistic Safety Studies

  11. Quiet engine program flight engine design study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapproth, J. F.; Neitzel, R. E.; Seeley, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of a preliminary flight engine design study based on the Quiet Engine Program high-bypass, low-noise turbofan engines. Engine configurations, weight, noise characteristics, and performance over a range of flight conditions typical of a subsonic transport aircraft were considered. High and low tip speed engines in various acoustically treated nacelle configurations were included.

  12. Program for parameter studies of steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathisen, R.P.

    1982-11-01

    R2-GEN is a computer code for stationary thermal parameter studies of steam generators. The geometry and data are valid for Ringhals-2 generators. Subroutines and relevant calculations are included. The program is based on a heterogeneous flow model and some applications on tubes with varying contamination are presented. (G.B.)

  13. Factors Associated with Male Partner Involvement in Programs for the Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV in Rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motlagabo G. Matseke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Male partner involvement (MPI can contribute to the success of programs aimed at preventing mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT of HIV. However, the definition and measures of MPI differ according to context. This study utilized secondary cross-sectional data to investigate the prevalence and determinants of MPI among 463 male partners of HIV-infected pregnant women in rural South Africa. Results indicated that 44.1% of male partners reported involvement in most or all specified male partner involvement activities (i.e., scores of 7 to 9. Descriptive, correlation and multiple linear-regression analyses were conducted. Positive predictors of MPI included relationship status, own HIV status, awareness of female partner’s positive HIV status, female partner’s desire to have more children, having family planning discussions with provider, condom use to prevent HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs, and partner reasoning skills. Negative predictors included partner verbal aggression. Overall, although MPI is low, the study underlines important information that could be used to develop interventions aimed at improving maternal and infant health in PMTCT programs in South Africa.

  14. The Impact of Early Involvement in a Postdischarge Support Program for Ostomy Surgery Patients on Preventable Healthcare Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanasarot, Sirikan

    To evaluate the impact of a postdischarge ostomy support program as an adjunct to nurse-led ostomy care on preventable healthcare utilization. A cross-sectional study. A postdischarge support program offered by an ostomy product's manufacturer provides persons living with an ostomy with patient-centered and easily accessible assistance. Individuals who underwent ostomy surgery within 18 months prior to the survey date were selected from an ostomy patient database maintained by the ostomy patient support program provider. Of 7026 surveys sent to program enrollees, 493 (7%) responded, compared with 225 (5%) out of 4149 surveys sent to individuals in a comparison group. The 2 groups were similar in demographics. A majority of the survey respondents were female (60% of program enrollees vs 55% of respondents in the comparison group). Among the program enrollees, 44% had colostomy, 43% had ileostomy, 10% had urostomy, and 4% had at least 2 types of ostomy surgery compared with 52%, 32%, 12%, and 4% of the respondents in a comparison group, respectively. The study compared hospital readmission and emergency room (ER) visit rates attributable to ostomy complications between program enrollees and respondents in the comparison group. The event rates were measured in 2 study periods: within the first month of discharge and after the first month of discharge. Eligible individuals received an online survey that included the following domains: characteristics of ostomy surgery; readmissions and ER visits within the first month or after the first month of discharge, including reasons for preventable events; and level of health care access. Multivariate logistic regressions controlling for covariates were applied to investigate associations between program enrollment and ostomy-related readmission or ER visit rates. Logistic regression analyses showed that, when compared with respondents in the comparison group, program enrollees had a significantly lower likelihood of being

  15. Summer Undergraduate Research Program: Environmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J. [ed.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. The students are offered research topics at the Medical University in the scientific areas of pharmacology and toxicology, epidemiology and risk assessment, environmental microbiology, and marine sciences. Students are also afforded the opportunity to work with faculty at the University of Charleston, SC, on projects with an environmental theme. Ten well-qualified students from colleges and universities throughout the eastern United States were accepted into the program.

  16. The Relation between Deterministic Thinking and Mental Health among Substance Abusers Involved in a Rehabilitation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jalal Younesi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The current research is to investigate the relation between deterministic thinking and mental health among drug abusers, in which the role of  cognitive distortions is considered and clarified by focusing on deterministic thinking. Methods: The present study is descriptive and correlative. All individuals with experience of drug abuse who had been referred to the Shafagh Rehabilitation center (Kahrizak were considered as the statistical population. 110 individuals who were addicted to drugs (stimulants and Methamphetamine were selected from this population by purposeful sampling to answer questionnaires about deterministic thinking and general health. For data analysis Pearson coefficient correlation and regression analysis was used. Results: The results showed that there is a positive and significant relationship between deterministic thinking and the lack of mental health at the statistical level [r=%22, P<0.05], which had the closest relation to deterministic thinking among the factors of mental health, such as anxiety and depression. It was found that the two factors of deterministic thinking which function as the strongest variables that predict the lack of mental health are: definitiveness in predicting tragic events and future anticipation. Discussion: It seems that drug abusers suffer from deterministic thinking when they are confronted with difficult situations, so they are more affected by depression and anxiety. This way of thinking may play a major role in impelling or restraining drug addiction.

  17. Extent of Parent-Teacher Association Involvement in the Implementation of Universal Basic Education Program in Primary Schools in Northern Senatorial District of Ondo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidi Nnebedum

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Pupil’ absenteeism and lateness to school, dilapidated and shortage of relevant facilities in primary schools in the Northern Senatorial District of Ondo State seems to suggest lapses in parent-teacher association involvement in school affairs. This prompted the researchers to ascertain the extent of parent-teacher association (PTA involvement in the implementation of universal basic education program in primary schools in the Northern Senatorial District of Ondo State. Three research questions guided the study and three null hypotheses were tested. The descriptive survey research design was adopted for the study. The population of the study was comprised of all 250 head teachers and all PTA members at all 250 primary schools in the Northern Senatorial District. Multiple stage sampling technique was used to sample 205 respondents made up of 75 head teachers and 130 PTA members. The researchers developed an instrument titled “Parent-Teacher Association Involvement in School Questionnaire (PTAISQ” which was used for data collection. The instrument was validated by three experts. The reliability of the instrument was ascertained using Cronbach alpha and it yielded an overall reliability coefficient value of .76. Mean and standard deviation were used to answer the research questions, while t-test was used to test the null hypotheses at .05 level of significance. The findings of the study revealed among others that the extent of PTA involvement in maintenance of facilities in the implementation of universal basic education program in primary schools in the Northern Senatorial District of Ondo State was high. Based on the findings, recommendations were made and conclusions were drawn.

  18. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Zhang, Yuanzhen; Feng, Jianghua; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg · d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose–effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time–course study were analyzed by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine exposure elevated maternal blood glucocorticoid levels. • Prenatal caffeine exposure altered maternal blood metabonomes. • Maternal metabonome

  19. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang [Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Yuanzhen [Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Center for Reproductive Medicine, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Feng, Jianghua, E-mail: jianghua.feng@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Science, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg · d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose–effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time–course study were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine exposure elevated maternal blood glucocorticoid levels. • Prenatal caffeine exposure altered maternal blood metabonomes. • Maternal

  20. External tank program productivity and quality enhancements - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The optimization of the Manned Space Systems productivity and quality enhancement program is described. The guidelines and standards of the program and the roles played in it by various employee groups are addressed. Aspects of the program involving job/organization redefinition, production and planning in automation, and artificial intelligence and robotics are examined.

  1. Evidence of cardiac involvement in the fetal inflammatory response syndrome: disruption of gene networks programming cardiac development in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Timothy; MacDonald, James W; Srinouanpranchanh, Sengkeo; Bammler, Theodor K; Merillat, Sean; Boldenow, Erica; Coleman, Michelle; Agnew, Kathy; Baldessari, Audrey; Stencel-Baerenwald, Jennifer E; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Green, Richard R; Gale, Michael J; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M

    2018-04-01

    Most early preterm births are associated with intraamniotic infection and inflammation, which can lead to systemic inflammation in the fetus. The fetal inflammatory response syndrome describes elevations in the fetal interleukin-6 level, which is a marker for inflammation and fetal organ injury. An understanding of the effects of inflammation on fetal cardiac development may lead to insight into the fetal origins of adult cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the fetal inflammatory response syndrome is associated with disruptions in gene networks that program fetal cardiac development. We obtained fetal cardiac tissue after necropsy from a well-described pregnant nonhuman primate model (pigtail macaque, Macaca nemestrina) of intrauterine infection (n=5) and controls (n=5). Cases with the fetal inflammatory response syndrome (fetal plasma interleukin-6 >11 pg/mL) were induced by either choriodecidual inoculation of a hypervirulent group B streptococcus strain (n=4) or intraamniotic inoculation of Escherichia coli (n=1). RNA and protein were extracted from fetal hearts and profiled by microarray and Luminex (Millipore, Billerica, MA) for cytokine analysis, respectively. Results were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Statistical and bioinformatics analyses included single gene analysis, gene set analysis, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Qiagen, Valencia, CA), and Wilcoxon rank sum. Severe fetal inflammation developed in the context of intraamniotic infection and a disseminated bacterial infection in the fetus. Interleukin-6 and -8 in fetal cardiac tissues were elevated significantly in fetal inflammatory response syndrome cases vs controls (P1.5-fold change, P<.05) in the fetal heart (analysis of variance). Altered expression of select genes was validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction that included several with known functions in cardiac injury, morphogenesis

  2. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Synovial membrane involvement in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints - A light microscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Liem, RSB; deBont, LGM

    Objective. To study the light microscopic characteristics of the synovial membrane of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints to evaluate synovial membrane involvement in the osteoarthritic process. Study design. Synovial membrane biopsies were obtained during unilateral arthroscopy in 40 patients.

  4. Implementation of an interprofessional team-based learning program involving seven undergraduate health and social care programs from two universities, and students’ evaluation of their readiness for interprofessional learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lap Ki Chan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interprofessional learning is gaining momentum in revolutionizing healthcare education. During the academic year 2015/16, seven undergraduate-entry health and social care programs from two universities in Hong Kong took part in an interprofessional education program. Based on considerations such as the large number of students involved and the need to incorporate adult learning principles, team-based learning was adopted as the pedagogy for the program, which was therefore called the interprofessional team-based learning program (IPTBL. The authors describe the development and implementation of the IPTBL program and evaluate the effectiveness of the program implementation. Methods Eight hundred and one students, who are predominantly Chinese, participated in the IPTBL. The quantitative design (a pretest-posttest experimental design was utilized to examine the students’ gains on their readiness to engage in interprofessional education (IPE. Results Three instructional units (IUs were implemented, each around a clinical area which could engage students from complementary health and social care disciplines. Each IU followed a team-based learning (TBL process: pre-class study, individual readiness assurance test, team readiness assurance test, appeal, feedback, and application exercise. An electronic platform was developed and was progressively introduced in the three IUs. The students’ self-perceived attainment of the IPE learning outcomes was high. Across all four subscales of RIPLS, there was significant improvement in student’s readiness to engage in interprofessional learning after the IPTBL. A number of challenges were identified: significant time involvement of the teachers, difficulty in matching students from different programs, difficulty in making IPTBL count towards a summative assessment score, difficulty in developing the LAMS platform, logistics difficulty in managing paper TBL, and inappropriateness of the

  5. Implementation of an interprofessional team-based learning program involving seven undergraduate health and social care programs from two universities, and students' evaluation of their readiness for interprofessional learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap Ki; Ganotice, Fraide; Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Lau, Chak Sing; Bridges, Susan M; Chan, Celia Hoi Yan; Chan, Namkiu; Chan, Phoebe Wing Lam; Chen, Hai Yong; Chen, Julie Yun; Chu, Jody Kwok Pui; Ho, Charlene C; Ho, Jacqueline Mei Chi; Lam, Tai Pong; Lam, Veronica Suk Fun; Li, Qingyun; Shen, Jian Gang; Tanner, Julian Alexander; Tso, Winnie Wan Yee; Wong, Arkers Kwan Ching; Wong, Gordon Tin Chun; Wong, Janet Yuen Ha; Wong, Nai Sum; Worsley, Alan; Yu, Lei King; Yum, Tin Pui

    2017-11-21

    Interprofessional learning is gaining momentum in revolutionizing healthcare education. During the academic year 2015/16, seven undergraduate-entry health and social care programs from two universities in Hong Kong took part in an interprofessional education program. Based on considerations such as the large number of students involved and the need to incorporate adult learning principles, team-based learning was adopted as the pedagogy for the program, which was therefore called the interprofessional team-based learning program (IPTBL). The authors describe the development and implementation of the IPTBL program and evaluate the effectiveness of the program implementation. Eight hundred and one students, who are predominantly Chinese, participated in the IPTBL. The quantitative design (a pretest-posttest experimental design) was utilized to examine the students' gains on their readiness to engage in interprofessional education (IPE). Three instructional units (IUs) were implemented, each around a clinical area which could engage students from complementary health and social care disciplines. Each IU followed a team-based learning (TBL) process: pre-class study, individual readiness assurance test, team readiness assurance test, appeal, feedback, and application exercise. An electronic platform was developed and was progressively introduced in the three IUs. The students' self-perceived attainment of the IPE learning outcomes was high. Across all four subscales of RIPLS, there was significant improvement in student's readiness to engage in interprofessional learning after the IPTBL. A number of challenges were identified: significant time involvement of the teachers, difficulty in matching students from different programs, difficulty in making IPTBL count towards a summative assessment score, difficulty in developing the LAMS platform, logistics difficulty in managing paper TBL, and inappropriateness of the venue. Despite some challenges in developing and

  6. Outcomes of group-based treatment program with parental involvement for the management of childhood and adolescent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiprabhob, Jeerunda; Leewanun, Chanin; Limprayoon, Kawewan; Kiattisakthavee, Pornpimol; Wongarn, Renu; Aanpreung, Prapun; Likitmaskul, Supawadee

    2014-10-01

    An uncontrolled study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a group-based program on weight control, metabolic profiles, and obesity-related complications in obese youth. The program consisted of an initial in-patient session and five group sessions, one, two, three, six, and nine months into the study, providing participants and their parents with information about the consequences of obesity and lifestyle modifications. The severity of obesity and obesity-related complications were evaluated at baseline and 12 months after the intervention. The participants' and their parents' perceptions of the program were assessed. Of the obese youth recruited (n=126), 115 completed the study. Their percentage weight for height and percentage body fat decreased significantly (both pchildhood obesity, improving metabolic profiles, and alleviating certain obesity-related complications. A group-based program that provides education and raises the awareness of obese children and their parents about the consequences of obesity is an effective model for treating childhood obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Department of Physics' Involvement of the Impact Testing Project of the High Speed Civil Transport Program (HSCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    VonMeerwall, Ernst D.

    1994-01-01

    The project involved the impact testing of a kevlar-like woven polymer material, PBO. The purpose was to determine whether this material showed any promise as a lightweight replacement material for jet engine fan containment. The currently used metal fan containment designs carry a high drag penalty due to their weight. Projectiles were fired at samples of PBO by means of a 0.5 inch diameter Helium powered gun. The Initial plan was to encase the samples inside a purpose-built steel "hot box" for heating and ricochet containment. The research associate's responsibility was to develop the data acquisition programs and techniques necessary to determine accurately the impacting projectile's velocity. Beyond this, the Research Associate's duties include any physical computations, experimental design, and data analysis necessary.

  8. A Study On English Reading Habits Of Students Of English Study Program Of Riau University

    OpenAIRE

    Al Nazhari, Hafiz; Delfi, Syofia; ', Syafri K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the habits of English reading among the students of English Study Program of Riau University. The method used in this research is quantitative research and the design is survey study. A questionnaire was used as the instrument of this research. The questionnaire involved seven indicators of reading habits: attitudes toward reading, reading frequency, reading materials read, time spend on academic reading, time spend on non-academic reading, motivation in t...

  9. National Household Education Surveys Program of 2012: Data File User's Manual. Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey. Early Childhood Program Participation Survey. NCES 2015-030

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, C.; Bielick, S.; Masterton, M.; Flores, L.; Parmer, R.; Amchin, S.; Stern, S.; McGowan, H.

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES:2012) Data File User's Manual provides documentation and guidance for users of the NHES:2012 data files. The manual provides information about the purpose of the study, the sample design, data collection procedures, data processing procedures, response rates, imputation, weighting and…

  10. The effects of parental involvement on children's education: A study in elementary schools in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yulianti, K.; Denessen, E.J.P.G.; Droop, W.

    2018-01-01

    The Indonesian government through the Ministry of Education has begun to emphasize the importance of parental involvement and community participation in children's education. However, there is a lack of research on parental involvement in Indonesia. The aim of the study is to provide insights into

  11. Student Involvement in Wellness Policies: A Study of Pennsylvania Local Education Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Lamis H.; McDonnell, Elaine; Weirich, Elaine; Hartman, Terryl; Jensen, Leif; Probart, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Explore student-involvement goals in local wellness policies (LWPs) of local education agencies (LEAs) in Pennsylvania (PA) and investigate associations with LEA characteristics. Design: An observational study that helped examine student-involvement goals. Setting: Public PA LEAs. Participants: LWPs submitted by 539 PA public LEAs. Main…

  12. The cysteine protease CEP1, a key executor involved in tapetal programmed cell death, regulates pollen development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Liu, Di; Lv, Xiaomeng; Wang, Ying; Xun, Zhili; Liu, Zhixiong; Li, Fenglan; Lu, Hai

    2014-07-01

    Tapetal programmed cell death (PCD) is a prerequisite for pollen grain development in angiosperms, and cysteine proteases are the most ubiquitous hydrolases involved in plant PCD. We identified a papain-like cysteine protease, CEP1, which is involved in tapetal PCD and pollen development in Arabidopsis thaliana. CEP1 is expressed specifically in the tapetum from stages 5 to 11 of anther development. The CEP1 protein first appears as a proenzyme in precursor protease vesicles and is then transported to the vacuole and transformed into the mature enzyme before rupture of the vacuole. cep1 mutants exhibited aborted tapetal PCD and decreased pollen fertility with abnormal pollen exine. A transcriptomic analysis revealed that 872 genes showed significantly altered expression in the cep1 mutants, and most of them are important for tapetal cell wall organization, tapetal secretory structure formation, and pollen development. CEP1 overexpression caused premature tapetal PCD and pollen infertility. ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR analyses confirmed that the CEP1 expression level showed a strong relationship to the degree of tapetal PCD and pollen fertility. Our results reveal that CEP1 is a crucial executor during tapetal PCD and that proper CEP1 expression is necessary for timely degeneration of tapetal cells and functional pollen formation. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  13. A Pilot Study Involving the Effect of Two Different Complex Training Protocols on Lower Body Power

    OpenAIRE

    Smith Chad E.; Lyons Brian; Hannon James C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Complex training (CT) involves the coupling of two exercises ostensibly to enhance the effect of the second exercise. Typically, the first exercise is a strength exercise and the second exercise is a power exercise involving similar muscles. In most cases, CT is designed to enhance power. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, this study was designed to determine if lower body power could be enhanced using complex training protocols. Second, this study investigated whether the...

  14. Applying the Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) approach to a large pragmatic study involving safety net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coury, Jennifer; Schneider, Jennifer L; Rivelli, Jennifer S; Petrik, Amanda F; Seibel, Evelyn; D'Agostini, Brieshon; Taplin, Stephen H; Green, Beverly B; Coronado, Gloria D

    2017-06-19

    The Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycle is a commonly used improvement process in health care settings, although its documented use in pragmatic clinical research is rare. A recent pragmatic clinical research study, called the Strategies and Opportunities to STOP Colon Cancer in Priority Populations (STOP CRC), used this process to optimize the research implementation of an automated colon cancer screening outreach program in intervention clinics. We describe the process of using this PDSA approach, the selection of PDSA topics by clinic leaders, and project leaders' reactions to using PDSA in pragmatic research. STOP CRC is a cluster-randomized pragmatic study that aims to test the effectiveness of a direct-mail fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) program involving eight Federally Qualified Health Centers in Oregon and California. We and a practice improvement specialist trained in the PDSA process delivered structured presentations to leaders of these centers; the presentations addressed how to apply the PDSA process to improve implementation of a mailed outreach program offering colorectal cancer screening through FIT tests. Center leaders submitted PDSA plans and delivered reports via webinar at quarterly meetings of the project's advisory board. Project staff conducted one-on-one, 45-min interviews with project leads from each health center to assess the reaction to and value of the PDSA process in supporting the implementation of STOP CRC. Clinic-selected PDSA activities included refining the intervention staffing model, improving outreach materials, and changing workflow steps. Common benefits of using PDSA cycles in pragmatic research were that it provided a structure for staff to focus on improving the program and it allowed staff to test the change they wanted to see. A commonly reported challenge was measuring the success of the PDSA process with the available electronic medical record tools. Understanding how the PDSA process can be applied to pragmatic

  15. Factors influencing first-time fathers' involvement in their wives' pregnancy and childbirth: A correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Weilin Lynn; He, Hong-Gu; Chua, Ying Jie; Wang, Wenru; Shorey, Shefaly

    2018-03-20

    To examine factors influencing first-time fathers' involvement in their wives' pregnancy and childbirth in Singapore. A cross-sectional descriptive correlational study was conducted in a public tertiary hospital in Singapore. A total of 182 first-time fathers whose wives were hospitalized at four obstetric wards were recruited from November 2015 to January 2016. Data were collected by three newly developed and validated instruments, namely Father's Involvement in Pregnancy and Childbirth, Father's Informational and Sources of Support, and Father's Attitude Towards Involvement in Pregnancy and Childbirth, as well as the 16-item Couple Satisfaction Index and Family of Origin Questionnaire. The participants were generally involved in their wives' pregnancy and childbirth, with 35.2% being highly involved. There was no significant difference in fathers' levels of involvement between or among any sociodemographic subgroups. Significant Spearman's correlations were found between fathers' levels of involvement and levels of informational support as well as fathers' attitudes towards involvement. However, the logistic regression showed the level of informational support was the only significant factor that influenced first-time fathers' high levels of involvement in their wives' pregnancy and childbirth. The study revealed the importance of providing sufficient informational support to first-time fathers so that they can be highly involved in their wife's pregnancy and childbirth. Future studies can develop technology-based intervention programmes to improve fathers' involvement in their wife's pregnancy and childbirth. Healthcare professionals should examine and improve the existing informational support for first-time fathers and ensure its relevance and convenient access. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Summary of case studies presented at the WPDD topical session on stakeholder involvement in decommissioning projects - november 14, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, Doug

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Two case studies were presented on experiences with stakeholder involvement in decommissioning projects. The first paper described the development of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority's (UKAEA) stakeholder involvement activities for the Dounreay Nuclear Reactor Test Establishment. The second paper presented the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory process for decommissioning that includes opportunities for public involvement. The presentation contrasted the stakeholder involvement for two commercial US nuclear power plants (NPPs) that completed decommissioning in 2005, the Trojan NPP and the Maine Yankee NPP. The two case studies highlighted the importance of involving stakeholders in decommissioning projects, and provide important lessons learned. The Dounreay case study demonstrated the UKAEA's determination and commitment to continuously improve its stakeholder engagement program. In 2002, the UKAEA set out to broaden its stakeholder program by improving both public understanding and participation. With regard to public understanding, the UKAEA committed to keep the public informed on decommissioning developments, and ensure that communication was in an understandable form. To improve participation, the UKAEA actively worked to identify and engage stakeholders. The UKAEA then made efforts to involve stakeholders in decision-making activities, including the use of stakeholder panels to discuss and consider options for specific aspects of the Dounreay decommissioning and site restoration plan. In 2004, the UKAEA commissioned an independent review of its stakeholder involvement program to assess the program's effectiveness and benchmark it against best practices. The program was found to be useful, and positive feedback was provided on the use of stakeholder panels and the UKAEA's determination to deliver a broad based and effective stakeholder strategy. Recommendations to UKAEA included involving stakeholders

  17. Program for transfer research and impact studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnak, J. J.; Freeman, J. E.; Hartley, J. M.; Kottenstette, J. P.; Staskin, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    Research activities conducted under the Program for Transfer Research and Impact Studies (TRIS) during 1972 included: (1) preparation of 10,196 TSP requests for TRIS application analysis; (2) interviews with over 500 individuals concerning the technical, economic, and social impacts of NASA-generated technology; (3) preparation of 38 new technology transfer example files and 101 new transfer cases; and (4) maintenance of a technology transfer library containing more than 2,900 titles. Six different modes of technology utilization are used to illustrate the pervasiveness of the transfer and diffusion of aerospace innovations. These modes also provide a basis for distinguishing the unique characteristics of the NASA Technology Utilization Program. An examination is reported of the ways in which NASA-generated technology is contributing to beneficial social change in five major areas of human concern: health, environment, safety, transportation, and communication.

  18. The Outcomes of an Educational Program Involving Men as Motivators to Encourage Women to Be Screened for Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwamugira, Jeniffer; Maree, Johanna E; Mafutha, Nokuthula

    2017-11-14

    Cervical cancer is a major health problem in South Africa. Despite having a national, population-based screening program, screening coverage is as low as 13%. Based on the role men could play in increasing cervical cancer screening and the low level of knowledge, men living in the study setting had about this health issue, we developed and pilot tested an educational program aimed at empowering men to teach their female partners and family members about cervical cancer and motivate them to be screened. The study setting was Ward 23 in Muldersdrift, a semi-urban, resource poor area situated northeast of Johannesburg. We used an intervention research design to assess the outcomes of our educational program. The primary outcome was screening uptake, with knowledge the secondary outcome. Statistics and face-to-face and telephone interviews, guided by questionnaires, were used to collect the data which were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and content analysis. A total of 120 men (n = 120) participated in the educational program and 100 (n = 100) completed the post-test questionnaire. Only 30 women (n = 30) reported for screening. The men's knowledge improved after the education program but did not guarantee that they would educate women about cervical cancer as only 55% (n = 66) indicated they taught a female family member or their partner. Cultural restrictions were the most common reason presented for not teaching women about this health issue. Ways of supporting men to overcome cultural barriers prohibiting them from discussing matters related to sexuality should be explored, before refining and replicating the intervention.

  19. HOUSEHOLD PARTICIPATION IN RECYCLING PROGRAMS: A CASE STUDY FROM MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azilah M Akil

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The increase in per capita income and rapid urbanization, have contributed significantly to changes in consumption behaviour leading to increased waste generation.  Waste disposed to landfill sites is fast becoming unfeasible thus requiring a more effective management of waste material involving waste reduction, reuse and recycling. The success of recycling program, however, is largely dependent on household participation activities which are essentially behaviour driven. The recycling performance of Malaysian households is still low as it stands at 5.5% compared to Singapore and Vietnam which are 56% and 22% respectively. This study examines recycling behaviour among households and the influence of socioeconomic, demographic and behavioural characteristics on households’ participation in recycling program in Malaysia.  A sample of 300 randomly selected household were surveyed.  The findings revealed that most of the households (70% claim that they are practicing recycling particularly types of paper and old clothes. The factors of participation in recycling show equal results both for environmental concerns and economic benefits. Those who did not participate in recycling, listed household issues or behaviour, namely lack of time and materials to recycle, inconvenient, lack of space, lack of facilities and information as well as laziness, as barriers. The paper finally highlights the factors which can encourage household to be involved in recycling and give recommendations to the authorities in terms of facilities and infrastructures to facilitate the program.

  20. Parent and Family Involvement in Education: Results from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016. First Look. NCES 2017-102

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuiggan, Meghan; Megra, Mahi

    2017-01-01

    This report presents findings from the Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey of the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016 (NHES:2016). The Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey collected data on children enrolled in public or private school for kindergarten through 12th grade or homeschooled for these grades.…

  1. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies on the zero G cloud physics laboratory are reported. This program involves the definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineations of a set of candidate experiments that must utilize the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity.

  2. Communication Barriers: A Study of Eastern Mediterranean University Students' and Teachers' of Online Program and Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Altinay, Fahriye

    2005-01-01

    This research study defines communication barriers in online programs and courses by determining the perceptions of students and teachers at Eastern Mediterranean University. It aims to get the answers to the questions of what sorts of problems students and teachers face while being involved in online courses and online programs. Distance…

  3. Collaborative Learning Processes in the Context of a Public Health Professional Development Program: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Chiocchio, François; Beaudet, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    The health promotion laboratory (HPL-Canada) is a public health professional development program building on a collaborative learning approach in order to support long-term practice change in local health services teams. This study aims to analyse the collaborative learning processes of two teams involved in the program during the first year of…

  4. Feeling Our Way: Emotions and the Politics of Global Citizenship in Study Abroad Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, Nicole; Waddell, Charlene

    2017-01-01

    The terms "solidarity" and "ethical travel" were used to frame a one-week study abroad program to Guatemala. The students involved came from a Canadian university and were primed through pretrip meetings and program materials to expect their trip to produce good feelings of connection and support. However, many of the students…

  5. Predictors of activity involvement in dementia care homes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Dieneke; de Lange, Jacomine; Willemse, Bernadette; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2017-08-04

    Despite the finding that involvement in activities is one of the most important needs of residents with dementia living in care homes, care facilities struggle to fulfill this need. Over the years, various factors are suggested which may contribute to or disable activity provision in dementia care homes. These include limited financial resources, task oriented staff and disease-related characteristics of residents. This study aims to further clarify which of these factors predict higher activity involvement. Data were derived from the second measurement (2011) of the Living Arrangements for people with Dementia study. One thousand two hundred eighteen people residing in 139 dementia care homes were involved. Forty predictors of higher involvement were studied. Multilevel backward regression analyses were performed. The most important predictors of higher involvement were: absence of agitation, less ADL dependency, and a higher cognitive status of the residents, higher staff educational level, lower experienced job demands by care staff and a smaller number of residents living in the dementia care wards of a facility. More social supervisor support as perceived by staff was found to predict less activity involvement. To increase the activity involvement of care home residents with dementia it seems vital to: 1) reduce staff's experienced job demands; 2) elevate their overall educational level; 3) train staff to provide suitable activities, taking account of the behavior and preserved capabilities of residents; and 4) foster transition towards small-scale care. In order to achieve these aims, care organizations might need to evaluate the use of their financial means.

  6. Lay involvement in the analysis of qualitative data in health services research: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, S; Jheeta, S; Husson, F; Jacklin, A; Bischler, A; Norton, C; Franklin, B D

    2016-01-01

    There is a consensus that patients and the public should be involved in research in a meaningful way. However, to date, lay people have been mostly involved in developing research ideas and commenting on patient information.We previously published a paper describing our experience with lay partners conducting observations in a study of how patients in hospital are involved with their medicines. In a later part of the same study, lay partners were also involved in analysing interviews that a researcher had conducted with patients, carers and healthcare professionals about patient and carer involvement with medicines in hospital. We therefore wanted to build on our previous paper and report on our experiences with lay partners helping to conduct data analysis. We therefore interviewed the lay members and researchers involved in the analysis to find out their views.Both lay members and researchers reported that lay partners added value to the study by bringing their own perspectives and identifying further areas for the researcher to look for in the interviews. In this way researchers and lay partners were able to work together to produce a richer analysis than would have been possible from either alone. Background It is recognised that involving lay people in research in a meaningful rather than tokenistic way is both important and challenging. In this paper, we contribute to this debate by describing our experiences of lay involvement in data analysis. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with the lay partners and researchers involved in qualitative data analysis in a wider study of inpatient involvement in medication safety. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and coded using open thematic analysis. Results We interviewed three lay partners and the three researchers involved. These interviews demonstrated that the lay members added value to the analysis by bringing their own perspectives; these were systematically integrated into the analysis by the

  7. PSYCHOLOGICAL FEATURES IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE (MEN AND WOMEN PRIOR TO CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFTING DEPENDING ON THEIR INVOLVEMENT IN THE INDIVIDUAL PSYCHO-CORRECTION PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Starunskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance. The study of psychological characteristics of patients is important for the creation and planning of psychological correction and improve the efficiency of the treatment of coronary heart disease.Тhe purpose. This research is devoted to the study of the psychological features in patients with coronary artery disease (CHD in the preoperative period, depending on their involvement in psycho-correction program.Material and methods. We observed 30 patients with coronary heart disease before coronary bypass surgery. Clinical-psychological method (observation, conversation and psychological testing were used.Results  and conclusions. We found that patients who participated in psycho-correction program had lower values of «anxiety», «phobic anxiety» and «obsessive-compulsive» symptoms. In both groups of patients, on average, we identified the prevalence  of the coping-strategies «self-control» and «planning solution». Furthermore, on average, the «self-awareness» and «extraversion» were more manifested features in the structure of the personality traits of the surveyed patients. The revealed features should be taken into account in planning the programs of psycho-correction for patients with CHD prior to CABG surgery.

  8. Supplementary report: millimeter wave study program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jory, H.R.; Symons, R.S.

    1976-02-01

    This report describes work done during the months of December 1975 and January 1976, following the writing of the final report on the millimeter wave study program for generation of 100 kW or more power at 120 GHz. The work has been directed to three areas for application to gyrotron devices, small signal analysis, electron beam simulation, and microwave measurements on cavity coupling. A small signal analysis is presented, which allows determination of beam loading in cavities. The results are similar to previous published work, but contain a higher order relativistic correction. The electron beam simulations include two magnetron type guns and one based on electrostatic lenses

  9. Site characterization studies in the NWTS program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.; Evans, G.

    1980-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has the responsibility to identify sites and construct and operate facilities for the storage or isolation of spent fuel and/or reprocessing radioactive wastes from commercial nuclear power plants. The National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program has been initiated by the DOE to develop the technology and demonstrate the feasibility of burial and isolation of high level radioactive waste in deep geologic formations. The NTWS Program plan which sets forth the criteria, procedures, and other considerations required to characterize and select a site in a comprehensive stepwise manner is discussed. The plan is not specific to any given geologic medium but serves as a guide for site selection in any geohydrologic system deemed appropriate for consideration for a deep geologic repository. The plan will be used by all NWTS Project Offices in the conduct of their site characterization program. The plan will be updated, as warranted, to reflect technology development, National policies, rulemakings by regulatory agencies, and other changing political, social, and institutional considerations. Site characterization begins with the identification of regions believed to have suitable geologic, hydrologic, and environmental characteristics for repository siting. This is followed by an iterative process of data collection and analysis to identify areas and locations which appear most suitable for further investigations. In addition, screening studies of the DOE's nuclear complexes has led to the selection of the Nevada Test Site and the Hanford Site for further characterization studies. The site characterization process results in a number of candidate sites from which a site will be selected and proposed to the NRC for licensing

  10. An Observational Study of Children's Involvement in Informed Consent for Exome Sequencing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Victoria A; Werner-Lin, Allison; Walser, Sarah A; Biswas, Sawona; Bernhardt, Barbara A

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine children's involvement in consent sessions for exome sequencing research and associations of involvement with provider and parent communication. Participants included 44 children (8-17 years) from five cohorts who were offered participation in an exome sequencing study. The consent sessions were audiotaped, transcribed, and coded. Providers attempted to facilitate the child's involvement in the majority (73%) of sessions, and most (75%) children also verbally participated. Provider facilitation was strongly associated with likelihood of child participation. These findings underscore that strategies such as asking for children's opinions and soliciting their questions show respect for children and may increase the likelihood that they are engaged and involved in decisions about research participation.

