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Sample records for program involves study

  1. Community Involvement Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    A dynamic training conference that brings together more than 450 people from EPA and the Agency’s partners and stakeholders who plan and implement environmental community involvement, partnership, stewardship, outreach, and education programs.

  2. A 3-Year Study of a School-Based Parental Involvement Program in Early Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Susan Ann; Rasinski, Timothy; Padak, Nancy; Yildirim, Kasim

    2015-01-01

    Although parental involvement in children's literacy development has been recognized for its potential in helping children develop early literacy achievement, studies of the effectiveness and sustainability of school-based parent involvement programs are not numerous. This study examines the effectiveness and durability of a school-based…

  3. Assessment of anxiety in adolescents involved in a study abroad program: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roitblat, Yulia; Cleminson, Ryan; Kavin, Aaron; Schonberger, Edan; Shterenshis, Michael

    2017-11-23

    Objective The aim of the study was to measure the effects on levels of anxiety in healthy teenagers caused by a temporary change of country and school during a study abroad program. Methods In a prospective study we gathered the data from six anxiety level related tests on high school participants in a study abroad program (age 15-17, n = 364, M 172, F 192). These volunteer participants were divided into two separate groups: with self-reported elevated levels of anxiety (n = 111; YES-group) and with self-reported normal levels of anxiety (n = 253; NO-group). Two control groups of schoolchildren drawn from two local schools were used for comparison (n = 100 each). Three tests were subjective, i.e. self-fill-out tests. The next three tests were objective psychological or neurophysiological tests designed to estimate reflex control, concentration and a feeling for the passage of time. Results The initial mean anxiety level score among the 364 participants was 41.5 ± 16.7 (min 16, max 80) on 5-110 scale. For the YES-group the score was 56.5 ± 15.9, and for the NO-group the score was 34.7 ± 17.4 (p = 0.05). The retesting after they had been in the same place for 7 weeks revealed that the mean anxiety level score of the participants decreased to 37.4 ± 16.9 (min 15, max 72). For the YES-group the score significantly decreased to 39.3 ± 15.5, and for the NO-group the score slightly elevated to 36.7 ± 16.4 producing similar results for both groups (p = 0.81). Conclusion A temporary change of country and school at first results in a rise in anxiety levels in about one third of participants. However, after an extended stay it falls to normal levels.

  4. Parent training education program: a pilot study, involving families of children with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodra, Yllka; Kondili, Loreta A; Ferraroni, Alessia; Serra, Maria Antonietta; Caretto, Flavia; Ricci, Maria Antonietta; Taruscio, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by severe hypotonia during the neonatal period and the first two years of life, the onset of hyperphagia with a risk of obesity during infancy and adulthood, learning difficulties and behavioral or severe psychiatric problems. This complex disease has severe consequences and difficult management issues also for patients' families. Parents of children with PWS need appropriate psychoeducational intervention in order to better manage their children with PWS. The purpose of this study was the implementation and evaluation of a PWS psychoeducational parent training program. The Italian National Center for Rare Diseases implemented a pilot parent training program offered to parents of children with PWS. The intervention's effects was evaluated using questionnaires comprised of 11 items rated on a 7 point Likert scale. The intervention was offered to 43 parents. The behavior problems management, dietary restrictions, autonomy and relationships were indicated by parents as the priority topics which needed to be addressed. Evaluations, immediately post-intervention and after 6 months, were reported by parents, fulfilling specific questionnaires. 90% of parents involved in the study, appreciated the methodology, 86% felt more informed about PWS, 47-62% felt more capable to better approach behaviour's problems, 20-25% felt better about the child's health situation and future expectations. Feeling more capable to help the child autonomy and relationships were reported in 62% and 63% of parents respectively, which decreased significantly (p < 0.05) according to the evaluation 6 months after the intervention. Younger age of parents (< 44 years of age) was significantly correlated with better understanding on how to help the child's autonomy (OR: 0.05; CI: 0.04-0.8) and to better collaborate with the child's teachers (OR: 0.02; CI: 0.001-0.9). Parent training is a promising intervention for parents of children

  5. Participant-reported benefits of involvement in an adaptive sports program: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lape, Emma C; Katz, Jeffrey N; Losina, Elena; Kerman, Hannah M; Gedman, Marissa A; Blauwet, Cheri A

    2017-10-27

    While participation in adaptive sports offers numerous benefits for persons with disabilities, a substantial number of eligible persons do not take part. Previous studies have identified personal and environmental factors that promote or inhibit adaptive sports participation. However, these studies have considered a relatively narrow range of factors. Use qualitative research techniques to identify novel factors that influence participation in a community-based adaptive sports program. Qualitative focus group study SETTING: Community-based adaptive sports programs affiliated with a rehabilitation hospital network PARTICIPANTS: Participants were recruited from among 134 adults who registered for the sports program in 2013-2014. We included participants with mobility or sensory impairment, absence of cognitive impairment, and English proficiency. We contacted the 91 former participants with adequate contact information; 17 participated in the focus groups. Two moderators led each of three audio-recorded focus groups utilizing a moderator's guide. We conducted a thematic analysis of transcript data to identify perceived benefits, barriers, and facilitators of participation. Our analysis identified five themes: physical well-being and health/safety; interpersonal and social relationships; intrapersonal and beliefs/attitudes; physical environment; and access. Participants experienced participation both as physically beneficial and as transformative in terms of how they view themselves. However, programs drew on limited personal resources and sometimes presented a perceived risk of injury. Finding information about and transportation to programs was a challenge. Participants formed an informal community that modeled what athletes with disabilities are capable of, helping to overcome initial doubts. To gain the benefits of participation, athletes overcame significant barriers, several of which may be modifiable, including transportation and hard-to-find information about

  6. Psychological Evaluation of Animal-assisted Intervention (AAI) Programs Involving Visiting Dogs and Cats for Alcohol Dependents: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Nobuyo; Narita, Shin; Yoshihara, Eiji; Ohta, Mitsuaki; Iwahashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an evaluation method for animal-assisted intervention (AAI) programs involving Mood Check List-Short form.2 (MCL-S.2) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) for psychiatric daycare of Japanese alcohol. dependents. A total of 36 alcohol dependents completed the study and questionnaires assessing their state. A single session of AAI reduced both subjective and physiological measures of state anxiety (A-State); and this program induced a significant reduction in the anxiety after an AAI program session with the dogs and cats involved in the intervention (p = 0.001). The Wilcoxon t-test showed that there were also significant differences in the "anxiety", "pleasantness", and "relaxation". scores for MCL-S.2 among the alcohol dependents, before and after AAI; a significantly decreased "anxiety" score (p = 0.006), and increased "pleasantness" (p = 0.002) and "relaxation" (p=0.012) scores for MCL-S.2 after AAI. The results of this study indicated that alcohol dependents who experienced a group AAI session-program exhibited significant improvements in their feeling; decreased anxiety, and increased pleasantness and relaxation.

  7. Collaboration in Technology. An Exploratory Study of United States Involvement in International Cooperative Technology Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    College of the Armed Forces, Washington, D.C.: 1970. Valle , Ivan Aranco. "Managerial Implications of Innovation Diffusion Generalization Applied to...assistnace of M. Baeza . Pricing and Recoupment Policies for ConvxL ally Useful Te ’o Resulting from NASA Program A rt prepared to National Aeronautics and

  8. Literacy Programs with Parent Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Joel R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this working paper is to review current literature on literacy programs for parents of English language learners (ELLs). The paper includes a summary of five literacy programs for ELL parents throughout the United States of America. Four of these were system-wide interventions affecting more than one school or classroom. Each…

  9. Effectiveness of a role-play simulation program involving the sbar technique: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mi; Kang, Kyung Ja

    2017-06-01

    Accurate, skilled communication in handover is of high priority in maintaining patients' safety. Nursing students have few chances to practice nurse-to-doctor handover in clinical training, and some have little knowledge of what constitutes effective handover or lack confidence in conveying information. This study aimed to develop a role-play simulation program involving the Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation technique for nurse-to-doctor handover; implement the program; and analyze its effects on situation, background, assessment, recommendation communication, communication clarity, handover confidence, and education satisfaction in nursing students. Non-equivalent control-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental. A convenience sample of 62 senior nursing students from two Korean universities. The differences in SBAR communication, communication clarity, handover confidence, and education satisfaction between the control and intervention groups were measured before and after program participation. The intervention group showed higher Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation communication scores (t=-3.05, p=0.003); communication clarity scores in doctor notification scenarios (t=-5.50, pcommunicative competence in nursing students. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Developing effective animal-assisted intervention programs involving visiting dogs for institutionalized geriatric patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Alessandra; Borgi, Marta; Terranova, Livia; Chiarotti, Flavia; Alleva, Enrico; Cirulli, Francesca

    2012-09-01

    An ever increasing interest in the therapeutic aspects of the human-animal bond has led to a proliferation of animal-assisted interventions (AAI) involving dogs. However, most of these programs lack a solid methodological structure, and basic evaluative research is needed. The purpose of this study was to test the value of dog-assisted interventions as an innovative tool to increase quality of life in the geriatric population. Nineteen patients (men and women) with a mean age of 85 years participated in the study. Interactions between patients and visiting dogs occurred either in a social situation (socialization sessions) or in a therapeutic context (physical therapy sessions). We derived and characterized a specific ethogram of elderly-dog interactions aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of visiting dogs in improving mood, catalyzing social interactions and reducing their everyday apathetic state. Cortisol levels were also measured in the saliva, and depressive state was evaluated. Overall, results show a time-dependent increase in social behaviour and spontaneous interactions with the dogs. Dog-mediated interactions affected the daily increase in cortisol levels, thus having an 'activational effect', in contrast to the apathetic state of institutionalized elderly. Dog-mediated intervention programs appear to be promising tools to improve the social skills and enrich the daily activities of the institutionalized elderly. © 2012 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2012 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  11. Employee suggestion programs: the rewards of involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, J M; McKendall, M

    1993-09-01

    Successful ESPs are the products of a great deal of effort by managers, administrators, teams, individuals, and reviewers, who are all striving to achieve the goals of increased profitability and enhanced employee involvement. A review of the literature indicates that there are several prescriptions that will increase the likelihood of a successful ESP (see the box). Today's American business prophets sound ceaseless calls to arms in the name of "world class performance," "global competitiveness," "total quality management," and a variety of other buzz terms. A burgeoning industry has evolved that promises, through speeches, teleconferences, seminars, and consulting contracts, to teach American organizations how to achieve excellence. In the face of a sputtering economy and unrelenting competitive pressure, today's managers must translate these laudatory ideals into hands-on reality without sacrificing the firm's profit margin to experimentation. If any idea can help an organization achieve improvement through a workable program, then that idea and that program deserve real consideration. An ESP represents an opportunity to tap the intelligence and resourcefulness of an organization's employees, and by doing so, reap significant cost savings. Those companies and managers that have an ESP program uniformly list economic advantages first when describing the benefits of their employee suggestion programs. But there is another deeper and longer term benefit inherent in an ESP. These programs allow employees to become involved in their organization; they drive deaccession to lower levels, they give employees more responsibility, they foster creative approaches to work, and they encourage creativity in pursuit of company goals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Epigenetic mechanisms involved in developmental nutritional programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabory, Anne; Attig, Linda; Junien, Claudine

    2011-10-15

    The ways in which epigenetic modifications fix the effects of early environmental events, ensuring sustained responses to transient stimuli, which result in modified gene expression patterns and phenotypes later in life, is a topic of considerable interest. This review focuses on recently discovered mechanisms and calls into question prevailing views about the dynamics, position and functions of epigenetic marks. Most epigenetic studies have addressed the long-term effects on a small number of epigenetic marks, at the global or individual gene level, of environmental stressors in humans and animal models. In parallel, increasing numbers of studies based on high-throughput technologies and focusing on humans and mice have revealed additional complexity in epigenetic processes, by highlighting the importance of crosstalk between the different epigenetic marks. A number of studies focusing on the developmental origin of health and disease and metabolic programming have identified links between early nutrition, epigenetic processes and long-term illness. The existence of a self-propagating epigenetic cycle has been demonstrated. Moreover, recent studies demonstrate an obvious sexual dimorphism both for programming trajectories and in response to the same environmental insult. Despite recent progress, we are still far from understanding how, when and where environmental stressors disturb key epigenetic mechanisms. Thus, identifying the original key marks and their changes throughout development during an individual's lifetime or over several generations remains a challenging issue.

  13. An exercise program with patient's involvement and family support can modify the cognitive and affective trajectory of acutely hospitalized older medical patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Velilla, Nicolás; Garrués-Irisarri, Mirian; Ibañez-Beroiz, Berta; Gil-Cabañas, Jenifer; Richarte-García, Analía; Idoate-Saralegui, Fernando; de Paz, Patricia Corte; Cambra, Koldo

    2016-06-01

    Most hospitalized older adults have reduced functional and physiological reserves, rendering them more vulnerable to the effects of a series of circumstances beyond the existence of health conditions unrelated to the reason for the hospitalization, usually worsening the hospitalization outcome. Despite the theoretical support for the idea that mobility improvement in the hospitalized patient carries multiple benefits, this idea has not been fully translated into clinical practice. Our objective was to assess if an exercise intervention involving patients and families could modify the cognitive and affective progression of hospitalized older patients, from admission to discharge and 30 days after discharge. This was a prospective intervention study with blinded outcome progression. Patients were recruited over a 3-month period and prospectively followed up. The intervention consisted in a supervised individualized graduated exercise program and education of ward and team staff, patients and caregivers to actively encourage mobility and functional independence. A total of 29 patients were recruited. Mean age was 86.1 (SD 4.92), and 18 (62 %) were women. At discharge, we found a significant improvement in Mini-mental State Examination (p = 0.008), Trail making Test-A (p = 0.03), and verbal fluency (p = 0.019). One month after discharge, Geriatric Depression Scale-Yesavage and Delirium Rating Scale-revised-98 remained statistically different. This pilot study shows that an exercise program is feasible, and can be suitable to prevent cognitive and affective decline during acute hospitalization of older adults. It is a challenge for the new models of hospitalization to change the actual disease-centered view to the patient-centered view, optimizing traditionally neglected aspects such as functional, cognitive and affective recovery after hospitalization.

  14. Creating opportunities through mentorship, parental involvement, and safe spaces (COMPASS program: multi-country study protocol to protect girls from violence in humanitarian settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L. Falb

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence against adolescent girls in humanitarian settings is of urgent concern given their additional vulnerabilities to violence and unique health and well-being needs that have largely been overlooked by the humanitarian community. In order to understand what works to prevent violence against adolescent girls, a multi-component curriculum-based safe spaces program (Creating Opportunities through Mentorship, Parental involvement and Safe Spaces – COMPASS will be implemented and evaluated. The objectives of this multi-country study are to understand the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of COMPASS programming to prevent violence against adolescent girls in diverse humanitarian settings. Methods/design Two wait-listed cluster-randomized controlled trials are being implemented in conflict-affected communities in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (N = 886 girls aged 10–14 years and in refugee camps in western Ethiopia (N = 919 girls aged 13–19 years. The intervention consists of structured facilitated sessions delivered in safe spaces by young female mentors, caregiver discussion groups, capacity-building activities with service providers, and community engagement. In Ethiopia, the research centers on the overall impact of COMPASS compared to a wait-list group. In DRC, the research objective is to understand the incremental effectiveness of the caregiver component in addition to the other COMPASS activities as compared to a wait-list group. The primary outcome is change in sexual violence. Secondary outcomes include decreased physical and emotional abuse, reduced early marriage, improved gender norms, and positive interpersonal relationships, among others. Qualitative methodologies seek to understand girls’ perceptions of safety within their communities, key challenges they face, and to identify potential pathways of change. Discussion These trials will add much needed evidence for the humanitarian

  15. Epigenetic mechanisms involved in developmental nutritional programming

    OpenAIRE

    Gabory, Anne; Attig, Linda; Junien, Claudine

    2011-01-01

    The ways in which epigenetic modifications fix the effects of early environmental events, ensuring sustained responses to transient stimuli, which result in modified gene expression patterns and phenotypes later in life, is a topic of considerable interest. This review focuses on recently discovered mechanisms and calls into question prevailing views about the dynamics, position and functions of epigenetic marks. Most epigenetic studies have addressed the long-term effects on a small number o...

  16. Incentives: Getting and Keeping Workers Involved in Health Promotion Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, James F.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The article explores motivation as it relates to worksite health promotion participation, addressing incentive use as a motivational means of getting and keeping employees involved in health promotion programs. It suggests various incentives to help program planners, categorizing them as social or material reinforcers. (SM)

  17. ASCO's International programs and how you can become involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Saghir, Nagi S; Assi, Hussein A; Pyle, Doug

    2013-01-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is dedicated to serving its members and to reducing disparities in the treatment of patients with cancer and their outcome. ASCO has a portfolio of international programs called ASCO International that aims to improve clinical practice by sharing oncology knowledge through a network of ASCO members and partners. In order to achieve its goals, ASCO has an International Affairs Committee that oversees many programs that involve a global exchange of knowledge through courses and workshops, mentoring, initiatives promoting research, and specialty training standards. All of these programs depend on ASCO member volunteers in one capacity or another.

  18. Examining Understandings of Parent Involvement in Early Childhood Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, Aimee V.; Kallemeyn, Leanne; Phillips, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    The importance of parent involvement in children's development and learning is increasingly recognized in the research literature and in federal and state policies; however, no unified definition of parent involvement exists. This study examined different understandings and definitions of parent involvement in a sample of administrators of…

  19. A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Different Types of Parental Involvement Programs for Urban Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeynes, William

    2012-01-01

    This meta-analysis of 51 studies examines the relationship between various kinds of parental involvement programs and the academic achievement of pre-kindergarten-12th-grade school children. Analyses determined the effect sizes for various parental involvement programs overall and subcategories of involvement. Results indicate a significant…

  20. Implementing a Parental Involvement Program to Improve Parents' Engagement in Their Children's Learning: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Saoussen S.

    2017-01-01

    Since the early 1900s, the traditional thinking about education and school role in the USA has shifted to view schools as non-isolated entities from the larger society where schooling should be re-energized with help from the society, which includes student homes and communities. This mixed approach action research study evolves around improving…

  1. Effect of a program of short bouts of exercise on bone health in adolescents involved in different sports: the PRO-BONE study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachopoulos, Dimitris; Barker, Alan R; Williams, Craig A; Knapp, Karen M; Metcalf, Brad S; Gracia-Marco, Luis

    2015-04-11

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease associated with high morbidity, mortality and increased economic costs. Early prevention during adolescence appears to be one of the most beneficial practices. Exercise is an effective approach for developing bone mass during puberty, but some sports may have a positive or negative impact on bone mass accrual. Plyometric jump training has been suggested as a type of exercise that can augment bone, but its effects on adolescent bone mass have not been rigorously assessed. The aims of the PRO-BONE study are to: 1) longitudinally assess bone health and its metabolism in adolescents engaged in osteogenic (football), non-osteogenic (cycling and swimming) sports and in a control group, and 2) examine the effect of a 9 month plyometric jump training programme on bone related outcomes in the sport groups. This study will recruit 105 males aged 12-14 years who have participated in sport specific training for at least 3 hours per week during the last 3 years in the following sports groups: football (n = 30), cycling (n = 30) and swimming (n = 30). An age-matched control group (n = 15) that does not engage in these sports more than 3 hours per week will also be recruited. Participants will be measured on 5 occasions: 1) at baseline; 2) after 12 months of sport specific training where each sport group will be randomly allocated into two sub-groups: intervention group (sport + plyometric jump training) and sport group (sport only); 3) exactly after the 9 months of intervention; 4) 6 months following the intervention; 5) 12 months following the intervention. Body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, air displacement plethysmography and bioelectrical impedance), bone stiffness index (ultrasounds), physical activity (accelerometers), diet (24 h recall questionnaire), pubertal maturation (Tanner stage), physical fitness (cardiorespiratory and muscular), bone turnover markers and vitamin D will be measured at each visit. The PRO

  2. The "Generacion Diez" after-school program and Latino parent involvement with schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Nathaniel R; Medina, Carmen

    2005-11-01

    The current study examines associations between participation in after-school programs and change in Latino parent involvement with schools. Hierarchical linear regression analyses demonstrated that parents of children who had higher after-school program attendance rates were significantly more likely to report increases in the quality of relationships with their children's teachers, frequency of parent-teacher contact, and engagement with their children's schooling over a two-year period. However, greater home educator contacts were related to decreases in quality and quantity of parent-school involvement. A primary implication is that attendance in school-based after-school programs may draw parents into children's regular-day school context. Editors' Strategic Implications The authors illustrate the promising practice of using after-school programs to promote parent involvement and to help integrate the often disparate family and school contexts for Latino children.

  3. Impact of a nutrition/educational program in a group of type 2 diabetes patients, already involved in a wider "Group Care" plan and not achieving complete target: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comba, Anna; Ardizzone, Alessandra; Leto, Laura; Feola, Mauro

    2017-05-18

    Type 2 diabetes is one of the most frequent chronic degenerative diseases in the world (5.4% in Italy); it has many chronic consequences with a significant impact either on expectation or quality of life. About 80-90% of type 2 diabetes patients is either overweight or obese, condition that can cause many more negative consequences than in individuals in the same conditions but with normal weight. The aim of the research is to assess if diabetic people who cannot reach the goals of glycemic control, good eating habits and weight loss can eventually obtain, with an individualized care plan, long lasting improvements. This study involved a little group of diabetic patients who did not achieve an optimal therapeutic target. These patients have been individually followed by a dietician for six months through a program of dietetic counseling and regular controls and at the end we compare the results of another group of diabetic people, involved in the Group Care Plan (but without the support of the dietitian). The nutrition educational program determined a significant weight loss (- 4.62 kg vs + 3.46 kg; p<0.05), a reduction of waist circumference (-5.34 cm vs + 4.15 cm; p<0.05), an improvement of glycemic control (Hb1Ac: - 0.67 % vs + 0.57%; p<0.05), lipidic profile (total cholesterol: - 1 mg/dl vs + 12.85 mg/dl; p<0.05) and perceived quality of life (Test Att 19: 0 subjects vs 6 subjects). An individualized nutrition educational program in patients with type 2 diabetes not achieving a therapeutic target can optimize global care of the disease.

  4. Controlled Education of patients after Stroke (CEOPS)- nurse-led multimodal and long-term interventional program involving a patient's caregiver to optimize secondary prevention of stroke: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendyk, Anne-Marie; Duhamel, Alain; Bejot, Yannick; Leys, Didier; Derex, Laurent; Dereeper, Olivier; Detante, Olivier; Garcia, Pierre-Yves; Godefroy, Olivier; Montoro, Francisco Macian; Neau, Jean-Philippe; Richard, Sébastien; Rosolacci, Thierry; Sibon, Igor; Sablot, Denis; Timsit, Serge; Zuber, Mathieu; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Bordet, Régis

    2018-02-22

    Setting up a follow-up secondary prevention program after stroke is difficult due to motor and cognitive impairment, but necessary to prevent recurrence and improve patients' quality of life. To involve a referent nurse and a caregiver from the patient's social circle in nurse-led multimodal and long-term management of risk factors after stroke could be an advantage due to their easier access to the patient and family. The aim of this study is to compare the benefit of optimized follow up by nursing personnel from the vascular neurology department including therapeutic follow up, and an interventional program directed to the patient and a caregiving member of their social circle, as compared with typical follow up in order to develop a specific follow-up program of secondary prevention of stroke. The design is a randomized, controlled, clinical trial conducted in the French Stroke Unit of the Strokavenir network. In total, 410 patients will be recruited and randomized in optimized follow up or usual follow up for 2 years. In both group, patients will be seen by a neurologist at 6, 12 and 24 months. The optimized follow up will include follow up by a nurse from the vascular neurology department, including therapeutic follow up, and a training program on secondary prevention directed to the patient and a caregiving member of their social circle. After discharge, a monthly telephone interview, in the first year and every 3 months in the second year, will be performed by the nurse. At 6, 12 and 24 month, the nurse will give the patient and caregiver another training session. Usual follow up is only done by the patient's general practitioner, after classical information on secondary prevention of risk factors during hospitalization. The primary outcome measure is blood pressure measured after the first year of follow up. Blood pressure will be measured by nursing personnel who do not know the group into which the patient has been randomized. Secondary endpoints are

  5. The Fernald Envoy Program: How face-to-face public involvement is working

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopes, J. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Hundertmark, C.A. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jordan, J. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Center for Environmental Communication Studies

    1995-12-31

    In March 1994, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), initiated the Fernald Envoy Program as a tool for strengthening public involvement in the restoration of the Fernald site, a former US Department of Energy uranium processing facility which ceased operation in 1989 and became an environmental restoration site. Based on the concept that opinion leaders play a key role in the flow of information, the Envoy Program was developed to link Fernald with opinion leaders in community groups. In February and March 1995, the University of Cincinnati Center for Environmental Communication Studies, under contract with the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation, conducted an evaluation to determine how the Envoy Program was functioning in relation to the original Envoy Plan. A quasi-experimental design was applied using telephone surveys of opinion leaders in groups with envoy representation and in groups without representation. Findings validated the effectiveness of the program and also identified areas for program improvement.

  6. The Importance of Father Involvement in Early Childhood Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancell, Katherine S.; Bruns, Deborah A.; Chitiyo, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Active family involvement in Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) is regarded as a beneficial factor in young children's learning and development. One definition of family involvement is the active role parents take in their child's development and the knowledge and participation they share with professionals who are part of the child's daily…

  7. Identifying barriers that hinder onsite parental involvement in a school-based health promotion program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Dominic, Oralia; Wray, Linda A; Treviño, Roberto P; Hernandez, Arthur E; Yin, Zenong; Ulbrecht, Jan S

    2010-09-01

    We investigated whether barriers to onsite parental involvement in the Bienestar Health Program Parent Component could be identified and whether participation rates could be increased by addressing these barriers. All nonparticipating parents of fourth-grade students of San Antonio Independent School District from 4 schools, which were selected randomly from 20 intervention schools in Bienestar, were invited to take part in this study. A total of 47 of 223 (21%) parents engaged in one of four focus groups offered. Parents identified barriers to their involvement in Bienestar that fit into five descriptive categories: (a) low value, (b) high cost, (c) competing family demands, (d) concerns about the program design, and (e) social role norms. The Bienestar Parent Component was then modified according to the focus group findings, which resulted in a marked increase in parental involvement from 17% to 37% overall. These findings suggest that even when parents are involved in the initial design of parent-friendly and culturally sensitive programs, as was the case for Bienestar, maximizing parental involvement may require additional assessment, identification, and remediation of barriers.

  8. The impact of banners on digital television: the role of program interactivity and product involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauberghe, Verolien; De Pelsmacker, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    In a sample of 281 respondents, the effect of a noninteractive and a medium-interactive television program on recall and brand attitudes for low- and high-involvement products advertised in banners during these programs was investigated. Medium-interactive programs resulted in less product and brand recall and recognition of brands in embedded banner advertisements, but generated more positive brand attitudes than noninteractive programs. These effects were more outspoken for a high-involvement product than for a low-involvement product. The impact of perceived program interactivity on brand attitude is fully mediated program valence and involvement for low-involvement products, but not for high-involvement products, for which perceived program interactivity had a direct impact on brand attitude.

  9. STUDY OF CARDIAC INVOLVEMENT IN DIPHTHERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bala Raju Gundam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diphtheria still endemic in many developing countries and is responsible for high case fatality. Myocardial involvement is a serious complication of diphtheria and diphtheria myocarditis frequently complicated by arrhythmias causes sudden death if not managed properly. So, early and adequate administration of Anti-Diphtheritic Serum (ADS and frequent monitoring particularly 24 hrs. ECG monitoring is helpful to detect any serious cardiac arrhythmias. METHODS A prospective study on patients who were culture positive diagnosed on the basis of WHO definition were treated and analysed in respect to homographic details, immunisation strategy, and clinical features with particular attention to myocarditis. RESULTS In the study, common age group affected by diphtheria was 5 to 10 years. Incidence of myocarditis more in same age group. Out of 64 patients with myocarditis, 23 patients died. CONCLUSION Incidence of diphtheria has increased in the recent years. Commonly effected age group is 5 to 10 years and most of them are presented with asymptomatic myocarditis. Symptomatic diphtheritic myocarditis has high mortality rate even with aggressive management. Patient who presented with either LBBB alone are with combination of other conduction of abnormalities has high mortality rate.

  10. The Impact of Parental Involvement on a Structured Youth Program Experience: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat D. Duerden

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Parental involvement is an often proposed, but rarely researched, key element of youth programs. Questions remain regarding the impact of parental involvement on program processes and outcomes. Qualitative data were collected over a one-year period with youth participants (n=46, parents (n=26, and teachers (n=5 associated with an international immersion/service learning program for adolescents. Three main research questions guided the data analysis: (1 what role does parental involvement play in the youths’ experience in the program; (2 how does parental involvement in the program influence the parent/child relationship; and (3 what role does parental involvement play in terms of the program’s long-term impact on the youth participants? Findings suggest a relationship between parental involvement in youth programs and improved parent/child communication, bonding, and perceptions of one another. Findings also suggest that having a common ground experience prolonged the experience’s positive post-participation effects.