  11. Involving International Student Teams in GPS and GRS Surveys to Study Cryospheric Change in Greenland and the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzfeld, U. C.; Mayer, H.

    2009-12-01

    In the course of research programs to develop a methodology for the study of microtopography of ice and snow surfaces, we placed a strong emphasis on the involvement of students. This project provided the opportunity to engage students in every step from building the instrument through development of the data processing, the actual field measurements, processing of the resultant data, their evaluation and interpretation to the final publication in scientific journals. The development of the Glacier Roughness Sensor (GRS) incorporating Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and the fieldwork on the Greenland Inland Ice were particularly fascinating and instructive for students. In a related snow-hydrological research project on Niwot Ridge in the Colorado Front Range, we involved students in two season-long measurement campaigns in a high alpine environment. Students from the Universität Trier, Germany, and the University of Colorado Boulder participated in this project to learn about the value of international collaboration in science. Funding was provided by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Antarctic and Arctic Program) and the U.S. National Science Foundation (Hydrological Sciences Program). Students participated in preparatory classes and field camps, selected their own research projects and received university credit towards their degrees in geography or environmental sciences. All student participants in the MICROTOP projects have gone on to higher university education and become professionally exceptionally successful. Students setting up camp on the Greenland Ice Sheet during expedition MICROTOP 99.

  12. Genomics and structure/function studies of Rhabdoviridae proteins involved in replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenberg, R; Delmas, O; Morin, B; Graham, S C; De Lamballerie, X; Laubert, C; Coutard, B; Grimes, J M; Neyts, J; Owens, R J; Brandt, B W; Gorbalenya, A; Tucker, P; Stuart, D I; Canard, B; Bourhy, H

    2010-08-01

    Some mammalian rhabdoviruses may infect humans, and also infect invertebrates, dogs, and bats, which may act as vectors transmitting viruses among different host species. The VIZIER programme, an EU-funded FP6 program, has characterized viruses that belong to the Vesiculovirus, Ephemerovirus and Lyssavirus genera of the Rhabdoviridae family to perform ground-breaking research on the identification of potential new drug targets against these RNA viruses through comprehensive structural characterization of the replicative machinery. The contribution of VIZIER programme was of several orders. First, it contributed substantially to research aimed at understanding the origin, evolution and diversity of rhabdoviruses. This diversity was then used to obtain further structural information on the proteins involved in replication. Two strategies were used to produce recombinant proteins by expression of both full length or domain constructs in either E. coli or insect cells, using the baculovirus system. In both cases, parallel cloning and expression screening at small-scale of multiple constructs based on different viruses including the addition of fusion tags, was key to the rapid generation of expression data. As a result, some progress has been made in the VIZIER programme towards dissecting the multi-functional L protein into components suitable for structural and functional studies. However, the phosphoprotein polymerase co-factor and the structural matrix protein, which play a number of roles during viral replication and drives viral assembly, have both proved much more amenable to structural biology. Applying the multi-construct/multi-virus approach central to protein production processes in VIZIER has yielded new structural information which may ultimately be exploitable in the derivation of novel ways of intervening in viral replication. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative Study of Parental Involvement and Private Tuition regarding Educational Attainment of Students

    OpenAIRE

    Malik Amer Atta; Shabnam Razzaq Khan; Shehla Sheikh; Fahmida Akbar

    2014-01-01

    This research work was focused on the “comparative study of parental involvement and private tuition regarding educational attainments of students at secondary school level”. A sample of 80 students of 10th class from ten different secondary schools was taken. To analyze the results t-test was used. In this comparison it was conducted that parental involvement turn out significant effect on student educational attainments as compared to private tuition. On the bases of results researcher has ...

  14. Service user involvement in mental health system strengthening in a rural African setting: qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Abayneh, Sisay; Lempp, Heidi; Alem, Atalay; Alemayehu, Daniel; Eshetu, Tigist; Lund, Crick; Semrau, Maya; Thornicroft, Graham; Hanlon, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Background It is essential to involve service users in efforts to expand access to mental health care in integrated primary care settings in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, there is little evidence from LMICs to guide this process. The aim of this study was to explore barriers to, and facilitators of, service user/caregiver involvement in rural Ethiopia to inform the development of a scalable approach. Methods Thirty nine semi-structured interviews were carried out with pur...

  15. Attitudes, involvement and consumer behaviour : a longitudinal study in fast moving consumer goods markets

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, David

    1994-01-01

    An empirical study is reported which attempts to validate two key theoretical consequences of consumer involvement: differences in brand buying behaviour and differences in the type of decision processing undertaken. A literature review is provided which traces the history of involvement and identifies a suitable contemporary framework. Work on brand loyalty and attitude modelling is also reviewed and suitable frameworks identified. A pilot stage is reported which show...

  16. Can the impact of public involvement on research be evaluated? A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Rosemary; Boote, Jonathan D; Parry, Glenys D; Cooper, Cindy L; Yeeles, Philippa; Cook, Sarah

    2012-09-01

      Public involvement is central to health and social research policies, yet few systematic evaluations of its impact have been carried out, raising questions about the feasibility of evaluating the impact of public involvement.   To investigate whether it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on health and social research.   Mixed methods including a two-round Delphi study with pre-specified 80% consensus criterion, with follow-up interviews. UK and international panellists came from different settings, including universities, health and social care institutions and charitable organizations. They comprised researchers, members of the public, research managers, commissioners and policy makers, self-selected as having knowledge and/or experience of public involvement in health and/or social research; 124 completed both rounds of the Delphi process. A purposive sample of 14 panellists was interviewed.   Consensus was reached that it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on 5 of 16 impact issues: identifying and prioritizing research topics, disseminating research findings and on key stakeholders. Qualitative analysis revealed the complexities of evaluating a process that is subjective and socially constructed. While many panellists believed that it is morally right to involve the public in research, they also considered that it is appropriate to evaluate the impact of public involvement.   This study found consensus among panellists that it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on some research processes, outcomes and on key stakeholders. The value of public involvement and the importance of evaluating its impact were endorsed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Can the impact of public involvement on research be evaluated? A mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Rosemary; Boote, Jonathan D; Parry, Glenys D; Cooper, Cindy L; Yeeles, Philippa; Cook, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  Public involvement is central to health and social research policies, yet few systematic evaluations of its impact have been carried out, raising questions about the feasibility of evaluating the impact of public involvement. Objective  To investigate whether it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on health and social research. Methods  Mixed methods including a two‐round Delphi study with pre‐specified 80% consensus criterion, with follow‐up interviews. UK and international panellists came from different settings, including universities, health and social care institutions and charitable organizations. They comprised researchers, members of the public, research managers, commissioners and policy makers, self‐selected as having knowledge and/or experience of public involvement in health and/or social research; 124 completed both rounds of the Delphi process. A purposive sample of 14 panellists was interviewed. Results  Consensus was reached that it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on 5 of 16 impact issues: identifying and prioritizing research topics, disseminating research findings and on key stakeholders. Qualitative analysis revealed the complexities of evaluating a process that is subjective and socially constructed. While many panellists believed that it is morally right to involve the public in research, they also considered that it is appropriate to evaluate the impact of public involvement. Conclusions  This study found consensus among panellists that it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on some research processes, outcomes and on key stakeholders. The value of public involvement and the importance of evaluating its impact were endorsed. PMID:21324054

  18. Paradigms of artificial intelligence programming case studies in common Lisp

    CERN Document Server

    Norvig, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Paradigms of AI Programming is the first text to teach advanced Common Lisp techniques in the context of building major AI systems. By reconstructing authentic, complex AI programs using state-of-the-art Common Lisp, the book teaches students and professionals how to build and debug robust practical programs, while demonstrating superior programming style and important AI concepts. The author strongly emphasizes the practical performance issues involved in writing real working programs of significant size. Chapters on troubleshooting and efficiency are included, along with a discussion of th

  19. A Comparative Study of Parental Involvement and Its Effect on African-American Male and Overall Student Achievement at Single Gender and Coeducational Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellums, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if Parental Involvement influenced academic performance at single gender and co-educational schools. This study also compared African American male academic achievement with all students enrolled in two single gender, and one coeducational, middle school programs. Although all three schools reflected a…

  20. Workplace Wellness Programs Study: Final Report

    OpenAIRE

    Mattke, Soeren; Liu, Hangsheng; Caloyeras, John; Huang, Christina Y.; Van Busum, Kristin R.; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Shier, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the characteristics of workplace wellness programs, their prevalence, their impact on employee health and medical cost, facilitators of their success, and the role of incentives in such programs.

  1. An Overview of Head Start Program Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jeanne Morris

    2017-01-01

    Johnson's "War on Poverty" administrative team campaigned for committee members to join the War on Poverty efforts to create and develop programs for children born into poverty (Zigler, 2003). Poverty based programs, such as the Head Start program, continue to put into place proactive measures to increase preschooler's cognitive…

  2. Large Coil Program magnetic system design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, S.D.; Johnson, N.E.

    1977-01-01

    The primary objective of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting coils to provide a basis for the design principles, materials, and fabrication techniques proposed for the toroidal magnets for the THE NEXT STEP (TNS) and other future tokamak devices. This paper documents a design study of the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) in which the structural response of the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils and the supporting structure was evaluated under simulated reactor conditions. The LCP test facility structural system consists of six TF Coils, twelve coil-to-coil torsional restraining beams (torque rings), a central bucking post with base, and a Pulse Coil system. The NASTRAN Finite Element Structural Analysis computer Code was utilized to determine the distribution of deflections, forces, and stresses for each of the TF Coils, torque rings, and the central bucking post. Eleven load conditions were selected to represent probable test operations. Pulse Coils suspended in the bore of the test coil were energized to simulate the pulsed field environment characteristic of the TNS reactor system. The TORMAC Computer Code was utilized to develop the magnetic forces in the TF Coils for each of the eleven loading conditions examined, with or without the Pulse Coils energized. The TORMAC computer program output forces were used directly as input load conditions for the NASTRAN analyses. Results are presented which demonstrate the reliability of the LCTF under simulated reactor operating conditions

  3. The Management of Parental Involvement in Multicultural Schools in South Africa: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathiapama Michael

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the management of parental involvement in three multicultural schools in the Umlazi District in Durban, South Africa. A literature survey resulting in a theoretical framework on parental involvement in schools, multicultural schools, and the managing of parental involvement in schools has been done. The contextual background of schools in contemporary South Africa is depicted. A qualitative research design has been used. Focus group discussions have been conducted, with a total of thirty-three principals, teachers and parents. It has found that there is a low level of meaningful contact between school and parents. Apathy exists on the side of parents, low expectations on the side of principals and teachers, and an organisational structure facilitating parent-school interaction is lacking. In managing parental involvement in multicultural schools, school managers display a lack of intercultural sensitivity.

  4. Stakeholder involvement in the design of a patient-centered comparative effectiveness trial of the “On the Move” group exercise program in community-dwelling older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brach, Jennifer S.; Perera, Subashan; Gilmore, Sandra; VanSwearingen, Jessie M.; Brodine, Deborah; Wert, David; Nadkarni, Neelesh K.; Ricci, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Background Group exercise programs for older adults often exclude the timing and coordination of movement. Stakeholder involvement in the research process is strongly encouraged and improves the relevance and adoption of findings. We describe stakeholder involvement in the design of a clinical trial of a group-based exercise program that incorporates timing and coordination of movement into the exercises. Methods The study was a cluster randomized, single-blind intervention trial to compare the effects on function, disability and mobility of a standard group exercise program and the “On the Move” group exercise program in older adults residing in independent living facilities and senior apartment buildings, and attending community centers. Exercise classes were twice weekly for 12 weeks delivered by study exercise leaders and facility activity staff personnel. Outcomes The primary outcomes function, disability and mobility were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Function and disability were assessed using the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument, and mobility using the Six-Minute Walk Test and gait speed. Stakeholders Patient and provider stakeholders had significant input into the study aims, design, sample, intervention, outcomes and operational considerations. Summary A community-based exercise program to improve walking can be developed to address both investigator identified missing components in current exercise to improve walking and stakeholder defined needs and interest for the activity program. Involvement of stakeholders substantially improves the relevance of research questions, increases the transparency of research activities and may accelerate the adoption of research into practice. PMID:27521806

  5. Reasons for family involvement in elective surgical decision-making in Taiwan: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mei-Ling; Huang, Chuen-Teng; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2017-07-01

    To inquire into the reasons for family involvement in adult patients' surgical decision-making processes from the point of view of the patients' family. Making a patient the centre of medical decision-making is essential for respecting individual's autonomy. However, in a Chinese society, family members are often deeply involved in a patient's medical decision-making. Although family involvement has long been viewed as an aspect of the Chinese culture, empirical evidence of the reasons for family involvement in medical decision-making has been lacking. A qualitative study. In order to record and examine reasons for family involvement in adult patients' surgical decision-making, 12 different family members of 12 elective surgery patients were interviewed for collecting and analysing data. Three major reasons for family involvement emerged from the data analyses: (1) to share responsibility; (2) to ensure the correctness of medical information; and (3) to safeguard the patient's well-being. These findings also reveal that culture is not the only reason for family involvement. Making decision to undergo a surgery is a tough and stressful process for a patient. Family may provide the patient with timely psychological support to assist the patient to communicate with his or her physician(s) and other medical personnel to ensure their rights. It is also found that due to the imbalanced doctor-patient power relationship, a patient may be unable, unwilling to, or even dare not, tell the whole truth about his or her illness or feelings to the medical personnel. Thus, a patient would expect his or her family to undertake such a mission during the informed consent and decision-making processes. The results of this study may provide medical professionals with relevant insights into family involvement in adult patients' surgical decision-making. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Involvement in Bullying and Suicide-Related Behavior at 11 Years: A Prospective Birth Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsper, Catherine; Lereya, Tanya; Zanarini, Mary; Wolke, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the prospective link between involvement in bullying (bully, victim, bully/victim), and subsequent suicide ideation and suicidal/self-injurious behavior, in preadolescent children in the United Kingdom. Method: A total of 6,043 children in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort were assessed to…

  7. Managing Supplier Involvement in New Product Development: A Multiple-Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.E.A. van Echtelt (Ferrie); J.Y.F. Wynstra (Finn); A.J. van Weele (Arjan); G.M. Duysters (Geert)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractExisting studies of supplier involvement in new product development have mainly focused on project-related short-term processes and success-factors. This study validates and extends an existing exploratory framework, which comprises both long-term strategic processes and short-term

  8. Managing supplier involvement in new product development : a multiple-case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Echtelt, van F.E.A.; Wynstra, J.Y.F.; Weele, van A.J.; Duysters, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Existing studies of supplier involvement in new product development have mainly focused on project-related short-term processes and success factors. This study validates and extends an existing exploratory framework, which comprises both long-term strategic processes and short-term operational

  9. Latino Parental Involvement in Kindergarten: Findings from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Tina M.

    2011-01-01

    Parental involvement in children's schooling is an important component of children's early school success. Few studies have examined this construct exclusively among Latino families. Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-K), the present investigation (N = 2,051) explored relations between Latino parents' home and school…

  10. Experiences of service users involved in recruitment for nursing courses: A phenomenological research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Katie; Bernal, Cathy; Devis, Kate; Southgate, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into service users' experiences of participating in recruitment for Adult, Mental Health and Child nursing studies at the authors' university; to establish potential motivations behind such participation; and to make suggestions for improved future practice. The involvement of service users in nurse education and recruitment has for some years been required by the Nursing and Midwifery Council, but there is a dearth of publications on the meaning of that involvement to participating service users. It is hoped that this study will contribute to this body of knowledge. A phenomenological approach was selected, field-specific focus groups of service users being facilitated using a semi-structured interview format; these were audio recorded and transcribed. The data was analysed using thematic analysis. Participation was subject to the service users having been involved in recruitment to nursing studies at the authors' university and the focus groups took place either at the university or at the child participants' school. Themes identified demonstrated largely positive experiences and a sense of meaningful involvement for all concerned. Findings indicated a close link between the values of the participants and those of the wider NHS, benefits to a sense of wellbeing and achievement, as well as the need for greater ownership of the recruitment process by service users. Potential lessons for academics wishing to promote greater service user involvement in student recruitment are articulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Zhang, Yuanzhen; Feng, Jianghua; Wang, Hui

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg·d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg·d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose-effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time-course study were analyzed by ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. US country studies program: Results from mitigation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Country Studies Program which was implemented to support the principles and objectives of the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). There were three principle objectives in this program: to enhance capabilities to conduct climate change assessments, prepare action plans, and implement technology projects; to help establish a process for developing and implementing national policies and measures; to support principles and objective of the FCCC. As a result, 55 countries are completing studies, more than 2000 analysts engaged in the studies have been trained, and there is a much broader understanding and support for climate change concerns. The article describes experiences of some countries, and general observations and conclusions which are broadly seperated into developed countries and those with economies in transition.

  13. Self–Evaluation of Distance Learning Study Program as a Part of Internal Quality Assurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojka Krneta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper features quality assurance of specific distance learning master study program through self-evaluation. This unique program involving e-learning as the program content, as well as delivery method, is presented in the paper from the aspects of its quality assurance. Student evaluation of this study program as a part of the internal quality assurance is performed at the end of every school year in the aim of its quality assurance. Results and conclusions of self-evaluation conducted in this school year by known SEVAQ+ evaluation tool are presented here.

  14. Pulmonary sarcoidosis with and without extrapulmonary involvement: a cross-sectional and observational study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Tao, Ru-Jia; Zou, Dan-Feng; Li, Man-Hui; Xu, Xin; Cao, Wei-Jun

    2018-02-16

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease characterised by the formation of granulomas within various organs, mainly the lungs. Several studies from different countries have been undertaken to investigate sarcoidosis with extrapulmonary involvement except from China. The objective of this study is to investigate a comparative clinical analysis in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis with and without extrapulmonary involvement from China. Data from inpatients diagnosed with sarcoidosis at Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital (Shanghai, China) between January 2009 and December 2014 were retrospectively collected and analysed. Six hundred and thirty-six patients with biopsy-proven sarcoidosis were included in the study, including 378 isolated pulmonary sarcoidosis and 258 pulmonary sarcoidosis plus extrapulmonary involvement. Two hundred and fifty-eight (40.6%) patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis had extrapulmonary involvement. Extrapulmonary localisations were detected mostly in extrathoracic lymph nodes (n=147) and skin (n=86). Statistically significant differences were demonstrated between patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis plus extrapulmonary involvement and patients with isolated pulmonary sarcoidosis for fatigue (16.6%vs8.3%, PSACE) levels (79.0±46.9 IU/L vs 69.7±38.7 IU/L, PSACE levels and more deteriorating HRCT findings, to which clinicians should pay attention. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. A comparative study of contemporary user involvement within healthcare systems across England, Poland and Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichon, Mateusz; Kavcic, Matic; Masterson, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how healthcare-users' engagement is perceived, how it occurs and how these perceptions differ between three European countries: England, Poland and Slovenia, using the concepts of voice, choice and coproduction. This comparative, qualitative study is based on a review of legal documents, academic literature and semi-structured interviews conducted in October and November 2011. A research sample consisted of 21 interviewees representing various stakeholders including healthcare-users, doctors and managers. Primary and secondary data were analysed using theoretical thematic analysis. Emerging themes were identified from the interviews and related to the indicators describing healthcare-users' involvement in the voice, choice and coproduction model. Results of the comparative qualitative research suggest that the healthcare-users' influence is strongly grounded in England where the healthcare system and professionals are prepared to include healthcare-users in the decision-making process. In Slovenia, cultural development of healthcare-users' involvement seems to proceed the institutional development. In Poland, institutions are ready to involve healthcare-users in decision-making process although the cultural desirability of involving users among doctors and patients is lacking. The notion of user involvement is increasingly gaining importance and research attention, yet there is still little known about the way cultural, political, historical differences between various European countries influence it. This paper explores this little known area using the original approach of user involvement (Dent et al., 2011) with input from various stakeholders including patients, healthcare representatives and academics.

  16. "Do-It-Ourselves Science": Case Studies of Volunteer-Initiated Citizen Science Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddick, Jordan; Bracey, G.; Gay, P. L.

    2009-05-01

    Galaxy Zoo is a citizen science website in which members of the public volunteer to classify galaxies, thereby helping astronomers conduct publishable research into galaxy morphologies and environments. Although the site was originally created to answer a few specific questions, some members of the community - both scientists and volunteers - have spontaneously developed an interest in a wider variety of questions. Volunteers have pursued answers to these questions with guidance from professional astronomers; in completing these projects, volunteers have independently used some of the same data viewing and analysis tools that professional astronomers use, and have even developed their own online tools. They have created their own research questions and their own plans for data analysis, and are planning to write scientific papers with the results to be submitted to peer-reviewed scientific journals. Volunteers have identified a number of such projects. These volunteer-initiated projects have extended the scientific reach of Galaxy Zoo, while also giving volunteers first-hand experience with the process of science. We are interested in the process by which volunteers become interested in volunteer-initiated projects, and what tasks they participate in, both initially and as their involvement increases. What motivates a volunteer to become involved in a volunteer-initiated project? How does his or her motivation change with further involvement? We are conducting a program of qualitative education research into these questions, using as data sources the posts that volunteers have made to the Galaxy Zoo forum and transcripts of interviews with volunteers.

  17. A Taiwan Study Abroad Program on Aging, Culture, and Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Su-I

    2018-01-01

    This article introduces a Taiwan Study Abroad program on aging, culture, and healthcare. The program is a short-term academic summer program (6 credits) to bring U.S. students to Taiwan. During 2011 ~ 2015, a total of four groups including over 54 students and faculty members participated. This program partnered with multiple universities,…

  18. Genetic and environmental influences on adolescents' smoking involvement: a multi-informant twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seglem, Karoline Brobakke; Waaktaar, Trine; Ask, Helga; Torgersen, Svenn

    2015-03-01

    Studying monozygotic and dizygotic adolescent twin pairs of both sexes reared together, the present study examined the extent to which the variance in smoking involvement is attributable to genetic and environmental effects, and to what extent there are sex differences in the etiology. Questionnaire data on how often the adolescent had ever smoked tobacco was collected from a population-based twin sample consisting of seven national birth cohorts (ages 12-18), their mothers, and their fathers (N = 1,394 families). The data was analyzed with multivariate genetic modeling, using a multi-informant design. The etiological structure of smoking involvement was best represented in an ACE common pathway model, with smoking defined as a latent factor loading onto all three informants' reports. Estimates could be set equal across sexes. Results showed that adolescent lifetime smoking involvement was moderately heritable (37 %). The largest influence was from the shared environment (56 %), while environmental effects unique to each twin had minimal influence (7 %).

  19. Students at risk of educational exclusion in secondary education. Perceptions of teachers involved in special programs about prevention of school failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier AMORES FERNÁNDEZ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available School failure in Secondary Education is one of the most serious problems that carries the Spanish educational system today. Initial vocational qualification programs (pcpi were designed to offer a second chance to failed students (or at risk of educational exclusion in this educational stage. This study, for which has been used a mixed or hybrid method research, has provided a number of results that offer a more complete vision on the usefulness of these «Educational reclosing» programs (now Vocational Basic Training, in the centers of the province of Granada, showing viewpoints as interesting as the teachers and students involved in the study. Here the perception of teachers is summarized on these students at risk who, due to several reasons, have been excluded from the mainstream educational system, and doomed to failure. Students that fail not only for learning difficulties or personal problems related to their family, also crash into an educational system that has not been able to provide adequate answers to their needs. 

  20. Parent Involvement in Children's Education: An Exploratory Study of Urban, Chinese Immigrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cheng Shuang; Koblinsky, Sally A.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the involvement of Chinese immigrant parents in children's elementary and secondary education. Participants were 29 low-income, urban parents of public school children working primarily in the hospitality sector. Parents were interviewed about their academic expectations, knowledge of school performance, parent…

  1. Department Involvement in Instructional Materials Development for ODL Study at the Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyanyiwa, Vincent Itai; Mutambanengwe, Betty

    2015-01-01

    The teaching and designing of modules at Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU) is the principal responsibility of a single body of teaching staff, although some authors and content reviewers could be sourced from elsewhere if they are not available in ZOU. This survey, through a case study, examines the involvement of lecturers and staff in the…

  2. The effect of parental involvement in CBT of anxious children: Preliminary results from a RCT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Breinholst, Sonja; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2011-01-01

    Esbjørn, B. H., Breinholst, S., Reinholdt-Dunne, M. L., & Leth, I. (2011). The effect of parental involvement in CBT of anxious children: Preliminary results from a RCT study. Poster accepted for the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Toronto, Canada....

  3. Governing integration through sports. A case study of civil society involvement in welfare policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Sine; Michelsen la Cour, Annette

    2012-01-01

    governing techniques of the welfare state. To do so, a case study approach is applied. First of all, the article will describe the ways in which the issues of enhancing ethnic integration through sports is represented (thought of as a problem) by the involved public authorities and non-state actors using...

  4. Involvement of External Stakeholders in Local Health Policymaking Process: A Case Study from Odense Municipality, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Leena Eklund; Jakobsen, Mette Winge; Winblad, Malin; Aro, Arja R.

    2017-01-01

    Collaboration between research and policy is an essential element for knowledge-based public health. However, only half of the Danish municipalities have experience with collaborating with researchers or other stakeholders. Through content analysis of interviews and policy documents the study explores the involvement of external stakeholders in…

  5. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia involving with mediastinal lymph nodes: radiologic study of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo Garcia, A.; Gordillo Gutierrez, I.; Guembe Urtiaga, P.

    1994-01-01

    Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) is an uncommon disorder in our setting. Chest x-ray is essential to diagnosis. To date, we have found only three reported cases in which mediastinal lymph nodes were involved. We present three additional cases with standard thoracic study. (Author)

  6. CT and pathologic studies in detecting hepatic involvement of malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Atsushi; Niibe, Hideo; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine the value of CT in detecting lymphomatous involvement of the liver, 57 autopsied cases (48 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 9 of Hodgkin's disease) were analyzed in detail. Additionally, 90 recent cases of abdominal CT with liver study in the initial staging were reviewed and 6 cases in which the liver had been examined within 2 weeks before autopsy were compared for macroscopic and pathologic findings. The following results were obtained. 1) Autopsy findings in 57 cases of malignant lymphoma. (1) Hepatic involvement was demonstrated in 56% of the patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and in 67% of those with Hodgkin's disease. (2) Of these patients with hepatic involvement, intrahepatic nodular lesions over 1.0cm in diameter were macroscopically identified in 22% of the cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 33% of those with Hodgkin's disease. (3) Lymphomatous involvements were seen in many organs in the cases of hepatic involvement. 2) CT examinations of 90 cases for the initial staging showed no significant abnormality in the liver or spleen. 3) Of the 6 cases in which the liver was examined by CT within about 2 weeks before autopsy, lymphomatous involvemet was pathologically diagnosed in 5. Of these, only one having multiple nodules larger than the tip of a thumb was correctly diagnosed by CT. 4) Hepatic involvement of lymphoma was thought to be the end stage, and minimal or early disease was detected in the region of Glisson's capsule. The above findings indicate that early hepatic involvement is not likely to be detected by CT at the present time. (author)

  7. DOES FATHER INVOLVEMENT INFLUENCE THE AFFECT, LANGUAGE ACQUISITION, SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT AND BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG AUTISTIC CHILDREN? AN EARLY INTERVENTION STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Tabitha LOUIS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study adopts a randomized experimental design to evaluate the impact of a father-mediated therapy to improve the play skills, affect, language, social skills and behavior among 30 clinically diagnosed autistic children at the age of 3-5 years. Standardized inventories such as, The Play Based Observation (PBO, The Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales (GMDS, The Vineland Social Maturity Scale (VSMS and the Rendel Shorts Questionnaire were administered pre and post intervention. A special program that involved fathers in the caregiving and nurturing processes of these children was designed and implemented for 6 months after which the children were reassessed. Prior to the intervention, deficits in play skills and developmental delays across expressive and receptive language were observed Scores on the Vineland Social Maturity Scale and the Rendel Shorts revealed behavioral markers. Post intervention, we noticed significant differences in the play, language acquisition, social engagement and behavior in the treatment group in comparison to the control group. The results suggested that father-mediated therapeutic involvement significantly has proven to positively foster development in young autistic children and this is an important implication for practitioners in developing early intervention programs.

  8. The Role of Involvement as a Moderating Variable in a Country of Origin Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rindang Matoati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the effect that the country of design and the country of manufacture has on the perceived quality of a product, and the role of involvement as a moderating variable. The conceptual framework has been tested using laboratory experiments that included a 2x2x2 between the subject’s factorial designs. Data have been collected using a randomization method to reduce any bias in the group’s variations. This data were analyzed using a one-way and two-way ANOVA. The results indicate that there is no difference between the high and low points of a product’s perceived quality, based on its country of design. Conversely, a favorable country of manufacture results in a higher perceived quality for its products, than for those of a lower scoring country of manufacture. Furthermore, consumers’ involvement, as a moderating variable, limits the strength of the country of design and the perceived quality’s relationship as this relationship is found to be stronger in circumstances where the consumers’ involvement is greater than in the less involved group’s condition. However, consumers’ involvement does not have any role as a moderating variable in the relationship between the country of manufacture and the perceived quality.

  9. Public involvement in research within care homes: benefits and challenges in the APPROACH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froggatt, Katherine; Goodman, Claire; Morbey, Hazel; Davies, Sue L; Masey, Helen; Dickinson, Angela; Martin, Wendy; Victor, Christina

    2016-12-01

    Public involvement in research (PIR) can improve research design and recruitment. Less is known about how PIR enhances the experience of participation and enriches the data collection process. In a study to evaluate how UK care homes and primary health-care services achieve integrated working to promote older people's health, PIR was integrated throughout the research processes. This paper aims to present one way in which PIR has been integrated into the design and delivery of a multisite research study based in care homes. A prospective case study design, with an embedded qualitative evaluation of PIR activity. Data collection was undertaken in six care homes in three sites in England. Six PIR members participated: all had prior personal or work experience in care homes. Qualitative data collection involved discussion groups, and site-specific meetings to review experiences of participation, benefits and challenges, and completion of structured fieldwork notes after each care home visit. PIR members supported recruitment, resident and staff interviews and participated in data interpretation. Benefits of PIR work were resident engagement that minimized distress and made best use of limited research resources. Challenges concerned communication and scheduling. Researcher support for PIR involvement was resource intensive. Clearly defined roles with identified training and support facilitated involvement in different aspects of the data collection process. This can also ensure that vulnerable older people who participate in research have a positive experience that reinforces the value of their views. © 2015 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Renal and perirenal space involvement in acute pancreatitis: An MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xing Hui, E-mail: lixinghui1005@126.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Zhang, Xiao Ming, E-mail: cjr.zhxm@vip.163.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Ji, Yi Fan, E-mail: 526504036@qq.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Jing, Zong Lin, E-mail: jzl325@163.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Huang, Xiao Hua, E-mail: nc_hxh1966@yahoo.com.cn [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Yang, Lin, E-mail: linyangmd@163.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Zhai, Zhao Hua, E-mail: zhaizhaohuada@163.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Objectives: To study the prevalence and characteristics of renal and perirenal space involvement and its relation to the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) using MRI. Methods: 115 patients with AP who underwent MRI with the clinical kidney function test were retrospectively analyzed in this study. MRI sequences included conventional and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) sequences. The renal and perirenal space involvement in AP was noted on MRI. The renal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on DWI was measured for each kidney. The severity of AP on MRI was graded using MR severity index (MRSI). The relationships among the renal and perirenal space involvement on MRI, the renal ADC, MRSI and the results of the kidney function test were analyzed. Results: In the 115 patients with AP, the renal and perirenal space abnormalities detected included renal parenchymal abnormalities (0.8%), abnormalities of the renal collecting system (2.6%), renal vascular abnormalities (1.7%), thickened renal fascia (99%), perirenal stranding (62%) and perirenal fluid collection (40%). The prevalence of perirenal space abnormalities was correlated with the severity of AP based on MRSI (P < 0.05). The renal ADC values were lower in patients with abnormal kidney function than in those without kidney injury (P < 0.05). The prevalence of kidney function abnormalities was 9.4%, 32% and 100% in mild, moderate, and severe AP cases, respectively (P = 0.00). Conclusion: Perirenal space involvement is much more than renal parenchymal involvement in AP. The prevalence of perirenal space involvement in AP on MRI has a positive correlation with the severity of AP according to MRSI.

  11. Renal and perirenal space involvement in acute pancreatitis: An MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xing Hui; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Ji, Yi Fan; Jing, Zong Lin; Huang, Xiao Hua; Yang, Lin; Zhai, Zhao Hua

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To study the prevalence and characteristics of renal and perirenal space involvement and its relation to the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) using MRI. Methods: 115 patients with AP who underwent MRI with the clinical kidney function test were retrospectively analyzed in this study. MRI sequences included conventional and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) sequences. The renal and perirenal space involvement in AP was noted on MRI. The renal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on DWI was measured for each kidney. The severity of AP on MRI was graded using MR severity index (MRSI). The relationships among the renal and perirenal space involvement on MRI, the renal ADC, MRSI and the results of the kidney function test were analyzed. Results: In the 115 patients with AP, the renal and perirenal space abnormalities detected included renal parenchymal abnormalities (0.8%), abnormalities of the renal collecting system (2.6%), renal vascular abnormalities (1.7%), thickened renal fascia (99%), perirenal stranding (62%) and perirenal fluid collection (40%). The prevalence of perirenal space abnormalities was correlated with the severity of AP based on MRSI (P < 0.05). The renal ADC values were lower in patients with abnormal kidney function than in those without kidney injury (P < 0.05). The prevalence of kidney function abnormalities was 9.4%, 32% and 100% in mild, moderate, and severe AP cases, respectively (P = 0.00). Conclusion: Perirenal space involvement is much more than renal parenchymal involvement in AP. The prevalence of perirenal space involvement in AP on MRI has a positive correlation with the severity of AP according to MRSI.

  12. New study program: Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Simić, Diana; Božikov, Jadranka; Vondra, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Paper presents an overview of the EU funded Project of Curriculum Development for Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics named MEDINFO to be introduced in Croatia. The target group for the program is formed by professionals in any of the areas of medicine, IT professionals working on applications of IT for health and researchers and teachers in medical informatics. In addition to Croatian students, the program will also provide opportunity for enrolling students from a wider region of Southeast Europe. Project partners are two faculties of the University of Zagreb - Faculty of Organization and Informatics from Varaždin and School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health from Zagreb with the Croatian Society for Medical Informatics, Croatian Chamber of Economy, and Ericsson Nikola Tesla Company as associates.

  13. Human needs as predictors for organizational commitment and job involvement: An exploratory empirical study

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yang-Kyu; Lee, Chul-in; Kabst, Rüdiger

    2008-01-01

    While the literature on the determinants of organizational commitment (OC) and job involvement (JI) is vast, little has been studied about the impact of human needs. In search for the institutional stars, this study examines whether human needs can serve a predictor for both high OC and high JI. Exploratory empirical results based on quantile regressions suggest that the needs for achievement, belonging, and power are more important than others in predicting OC and JI. In addition, the basic ...

  14. Involving parents in cognitive-behavioral therapy for child anxiety problems: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Siddaway, Andy P; Wood, Alex M; Cartwright-Hatton, Sam

    2014-01-01

    This case study examines how parents can be incorporated into all aspects of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for child anxiety problems. This is an important issue, because although there are strong theoretical and empirical reasons for incorporating parents into treatment, evidence from randomized controlled trials has so far been inconclusive about whether outcomes are improved by involving parents. This case study describes the clinical benefits of a balanced focus on parent and child f...

  15. A study of Generation Z’s involvement in virtual reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puchkova E.B.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study analyzes the characteristics of modern teenagers’ involvement in virtual reality (VR. It also examines various approaches to VR in Russian science. In the current study the concept of virtual reality is defined as a particular informational environment in which a person can exist and develop. It is created by a special class of technical systems, formed on the basis of computer hypertext technology, and has a number of social and psychological characteristics. We pay special attention to the significance of virtual space for generation Z (according to the William Strauss and Neil Howe generational theory. The main factor determining the unique psychological features of the generation Z is its active involvement in virtual reality from the moment of birth. Involvement in a virtual reality is measurable by a teenager’s activity on the Internet. Objective. Our study set out to determine the level of Russian generation Z’s involvement in virtual reality. Design. We analyzed the results of a survey conducted among Moscow adolescents using multivariate profiles. Two hundred fifty-four teenagers 12-14 years old were interviewed during the study. Results and conclusion. Analysis of the data revealed the following: Modern teenagers are involved in VR with varying degrees of depth; their main type of activity on the Internet is searching for educational information and news; and no significant differences by gender in the purposes of using the Internet were found. However, it was also determined that girls’ activity in VR is more related to communication and interpersonal interaction, even though it’s indirect via the Internet, while boys prefer the “gaming” possibilities of VR; that teenagers are rather critical of the information they obtain by the Internet, and that their level of trust in the online information is low. The same trend is evident in the fact that students prefer not to make new friends in virtual

  16. A devolved model for public involvement in the field of mental health research: case study learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moule, Pam; Davies, Rosie

    2016-12-01

    Patient and public involvement in all aspects of research is espoused and there is a continued interest in understanding its wider impact. Existing investigations have identified both beneficial outcomes and remaining issues. This paper presents the impact of public involvement in one case study led by a mental health charity conducted as part of a larger research project. The case study used a devolved model of working, contracting with service user-led organizations to maximize the benefits of local knowledge on the implementation of personalized budgets, support recruitment and local user-led organizations. To understand the processes and impact of public involvement in a devolved model of working with user-led organizations. Multiple data collection methods were employed throughout 2012. These included interviews with the researchers (n = 10) and research partners (n = 5), observation of two case study meetings and the review of key case study documentation. Analysis was conducted in NVivo10 using a coding framework developed following a literature review. Five key themes emerged from the data; Devolved model, Nature of involvement, Enabling factors, Implementation challenges and Impact. While there were some challenges of implementing the devolved model it is clear that our findings add to the growing understanding of the positive benefits research partners can bring to complex research. A devolved model can support the involvement of user-led organizations in research if there is a clear understanding of the underpinning philosophy and support mechanisms are in place. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Converging and Diverging Service Delivery Systems in Alternative Education Programs for Disabled and Non-Disabled Youth Involved in the Juvenile Justice System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Trent; Bullis, Michael; Todis, Bonnie

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of a directed research project funded by the Office of Special Education Programs. Using qualitative research methods, consisting of interviews and participant observations, the policies and procedures of three alternative education programs in various settings were investigated. These programs served youth with and without…

  18. Syracuse/NASA program: A historical critique: Multidisciplinary studies in management and development programs in the public sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzelay, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    A historical critique is presented of the Syracuse/NASA program on management and development programs. Brief summaries are included of each of the major projects undertaken, including identification of the principal investigators and the university departments and disciplines involved.

  19. The Kamehameha Schools Program of Hawaiian Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Donald D.

    1975-01-01

    Article described the efforts of the Kamehameha Schools to teach a program of Hawaiian subjects to help the young citizens of Hawaii in their quest for knowledge and skills in this culture. (Author/RK)

  20. National Estuary Program Study Area Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — There are 28 National Estuary Programs (NEPs) in the U.S.that implement habitat protection and restoration projects with their partners. This work takes place within...

  1. Study on the ocean drilling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jae Ho; Han, Hyun Chul; Chin, Jae Wha; Lee, Sung Rok; Park, Kwan Soon; Lee, Young Joo; Park, Young Soo [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Geoscience research trend of the world nations is focusing on the study of climate changes and preventing people from the natural hazards such as earthquakes and volcanic activities. For this study, it is necessary for scientists to interpret ancient climate changes preserved in ocean sediments, and to observe plate motions. Thus, geological and geophysical studies should be proceeded for the core samples recovered from the deep sea sediments and basement. It is essential to join the ODP(Ocean Drilling Program) that drills ocean basins and crusts using the drilling vessel with the ability of deploying almost 9 km of drilling string. The first year (1995) was focused on the analyzing the appropriateness Korea to join the ODP. The second year (1996) has been stressed on being an ODP member country based on results of the first year study, and planning the future activities as a member. The scope of study is joining the ODP as a Canada-Australia Consortium member and to set up the Korean ODP organization and future activities. The results and suggestions are as follows. 1) Necessities of Korea joining the ODP: If Korea becomes a member of the ODP, the benefits could be obtained based on the activities of other ODP members through academic, social and economic sectors. 2) Korean membership of ODP: Korea becomes a member of the Australia-Canada Consortium for ODP. AGSO (Austrian Geological Survey Organization), GSC (Geological Survey of Canada), and KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geology, Mining and Materials) on behalf of their own countries will each pay a share of the full member financial contribution to the ODP. AGSO and GSC will pay one third of the full member financial contribution, and KIGAM will pay one twelfth. 3) Korean ODP structure and future activities: To enhance the efficiency of initial activities after joining the ODP, it has been decided to have a relatively simple organization. The primary governing arm of the Korean ODP organizations is the Korean ODP

  2. AMOP (Arctic Marine Oil Spill Program) studies reviewed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-05

    A discussion of the Arctic Marine Oil Spill Program organized in 1976 by the Canadian Federal Government includes: an Arctic Atlas compiled by Fenco Consultants Ltd. to give background information necessary for developing marine oil spill countermeasures for the Arctic north of 60/sup 0/ including the west Greenland coast and the Labrador shelf (geology, meteorology and oceanography, ice conditions, biology, and social factors); program in emergency transport of spill-combatting equipment; and the factors which influence the choice of conveyance, i.e., accessibility of the site, urgency for response, and quantity of material required; laboratory studies involving the release of oil under artificial sea ice in simulated ice formation and decay purposes to determine the interaction of crude oil and first-year sea ice; inability of companies and government to control a major spill in the Labrador Sea because of poor and inadequate transport facilities, communications, and navigational aids, severe environmental conditions, and logistics problems; and studies on the effects of oil-well blowouts in deep water, including formation of oil and gas hydrates, design of oil skimmers, the use of hovercraft, and specifications for an airborne multisensor system for oil detection in ice-infested waters.

  3. Factors associated with sex work involvement among transgender women in Jamaica: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Wang, Ying; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Jones, Nicolette; Ahmed, Uzma; Levermore, Kandasi; Neil, Ava; Ellis, Tyrone; Bryan, Nicolette; Marshall, Annecka; Newman, Peter A

    2017-04-06

    Transgender women are disproportionately impacted by HIV. Transgender women involved in sex work may experience exacerbated violence, social exclusion, and HIV vulnerabilities, in comparison with non-sex work-involved transgender women. Scant research has investigated sex work among transgender women in the Caribbean, including Jamaica, where transgender women report pervasive violence. The study objective was to examine factors associated with sex work involvement among transgender women in Jamaica. In 2015, we implemented a cross-sectional survey using modified peer-driven recruitment with transgender women in Kingston and Ocho Rios, Jamaica, in collaboration with a local community-based AIDS service organization. We conducted multivariable logistic regression analyses to identify factors associated with paid sex and transactional sex. Exchanging oral, anal or vaginal sex for money only was categorized as paid sex. Exchanging sex for survival needs (food, accommodation, transportation), drugs or alcohol, or for money along with survival needs and/or drugs/alcohol, was categorized as transactional sex. Among 137 transgender women (mean age: 24.0 [SD: 4.5]), two-thirds reported living in the Kingston area. Overall, 25.2% reported being HIV-positive. Approximately half (n = 71; 51.82%) reported any sex work involvement, this included sex in exchange for: money (n = 64; 47.06%); survival needs (n = 27; 19.85%); and drugs/alcohol (n = 6; 4.41%). In multivariable analyses, paid sex and transactional sex were both associated with: intrapersonal (depression), interpersonal (lower social support, forced sex, childhood sexual abuse, intimate partner violence, multiple partners/polyamory), and structural (transgender stigma, unemployment) factors. Participants reporting transactional sex also reported increased odds of incarceration perceived to be due to transgender identity, forced sex, homelessness, and lower resilience, in comparison with participants reporting

  4. Service user involvement in mental health system strengthening in a rural African setting: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayneh, Sisay; Lempp, Heidi; Alem, Atalay; Alemayehu, Daniel; Eshetu, Tigist; Lund, Crick; Semrau, Maya; Thornicroft, Graham; Hanlon, Charlotte

    2017-05-18

    It is essential to involve service users in efforts to expand access to mental health care in integrated primary care settings in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, there is little evidence from LMICs to guide this process. The aim of this study was to explore barriers to, and facilitators of, service user/caregiver involvement in rural Ethiopia to inform the development of a scalable approach. Thirty nine semi-structured interviews were carried out with purposively selected mental health service users (n = 13), caregivers (n = 10), heads of primary care facilities (n = 8) and policy makers/planners/service developers (n = 8). The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed in Amharic, and translated into English. Thematic analysis was applied. All groups of participants supported service user and caregiver involvement in mental health system strengthening. Potential benefits were identified as (i) improved appropriateness and quality of services, and (ii) greater protection against mistreatment and promotion of respect for service users. However, hardly any respondents had prior experience of service user involvement. Stigma was considered to be a pervasive barrier, operating within the health system, the local community and individuals. Competing priorities of service users included the need to obtain adequate individual care and to work for survival. Low recognition of the potential contribution of service users seemed linked to limited empowerment and mobilization of service users. Potential health system facilitators included a culture of community oversight of primary care services. All groups of respondents identified a need for awareness-raising and training to equip service users, caregivers, service providers and local community for involvement. Empowerment at the level of individual service users (information about mental health conditions, care and rights) and the group level (for advocacy and representation) were considered

  5. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county's future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County

  6. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county's future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  7. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county`s future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  8. Evaluation of brachial plexus fascicles involvement on infraclavicular block: unfixed cadaver study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Buarque de Gusmão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study shows how the diffusion of the anesthetic into the sheath occurs through the axillary infraclavicular space and hence proves the efficacy of the anesthetic block of the brachial plexus, and may thereby allow a consolidation of this pathway, with fewer complications, previously attached to the anesthesia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 33 armpits of adult cadavers were analyzed and unfixed. We injected a solution of neoprene with latex dye in the infraclavicular space, based on the technique advocated by Gusmão et al., and put the corpses in refrigerators for three weeks. Subsequently, the specimens were thawed and dissected, exposing the axillary sheath along its entire length. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Was demonstrated involvement of all fasciculus of the plexus in 51.46%. In partial involvement was 30.30%, 18.24% of cases the acrylic was located outside the auxiliary sheath involving no issue. CONCLUSIONS: The results allow us to establish the infraclavicular as an effective and easy way to access plexus brachial, because the solution involved the fascicles in 81.76% partially or totally, when it was injected inside the axillary sheath. We believe that only the use of this pathway access in practice it may demonstrate the efficiency.

  9. Swedish pediatric diabetes teams' perception of fathers' involvement: A Grounded Theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, Ase; Povlsen, Lene; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth; Borup, Ina

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze how Swedish pediatric diabetes teams perceived and discussed fathers' involvement in the care of their child with type 1 diabetes. It also aimed to discuss how the teams' attitudes towards the fathers' involvement developed during the data collection process. The Constructivist Grounded Theory design was used and data were collected during three repeated focus group discussions with three Swedish pediatric diabetes teams. The core category of the teams' perception of fathers' involvement emerged as: If dad attends, we are happy - if mom doesn't, we become concerned. Initially the teams balanced their perception of fathers' involvement on the mother's role as the primary caregiver. In connection with the teams' directed attention on fathers, in the focus group discussions, the teams' awareness of the importance of fathers increased. As a consequence, the team members began to encourage fathers' engagement in their child's care. We conclude that by increasing the teams' awareness of fathers as a health resource, an active health promotion perspective could be implemented in pediatric diabetes care. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Ideal and actual involvement of community pharmacists in health promotion and prevention: a cross-sectional study in Quebec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laliberté Marie-Claude

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increased interest is observed in broadening community pharmacists' role in public health. To date, little information has been gathered in Canada on community pharmacists' perceptions of their role in health promotion and prevention; however, such data are essential to the development of public-health programs in community pharmacy. A cross-sectional study was therefore conducted to explore the perceptions of community pharmacists in urban and semi-urban areas regarding their ideal and actual levels of involvement in providing health-promotion and prevention services and the barriers to such involvement. Methods Using a five-step modified Dillman's tailored design method, a questionnaire with 28 multiple-choice or open-ended questions (11 pages plus a cover letter was mailed to a random sample of 1,250 pharmacists out of 1,887 community pharmacists practicing in Montreal (Quebec, Canada and surrounding areas. It included questions on pharmacists' ideal level of involvement in providing health-promotion and preventive services; which services were actually offered in their pharmacy, the employees involved, the frequency, and duration of the services; the barriers to the provision of these services in community pharmacy; their opinion regarding the most appropriate health professionals to provide them; and the characteristics of pharmacists, pharmacies and their clientele. Results In all, 571 out of 1,234 (46.3% eligible community pharmacists completed and returned the questionnaire. Most believed they should be very involved in health promotion and prevention, particularly in smoking cessation (84.3%; screening for hypertension (81.8%, diabetes (76.0% and dyslipidemia (56.9%; and sexual health (61.7% to 89.1%; however, fewer respondents reported actually being very involved in providing such services (5.7% [lifestyle, including smoking cessation], 44.5%, 34.8%, 6.5% and 19.3%, respectively. The main barriers to the

  11. The insula is not specifically involved in disgust processing: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schienle, A; Stark, R; Walter, B; Blecker, C; Ott, U; Kirsch, P; Sammer, G; Vaitl, D

    2002-11-15

    fMRI studies have shown that the perception of facial disgust expressions specifically activates the insula. The present fMRI study investigated whether this structure is also involved in the processing of visual stimuli depicting non-mimic disgust elicitors compared to fear-inducing and neutral scenes. Twelve female subjects were scanned while viewing alternating blocks of 40 disgust-inducing, 40 fear-inducing and 40 affectively neutral pictures, shown for 1.5 s each. Afterwards, affective ratings were assessed. The disgust pictures, rated as highly repulsive, induced activation in the insula, the amygdala, the orbitofrontal and occipito-temporal cortex. Since during the fear condition the insula was also involved, our findings do not fit the idea of the insula as a specific disgust processor.

  12. Studies involving direct heating of uranium and plutonium oxides by microwaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, G K; Malav, R K; Karande, A P; Bhargava, V K; Kamath, H S [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India). Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility

    1997-08-01

    Nuclear fuel fabrication and recovery of nuclear materials from scraps generated during fabrication involve heating steps like dewaxing, sintering, roasting of scraps, calcination, etc. The dielectric properties of uranium and plutonium oxides place them in the category of materials which are susceptible to absorption of microwaves. The studies were carried out to explore the microwave heating technique for these steps required in nuclear fuel fabrication and scrap recovery laboratories. (author). 1 ref.

  13. Father Identity, Involvement and Work–Family Balance: An In-depth Interview Study

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, Katrina; Muldoon, Orla

    2014-01-01

    Work and family roles have changed considerably in the past number of decades. Fathers are now expected to fulfil the role of 'new father' that involves actively caring and sharing in child rearing and, at the same time, maintain commitment to their occupational role. As a consequence, men are subject to the same pressure that women were when they initially entered the workplace decades ago and indeed still are today. This study aims to explore the meanings fathers attach to their life roles,...

  14. [An intergenerational health promotion program involving older adults in urban areas. "Research of Productivity by Intergenerational Sympathy (REPRINTS)": first-year experience and short-term effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Nishi, Mariko; Watanabe, Naoki; Lee, Sangyoon; Inoue, Kazuko; Yoshida, Hiroto; Sakuma, Naoko; Kureta, Youichi; Ishii, Kenji; Uchida, Hayato; Kakuno, Fumihiko; Shinkai, Shoji

    2006-09-01

    We have launched a new intervention study, called "Research of Productivity by Intergenerational Sympathy (REPRINTS)" in which senior volunteers engage in reading picture books to children. The "REPRINTS" program consistently involves social roles and intellectual activity, two higher-level functional capacities. This study reported findings and problems experienced through "REPRINTS" during the first year, ascertained potential effectiveness of social activity, and proposed methods for continued activity. Basic concepts of "REPRINTS"program include "contribution to society", "life-long learning", and "group activity." Sixty seven volunteers and 74 controls, all aged 60 years and over living in three areas, ie., Chuo-ku, central Tokyo, Kawasaki city, suburb of Tokyo and Nagahama city, a local city, participated in a baseline health check-up in June, 2004. After completion of 3-month training seminars (once a week, 2 hr per session), volunteers visited public elementary schools and kindergartens in groups of 6-10 persons for 6 months. They were assessed again by follow-up health check-up in March, 2005. At baseline, the proportion of those who had no grand children (41.8% vs. 20.3%, P= 0.006), average school years (13.4 +/- 2.5 vs. 12.3 +/- 2.5 years, P= 0.008), having any experience of volunteer activities (79.1% vs. 52.7%, P=0.001), and an usual walking speed (86.7 +/- 12.3 vs. 81.3 +/- 12.9 m/min, P=0.012) were significantly higher in volunteers than in controls. There was no significant difference in other baseline characteristics between the two groups. At follow-up, social network scores for 56 volunteers were significantly improved: frequency of contact with grandchildren and others around neighborhood and size of circles of friends and acquaintances were increased, as compared to controls. Social support scores for the volunteers significantly decreased in the receiving aspect, while increased in the giving aspect. In addition, consciousness of loving

  15. Managing Ethical Problems in Qualitative Research Involving Vulnerable Populations, Using a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalina van Wijk RN, PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the researcher's study was to examine the meaning that intimate partners of female rape victims attached to their lived experiences after the rape. The conduct of qualitative research concerning non-offending partners of female rape victims, however, often involves multifaceted ethical and practical challenges, which can be managed through the use of pilot studies. The pilot study described in this report had three objectives. The first was to pretest and refine the proposed method for locating, accessing, and recruiting intimate partners of female rape victims, within the first two weeks after the rape, for participation in a six-month longitudinal study. The second objective was to identify and prevent all possible risk factors in the proposed recruitment and data collection methods that could harm the participants' safety during the main study. The third objective was to determine the feasibility of the main study, in terms of the limited financial and human resources available. The pilot phase was valuable in identifying ethical and methodological problems during the recruitment of participants and collection of data. It allowed for methodological adjustments prior to the main study and confirmed the feasibility of the overall research design. A pilot, pretesting phase is therefore seen as an essential component of a qualitative study involving a vulnerable population.

  16. Prescription drug monitoring program data tracking of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in integrated dual diagnosis care involving injectable naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Ayesha; Whiteman, Aaron; Bell, Richard L; Greene, Marion S; Engleman, Eric A; Chambers, R Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Fourfold increases in opioid prescribing and dispensations over 2 decades in the U.S. has paralleled increases in opioid addictions and overdoses, requiring new preventative, diagnostic, and treatment strategies. This study examines Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) tracking as a novel measure of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in a university-affiliated integrated mental health-addiction treatment clinic. Repeated measure parametrics examined PDMP and urine drug screening (UDS) data before and after first injection for all patients (N = 68) who received at least one long-acting naltrexone injection (380 mg/IM) according to diagnostic groupings of having either (i) alcohol (control); (ii) opioid; or (iii) combined alcohol and opioid use disorders. There were no group differences post-injection in treatment days, injections delivered, or treatment service encounters. UDS and PDMP measures of opioid exposures were greater in opioid compared to alcohol-only patients. Post-first injection, UDS's positive for opioids declined (p opioid prescriptions (p Opioid patients without alcohol disorders showed the best outcomes with 50% to 80% reductions in PDMP-measures of opioids, down to levels of alcohol-only patients. This study shows PDMP utility for measuring opioid addiction treatment outcomes, supporting the routine use of PDMPs in clinical and research settings. These findings demonstrate that opioid addiction in patients with complex addictions and mental illnesses comorbidities can show effective treatment responses as measured by PDMP tracking of decreases in opioid prescriptions to those patients. (Am J Addict 2016;25:557-564). © 2016 The Authors. The American Journal on Addictions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP).

  17. Novel participatory methods of involving patients in research: naming and branding a longitudinal cohort study, BRIGHTLIGHT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Mohain, Jasjeet; Gibson, Faith; Solanki, Anita; Whelan, Jeremy; Fern, Lorna A

    2015-03-14

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) is central to research and service planning. Identifying effective, meaningful ways of involvement is challenging. The cohort study 'Do specialist services for teenagers and young adults with cancer add value?' follows young people for three years, examining outcomes associated with specialist care. Participant retention in longitudinal research can be problematic potentially jeopardising study completion. Maximising study awareness through high impact branding and publicity may improve study retention. Study names are typically generated by researchers rather than designed with patients. We aimed to involve young people in developing a brand identity and name to 'Do specialist services for teenagers and young adults with cancer add value?'. Nine young people aged 17-26 years diagnosed with cancer when aged 14-25 years participated in a one day workshop with further data collection at a patient conference. Methodology was similar to conventional branding and naming exercises and was divided into six stages. The workshop comprised five stages. Stage 1: 'What's in a brand' allowed young people to enquire why brands/logos are important, Stage 2: 'Brand Transformation' identified what young people needed to know and believe about the study when approached about participation, Stage 3: 'Brand Essence' determined how we wanted the study to be perceived by young people, Stage 4: 'What's in a name' identified potential names for the study. Stage 5: 'Logo creation' assembled the mood and feel of logos. Stage 6 was logo design and an electronic survey of 249 young people attending a patient conference. BRIGHTLIGHT was the final study name and the brand essence (or study personality) was friendly, supportive and inspiring. Four logos were designed and the final logo received 47% (n = 115) of votes. Acceptance and retention to BRIGHTLIGHT is higher than anticipated (80% versus 60%), this may be related to our integral PPI strategy. We

  18. The Benefits and Challenges of Involving Adolescents in Medical Education: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Eady, Kaylee

    2018-05-30

    To explore the potential benefits and challenges of involving adolescents in the education of medical students and residents from the perspectives of adolescents who are hospitalized with chronic health conditions. We conducted qualitative interviews with adolescents at a Canadian pediatric hospital. Eligible participants were those between 13-18 years of age, with chronic health conditions lasting more than three months who were feeling well enough to participate in an interview. We used conventional content analysis to analyze the data. Sixteen adolescents participated in the study. In terms of benefits, the participants described how involving adolescents in the education of medical students and residents would improve patient-physician interactions, increase patients' confidence and self-worth, encourage patients to self-reflect and gain knowledge about their health conditions and themselves, as well as enable patients to socialize with other patients. When asked about the challenges, the participants discussed how it might be difficult to include diverse patient perspectives, manage adolescents' negativity, and ensure that learners are non-judgmental towards adolescents and take them seriously. While many of the reported benefits and challenges correspond with those featured in the literature on adult patient involvement in medical education, our findings underscore the distinctive benefits and challenges that medical educators may experience in designing and implementing educational initiatives that involve adolescents. Through the future design and implementation of educational initiatives, it is important to further explore the benefits and challenges of such adolescent involvement, as we know that adolescents can be valuable contributors to medical education. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. The normal transverse mesocolon and involvement of the mesocolon in acute pancreatitis: an MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiao Xiao; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Chen, Tian Wu; Huang, Xiao Hua; Yang, Lin; Tang, Wei; Xiao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    To study the MRI findings of the normal transverse mesocolon and the involvement of the mesocolon in acute pancreatitis (AP) as well as the relationship between the involvement of the mesocolon and the severity of AP. Forty patients without pancreatic disorders were retrospectively analyzed to observe the normal transverse mesocolon using MRI; 210 patients with AP confirmed by clinical and laboratory tests were retrospectively analyzed using MRI to observe transverse-mesocolon involvement (TMI). The severity of TMI was recorded as zero points (no abnormalities and transverse-mesocolon vessel involvement), one point (linear and patchy signal in the transverse mesocolon) or two points (transverse-mesocolon effusion). The AP severity was graded by the MRI severity index (MRSI) and the Acute Physiology And Chronic Healthy Evaluation II (APACHE II) scoring system. The correlations of TMI with MRSI and APACHE-II were analyzed. In a normal transverse mesocolon, the display rates of the middle colic artery, the middle colic vein and the gastrocolic trunk on MRI were 95.0%, 82.5% and 100.0%, respectively. Of the 210 patients with AP, 130 patients (61.9%) had TMI. According to the TMI grading, 40%, 39% and 20% of the patients were graded at zero, one and two points, respectively. TMI was strongly correlated with the MRSI score (r = 0.759, P = 0.000) and the APACHE-II score (r = 0.384, P = 0.000). MRI could be used to visualize transverse-mesocolon involvement. The severity of TMI could reflect that of AP in the clinical setting and imaging. TMI might be a supplementary indicator of the severity of AP.

  20. Evaluating and operationalizing an environmental auditing program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Laura; Bruce, Natalie; Suh, Kathryn N; Roth, Virginia

    2014-07-01

    Environmental auditing is an important tool to ensure consistent and effective cleaning. Our pilot study compared an alcohol-based fluorescent marking product and an adenosine-5'-triphosphate bioluminescence product for use in an environmental auditing program to determine which product was more practical and acceptable to users. Both products were tested on 15 preselected high touch objects in randomly selected patient rooms, following regular daily cleaning. A room was considered a "pass" if ≥80% of surfaces were adequately cleaned as defined by manufacturers' guidelines. A qualitative survey assessed user preference and operational considerations. Using fluorescent marking, 9 of 37 patient rooms evaluated (24%) were considered a "pass" after daily cleaning. Using adenosine-5'-triphosphate bioluminescence, 21 of 37 patient rooms passed (57%). There was great variability in results between different high touch objects. Eighty percent of users preferred the alcohol-based fluorescent marking product because it provided an effective visual aid to coach staff on proper cleaning techniques and allowed simple and consistent application. Environmental auditing using translucent, alcohol-based fluorescent marking best met the requirements of our organization. Our results reinforce the importance of involving a multidisciplinary team in evaluating and operationalizing an environmental auditing program. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Automated Source Code Analysis to Identify and Remove Software Security Vulnerabilities: Case Studies on Java Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan Meghanathan

    2013-01-01

    The high-level contribution of this paper is to illustrate the development of generic solution strategies to remove software security vulnerabilities that could be identified using automated tools for source code analysis on software programs (developed in Java). We use the Source Code Analyzer and Audit Workbench automated tools, developed by HP Fortify Inc., for our testing purposes. We present case studies involving a file writer program embedded with features for password validation, and ...

  2. Evaluation Study of VTAE Wood Technics Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Madison.

    A survey of former students of the Wisconsin Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education (VTAE) wood technics programs and employers in woodworking industries was conducted during spring of 1985. General objectives were to determine job classifications, types of businesses, and relative importance of tasks or duties in various woodworking-related…

  3. Middle East Studies Teacher Training Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefein, Naim A.

    This guide presents a teacher training program in Middle Eastern studies and procedures for program implementation. Details concerning program announcement, participant selection, and travel accommodations are included. Participants attended an orientation and registration workshop and an intensive academic workshop before flying to Egypt for the…

  4. An Exploratory Study to Measure Excessive Involvement in Multitasking Interaction with Smart Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yubo; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick

    2016-06-01

    This study developed a scale measuring excessive involvement in multitasking interaction with smart devices. An online questionnaire was designed and surveyed in a sample of 380 respondents. The sample was split into two groups for exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, respectively. A four-factor structure was identified with an acceptable goodness of fit. The first two factors, "Obsession and neglect" and "Problematic control," described the obsessive feelings, neglect behaviors, and behavior control problems accompanied by excessive multitasking interaction with smart devices. The latter two factors, "Multitasking preference" and "Polychronic orientation," referred to multitaskers' preference of engaging in multiple media use or interaction tasks rather than a single task from the time orientation perspective. The four-factor structure indicates that excessive involvement in multitasking interaction with smart devices shares some similarities with other behavioral addiction types, but demonstrates uniqueness compared with excessive engagement in single media use.

  5. Somatisation in primary care: experiences of primary care physicians involved in a training program and in a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salazar Agustín

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new intervention aimed at managing patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS based on a specific set of communication techniques was developed, and tested in a cluster randomised clinical trial. Due to the modest results obtained and in order to improve our intervention we need to know the GPs' attitudes towards patients with MUS, their experience, expectations and the utility of the communication techniques we proposed and the feasibility of implementing them. Physicians who took part in 2 different training programs and in a randomised controlled trial (RCT for patients with MUS were questioned to ascertain the reasons for the doctors' participation in the trial and the attitudes, experiences and expectations of GPs about the intervention. Methods A qualitative study based on four focus groups with GPs who took part in a RCT. A content analysis was carried out. Results Following the RCT patients are perceived as true suffering persons, and the relationship with them has improved in GPs of both groups. GPs mostly valued the fact that it is highly structured, that it made possible a more comfortable relationship and that it could be applied to a broad spectrum of patients with psychosocial problems. Nevertheless, all participants consider that change in patients is necessary; GPs in the intervention group remarked that that is extremely difficult to achieve. Conclusion GPs positively evaluate the communication techniques and the interventions that help in understanding patient suffering, and express the enormous difficulties in handling change in patients. These findings provide information on the direction in which efforts for improving intervention should be directed. Trial registration US ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00130988

  6. A prospective longitudinal study of children’s theory of mind and adolescent involvement in bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sania, Shakoor; Jaffee, Sara R; Bowes, Lucy; Ouellet-Morin, Isabelle; Andreou, Penelope; Happé, Francesca; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Background Theory of mind allows the understanding and prediction of other people’s behaviours based on their mental states (e.g. beliefs). It is important for healthy social relationships and thus may contribute towards children’s involvement in bullying. The present study investigated whether children involved in bullying during early adolescence had poor theory of mind in childhood. Method Participants were members of the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally-representative sample of 2,232 children and their families. Families were visited by the authors when children were 5, 7, 10 and 12 years. Theory of mind was assessed when the children were 5 years using eight standardized tasks. Identification of those children who were involved in bullying as victims, bullies and bully-victims using mothers’, teachers’ and children’s reports was carried out when they were 12 years’ old. Results Poor theory of mind predicted becoming a victim (effect size, d=0.26), bully (d=0.25) or bully-victim (d=0.44) in early adolescence. These associations remained for victims and bully-victims when child-specific (e.g., IQ) and family factors (e.g., child maltreatment) were controlled for. Emotional and behavioural problems during middle childhood did not modify the association between poor theory of mind and adolescent bullying experiences. Conclusion Identifying and supporting children with poor theory of mind early in life could help reduce their vulnerability for involvement in bullying and thus limit its adverse effects on mental health. PMID:22081896

  7. Package of programs for calculating accidents involving melting of the materials in a fast-reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasichev, G.N.

    1994-01-01

    Methods for calculating one-dimensional nonstationary temperature distribution in a system of physically coupled materials are described. Six computer programs developed for calculating accident processes for fast reactor core melt are described in the article. The methods and computer programs take into account melting, solidification, and, in some cases, vaporization of materials. The programs perform calculations for heterogeneous systems consisting of materials with arbitrary but constant composition and heat transfer conditions at material boundaries. Additional modules provide calculations of specific conditions of heat transfer between materials, the change in these conditions and configuration of the materials as a result of coolant boiling, melting and movement of the fuel and structural materials, temperature dependences of thermophysical properties of the materials, and heat release in the fuel. 11 refs., 3 figs

  8. The ethics of human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides: unanswered dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London Leslie

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The controversy about the use of data from human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides as part of regulatory risk assessment has been widely discussed, but the complex and interrelated scientific and ethical issues remain largely unresolved. This discussion paper, generated by authors who comprised a workgroup of the ICOH Scientific Committee on Rural Health, reviews the use of human experimental studies in regulatory risk assessment for pesticides with a view to advancing the debate as to when, if ever, such studies might be ethically justifiable. The discussion is based on three elements: (a a review of discussion papers on the topic of human testing of pesticides and the positions adopted by regulatory agencies in developed countries; (b an analysis of published and unpublished studies involving human testing with pesticides, both in the peer-reviewed literature and in the JMPR database; and (c application of an ethical analysis to the problem. The paper identifies areas of agreement which include general principles that may provide a starting point on which to base criteria for judgements as to the ethical acceptability of such studies. However, the paper also highlights ongoing unresolved differences of opinion inherent in ethical analysis of contentious issues, which we propose should form a starting point for further debate and the development of guidelines to achieve better resolution of this matter.