  11. Transcriptome assembly and candidate genes involved in nutritional programming in the swordtail fish Xiphophorus multilineatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan; Klimovich, Charlotte M; Robeson, Kalen Z; Boswell, William; Ríos-Cardenas, Oscar; Walter, Ronald B; Morris, Molly R

    2017-01-01

    Nutritional programming takes place in early development. Variation in the quality and/or quantity of nutrients in early development can influence long-term health and viability. However, little is known about the mechanisms of nutritional programming. The live-bearing fish Xiphophorus multilineatus has the potential to be a new model for understanding these mechanisms, given prior evidence of nutritional programming influencing behavior and juvenile growth rate. We tested the hypotheses that nutritional programming would influence behaviors involved in energy homeostasis as well gene expression in X. multilineatus. We first examined the influence of both juvenile environment (varied in nutrition and density) and adult environment (varied in nutrition) on behaviors involved in energy acquisition and energy expenditure in adult male X. multilineatus. We also compared the behavioral responses across the genetically influenced size classes of males. Males stop growing at sexual maturity, and the size classes of can be identified based on phenotypes (adult size and pigment patterns). To study the molecular signatures of nutritional programming, we assembled a de novo transcriptome for X. multilineatus using RNA from brain, liver, skin, testis and gonad tissues, and used RNA-Seq to profile gene expression in the brains of males reared in low quality (reduced food, increased density) and high quality (increased food, decreased density) juvenile environments. We found that both the juvenile and adult environments influenced the energy intake behavior, while only the adult environment influenced energy expenditure. In addition, there were significant interactions between the genetically influenced size classes and the environments that influenced energy intake and energy expenditure, with males from one of the four size classes (Y-II) responding in the opposite direction as compared to the other males examined. When we compared the brains of males of the Y-II size class

  12. Effects of a Statewide Tobacco Cessation Program Among Individuals Involved With Arkansas Community Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garver-Apgar, Christine; Young, Susan; Howard, Brenda; Udochi, Ben; Morris, Chad

    2017-07-01

    In response to a critical need for tobacco cessation services among justice-involved populations, Arkansas Community Correction (ACC) partnered with the University of Colorado's Behavioral Health & Wellness Program in 2013 to implement the DIMENSIONS: Tobacco Free Program within all probation, parole, and drug court units. In the first 2 years of this statewide, evidence-based program, more than 1,100 individuals from 33 ACC area office locations attended tobacco-free group sessions and provided data on tobacco use and readiness to quit. Results demonstrated a significant reduction in tobacco use among participants as well as increased knowledge, confidence, and intent to quit. This study provides some of the first evidence that members of this vulnerable population will attend tobacco-free group sessions with regularity and make progress toward tobacco cessation.

  13. Program management model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, J. J.; Russell, J. E.; Seline, J. R.; Sumner, N. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Two models, a system performance model and a program assessment model, have been developed to assist NASA management in the evaluation of development alternatives for the Earth Observations Program. Two computer models were developed and demonstrated on the Goddard Space Flight Center Computer Facility. Procedures have been outlined to guide the user of the models through specific evaluation processes, and the preparation of inputs describing earth observation needs and earth observation technology. These models are intended to assist NASA in increasing the effectiveness of the overall Earth Observation Program by providing a broader view of system and program development alternatives.

  14. Program Cost Allocation and the Validation of Faculty Activity Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilles, William C.

    1973-01-01

    The author reviews the historical use of effort measure in cost allocation studies, examines criticism of the effort technique, and reports on several recent attempts by academic health centers to achieve a more valid measure of faculty activities. (Editor)

  15. Parental Involvement, Is It Real? A Study of Viewpoints Promoting Parental Involvement That Enhances Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Lorretta Faye

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the motives, practices, attitudes, and barriers of parental involvement as recognized by administrators and teachers in southwest Tennessee in order to improve the school-home and community relationship in southwest Tennessee. This study investigated the benefits of parental involvement and…

  16. Study on Java Programming Education

    OpenAIRE

    太田, 信宏

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to consider the content and key points for inclusion in a Java programming course for beginners. The Java programming language has a variety of functions and has the largest application field of all such languages, containing many themes that are appropriate for any such programming course. The multifunctional and wide-ranging functions of Java, however, may actually act as a barrier to study for beginners. The core content of a programming class for beginners sho...

  17. [Atomic force microscopy involved in protein study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhengjian; Chen, Guoping; Wang, Jianhua

    2010-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy is a rather new type of nano microscopic technology. It has some advantages, such as high resolution (sub-nano scale); avoidance of special sample preparation; real-time detection of samples under nearly physiological environment; in situ study of samples under water environment; feasibility of investigating physical and chemical properties of samples at molecular level, etc. In recent years, the application of atomic force microscopy in protein study has brought about outstanding achievements. In this paper are introduced the principle and operation modes of atomic force microscopy, also presented are its application in protein imaging, adsorption, folding-and-unfolding, assembly, and single molecular recognition. Additionally, the future application of atomic force microscopy in protein study is prospected.

  18. Genetics studies involving Swiss needle cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Johnson; F. Temel; K. Jayawickrama

    2002-01-01

    Three studies were analyzed this year that examined genetic aspects of Swiss needle cast (SNC) tolerance . Families sampled across the Siuslaw National forest showed differences in foliage health traits, but very little of the variation could be explained by environmental or climatic conditions at the parent tree location. Five test sites of the Nehalem series of...

  19. A CAI Study Skills Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.

    This paper describes a computer assisted instruction (CAI) study skills program and reports the results of a study conducted to determine its effectiveness. The program consists of ten CAI study skills modules, a CAI study skills notebook, and a CAI study skills test. The modules address (1) managing time, (2) improving memory, (3) taking lecture…

  20. Parental Involvement in Deaf Children's Education Programs as a Predictor of Child's Language, Early Reading, and Social-Emotional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, R

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the impact of school-based, teacher-rated parental involvement on four child outcomes: language development, early reading skills, and positive and negative measures of social-emotional development. The 28 children were assessed for outcomes between 9 to 53 months post-graduation from a birth-to-3 early intervention (EI) program for children with hearing loss. Other factors included in the study were child's hearing loss, mother's education level, mother's current communication skills with her child, and maternal use of additional services beyond those offered by the early intervention program or the child's school program. Parental involvement in children's school-based education program is a significant positive predictor to early reading skills but shares considerable variance with maternal communication skill for this outcome. In this study, maternal communication skills and the child's hearing loss were the strongest predictors for language development. Maternal use of additional services was the strongest predictor to poorer social-emotional adjustment. The study's findings indicate that although parental involvement in their deaf child's school-based education program can positively contribute to academic performance, parental communication skill is a more significant predictor for positive language and academic development. Factors associated with parental involvement, maternal communication, and use of additional services are explored and suggestions are offered to enhance parental involvement and communication skills.

  1. Child Welfare Involved Parents and Pathways Triple P: Perceptions of Program Acceptability and Appropriateness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ericka M; Feely, Megan; Seay, Kristen D; Fedoravicis, Nicole; Kohl, Patricia L

    2016-12-01

    Nearly half of children in the child welfare system have clinically significant behavior problems and are at risk of developing disruptive behavioral disorders. Yet, behavioral parent training interventions, which are the most effective way to treat these problems, are rarely provided to child welfare involved families. As a result, little is known about the acceptability and appropriateness of these parent training interventions with these families. This qualitative study explored implementation outcomes of an evidenced-based parenting intervention, Pathways Triple P, with families in the child welfare system. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents investigated for child maltreatment (n=47); following participation in the Pathways Triple P. Parents were asked about their perceptions of acceptability (program satisfaction) and appropriateness (program fit). Despite the complicated and often chaotic lives common among this vulnerable population, study findings suggest that most parents found the intervention to be useful and relevant. Pathways Triple P's content, structure and materials for parents were key aspects of acceptability and appropriateness. Barriers to participation were also identified separately for parents who did not receive the full dosage of the intervention. Study findings indicate that Pathways Triple P is a promising strategy to improve behavioral health outcomes for maltreated children and increase positive parenting behaviors for child welfare involved parents.

  2. International Research and Studies Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The International Research and Studies Program supports surveys, studies, and instructional materials development to improve and strengthen instruction in modern foreign languages, area studies, and other international fields. The purpose of the program is to improve and strengthen instruction in modern foreign languages, area studies and other…

  3. DCD – a novel plant specific domain in proteins involved in development and programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerks Tobias

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of microbial pathogens by plants triggers the hypersensitive reaction, a common form of programmed cell death in plants. These dying cells generate signals that activate the plant immune system and alarm the neighboring cells as well as the whole plant to activate defense responses to limit the spread of the pathogen. The molecular mechanisms behind the hypersensitive reaction are largely unknown except for the recognition process of pathogens. We delineate the NRP-gene in soybean, which is specifically induced during this programmed cell death and contains a novel protein domain, which is commonly found in different plant proteins. Results The sequence analysis of the protein, encoded by the NRP-gene from soybean, led to the identification of a novel domain, which we named DCD, because it is found in plant proteins involved in development and cell death. The domain is shared by several proteins in the Arabidopsis and the rice genomes, which otherwise show a different protein architecture. Biological studies indicate a role of these proteins in phytohormone response, embryo development and programmed cell by pathogens or ozone. Conclusion It is tempting to speculate, that the DCD domain mediates signaling in plant development and programmed cell death and could thus be used to identify interacting proteins to gain further molecular insights into these processes.

  4. Leadership development at university: Comparing student leaders with different levels of involvement in a leadership education program

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, Krista Lee

    2007-01-01

    This study examined how students’ leadership behaviours are related to both their personal leadership experience and their involvement in a leadership education program. The context of the study was the University of Guelph’s Certificate in Leadership program. The Student Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) was administered to 33 student leaders who did not participate in the Leadership Certificate and 14 students who were at various levels of completion of the Certificate. No significant di...

  5. The Impact of Parents’ Involvement in and Attitude toward Their Children’s Foreign Language Programs for Learning English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Hosseinpour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Since parents and their involvement and attitude have a crucial role in children’s achievement in learning English, the present study is to explore and evaluate the impact of Iranian parents’ involvement in and attitude toward their children’s foreign language programs for learning English. In other words, the effectiveness of their high level of involvement and strength of attitude will be evaluated. Besides, this study is to explore whether some factors such as parents’ gender, knowledge of English, income, and educational background are related in the parents’ involvement and attitude or not. To this end, first of all, a reliable questionnaire, checked through a pilot study, was distributed among 140 parents to find out the level of their involvement in and attitude toward the programs. Based on the normal curve and the Z score, the parents were divided into two groups, one with a higher level of involvement and more positive attitude and the other with a lower level of involvement and less positive attitude. By using a standard final achievement test of the course book among 70 primary school student in third grade and Independent T-test analysis, the impact of parents’ involvement and attitude were checked. As the results revealed those parents who have high level of involvement in and positive attitude toward their children’s English language programs made their children’s higher level of achievement in the language program. Besides, the further outcomes showed that there are significant differences between the parents’ knowledge of English, income, and educational background and their level of involvement and attitude. The aforementioned factors affect children’s achievement test scores as well.

  6. The Impact of a Collaborative Family Involvement Program on Latino Families and Children's Educational Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Julie; Kirkner, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Latino families highly value education and are committed to their children's educational success; however, Latino students often experience educational challenges. Well-designed family involvement programs can encourage Latino families, especially new immigrants or monolingual Spanish-speakers, to increase their involvement resulting in positive…

  7. Association between organizational capacity and involvement in chronic disease prevention programming among Canadian public health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusaik, Nancy; Sabiston, Catherine M; Kishchuk, Natalie; Maximova, Katerina; O'Loughlin, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    In the context of the emerging field of public health services and systems research, this study (i) tested a model of the relationships between public health organizational capacity (OC) for chronic disease prevention, its determinants (organizational supports for evaluation, partnership effectiveness) and one possible outcome of OC (involvement in core chronic disease prevention practices) and (ii) examined differences in the nature of these relationships among organizations operating in more and less facilitating external environments. OC was conceptualized as skills and resources/supports for chronic disease prevention programming. Data were from a census of 210 Canadian public health organizations with mandates for chronic disease prevention. The hypothesized relationships were tested using structural equation modeling. Overall, the results supported the model. Organizational supports for evaluation accounted for 33% of the variance in skills. Skills and resources/supports were directly and strongly related to involvement. Organizations operating within facilitating external contexts for chronic disease prevention had more effective partnerships, more resources/supports, stronger skills and greater involvement in core chronic disease prevention practices. Results also suggested that organizations functioning in less facilitating environments may not benefit as expected from partnerships. Empirical testing of this conceptual model helps develop a better understanding of public health OC. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Head Start Program Quality: Examination of Classroom Quality and Parent Involvement in Predicting Children's Vocabulary, Literacy, and Mathematics Achievement Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaoli; Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.; Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie L.; Korfmacher, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Guided by a developmental-ecological framework and Head Start's two-generational approach, this study examined two dimensions of Head Start program quality, classroom quality and parent involvement and their unique and interactive contribution to children's vocabulary, literacy, and mathematics skills growth from the beginning of Head Start…

  9. Efficiency and duality in nonsmooth multiobjective fractional programming involving η-pseudolinear functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we shall establish necessary and sufficient optimality conditions for a feasible solution to be efficient for a nonsmooth multiobjective fractional programming problem involving η-pseudolinear functions. Furthermore, we shall show equivalence between efficiency and proper efficiency under certain boundedness condition. We have also obtained weak and strong duality results for corresponding Mond-Weir subgradient type dual problem. These results extend some earlier results on efficiency and duality to multiobjective fractional programming problems involving η-pseudolinear and pseudolinear functions.

  10. PROGRAM EVALUATION INVOLVEMENT INDONESIAN NATIONAL ARMED FORCES (TNI ON MISSION UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS (UNPKO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gede Sumertha KY

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is constructed in order to study and to evaluate involvement TNI on mission United Nations Peacekeeping Operations (UNPKO in Lebanon program FY 2014-2015 due to achieve vision 4000 Peacekeepers. The CIPP model is using on apply the qualitative method for the research with consist of four evaluation components: (1 context; (2 input; (3 process; (4 product. The mechanism collecting data were collected through interviews, observations, questionnaires and documentation study. There are three levels of evaluation for judgment each aspect: low, moderate, and high. The summarized results and figured into case-order effect matrix was figure out of the categorization.The results of this research indicate that TNI involvement in mission UNPKO Lebanon, aspire to increase the number of peacekeepers up to 4.000 personnel in the category “high”, but still have some minor additional improvement especially on coordination among stakeholders. This is because the Results of Context Evaluation has a category of "high" with a scale of assessment "many" (75.3%; the Results of Input Evaluation has a category of "high" with a scale of assessment "moderate" (60.6%; the Results of Process Evaluation has a category of "high" with a scale of assessment "moderate" (65.3% and the Results of Product Evaluation has a category of "high" with a scale of assessment "moderate" (63.3% .

  11. The academic differences between students involved in school-based robotics programs and students not involved in school-based robotics programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoullos, Michael

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N=121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these students was compared to a group of students who were members of school based sports teams and to a group of students who were not part of either of the first two groups. Academic record was defined as overall GPA, English grade, mathematics grade, mathematics-based standardized state exam scores, and attendance rates. All of the participants of this study were students in a large, urban career and technical education high school. As STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) has come to the forefront of educational focus, robotics programs have grown in quantity. Starting robotics programs requires a serious commitment of time, money, and other resources. The benefits of such programs have not been well analyzed. This research study had three major goals: to identify the academic characteristics of students who are drawn to robotics programs, to identify the academic impact of the robotics program during the robotics season, and to identify the academic impact of the robotics program at the end of the school year. The study was a non-experiment. The researchers ran MANOVS, repeated measures analyses, an ANOVA, and descriptive statistics to analyze the data. The data showed that students drawn to robotics were academically stronger than students who did not participate in robotics. The data also showed that grades and attendance did not significantly improve or degrade either during the robotics season or at year-end. These findings are significant because they show that robotics programs attract students who are academically strong. This information can be very useful in high school articulation programs

  12. Interventions aimed at reducing obesity in early childhood: a meta-analysis of programs that involve parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, H Melis; van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H; Mesman, Judi; van der Veek, Shelley

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is a growing problem even in very young childhood, resulting in high costs for individuals and society. As a response, numerous obesity prevention and intervention programs have been developed. Previous research has shown that early intervention programs are more effective when parents are involved, but the effectiveness of specific aspects of programs with parental involvement has not been investigated. This meta-analysis aims to investigate the features related to the effectiveness of different types of obesity intervention programs involving parents and targeting young children (0-6-year-olds). The Web of Science, PubMed, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and ERIC databases were searched for childhood obesity prevention and intervention programs involving parents. Data were analyzed using the Comprehensive Meta-analysis (CMA) software. Fifty studies with effect sizes measured at short-term follow-up (within 3 months from the end of the intervention) and 26 studies with effect sizes measured at long-term follow-up (all reported in a total of 49 publications) were identified. The combined effect size of interventions was small but significant at short-term follow-up (d = .08, p interventions were not effective at long-term follow-up. Multivariate meta-regression analyses showed that interventions were more effective when including either interactive sessions or educational materials as opposed to those including both interactive sessions and noninteractive educational materials. No other moderators regarding sample characteristics, study design, or methodological quality were significant. Interventions targeting young children that require parental involvement are effective at short-term follow-up, specifically when interventions include one mode of intervention rather than two. However, results were not retained in the long run. © 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  13. The Community Environmental Monitoring Program: Reducing Public Perception of Risk through Stakeholder Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William T. Hartwell

    2007-05-21

    The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) has promoted stakeholder involvement, awareness, and understanding of radiological surveillance in communities surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) since 1981. It involves stakeholders in the operation, data collection, and dissemination of information obtained from a network of 29 stations across a wide area of Nevada, Utah and California. It is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration’s Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) and administered by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the Nevada System of Higher Education. Integration of a near real-time communications system, a public web site, training workshops for involved stakeholders, and educational programs all help to alleviate public perception of risk of health effects from past activities conducted at the NTS.

  14. Dark Skies Awareness Programs for the International Year of Astronomy: Involvement, Outcomes and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2010-01-01

    The preservation of dark skies is a growing global concern, yet it is one of the easiest environmental problems people can address on local levels. For this reason, the goal of the IYA Dark Skies Awareness Cornerstone Project is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs. These programs provide resources on light pollution for new technologies like a presence in Second Life and podcasts, for local thematic events at national parks and observatory open houses, for international thematic events like International Dark Skies Week and Earth Hour, for a program in the arts like an international photo contest, for global citizen-science programs that measure night sky brightness worldwide, and for educational materials like a kit with a light shielding demonstration. These programs have been successfully used around the world during IYA to raise awareness of the effects of light pollution on public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy. The presentation will provide an update, take a look ahead at the project's sustainability, and describe how people can be involved in the future. Information about the programs is at www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  15. Hospitalist involvement in family medicine residency training: A CERA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, Robert; Savageau, Judith A; Shokar, Navkiran; Potts, Stacy; Gravel, Joseph; Eisenstock, Kimberly; Ledwith, James

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the impact of hospitalists on family medicine residencies. We surveyed family medicine residency directors to assess attitudes about hospitalists and their involvement in residency teaching. Questions were included in the 2012 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) survey of family medicine residency directors. Univariate statistics were used to describe programs, directors, and our questions on the use of hospitalists. Bivariate statistics were used to examine relationships between the use of hospitalists to teach and program characteristics. Forty-one percent (n=175) of residency directors completed the hospitalist section of the CERA survey. Sixty-six percent of residency programs were community based/university affiliated. The majority of directors who have, or are planning to develop, a hospitalist service currently use an internal medicine service (92.5%), followed by family medicine (39.1%), pediatrics (35.4%), OB/laborists (18.0%), and combined services (8.7%). The majority of programs with a hospitalist training track (or plans to develop one) indicated that this was for a family medicine service. Sixty percent of programs that have a hospitalist service involve hospitalists in teaching. Twenty percent of directors reported that hospitalists serve as family medicine faculty, and 63% viewed them as "good educators." However, 85% reported no reduction in inpatient teaching by family medicine faculty despite using hospitalist teaching services. Hospitalists have a significant educational role in family medicine resident training. Further research is needed to explore how hospitalists and family medicine faculty can collaborate to promote enhanced efficiency and effectiveness as residency teachers.

  16. The Academic Differences between Students Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs and Students Not Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N = 121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these…

  17. The emotional involvement in the workplace: An empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Lucia-Casademunt

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In a multitude of studies, it is verified that the generation of positive attitudes for employees such as job satisfaction or job involvement, have a positive influence on productivity levels of companies. The current investigation focus on the identification of employee-profile -who is emotionally involved with their work activity- through the use of a set of individual, job related and attitudinal factors.Design/methodology: A review of the literature about the main factors that affect the job involvement particularly on its emotional dimension has been completed. For its measurement at the empirical level, various items related to psychological well being of employees included in the IV European Working Conditions Survey-2010 are used. Moreover, those items are identified in Job Involvement Questionnaire (Lodahl & Kejner, 1965. Since then, an empirical and multidimensional study is carried out by applying a logistic regression model on the sample of 11,149 employees obtained with European survey cited previously.Findings: The logistic regression model identifies the factors, which are directly related to emotional involvement at the workplace. Ultimately, is raised a definitive model that define the European employee-profile -who is emotionally involved at the workplace-: a rather aged person who has been working at his/her present place of employment for several years in a medium-sized company where possibly there exist a good working relationship between workers and their superiors –social support-. These employees are “white-collar” workers, have career advancement opportunities in the organizational hierarchy. They perform variety, flexible and complex tasks, which leads to satisfaction in terms of pay and working conditions.Research limitations/implications: Emotional involvement has been measured through self-awareness and, therefore, the corresponding bias in the key variable must be assumed. In addition, the casual

  18. Factors Influencing California Dental Hygienists' Involvement in School-Based Oral Health Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Katherine V; Essex, Gwen; Rowe, Dorothy J

    2016-08-01

    To assess the influence of community oral health experiences during entry-level dental hygiene education on participation in community oral health events after graduation and the facilitators and barriers experienced by dental hygienists in participating in these programs. A 27-item survey, consisting of items related to community oral health experiences during and after entry-level education, was distributed by the California Dental Hygienists' Association to all dental hygienists whose email addresses were in their database. Frequencies of participants' responses to each survey item were calculated. Chi-square analysis was performed to identify significant relationships among variables. Response rate was 8%, with 513 out of the 6,248 contacted having responded. Additionally, 95% of the respondents had participated, as entry-level students, in community oral health experiences such as school-based oral health educational programs. Respondents agreed that participation in these programs was valuable to their professional development and encouraged them to participate after graduation; both these variables were related (pconflict with work (61%), family time commitment (52%), and no knowledge of existing programs (24%). Dental hygienists' involvement in school-based oral health programs is enhanced by their community experiences as a dental hygiene student. Barriers and facilitators need to be addressed to increase the number of programs and participants so that more children can benefit. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  19. Prescription monitoring programs and emergency department visits involving opioids, 2004–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Brandon C.; Bachhuber, Marcus A.; Mitra, Nandita; Starrels, Joanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) implementation and emergency department (ED) visits involving opioid analgesics. Methods Rates of ED visits involving opioid analgesics per 100,000 residents were estimated from the Drug Abuse Warning Network dataset for 11 geographically diverse metropolitan areas in the United States on a quarterly basis from 2004 to 2011. Generalized estimating equations assessed whether implementation of a prescriber-accessible PDMP was associated with a difference in ED visits involving opioid analgesics. Models were adjusted for calendar quarter, metropolitan area, metropolitan area-specific linear time trends, and unemployment rate. Results Rates of ED visits involving opioid analgesics increased in all metropolitan areas. PDMP implementation was not associated with a difference in ED visits involving opioid analgesics (mean difference of 0.8 visits [95% CI: −3.7 to 5.2] per 100,000 residents per quarter). Conclusions During 2004–2011, PDMP implementation was not associated with a change in opioid-related morbidity, as measured by emergency department visits involving opioid analgesics. Urgent investigation is needed to determine the optimal PDMP structure and capabilities to improve opioid analgesic safety. PMID:26454836

  20. Towards a More Meaningful Involvement of Librarians in Academic Program Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Lynne

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Using a descriptive case study approach, this paper aims to validate academic librarians' perceptions that they are marginalized by faculty during academic program reviews, and recommends ways for the two groups to collaborate more effectively to make program reviews more meaningful. Design/methodology/approach: The paper describes a case…

  1. The "Extra Boost": Parental Involvement and Decision Making in Immersion Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesely, Pamela M.; Baig, Fatima

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how parents decide to enroll their children in one-way immersion programs and how the decision is made to continue in those programs at the middle/junior high school level. A total of 131 parents responded to a survey with open-ended questions about these two decisions. Analyzed thematically and within a conceptual…

  2. Sensitizing Children to the Social and Emotional Mechanisms involved in Racism: a program evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Triliva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes and discusses the results of an intervention aiming to sensitize children to the social and emotional processes involved in racism. The intervention was applied and evaluated in 10 Greek elementary schools. The goals and the intervention methods of the program modules are briefly outlined and the results of the program evaluation are elaborated and discussed. Two-hundred students participated in the program and 180 took part in the pre-and-post-testing which assessed their ability to identify emotions associated with prejudice, discrimination and stereotypical thinking; to understand similarities and differences between people; and to develop perspective taking and empathic skills in relation to diverse others. Results indicate gains in all three areas of assessment although the increased ability to identify similarities between people can also be attributed to age/grade effects. The implications of the findings are discussed with regard to antiracism intervention methods and evaluation strategies.

  3. The California Linkages Program: Doorway to Housing Support for Child Welfare-Involved Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrade, Amy; Simon, James David; Fabella, Danna; Castillo, Lolita; Mejia, Cesar; Shuster, David

    2017-09-01

    Housing instability can complicate parents' efforts to provide for their children. Child welfare service agencies have had difficulty adequately serving parents' housing needs due to limited and constrained funding streams. This article integrates the voices of four important stakeholders to illuminate how an innovative model of service system coordination called Linkages addresses housing needs for child welfare-involved parents eligible for public assistance. Facilitated by Linkages, these parents can receive supportive housing services through programs affiliated with the California public assistance program CalWORKs. Personal narratives reflecting the diverse perspectives of stakeholders in the Linkages collaboration-the statewide program director, a child welfare services coordinator, a CalWORKs caseworker, and a parent program participant-shed light on how the collaboration assists parents in attaining case plan goals, and highlights some of the factors facilitating and hindering effective collaboration between the agencies involved. Stakeholders emphasized the value of flexible service approaches, the intensity of the efforts required, the role of advocacy, and the importance of a shared vision between agencies working together to provide housing supports. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  4. Inspiring the Next Generation of Explorers: Scientist Involvement in the Expedition Earth and Beyond Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists, science experts, graduate and even undergraduate student researchers have a unique ability to inspire the next generation of explorers. These science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experts can serve as role models for students and can help inspire them to consider future STEM-related careers. They have an exceptional ability to instill a sense of curiosity and fascination in the minds of students as they bring science to life in the classroom. Students and teachers are hungry for opportunities to interact with scientists. They feel honored when these experts take time out of their busy day to share their science, their expertise, and their stories. The key for teachers is to be cognizant of opportunities to connect their students with scientists. For scientists, the key is to know how to get involved, to have options for participation that involve different levels of commitment, and to work with educational specialists who can help facilitate their involvement. The Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program, facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center, is an Earth and planetary science education program designed to inspire, engage, and educate teachers and students by getting them actively involved with NASA exploration, discovery, and the process of science. One of the main goals of the program is to facilitate student research in the classroom. The program uses astronaut photographs, provided through the ARES Crew Earth Observations (CEO) payload on the International Space Station (ISS) as the hook to help students gain an interest in a research topic. Student investigations can focus on Earth or involve comparative planetology. Student teams are encouraged to use additional imagery and data from Earth or planetary orbital spacecraft, or ground-based data collection tools, to augment the astronaut photography dataset. A second goal of the program is to provide

  5. Inspiring the Next Generation of Explorers: Scientist Involvement in the Expedition Earth and Beyond Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Paige; Stefanov, William; Willis, Kim; Runco, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Scientists, science experts, graduate and even undergraduate student researchers have a unique ability to inspire the next generation of explorers. These science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experts can serve as role models for students and can help inspire them to consider future STEM-related careers. They have an exceptional ability to instill a sense of curiosity and fascination in the minds of students as they bring science to life in the classroom. Students and teachers are hungry for opportunities to interact with scientists. They feel honored when these experts take time out of their busy day to share their science, their expertise, and their stories. The key for teachers is to be cognizant of opportunities to connect their students with scientists. For scientists, the key is to know how to get involved, to have options for participation that involve different levels of commitment, and to work with educational specialists who can help facilitate their involvement. The Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program, facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center, is an Earth and planetary science education program designed to inspire, engage, and educate teachers and students by getting them actively involved with NASA exploration, discovery, and the process of science. One of the main goals of the program is to facilitate student research in the classroom. The program uses astronaut photographs, provided through the ARES Crew Earth Observations (CEO) payload on the International Space Station (ISS) as the hook to help students gain an interest in a research topic. Student investigations can focus on Earth or involve comparative planetology. Student teams are encouraged to use additional imagery and data from Earth or planetary orbital spacecraft, or ground-based data collection tools, to augment the astronaut photography dataset. A second goal of the program is to provide

  6. One Model for Scientist Involvement in K-12 Education: Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meese, D.; Shipp, S. S.; Porter, M.; Bruccoli, A.