  9. The ethics of human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides: unanswered dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Leslie; Coggon, David; Moretto, Angelo; Westerholm, Peter; Wilks, Martin F; Colosio, Claudio

    2010-08-18

    The controversy about the use of data from human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides as part of regulatory risk assessment has been widely discussed, but the complex and interrelated scientific and ethical issues remain largely unresolved. This discussion paper, generated by authors who comprised a workgroup of the ICOH Scientific Committee on Rural Health, reviews the use of human experimental studies in regulatory risk assessment for pesticides with a view to advancing the debate as to when, if ever, such studies might be ethically justifiable. The discussion is based on three elements: (a) a review of discussion papers on the topic of human testing of pesticides and the positions adopted by regulatory agencies in developed countries; (b) an analysis of published and unpublished studies involving human testing with pesticides, both in the peer-reviewed literature and in the JMPR database; and (c) application of an ethical analysis to the problem. The paper identifies areas of agreement which include general principles that may provide a starting point on which to base criteria for judgements as to the ethical acceptability of such studies. However, the paper also highlights ongoing unresolved differences of opinion inherent in ethical analysis of contentious issues, which we propose should form a starting point for further debate and the development of guidelines to achieve better resolution of this matter.

  10. The ethics of human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides: unanswered dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The controversy about the use of data from human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides as part of regulatory risk assessment has been widely discussed, but the complex and interrelated scientific and ethical issues remain largely unresolved. This discussion paper, generated by authors who comprised a workgroup of the ICOH Scientific Committee on Rural Health, reviews the use of human experimental studies in regulatory risk assessment for pesticides with a view to advancing the debate as to when, if ever, such studies might be ethically justifiable. The discussion is based on three elements: (a) a review of discussion papers on the topic of human testing of pesticides and the positions adopted by regulatory agencies in developed countries; (b) an analysis of published and unpublished studies involving human testing with pesticides, both in the peer-reviewed literature and in the JMPR database; and (c) application of an ethical analysis to the problem. The paper identifies areas of agreement which include general principles that may provide a starting point on which to base criteria for judgements as to the ethical acceptability of such studies. However, the paper also highlights ongoing unresolved differences of opinion inherent in ethical analysis of contentious issues, which we propose should form a starting point for further debate and the development of guidelines to achieve better resolution of this matter. PMID:20718963

  11. Quench Simulation Studies: Program documentation of SPQR

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnemann, F

    2001-01-01

    Quench experiments are being performed on prototypes of the superconducting magnets and busbars to determine the adequate design and protection. Many tests can only be understood correctly with the help of quench simulations that model the thermo-hydraulic and electrodynamic processes during a quench. In some cases simulations are the only method to scale the experimental results of prototype measurements to match the situation of quenching superconducting elements in the LHC. This note introduces the theoretical quench model and the use of the simulation program SPQR (Simulation Program for Quench Research), which has been developed to compute the quench process in superconducting magnets and busbars. The model approximates the heat balance equation with the finite difference method including the temperature dependence of the material parameters. SPQR allows the simulation of longitudinal quench propagation along a superconducting cable, the transverse propagation between adjacent conductors, heat transfer i...

  12. Quality-assurance study of the special - purpose finite-element program - SPECTROM: I. Thermal, thermoelastic, and viscoelastic problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, R.A.

    1980-12-01

    This comparison study involves a preliminary verification of finite element calculations. The methodology of the comparison study consists of solving four example problems with both the SPECTROM finite element program and the MARC-CDC general purpose finite element program. The results show close agreement for all example problems

  13. Social influences upon injection initiation among street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Evan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Street-involved youth are a population at risk of adopting injection as a route of administration, and preventing the transition to injection drug use among street youth represents a public health priority. In order to inform epidemiological research and prevention efforts, we conducted a qualitative study to investigate the initiation of injection drug use among street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada. Methods Qualitative interviews with street youth who inject drugs elicited descriptions of the adoption of injection as a route of administration. Interviewees were recruited from the At-Risk Youth Study (ARYS, a cohort of street-involved youth who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, Canada. Audio recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted. Results 26 youth aged 16 to 26 participated in this study, including 12 females. Among study participants the first injection episode frequently featured another drug user who facilitated the initiation of injecting. Youth narratives indicate that the transition into injecting is influenced by social interactions with drug using peers and evolving perceptions of injecting, and rejecting identification as an injector was important among youth who did not continue to inject. It appears that social conventions discouraging initiating young drug users into injection exist among established injectors, although this ethic is often ignored. Conclusion The importance of social relationships with other drug users within the adoption of injection drug use highlights the potential of social interventions to prevent injection initiation. Additionally, developing strategies to engage current injectors who are likely to initiate youth into injection could also benefit prevention efforts.

  14. A Pilot Study Involving the Effect of Two Different Complex Training Protocols on Lower Body Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Chad E.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Complex training (CT involves the coupling of two exercises ostensibly to enhance the effect of the second exercise. Typically, the first exercise is a strength exercise and the second exercise is a power exercise involving similar muscles. In most cases, CT is designed to enhance power. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, this study was designed to determine if lower body power could be enhanced using complex training protocols. Second, this study investigated whether the inclusion of a power exercise instead of a strength exercise as the first exercise in CT would produce differences in lower body power. Methods. Thirty-six recreationally-trained men and women aged 20 to 29 years attending a college physical education course were randomly assigned to one of three groups: squat and countermovement squat jumps (SSJ, kettlebell swings and countermovement squat jumps (KSJ, and a control (CON. Training involving CT lasted 6 weeks. All participants were pre- and posttested for vertical jump performance in order to assess lower body power. Results. Vertical jump scores improved for all groups (p < 0.01. The results also indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between group scores across time (p = 0.215. The statistical power for this analysis was low (0.312, most likely due to the small sample size. However, the results did reveal a trend suggesting that the training improvements were greater for both the SSJ and KSJ groups compared with the CON (by 171% and 107%, respectively although significance was not reached. Conclusions. Due to the observed trend, a replication of this study with a greater number of participants over a longer period of time is warranted.

  15. Cross sectional study of young people's awareness of and involvement with tobacco marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFadyen, L; Hastings, G; MacKintosh, A M

    2001-03-03

    To examine young people's awareness of and involvement with tobacco marketing and to determine the association, if any, between this and their smoking behaviour. Cross sectional, quantitative survey, part interview and part self completion, administered in respondents' homes. North east England. Stratified random sample of 629 young people aged 15 and 16 years who had "opted in" to research through a postal consent procedure. There was a high level of awareness of and involvement in tobacco marketing among the 15-16 year olds sampled in the study: around 95% were aware of advertising and all were aware of some method of point of sale marketing. Awareness of and involvement with tobacco marketing were both significantly associated with being a smoker: for example, 30% (55/185) of smokers had received free gifts through coupons in cigarette packs, compared with 11% (21/199) of non-smokers (Pawareness of coupon schemes, brand stretching, and tobacco marketing in general were all independently associated with current smoking status. Teenagers are aware of, and are participating in, many forms of tobacco marketing, and both awareness and participation are associated with current smoking status. This suggests that the current voluntary regulations designed to protect young people from smoking are not working, and that statutory regulations are required.

  16. Phytoremediation potential of the novel atrazine tolerant Lolium multiflorum and studies on the mechanisms involved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merini, Luciano J.; Bobillo, Cecilia; Cuadrado, Virginia; Corach, Daniel; Giulietti, Ana M.

    2009-01-01

    Atrazine impact on human health and the environment have been extensively studied. Phytoremediation emerged as a low cost, environmental friendly biotechnological solution for atrazine pollution in soil and water. In vitro atrazine tolerance assays were performed and Lolium multiflorum was found as a novel tolerant species, able to germinate and grow in the presence of 1 mg kg -1 of the herbicide. L. multiflorum presented 20% higher atrazine removal capacity than the natural attenuation, with high initial degradation rate in microcosms. The mechanisms involved in atrazine tolerance such as mutation in psbA gene, enzymatic detoxification via P 450 or chemical hydrolysis through benzoxazinones were evaluated. It was demonstrated that atrazine tolerance is conferred by enhanced enzymatic detoxification via P 450 . Due to its atrazine degradation capacity in soil and its agronomical properties, L. multiflorum is a candidate for designing phytoremediation strategies for atrazine contaminated agricultural soils, especially those involving run-off avoiding. - Finding of a novel atrazine-tolerant species, as a potential candidate for phytoremediating herbicide-contaminated agriculture soils and elucidation of the mechanisms involved in tolerance.

  17. Phytoremediation potential of the novel atrazine tolerant Lolium multiflorum and studies on the mechanisms involved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merini, Luciano J. [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bobillo, Cecilia [Servicio de Huellas Digitales Geneticas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, BS As (Argentina); Cuadrado, Virginia [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Corach, Daniel [Servicio de Huellas Digitales Geneticas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, BS As (Argentina); Giulietti, Ana M., E-mail: agiule@ffyb.uba.a [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-11-15

    Atrazine impact on human health and the environment have been extensively studied. Phytoremediation emerged as a low cost, environmental friendly biotechnological solution for atrazine pollution in soil and water. In vitro atrazine tolerance assays were performed and Lolium multiflorum was found as a novel tolerant species, able to germinate and grow in the presence of 1 mg kg{sup -1} of the herbicide. L. multiflorum presented 20% higher atrazine removal capacity than the natural attenuation, with high initial degradation rate in microcosms. The mechanisms involved in atrazine tolerance such as mutation in psbA gene, enzymatic detoxification via P{sub 450} or chemical hydrolysis through benzoxazinones were evaluated. It was demonstrated that atrazine tolerance is conferred by enhanced enzymatic detoxification via P{sub 450}. Due to its atrazine degradation capacity in soil and its agronomical properties, L. multiflorum is a candidate for designing phytoremediation strategies for atrazine contaminated agricultural soils, especially those involving run-off avoiding. - Finding of a novel atrazine-tolerant species, as a potential candidate for phytoremediating herbicide-contaminated agriculture soils and elucidation of the mechanisms involved in tolerance.

  18. Improving the active involvement of stakeholders and the public in flood risk management – tools of an involvement strategy and case study results from Austria, Germany and Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vitale

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The EU Flood Risk Management Directive 2007/60/EC aims at an active involvement of interested parties in the setting up of flood risk management plans and thus calls for more governance-related decision-making. This requirement has two perspectives. On the one hand, there is (1 the question of how decision-makers can improve the quality of their governance process. On the other hand, there is (2 the question of how the public shall be appropriately informed and involved. These questions were the centre of the ERA-Net CRUE-funded project IMRA (integrative flood risk governance approach for improvement of risk awareness that aimed at an optimisation of the flood risk management process by increasing procedural efficiency with an explicit involvement strategy. To reach this goal, the IMRA project partners developed two new approaches that were implemented in three case study areas for the first time in flood risk management: 1. risk governance assessment tool: An indicator-based benchmarking and monitoring tool was used to evaluate the performance of a flood risk management system in regard to ideal risk governance principles; 2. social milieu approach: The concept of social milieus was used to gain a picture of the people living in the case study regions to learn more about their lifestyles, attitudes and values and to use this knowledge to plan custom-made information and participation activities for the broad public. This paper presents basic elements and the application of two innovative approaches as a part of an "involvement strategy" that aims at the active involvement of all interested parties (stakeholders for assessing, reviewing and updating flood risk management plans, as formulated in the EU Flood Risk Management Directive 2007/60/EC.

  19. African Social Studies Program-1, 1988-89. Final Report. A Master's Degree Program for African Social Studies Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana Univ., Bloomington.

    This paper presents the final report on a project that brought African social studies education leaders to Indiana University (Bloomington) to take part in a Master's Degree program. The report contains a brief history of the program, a description of the program, a discussion of issues relating to acculturation, an evaluation, a list of…

  20. Handling ethical, legal and social issues in birth cohort studies involving genetic research: responses from studies in six countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeGrandeur Jane

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research involving minors has been the subject of much ethical debate. The growing number of longitudinal, pediatric studies that involve genetic research present even more complex challenges to ensure appropriate protection of children and families as research participants. Long-term studies with a genetic component involve collection, retention and use of biological samples and personal information over many years. Cohort studies may be established to study specific conditions (e.g. autism, asthma or may have a broad aim to research a range of factors that influence the health and development of children. Studies are increasingly intended to serve as research platforms by providing access to data and biological samples to researchers over many years. This study examines how six birth cohort studies in North America and Europe that involve genetic research handle key ethical, legal and social (ELS issues: recruitment, especially parental authority to include a child in research; initial parental consent and subsequent assent and/or consent from the maturing child; withdrawal; confidentiality and sample/data protection; handling sensitive information; and disclosure of results. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out in 2008/09 with investigators involved in six birth cohort studies in Canada, Denmark, England, France, the Netherlands and the United States. Interviewees self-identified as being knowledgeable about ELS aspects of the study. Interviews were conducted in English. Results The studies vary in breadth of initial consent, but none adopt a blanket consent for future use of samples/data. Ethics review of new studies is a common requirement. Studies that follow children past early childhood recognise a need to seek assent/consent as the child matures. All studies limit access to identifiable data and advise participants of the right to withdraw. The clearest differences among studies concern

  1. Neurotransmitter systems and neurotrophic factors in autism: association study of 37 genes suggests involvement of DDC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Claudio; Hervás, Amaia; Balmaña, Noemí; Salgado, Marta; Maristany, Marta; Vilella, Elisabet; Aguilera, Francisco; Orejuela, Carmen; Cuscó, Ivon; Gallastegui, Fátima; Pérez-Jurado, Luis Alberto; Caballero-Andaluz, Rafaela; Diego-Otero, Yolanda de; Guzmán-Alvarez, Guadalupe; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Ribasés, Marta; Bayés, Mònica; Cormand, Bru

    2013-09-01

    Neurotransmitter systems and neurotrophic factors can be considered strong candidates for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems are involved in neurotransmission, brain maturation and cortical organization, while neurotrophic factors (NTFs) participate in neurodevelopment, neuronal survival and synapses formation. We aimed to test the contribution of these candidate pathways to autism through a case-control association study of genes selected both for their role in central nervous system functions and for pathophysiological evidences. The study sample consisted of 326 unrelated autistic patients and 350 gender-matched controls from Spain. We genotyped 369 tagSNPs to perform a case-control association study of 37 candidate genes. A significant association was obtained between the DDC gene and autism in the single-marker analysis (rs6592961, P = 0.00047). Haplotype-based analysis pinpointed a four-marker combination in this gene associated with the disorder (rs2329340C-rs2044859T-rs6592961A-rs11761683T, P = 4.988e-05). No significant results were obtained for the remaining genes after applying multiple testing corrections. However, the rs167771 marker in DRD3, associated with ASD in a previous study, displayed a nominal association in our analysis (P = 0.023). Our data suggest that common allelic variants in the DDC gene may be involved in autism susceptibility.

  2. Cardio-pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis: A study at a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetakiran Arakkal

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In our patients, pulmonary involvement was more common than cardiac involvement. Interstitial lung disease and cardiac involvement were more commonly seen in diffuse systemic sclerosis whereas pulmonary hypertension was more frequent in limited systemic sclerosis. Hence, it is important to screen the patients for cardiopulmonary involvement for early diagnosis and treatment and a better prognostic outcome.

  3. Involvement of phospholipase D-related signal transduction in chemical-induced programmed cell death in tomato cell cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Michaeli, R.; Woltering, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) and its product phosphatidic acid (PA) are incorporated in a complex metabolic network in which the individual PLD isoforms are suggested to regulate specific developmental and stress responses, including plant programmed cell death (PCD). Despite the accumulating knowledge,

  4. A QUALITATIVE EVALUATION OF THE DIDACTIC ACTING OF THE TUTORS INVOLVED IN THE PROGRAM OF TUTORIA IN BIOCHEMISTRY AT UFV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Damasceno

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The Tutorial Program in Biochemistry is part of a Program of Didactic Support atUFV that intends to give academic-pedagogic support to students that arrived tothe UFV with deficiency of previous knowledge in basic areas of the sciences. Thetutors are under-graduated students chosen by public selection. The present workseeks to evaluate the tutors of the biochemistry area as for the aspects publicspeaking, didacticism and satisfaction of the tutor and of the students assisted bythe program. Two questionnaires were applied, one to the tutors and one to theunder-graduated assisted-students. The totality of the tutors answered that theparticipation in this program contributes professionally by increasing the capacityof relationship in group, dynamism, decisions and organization, helped them to bemore extroverted and they felt satisfied to help other people, which characteristicsthat are more and more appraised in the job market. The evaluation showed alsothat the ability to express in public developed positively and improved the diction,presenting safety when speaking in public. The tutors also opened your vision onthe teaching form in the University, a positive result, considering their positions ofstudent in one public university.

  5. Parent Involvement Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arna

    This handbook on parent involvement, designed to be used with preschool programs, was developed by the Jefferson County Public Schools in Lakewood, Colorado. Included are: (1) a general statement about parent involvement in an early childhood program, (2) a description of the Jefferson County Early Childhood Program, (3) a description of the…

  6. A Study of the Effect of Alternative Programs on the Potential Dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Cyril; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    Educators are very concerned about the problem of students dropping out of school. The reasons for students dropping out vary from social to economic causes. Alternative programs or schools have been used since the 1960s to try to keep students in school. This study involved a literature review of research on the identification and remediation of…

  7. The Effect of Persuasion on the Utilization of Program Evaluation Information: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Sandra H.; Thompson, Bruce

    The utilization of program evaluation may be made more effective by means of the application of contemporary persuasion theory. The Elaboration Likelihood Model--a model of cognitive processing, ability, and motivation--was used in this study to test the persuasive effects of source credibility and involvement on message acceptance of evaluation…

  8. Multicultural Women's Sourcebook. Materials Guide for Use in Women's Studies and Bilingual/Multicultural Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotera, Martha P., Comp.; Cunningham, Nella, Ed.

    This sourcebook for persons involved with bilingual education, multicultural education, and womens' studies programs contains over 2000 entries for materials on women of various cultures in the United States. Materials are organized as much as possible by specific racial or ethnic groups. The many publications that present information on more than…

  9. Central nervous system involvement in adults with haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guilan; Wang, Yini; Liu, Xiaojing; Han, Yanfei; Wang, Zhao

    2017-08-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by proliferation and diffuse infiltration multiple organs with histiocytes, including the central nervous system (CNS). Neurological manifestations of HLH have been recognized in different studies with children, but they remain relatively ill-defined in adults with HLH. From March 2008 to October 2014, 289 adult patients with HLH were admitted to our center. Clinical, radiological, and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) data of the patients with CNS involvement were reviewed, and a retrospective study in our single-center was carried out. CNS involvement was observed in 29 patients (10%) either in their diagnosis process or during disease course. CNS symptoms included disturbance of consciousness, cranial nerve palsies, seizures, headache, limb paralysis, irritability, meningism, and memory loss. CSF analysis was conducted in 17 patients (59%). Among them, 11 patients (65%) were reported as having abnormal CSF. Neuroradiological studies were performed in 25 patients (86%). Among the 13 cases that underwent CT scan, one patient hemorrhaged. Single or multiple hypodense foci were detected in the other 2 patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities were found in 15 patients, including focal lesions in cortical and adjacent subcortical regions with or without variable nodular or ring contrast-enhancement, multiple lesions in white matter, diffuse white matter signal changes, and meningeal enhancement. Basal ganglia, cerebellum, and brainstem lesions were also observed. CNS involvement could also be found in adult patients with HLH, but not as frequent as it was in children. The clinical manifestations could be diversified. By carrying out rigorous CNS examinations, an early diagnosis could be made and it was of the utmost importance for the prevention of further lesions.

  10. Impact of Aspect-Oriented Programming on the Quality of Novices’ Programs: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Katic

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspect-oriented programming has been introduced in order to increase the modularity of object-oriented programs and is claimed to improve software quality. Although there are various researches on this claim, the question to what extent aspect-oriented programming improves the quality of programs depending on a developer’s experience still remains. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether aspect-oriented programming used by novice programmers improves the quality of programs, in terms of software flexibility and readability (consequently reusability and maintainability as well. As a part of an undergraduate course in programming paradigms and languages, a systematic comparison between students’ object-oriented and aspect-oriented solutions of the same problem was driven. In order to drive this comparison we have established the basis for the development of the new quality assessment model consisting of software metrics for an objective evaluation and student survey for subjective evaluation. The results show that the use of aspect-oriented programming lead to novices’ programs that are easier to change and read (flexible and readable compared to object-oriented programs. What is more, administered survey showed that students perceive their programs as more flexible and readable.

  11. Using metagenomics and metatranscriptomics to study specific bacterial species involved in biological phosphorus removal from wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel

    an enrichment of the target organisms in laboratory scale reactors under controlled conditions. We demonstrate that it is now easy and affordable to extract genomes of all the dominant organisms from reactors due to reduced micro-diversity and further use these to examine their individual gene expression...... profiles by metatranscriptomics. To demonstrate this we revisited the bacteria involved in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from wastewater treatment plants. The EBPR process is used all over the world, has a large body of information regarding the underlying microbiology, and is often studied...

  12. Customizing Process to Align with Purpose and Program: The 2003 MS PHD'S in Ocean Sciences Program Evaluative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, V. A.; Pyrtle, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    How did the 2003 Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) in Ocean Sciences Program customize evaluative methodology and instruments to align with program goals and processes? How is data captured to document cognitive and affective impact? How are words and numbers utilized to accurately illustrate programmatic outcomes? How is compliance with implicit and explicit funding regulations demonstrated? The 2003 MS PHD'S in Ocean Sciences Program case study provides insightful responses to each of these questions. MS PHD'S was developed by and for underrepresented minorities to facilitate increased and sustained participation in Earth system science. Key components of this initiative include development of a community of scholars sustained by face-to-face and virtual mentoring partnerships; establishment of networking activities between and among undergraduate, graduate, postgraduate students, scientists, faculty, professional organization representatives, and federal program officers; and provision of forums to address real world issues as identified by each constituent group. The evaluative case study of the 2003 MS PHD'S in Ocean Sciences Program consists of an analysis of four data sets. Each data set was aligned to document progress in the achievement of the following program goals: Goal 1: The MS PHD'S Ocean Sciences Program will successfully market, recruit, select, and engage underrepresented student and non-student participants with interest/ involvement in Ocean Sciences; Goal 2: The MS PHD'S Ocean Sciences Program will provide meaningful engagement for participants as determined by quantitative analysis of user-feedback; Goal 3: The MS PHD'S Ocean Sciences Program will provide meaningful engagement for participants as determined by qualitative analysis of user-feedback, and; Goal 4: The MS PHD'S Ocean Sciences Program will develop a constituent base adequate to demonstrate evidence of interest, value, need and sustainability in

  13. Object oriented distributed programming: studies and proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerraoui, Rachid

    1992-01-01

    This thesis contributes to the investigation of the object concept in distributed programming. Henceforth, this programming style has become a reality in the computer science world, since it allows to increase of the availability of applications and to decrease their execution time. Nevertheless, designing a distributed application is a hard task: the various abstraction levels that must be considered hinder the software reusability and maintenance, while errors and concurrent accesses are often sources of executions incoherence. The object concept improves the software modularity, and raises the computing abstraction level. Integrating distribution related aspects into the object model brings up the issues of expressing the concurrency and maintaining the coherency. The investigation of these problems in this thesis has been guided by a major concern for the preservation of the intrinsic properties of object-orientation, and the orthogonality of the solutions given. The main contributions of the thesis are: (i) the classification, regarding modularity, of the different design alternatives for object-oriented concurrent languages; (ii) the evaluation of various transactional mechanisms in object-based concurrent languages, and the design of an atomic asynchronous communication protocol named ACS; (iii) the definition of a transaction-based object-oriented concurrent language called KAROS; (iv) the implementation of a modular framework which allows to combine in a same application, various concurrency control and error recovery mechanisms; (v) the identification of a formal property, named general atomicity, which constitutes a correctness criteria for atomic objects specifications. (author) [fr

  14. The study of perceived adverse effects of digital piracy and involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kos Koklic, M.; Vida, I.; Bajde, Domen

    2014-01-01

    intentions, and explore the rarely examined moderating effect of issue involvement on the relationship between the attitude and intention to pirate. The dominant attitude-behaviour theory is extended with an ethical decision-making theoretical perspective. The hypotheses are tested via mail survey data from......In this study, we focus on two sets of expected negative consequences of engaging in digital piracy among the seldom studied adult computer users rather than student population. We delve into the role of perceived risk and moral intensity as drivers of consumers' attitudes and behavioural...... a random sample of adult consumers using structural equations modelling. The results of this cross-sectional study show unfailing support for the relationships proposed in our model. Our findings suggest that, in addition to perceived risk, moral intensity (i.e. the expected consequences for others), has...

  15. Energy Justice and the Stakeholders Involved: A Case Study of Solar Power in Rural Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romulus, Elijah Rey Asse

    This paper explores and analyzes energy justice and the stakeholders involved. Energy insecurity, specifically the lack of access to electricity effects over 1.3 billion people worldwide and energy justice is a way to address it. This paper is supported by a case study with data collected in the southern rural regions of Haiti regarding energy justice communities. Three cities were studied: Les Cayes, Anse-a-Veau, and Les Anglais. It examines how solar businesses can aid energy justice communities seeking access to electricity. Stakeholders such as the communities themselves, solar businesses, and nonprofits in the region are studied and analyzed. The paper concludes solar businesses are helping said communities but needs participation from other stakeholders to be successful. Finally, there are five recommendations to build capacity, develop infrastructure in the region, explore the possibility of solar cooperatives, strengthen the solar economy in Haiti, and demand reparations.

  16. Effectiveness of Subsidies in Technology Adoption: A Case Study Involving Reverse Osmosis (RO Membrane Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Laili

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adoption of new technologies is a process that involves technological learning and penetration of new products into the market. Within the process of new technologies adoption, government usually intervened by providing incentives, in order to support the technology adoption to be succeed. This paper examines the effectiveness of incentives for the sustainability of reverse osmosis (RO membrane technology adoption. The study conducted through single case study on SWRO installation in Mandangin Island, East Java, Indonesia. Results of case study indentify the existence of government incentive in the form of direct subsidies to decrease the price of clean water. Although successful in reducing the price of water, but effectiveness of the subsidy on the sustainability of SWRO is still low, which is operates only 30% in a year. Further analysis shows that these subsidies actually be counter-productive to the sustainability of SWRO installation.

  17. A national study of the streamflow data-collection program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Manuel A.; Carter, Rolland William

    1973-01-01

    The streamflow data program of the U.S. Geological Survey was evaluated in a nationwide study during 1970. The principal elements of the study were (1) establishing the objectives and goals of the program, (2) analyzing all available data to determine which of the goals have already been met, (3) considering alternate means of meeting the remaining goals, and (4) identifying the elements which should be included in the future program.

  18. Exploring the experiences of bereaved families involved in assisted suicide in Southern Switzerland: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamondi, Claudia; Pott, Murielle; Forbes, Karen; Payne, Sheila

    2015-06-01

    In Switzerland, helping with assisted suicide under certain conditions is not prosecuted. With approximately 300 cases annually, this leaves behind a large group of bereaved people where its consequences are mostly unknown. The study aimed to explore family involvement in decision making prior to assisted suicide, and to examine their ways of coping during the bereavement period. A qualitative interview study used the principles of Grounded Theory analysis. Eleven relatives of eight patients, who died in Southern Switzerland after assisted suicide, participated in semistructured interviews. The large majority of family members faced moral dilemmas during the decision-making phase. Their respect for patient's autonomy was a key justification to resolve dilemmas. Two types of involvement were identified: categorised as 'passive' when the decision making was located with the patient, and 'active' when assisted suicide was proposed by the family member and/or the relative was involved in some way. The relatives reported feelings of isolation during and after assisted suicide. Family members reported fear of social stigma and did not openly disclose assisted suicide as the cause of death. None of those interviewed received formal psychological support. Bereaved families express moral dilemmas, feelings of isolation and secrecy in the management of assisted suicide in Southern Switzerland. These features seem underestimated and not sufficiently recognised by the healthcare professionals. Management of assisted suicide requests should include consideration of family members' needs, in addition to those of the patient. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Exact solutions to traffic density estimation problems involving the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards traffic flow model using mixed integer programming

    KAUST Repository

    Canepa, Edward S.; Claudel, Christian G.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a new mixed integer programming formulation of the traffic density estimation problem in highways modeled by the Lighthill Whitham Richards equation. We first present an equivalent formulation of the problem using an Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Then, using a semi-analytic formula, we show that the model constraints resulting from the Hamilton-Jacobi equation result in linear constraints, albeit with unknown integers. We then pose the problem of estimating the density at the initial time given incomplete and inaccurate traffic data as a Mixed Integer Program. We then present a numerical implementation of the method using experimental flow and probe data obtained during Mobile Century experiment. © 2012 IEEE.

  20. Exact solutions to traffic density estimation problems involving the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards traffic flow model using mixed integer programming

    KAUST Repository

    Canepa, Edward S.

    2012-09-01

    This article presents a new mixed integer programming formulation of the traffic density estimation problem in highways modeled by the Lighthill Whitham Richards equation. We first present an equivalent formulation of the problem using an Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Then, using a semi-analytic formula, we show that the model constraints resulting from the Hamilton-Jacobi equation result in linear constraints, albeit with unknown integers. We then pose the problem of estimating the density at the initial time given incomplete and inaccurate traffic data as a Mixed Integer Program. We then present a numerical implementation of the method using experimental flow and probe data obtained during Mobile Century experiment. © 2012 IEEE.

  1. Centennial Challenges Program Overview: How NASA Successfully Involves the General Public in the Solving of Current Technology Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Monsi C.; Kim, Tony; Sudnik, Janet; Sivak, Amy; Porter, Molly; Cylar, Rosaling; Cavanaugh, Dominique; Krome, Kim

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Centennial Challenges Program, part of the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD), addresses key technology needs of NASA and the nation, while facilitating new sources of innovation outside the traditional community. This is done by the direct engagement of the public at large, through the offering of Congressional authorized prize purses and associated challenges developed by NASA and the aerospace community and set up as a competition awarding the prize money for achieving the specified technology goal.

  2. Are media still the message? A comparative study of high and low involvement brands in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Neda

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the importance of media choice for branding of high and low involvement products. Given the magnitude of branding today and the complexity of the media environment, the lack of modern studies comparing different media from the consumers' perspective especially in different cultural settings, is both profound and surprising. Studies of Larkin (1978 and Stephens (1981 are not only outdated but also US-specific. Furthermore, although McLuhan (2002 has famously claimed that the medium is the message, there is no contemporary marketing study examining this claim in relation to major branding elements such as brand awareness perceived quality, brand attitude, and brand image. The study's major contribution is that it attempts to fill in this research gap by investigating if and how consumers differentiate brands, with respect to the media that they appear in. A comparison between low and high involvement brands was considered apparent for a more comprehensive research approach. This study is a deductive and a quantitative one. Sample consisted of 160 respondents in Serbia, ranging from 18 to 59 years old, and the data collection method was a self-administered e-mail questionnaire. Major findings suggest that different media indeed affect various aspects of branding, with magazines favoring most of brand image characteristics, and television favoring brand awareness. However, analysis also indicated a clustering of television, magazine, and outdoor as media with similar scores in almost every aspect. This clustering has the potential to affect both branding and media planning decisions. Internet is found to be a promising medium for the future in Serbia but not so much for the present.

  3. Compulsory Project-Level Involvement and the Use of Program-Level Evaluations: Evaluating the Local Systemic Change for Teacher Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kelli; Weiss, Iris R.

    2011-01-01

    In 1995, the National Science Foundation (NSF) contracted with principal investigator Iris Weiss and an evaluation team at Horizon Research, Inc. (HRI) to conduct a national evaluation of the Local Systemic Change for Teacher Enhancement program (LSC). HRI conducted the core evaluation under a $6.25 million contract with NSF. This program…

  4. Institutional ethical review and ethnographic research involving injection drug users: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Will; Maher, Lisa; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Ethnographic research among people who inject drugs (PWID) involves complex ethical issues. While ethical review frameworks have been critiqued by social scientists, there is a lack of social science research examining institutional ethical review processes, particularly in relation to ethnographic work. This case study describes the institutional ethical review of an ethnographic research project using observational fieldwork and in-depth interviews to examine injection drug use. The review process and the salient concerns of the review committee are recounted, and the investigators' responses to the committee's concerns and requests are described to illustrate how key issues were resolved. The review committee expressed concerns regarding researcher safety when conducting fieldwork, and the investigators were asked to liaise with the police regarding the proposed research. An ongoing dialogue with the institutional review committee regarding researcher safety and autonomy from police involvement, as well as formal consultation with a local drug user group and solicitation of opinions from external experts, helped to resolve these issues. This case study suggests that ethical review processes can be particularly challenging for ethnographic projects focused on illegal behaviours, and that while some challenges could be mediated by modifying existing ethical review procedures, there is a need for legislation that provides legal protection of research data and participant confidentiality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cardiac involvement in myotonic muscular dystrophy (Steinert's disease): a prospective study of 25 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perloff, J.K.; Stevenson, W.G.; Roberts, N.K.; Cabeen, W.; Weiss, J.