    2002-12-01

    Scientists involved in the NSF-funded Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic (TEA) Program integrate a K-12 science teacher into their polar field project. Objectives of the program include: having the science teacher immersed in the experience of research; 2) through the teacher, leveraging the research experience to better inform teaching practices; and 3) sharing the experience with the broader educational and general community. The scientist - or qualified team member - stays involved with the teacher throughout the program as a mentor. Preparation of the teacher involves a week-long orientation presented by the TEA Program, and a two week pre-expedition visit at the scientist's institution. Orientation acquaints teachers with program expectations, logistical information, and an overview of polar science. While at the scientist's institution, the teacher meets the team, prepares for the field, and strengthens content knowledge. In the field, the teacher is a team member and educational liaison, responding to questions from students and colleagues by e-mail, and posting electronic journals describing the research experience. Upon return, the teachers work closely with colleagues to bring the experience of research into classrooms through creation of activities, design of longer-term student investigations, and presentations at scientific, educational, and community meetings. Interaction with the scientific team continues with a visit by the scientist to the teacher's classrooms, collaboration on presentations at scientific meetings, and consultation on classroom activities. In some cases, the teacher may participate in future expeditions. The involvement by scientists in mentor relationships, such as those of the TEA Program, is critical to improving science education. Many teachers of science have not had the opportunity to participate in field research, which offers valuable first-hand experience about the nature of science, as well as about specific

  7. A Comparison Study of Adults with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder with and without Forensic Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, P.; Lunsky, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The current study describes and compares profiles of patients in the same specialized hospital program for patients with intellectual disability with and without forensic involvement. A retrospective chart review of 78 individuals (39 forensic and 39 non-forensic) served between 2006 and 2008 was completed. The forensic sample was more likely to…

  8. [Implementation of telemedicine programs in Spain: experience of the main actors involved in the decision-making process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtani Chugani, Vinita; Martín Fernández, Roberto Luis; Soto Pedre, Enrique; Yanes López, Virginia; Serrano Aguilar, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    To identify the main benefits and risks related to the implementation of telemedicine programs in Spain, based on the experience of the actors influencing the decision-making process. We performed a qualitative study based on audiotaped semi-structured telephone interviews. Eleven interviews were carried out, and the perspective of four physicians, three administrators, two researchers and two telecommunications industry workers were included. Theoretical sampling was used and thematic inductive analysis was performed. The following factors were identified as necessary to successfully resolve problems by using telemedicine programs: the commitment of the persons involved, technological aspects, economic and institutional support, acceptance by healthcare professionals and patients, the existence of protocols adjusted to the context, the need for information and training prior to the development of telemedicine programs, a forward-looking approach, routine use and full acceptance of telemedicine programs in the organization, and the need to defend equity for professionals and users. Successfully developing a telemedicine program requires a favorable environment in which risk can be foreseen. The main key element seems to be the human factor. The factors identified in this study should be considered when developing strategies to increase the chances of success of telemedicine programs in Spain.

  9. Advantages of customer/supplier involvement in the upgrade of River Bend`s IST program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Womack, R.L.; Addison, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    At River Bend Station, IST testing had problems. Operations could not perform the test with the required repeatability; engineering could not reliably trend test data to detect degradation; licensing was heavily burdened with regulatory concerns; and maintenance could not do preventative maintenance because of poor prediction of system health status. Using Energy`s Total Quality principles, it was determined that the causes were: lack of ownership, inadequate test equipment usage, lack of adequate procedures, and lack of program maintenance. After identifying the customers and suppliers of the IST program data, Energy management put together an upgrade team to address these concerns. These customers and suppliers made up the IST upgrade team. The team`s mission was to supply River Bend with a reliable, functional, industry correct and user friendly IST program. The IST program in place went through a verification process that identified and corrected over 400 individual program discrepancies. Over 200 components were identified for improved testing methods. An IST basis document was developed. The operations department was trained on ASME Section XI testing. All IST tests have been simplified and shortened, due to heavy involvement by operations in the procedure development process. This significantly reduced testing time, resulting in lower cost, less dose and greater system availability.

  10. Studying the implementation of public programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, R.K.

    1980-02-01

    This report describes and critically assesses approaches that have been employed to study the implementation of public programs. Implementation is defined as the process by which new policies and/or practices are installed in organizations. The report was produced because of the increased interest among researchers and policy makers alike in the linkages between policy and outcome. The study of implementation has barely begun, and it was recognized that methodological issues of a particularly complex nature arise because of certain unique characteristics of the implementation processes: (1) they involve a series of decisions that occur over a long period of time, with no clear beginning or end points; (2) their outcomes have direct or indirect implications that are too complex for single-factor theories; (3) they involve a large number of participants; and (4) they involve situations that are rather unique in terms of agency context, historical moment in time, and other key elements. The approach employed in the report was to examine the methods that have been used in a number of exemplary studies of implementation. These studies are commonly cited in publications and informally in research circles. Descriptive material from each study was used to address three questions: (1) How is evidence collected in studies of implementation; (2) How is evidence analyzed; (3) What are the reasons for believing the conclusions from such studies. The report concludes with recomendations for the conduct of future studies of implementation.

  11. Involvement of Proline Oxidase (PutA) in Programmed Cell Death of Xanthomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhawan, Surbhi; Gautam, Satyendra; Sharma, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris strains have been reported to undergo programmed cell death (PCD) in a protein rich medium. Protein hydrolysates used in media such as nutrient broth comprise of casein digest with abundance of proline and glutamate. In the current study, X. campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) cells displayed PCD when grown in PCD inducing medium (PIM) containing casein tryptic digest. This PCD was also observed in PCD non-inducing carbohydrate rich medium (PNIM) fortified with either proline or proline along with glutamate. Surprisingly, no PCD was noticed in PNIM fortified with glutamate alone. Differential role of proline or glutamate in inducing PCD in Xcc cells growing in PNIM was studied. It was found that an intermediate product of this oxidation was involved in initiation of PCD. Proline oxidase also called as proline utilization A (PutA), catalyzes the two step oxidation of proline to glutamate. Interestingly, higher PutA activity was noticed in cells growing in PIM, and PCD was found to be inhibited by tetrahydro-2-furoic acid, a competitive inhibitor of this enzyme. Further, PCD was abolished in Xcc ΔputA strain generated using a pKNOCK suicide plasmid, and restored in Xcc ΔputA strain carrying functional PutA in a plasmid vector. Xanthomonas cells growing in PIM also displayed increased generation of ROS, as well as cell filamentation (a probable indication of SOS response). These filamented cells also displayed enhanced caspase-3-like activity during in situ labeling using a fluorescent tagged caspase-3 inhibitor (FITC-DEVD-FMK). The extent of PCD associated markers such as DNA damage, phosphatidylserine externalization and membrane depolarization were found to be significantly enhanced in wild type cells, but drastically reduced in Xcc ΔputA cells. These findings thus establish the role of PutA mediated proline oxidation in regulating death in stressed Xanthomonas cells. PMID:24788936

  12. Advanced general dentistry program directors' attitudes on physician involvement in pediatric oral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Ted P; Wrightson, A Stevens; Massey, Christi Sporl; Smith, Tim A; Skelton, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Childhood oral disease is a significant health problem, particularly for vulnerable populations. Since a major focus of General Dentistry Program directors is the management of vulnerable populations, we wanted to assess their attitudes regarding the inclusion of physicians in the prevention, assessment, and treatment of childhood oral disease. A survey was mailed to all General Practice Residency and Advanced Education in General Dentistry program directors (accessed through the ADA website) to gather data. Spearman's rho was used to determine correlation among variables due to nonnormal distributions. Overall, Advanced General Dentistry directors were supportive of physicians' involvement in basic aspects of oral health care for children, with the exception of applying fluoride varnish. The large majority of directors agreed with physicians' assessing children's oral health and counseling patients on the prevention of dental problems. Directors who treated larger numbers of children from vulnerable populations tended to strongly support physician assistance with early assessment and preventive counseling.

  13. Parental Involvement and Home Environment in Music: Current and Former Students from Selected Community Music Programs in Brazil and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Gail V.; DeFreitas, Aureo; Grego, John

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether individuals' perceptions of parental involvement and home environment in music vary with nationality (Brazil/United States) and time frame (past/current). Past and current students from selected community music programs in the United States and Brazil completed the PI-HEM (Parental Involvement and…

  14. Findings of an evaluation of public involvement programs associated with the development of a Land and Resource Management Plan for the Ouachita National Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holthoff, M.G. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Howell, R.E. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Federal regulations require the United States Forest Service (USFS) to integrate public input and values into decisions concerning land and resource management planning. The USFS has typically relied on traditional methods of involving the public, whereby public access and input to policy development are unilaterally controlled by the agency. Because of the highly political nature of land and resource management planning, such technocratic forms of public involvement and decision-making appear to be proving ineffective. This paper describes and evaluates two public involvement programs associated with the Ouachita National Forest`s (ONF) lengthy forest planning process. The research consisted of personal interviews with key program leaders and knowledgeable citizen participants, collection of secondary data, and a survey of citizen participants. Because of controversial planning decisions made during an initial planning process, the ONF was forced to re-enter the planning process in order to address unresolved planning issues and to conduct a more effective public involvement program. The supplemental planning process also resulted in a considerable degree of public contention. The survey revealed that although citizen participants were somewhat more satisfied with the supplemental public involvement program relative to the initial program, neither program was viewed as satisfactory. The findings of the study suggest that in order to be more effective, USFS public involvement programs should be more responsive to public concerns and conducted in adherence to principles of collaborative planning.

  15. Joint Program Study. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-27

    about non-major programs was that very little changed in the initial program office organization despite significant changes in program requirements... office organization and staffing • Key participating Service personnel responsibilities. 4.3.3 Funding Practices and Agreements Funding agreements...including management philoso- phies and structures, acquisition strategies, program office organization , the POM process, and contracting procedures. 6.2

  16. Male involvement in prevention programs of mother to child transmission of HIV: a systematic review to identify barriers and facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfaw, Frederick; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Thabane, Lehana; Rodrigues, Clarissa; Wunderlich, Ana-Paula; Nana, Philip; Kunda, John

    2013-01-16

    Many reports point to the beneficial effect of male partner involvement in programs for the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT) of HIV in curbing pediatric HIV infections. This paper summarizes the barriers and facilitators of male involvement in prevention programs of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) for studies published in English from 1998 to March 2012. We included studies conducted in a context of antenatal care or PMTCT of HIV reporting male actions that affected female uptake of PMTCT services. We did not target any specific interventions for this review. We identified 24 studies from peer-reviewed journals; 21 from sub-Saharan Africa, 2 from Asia and 1 from Europe. Barriers to male PMTCT involvement were mainly at the level of the society, the health system and the individual. The most pertinent was the societal perception of antenatal care and PMTCT as a woman's activity, and it was unacceptable for men to be involved. Health system factors such as long waiting times at the antenatal care clinic and the male unfriendliness of PMTCT services were also identified. The lack of communication within the couple, the reluctance of men to learn their HIV status, the misconception by men that their spouse's HIV status was a proxy of theirs, and the unwillingness of women to get their partners involved due to fear of domestic violence, stigmatization or divorce were among the individual factors. Actions shown to facilitate male PMTCT involvement were either health system actions or factors directly tied to the individuals. Inviting men to the hospital for voluntary counseling and HIV testing and offering of PMTCT services to men at sites other than antenatal care were key health system facilitators. Prior knowledge of HIV and prior male HIV testing facilitated their involvement. Financial dependence of women was key to facilitating spousal

  17. Involvement in Community Extension Program of Business Administration Students in one Higher Education Institution in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo-Anne May A. Rubio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Conducting community service is about relationship on building communities. It is designed for personal and social development. The researchers conduct this investigation to assess the Community Extension program of the College of Business Administration (CBA in one Private Higher Education Institution in the Philippines. The descriptive method of research utilizing the normative survey technique was employed in the study. The results of the study revealed that majority of the respondents are first year level and from Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. It also shows that there are students who are not involve in any organization of the college. This study further shows that community extension program of the college was well implemented. Students were well involved in the said activities. The students can expect benefits that will help them grow to a more productive and efficient students and member of the community. Moreover, there are also some expected problems in joining this kind of activity like funds, location and the logistics. The extension programs may continue to move on and reach out for the sustainable development of the students and community.

  18. Five case studies of multifamily weatherization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, L; Wilson, T.; Lewis, G. [Synertech Systems Corp. (United States); MacDonald, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The multifamily case studies that are the subject of this report were conducted to provide a better understanding of the approach taken by program operators in weatherizing large buildings. Because of significant variations in building construction and energy systems across the country, five states were selected based on their high level of multifamily weatherization. This report summarizes findings from case studies conducted by multifamily weatherization operations in five cities. The case studies were conducted between January and November 1994. Each of the case studies involved extensive interviews with the staff of weatherization subgrantees conducting multifamily weatherization, the inspection of 4 to 12 buildings weatherized between 1991 and 1993, and the analysis of savings and costs. The case studies focused on innovative techniques which appear to work well.

  19. Parental decision making involvement and decisional conflict: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Laura; Kryworuchko, Jennifer; Saarimaki, Anton; Lawson, Margaret L

    2017-06-13

    Decisional conflict is a state of uncertainty about the best treatment option among competing alternatives and is common among adult patients who are inadequately involved in the health decision making process. In pediatrics, research shows that many parents are insufficiently involved in decisions about their child's health. However, little is known about parents' experience of decisional conflict. We explored parents' perceived decision making involvement and its association with parents' decisional conflict. We conducted a descriptive survey study in a pediatric tertiary care hospital. Our survey was guided by validated decisional conflict screening items (i.e., the SURE test). We administered the survey to eligible parents after an ambulatory care or emergency department consultation for their child. Four hundred twenty-nine respondents were included in the analysis. Forty-eight percent of parents reported not being offered treatment options and 23% screened positive for decisional conflict. Parents who reported being offered options experienced less decisional conflict than parents who reported not being offered options (5% vs. 42%, p parents with options were more likely to: feel sure about the decision (RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02-1.15); understand the information (RR 1.92, 95% CI 1.63-2.28); be clear about the risks and benefits (RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.05-1.20); and, have sufficient support and advice to make a choice (RR 1.07, 95% CI 1.03-1.11). Many parents in our sample experienced decisional conflict after their clinical consultation. Involving parents in the decision making process might reduce their risk of decisional conflict. Evidence based interventions that support parent decision making involvement, such as shared decision making, should be evaluated and implemented in pediatrics as a strategy to reduce parents' decisional conflict.