    1984-01-01

    The presence, degree and frequency of disorders of cardiac conduction and rhythm and of regional or global myocardial dystrophy or myotonia have not previously been studied prospectively and systematically in the same population of patients with myotonic dystrophy. Accordingly, 25 adults with classic Steinert's disease underwent electrocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, vectorcardiography, chest x-rays, echocardiography, electrophysiologic studies, and technetium-99m angiography. Clinically important cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy reside in specialized tissues rather than in myocardium. Involvement is relatively specific, primarily assigned to the His-Purkinje system. The cardiac muscle disorder takes the form of dystrophy rather than myotonia, and is not selective, appearing with approximately equal distribution in all 4 chambers. Myocardial dystrophy seldom results in clinically overt ventricular failure, but may be responsible for atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since myotonic dystrophy is genetically transmitted, a primary biochemical defect has been proposed with complete expression of the gene toward striated muscle tissue, whether skeletal or cardiac. Specialized cardiac tissue and myocardium have close, if not identical, embryologic origins, so it is not surprising that the genetic marker affects both. Cardiac involvement is therefore an integral part of myotonic dystrophy, targeting particularly the infranodal conduction system, to a lesser extent the sinus node, and still less specifically, the myocardium

  6. Occipital and occipital "plus" epilepsies: A study of involved epileptogenic networks through SEEG quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Angela; Bonini, Francesca; Lagarde, Stanislas; McGonigal, Aileen; Gavaret, Martine; Scavarda, Didier; Carron, Romain; Aubert, Sandrine; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Médina Villalon, Samuel; Bénar, Christian; Trebuchon, Agnes; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2016-09-01

    Compared with temporal or frontal lobe epilepsies, the occipital lobe epilepsies (OLE) remain poorly characterized. In this study, we aimed at classifying the ictal networks involving OLE and investigated clinical features of the OLE network subtypes. We studied 194 seizures from 29 consecutive patients presenting with OLE and investigated by stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG). Epileptogenicity of occipital and extraoccipital regions was quantified according to the 'epileptogenicity index' (EI) method. We found that 79% of patients showed widespread epileptogenic zone organization, involving parietal or temporal regions in addition to the occipital lobe. Two main groups of epileptogenic zone organization within occipital lobe seizures were identified: a pure occipital group and an occipital "plus" group, the latter including two further subgroups, occipitotemporal and occipitoparietal. In 29% of patients, the epileptogenic zone was found to have a bilateral organization. The most epileptogenic structure was the fusiform gyrus (mean EI: 0.53). Surgery was proposed in 18/29 patients, leading to seizure freedom in 55% (Engel Class I). Results suggest that, in patient candidates for surgery, the majority of cases are characterized by complex organization of the EZ, corresponding to the occipital plus group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Male College Student Perceptions of Intercultural and Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirolf, Kathryn Q.

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to understand why men participate in study abroad at much lower rates than women, this study examines how male college students at a large research university perceive a university-run global education program, especially in terms of the expected costs and benefits of participating in such programs, and the extent to which gender…

  8. Compassion and Caring: Missing Concepts in Social Studies Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliner, Pearl

    1979-01-01

    Current social studies programs do not include the study of prosocial behaviors such as altruism, generosity, and compassion. This omission legitimizes the view that human behaviors are self-serving. Curriculum developers should fashion programs which provide prosocial models and opportunities for students to conceptualize such behaviors and…

  9. Dropout from exercise programs for seniors: A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiggelbout, M.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Tak, E.; Lechner, L.; Mechelen, W. van

    2005-01-01

    This study examines dropout incidence, moment of dropout, and switching behavior in organized exercise programs for seniors in the Netherlands, as determined in a prospective cohort study (with baseline measurements at the start of the exercise program and follow-up after 6 months; N = 1,725,

  10. Lower leg muscle involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an MR imaging and spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torriani, Martin; Townsend, Elise; Thomas, Bijoy J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Ghomi, Reza H.; Tseng, Brian S.

    2012-01-01

    To describe the involvement of lower leg muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by using MR imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) correlated to indices of functional status. Nine boys with DMD (mean age, 11 years) and eight healthy age- and BMI-matched boys (mean age, 13 years) prospectively underwent lower leg MRI, 1H-MRS of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) for lipid fraction measures, and 31P-MRS for pH and high-energy phosphate measures. DMD subjects were evaluated using the Vignos lower extremity functional rating, and tests including 6 min walk test (6MWT) and 10 m walk. DMD subjects had highest fatty infiltration scores in peroneal muscles, followed by medial gastrocnemius and soleus. Compared to controls, DMD boys showed higher intramuscular fat (P = 0.04), lipid fractions of TA and SOL (P = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively), pH of anterior compartment (P = 0.0003), and lower phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphorus ratio of posterior compartment (P = 0.02). The Vignos rating correlated with TA (r = 0.79, P = 0.01) and SOL (r = 0.71, P = 0.03) lipid fractions. The 6MWT correlated with fatty infiltration scores of SOL (r = -0.76, P = 0.046), medial (r = -0.80, P = 0.03) and lateral (r = -0.84, P = 0.02) gastrocnemius, intramuscular fat (r = -0.80, P = 0.03), and SOL lipid fraction (r = -0.89, P = 0.007). Time to walk 10 m correlated with anterior compartment pH (r = 0.78, P = 0.04). Lower leg muscles of boys with DMD show a distinct involvement pattern and increased adiposity that correlates with functional status. Lower leg MRI and 1H-MRS studies may help to noninvasively demonstrate the severity of muscle involvement. (orig.)

  11. Lower leg muscle involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an MR imaging and spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Townsend, Elise [MGH Institute of Health Professions and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Thomas, Bijoy J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Ghomi, Reza H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Tseng, Brian S. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinic, Boston, MA (United States); Novartis Institute of Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-04-15

    To describe the involvement of lower leg muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by using MR imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) correlated to indices of functional status. Nine boys with DMD (mean age, 11 years) and eight healthy age- and BMI-matched boys (mean age, 13 years) prospectively underwent lower leg MRI, 1H-MRS of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) for lipid fraction measures, and 31P-MRS for pH and high-energy phosphate measures. DMD subjects were evaluated using the Vignos lower extremity functional rating, and tests including 6 min walk test (6MWT) and 10 m walk. DMD subjects had highest fatty infiltration scores in peroneal muscles, followed by medial gastrocnemius and soleus. Compared to controls, DMD boys showed higher intramuscular fat (P = 0.04), lipid fractions of TA and SOL (P = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively), pH of anterior compartment (P = 0.0003), and lower phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphorus ratio of posterior compartment (P = 0.02). The Vignos rating correlated with TA (r = 0.79, P = 0.01) and SOL (r = 0.71, P = 0.03) lipid fractions. The 6MWT correlated with fatty infiltration scores of SOL (r = -0.76, P = 0.046), medial (r = -0.80, P = 0.03) and lateral (r = -0.84, P = 0.02) gastrocnemius, intramuscular fat (r = -0.80, P = 0.03), and SOL lipid fraction (r = -0.89, P = 0.007). Time to walk 10 m correlated with anterior compartment pH (r = 0.78, P = 0.04). Lower leg muscles of boys with DMD show a distinct involvement pattern and increased adiposity that correlates with functional status. Lower leg MRI and 1H-MRS studies may help to noninvasively demonstrate the severity of muscle involvement. (orig.)

  12. A vignette study to examine health care professionals' attitudes towards patient involvement in error prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwappach, David L B; Frank, Olga; Davis, Rachel E

    2013-10-01

    Various authorities recommend the participation of patients in promoting patient safety, but little is known about health care professionals' (HCPs') attitudes towards patients' involvement in safety-related behaviours. To investigate how HCPs evaluate patients' behaviours and HCP responses to patient involvement in the behaviour, relative to different aspects of the patient, the involved HCP and the potential error. Cross-sectional fractional factorial survey with seven factors embedded in two error scenarios (missed hand hygiene, medication error). Each survey included two randomized vignettes that described the potential error, a patient's reaction to that error and the HCP response to the patient. Twelve hospitals in Switzerland. A total of 1141 HCPs (response rate 45%). Approval of patients' behaviour, HCP response to the patient, anticipated effects on the patient-HCP relationship, HCPs' support for being asked the question, affective response to the vignettes. Outcomes were measured on 7-point scales. Approval of patients' safety-related interventions was generally high and largely affected by patients' behaviour and correct identification of error. Anticipated effects on the patient-HCP relationship were much less positive, little correlated with approval of patients' behaviour and were mainly determined by the HCP response to intervening patients. HCPs expressed more favourable attitudes towards patients intervening about a medication error than about hand sanitation. This study provides the first insights into predictors of HCPs' attitudes towards patient engagement in safety. Future research is however required to assess the generalizability of the findings into practice before training can be designed to address critical issues. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Different strategies do not moderate primary motor cortex involvement in mental rotation: a TMS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koeneke Susan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regions of the dorsal visual stream are known to play an essential role during the process of mental rotation. The functional role of the primary motor cortex (M1 in mental rotation is however less clear. It has been suggested that the strategy used to mentally rotate objects determines M1 involvement. Based on the strategy hypothesis that distinguishes between an internal and an external strategy, our study was designed to specifically test the relation between strategy and M1 activity. Methods Twenty-two subjects were asked to participate in a standard mental rotation task. We used specific picture stimuli that were supposed to trigger either the internal (e.g. pictures of hands or tools or the external strategy (e.g. pictures of houses or abstract figures. The strategy hypothesis predicts an involvement of M1 only in case of stimuli triggering the internal strategy (imagine grasping and rotating the object by oneself. Single-pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS was employed to quantify M1 activity during task performance by measuring Motor Evoked Potentials (MEPs at the right hand muscle. Results Contrary to the strategy hypothesis, we found no interaction between stimulus category and corticospinal excitability. Instead, corticospinal excitability was generally increased compared with a resting baseline although subjects indicated more frequent use of the external strategy for all object categories. Conclusion This finding suggests that M1 involvement is not exclusively linked with the use of the internal strategy but rather directly with the process of mental rotation. Alternatively, our results might support the hypothesis that M1 is active due to a 'spill-over' effect from adjacent brain regions.

  14. Different strategies do not moderate primary motor cortex involvement in mental rotation: a TMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Stefan; Koeneke, Susan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2007-08-07

    Regions of the dorsal visual stream are known to play an essential role during the process of mental rotation. The functional role of the primary motor cortex (M1) in mental rotation is however less clear. It has been suggested that the strategy used to mentally rotate objects determines M1 involvement. Based on the strategy hypothesis that distinguishes between an internal and an external strategy, our study was designed to specifically test the relation between strategy and M1 activity. Twenty-two subjects were asked to participate in a standard mental rotation task. We used specific picture stimuli that were supposed to trigger either the internal (e.g. pictures of hands or tools) or the external strategy (e.g. pictures of houses or abstract figures). The strategy hypothesis predicts an involvement of M1 only in case of stimuli triggering the internal strategy (imagine grasping and rotating the object by oneself). Single-pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) was employed to quantify M1 activity during task performance by measuring Motor Evoked Potentials (MEPs) at the right hand muscle. Contrary to the strategy hypothesis, we found no interaction between stimulus category and corticospinal excitability. Instead, corticospinal excitability was generally increased compared with a resting baseline although subjects indicated more frequent use of the external strategy for all object categories. This finding suggests that M1 involvement is not exclusively linked with the use of the internal strategy but rather directly with the process of mental rotation. Alternatively, our results might support the hypothesis that M1 is active due to a 'spill-over' effect from adjacent brain regions.

  15. A Qualitative Study of Labour Market Precarisation and Involved Fatherhood in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majda Hrženjak

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about the reconciliation of work and family are often considered to be focussing on women and middle class people with safe employments. By identifying the differences among men in their capacities to engage in involved fatherhood that stem from their positions in the labour market, this article introduces the perspective of a deprivileged marginalised group in the labour market and critically reflects on the impact of labour flexibilisation on caring masculinity and gender equality. Men as employees have heterogeneous positions in the labour market, which impacts their access to social – including parental – rights and possibilities for balancing work and care. Given that the precarisation of the labour market is a salient problem in Slovenia, this qualitative study based on explorative in-depth semi-structured interviews with fathers in diverse forms of precarious employments analysed how insecure and flexible work arrangements shape fatherhood practices, impact the chances for involved fatherhood and structure gender relations. The fathers’ experiences showed that precarious working conditions enable fathers to be intensely involved in children’s care mainly when their employment approaches standard employment in terms of stability and predictability of working hours and guaranteed workload. When work is entirely flexible and unpredictable and the employee is faced with either taking such a job or losing it, the reconciliation of work and fatherhood is aggravated as the organisation of everyday life is fully subordinated to paid work. In conclusion, precarious working relations were indicated to foster the strengthening of the breadwinner model and retraditionalisation of gender relations.

  16. Case Studies of Successful Assistance in Urban School Improvement Programs. I. The Teacher Growth Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piety-Jacobs, Sharon R.

    As part of a research project on "Patterns of Successful Assistance in Urban School Programs," this paper presents a case study of an assister's work in a Teacher Growth Program (TGP) at an elementary school in Staten Island, New York. The school has an experienced teaching staff, a supportive principal, a cross-sectional student…

  17. Volunteering in adolescence and young adulthood crime involvement: a longitudinal analysis from the add health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranapurwala, Shabbar I; Casteel, Carri; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2016-12-01

    Experiences in adolescence may have a lasting impact on adulthood. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association between adolescent (12-18 years of age) volunteerism with the incidence of illegal behaviors, arrests, and convictions in adulthood (>18 years of age). We conducted a retrospective cohort study using secondary data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Students from grades 7-12 were recruited in 1994-1995 (n = 20,745), and then followed in 2001-2002 (n = 14,322) and in 2008-2009 (n = 12,288). In 2000-2001, participants were retrospectively asked about their volunteering experience from 12 to 18 years of age. Consequently, participants were divided into non-volunteers, self-volunteers, adult-required volunteers, and court-ordered volunteers. Groups were compared for rates of illegal behaviors, arrest, and convictions in adulthood (>18 years of age) using weighted generalized linear mixed negative binomial models while accounting for sampling design. Relative to non-volunteers, self-volunteers reported 11 % fewer illegal behaviors (RR: 0.89, 95 % CI: 0.80, 0.99), 31 % fewer arrests (RR: 0.69, 95 %: 0.57, 0.85), and 39 % fewer convictions (RR: 0.61, 95 % CI: 0.47, 0.79) by age 18-28 years, and 28 % fewer illegal behaviors, 53 % fewer arrests, and 36 % fewer convictions by age 24-34. In comparison the adult-required volunteers also reported fewer arrests and convictions; however, they reported more illegal behaviors than the non-volunteers. The court-ordered volunteers reported higher rates of criminal involvement than the non-volunteers, throughout. This study suggests that volunteering in adolescence may reduce crime involvement in adulthood.

  18. Proficiency Test Program Involvement as a Tool for External Quality Control for Radiochemistry and Environmental Laboratory, Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurrul Assyikeen Mohd Jaffary; Wo, Y.M.; Zal U'yun Wan Mahmood; Norfaizal Mohamed; Abdul Kadir Ishak; Noor Fadzilah Yusof; Jalal Sharib

    2016-01-01

    As the only Laboratory in Malaysia under the IAEA Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity (ALMERA) Network, the Radiochemistry and Environmental Laboratory (RAS), Malaysian Nuclear Agency participates in the proficiency test programmes organised by ALMERA to achieve mutual acceptance of analytical data. The ALMERA has been providing quality support of proficiency tests using sets of different samples matrices and radionuclide levels typically encountered in environmental and food monitoring laboratories. The involvement of RAS laboratory in the IAEA proficiency tests gives opportunity to improve the laboratory capability and personnel skills in the field of radioactivity testing. (author)

  19. CDIO Projects in Civil Engineering Study Program at DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Simonsen, Claus; Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2011-01-01

    or a design build project on each of the first four semesters. In this paper the four projects in the civil engineering study program are described along with a brief description of the entire study program. The aim is to provide additional information and documentation to accompany an exposition where......In 2008 all Bachelor of engineering study programs at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) have been adopted to the “Conceive – Design – Implement – Operate” approach. As part of the necessary changes it was decided that all seven study programs should have a cross disciplinary project...... students present their projects. Learning outcomes, training and assessment of personal, professional and social engineering skills are described from a project point of view. Progression of engineering skills is discussed from a study program perspective. The interrelation between the various elements...

  20. EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN A CHANGE PROCESS - A CASE STUDY FOR ROMANIAN ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prediscan Mariana

    2015-07-01

    's perception towards change and the way they perceive the need of involving employees when decisions are made. In order to answer those questions we have based our results on a study made on Romanian organizations from the western side of the country. The sample included managers and employees from organizations operating in industries such as: trade, manufacturing and services.

  1. The Super Efficient Refrigerator Program: Case study of a Golden Carrot program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, J B

    1995-07-01

    The work in this report was conducted by the Analytic Studies Division (ASD) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technologies. This case study describes the development and implementation of the Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP), which awarded $30 million to the refrigerator manufacturer that developed and commercialized a refrigerator that exceeded 1993 federal efficiency standards by at least 25%. The program was funded by 24 public and private utilities. As the first Golden Carrot program to be implemented in the United States, SERP was studied as an example for future `market-pull` efforts.

  2. Study of the exposures received by the persons involved in the transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamard, J.; Sousselier, Y.

    1983-01-01

    An important step in the optimization process applied to exposures in the field of the transport of radioactive materials is an accurate inventory of the exposures actually received by the workers. The results of this study underlines that nearly all the doses received are well below the threshold values for the classification of the workers as occasionally exposed and a fortiori as professionally exposed and consequently no personal monitoring should be necessary for them. Thus the inventory of exposures is somewhat difficult as the workers implied in the transport process are not classified as exposed workers and not subject to personnal or collective dosimetry. Therefore a good knowledge of the exposures received during the transport of irradiated fuels should require a systematic follow up of this kind of transport all along their route including a careful dosimetric monitoring of the workers taking part in the transport. On the other hand, the reduction of the doses obtained by increasing the mechanization involves very high monetary costs as compared to the reduction of the detriment. Perhaps a more important reduction of the exposures could be attained by a better protection in the cars or lorries used for the transport of categories A and B packages. But it seems that in the case of the transports, the optimization is applied mainly during the conception and the testing of the packages and only little progress will be possible without involving disproportionated monetary costs. 4 references, 10 tables

  3. Primary prevention research: a preliminary review of program outcome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaps, E; Churgin, S; Palley, C S; Takata, B; Cohen, A Y

    1980-07-01

    This article reviews 35 drug abuse prevention program evaluations employing drug-specific outcome measures. Many of these evaluations assessed the effects of "new generation" prevention strategies: affective, peer-oriented, and multidimensional approaches. Only 14 studies evaluated purely informational programs. Evaluations were analyzed to ascertain (1) characteristics of the programs under study, (2) characteristics of the research designs, and (3) patterns among findings. This review provides some evidence that the newer prevention strategies may produce more positive and fewer negative outcomes than did older drug information approaches. Over 70% of the programs using the newer strategies produced some positive effects; only 29% showed negative effects. In contrast, 46% of informational programs showed positive effects; 46% showed negative effects. These findings must be approached with great caution, since the research was frequently scientifically inadequate, and since rigor of research was negatively correlated with intensity and duration of program services.

  4. A comparative modeling and molecular docking study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhar, Zeynab; Naiker, Suhashni; Alves, Claudio N; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Lameira, Jeronimo; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Kruger, Hendrik G; Honarparvar, Bahareh

    2016-11-01

    An alarming rise of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and the continuous high global morbidity of tuberculosis have reinvigorated the need to identify novel targets to combat the disease. The enzymes that catalyze the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan in M. tuberculosis are essential and noteworthy therapeutic targets. In this study, the biochemical function and homology modeling of MurI, MurG, MraY, DapE, DapA, Alr, and Ddl enzymes of the CDC1551 M. tuberculosis strain involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan cell wall are reported. Generation of the 3D structures was achieved with Modeller 9.13. To assess the structural quality of the obtained homology modeled targets, the models were validated using PROCHECK, PDBsum, QMEAN, and ERRAT scores. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate root mean square deviation (RMSD) and radius of gyration (Rg) of MurI and MurG target proteins and their corresponding templates. For further model validation, RMSD and Rg for selected targets/templates were investigated to compare the close proximity of their dynamic behavior in terms of protein stability and average distances. To identify the potential binding mode required for molecular docking, binding site information of all modeled targets was obtained using two prediction algorithms. A docking study was performed for MurI to determine the potential mode of interaction between the inhibitor and the active site residues. This study presents the first accounts of the 3D structural information for the selected M. tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  5. Role of Brachytherapy in the Boost Management of Anal Carcinoma With Node Involvement (CORS-03 Study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence, E-mail: moureaul@ipc.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiation Therapy, Institut Paoli Calmettes, Marseille (France); Ortholan, Cecile [Department of Radiation Therapy, Monaco (France); Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel [Department of Radiation Therapy, Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice (France); Teissier, Eric [Azurean Cancer Center, Mougins (France); Cowen, Didier [Department of Radiation Therapy, Timone Academic Hospital and North Academic Hospital, Marseille (France); Department of Radiation Therapy, Val d' Aurelle Cancer Center, Montpellier (France); Salem, Nagi [Department of Radiation Therapy, Institut Paoli Calmettes, Marseille (France); Lemanski, Claire [Catalan Oncology Center, Perpignan (France); Ellis, Steve [French Red Cross Center, Toulon (France); Resbeut, Michel [Department of Radiation Therapy, Institut Paoli Calmettes, Marseille (France); French Red Cross Center, Toulon (France)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To assess retrospectively the clinical outcome in anal cancer patients, with lymph node involvement, treated with split-course radiation therapy and receiving a boost through external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From 2000 to 2005, among 229 patients with invasive nonmetastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma, a selected group of 99 patients, with lymph node involvement, was studied. Tumor staging reported was T1 in 4 patients, T2 in 16 patients, T3 in 49 patients, T4 in 16 patients, and T unknown in 14 patients and as N1 in 67 patients and N2/N3 in 32 patients. Patients underwent a first course of EBRT (mean dose, 45.1 Gy) followed by a boost (mean dose, 18 Gy) using EBRT (50 patients) or BCT (49 patients). All characteristics of patients and tumors were well balanced between the BCT and EBRT groups. Prognostic factors of cumulative rate of local recurrence (CRLR), cumulative rate of distant (including nodal) recurrence (CRDR), colostomy-free survival (CFS) rate, and overall survival (OS) rate were analyzed for the overall population and according to the nodal status classification. Results: The median follow-up was 71.5 months. The 5-year CRLR, CRDR, CFS rate, and OS rate were 21%, 19%, 63%, and 74.4%, respectively. In the overall population, the type of node involvement (N1 vs N2/N3) was the unique independent prognostic factor for CRLR. In N1 patients, by use of multivariate analysis, BCT boost was the unique prognostic factor for CRLR (4% for BCT vs 31% for EBRT; hazard ratio, 0.08; P=.042). No studied factors were significantly associated with CRDR, CFS, and OS. No difference with regard to boost technique and any other factor studied was observed in N2/N3 patients for any kind of recurrence. Conclusion: In anal cancer, even in the case of initial perirectal node invasion, BCT boost is superior to EBRT boost for CRLR, without an influence on OS, suggesting that N1 status should not be a contraindication to

  6. An Evaluative Study of a Distance Teacher Education Program in a University in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwasi Addo Sampong

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The study used an adaptation of Provus’ discrepancy evaluation model to evaluate a distance teacher education program in the University of Cape Coast, the premier teacher education institution in Ghana. The study involved comparing performance data of the program as perceived by students and faculty/administrators to standards prepared from the program’s design. Performance data was obtained by administering two survey instruments to a random sample of students and faculty/administrators. Discrepancies between performance and standards were reported. The study concluded that although there were some discrepancies between program standards and performance the program is fulfilling its purpose of upgrading the professional and academic performance of a large number of teachers in the public K-8 schools in Ghana.

  7. 'Talk To Me' - Lessons Learned In Communicating Risks To Tenants And Others Involved In The Department Of Energy's Reindustrialization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusick, Lesley T.; Golden, Karen M.

    2003-01-01

    Communicating risk information is more difficult than assessing it. The latter relies on data, formulas, theorems and mathematical relationships that, with some effort, can be logically explained to another person; it's objective. Communicating risks, however, is subjective and relies on personalities, perceptions and predisposition, as well as emotions. Most notably the emotion is fear--fear of the unknown, fear of the message, the messenger, or the impact of the information on something of value to the person asking the questions. The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Operations Office is engaged in a Reindustrialization program to lease (and most recently, to transfer) formerly used facilities to private sector entities. The facilities are located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, originally a gaseous diffusion plant operated to enrich uranium for World War II efforts and later for use as fuel in civilian nuclear reactors

  8. Study of $\\tau$ decays involving kaons, spectral functions and determination of the strange quark mass

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I.C.; Riu, I.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Tournefier, E.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, N.A.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Etienne, F.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Schune, M.H.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foa, L.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Johnson, R.P.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Prange, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1999-01-01

    All ALEPH measurements of branching ratios of tau decays involving kaons are summarized including a combination of results obtained with K^0_S and K^0_L detection. The decay dynamics are studied, leading to the determination of contributions from vector K^*(892) and K^{*}(1410), and axial-vector K_1(1270) and K_1(1400) resonances. Agreement with isospin symmetry is observed among the different final states. Under the hypothesis of the conserved vector current, the spectral function for the K\\bar{K}\\pi mode is compared with the corresponding cross section for low energy e^+e^- annihilation, yielding an axial-vector fraction of (94^{+6}_{-8})% for this mode. The branching ratio for tau decay into all strange final states is determined to be B(\\tau^-\\to X^-(S=-1)\

  9. Hypophyseal Involvement in Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease: A Retrospective Study from a Single Tertiary Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to outline the clinical features and outcomes of IgG4-related hypophysitis (IgG4-RH patients in a tertiary medical center. We reviewed clinical manifestations and imaging and pituitary function tests at baseline, as well as during follow-up. Ten patients were included. The mean age at diagnosis of IgG4-RH was 48.4 (16.0–64.0 years. An average of 3 (0–9 extrapituitary organs were involved. Five patients had panhypopituitarism, three had only posterior hypopituitarism, one had only anterior hypopituitarism, and one had a normal pituitary function. One patient in our study had pituitary mass biopsy, lacking IgG4-positive cells despite lymphocyte infiltration forming an inflammatory pseudotumor. Five patients with a clinical course of IgG4-RH less than nine months and a whole course of IgG4-RD less than two years were managed with glucocorticoids, while three patients with a longer history were administered glucocorticoids plus immunosuppressive agents. One patient went through surgical excision, and one patient was lost to follow-up. All patients showed a prompt response clinically, but only three patients had normalized serum IgG4 levels. Two patients who took medications for less than six months relapsed. Conclusions. IgG4-RD is a broad disease, and all physicians involved have to be aware of the possibility of pituitary dysfunction. Younger patients should be expected. The histopathological feature of pituitary gland biopsy could be atypical. For patients with a longer history, the combination of GC and immunosuppressive agents is favorable. Early and adequate courses of treatment are crucial for the management of IgG4-RH. With GC and/or immunosuppressant treatment, however, pituitary function or diabetes insipidus did not improve considerably.

  10. Substance Use among Adolescents Involved in Bullying: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Jorge; Tornero, Bernardita; Valenzuela, Daniela; Rojas-Barahona, Cristian A; Salmivalli, Christina; Valenzuela, Eduardo; Araya, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Being involved in bullying as a victim or perpetrator could have deleterious health consequences. Even though there is some evidence that bullies and victims of bullying have a higher risk for drug use, less is known about bystanders. The aim of this research was to study the association between bullying experience (as victims, bullies, or bystanders) and substance use. We gathered complete information from a nationally representative sample of 36,687 students (51.4% female) attending 756 schools in Chile. We used a self-reported questionnaire which was developed based on similar instruments used elsewhere. This questionnaire was piloted and presented to an expert panel for approval. We used multilevel multivariate logistic regression analyses, controlling for several variables at the individual (e.g., school membership, parental monitoring) and school levels (e.g., school type, school denomination). This study shows that bullies and bully-victims have a high risk for cigarette, alcohol, and cannabis use than bystanders. This is one of the few studies exploring the association between witnessing bullying and substance use. These findings add new insights to the study of the co-occurrence of bullying and substance use. Other factors, such as higher academic performance, stronger school membership, and better parental monitoring reduced the risk of any substance use, while the experience of domestic violence and the perception of social disorganization in the neighborhood, increased the risk. These findings may help the design of preventive interventions.

  11. Substance Use among Adolescents Involved in Bullying: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Gaete

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Being involved in bullying as a victim or perpetrator could have deleterious health consequences. Even though there is some evidence that bullies and victims of bullying have a higher risk for drug use, less is known about bystanders. The aim of this research was to study the association between bullying experience (as victims, bullies, or bystanders and substance use. We gathered complete information from a nationally representative sample of 36,687 students (51.4% female attending 756 schools in Chile. We used a self-reported questionnaire which was developed based on similar instruments used elsewhere. This questionnaire was piloted and presented to an expert panel for approval. We used multilevel multivariate logistic regression analyses, controlling for several variables at the individual (e.g., school membership, parental monitoring and school levels (e.g., school type, school denomination. This study shows that bullies and bully-victims have a high risk for cigarette, alcohol, and cannabis use than bystanders. This is one of the few studies exploring the association between witnessing bullying and substance use. These findings add new insights to the study of the co-occurrence of bullying and substance use. Other factors, such as higher academic performance, stronger school membership, and better parental monitoring reduced the risk of any substance use, while the experience of domestic violence and the perception of social disorganization in the neighborhood, increased the risk. These findings may help the design of preventive interventions.

  12. A comparative study of European nuclear energy programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presas i Puig, Albert [ed.

    2011-07-01

    The report includes the following contributions: Comparative study of European Nuclear Energy Programs. From international cooperation to the failure of a national program: the Austrian case. The ''go-and-stop'' of the Italian civil nuclear programs, among improvisations, ambitions and conspiracy. Nuclear energy in Spain - a research agenda for economic historians. The Portuguese nuclear program: a peripheral experience under dictatorship (1945-1973). The nuclear energy programs in Switzerland. The rise and decline of an independent nuclear power industry in Sweden, 1945-1970. The German fast breeder program, a historical review. Fast reactors as future visions - the case of Sweden. Transnational flows of nuclear knowledge between the U.S. and the U.K. and continental Europe in the 1950/60s. The Carter administration and its non-proliferation policies: the road to INFCE.

  13. [PROFAMILIA studies the effectiveness of contraceptive marketing programs in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    A recent study by PROFAMILIA, the private Colombian family planning organization, indicates that community based distribution programs and social marketing programs are not totally interchangeable forms of contraceptive distribution. Comparison of the efficacy of different systems in making contraceptives more accessible to the low income population led the researchers to conclude that social marketing programs work as well as community based distribution programs in rural areas which already have high rates of contraceptive usage. Community based distribution programs appear more effective than social marketing programs in areas where contraceptive usage is not yet well established. PROFAMILIA researchers conducted operational studies in 3 different states, each of which had a community based distribution program. In the first state the community based distribution program was suspended and a vender who had previously supplied only urban outlets added rural pharmacies to his route. The vender handled 3 kinds of pills, 2 types of spermicidal suppositories, and condoms. In a neighboring state, 3 instructors belonging to the community based distribution program were offered commissions of about 10% of the value of the products if the distributors they supervised met monthly sales quotas. The community based distribution program was left unchanged in the third state but a 2-member mobile team was trained to travel through the region by jeep, talking to community groups about the advantage of contraception. At the end of 18 months, sales of contraceptives had declined in the state where the community based distribution program was replaced by the social marketing program. The decline was believed to be related to unforeseen price increases for pills and devaluation of the Colombian peso. The social marketing project was however much more cost effective than the other 2, which continued to require PROFAMILIA subsidies. Contraceptive usage increased in the other 2 areas

  14. Epidemiological study of overlapping of involved organs in functional gastrointestinal disorders in the Chinese naval servicemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-kai WANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the overlapping of involved organs in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs occurring in the Chinese naval servicemen, and to provide a sound basis for its diagnosis and treatment. Methods From November 2006 to April 2007, a questionnaire survey was conducted in 8600 officers and soldiers of Chinese naval force in three regions using randomized, stratified, multistage sampling method. All respondents completed the Rome Ⅲ Modular Questionnaire. The collected data were double input by EpiData3.02 software and analyzed by SPSS 13.0 software. Results 7454 valid questionnaires were retrieved. The incidence of overlapping was 46.7% involving two to five sites. In two-site overlap of FGIDs, the incidence of overlap functional gastroduodenal disorder (FGD and functional bowel disorder (FBD was shown to be highest (51.2%, 339/662, followed by the overlap of functional esophageal disorder (FED and FBD (15.4%, 102/662. In three-site overlap of FGIDs, the overlapping rate of FED, FGD and FBD was the highest (44.4%, 151/340, followed by that of FGD, FBD and functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS (20.3%, 69/340. The commonest four-site overlap of FGIDs included FED, FGD, FBD and FAPS (57.7%, 94/163. The five-site overlap of FGIDs was the combination of FED, FGD, FBD, FAPS and functional anorectal disorder (FAD. The incidence of FGIDs in southern military region was 49.8% (987/1983, which was higher than that of northern (31.8%, 1064/3351 and eastern (23.8%, 533/2240 regions. The incidence of FGIDs of single organ was 44.9% in southern military region, which was lower than 59.0% in eastern and 58.4% in northern region. The incidence of the illness involving two to five sites were higher in southern military region as compared with that of eastern and northern regions. Conclusions The rate of overlapping of FGIDs at different sites is common in the Chinese naval servicemen. There is a difference in rate of overlapping

  15. User Involvement in In-house Developed Software : Case Study of a Nigerian Financial Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Owoseni, Adebowale; Imhanyehor, Germaine

    2011-01-01

    Over the years, researchers have argued that user friendly and result oriented systems were not necessarily products of participatory user involvement; however there is a degree of user involvement required in the development process of any Information System. The aim of this research is to discover the level of user involvement in in-house software development process in All Nigerian Bank (ANB). We use two research methods - survey and process observation. A survey was conducted for 107 end ...

  16. An ecological approach to prospective and retrospective timing of long durations: a study involving gamers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Tobin

    Full Text Available To date, most studies comparing prospective and retrospective timing have failed to use long durations and tasks with a certain degree of ecological validity. The present study assessed the effect of the timing paradigm on playing video games in a "naturalistic environment" (gaming centers. In addition, as it involved gamers, it provided an opportunity to examine the effect of gaming profile on time estimation. A total of 116 participants were asked to estimate prospectively or retrospectively a video game session lasting 12, 35 or 58 minutes. The results indicate that time is perceived as longer in the prospective paradigm than in the retrospective one, although the variability of estimates is the same. Moreover, the 12-minute session was perceived as longer, proportionally, than the 35- and 58-minute sessions. The study also revealed that the number of hours participants spent playing video games per week was a significant predictor of time estimates. To account for the main findings, the differences between prospective and retrospective timing are discussed in quantitative terms using a proposed theoretical framework, which states that both paradigms use the same cognitive processes, but in different proportions. Finally, the hypothesis that gamers play more because they underestimate time is also discussed.

  17. The multiple imputation method: a case study involving secondary data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walani, Salimah R; Cleland, Charles M

    2015-05-01

    To illustrate with the example of a secondary data analysis study the use of the multiple imputation method to replace missing data. Most large public datasets have missing data, which need to be handled by researchers conducting secondary data analysis studies. Multiple imputation is a technique widely used to replace missing values while preserving the sample size and sampling variability of the data. The 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. The authors created a model to impute missing values using the chained equation method. They used imputation diagnostics procedures and conducted regression analysis of imputed data to determine the differences between the log hourly wages of internationally educated and US-educated registered nurses. The authors used multiple imputation procedures to replace missing values in a large dataset with 29,059 observations. Five multiple imputed datasets were created. Imputation diagnostics using time series and density plots showed that imputation was successful. The authors also present an example of the use of multiple imputed datasets to conduct regression analysis to answer a substantive research question. Multiple imputation is a powerful technique for imputing missing values in large datasets while preserving the sample size and variance of the data. Even though the chained equation method involves complex statistical computations, recent innovations in software and computation have made it possible for researchers to conduct this technique on large datasets. The authors recommend nurse researchers use multiple imputation methods for handling missing data to improve the statistical power and external validity of their studies.

  18. Three case studies involving Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona infection in mixed farming units : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gummow

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Three case studies involving Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona outbreaks within mixed farming systems in South Africa are described. On 2 farms, pigs constituted the main enterprise with cattle and sheep of secondary importance. On each of these 2 farms, abortion due to L. pomona in sows was confirmed by culture, and antibody titres to pomona were detected in cattle, sheep, horses and dogs. On the 3rd farm, a piggery was ofsecondary importance to cattle farming. Abortion and death in cows occurred on this farmand serology showed titres to various serovars, including pomona. L. pomona was also isolated from bovine urine, an aborted bovine foetus and kidneys from slaughtered pigs. This particular case study was regarded as clinically atypical in that adult Jersey cattle died of acute leptospirosis in a semiarid region of South Africa. In all 3 case studies, the poor management of pig effluent and of the drinking water and its sources played a pivotal role in the transmission of the disease. Inadequate vaccination of animals against Leptospira and poor record-keeping within the secondary farming enterprises were also contributing factors to the spread of leptospirosis.

  19. Hyaline cartilage involvement in patients with gout and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. An ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippucci, E; Riveros, M Gutierrez; Georgescu, D; Salaffi, F; Grassi, W

    2009-02-01

    The main aim of the present study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in detecting monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals deposits at knee cartilage level using clinical definite diagnosis as standard reference. A total of 32 patients with a diagnosis of gout and 48 patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy were included in the study. Fifty-two patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis or osteoarthritis (OA) were recruited as disease controls. All diagnoses were made using an international clinical criterion. US examinations were performed by an experienced sonographer, blind to clinical and laboratory data. Hyaline cartilage was assessed to detect two US findings recently indicated as indicative of crystal deposits: hyperechoic enhancement of the superficial margin of the hyaline cartilage and hyperechoic spots within the cartilage layer not generating a posterior acoustic shadow. Hyperechoic enhancement of the chondrosynovial margin was found in at least one knee of 14 out of 32 (43.7%) patients with gout and in a single knee of only one patient affected by pyrophosphate arthropathy (specificity=99%). Intra-cartilaginous hyperechoic spots were detected in at least one knee of 33 out of 48 (68.7%) patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy and in two disease controls one with OA and the second with RA (specificity=97.6%). The results of the present study indicate that US may play a relevant role in distinguishing cartilage involvement in patients with crystal-related arthropathy. The selected US findings were found to be highly specific.

  20. Study of the Genes and Mechanism Involved in the Radioadaptive Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Pushan R.

    2009-01-01

    The radioadaptive response is a phenomenon where exposure to a prior low dose of radiation reduces the level of damage induced by a subsequent high radiation dose. The molecular mechanism behind this is still not well understood. Learning more about the radioadaptive response is critical for long duration spaceflight since astronauts are exposed to low levels of cosmic radiation. The micronucleus assay was used to measure the level of damage caused by radiation. Although cells which were not washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) after a low priming dose of 5cGy did not show adaptation to the challenge dose, washing the cells with PBS and giving the cells fresh media after the low dose did allow radioadaptation to occur. This is consistent with the results of a previous publication by another research group. In the present study, genes involved in DNA damage signaling and the oxidative stress response were studied using RT PCR techniques in order to look at changes in expression level after the low dose with or without washing. Our preliminary results indicate that upregulation of oxidative stress response genes ANGPTL7, NCF2, TTN, and SRXN1 may be involved in the radioadaptive response. The low dose of radiation alone was found to activate the oxidative stress response genes GPR156 and MTL5, whereas, washing the cells alone caused relatively robust upregulation of the oxidative stress response genes DUSP1 and PTGS2. Washing after the priming dose showed some changes in the expression level of several DNA damage signaling genes. In addition, we studied whether washing the cells after the priming dose has an effect on the level of nitric oxide in both the media and cells, since nitric oxide levels are known to increase in the media of the cells after a high dose of radiation only if the cells were already exposed to a low priming dose. Based on this preliminary study, we propose that washing the cells after priming exposure actually eliminates some factor

  1. Transcription elongation factors are involved in programming hormone production in pituitary neuroendocrine GH4C1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Piuz, Isabelle; Schlegel, Werner

    2010-05-05

    Transcription elongation of many eukaryotic genes is regulated. Two negative transcription elongation factors, 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF) and negative elongation factor (NELF) are known to stall collaboratively RNA polymerase II promoter proximally. We discovered that DSIF and NELF are linked to hormone expression in rat pituitary GH4C1 cells. When NELF-E, a subunit of NELF or Spt5, a subunit of DSIF was stably knocked-down, prolactin (PRL) expression was increased both at the mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, stable knock-down of only Spt5 abolished growth hormone (GH) expression. Transient NELF-E knock-down increased coincidentally PRL expression and enhanced transcription of a PRL-promoter reporter gene. However, no direct interaction of NELF with the PRL gene could be demonstrated by chromatin immuno-precipitation. Thus, NELF suppressed PRL promoter activity indirectly. In conclusion, transcription regulation by NELF and DSIF is continuously involved in the control of hormone production and may contribute to neuroendocrine cell differentiation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Strategi Komunikasi Program Internet Sehat Dan Aman Kementerian Komunikasi Dan Informatika Republik Indonesia (Studi Kasus Evaluasi Program Incakap Tahun 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucianty Dyah Astuti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Internet has become a lifestyle in community along with the development of internet technology in the life and social relationship. The high number of internet users in Indonesia gave rise to a variety of impacts on society, both positive and negative. Relates with these impacts, to create an understanding in the community against the use of the internet the Government through the Ministry of communications and Informatics of the Republic of Indonesia create program, that is Internet healthy and safe in order to socialize the use of the internet for healthy and safe through the ethics of the Internet learning healthy by involving all components of society.The research focused on the evaluation of healthy and safe internet programme conducted by the Ministry of communications and Informatics of the Republic of Indonesia in 2015. The objective of the research is to perceive the communication strategy and the achievement of the objectives of the healthy and safe internet program by KemKominfo. This research used the qualitative method with descriptive case study research. The data obtained through interviews and literature studies, while informants in this study was KemKominfo staff on to the various Directorate General Application Infomatika sub direktotar empowerment of informatics as many as three people. Through the whole concatenation of process research obtained results that indicate that: (1 the achievement of healthy and safe Internet Programme until 2015 has achieved the target but not 100%. (2 in the implementation of the program there are some obstacles faced by KemKominfo, specifically: (i the limitation of APBN, (ii affordability limitations due to the geographical of indonesia as an archipelago state. (3\tthe evaluation needs to be done about the use of online media in the communication strategy of healthy and secure internet program. There were some changes since the beginning of the implementation of the Insan program in the year

  3. Differential involvement of cortical and cerebellar areas using dominant and nondominant hands: An FMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Matteo; Samson, Rebecca S.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Friston, Karl J.; Toosy, Ahmed T.; Gandini Wheeler‐Kingshott, Claudia A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Motor fMRI studies, comparing dominant (DH) and nondominant (NDH) hand activations have reported mixed findings, especially for the extent of ipsilateral (IL) activations and their relationship with task complexity. To date, no study has directly compared DH and NDH activations using an event‐related visually guided dynamic power‐grip paradigm with parametric (three) forces (GF) in healthy right‐handed subjects. We implemented a hierarchical statistical approach aimed to: (i) identify the main effect networks engaged when using either hand; (ii) characterise DH/NDH responses at different GFs; (iii) assess contralateral (CL)/IL‐specific and hemisphere‐specific activations. Beyond confirming previously reported results, this study demonstrated that increasing GF has an effect on motor response that is contextualised also by the use of DH or NDH. Linear analysis revealed increased activations in sensorimotor areas, with additional increased recruitments of subcortical and cerebellar areas when using the NDH. When looking at CL/IL‐specific activations, CL sensorimotor areas and IL cerebellum were activated with both hands. When performing the task with the NDH, several areas were also recruited including the CL cerebellum. Finally, there were hand‐side‐independent activations of nonmotor‐specific areas in the right and left hemispheres, with the right hemisphere being involved more extensively in sensori‐motor integration through associative areas while the left hemisphere showing greater activation at higher GF. This study shows that the functional networks subtending DH/NDH power‐grip visuomotor functions are qualitatively and quantitatively distinct and this should be taken into consideration when performing fMRI studies, particularly when planning interventions in patients with specific impairments. Hum Brain Mapp 36:5079–5100, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26415818

  4. Best Practices in Academic Management. Study Programs Classification Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofelia Ema Aleca

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes and tests a set of performance indicators for the assessment of Bachelor and Master studies, from two perspectives: the study programs and the disciplines. The academic performance at the level of a study program shall be calculated based on success and efficiency rates, and at discipline level, on the basis of rates of efficiency, success and absenteeism. This research proposes a model of classification of the study programs within a Bachelor and Master cycle based on the education performance and efficiency. What recommends this model as a best practice model in academic management is the possibility of grouping a study program or a discipline in a particular category of efficiency

  5. Exploring Managers' Perspectives on MNCH Program in Pakistan: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariyam Sarfraz

    Full Text Available Pakistan's Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (MNCH Program is faced with multiple challenges in service delivery, financial and logistic management, training and deployment of human resources, and integration within the existing health system. There is a lack of evidence on managerial aspects of the MNCH program management and implementation.This study used qualitative methods to explore the challenges national, provincial and district program managers have faced in implementing a community midwifery program in province of Punjab while also exploring future directions for the program under a devolved health system. While the program had been designed in earnest, the planning lacked critical elements of involving relevant stakeholders in design and implementation, socio-demographic context and capacity of the existing health system. Financial limitations, weak leadership and lack of a political commitment to the problem of maternal health have also had an impact on program implementation.Our study results suggest that there is a need to re-structure the program while ensuring sustainability and collaboration within the health sector to increase uptake of skilled birth attendance and improve maternal health care in Pakistan.

  6. More mentoring needed? A cross-sectional study of mentoring programs for medical students in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    programs (27%) offer mentoring in a one-on-one setting. 18 programs (82%) feature faculty physicians as mentors. Nine programs (41%) involve students as mentors in a peer-mentoring setting. The most commonly reported goals of the mentoring programs include: establishing the mentee's professional network (13 programs, 59%), enhancement of academic performance (11 programs, 50%) and counseling students in difficulties (10 programs, 45%). Conclusions Despite a clear upsurge of mentoring programs for German medical students over recent years, the overall availability of mentoring is still limited. The mentoring models and goals of the existing programs vary considerably. Outcome data from controlled studies are needed to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of different forms of mentoring for medical students. PMID:21943281

  7. More mentoring needed? A cross-sectional study of mentoring programs for medical students in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Störmann Sylvère

    2011-09-01

    last 2 years. Six programs (27% offer mentoring in a one-on-one setting. 18 programs (82% feature faculty physicians as mentors. Nine programs (41% involve students as mentors in a peer-mentoring setting. The most commonly reported goals of the mentoring programs include: establishing the mentee's professional network (13 programs, 59%, enhancement of academic performance (11 programs, 50% and counseling students in difficulties (10 programs, 45%. Conclusions Despite a clear upsurge of mentoring programs for German medical students over recent years, the overall availability of mentoring is still limited. The mentoring models and goals of the existing programs vary considerably. Outcome data from controlled studies are needed to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of different forms of mentoring for medical students.

  8. More mentoring needed? A cross-sectional study of mentoring programs for medical students in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, Felix G; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; von der Borch, Philip; Störmann, Sylvère; Niedermaier, Sophie; Fischer, Martin R

    2011-09-24

    in a one-on-one setting. 18 programs (82%) feature faculty physicians as mentors. Nine programs (41%) involve students as mentors in a peer-mentoring setting. The most commonly reported goals of the mentoring programs include: establishing the mentee's professional network (13 programs, 59%), enhancement of academic performance (11 programs, 50%) and counseling students in difficulties (10 programs, 45%). Despite a clear upsurge of mentoring programs for German medical students over recent years, the overall availability of mentoring is still limited. The mentoring models and goals of the existing programs vary considerably. Outcome data from controlled studies are needed to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of different forms of mentoring for medical students.

  9. ANALISIS FAKTOR DOMINAN YANG MEMPENGARUHI KEPUTUSAN MAHASISWA MELANJUTKAN PENDIDIKAN KE PROGRAM STUDI PIPS PASCASARJANA UNP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivina Eprillison

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed at revealing the dominant factors influencing the students’ decision to continue their study to the Social Science Education Program of Graduate Program of Padang State University. The factors analyzed involved future income, cost of study, work opportunities in the future, social status, parents’ education, intrinsic motivation and the National Education Departement policies. This research was a kind of survey using exploratory approach and factors analysis. The population of the research was all students took the Social Science Education Program of Graduate Program of Padang State University registered in period 2011. The result of the research showed that the dominant factors influencing the students’ decision to continue their study to the Social Science Education Program of Graduate Program of Padang State University were the future income, bonus and work opportunities in the future. In addition, the cost of transportation during their study was higher than the cost of buying books & photo copy which of course very important in continuing education to a higher level, especially at Post Graduate Program.

  10. Study on exposures in incidents situations involving X-ray generators of industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, Paulo B.; Rios, Denise A. da S.

    2014-01-01

    Case studies of accidents involving radiation sources provides valuable information for the improvement of equipment and procedures to be adopted to prevent their recurrence. Therefore, they are recommended as part of the licensing process of radiative facilities. However, when the equipment has no radiological protection requirements or have no record of accidents, an effective method to appropriate this knowledge necessary to improvements of process and project is the investigation of reported incidents and the proposition limit situations where exposures unlikely and even low intensity can occur. This work reviews incidents in X-ray equipment and thickness meters. Emergency situations are also studied in this type of equipment and in an accelerator of electrons self-shielded for curing of paints and varnishes. The exposure estimates are calculated from data collected in workplaces on the distance and time for each proposed case. Although there is no severe consequences to occupational health, the results can be used to improve the quality of training for operators and maintenance technicians, for proposing of new alarm systems and emergency teams procedures and may serve as a warning in inadvertent and avoidable situations of unnecessary exposures

  11. Effect of citric acid, tetracycline, and doxycycline on instrumented periodontally involved root surfaces: A SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurparkash Singh Chahal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A surface smear layer consisting of organic and inorganic material is formed on the root surface following mechanical instrumentation and may inhibit the formation of new connective tissue attachment to the root surface. Modification of the tooth surface by root conditioning has resulted in improved connective tissue attachment and has advanced the goal of reconstructive periodontal treatment. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of citric acid, tetracycline, and doxycycline on the instrumented periodontally involved root surfaces in vitro using a scanning electron microscope. Settings and Design: A total of 45 dentin samples obtained from 15 extracted, scaled, and root planed teeth were divided into three groups. Materials and Methods: The root conditioning agents were applied with cotton pellets using the "Passive burnishing technique" for 5 minutes. The samples were then examined by the scanning electron microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analysis was carried out using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, version 15.0 for Windows. For all quantitative variables means and standard deviations were calculated and compared. For more than two groups ANOVA was applied. For multiple comparisons post hoc tests with Bonferroni correction was used. Results: Upon statistical analysis the root conditioning agents used in this study were found to be effective in removing the smear layer, uncovering and widening the dentin tubules and unmasking the dentin collagen matrix. Conclusion: Tetracycline HCl was found to be the best root conditioner among the three agents used.

  12. Parental Involvement in U.S. Study Abroad: Helicopters or Helpers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal Dauer, Kevin Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    Parental involvement in higher education has received much attention since the 1990s, though mostly through mainstream media sources. The term "helicopter parents" is now used to describe over-involved parents who "hover" over their children, intent on ensuring that their children's needs are addressed. The perception within…

  13. EVALUASI PELAKSANAAN PEMBELAJARAN PROGRAM STUDI DESAIN KOMUNIKASI VISUAL MSD YOGYAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Fatmawati

    2016-06-01

    THE EVALUATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL IMPLEMENTATION OF VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN STUDY PROGRAM IN MSD YOGYAKARTA Abstract This research aims to determine the suitability of the instructional implementation in Visual Communication Design (VCD Study Program of MSD Yogyakarta Design and Art Academy with standard or criteria which have been formulated. This research was an evaluation research study that refers to the discrepancy evaluation model. The subjects consisted of the head of study program, lecturers and students of VCD study program MSD Yogyakarta. The research was conducted in five stages: design preparation, determination of the program’s completeness, data collection, purpose measurement or data analysis, and comparison. Data were collected through observation, interviews, and document searches, and were analyzed using an interactive analysis model proposed by Miles and Huberman. The questionnaire data were analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis in the scale 4. The result of the study shows that instructional implementation in Visual Communication Design Study Program of MSD Yogyakarta is not suitable to the Minister of Education and Culture Regulation No. 49, 2014. The result of student assessment indicates that the instructional implementation in VCD MSD Yogyakarta is categorized good with the value of 3.20. The instructional implementation in Visual Communication Design Study Program of MSD Yogyakarta needs to be adjusted with the National Standards for Higher Education the Minister of Education and Culture Regulation No. 49, 2014 for the instructional implementation can be presented. Keywords: instructional implementation, instructional planning

  14. Exploring the relationships between high involvement work system practices, work demands and emotional exhaustion : A multi-level study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppenauer, V.; van de Voorde, F.C.

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the impact of enacted high involvement work systems (HIWS) practices on employee emotional exhaustion. This study hypothesized that work overload and job responsibility mediate the relationship between HIWS practices (ability, motivation, opportunity and work design HIWS

  15. Involvement of patients with cancer in patient safety: a qualitative study of current practices, potentials and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Helle Max; Navne, Laura Emdal; Lipczak, Henriette

    2013-10-01

    Patient involvement in patient safety is widely advocated but knowledge regarding implementation of the concept in clinical practice is sparse. To investigate existing practices for patient involvement in patient safety, and opportunities and barriers for further involvement. A qualitative study of patient safety involvement practices in patient trajectories for prostate, uterine and colorectal cancer in Denmark. Observations from four hospital wards and interviews with 25 patients with cancer, 11 hospital doctors, 10 nurses, four general practitioners and two private practicing gynaecologists were conducted using ethnographic methodology. Patient safety was not a topic of attention for patients or dominant in communication between patients and healthcare professionals. The understanding of patient safety in clinical practice is almost exclusively linked to disease management. Involvement of patients is not systematic, but healthcare professionals and patients express willingness to engage. Invitation and encouragement of patients to become involved could be further systematised and developed. Barriers include limited knowledge of patient safety, of specific patient safety involvement techniques and concern regarding potential negative impact on doctor-patient relationship. Involvement of patients in patient safety must take into account that despite stated openness to the idea of involvement, patients and health professionals may not in practice show immediate concern. Lack of systematic involvement can also be attributed to limited knowledge about how to implement involvement beyond the focus of self-monitoring and compliance and a concern about the consequences of patient involvement for treatment outcomes. To realise the potential of patients' and health professionals' shared openness towards involvement, there is a need for more active facilitation and concrete guidance on how involvement can be practiced by both parties.

  16. The Relationship Between Father Involvement and Child Problem Behaviour in Intact Families: A 7-Year Cross-Lagged Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouri, Eirini; Midouhas, Emily; Narayanan, Martina K

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the cross-lagged relationship between father involvement and child problem behaviour across early-to-middle childhood, and tested whether temperament modulated any cross-lagged child behaviour effects on father involvement. It used data from the first four waves of the UK's Millennium Cohort Study, when children (50.3 % male) were aged 9 months, and 3, 5 and 7 years. The sample was 8302 families where both biological parents were co-resident across the four waves. Father involvement (participation in play and physical and educational activities with the child) was measured at ages 3, 5 and 7, as was child problem behaviour (assessed with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire). Key child and family covariates related to father involvement and child problem behaviour were controlled. Little evidence was found that more father involvement predicted less child problem behaviour two years later, with the exception of father involvement at child's age 5 having a significant, but small, effect on peer problems at age 7. There were two child effects. More hyperactive children at age 3 had more involved fathers at age 5, and children with more conduct problems at age 3 had more involved fathers at age 5. Child temperament did not moderate any child behaviour effects on father involvement. Thus, in young, intact UK families, child adjustment appears to predict, rather than be predicted by, father involvement in early childhood. When children showed more problematic behaviours, fathers did not become less involved. In fact, early hyperactivity and conduct problems in children seemed to elicit more involvement from fathers. At school age, father involvement appeared to affect children's social adjustment rather than vice versa.

  17. Opportunities for involving men and families in chronic disease management: a qualitative study from Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Meredith P; Castro, Maricruz; Peña, Liz; López Hernández, Sergio Hernán; Arreola Camacho, Gabriel; Ramírez-Zea, Manuel; Martínez, Homero

    2015-10-05

    A healthy lifestyle intervention was implemented in primary care health centers in urban parts of Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, Mexico with an aim of reducing cardiovascular disease risk for patients with type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension. During implementation, research questions emerged. Considerably fewer men participated in the intervention than women, and an opportunity was identified to increase the reach of activities aimed at improving disease self-management through strategies involving family members. A qualitative study was conducted to identify strategies to involve men and engage family members in disease management and risk reduction. Nine men with hypertension and/or type 2 diabetes with limited to no participation in disease self-management and health promotion activities, six families in which at least one family member had a diagnosis of one or both conditions, and nine health care providers from four different government health centers were recruited for the study. Participants took part in semi-structured interviews. During interviews with families, genograms and eco-maps were used to diagram family composition and structure, and capture the nature of patients' relationships to the extended family and community resources. Transcripts were coded and a general inductive analytic approach was used to identify themes related to men's limited participation in health promotion activities, family support and barriers to disease management, and health care providers' recommendations. Participants reported barriers to men's participation in chronic disease management and healthy lifestyle education activities that can be grouped into two categories: internal and external factors. Internal factors are those for which they are able to make the decision on their own and external factors are those that are not related solely to their decision to take part or not. Four primary aspects were identified related to families' relationships with disease: different

  18. Center for Advanced Energy Studies Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Kostelnik

    2005-09-01

    The world is facing critical energy-related challenges regarding world and national energy demands, advanced science and energy technology delivery, nuclear engineering educational shortfalls, and adequately trained technical staff. Resolution of these issues is important for the United States to ensure a secure and affordable energy supply, which is essential for maintaining U.S. national security, continued economic prosperity, and future sustainable development. One way that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges is by tasking the Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) with developing the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). By 2015, CAES will be a self-sustaining, world-class, academic and research institution where the INL; DOE; Idaho, regional, and other national universities; and the international community will cooperate to conduct critical energy-related research, classroom instruction, technical training, policy conceptualization, public dialogue, and other events.

  19. Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year's findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to γ radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H 2 . Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs

  20. Acrolein acts as a neurotoxin in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of rat: involvement of ?-synuclein aggregation and programmed cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Hui-Ching; Zhao, Wei-Zhong; Huang, Hui-Ju; Lo, Yu-Li; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Maan-Yuh Lin, Anya

    2017-01-01

    Clinical studies report significant increases in acrolein (an ?,?-unsaturated aldehyde) in the substantia nigra (SN) of patients with Parkinson?s disease (PD). In the present study, acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system was investigated by local infusion of acrolein (15, 50, 150?nmoles/0.5??l) in the SN of Sprague-Dawley rats. Acrolein-induced neurodegeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic system was delineated by reductions in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) leve...

  1. SISTEM PENDUKUNG KEPUTUSAN UNTUK MENGEVALUASI INTERNAL PROGRAM STUDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indhitya Rahman Padiku

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of major and study program cannot be separated by some internal factors weather directly influenced number of new registration students or indirectly. It needs a method to both know and to analyze internal evaluation variables in major or study program. Naive Bayes Clasifier (NBC method is the simple form of Bayesian network that assume all features are independent each other. NBC shows us a great performance entirely in accuracy and error level classification. NBC is able to differentiate irrelevance attribute and also classified some attributes in prediction needs. This research hopefully can be useful for major internal evaluating and study program in order to increase the number of new registration students. The classification by influenced of variables to evaluate the condition of both major and study program for the new registration students.

  2. Using Career Pathways to Guide Students through Programs of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Debra D.; Krismer, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes career pathways that evolved through a Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training consortium grant designed to help students complete programs of study and enter health care careers.

  3. Federal Tax Issues Raised by International Study Abroad Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Bertrand M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Identifies and describes tax issues raised by study abroad programs and suggests steps that a college or university can take to minimize or eliminate adverse U.S. and foreign tax exposure to both itself and its employees. (EV)

  4. Northeast Cooperative Research Study Fleet (SF) Program Biological Sampling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Northeast Cooperative Research Study Fleet (SF) Program partners with a subset of commercial fishermen to collect high quality, high resolution, haul by haul...

  5. The Impact of Job Involvement on Emotional Labor to Customer-Oriented Behavior: An Empirical Study of Hospital Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Ling; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2016-06-01

    Healthcare is a profession that requires a high level of emotional labor (EL). Nurses provide frontline services in hospitals and thus typically experience high levels of EL. The quality of services that nurses provide impacts on how patients evaluate the service quality of hospitals. The aim of this study is to explore the relationships among EL, job involvement (JI), and customer-oriented behavior (COB) in the context of the nursing profession. The participants in this study were nurses at eight hospitals, all located in Taiwan. This study used a self-reporting questionnaire. Research data were gathered at two discrete periods (A and B). Questionnaire A collected data on EL and JI, and Questionnaire B collected data on COB. Five hundred questionnaires were sent out to qualified participants, and 472 valid questionnaires were returned. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses. The expression of positive emotion (EPE) and the suppression of negative emotion (SNE) were found to positively affect the patient-oriented COB. Furthermore, the EPE was found to positively affect the task-oriented COB. In terms of the moderating effect of JI, JI was found to relate positively to the EPE, patient-oriented COB, and task-oriented COB. In addition, higher values of JI were found to weaken the relationship between the SNE and the task-oriented COB. It has become an increasingly popular practice for hospital organizations to work to promote the COB of their nursing staffs. The results of this study prove empirically that a relationship exists among EL, COB, and JI in nurses. This study contributes to the related literature, enhances the knowledge of hospital and nursing administrators with regard to EL and COB, and offers a reference for hospital managers who are responsible for designing and executing multidisciplinary programs and for managing hospital-based human resources.

  6. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.J.; Harren, F.J.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 23 days which indicates the existence

  7. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.; Harren, F.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2¿3 days which indicates the existence

  8. Study on the Control Strategy of Shifting Time Involving Multigroup Clutches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the control strategy of shifting time involving multigroup clutches for a hydromechanical continuously variable transmission (HMCVT. The dynamic analyses of mathematical models are presented in this paper, and the simulation models are used to study the control strategy of HMCVT. Simulations are performed in Simulation X platform to investigate the shifting time of clutches under different operating conditions. On this basis, simulation analysis and test verification of two typical conditions, which play the decisive roles for the shifting quality, are carried out. The results show that there are differences in the shifting time of the two typical conditions. In the shifting process from the negative transmission of hydromechanical ranges to the positive transmission of hydromechanical ranges, the control strategy based on the shifting time is switching the clutches of shifting mechanism firstly and then disengaging a group of clutches of planetary gear mechanism and engaging another group of the clutches of planetary gear mechanism lastly. In the shifting process from the hydraulic range to the hydromechanical range, the control strategy based on the shifting time is switching the clutches of hydraulic shifting mechanism and planetary gear mechanism at first and then engaging the clutch of shifting mechanism.

  9. Hemispheric involvement in the processing of Chinese idioms: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Li, Ping; Fang, Xiaoping; Shu, Hua; Liu, Youyi; Chen, Lang

    2016-07-01

    Although the left hemisphere is believed to handle major language functions, the role of the right hemisphere in language comprehension remains controversial. Recently researchers have investigated hemispheric language processing with figurative language materials (e.g., metaphors, jokes, and idioms). The current study capitalizes on the pervasiveness and distinct features of Chinese idioms to examine the brain mechanism of figurative language processing. Native Chinese speakers performed a non-semantic task while reading opaque idioms, transparent idioms, and non-idiomatic literal phrases. Whole-brain analyses indicated strong activations for all three conditions in an overlapping brain network that includes the bilateral inferior/middle frontal gyrus and the temporo-parietal and occipital-temporal regions. The two idiom conditions elicited additional activations in the right superior parietal lobule and right precuneus. Item-based modulation analyses further demonstrated that activation amplitudes in the right angular gyrus, right superior parietal lobule and right precuneus, as well as left inferior temporo-occipital cortex, are negatively correlated with the semantic transparency of the idioms. These results suggest that both hemispheres are involved in idiom processing but they play different roles. Implications of the findings are discussed in light of theories of figurative language processing and hemispheric functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Atrophy progression in semantic dementia with asymmetric temporal involvement: a tensor-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambati, S M; Rankin, K P; Narvid, J; Seeley, W W; Dean, D; Rosen, H J; Miller, B L; Ashburner, J; Gorno-Tempini, M L

    2009-01-01

    We performed a longitudinal anatomical study to map the progression of gray matter atrophy in anatomically defined predominantly left (LTLV) and right (RTLV) temporal lobe variants of semantic dementia (SD). T1-weighted MRI scans were obtained at presentation and one-year follow-up from 13 LTLV, 6 RTLV, and 25 control subjects. Tensor-based morphometry (TBM) in SPM2 was applied to derive a voxel-wise estimation of regional tissue loss over time from the deformation field required to warp the follow-up scan to the presentation scan in each subject. When compared to controls, both LTLV and RTLV showed significant progression of gray matter atrophy not only within the temporal lobe most affected at presentation, but also in the controlateral temporal regions (p<0.05 FWE corrected). In LTLV, significant progression of volume loss also involved the ventromedial frontal and the left anterior insular regions. These results identified the anatomic substrates of the previously reported clinical evolution of LTLV and RTLV into a unique 'merged' clinical syndrome characterized by semantic and behavioral deficits and bilateral temporal atrophy.

  11. An Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions Involving Polymers and Silane Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo L. Oréfice

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Silane coupling agents have been frequently used as interfacial agents in polymer composites to improve interfacial strength and resistance to fluid migration. Although the capability of these agents in improving properties and performance of composites has been reported, there are still many uncertainties regarding the processing-structure-property relationships and the mechanisms of coupling developed by silane agents. In this work, an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM was used to measure interactions between polymers and silica substrates, where silane networks with a series of different structures were processed. The influence of the structure of silane networks on the interactions with polymers was studied and used to determine the mechanisms involved in the coupling phenomenon. The AFM results showed that phenomena such as chain penetration, entanglements, intersegment bonding, chain conformation in the vicinities of rigid surfaces were identified as being relevant for the overall processes of adhesion and adsorption of polymeric chains within a silane network. AFM adhesion curves showed that penetration of polymeric chains through a more open silane network can lead to higher levels of interactions between polymer and silane agents.

  12. Testing the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in lucid dreaming: a tDCS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumbrys, Tadas; Erlacher, Daniel; Schredl, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that lucid dreaming (awareness of dreaming while dreaming) might be associated with increased brain activity over frontal regions during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. By applying transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), we aimed to manipulate the activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during REM sleep to increase dream lucidity. Nineteen participants spent three consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. On the second and third nights they randomly received either 1 mA tDCS for 10 min or sham stimulation during each REM period starting with the second one. According to the participants' self-ratings, tDCS over the DLPFC during REM sleep increased lucidity in dreams. The effects, however, were not strong and found only in frequent lucid dreamers. While this indicates some preliminary support for the involvement of the DLPFC in lucid dreaming, further research, controlling for indirect effects of stimulation and including other brain regions, is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Er:YAG laser in defocused mode for scaling of periodontally involved root surfaces: an in vitro pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crespi, R.; Romanos, G.E.; Barone, A.; Sculean, A.; Covani, U.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Er:YAG laser may be used on periodontally involved teeth in combination with conventional periodontal therapy in order to improve the efficacy of root instrumentation. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of hand instrumentation on root surfaces of periodontally involved

  14. Applying the Intervention Model for Fostering Affective Involvement with Persons Who Are Congenitally Deafblind: An Effect Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marga A. W.; Janssen, Marleen J.; Ruijssenaars, Wied A. J. J. M.; Huisman, Mark; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we applied the Intervention Model for Affective Involvement (IMAI) to four participants who are congenitally deafblind and their 16 communication partners in 3 different settings (school, a daytime activities center, and a group home). We examined whether the intervention increased affective involvement between the…

  15. Evidence for thalamic involvement in the thermal grill illusion: an FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Lindstedt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Perceptual illusions play an important role in untangling neural mechanisms underlying conscious phenomena. The thermal grill illusion (TGI has been suggested as a promising model for exploring percepts involved in neuropathic pain, such as cold-allodynia (pain arising from contact with innocuous cold. The TGI is an unpleasant/painful sensation from touching juxtapositioned bars of cold and warm innocuous temperatures. AIM: To develop an MRI-compatible TGI-unit and explore the supraspinal correlates of the illusion, using fMRI, in a group of healthy volunteers. METHODS: We constructed a TGI-thermode allowing the rapid presentation of warm(41°C, cold(18°C and interleaved(41°C+18°C = TGI temperatures in an fMRI-environment. Twenty volunteers were tested. The affective-motivational ("unpleasantness" and sensory-disciminatory ("pain-intensity" dimensions of each respective stimulus were rated. Functional images were analyzed at a corrected α-level <0.05. RESULTS: The TGI was rated as significantly more unpleasant and painful than stimulation with each of its constituent temperatures. Also, the TGI was rated as significantly more unpleasant than painful. Thermal stimulation versus neutral baseline revealed bilateral activations of the anterior insulae and fronto-parietal regions. Unlike its constituent temperatures the TGI displayed a strong activation of the right (contralateral thalamus. Exploratory contrasts at a slightly more liberal threshold-level also revealed a TGI-activation of the right mid/anterior insula, correlating with ratings of unpleasantness (rho = 0.31. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first fMRI-study of the TGI. The activation of the anterior insula is consistent with this region's putative role in processing of homeostatically relevant feeling-states. Our results constitute the first neurophysiologic evidence of thalamic involvement in the TGI. Similar thalamic activity

  16. Stakeholder involvement in other sectors. High Voltage Electricity Transmission. Case study: CO_2 capture and storage. Common misconceptions on stakeholder involvement - Reviewing deployment of RES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolsink, Maarten; Komendantova, Nadejda; Kalaydjian, Francois

    2017-01-01

    Session 7 featured several speakers with expertise outside of the nuclear field. High-voltage electricity transmission and carbon capture and storage projects were presented by experts who study and advise on stakeholder involvement in such activities. The session chair provided an overview of stakeholder involvement fundamentals as applied to renewable energy projects. Though the presentations were on non-nuclear projects, the principles presented and discussed were clearly applicable in nuclear contexts as well. Mr Wolsink of University of Amsterdam re-framed the topic of the power supply system as a 'socio-technical system'. He identified three types or levels of societal acceptance for energy innovation: socio-political acceptance, market acceptance and community acceptance. This distinction highlights the different nature of questions, issues, set of actors and challenges that arise at different points or forums around energy infrastructure projects and why general favorability towards a technology does not translate into support of its local implementation. Societal acceptance probably cannot be acquired without meaningful involvement. Arnstein's 'ladder of citizen participation' was referenced by two session speakers. Mr Wolsink explained that inexperienced organisations may target 'consultation', thinking that this is real participation. However, consultation is a relatively low level of involvement which consists of gathering information or views, without promoting two-way dialogue (engagement) or committing to actual influence and indeed some degree of citizen power. He advised that simple consultation should be avoided unless the organisation finds that such stakeholder or public input is essential to the decision and intends to give it due account. The Barendrecht case on carbon capture and storage, as presented by Mr Kalaydjian of IFP Energies Nouvelles, illustrates the danger in overly restricting or compartmentalising stakeholder involvement. Ms

  17. Birds of a feather stay active together: a case study of an all-male older adult exercise program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, William L; Beauchamp, Mark R

    2013-04-01

    In this article, the authors report the results of a case study examining a group-based exercise program for older adult men. The purpose of the investigation was to identify the elements of this program responsible for its appeal. Interviews, conducted with a purposely sampled subset of program members, were subject to content-analytic procedures. Participants identified social connectedness (reflected by themes of demographic homogeneity, support and care, customs and traditions, and interpersonal comparisons) and supportive leadership behaviors (constituted by communication, the provision of choice, and individualized attention) as major attractions in the program. A few participants also noted the challenge that exists when a program is seen by some as being a social program that provides opportunities for exercise and by others as an exercise program that provides opportunities for socializing. Findings are discussed in relation to contextual factors associated with older adult men's involvement in physical activity programs.