  20. Participants needed for new study on parental involvement in treatment of children with phobias

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Virginia Tech's Child Study Center, part of the College of Science, is seeking children with phobias, and their parents, to participate in a study of the effectiveness of parental involvement in treating their children's fears. In order to be considered for the project, children must be between the ages of 7 and 12, have a specific phobia, and be able to travel to Blacksburg for the treatment program.

  1. Organization and staffing barriers to parent involvement in teen pregnancy prevention programs: challenges for community partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Janet E; Montgomery, Susanne; Lee, Jerry W

    2005-09-01

    To evaluate parent involvement in a Southern California teen pregnancy prevention community partnership project. Researchers expected to find parent and family-related participation barriers similar to those described in the family support literature, which they could address with program modifications. Three phases of qualitative evaluation occurred: key informant interviews and focus groups with youth and parents; focus groups with service providers; and key informant interviews with service providers, their supervisor, and the collaborative coordinator. Theory-based, open-ended question guides directed the interviews and focus groups, and transcriptions were coded and themed using grounded theory methods. Parents and youth sought ways to improve connections and communication with each other, and parents welcomed parenting education from the project. Unexpectedly, the major obstacles to parent participation identified in this project were largely organizational, and included the assignment of parent involvement tasks to agencies lacking capacities to work effectively with parents, inadequate administrative support for staff, and the absence of an effective system for communicating concerns and resolving conflicts among collaborative partners. Youth serving agencies may not be the best partners to implement effective parent involvement or family support interventions. Collaborative leadership must identify appropriate partners, engender their cooperation, and support their staff to further the overall goals of the collaborative.

  2. Religious Congregations’ Involvement in HIV: A Case Study Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Peter J.; Palar, Kartika; Kanouse, David E.; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Castaneda, Laura Werber; Corbin, Dennis E.; Domínguez, Blanca X.; Hawes-Dawson, Jennifer; Mata, Michael A.; Oden, Clyde W.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative case studies were used to explore religious congregations’ HIV involvement, including types and extent of activities, interaction with external organizations or individuals, and how activities were initiated and have changed over time. The cases included 14 congregations in Los Angeles County representing diverse faith traditions and races-ethnicities. Activities fell into three broad categories: (1) prevention and education; (2) care and support; and (3) awareness and advocacy. Congregations that engaged early in the epidemic focused on care and support while those that became involved later focused on prevention and education. Most congregations interacted with external organizations or individuals to conduct their HIV activities, but promoting abstinence and teaching about condoms were conducted without external involvement. Opportunities exist for congregations to help address a variety of HIV-related needs. However, activities that are mission-congruent, such as providing pastoral care for people with HIV, raising HIV awareness, and promoting HIV testing, appear easier for congregations to undertake than activities aimed at harm reduction. PMID:20953903

  3. Participatory Evaluation and Learning: A Case Example Involving Ripple Effects Mapping of a Tourism Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Rani; Templin, Elizabeth; Messer, Cynthia; Chazdon, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Engaging communities through research-based participatory evaluation and learning methods can be rewarding for both a community and Extension. A case study of a community tourism development program evaluation shows how participatory evaluation and learning can be mutually reinforcing activities. Many communities value the opportunity to reflect…

  4. From users involvement to users' needs understanding: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niès, Julie; Pelayo, Sylvia

    2010-04-01

    Companies developing and commercializing Healthcare IT applications may decide to involve the users in the software development lifecycle in order to better understand the users' needs and to optimize their products. Unfortunately direct developers-users dialogues are not sufficient to ensure a proper understanding of the users' needs. It is also necessary to involve human factors specialists to analyze the users' expression of their needs and to properly formalize the requirements for design purposes. The objective of this paper is to present a case study reporting the collaborative work between HF experts and a company developing and commercializing a CPOE. This study shows how this collaboration helps resolve the limits of direct users involvement and usual problems pertaining to users' needs description and understanding. The company participating in the study has implemented a procedure to convene regular meetings allowing direct exchanges between the development team and users' representatives. Those meetings aim at getting users' feedbacks on the existing products and at validating further developments. In parallel with usual HF methods supporting the analysis of the work system (onsite observations followed by debriefing interviews) and the usability evaluation of the application (usability inspection and usability tests), HF experts took the opportunity of the meetings organized by the company to collect, re-interpret and re-formulate the needs expressed by the users. The developers perceive the physicians' requirements concerning the display of the patient's list of medication as contradictory. In a previous meeting round the users had required a detailed view of the medication list against the synthesized existing one. Once this requirement satisfied, the users participating in the current meeting round require a synthesized view against the existing detailed one. The development team is unable to understand what they perceive as a reverse claim. Relying

  5. Influence of Involvement in the Girls on Track Program on Early Adolescent Girls' Self-Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Jennifer J.

    2007-01-01

    The Model of Competence Motivation (Harter, 1978) highlights how self-perceptions are influenced by individual and socialization factors. Using this model, the present study investigated, quantitatively with a pretest and posttest design (N = 34) and qualitatively via individual interviews (N = 8), how involvement in the Girls on Track program…

  6. Fostering Parental Involvement in Writing: Development and Testing of the Program Cultivating Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Ana; Alves, Rui A.

    2017-01-01

    Learning to read and write efficiently is of the utmost importance in elementary school. However, writing is frequently difficult and can be demotivating for beginning writers. Fortunately these barriers can be partially alleviated with parental help. Many studies showed that parental involvement influences children's competence and motivation in…

  7. Replicating MISTERS: an epidemiological criminology framework analysis of a program for criminal justice-involved minority males in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Roberto Hugh; Akers, Timothy A; Bowman, Daniel Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Men in STD Training and Empowerment Research Study (MISTERS) program and epidemiological criminology began their development in Atlanta at about the same time. MISTERS focuses on men recently released from jail to reduce both HIV/STD and crime-related risk factors through a brief educational intervention. This article examines ways in which MISTERS and epidemiological criminology have been used to inform one another in the replication of the MISTERS program in Orange County, Florida. Data from 110 MISTERS participants during the first 10 months of operation are analyzed to examine the overlapping occurrence of health and criminal risk behaviors in the men's lives. This provides a test of core hypotheses from the epidemiological criminology framework. This article also examines application of the epidemiological criminology framework to develop interventions to address health and crime risk factors simultaneously in Criminal Justice-Involved populations in the community.

  8. Patient Involvement in Safe Delivery: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfati, Forozun; Asefzadeh, Saeid; Changizi, Nasrin; Keramat, Afsaneh; Yunesian, Masud

    2015-09-28

    Patient involvement in safe delivery planning is considered important yet not widely practiced. The present study aimed at identifythe factors that affect patient involvementin safe delivery, as recommended by parturient women. This study was part of a qualitative research conducted by content analysis method and purposive sampling in 2013.The data were collected through 63 semi-structured interviews in4 hospitalsand analyzed using thematic content analysis. The participants in this research were women before discharge and after delivery. Findings were analyzed using Colaizzi's method. Four categories of factors that could affect patient involvement in safe delivery emerged from our analysis: patient-related (true and false beliefs, literacy, privacy, respect for patient), illness-related (pain, type of delivery, patient safety incidents), health care professional-relatedand task-related factors (behavior, monitoring &training), health care setting-related (financial aspects, facilities). More research is needed to explore the factors affecting the participation of mothers. It is therefore, recommended to: 1) take notice of mother education, their husbands, midwives and specialists; 2) provide pregnant women with insurance coverage from the outset of pregnancy, especially during prenatal period; 3) form a labor pain committee consisting of midwives, obstetricians, and anesthesiologists in order to identify the preferred painless labor methods based on the existing facilities and conditions, 4) carry out research on observing patients' privacy and dignity; 5) pay more attention on the factors affecting cesarean.

  9. Factors Associated with Involvement in Bullying: A Study in Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva M. Romera

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available School bullying is one of the main problems affecting the quality of peer relationships in schools and in general the coexistence. At European level, there are scientific findings that indicate its nature, characteristics and factors related to its involvement. However, in poor and developing countries, where the problem is more serious, there is a high degree of awareness on this matter. The present study aimed to identify what factors may be influencing the occurrence of bullying in a representative sample of primary schools in the Nicaraguan capital. For this propose, 3042 students from Managua and its metropolitan area were explored with instruments comparable to those used in Europe. A multinomial logistic regression analysis indicated that being a boy, to show antisocial behaviors and attitudes and contact with drugs were the three factors most related with the role of aggressor, as well as negative relationships had a significant influence on involvement in this phenomenon, either as a victim, aggressor or victimized aggressor. Results are discussed in relation to the profiles of aggressor and victim of bullying in international studies focusing on differences in developed countries.

  10. Cellular and Molecular Changes Associated with Onion Skin Formation Suggest Involvement of Programmed Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galsurker, Ortal; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Daus, Avinoam; Fridman, Yael; Lers, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2017-01-01

    Skin formation of onion (Allium cepa L.) bulb involves scale desiccation accompanied by scale senescence, resulting in cell death and tissue browning. Understanding the mechanism of skin formation is essential to improving onion skin and bulb qualities. Although onion skin plays a crucial role in postharvest onion storage and shelf life, its formation is poorly understood. We investigated the mode of cell death in the outermost scales that are destined to form the onion skin. Surprisingly, fluorescein diacetate staining and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the outer scale desiccates from the inside out. This striking observation suggests that cell death in the outer scales, during skin formation, is an internal and organized process that does not derive only from air desiccation. DNA fragmentation, a known hallmark of programmed cell death (PCD), was revealed in the outer scales and gradually decreased toward the inner scales of the bulb. Transmission electron microscopy further revealed PCD-related structural alterations in the outer scales which were absent from the inner scales. De novo transcriptome assembly for three different scales: 1st (outer), 5th (intermediate) and 8th (inner) fleshy scales identified 2,542 differentially expressed genes among them. GO enrichment for cluster analysis revealed increasing metabolic processes in the outer senescent scale related to defense response, PCD processes, carbohydrate metabolism and flavonoid biosynthesis, whereas increased metabolism and developmental growth processes were identified in the inner scales. High expression levels of PCD-related genes were identified in the outer scale compared to the inner ones, highlighting the involvement of PCD in outer-skin development. These findings suggest that a program to form the dry protective skin exists and functions only in the outer scales of onion. PMID:28119713

  11. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Security Studies Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    incoming SSP Directors. Among other notables who have called Belmont home are Vannevar Bush, Winslow Homer, Talcott Parsons , the John Birch Society...Researchers 15 Affiliates 26 Seminar Series 33 Special Events 34 Field Trip 36 Publications 41 SSP Teaching 42 Courses 48 Professional Education 50 SSP...STUDIES PROGRAM MIT SECURITY STUDIES PROGRAM SECURITY STUDIES PROGRAM 1 he Security Studies Program (SSP) is a graduate level research and educational

  12. The involvement of Spanish older people in nondegree educational programs: reasons for and barriers to participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Celdrán, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the reasons older Spanish people participate in nondegree educational programs and the barriers they may face when they want to do so. Data were drawn from the 2007 Survey on Adults' Involvement in Learning Activities (Encuesta sobre la Participación de la Población Adulta en Actividades de Aprendizaje: EADA) and correspond to a nationally representative sample of Spanish people aged between 60 and 74 years old (n=4,559). Overall, only 8.7% of the sample participated in a nondegree educational program. Predictors of participation were being a woman, being younger, having a higher educational level, and being employed. The most frequent reason given for participation was of an intrinsic nature (e.g., interest in the topic), although instrumental motives (e.g., utility of the content for daily life) were more common than suggested by previous research. As for barriers to participation, the vast majority of older people (95.6% of those who did not participate) did not even express a desire to participate. The most frequent barriers were internal (e.g., age/health restrictions). This kind of barrier was ascribed a greater importance by older and less educated groups as well as by those who participate less in cultural activities. Policies to promote older people's participation in nonformal educational activities are discussed in light of the data.

  13. Developmental Programming of Obesity and Liver Metabolism by Maternal Perinatal Nutrition Involves the Melanocortin System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Cordero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity predisposes offspring to metabolic dysfunction and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD. Melanocortin-4 receptor (Mc4r-deficient mouse models exhibit obesity during adulthood. Here, we aim to determine the influence of the Mc4r gene on the liver of mice subjected to perinatal diet-induced obesity. Female mice heterozygous for Mc4r fed an obesogenic or a control diet for 5 weeks were mated with heterozygous males, with the same diet continued throughout pregnancy and lactation, generating four offspring groups: control wild type (C_wt, control knockout (C_KO, obese wild type (Ob_wt, and obese knockout (Ob_KO. At 21 days, offspring were genotyped, weaned onto a control diet, and sacrificed at 6 months old. Offspring phenotypic characteristics, plasma biochemical profile, liver histology, and hepatic gene expression were analyzed. Mc4r_ko offspring showed higher body, liver and adipose tissue weights respect to the wild type animals. Histological examination showed mild hepatic steatosis in offspring group C_KO. The expression of hepatic genes involved in regulating inflammation, fibrosis, and immune cell infiltration were upregulated by the absence of the Mc4r gene. These results demonstrate that maternal obesogenic feeding during the perinatal period programs offspring obesity development with involvement of the Mc4r system.

  14. Identifying Barriers to Study Abroad Program Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    University administrators, industry professionals, and government leaders encourage college students to participate in study abroad programs. Despite an increase in the number of students going abroad, the percentage of students participating in global programs remain low. This study identified barriers to study abroad program participation at a…

  15. Making program evaluation activities family-centered: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Cousins, J Bradley

    2014-01-01

    This study explored ways in which program evaluation activities in pediatric rehabilitation settings can become congruent with family-centered service (FCS) philosophy. Two Canadian pediatric rehabilitation centers participated in this study, which included focus groups with staff members and interviews with parents. Participants identified seven ways in which program evaluation practices could be made congruent with FCS. Suggestions included: (a) the inclusion of a diverse group of program recipients, (b) the use of processes that facilitate family involvement, (c) the recruitment of family champions, (d) the involvement of families in program development, (e) the establishment of evaluations that are relevant to families (f) the development of center-wide statements about family involvement in evaluation and (g) the compensation of families for their active participation in evaluation. For program evaluation practices to be useful and relevant, they should be improved and made consistent with FCS philosophy. Those evaluating pediatric rehabilitation programs need to use approaches and activities that respect the needs, characteristics, cultures and diversity of the program recipients. Such actions will help to improve the quality of care provided, the nature of program evaluation activities, as well as the overall level of FCS in pediatric rehabilitation settings.