  18. Study of atmospheric emission trading programs in the United States. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A detailed review and evaluation was conducted of federal and state atmospheric emission trading programs in the USA to identify the factors critical to a successful program. A preliminary assessment was also made of the feasibility of such a program for NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the lower Fraser Valley in British Columbia. To date, experience in the USA with atmospheric emissions trading has primarily involved trades of emission reduction credits pursuant to the 1977 Clean Air Act amendments. Most trades occur under netting provisions which allow expansion of an existing plant without triggering the stringent new-source review process. Six case studies of emissions trading are described from jurisdictions in California, New Jersey, and Kentucky and from the national SO 2 allowance trading program. Estimates of cost savings achieved by emissions trading are provided, and factors critical to a successful program are summarized. These factors include clearly defined goals, participation proportional to problem contribution, an emissions inventory of satisfactory quality, a comprehensive permit system, a credible enforcement threat, efficient and predictable administration, location of the program in an economic growth area, and support by those affected by the program. In the Fraser Valley, it is concluded that either an emissions reduction credit or an allowance trading system is feasible for both NOx and VOC, and recommendations are given for implementation of such a program based on the factors determined above. 1 fig., 8 tabs

  19. Distribution of steroidogenic enzymes involved in androgen synthesis in polycystic ovaries: an immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, E. M.; Sasano, H.; Suzuki, T.; Beek, J. F.; van der Veen, F.

    2000-01-01

    To find an explanation for the possible working mechanism of laparoscopic ovarian electrocautery for the treatment of anovulation in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), we evaluated the distribution of steroidogenic enzymes involved in the synthesis of ovarian androgens in surgical pathology

  20. Ten years of Developing International Volcanology Graduate Study Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W. I.

    2010-12-01

    In 2000 I reported at this symposium about multi-institutional graduate field trips to IAVCEI events, such as the Bali meeting and its importance in building international collegiality and awareness among the volcanology doctoral students. NSF was an enthusiastic supporter of these field sessions and this support has continued through the highly successful Pucon and Reykjavik sessions. International volcanology graduate program development began with several exchange programs. EHaz was a highly successful program (McGill, Simon Fraser, Michigan Tech, Buffalo, UNAM and Universidad de Colima) funded by the Department of Education (FIPSE) that moved students across North America where dozens of graduate students spent semesters of their study abroad and shared annual field trips and online student led graduate seminar classes. Michigan Tech’s volcanology graduate program started a Masters International program that combined Peace Corps service with hazards mitigation graduate study and students were placed by Peace Corps in countries with prominent natural hazards. The new program funded 2 year residences in foreign environments, principally in Pacific Latin America. NSF strongly supported this program from its inception, and eventually it gained NSF PIRE support. Dozens of students have initiated the 3 year program (15 completed) to date. A similar PIRE developed at UAF with a link to volcanology in the Russian Far East. One gain is the development of many socially-conscious research selections. Beginning this year transatlantic dual degree masters programs in volcanology are being offered by a consortium of US and European volcanology programs (Michigan Tech, Buffalo, Clermont Ferrand and University of Milan Bicocca), again aided by FIPSE funding. Students have dual advisors on both sides of the Atlantic and spend about half of their two year programs in Europe and half in US. Faculty also travel in the program and the four campuses are increasingly linked by

  1. Posterior pharyngeal candidiasis in the absence of clinically overt oral involvement: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavey, Siobhan V; Keane, Niamh; Power, Maria; O'Regan, Anthony W

    2013-12-01

    Although oropharyngeal candidiasis is associated with inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) usage, there is sparse data on the prevalence of posterior pharyngeal candidiasis in those without any detectable oral candidiasis on clinical examination. We systematically investigated the relationship between oral candidiasis on clinical examination and the presence of posterior pharyngeal candidiasis at bronchoscopy. We conducted a cross-sectional study on a convenience sample of 100 patients undergoing bronchoscopy at our institution. Patients were assessed for symptoms of and risk factors for candida infection and had an examination of their oropharynx for evidence of candidiasis before bronchoscopy. They subsequently had a detailed assessment for posterior candidiasis at bronchoscopy. We performed a posteriori subgroup analysis, which focused solely on those patients on ICS maintenance therapy. Median age was 54.7 (27-84) years, and 55 patients were male; 47 % of patients were on ICS, and 20 % of this cohort received recent oral corticosteroids. Twenty-eight percent of this convenience sample had posterior pharyngeal candidiasis; however, only 10.7 % (3/28) of these patients had clinically detectable oral candidiasis on clinical examination before bronchoscopy. Factors that were independently associated with the presence of pharyngeal candidiasis at bronchoscopy were OR (95 % CI) ICS usage 6.9 (2.5-19.2), particularly fluticasone usage 6.8 (2.62-17.9) and the presence of dysphonia 3.2 (1.3-8.0). In the subgroup analysis of ICS usage, posterior pharyngeal candidiasis was correlated with the presence of dysphonia but was not independently associated with fluticasone or budesonide dosage. This study demonstrates that posterior pharyngeal candidiasis in the absence of clinically overt oral candidiasis is frequent amongst ICS users. A history of ICS use, particularly fluticasone usage, as well as the presence of dysphonia are associated with posterior pharyngeal candidiasis at

  2. Involving fathers in teaching youth about farm tractor seatbelt safety--a randomized control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinnah, Hamida Amirali; Stoneman, Zolinda; Rains, Glen

    2014-03-01

    Farm youth continue to experience high rates of injury and deaths as a result of agricultural activities. Farm machinery, especially tractors, is the most common cause of casualties to youth. A Roll-Over Protection Structure (ROPS) along with a fastened seatbelt can prevent almost all injuries and fatalities from tractor overturns. Despite this knowledge, the use of seatbelts by farmers on ROPS tractors remains low. This study treats farm safety as a family issue and builds on the central role of parents as teachers and role models of farm safety for youth. This research study used a longitudinal, repeated-measures, randomized-control design in which youth 10-19 years of age were randomly assigned to either of two intervention groups (parent-led group and staff-led group) or the control group. Fathers in the parent-led group were less likely to operate ROPS tractors without a seatbelt compared with other groups. They were more likely to have communicated with youth about the importance of wearing seatbelts on ROPS tractors. Consequently, youth in the parent-led group were less likely to operate a ROPS tractor without a seatbelt than the control group at post-test. This randomized control trial supports the effectiveness of a home-based, father-led farm safety intervention as a promising strategy for reducing youth as well as father-unsafe behaviors (related to tractor seatbelts) on the farm. This intervention appealed to fathers' strong motivation to practice tractor safety for the sake of their youth. Involving fathers helped change both father as well as youth unsafe tractor-seatbelt behaviors. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of covariances involved in the k0 method of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Vanderlei

    2011-01-01

    This work aimed the development of a methodology for the treatment of uncertainty in the k 0 Method for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), comprehensively and accurately, by applying the covariance analysis methodology. All parameters involved in determining the concentration of a given element were analyzed with criteria in order to establish the correlations among them. Also established were the possible correlations between the concentrations of different elements for the same sample and for different samples. This procedure generated a large number of correlations that have been rigorously addressed. Data for analysis were obtained experimentally by means of irradiations performed at 24A irradiation position, near the core of the IEA-R1 research reactor, located at IPEN-CNEN/SP. The parameters α and f, characterizing the neutron field were determined by applying several methods from the literature. A detailed statistical treatment was applied to each measurement, verifying the various uncertainties and partial correlations. In order to deepen the study, targets of 64 Zn and 68 Zn were chosen, for which the nuclear parameters k 0 and Q 0 showed discrepancies in the literature in order to determine them experimentally. For 64 Zn, the values for these parameters resulted 5.63(8) x 10 -3 and 1.69(6), respectively. For 68 Zn they resulted 4.00(6) x 10 -4 and 2.34(4), respectively. These values were compared with data from the literature. The Monte Carlo method was applied at various stages of study, to allow accurate determination of some parameters needed for the complete data analysis. (author)

  4. Involving the public in epidemiological public health research: a qualitative study of public and stakeholder involvement in evaluation of a population-wide natural policy experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson de Cuevas, Rachel; Nylén, Lotta; Burström, Bo; Whitehead, Margaret

    2018-04-20

    Public involvement in research is considered good practice by European funders; however, evidence of its research impact is sparse, particularly in relation to large-scale epidemiological research. To explore what difference public and stakeholder involvement made to the interpretation of findings from an evaluation of a natural policy experiment to influence the wider social determinants of health: 'Flexicurity'. Stockholm County, Sweden. Members of the public from different occupational groups represented by blue-collar and white-collar trade union representatives. Also, members of three stakeholder groups: the Swedish national employment agency; an employers' association and politicians sitting on a national labour market committee. Total: 17 participants. Qualitative study of process and outcomes of public and stakeholder participation in four focused workshops on the interpretation of initial findings from the flexicurity evaluation. New insights from participants benefiting the interpretation of our research findings or conceptualisation of future research. Participants sensed more drastic and nuanced change in the Swedish welfare system over recent decades than was evident from our literature reviews and policy analysis. They also elaborated hidden developments in the Swedish labour market that were increasingly leading to 'insiders' and 'outsiders', with differing experiences and consequences for financial and job security. Their explanation of the differential effects of the various collective agreements for different occupational groups was new and raised further potential research questions. Their first-hand experience provided new insights into how changes to the social protection system were contributing to the increasing trends in poverty among unemployed people with limiting long-standing illness. The politicians provided further reasoning behind some of the policy changes and their intended and unintended consequences. These insights fed into

  5. Participatory democracy, representative democracy, and the nature of diffuse and concentrated interests: A case study of public involvement on a national gorest district

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Overdevest

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate whether public involvement on a national forest district fairly represents the public's values, this article proposes four hypothesis tests. First, it is hypothesized that public-involvement programs operute according to a participatory democracy logic, in which broad cross sections of the public participate in public involvement opportunities. A...

  6. Alcohol involvement in aggression between intimate partners in New Zealand: a national cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypri, Kypros; Bell, Melanie L; Cousins, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the role of alcohol at the time of aggressive incidents between intimate partners in the general population by gender, by estimating (1) prevalence and severity of aggression, and drinking at the time, (2) associations of drinking at the time of the aggression with reported severity, anger and fear, and (3) association of usual drinking patterns with partner aggression. Design A national survey of 18–70-year-olds using an electoral roll sample obtained self-reported alcohol consumption, partner's alcohol consumption and details of the most severe partner aggression by the respondent and towards the respondent in the past 2 years. The mean scores for associated severity, anger and fear were analysed by gender and alcohol involvement. Multinomial models estimated associations of drinking patterns with aggression to and from the respondent. Results The response rate was 49% (n=1925). Men and women reported similar prevalence of victimisation and perpetration of aggression (11–15%). Alcohol was involved in more than 25% of incidents, and reported more by women than by men, particularly male-only drinking when the respondent was the victim. Women reported greater severity, anger and fear with victimisation than men, and drinking was associated with greater reported severity. Heavy episodic drinking by respondents was associated with a threefold increase in victimisation and doubling of perpetration of aggression involving alcohol. Heavy episodic drinking by either partner was also associated with drinking being involved in reported aggression. Conclusions The experience of intimate-partner aggression in a cross-section of households differs by gender and the involvement of alcohol, and ‘counts’ of aggressive acts in a population-based survey do not reflect the reality of gender differences. Heavy episodic drinking patterns are associated with more aggression involving alcohol within relationships, and alcohol involvement is associated

  7. A case study on the teaching of English in Environmental Education masters’ training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montejo, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a part of the result of a bibliometric study of the total number of theses presented as the graduation exercise by the participants of the third edition of Environmental Education Master Training Program, particular the results connected with role of the English Language in accessing, processing and communicating information. The results are compared to the objectives and contents of the English language syllabus used at the training program. By means of the methodology delivered by the Master Training Program Committee, and the use of bibliometric techniques a quantitative study of the whole population was carried out, later on the same basis a case study was completed involving two graduates of high, medial and low results in English. The authors arrived at conclusions in relation to the effectiveness of the English syllabus and the way graduates make use of English as a research tool. .

  8. Pedagogies of Transformation for High School Study Abroad Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Christine E.; Hartmann, Gennifre

    2014-01-01

    This autoethnographic case study examines the ways in which high school students and teachers' behaviors, values, and attitudes were transformed during their participation on a semester-long study abroad program in Central America. The study found that an integrative pedagogical approach in which place-based content was paired with place-based…

  9. Fundamental radiation effects studies in the fusion materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Fundamental radiation effects studies in the US Fusion Materials Program generally fall under the aegis of the Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) Program. In a narrow sense, the problem addressed by the DAFS program is the prediction of radiation effects in fusion devices using data obtained in non-representative environments. From the onset, the program has had near-term and long-term components. The premise for the latter is that there will be large economic penalties for uncertainties in predictive capability. Fusion devices are expected to be large and complex and unanticipated maintenance will be costly. It is important that predictions are based on a maximum of understanding and a minimum of empiricism. Gaining this understanding is the thrust of the long-term component. (orig.)

  10. Potential Involvement of P2 Receptors in the Pathological Processes of Hyperthyroidism: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wu; Li, Guodong; Nie, Yijun; Zou, Lifang; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Shuangmei; Li, Guilin; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Liang, Shangdong

    2016-05-01

    Symptoms of hyperthyroidism manifest mainly as changes in the nervous and metabolic systems. Whether P2X receptors (ionotropic ATP purinergic receptors, including P2X3 receptor and P2X7 receptor) are involved in the alterations of these disorders still remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to assess the association of hyperthyroidism with the expression of P2X3 and P2X7 receptors and the concentrations of ATP in blood leukocytes and catecholamine. Twelve healthy subjects and twelve patients diagnosed with hyperthyroidism were recruited. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels had been detected by chemiluminescence method. Meanwhile, the catecholamine levels (including adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine) in plasma, ATP level and P2X receptors (including P2X3 receptor and P2X7 receptor) in peripheral blood had been detected by high performance liquid chromatography, bioluminescence method, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine were significantly higher in the hyperthyroidism group compared with the control group. The concentration of ATP in the hyperthyroidism group was significantly higher than its in the control group. The expression of P2X3 mRNA and P2X7 mRNA in hyperthyroidism group were significantly increased compared with those in control group. In a conclusion, there is a relationship between the elevated expression of P2X3 receptor and P2X7 receptor in peripheral blood leukocytes and high serum epinephrine and norepinephrine levels in hyperthyroidism patients. © 2016 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  11. Study of ionizing collisions involving excited states in a potassium-rubidium mixture at thermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djerad, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    This study concerns mainly ionising collisions involving excited states in a saturated mixture of K-Rb vapours, at thermal energy. The experimental method consists into continuous resonant two steps laser excitation of the atoms (n ≤ 10) and mass spectrometry of ion currents. Radiative and collisional relaxation of the atoms create a complex medium. The most efficient collisional processes are Penning ionisation and Hornbeck-Molnar ionisation. In the heteronuclear system Rb(n1) + K(4P), the following exit channels may be operative: Rb(n1) + K(4P) → Rb + + e - + K Rb(n1) + K(4p) → K + + e - + Rb Rb(n1) + K(4P) → KRb + + e - . The measurements show that the first channel has an average cross section ∼ 10 -13 cm 2 . Those of the other channels are at least three orders of magnitude smaller and thus comparatively negligible. The data obtained from 5D to 10S allow to conclude that the flux in the entrance channel ionises at large separation between Rb(n1) and K(4P). The process of ionisation is dominated by polarisation forces, exchange forces being negligible. In the present mixture, Hornbeck-Molnar ionisation leads to homonuclear molecular ions K 2 + , Rb 2 + as well as the heteronuclear one KRb + . We have measured the rate coefficients for the systems: K(n1) + Rb → KRb + + e - Rb(n1) + K → KRb + + e - . The rate coefficients increase with the excitation energy of the level n1; they do not exhibit fundamental differences with those measured in pure alkali vapours [fr

  12. Study of the mechanisms involved in the laser superficial hardening process of metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Edmara Marques Rodrigues da

    2001-01-01

    The laser superficial hardening process of a ferrous alloy (gray cast iron) and of an aluminum-silicon alloy was investigated in this work. These metallic alloys are used in the automobile industry for manufacturing cylinders and pistons, respectively. By application of individual pulses and single tracks, the involved mechanisms during the processing were studied. Variables such as energy density, power density, temporal width, beam diameter on the sample surface, atmosphere of the processing region, overlapping and scanning velocity. The hardened surface was characterized by optical and scanning electronic microscopy, dispersive energy microanalysis, X-ray mapping, X-ray diffraction, and measurements of roughness and Vickers microhardness. Depending on the processing parameters, it is possible to obtain different microstructures. The affected area of gray cast iron, can be hardened by remelting or transformation hardening (total or partial) if the reached temperature is higher or not that of melting temperature. Laser treatment originated new structures such as retained austenite, martensite and, occasionally, eutectic of cellular dendritic structure. Aluminum-silicon alloy does not have phase transformation in solid state, it can be hardened only by remelting. The increase of hardness is a function of the precipitation hardening process, which makes the silicon particles smaller and more disperse in the matrix. Maximal values of microhardness (700-1000 HV) were reached with the laser treatment in gray cast iron samples. The initial microhardness is of 242 HV. For aluminum-silicon alloy, the laser remelting increases the initial microhardness of 128 HV to the range of 160-320 HV. The found results give a new perspective for using the CLA/IPEN's laser in the heat treatment area. Besides providing a higher absorptivity to the materials, compared with the CO 2 laser, and optical fiber access, the superficial hardening with Nd:YAG laser, depending on the level of

  13. Factors involved in nurses' responses to burnout: a grounded theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikravesh Mansoure

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intense and long-standing problems in burn centers in Tehran have led nurses to burnout. This phenomenon has provoked serious responses and has put the nurses, patients and the organization under pressure. The challenge for managers and nurse executives is to understand the factors which would reduce or increase the nurses' responses to burnout and develop delivery systems that promote positive adaptation and facilitate quality care. This study, as a part of more extensive research, aims to explore and describe the nurses' perceptions of the factors affecting their responses to burnout. Methods Grounded theory was used as the method. Thirty- eight participants were recruited. Data were generated by unstructured interviews and 21 sessions of participant observations. Constant comparison was used for data analysis. Results Nurses' and patients' personal characteristics and social support influenced nurses' responses to burnout. Personal characteristics of the nurses and patients, especially when interacting, had a more powerful effect. They altered emotional, attitudinal, behavioral and organizational responses to burnout and determined the kind of caring behavior. Social support had a palliative effect and altered emotional responses and some aspects of attitudinal responses. Conclusions The powerful effect of positive personal characteristics and its sensitivity to long standing and intense organizational pressures suggests approaches to executing stress reduction programs and refreshing the nurses' morale by giving more importance to ethical aspects of caring. Moreover, regarding palliative effect of social support and its importance for the nurses' wellbeing, nurse executives are responsible for promoting a work environment that supports nurses and motivates them.

  14. UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on ''modest'' extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D- 3 He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs

  15. Patient Involvement in Patient Safety: A Qualitative Study of Nursing Staff and Patient Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Andrea C; Macdonald, Marilyn

    2017-06-01

    The risk associated with receiving health care has called for an increased focus on the role of patients in helping to improve safety. Recent research has highlighted that patient involvement in patient safety practices may be influenced by patient perceptions of patient safety practices and the perceptions of their health care providers. The objective of this research was to describe patient involvement in patient safety practices by exploring patient and nursing staff perceptions of safety. Qualitative focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of nursing staff and patients who had previously completed a patient safety survey in 2 tertiary hospital sites in Eastern Canada. Six focus groups (June 2011 to January 2012) were conducted and analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Four themes were identified: (1) wanting control, (2) feeling connected, (3) encountering roadblocks, and (4) sharing responsibility for safety. Both patient and nursing staff participants highlighted the importance of building a personal connection as a precursor to ensuring that patients are involved in their care and safety. However, perceptions of provider stress and nursing staff workload often reduced the ability of the nursing staff and patient participants to connect with one another and promote involvement. Current strategies aimed at increasing patient awareness of patient safety may not be enough. The findings suggest that providing the context for interaction to occur between nursing staff and patients as well as targeted interventions aimed at increasing patient control may be needed to ensure patient involvement in patient safety.

  16. LANGUAGE SCHOOLS AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDYING PROGRAMS IN PORTUGAL

    OpenAIRE

    Hritchenko, Iryna

    2017-01-01

    The article is devoted to the description and characterizing of language schools and foreign language studying programs in Portugal. The relevance of language learning for professional, mobility, self-developing means is shown. The main courses and programs are observed and the advantages and disadvantages of each of them are given. It is stated that Portuguese courses mostly follow the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. A small synopsis of the abilities for each level is p...

  17. The pedagogy of Short-Term Study-Abroad Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Gonsalvez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on establishing guidelines on the pedagogy of short term study abroad programs. This study follows 33 students who participated in a short-term study-abroad program to India with the researcher from 2006 through 2011. The study relies heavily on the student reflections and expressions as they experienced them. It is qualitative in nature. Focus groups were the main method of data collection, where participants were invited to reflect, express, and share their experiences with one another. This provided an opportunity for the participants to come together, relive their experiences, and help provide information as to how and what type of an influence this short-term study-abroad program provided.

  18. Preferred supplier programs for consulting services: An exploratory study of German client companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieweke, J.; Birkner, Stephanie; Mohe, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Research has recently provided evidence that at least some companies have involved purchasing departments in buying professional services such as management consulting services. Some departments have established preferred supplier programs (PSPs) for consulting services, i.e., programs for

  19. Nutritional Programming of Accelerated Puberty in Heifers: Involvement of Pro-Opiomelanocortin Neurones in the Arcuate Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, R C; Alves, B R C; Sharpton, S M; Williams, G L; Amstalden, M

    2015-08-01

    The timing of puberty and subsequent fertility in female mammals are dependent on the integration of metabolic signals by the hypothalamus. Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) comprise a critical metabolic-sensing pathway controlling the reproductive neuroendocrine axis. α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (αMSH), a product of the POMC gene, has excitatory effects on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones and fibres containing αMSH project to GnRH and kisspeptin neurones. Because kisspeptin is a potent stimulator of GnRH release, αMSH may also stimulate GnRH secretion indirectly via kisspeptin neurones. In the present work, we report studies conducted in young female cattle (heifers) aiming to determine whether increased nutrient intake during the juvenile period (4-8 months of age), a strategy previously shown to advance puberty, alters POMC and KISS1 mRNA expression, as well as αMSH close contacts on GnRH and kisspeptin neurones. In Experiment 1, POMC mRNA expression, detected by in situ hybridisation, was greater (P high-gain, HG; n = 6) compared to heifers that gained 0.5 kg/day (low-gain, LG; n = 5). The number of KISS1-expressing cells in the middle ARC was reduced (P < 0.05) in HG compared to LG heifers. In Experiment 2, double-immunofluorescence showed limited αMSH-positive close contacts on GnRH neurones, and the magnitude of these inputs was not influenced by nutritional status. Conversely, a large number of kisspeptin-immunoreactive cells in the ARC were observed in close proximity to αMSH-containing varicosities. Furthermore, HG heifers (n = 5) exhibited a greater (P < 0.05) percentage of kisspeptin neurones in direct apposition to αMSH fibres and an increased (P < 0.05) number of αMSH close contacts per kisspeptin cell compared to LG heifers (n = 6). These results indicate that the POMC-kisspeptin pathway may be important in mediating the nutritional acceleration of puberty in heifers.

  20. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: a national survey study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELD) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  1. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: A national survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; de Veer, A.J.E.; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELDs) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  2. Student involvement as a vehicle for empowerment: a case study of the student platform for engineering education development

    KAUST Repository

    Delaine, David A.; Seif-Naraghi, Sonya B.; Al-Haque, Shahed; Wojewoda, Nicolò ; Meninato, Yvonne; DeBoer, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the mission, structure and outputs of one organisation, the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development (SPEED), as a case study for how student-led organisations can use student involvement to promote and sustain

  3. Communication of work accidents involving biological material: a study in the city of Santa Cruz do Sul/RS

    OpenAIRE

    Dayane Diehl; Karini da Rosa; Susimar Souza Rosa; Susane Beatriz Frantz Krug

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: Healthcare workers are constantly exposed to the risk of occupational accidents involving biological material. Thus the aim of the study was to develop a profile of workers involved in workplace accidents with biological materials in Santa Cruz do Sul, through the number of notifications made in information systems. Methods: Transversal retrospective study with a quantitative approach; data collection was carried out between the years 2008 and 2010 from medical recor...

  4. Prognostic value of lymph node involvement in oral cancers: a study of 137 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankéré, F; Camproux, A; Barry, B; Guedon, C; Depondt, J; Gehanno, P

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of lymph node involvement in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Retrospective study of 137 patients with T4 squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated by surgery and radiotherapy (84 N0, 23 N1, 16 N2,14 N3). Twenty-three patients in the N0 group had a history of surgery or radiotherapy. One hundred fourteen patients underwent limited or radical neck dissection unilaterally or bilaterally. The histological charts were reviewed and correlated with preoperative lymph node clinical stage. The local failure rate and the overall survival curves were calculated with respect to clinical and histological stages. The causes of death were analyzed. No evidence of lymph node metastasis was found in 47.4% of cases (54 of 114 patients). Among the node-positive (N+) patients, 39 had rupture of the lymph node capsule (R+). In the N0 group, 27.8% of patients were N+. Regional control rates after surgery and radiotherapy were 95% at 1 year and 85.4% at 5 years. The local failure rates were 6% in N0, 8.7% in N1, 31.2% in N2, 51.7% in N3, 9% in node-negative (N-), and 29% in N+R+ patients. The overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years were, respectively, 44.7% and 34.8% in the N0 group, 37.7% and 37.7% (same rate at 3 and 5 years) in the N1 group, and 31.2% and 15.8% in the N2 group. None of the patients in the N3 group survived beyond 2 years. The overall survival rates at 5 years were 42.8% and 17.5% in the N- and N+ groups, respectively. In patients with locally advanced tumors (T4), clinical nodal status and histological nodal invasion were key prognostic factors. The presence of occult metastases in the N0 group justifies routine neck dissection.

  5. Personal involvement is related to increased search motivation and associated with activity in left BA44-a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael; Rumpel, Franziska; Sadrieh, Abdolkarim; Reimann, Martin; Denke, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies explore consumer perception of brands in a more or less passive way. This may still be representative for many situations or decisions we make each day. Nevertheless, sometimes we often actively search for and use information to make informed and reasoned choices, thus implying a rational and thinking consumer. Researchers suggested describing this distinction as low relative to high involvement consumer behavior. Although the involvement concept has been widely used to explain consumer behavior, behavioral and neural correlates of this concept are poorly understood. The current study aims to describe a behavioral measure that is associated with high involvement, the length of search behavior. A second aim of this study was to explore brain activations associated with involvement by employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We presented participants information cues for different products and told them that they had to answer questions with respect to these products at the end of the experiment. Participants were free to stop the information search if they think they gathered enough information or to continue with collecting information. Behavioral results confirmed our hypothesis of a relationship between searching behavior and personal involvement by demonstrating that the length of search correlated significantly with the degree of personal involvement of the participants. fMRI data revealed that personal involvement was associated with activation in BA44. Since this brain region is known to be involved in semantic memory, the results of this pilot study suggest that high involvement consumer behavior may be linked to cognitive load and attention towards a product.

  6. Personal involvement is related to increased search motivation and associated with activity in left BA44 - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSchaefer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies explore consumer perception of brands in a more or less passive way. This may still be representative for many situations or decisions we make each day. Nevertheless, sometimes we often actively search for and use information to make informed and reasoned choices, thus implying a rational and thinking consumer. Researchers suggested describing this distinction as low relative to high involvement consumer behavior. Although the involvement concept has been widely used to explain consumer behavior, behavioral and neural correlates of this concept are poorly understood. The current study aims to describe a behavioral measure that is associated with high involvement, the length of search behavior. A second aim of this study was to explore brain activations associated with involvement by employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. We presented participants information cues for different products and told them that they had to answer questions with respect to these products at the end of the experiment. Participants were free to stop the information search if they think they gathered enough information or to continue with collecting information. Behavioral results confirmed our hypothesis of a relationship between searching behavior and personal involvement by demonstrating that the length of search correlated significantly with the degree of personal involvement of the participants. FMRI data revealed that personal involvement was associated with activation in BA44. Since this brain region is known to be involved in semantic memory, the results of this pilot study suggest that high involvement consumer behavior may be linked to cognitive load and attention towards a product.

  7. Involvement of Roma Parents in Children's Education in Croatia: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahic, Tea; Vidovic, Vlasta Vizek; Miljevic-Ridicki, Renata

    2011-01-01

    This article compares Roma and mainstream parents' involvement in the education of their children, based on Epstein's six-dimensional model of parent-school partnership. The survey was conducted in Croatia on two sub-samples: 60 Roma parents and 908 mainstream parents. Results suggest that Roma parents show lower interest in participating in…

  8. Predictors of activity involvement in dementia care homes: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Smit; Dr. J. de Lange; B. Willemse; A.M. Pot

    2017-01-01

    Despite the finding that involvement in activities is one of the most important needs of residents with dementia living in care homes, care facilities struggle to fulfill this need. Over the years, various factors are suggested which may contribute to or disable activity provision in dementia care

  9. Predictors of activity involvement in dementia care homes : A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Dieneke; De Lange, Jacomine; Willemse, Bernadette; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite the finding that involvement in activities is one of the most important needs of residents with dementia living in care homes, care facilities struggle to fulfill this need. Over the years, various factors are suggested which may contribute to or disable activity provision in

  10. Functional brain imaging study on brain processes involved in visual awareness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Futakawa, Hiroyuki; Tokita, Shohko; Jung, Jiuk

    2003-01-01

    Recently, there has been great interest in visual awareness because it is thought that it may provide valuable information in understanding aspects of consciousness. An important but still controversial issue is what region in the brain is involved in visual awareness. When viewing ambiguous figures, observers can be aware of only one of multiple competing percepts at any given moment, but experience spontaneous alternations among the percepts over time. This phenomenon is known as multistable perceptions and thought to be essential in understanding the brain processes involved in visual awareness. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the brain activities associated with multistable perceptions. Two separate experiments were performed based on two different multistable phenomena known as binocular rivalry and perceptions of ambiguous figures. Significant differential activations in the parietal and prefrontal areas were commonly observed under multistable conditions compared to monostable control conditions in the two separate experiments. These findings suggest that neural processes in the parietal and prefrontal areas may be involved in perceptual alternations in situations involving multistable phenomena. (author)

  11. Introducing CARL - Studying Stakeholder Involvement in Decision-Making on RWM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmans, Anne

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides some background on the four following papers, drawing on the research conducted within the CARL research project. CARL is a cross-national 'social sciences research project into the effects of stakeholder involvement on decision-making in radioactive waste management'. The paper introduces the project, its aims, activities and describes the common framework used to look at each individual country

  12. Family and Differential Involvement with Marihuana: A Study of Suburban Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tec, Nechama

    1970-01-01

    Results point to a negative association between degree of involvement with marihuana and: (1) quality of parental models; (2) high amount of recognition received within the family; (3) perceptions of the family as warm and not simply controlling and/or indifferent; (4) subjective feelings of satisfaction and the ability to rely upon the family as…

  13. A Correlational Study of Extracurricular Involvement and Homework Performance of Third Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rachel; Moulden, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    There are many opportunities for students to participate in nonacademic activities. These activities can include: sports, clubs, private lessons, and religious activities. Participation in these activities enriches students' lives by encouraging social skills. Yet, if students are involved in activities requiring many hours of participation, does…

  14. The influence of contextual factors on patient involvement during follow-up consultations after colorectal cancer surgery: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Thora G; Soelver, Lisbeth; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-11-01

    To identify the contextual factors that influence individual patient involvement during colorectal cancer surgical follow-up consultations. The healthcare system is subject to the requirement and expectation of greater involvement of patients and relatives. Increased patient involvement requires the development and implementation of new communication initiatives. Research shows that it is also necessary to consider the contextual circumstances surrounding patient involvement in specific situations. Case study of a single Danish outpatient clinic, which allows the issues and circumstances involved in an everyday situation to be captured. 12 nonparticipative observations of outpatient visits and, subsequently, seven in-depth patient interviews. Content analysis based on a dialogical, interactive framework, which underpinned the identification of current contextual factors. The results showed five contextual factors that seemed to have an impact on patient involvement. The first, 'Two dimensions of patient involvement: treatment-oriented and person-oriented' highlighted a dual interpretation of patient involvement in the consultation situation. The two dimensions seemed to be influenced by four additional factors: 'Doctors leading the agenda', 'Traditional health professional roles', 'Unclear responsibilities' and 'Guidance primarily focused on treatment'. The results showed how patient involvement in clinical practice could be understood as a two-way movement, in which patients are invited to participate in clinical practice, while health professionals are invited to participate in the patients' lives. The movement will change from situation to situation and is influenced by several contextual factors. The results can help doctors and nurses to navigate using a goal-oriented approach towards patient involvement. The study makes visible the need for research-based development of the independent role of the nursing profession in cancer care follow-up, with a view to

  15. Energy Systems Studies Program annual report, fiscal year 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, M. (ed.)