  16. Gross motor outcomes in children with hemiparesis involved in a modified constraint-induced therapy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillick, Bernadette T; Koppes, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Constraint-Induced Therapy (CIT) has been used in pediatric rehabilitation and targets upper extremity (UE) outcomes. The purpose of this study was to measure concurrent gross motor and lower extremity functional changes using the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) before and after a modified UE CIT program. The Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) was used to evaluate upper extremity outcomes. Before-after trial design of a 19-day outpatient CIT program at Seattle Children's Hospital in Seattle, WA, USA of six ambulatory children with spastic hemiparesis between the ages of 5 and 11 years with GMFCS scores of 1. GMFM Section D (Standing) and E (Walking, Running, Jumping) and AHA scores were obtained before and after a modified CIT program. Significant differences were found between pre and post-CIT AHA and GMFM section D and E scores (p children improved from baseline, yet the child with the lowest initial scores revealed the greatest improvements. Improvements in GMFM and AHA scores were noted after a modified CIT program. Such data suggests that CIT may also influence rehabilitation outcomes not only specific to the upper extremity and warrants further investigation.

  17. [THE ROLE OF MATERNAL DIET IN METABOLIC AND BEHAVIOURAL PROGRAMMING: REVIEW OF BIOLOGIC MECHANISMS INVOLVED].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Vázquez Berrios, Mariam; Arco González, Rocío; Blanco Velilla, Rosario Noemí; Decara Del Olmo, Juan; Suárez Pérez, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Gómez de Heras, Raquel

    2015-12-01

    Over the last few years, a considerable amount of studies have focused on the effect of undernutrition and overnutrition during critical periods of offspring development and their risk of developing metabolic diseases later in life. Additionally, inadequate maternal diets have been involved in the malprogramming of brain functions and some behaviours. Several mechanisms have been associated with the process of malprogramming such as epigenetics modifications, excessive oxidative stress or hypothalamic alterations. This evidence supports the idea that nutritional prevention strategies must be considered for offspring during early development stages that include the preconceptional period. Additionally, studying involved mechanisms could be particularly useful in the search of efficient therapies against malprogramming. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. Renal involvement in childhood lupus: A study from Kolkata, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Nandi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a multi-system disease of autoimmune origin. The relative incidences of the various manifestations in children with SLE are significantly different from adults and among different age-groups of children. To analyze the characteristics of childhood lupus nephritis (LN, we prospectively followed-up 23 cases of pediatric LN, diag-nosed over a period of five years, in the pediatric rheumatology clinic at the Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, India. The resultant database was analyzed using standard statistical methods. Of all childhood lupus cases treated in our clinic over the last five years (n = 42, 54.7% (n = 23 had renal involvement. This study has tried to delineate the disease trends of childhood lupus from Eastern India. Certain important trends have emerged that are different from other contemporary Indian and International observations.

  19. Study Abroad Programs: Making Safety a Priority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddan, Michael Craig; Budden, Connie B.; Juban, Rusty; Baraya, Aristides

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, students are participating in study abroad programs. Such programs provide participants a variety of learning experiences. Developing cross-cultural appreciation, communication skills, maturity and a less ethno-centric mindset are among the impacts study abroad programs offer. However, care must be taken to assure student safety and…

  20. A STUDY OF OCULAR INVOLVEMENT IN ORBITAL FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Christy Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Orbital trauma is significantly disabling and is reported to occur in multiple situations. All traumas to the face require a careful ocular examination including an estimation of the visual acuity of each eye. However, other potentially blinding complications can easily be missed unless they are actively sought. The aim of the study is to study the prevalence and types of ocular involvement in orbital wall fractures. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study is a prospective, hospital-based study of patients with orbital injuries and other associated facial bone fractures reporting to casualty and Department of Ophthalmology in Sree Balaji Medical College and Hospital over a period of two years. The study included 50 consecutive patients of orbital fractures attending our hospital. The statistical significance was analysed using chi-square test. RESULTS Out of the 50 cases, the majority of the participants were males comprising 88% (n-44 and the remaining 12% (n-6 were females. 80% of the males met with road traffic accidents and 68% of them were in the age group of 20 to 40 years. Among the females, 67% met with road traffic accidents and 33% had injury due to slip and fall. The orbital wall fractures were distributed as 52% in the single wall, 28% in two walls and 20% in more than two walls categories. The periocular findings in orbital wall fractures was distributed as 25 with Subconjunctival Haemorrhage (SCH, 16 with periorbital oedema and SCH, 14 with ecchymosis, 14 with pupil abnormality (mydriasis and RAPD, 1 with corneal perforation and 6 with lid laceration. 58% of the participants who had visual acuity between 6/6 to 6/6p had single wall fracture. Those who had visual acuity less than 6/12 had more than two walls fracture. There was extraocular movement restriction in 6 patients, which comprises 12%. CONCLUSION 78% of the orbital wall fractures were due to road traffic accidents. 68% of the persons involved were males in the age

  1. Life under tension: Computational studies of proteins involved in mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor, Marcos Manuel

    Living organisms rely on macroscopic and microscopic structures that produce and transform force: from mechanical motion of our muscles and bones to sound transduction and cell volume regulation, handling of forces is essential to life. Investigation of the microscopic machinery behind force generation and transduction in the cell has only become possible with recent advances in x-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, single-molecule force spectroscopy, and computer modeling. In this thesis, molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study proteins that transform forces into biochemical signals (mechanotransduction). The first protein studied is the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance MscS. This membrane channel has been proposed to act as a safety valve during osmotic shock, facilitating the release of ions and small solutes upon increase in membrane tension, thereby preventing bacterial cells from bursting. The second set of proteins studied are ankyrin and cadherin repeats, likely forming part of the transduction apparatus in hearing and other mechanical senses. Simulations of all these proteins went beyond the standard approach in which only equilibrium properties are monitored; we adopted and developed strategies in which external electric fields and forces are used to probe their response and function and at the same time produce verifiable predictions. The outcome of the simulations performed on MscS, in close collaborations with experimentalists, allowed us to establish conduction properties of different conformations and propose structural models of MscS's open and closed states. Simulations of ankyrin and cadherin repeats focused on their elastic properties, resulting in the discovery and prediction of ankyrin's tertiary and secondary structure elasticity (later on corroborated by atomic force microscopy experiments), and the discovery of a novel form of secondary structure elasticity mediated by calcium ions in

  2. Patient involvement in research programming and implementation: A responsive evaluation of the Dialogue Model for research agenda setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abma, Tineke A; Pittens, Carina A C M; Visse, Merel; Elberse, Janneke E; Broerse, Jacqueline E W

    2015-12-01

    The Dialogue Model for research agenda-setting, involving multiple stakeholders including patients, was developed and validated in the Netherlands. However, there is little insight into whether and how patient involvement is sustained during the programming and implementation of research agendas. To understand how the Dialogue Model can be optimised by focusing on programming and implementation, in order to stimulate the inclusion of (the perspectives of) patients in research. A responsive evaluation of the programming and implementation phases of nine agenda-setting projects that had used the Dialogue Model for agenda-setting was conducted. Fifty-four semi-structured interviews were held with different stakeholders (patients, researchers, funding agencies). Three focus groups with patients, funding agencies and researchers (16 participants) were organized to validate the findings. Patient involvement in programming and implementation of the research agendas was limited. This was partly related to poor programming and implementation, partly to pitfalls in earlier phases of the agenda-setting. Optimization of the Dialogue Model is possible by attending to the nature of the agenda and its intended use in earlier phases. Attention should also be given to the ambassadors and intended users of agenda topics. Support is needed during programming and implementation to organize patient involvement and adapt organizational structures like review procedures. In all phases the attitude to patient involvement, stakeholder participation, especially of researchers, and formal and informal relationships between parties need to be addressed to build a strong relationship with a shared goal. Patient involvement in agenda-setting is not automatically followed by patient involvement in programming and implementation. More attention should be paid, in earlier stages, to the attitude and engagement of researchers and funding agencies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Study of Systemic Risk Involved in Mutual Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Kishore C.; Dash, Monika

    Systemic risk, may be defined as the risk that contaminates to the whole system, consisting of many interacting agents that fail one after another. These agents, in an economic context, could be firms, banks, funds, or other financial institutions. Systemic risk is a macroscopic property of a system which emerges due to the nonlinear interaction of agents on a microscopic level. A stock market itself is a system in which there are many sub-systems, like Dowjones, Nifty, Sensex, Nasdaq, Nikkei and other market indices in global perspective. In Indian market, subsystems may be like Sensex, Nifty, BSE200, Bankex, smallcap index, midcap index, S&P CNX 500 and many others. Similarly there are many mutual funds, which have their own portfolio of different stocks, bonds etc. We have attempted to study the systemic risk involved in a fund as a macroscopic object with regard to its microscopic components as different stocks in its portfolio. It is observed that fund managers do manage to reduce the systemic risk just like we take precautions to control the spread of an epidemic.

  4. A Review of Problems Concerning the Granting of Transfer of Credit for Undergraduate Study Abroad Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, James S.

    This review examines the various undergraduate study abroad programs and the problems involved in evaluating the programs for the granting of transfer credits. The five major factors influencing the credit evaluation decision are enumerated, and their importance is discussed. (MML)

  5. Conflict in adolescent dating relationships: a study of factors involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparício, Graça; Lopes, Ana; Ferreira, Manuela; Duarte, João

    2014-11-01

    Dating violence is a relevant current social and public health problem, not only due to adolescents exposure to risk of physical and mental injury, but also because it's at this age that romantic relationships begin with the possibility of these patterns of interaction to be perpetuated throughout life. The aim of this study is to characterize behaviours of violence and to identify the factors of conflict in adolescent dating relationships. Transversal and correlational study, with a non-probabilistic sample of 243 mostly Portuguese adolescents, 56.0% female (mean age = 16.29 years; SD = 1.02), 71.2% living in rural areas and who attended between the 10th and 12th year at school. A socio-demographic questionnaire and on the contextual characteristics of dating was applied as well as a validated and adapted version for the Portuguese population of the Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationships Inventory. Of the adolescents, 91.7% live with their parents and the vast majority is dating or has dated. The victimization conflict behaviours superseded those of perpetration and the boys showed more conflict strategies (of the self and the other) compared to girls, while girls and older boys had demonstrated more non-abusive strategies of the self. The conflict behaviours were significant in adolescents who initiated their sexual activity earlier and non-abusive strategies when dating couples or friends talk about sex. The results justify the need to integrate the topic of dating violence in adolescent education, using active methods with effective participation of everyone involved in the process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Bibliography of Ethnic Heritage Studies Program Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Greta; And Others

    The Ethnic Heritage Studies Program was designed to teach students about the nature of their heritage and to study the contributions of the cultural heritage of other ethnic groups. This is a bibliography of materials developed by projects which received Federal Ethnic Heritage Studies Program grants during fiscal year 1974-75 and 1975-76.…

  7. An Intergenerational Summer Program Involving Persons with Dementia and Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Christina; Morris, Matt; Smock, Sara; Jarrott, Shannon E.; Graham, Bonnie

    2005-01-01

    We implemented an intergenerational (IG) summer program at a colocated site for 2 consecutive summers to maximize continuity and enhance sustainability. We incorporated multiple methods to represent the views of key program stakeholders, including staff and administrators, parents who attended the program, and facilitators reports of the…

  8. Keys to success: Ten case studies of effective weatherization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Kolb, J.O.; White, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F.; Wilson, T. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    In 1990, DOE initiated a nationwide evaluation of its Weatherization Program, with assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an advisory group of 40 weatherization professionals, program managers, and researchers. The evaluation is comprised of three impact studies covering the Program`s major market segments: Single-family homes, mobile homes, and dwellings in small (2 to 4-unit) multifamily buildings (the Single-Family Study), Single-family homes heated primarily with fuel oil (the Fuel-Oil Study), and Dwellings in buildings with five or more units (the Multifamily Study). The Single-Family Study, the subject of this report, is a critical part of this coordinated evaluation effort. Its focus on single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and dwellings in small multifamily buildings covers 83% of the income-eligible population and 96% of the dwellings weatherized during Program Year 1989. The first phase of the Single-Family Study involved the analysis of a massive data base of information collected from 368 local weatherization agencies and 543 electric and gas utilities. This analysis resulted in energy-saving and cost-effectiveness estimates for the Weatherization Program and the identification of a set of ten high-performing agencies located throughout the country. The second phase, which is the subject of this report, involves a ``process`` evaluation of these ten high performers, aimed at identifying those weatherization practices that explain their documented success.

  9. The Africanisation of Academic Development Programs: A case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Africanisation of Academic Development Programs: A case study. Phillip Higgs, RMH Moeketsi. Abstract. The question this article addresses is: what does the Africanisation of academic development programmes involve? In trying to answer this question, we shall discuss the African concepts of ubuntu and communality ...

  10. Not Just Cupcakes Anymore: A Study of Community Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Elaine

    1994-01-01

    Parent involvement can have unforeseen consequences. Article recounts complicated process of choosing a high school biology textbook in Colorado Springs district populated mainly by evangelical Christians. Although controversy arose over creationism's treatment in one text, book discussing evolution as unifying concept of biology was eventually…

  11. The C6 Program: Monitoring Climatic Changes in Canyons and Caves Involving Scientific Istitutions, Environmental NGOs and Mountain Sport Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Pietro, R.; Casamento, G.; Interlandi, M.; Madonia, P.