    1976-06-01

    This is the fourth annual progress report of the Energy Systems Studies Program supported at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), Office of the Assistant Administrator for Planning and Analysis. The program is coordinated under the designation of a National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems (NCAES). Five working groups with specific program responsibilities are: policy analysis, economic analysis, biomedical and environmental assessment, technology assessment, and energy data and models. Future scenarios of the implementation of groups of technologies and new resources are developed. The socio-economic and environmental consequences are analyzed in detail and impact analyses are performed. Progress during FY 1976 is summarized in the following areas: energy system model development; energy-economic model development; technology assessments and support; economic analyses; and energy model data base activities. The program plan for FY 1977 is presented. (MCW)

  16. Poliovirus Studies during the Endgame of the Polio Eradication Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Minetaro

    2017-01-24

    Since the beginning of Global Polio Eradication Initiative in 1988, poliomyelitis cases caused by wild poliovirus (PV) have been drastically reduced, with only 74 cases reported in 2 endemic countries in 2015. The current limited PV transmission suggests that we are in the endgame of the polio eradication program. However, specific challenges have emerged in the endgame, including tight budget, switching of the vaccines, and changes in biorisk management of PV. To overcome these challenges, several PV studies have been implemented in the eradication program. Some of the responses to the emerging challenges in the polio endgame might be valuable in other infectious diseases eradication programs. Here, I will review challenges that confront the polio eradication program and current research to address these challenges.

  17. The Impact of a School-Based Weight Management Program Involving Parents via mHealth for Overweight and Obese Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lai-Tong Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a scarcity of resources and studies that utilize targeted weight management interventions to engage parents via mHealth tools targeting obese children and adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities (MIDs extended from school to a home setting. To test the feasibility and acceptability of a school-based weight program (SBWMP involving parents via mHealth tools designed to reduce weight, enhance knowledge and adopt healthy lifestyles, and thereby achieve better psychosocial well-being among children and adolescents with MIDs. Four special schools were randomly assigned as intervention or control schools. Students from the intervention group (n = 63 were compared to those in the control group (n = 52, which comprised those with usual school planned activities and no parental involvement. Demographics were considered as covariates in a general linear model, an ordinal regression model and a binary logistic regression model analyzing the relationships between the SBWMP and the outcome variables at baseline (T0 and six months later (T1. Body weight, body mass index, and triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness were lower in the intervention group compared to the control group, although the differences were not statistically significant. There was a positive and direct impact of the SBWMP on students’ health knowledge and psychological impacts in the intervention group. The SBWMP extended to the home involving parents via mHealth tools is a feasible and acceptable program for this group with MIDs and their parents.

  18. Approaches to dog health education programs in Australian rural and remote Indigenous communities: four case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, S E; Dixon, R M; Dixon, R J; Toribio, J-A

    2013-09-01

    Dog health in rural and remote Australian Indigenous communities is below urban averages in numerous respects. Many Indigenous communities have called for knowledge sharing in this area. However, dog health education programs are in their infancy, and lack data on effective practices. Without this core knowledge, health promotion efforts cannot progress effectively. This paper discusses a strategy that draws from successful approaches in human health and indigenous education, such as dadirri, and culturally respectful community engagement and development. Negotiating an appropriate education program is explored in its practical application through four case studies. Though each case was unique, the comparison of the four illustrated the importance of listening (community consultation), developing and maintaining relationships, community involvement and employment. The most successful case studies were those that could fully implement all four areas. Outcomes included improved local dog health capacity, local employment and engagement with the program and significantly improved dog health.

  19. Radioactive iodine treatment of a struma ovarii with extensive peritoneal involvement: a dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, D.; Ricard, M.; Lamartina, L.; Hartl, D.; Lhomme, C.; Morice, P.; Lepoutre, C.; Deandreis, D.; Lumbroso, J.; Schlumberger, M.; Leboulleux, S.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Objective: we report a patient with a very large and unresectable peritoneal involvement from a struma ovarii who was treated with radioactive iodine (3.7 GBq). Methods: whole body retention was measured during hospital stay (10 days), 3 times a day, using a calibrated automatic gamma counter attached to the ceiling of the room. Radiation protection for the husband was monitored with a radiation dosimeter, during one month after hospital discharge. OLINDA software was used to evaluate the absorbed dose delivered to the red marrow, assuming that radioactive iodine was concentrated mainly in the abdomen. Results: a 53-year-old woman, treated 22 years before for bilateral ovarian cysts with thyroid elements (struma ovarii) but no sign of malignancy, was explored for hyperthyroid symptoms with undetectable TSH level (0.07 mUI/ml) and elevated FT3 level (11,6 pmol/l). Thyroglobulin (Tg) level was elevated (15,200 ng/ml). Thyroid uptake was low. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed liver nodules and multiple intra-abdominal masses, the largest measuring 140, 57 and 53 mm. Coelio-scopic exploration and histologic analysis found peritoneal metastasis of a follicular carcinoma. The masses did not disclose any FDG uptake. Lesions were considered non resectable and the patient was referred for total thyroidectomy and radioactive iodine treatment. The post-therapy whole-body scan revealed an intense 131 I uptake in all abdominal masses. Dosimetric study 131 I showed a very long whole body effective half-life (7 days compared to 0.3 days in non-metastatic patients). The mean red marrow dose ranged between 100 and 200 mGy. Effective dose delivered to her husband was 225 μSv. A transient and moderate decrease in lymphocyte (1.15 G/l) and platelet (178 G/l) counts was observed 3 weeks after the 131 I administration. FT3 decreased slowly after treatment. Tumour response according to RECIST will be shown during the congress presentation. Conclusion

  20. Critical Elements of Student Assistance Programs: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Rodriguez, Leslie; Beyard, Karen; Goldstein, Marc B.

    2010-01-01

    Student assistance programs (SAPs) are one approach for using teams to respond to student needs, but there is little research on SAP implementation and whether SAPs function as intended. The authors present findings from a study of two SAPs that use a model developed by Connecticut's Governor's Prevention Partnership. The study focused on…

  1. Participation in Tertiary Study Abroad Programs: The Role of Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalis, Steve; Joiner, Therese A.

    2004-01-01

    The increasing trend for the globalisation of business has highlighted the need for a better understanding of the factors that influence levels of intercultural awareness within organisations. Within the higher education sector, one initiative that aims to address this issue is student study abroad programs. This paper reports on a study that…

  2. A Study of Four Library Programs for Disadvantaged Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsor, Charlotte B.; Burrows, Lodema

    This is a study of four projects in New York City which were established with federal grants to offer library service to the disadvantaged in the area. The four programs studied are the Preschool Project of the Brooklyn Public Library, the Community Coordinator Project of the Brooklyn Public Library, the North Manhattan Project of the New York…

  3. PULSAR: A Qualitative Study of a Substance Abuse Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino-McAllister, Jeanne M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the risk, protective factors, and resiliency characteristics of students selected to participate in the Police, Public Educators and Peers Utilizing the Leadership Skills of Students At Risk/As Resources (PULSAR) program. The study is significant as it employed qualitative methods and a resiliency-focused…

  4. Perceptions of user studies as a foundation for public programming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of user studies and the evaluation of services in the development of effective public programming initiatives by the public archives of east and southern Africa. Users of the archives are the backbone of effective archival services. Sadly, it appears that the records are more ...

  5. Risk Management for Study Abroad Programs: Issues and Resources to Inform Program Development, Administration, and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Gary

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides a practical background to the health and safety risks and challenges for U.S. colleges and universities and other program providers. Potential risks, field-based guidelines, good practices, and resources to support the management of risks by study abroad offices will be covered.

  6. Use of learning programs for SSC trigger strategy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clearwater, S.H.; Cleland, W.E.; Stern, E.G.

    1990-01-01

    In a novel application of the learning program RL, we are studying ways to develop the trigger for experiments at the SSC. Our initial study, which is still in progress, is to understand how to select top events from background, combining both cuts at the trigger level and in the off-line analysis. Our plan is to carry out these studies for a variety of reactions and thereby build up a comprehensive view of the trigger requirements for a calorimeter-based experiment at the SSC. Our initial results have shown that the learning program can find correlations and cuts that would be quite difficult to find using traditional methods. The program is expected to obtain cuts that are at least as good, if not better, than the the cuts found by traditional methods

  7. Study on Nuclear Facility Cyber Security Awareness and Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Lee, Cheol-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Cyber security awareness and training, which is a part of operational security controls, is defined to be implemented later in the CSP implementation schedule. However, cyber security awareness and training is a prerequisite for the appropriate implementation of a cyber security program. When considering the current situation in which it is just started to define cyber security activities and to assign personnel who has responsibilities for performing those activities, a cyber security awareness program is necessary to enhance cyber security culture for the facility personnel to participate positively in cyber security activities. Also before the implementation of stepwise CSP, suitable education and training should be provided to both cyber security teams (CST) and facility personnel who should participate in the implementation. Since such importance and urgency of cyber security awareness and training is underestimated at present, the types, trainees, contents, and development strategies of cyber security awareness and training programs are studied to help Korean nuclear facilities to perform cyber security activities more effectively. Cyber security awareness and training programs should be developed ahead of the implementation of CSP. In this study, through the analysis of requirements in the regulatory standard RS-015, the types and trainees of overall cyber security training programs in nuclear facilities are identified. Contents suitable for a cyber security awareness program and a technical training program are derived. It is suggested to develop stepwise the program contents in accordance with the development of policies, guides, and procedures as parts of the facility cyber security program. Since any training programs are not available for the specialized cyber security training in nuclear facilities, a long-term development plan is necessary. As alternatives for the time being, several cyber security training courses for industrial control systems by

  8. Study on Nuclear Facility Cyber Security Awareness and Training Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Lee, Cheol-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Cyber security awareness and training, which is a part of operational security controls, is defined to be implemented later in the CSP implementation schedule. However, cyber security awareness and training is a prerequisite for the appropriate implementation of a cyber security program. When considering the current situation in which it is just started to define cyber security activities and to assign personnel who has responsibilities for performing those activities, a cyber security awareness program is necessary to enhance cyber security culture for the facility personnel to participate positively in cyber security activities. Also before the implementation of stepwise CSP, suitable education and training should be provided to both cyber security teams (CST) and facility personnel who should participate in the implementation. Since such importance and urgency of cyber security awareness and training is underestimated at present, the types, trainees, contents, and development strategies of cyber security awareness and training programs are studied to help Korean nuclear facilities to perform cyber security activities more effectively. Cyber security awareness and training programs should be developed ahead of the implementation of CSP. In this study, through the analysis of requirements in the regulatory standard RS-015, the types and trainees of overall cyber security training programs in nuclear facilities are identified. Contents suitable for a cyber security awareness program and a technical training program are derived. It is suggested to develop stepwise the program contents in accordance with the development of policies, guides, and procedures as parts of the facility cyber security program. Since any training programs are not available for the specialized cyber security training in nuclear facilities, a long-term development plan is necessary. As alternatives for the time being, several cyber security training courses for industrial control systems by

  9. Family members' involvement in elder care provision in nursing homes and their considerations about financial compensation: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habjanič, Ana; Pajnkihar, Majda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish how family members are involved in elder care provision in nursing homes; this included research into their feelings about potentially extending their involvement to obtain financial benefits as compensation for high accommodation costs. Family members remain involved in the caring process after their relatives have been admitted to an institution. On average, accommodation costs in nursing homes in Slovenia have risen above the residents' retirement pension, and families must supplement the difference. Because of this, familial involvement should be linked to reduced accommodation costs. This research employed a non-experimental, descriptive study design through unstructured interviews. Participants included fifty family members (n=50) who visit their relatives in nursing homes. Data were collected in 2010 at five nursing homes in Slovenia and processed by means of conventional content analysis. The major themes that emerged from the content analysis, describing family involvement, were as follows: visiting and making oneself useful, delivery of items for personal use, hands-on care, physical therapy and organization of nursing home activities. Family members showed some interest in receiving financial compensation for their involvement. The proposed financial compensation may be a delicate and morally questionable matter but would involve fairness and transparency, while enabling easier organization of elder care provision. Eventually, nursing home residents' well-being could be improved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Involving women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbo, J

    1994-01-01

    I am a primary health care (PHC) coordinator working with the May Day Rural project, a local NGO involved in integrated approaches and programs with rural communities in the Ga District of the Greater-Accra region in Ghana. When we talk about the community development approach we must first and foremost recognize that we are talking about women, because in the developing world frequent childbirths mean that her burden of mortality is higher than a man's; her workload is extremely heavy--whether in gardening, farming, other household duties, caring for the sick, or the rearing of children; she has a key role in PHC and community development, because men are always looking for greener pastures elsewhere, leaving the women behind. Women's concerns are critical in most health care projects and women and children are their main beneficiaries. Why not include women in the management team, project design, implementation and evaluation processes? That is what the May Day Rural project is practicing, encouraging women's participation and creating a relationship of trust. full text

  11. Collaborative Behavioral Management for Drug-Involved Parolees: Rationale and Design of the Step'n Out Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Peter D.; Katz, Elizabeth C.; Rhodes, Anne G.; Taxman, Faye S.; O'Connell, Daniel J.; Frisman, Linda K.; Burdon, William M.; Fletcher, Bennett W.; Litt, Mark D.; Clarke, Jennifer; Martin, Steven S.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rationale, study design, and implementation for the Step'n Out study of the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies. Step'n Out tests the relative effectiveness of collaborative behavioral management of drug-involved parolees. Collaborative behavioral management integrates the roles of parole officers and treatment…

  12. A Pilot Study on Factors Involved with Work Participation in the Early Stages of Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Hiele, Karin; Middelkoop, Huub A. M.; Ruimschotel, Rob; Kamminga, Noëlle G. A.; Visser, Leo H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Up to 30% of recently diagnosed MS patients lose their jobs in the first four years after diagnosis. Taking into account the personal and socio-economic importance of sustaining employment, it is of the utmost importance to examine factors involved with work participation. Objective To investigate differences in self-reported functioning in recently diagnosed MS patients with and without a paid job. Methods Self-reports of physical and cognitive functioning, depression, anxiety and fatigue were gathered from 44 relapsing-remitting MS patients diagnosed within 3 years. Results Patients with a paid job (57%) reported better physical functioning (pworking hours. Conclusion Better physical functioning is the primary factor involved with increased work participation in early MS. Better self-reported memory functioning and less social fatigue were associated with increased working hours. These findings highlight the importance of battling these symptoms in the early stages of MS. PMID:25153710

  13. Community Involvement in Tourism Development: A Case Study of Lenggong Valley World Heritage Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khadar Nur Zafirah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the empirical relationship between the economic impact and community involvement in the Lenggong Valley. Recommendations for improvement in development effectiveness through the development of a community centre for economic and social activities, with specific attention given to types of activity and community involvement stimulating the economic development in the Lenggong Valley. Heritage tourism development is a tourism in which arts, culture and heritage form a key attraction for visitors and it can be represented as an area of significant economic benefit to heritage sites. The tourism industry in Hulu Perak became more widespread after Lenggong Valley is recognized as a World Heritage Site. There is shown a positive effect on the development and economic prosperity.

  14. Studi Kasus Pengembangan Program Bimbingan dan Konseling di SMA Negeri Kota Surakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Annisa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian berdasarkan fenomena program bimbingan dan konseling di sekolah belum berjalan dengan baik terutama pada bagian perencanaan dan pelaksanaan program BK. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui pengembangan program di SMA Negeri 7 Surakarta dan SMA N 8 Surakarta mulai dari (1 pelaksanaan asesmen kebutuhan melalui pengumpulan data, (2 interpretasi data asesmen kebutuhan, (3 penetapan prioritas kebutuhan, (4 penetapan tujuan program, (5 penetapan prosedur program, dan (6 perencanaan bagi perbaikan peningkatan penyempurnaan program. Jenis penelitian ini adalah deskriptif kualitatif dengan pendekatan studi kasus. Penelitian ini melibatkan guru BK di SMA Negeri Kota Surakarta. Metode pengumpulan data yang digunakan adalah menggunakan wawancara, observasi dan dokumentasi. Teknik analisis data menggunakan pengumpulan data, reduksi data, penyajian data dan penarikan kesimpulan. Simpulan dari penelitian ini adalah pada SMA N 7 Surakarta pengembangan program fokus pada penggunaan instrumen dalam asesmen, sasaran asesmen, kesesuaian asesmen dengan kebutuhan siswa, layann klasikal dan layanan kelompok. Sedangkan SMA N 8 Surakarta  difokuskan pada penentuan prioritas kebutuhan dan analisis data kebutuhan siswa. This research of program guidance and counselling in schools has not fully well especially at the planning and execution of counseling and guidance program. The purpose to know the development program at senior high school 7 Surakarta and senior high school 8 Surakarta ranging from (1 the implementation of needs assessment through data collection, data interpretation (2 the assessment of needs, (3 the determination of priority needs, (4 The goal setting program, (5 the determination of the procedures of the program, and (6 The planning for improvements to increase refinement program. Type of this research is descriptive qualitative approach to case studies. This research involves guidance and counseling teachers in senior high school of

  15. Limitations of Data on Cell Phone Involvement in Collisions: A Case Study of California

    OpenAIRE

    Griswold, Julia B. Corresponding author; Grembek, Offer

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing prevalence of mobile technology and high-profile crashes bringing attention to distracted driving, data on cell phone involvement in collisions is critical for understanding the extent of the problem, examining the effectiveness of policies, and developing interventions to improve safety. Some limitations of existing data have been previously identified, but this paper examines the specific case of California’s collision data. Temporal, geographic, and jurisdictional tre...

  16. Study of Bilingual-Bicultural Projects Involving Native American, Indo-European, Asian and Pacific Language Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiste, Marie A.; And Others

    This is the final report of one of three studies in an overall project entitled "Evaluation of Bilingual Education Programs." This study was sponsored in response to a need for more information regarding bilingual-bicultural education for other than Spanish language groups. The study's objectives were to: (1) identify the major issues…

  17. Genomics and structure/function studies of Rhabdoviridae proteins involved in replication and transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Assenberg , R.; Delmas , O; Morin , B; Graham , C; de Lamballerie , X; Laubert , C; Coutard , B; Grimes , J; Neyts , J; Owens , R J; Brandt , B; Gorbalenya , A; Tucker , P; Stuart , D I; Canard , Bruno

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Some mammalian rhabdoviruses may infect humans, and also infect invertebrates, dogs, and bats, which may act as vectors transmitting viruses among different host species. The VIZIER programme, an EU-funded FP6 program, has characterized viruses that belong to the Vesiculovirus, Ephemerovirus and Lyssavirus genera of the Rhabdoviridae family to perform ground-breaking research on the identification of potential new drug targets against these RNA viruses through comprehe...

  18. Promoting father involvement in early home visiting services for vulnerable families: Findings from a pilot study of "Dads matter".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Neil B; Bellamy, Jennifer L; Banman, Aaron

    2018-02-01

    Despite mounting evidence on the importance of fathers in children's development, evidence-based perinatal home visitation programs have largely overlooked fathers in the design and delivery of services. This paper describes the design, development, and pilot testing of the "Dads Matter" enhancement to standard home visiting services. Dads Matter is a manualized intervention package designed to fully incorporate fathers into perinatal home visiting services. Twenty-four families were enrolled in a pilot study to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes of the intervention. Using a quasi-experimental time-lagged design, 12 families received standard home visiting services and completed baseline and four-month post-tests. Home visitor staff were then trained and supervised to implement the Dads Matter enhancement in addition to standard services. Twelve additional families were then enrolled and completed baseline and four-month post-tests. Implementation data indicated that Dads Matter was implemented as planned. Cohen's d scores on outcome measures indicate positive trends associated with Dads Matter in the quality of the mother-father relationship, perceived stress reported by both parents, fathers' involvement with the child, maltreatment indicators, and fathers' verbalizations toward the infant. Effect sizes generally ranged from moderate to large in magnitude and were larger than overall effect sizes of home visitation services alone reported in prior meta-analyses. Dads Matter appears to be a feasible, acceptable, and promising approach to improving fathers' engagement in home visiting services and promoting family and child well-being. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Online social networks for crowdsourced multimedia-involved behavioral testing: An empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ho eChoi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk, which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods.

  20. Conflict and user involvement in drug misuse treatment decision-making: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jan; Neale, Joanne; Bloor, Michael; Jenkins, Nicholas

    2008-10-06

    This paper examines client/staff conflict and user involvement in drug misuse treatment decision-making. Seventy-nine in-depth interviews were conducted with new treatment clients in two residential and two community drug treatment agencies. Fifty-nine of these clients were interviewed again after twelve weeks. Twenty-seven interviews were also conducted with staff, who were the keyworkers for the interviewed clients. Drug users did not expect, desire or prepare for conflict at treatment entry. They reported few actual conflicts within the treatment setting, but routinely discussed latent conflicts--that is, negative experiences and problematic aspects of current or previous treatment that could potentially escalate into overt disputes. Conflict resulted in a number of possible outcomes, including the premature termination of treatment; staff deciding on the appropriate outcome; the client appealing to the governance structure of the agency; brokered compromise; and staff skilfully eliciting client consent for staff decisions. Although the implementation of user involvement in drug treatment decision-making has the potential to trigger high levels of staff-client conflict, latent conflict is more common than overt conflict and not all conflict is negative. Drug users generally want to be co-operative at treatment entry and often adopt non-confrontational forms of covert resistance to decisions about which they disagree. Staff sometimes deploy user involvement as a strategy for managing conflict and soliciting client compliance to treatment protocols. Suggestions for minimising and avoiding harmful conflict in treatment settings are given.

  1. Online Social Networks for Crowdsourced Multimedia-Involved Behavioral Testing: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods. PMID:26793137

  2. Online Social Networks for Crowdsourced Multimedia-Involved Behavioral Testing: An Empirical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods.

  3. The Cysteine Protease CEP1, a Key Executor Involved in Tapetal Programmed Cell Death, Regulates Pollen Development in Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Liu, Di; Lv, Xiaomeng; Wang, Ying; Xun, Zhili; Liu, Zhixiong; Li, Fenglan; Lu, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Tapetal programmed cell death (PCD) is a prerequisite for pollen grain development in angiosperms, and cysteine proteases are the most ubiquitous hydrolases involved in plant PCD. We identified a papain-like cysteine protease, CEP1, which is involved in tapetal PCD and pollen development in Arabidopsis thaliana. CEP1 is expressed specifically in the tapetum from stages 5 to 11 of anther development. The CEP1 protein first appears as a proenzyme in precursor protease vesicles and is then transported to the vacuole and transformed into the mature enzyme before rupture of the vacuole. cep1 mutants exhibited aborted tapetal PCD and decreased pollen fertility with abnormal pollen exine. A transcriptomic analysis revealed that 872 genes showed significantly altered expression in the cep1 mutants, and most of them are important for tapetal cell wall organization, tapetal secretory structure formation, and pollen development. CEP1 overexpression caused premature tapetal PCD and pollen infertility. ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR analyses confirmed that the CEP1 expression level showed a strong relationship to the degree of tapetal PCD and pollen fertility. Our results reveal that CEP1 is a crucial executor during tapetal PCD and that proper CEP1 expression is necessary for timely degeneration of tapetal cells and functional pollen formation. PMID:25035401

  4. A meta-analysis of experimental studies of diversion programs for juvenile offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Craig S; Gearing, Robin E; MacKenzie, Michael J; Brewer, Kathryne B; Ibrahim, Rawan

    2012-02-01

    Research to establish an evidence-base for the treatment of conduct problems and delinquency in adolescence is well established; however, an evidence-base for interventions with offenders who are diverted from the juvenile justice system has yet to be synthesized. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of experimental studies testing juvenile diversion programs and to examine the moderating effect of program type and implementation quality. A literature search using PsycINFO, Web of Science, and the National Criminal Justice Reference Service data-bases and research institute websites yielded 28 eligible studies involving 57 experimental comparisons and 19,301 youths. Recidivism was the most common outcome reported across all studies. Overall, the effect of diversion programs on recidivism was non-significant (k=45, OR=0.83, 95%CI=0.43-1.58). Of the five program types identified, including case management (k=18, OR=0.78), individual treatment (k=11, OR=0.83), family treatment (k=4, OR=0.57), youth court (k=6, OR=0.93), and restorative justice (k=6, OR=0.87), only family treatment led to a statistically significant reduction in recidivism. Restorative justice studies that were implemented with active involvement of researchers led to statistically significant reductions in recidivism (k=3, OR=0.69). Other outcomes, including frequency of offending, truancy, and psycho-social problems were reported infrequently and were not subjected to meta-analysis. High levels of heterogeneity characterize diversion research. Results of this study recommend against implementation of programs limited to case management and highlight the promise of family interventions and restorative justice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Algebraic computing program for studying the gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zet, G.

    2005-01-01

    An algebraic computing program running on Maple V platform is presented. The program is devoted to the study of the gauge theory with an internal Lie group as local symmetry. The physical quantities (gauge potentials, strength tensors, dual tensors etc.) are introduced either as equations in terms of previous defined quantities (tensors), or by manual entry of the component values. The components of the strength tensor and of its dual are obtained with respect to a given metric of the space-time used for describing the gauge theory. We choose a Minkowski space-time endowed with spherical symmetry and give some example of algebraic computing that are adequate for studying electroweak or gravitational interactions. The field equations are also obtained and their solutions are determined using the DEtools facilities of the Maple V computing program. (author)

  6. A Competence-Based Curriculum Design for Entrepreneurship Study Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska J.R. Siagian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is affected by global crisis. Increasing the number of entrepreneurs is one of many solutions to increase the economic growth in Indonesia. The number of entrepreneurs in Indonesia to leverage the economic growth is still limited. Entrepreneurs can be prepared through an Entrepreneurship Study Program. Entrepreneurship Study Program attempts to create qualified entrepreneurs who have relevant competences. In order to create a qualified entrepreneurs, the Entrepreneurial Studies Program requires a competency-based curriculum that will support the educational process and provide all the necessary to become future entrepreneurs who can survive through a global challenge. This research aims to design a competence-based curriculum for entrepreneurial study and uses Quality Function Deployment (QFD as the major tool to design the competence-based curriculum. From the QFD process, this research finds core and elective courses for the Entrepreneurship Study Program. The result shows the competences covered by the courses and sequence, credits, and teaching methods for each course. The competences prepared the potential entrepreneurs can be achieved through specific courses which can be acquired within 8 semesters.

  7. STRATEGI PENINGKATAN KINERJA PROGRAM STUDI MELALUI OPTIMALISASI PERAN PIMPINAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Martono

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyze the influence of leadership styles on an organizational culture, teamwork and organizational performance. Behavior and how a head department plays a role of a leader will determine people work quality. There are findings that in universities, not all leaders are able to comprehensively understand what program department scope’s is. The sample was determined by proportional random sampling totaled 139 people. The variables of study include leadership styles, teamwork, organizational culture, and organizational performance. Data were collected by questionnaires, analysis using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM. The results showed leadership style variable does not directly influence organizational performance of program department, but indirectly through the influence of organizational culture and teamwork. Teamwork variables impact directly or indirectly through organizational culture to organizational performance of program department. Suggestions from this research are there is a need to develop the leadership culture through example, attitude and behavior in utilizing existing resources in the faculties, program departments and unit program.

  8. EVALUASI DIRI PROGRAM STUDI PENDIDIKAN JASMANI JURUSAN SOSIOKINETIKA FIK UNJ

    OpenAIRE

    Sukiri, Sukiri

    2003-01-01

    This study aims to obtain answers in descriptions of Self Evaluation Performance Studies Program Physical Education at the Faculty of Sport Science State University of Jakarta in 2001. In this study using descriptive method, the entire population was taken as a sample of research. Data analysis technique used is descriptive statistics. The results are as follows: First, human resources (HR) lecturers and support staff. More than 40% of lecturers have S2 education, and 20% have S3 education. W...

  9. Summary of Epidemiology Studies or Activities Involving Workers at the Savannah River Site or the Surrounding Public: An Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.T.

    2002-10-18

    There have been numerous health studies or related activities over time that have involved workers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or the surrounding public. While most of these epidemiology studies or activities have been performed by external agencies, it has proved useful to provide interested parties an overall summary of such activities. The first such summary was provided in an October 1998 report. The 1998 summary was updated in a February 2000 report. This report provides an update on the status or findings of epidemiology studies or activities involving SRS workers or the surrounding public, as an update to the previous summaries.

  10. Digital Badges and Library Instructional Programs: Academic Library Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Andrea Reed; Puterbaugh, Mark

    2017-01-01

    This case study describes the planning, implementation, and migration process of Eastern University Library's information literacy digital badge. Prior to implementing a badging program, information literacy sessions were informally embedded in first-year college writing courses as a "one-shot" presentation. Spurred on by accreditation…

  11. Formulating Employability Skills for Graduates of Public Health Study Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qomariyah, Nurul; Savitri, Titi; Hadianto, Tridjoko; Claramita, Mora

    2016-01-01

    Employability skills (ES) are important for effective and successful individual participation in the workplace. The main aims of the research were to identify important ES needed by graduates of Public Health Study Program Universitas Ahmad Dahlan (PHSP UAD) and to assess the achievement of the ES development that has been carried out by PHSP UAD.…

  12. Damage analysis and fundamental studies program. Paper 78-97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.; Reuther, T.C.; Robinson, M.T.

    1978-01-01

    The Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) Task Group has been formed by the Office of Fusion Energy to develop procedures for applying data obtained in various irradiation test facilities to projected fusion environments. A long-range program plan has been prepared and implementation has begun. The plan and technical status are briefly described

  13. Study program for constant current capacitor charging method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C.

    1978-10-04

    The objective of the study program was to determine the best method of charging 20,000 to 132,000 microfarads of capacitance to 22 kVdc in 14 to 15 sec. Component costs, sizes, weights, line current graphs, copies of calculations and manufacturer's data are included.

  14. Students' Perception on the Prospect of Economics Education Study Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiriza, Mica Siar

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the extent to which perceptions of students on the prospect of the Economics Education Program. The method used in this research is descriptive method in which the required data is obtained through questionnaire and technique of analyzing data used is percentages. Questionnaires were distributed through the Student…

  15. Decoupling among CSR policies, programs, and impacts : An empirical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, Johan; Smid, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    There are relatively few empirical studies on the impacts of corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies and programs. This article addresses the research gap by analyzing the incidence of, and the conditions that affect, decoupling (defined as divergence) among CSR policies, implementation of

  16. Damage analysis and fundamental studies program. Paper 78-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doran, D G; Reuther, T C; Robinson, M T

    1978-01-01

    The Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) Task Group has been formed by the Office of Fusion Energy to develop procedures for applying data obtained in various irradiation test facilities to projected fusion environments. A long-range program plan has been prepared and implementation has begun. The plan and technical status are briefly described.

  17. Connected Lighting System Interoperability Study Part 1: Application Programming Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaidon, Clement [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poplawski, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-10-31

    First in a series of studies that focuses on interoperability as realized by the use of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), explores the diversity of such interfaces in several connected lighting systems; characterizes the extent of interoperability that they provide; and illustrates challenges, limitations, and tradeoffs that were encountered during this exploration.

  18. "Erlebte Landeskunde:" Adding Life to a Study Abroad Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Dinah; Wuttig, Juliana

    1985-01-01

    Describes a course--"German Culture and Civilization after 1945"--which is part of a study abroad program in Munich. In addition to classroom lectures, readings, music, art, television, tapes, and video, two hours a week are devoted to materials and information which students gather through interviewing residents of Munich. (SED)

  19. SHPPS 2006: School Health Policies and Programs Study--Foods and Beverages Sold Outside of the School Meals Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The School health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. This brief reports study results in the area of foods and beverages sold outside of the school meals program. (Contains 3 tables, 1 figure, and 2…

  20. Whistleblowing: An integrative literature review of data-based studies involving nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Debra; Hickman, Louise D; Hutchinson, Marie; Andrew, Sharon; Smith, James; Potgieter, Ingrid; Cleary, Michelle; Peters, Kath

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To summarise and critique the research literature about whistleblowing and nurses. Whistleblowing is identified as a crucial issue in maintenance of healthcare standards and nurses are frequently involved in whistleblowing events. Despite the importance of this issue, to our knowledge an evaluation of this body of the data-based literature has not been undertaken. An integrative literature review approach was used to summarise and critique the research literature. A comprehensive search of five databases including Medline, CINAHL, PubMed and Health Science: Nursing/Academic Edition, and Google, were searched using terms including: 'Whistleblow*,' 'nurs*.' In addition, relevant journals were examined, as well as reference lists of retrieved papers. Papers published during the years 2007-2013 were selected for inclusion. Fifteen papers were identified, capturing data from nurses in seven countries. The findings in this review demonstrate a growing body of research for the nursing profession at large to engage and respond appropriately to issues involving suboptimal patient care or organisational wrongdoing. Nursing plays a key role in maintaining practice standards and in reporting care that is unacceptable although the repercussions to nurses who raise concerns are insupportable. Overall, whistleblowing and how it influences the individual, their family, work colleagues, nursing practice and policy overall, requires further national and international research attention.