    2007-12-01

    The acronym "C6" means "Climatic Changes and Carbon Cycle in Canyons and Caves". The project was born in 2005, joining under the scientific supervision of the Palermo branch of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia two different programs both active since 1999; the first was due to the initiative of the Italian Canyoning Association, a no-profit association aimed to the diffusion of the canyoning sport practise in Italy, the second one, developed by the NGO Legambiente Sicilia and funded by the Regione Siciliana-Assessorato Territorio e Ambiente (Sicilian Regional Government, Territorial and Environmental Department), managing the natural reserves of Santa Ninfa, Carburangeli and Sant'Angelo Muxaro caves (Sicily), was focused to verify the existence of a possible environmental negative feedback of human fruition. In 2005 the Royal Society for the Conservation of Nature of Jordan joined the program, and a new site was established inside the Shagher Daghleh Canyon in the Wadi Dana Reserve. In October 2006 the Caver Federation of Bosnia Herzegovina joined the C6 program and another observational site was instituted into a cave close to Sarajevo. Preliminary data acquired indicate how canyons play a very important role in biodiversity preservation in arid and semi-arid environments, whereas caves are extraordinary natural laboratories for the study of carbon dioxide partition between atmosphere and lithosphere, of the effect of rain dynamic on the underground aquifer recharge and, last but not least, of the monitoring of climatic changes. The success of the initiative is based on the very different nature of the co-participants. Caver and canyoning associations guarantee the safe accessibility to difficult environments, like canyons and caves. The selection as measuring sites of natural reserves managed by NGOs, whose activity is essentially based on volunteers, ensure on one hand their environmental stability on a long term perspective, on the other hand

  12. Neuropeptide Exocytosis Involving Synaptotagmin-4 and Oxytocin in Hypothalamic Programming of Body Weight and Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo; Bai, Hua; Zhang, Hai; Dean, Camin; Wu, Qiang; Li, Juxue; Guariglia, Sara; Meng, Qingyuan; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides play essential roles in regulating energy and body weight balance. Energy imbalance and obesity have been linked to hypothalamic signaling defects in regulating neuropeptide genes; however, it is unknown whether dysregulation of neuropeptide exocytosis could be critically involved. This study discovered that synaptotagmin-4, an atypical modulator of synaptic exocytosis, is expressed most abundantly in oxytocin neurons of the hypothalamus. Synaptotagmin-4 negatively regulates oxytocin exocytosis, and dietary obesity is associated with increased vesicle binding of synaptotagmin-4 and thus enhanced negative regulation of oxytocin release. Overexpressing synaptotagmin-4 in hypothalamic oxytocin neurons and centrally antagonizing oxytocin in mice are similarly obesogenic. Synaptotagmin-4 inhibition prevents against dietary obesity by normalizing oxytocin release and energy balance under chronic nutritional excess. In conclusion, the negative regulation of synaptotagmin-4 on oxytocin release represents a hypothalamic basis of neuropeptide exocytosis in controlling obesity and related diseases. PMID:21315262

  13. Issues Primer. EEE708 Negotiated Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Leonie

    This issues primer is structured around a series of 20 contemporary concerns in the changing world of work and training in Australia in the early 1990s. It is part of the study materials for the one-semester distance education unit, Negotiated Study Program, in the Open Campus Program at Deakin University (Australia). Information on each issue is…

  14. Self-Employment Training Programs: Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Melissa, Ed.; And Others

    This self-employment training program case study booklet has been developed for general use in exploring the feasibility of this kind of development tool. The case studies describe a number of comprehensive, self-employment training and assistance programs, from the local to the national level. Chapter II includes information on the training plan,…

  15. Paralegal Studies Program. Curriculum Utilization. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Doris D.

    A program developed a paralegal studies program for Delaware County Community College in the Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) metropolitan area. Activities included gathering of information on paralegal studies as it related to curriculum content; advisory group establishment; curriculum development; training/educational material development; and…

  16. Meeting the Demand for Accountability: Case Study of a Teacher Education Program in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tak Cheung CHAN

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available To meet the demand for accountability, a teacher education program in a university located in South China has established processes at the college, the program, and the faculty levels to assure its program quality. Highlights of the processes are: involvement of stakeholders and the examination of program effectiveness. Although much has been done to help program candidates succeed, more effort is needed in the areas of program assessment and continuous improvement to assure program quality. An accountability implementation plan, a beginning teacher mentoring program, and a comparative study of beginning teacher performance were recommended to further enforce its strategies toward program accountability.

  17. A knowledge synthesis of patient and public involvement in clinical practice guidelines : study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legare, F.; Boivin, A.; Weijden, G.D.E.M. van der; Packenham, C.; Tapp, S.; Burgers, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Failure to reconcile patient preferences and values as well as social norms with clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) recommendations may hamper their implementation in clinical practice. However, little is known about patients and public involvement programs (PPIP) in CPGs

  18. Organizing the Program. The Logistics Involved in Introducing Microcomputing at Drexel University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Microcomputing Program.

    The introduction of Drexel University's microcomputing program, which provides students access to this technology for coursework, is described, with attention to the groups who played a major role in preparing the university. Faculty helped set the initial direction of the program and have been central to its operation. Other faculty roles…

  19. 26 CFR 1.861-18 - Classification of transactions involving computer programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... is permitted to distribute copies of the software to only either a related person, or to identified... rewrite elements of Program X so that it will conform to Country Z accounting standards and states that... programs, consisting of several components, including libraries of reusable software components that serve...

  20. "An arena for sharing": Exploring the joint involvement of patients and their relatives in a cancer rehabilitation intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Karen; Ledderer, Loni; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite an increasing focus on cancer rehabilitation programs, there is limited knowledge about the experiences of residential rehabilitation focusing on both the patients and their relatives. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the experienced benefits of the joint involv...... for Practice: The results can guide the development of cancer rehabilitation to involve patients and their relatives and provide opportunity for sharing and empowerment on individual as well as couple and group levels....

  1. Probabilistic Fuzzy Goal Programming Problems Involving Pareto Distribution: Some Additive Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Barik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In many real-life decision making problems, probabilistic fuzzy goal programming problems are used where some of the input parameters of the problem are considered as random variables with fuzzy aspiration levels. In the present paper, a linearly constrained probabilistic fuzzy goal programming programming problem is presented where the right hand side parameters in some constraints follows Pareto distribution with known mean and variance. Also the aspiration levels are considered as fuzzy. Further, simple, weighted, and preemptive additive approaches are discussed for probabilistic fuzzy goal programming model. These additive approaches are employed to aggregating the membership values and form crisp equivalent deterministic models. The resulting models are then solved by using standard linear mathematical programming techniques. The developed methodology and solution procedures are illustrated with a numerical example.

  2. Advanced turbocharger design study program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culy, D. G.; Heldenbrand, R. W.; Richardson, N. R.

    1984-01-01

    The advanced Turbocharger Design Study consisted of: (1) the evaluation of three advanced engine designs to determine their turbocharging requirements, and of technologies applicable to advanced turbocharger designs; (2) trade-off studies to define a turbocharger conceptual design and select the engine with the most representative requirements for turbocharging; (3) the preparation of a turbocharger conceptual design for the Curtiss Wright RC2-32 engine selected in the trade-off studies; and (4) the assessment of market impact and the preparation of a technology demonstration plan for the advanced turbocharger.

  3. Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Undergraduate International Studies and Foreign Language Program provides funds to institutions of higher education, a consortia of such institutions, or partnerships between nonprofit organizations and institutions of higher education to plan, develop, and implement programs that strengthen and improve undergraduate instruction in…

  4. Molecular studies of translocations and trisomy involving chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Dutly, F.; Schinzel, A.A. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1996-01-11

    Twenty-four cases of trisomy 13 and one case with disomy 13, but a de novo dic(13,13)(p12p12) chromosome, were examined with molecular markers to determine the origin of the extra (or rearranged) chromosome. Twenty-one of 23 informative patients were consistent with a maternal origin of the extra chromosome. Lack of a third allele at any locus in both paternal origin cases indicate a somatic duplication of the paternal chromosome occurred. Five cases had translocation trisomy. The patient with a paternal rob(13q14q) had a maternal meiotic origin of the trisomy; thus, the paternal inheritance of the translocation chromosome was purely coincidental. Since there is not a significantly increased risk for unbalanced offspring of a t(13q14q) carrier and most trisomies are maternal in origin, this result should not be surprising; however, it illustrates that one cannot infer the origin of translocation trisomy based on parental origin of the translocation. Lack of a third allele at any locus in one of the three t(13q13q) cases indicates that it was most likely an isochromosome of postmeiotic origin, whereas the other two cases showed evidence of recombination. One balanced (nontrisomic) case with a nonmosaic 45, -13, -13, +t(13;13) karyotype was also investigated and was determined to be a somatic Robertsonian translocation between the maternal and paternal homologues, as has been found for all balanced homologous Robertsonian translocations so far investigated. Thus, it is also incorrect to assume in de novo translocation cases that the two involved chromosomes are even from the same parent. Despite a maternal origin of the trisomy, we cannot therefore infer anything about the parental origin of the chromosomes 13 and 14 involved in the translocation in the de novo t(13q14q) case nor for the two t(13;13) chromosomes showing a meiotic origin of the trisomy. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. U.S. Department of Agriculture: Resolution of Discrimination Complaints Involving Farm Credit and Payment Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... These issues came to a head in 1997 when a group of African-American farmers consolidated their claims of racial discrimination in farm lending and benefit programs into one class action suit against USDA Pigford v. Glickman...

  6. Assessing parent education programs for families involved with child welfare services: evidence and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michelle; Stone, Susan; Lou, Christine; Ling, Jennifer; Claassen, Jennette; Austin, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Parent education programs may be offered or mandated at various stages of the child welfare services continuum. However, little is known regarding their efficacy in addressing the parenting problems that bring families to the attention of child welfare services. This article synthesizes outcome data generated from 58 parenting programs with families determined to be at-risk of child maltreatment and/or abusive or neglectful. It places parent education programs within the broader context of research on effective parenting as well as the leading etiological models of child maltreatment to assess the evaluations of these programs with regard to methodological rigor as well as theoretical salience. Practical and theoretical implications are presented along with recommendations for future research.

  7. Why evolutionary biologists should get seriously involved in ecological monitoring and applied biodiversity assessment programs

    OpenAIRE

    Brodersen, Jakob; Seehausen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    While ecological monitoring and biodiversity assessment programs are widely implemented and relatively well developed to survey and monitor the structure and dynamics of populations and communities in many ecosystems, quantitative assessment and monitoring of genetic and phenotypic diversity that is important to understand evolutionary dynamics is only rarely integrated. As a consequence, monitoring programs often fail to detect changes in these key components of biodiversity until after majo...

  8. Caregiver Involvement in the Education of Youth in Foster Care: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisse, Kay; Tyre, Ashli

    2013-01-01

    This study was an exploratory investigation of caregiver involvement in the education of youth in foster care. In this study, foster caregivers reported that they are involved in the education of children in their care and participate in at-home involvement activities more often than at-school involvement activities. Caregivers in this study…

  9. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: Results of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vale Claire L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs, meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Methods Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009 were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Results Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86% were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31% had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Conclusions Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development

  10. Understanding factors involved in college choice: implications for baccalaureate programs in nursing and allied health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bross, T M; Smugar, C

    1986-08-01

    Students entering their senior year ("rising" high school seniors) interested in baccalaureate programs in nursing and allied health were surveyed to determine which factors were most important in their college choice decision. Based on mean ratings, the five highest ranked factors were employment opportunities, quality of academic programs, educational opportunities after graduation, teaching reputation, and cost. However, when students were asked to list the most important factors in the final decision, financial aid, quality of academic programs, cost, and employment opportunities were mentioned most often. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that while the factors influencing college choice often differed among selected disciplines, those factors receiving the highest mean rating rarely did. More research of this kind is suggested to better understand student needs so that institutional resources may be appropriately allocated.

  11. Father involvement in infant care: two longitudinal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustia, J G; Abbott, D

    1993-12-01

    Data collected from two samples of fathers in separate longitudinal studies were compared. One sample consisted of 53 first-time fathers and the other of 69 multiple-time fathers. A post-test only time-series design was used for both studies, and both employed the same procedures and instruments. The studies examined role enactment of fathers with different child-caring experiences using role-theory concepts. Fathers' normative expectations, personal expectations, and personal learning about parenting were tested to determine if they were predictive of paternal role performance. The findings seem to indicate that the culture of fatherhood has changed more rapidly than the conduct of fatherhood.

  12. Attractions to and Challenges involved in Studying Abroad: the Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    university academic achievement grading systems between Uganda and some foreign student sending countries were identified as the main challenges facing the international students. Keywords: International students; Study abroad; Cross border ...

  13. Influenza preparedness and response: Involvement of African Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nykiconia Preacely

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available st pandemic preparedness and response exercise, five (83% of them were influenza specific. CONCLUSION: FELTPs played an important role in H1N1 surveillance and response in sub-Saharan Africa. Continued technical assistance and support to these programs is vital to foster their capacity to monitor and control public health threats.

  14. Services used by perinatal substance-users with child welfare involvement: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCann Kenneth J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance use during pregnancy often leads to involvement in the child welfare system, resulting in multiple social service systems and service providers working with families to achieve successful child welfare outcomes. The Vulnerable Infants Program of Rhode Island (VIP-RI is a care coordination program developed to work with perinatal substance-users to optimize opportunities for reunification and promote permanency for substance-exposed infants. This paper describes services used by VIP-RI participants and child welfare outcomes. Methods Data collected during the first four years of VIP-RI were used to identify characteristics of program participants, services received, and child welfare outcomes: closed child welfare cases, reunification with biological mothers and identified infant permanent placements. Descriptive Results Medical and financial services were associated with positive child welfare outcomes. Medical services included family planning, pre- and post-natal care and HIV test counseling. Financial services included assistance with obtaining entitlement benefits and receiving tangible support such as food and clothing. Conclusions Findings from this study suggest services that address basic family needs were related to positive child welfare outcomes. The provision of basic services, such as health care and financial assistance through entitlement benefits and tangible donations, may help to establish a foundation so mothers can concentrate on recovery and parenting skills. Identification of services for perinatal substance users that are associated with more successful child welfare outcomes has implications for the child welfare system, treatment providers, courts and families.

  15. Reflective processes and competencies involved in teaching practice at university: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caetano da Costa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Founded on practical rationality, this qualitative case study aimed to explore the teaching practice at university, focusing on teacher's reflections and competencies. To this end, teaching practices were described, analyzed, and interpreted. These interactions with students on a course in the pharmacy program, brought about situations involving dilemmas and learning opportunities for problem-solving and decision-making skills. Throughout the study, students were encouraged to use knowledge-in-action, reflection-in-action, and reflection-on-action, and these processes were also experienced by the teacher. Analysis of the records from classroom observation and the interviews with students and the teacher showed the fundamental role of such reflective processes, which led to attainment of the intended objectives. In this sense, the teacher's reflective practice was essential for supporting the application of each curricular component of the course.

  16. Group Involvement in Decision-Making: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genrich, Sandra J.; Banks, J. Carolyn; Bufton, Karen; Savage, Mary Ellen; Owens, Marcella Upshaw

    2001-01-01

    Health care leaders (n=27) read case studies and identified leadership styles appropriate for the scenarios. Results suggest that participating in a class on the use of the Vroom-Yetton-Jago Leadership Model may help leaders gain the skill needed to delegate decision making to groups. (Contains 16 references.) (JOW)

  17. Linguistic Skills Involved in Learning to Spell: An Australian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffern, Tessa

    2017-01-01

    Being able to accurately spell in Standard English requires efficient coordination of multiple knowledge sources. Therefore, spelling is a word-formation problem-solving process that can be difficult to learn. The present study uses Triple Word Form Theory as a conceptual framework to analyse Standard English spelling performance levels of…

  18. Promoting Relationship Building and Connection: Adapting an Evidence-Based Parenting Program for Families Involved in the Child Welfare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Heather L; Barkan, Susan E; Sherman, Emma L; Haggerty, Kevin P; Mattos, Leah M

    2012-09-01

    The high needs of youth involved in the child welfare system and the poor long-term outcomes of former foster youth represent a significant systemic challenge. As part of a process to adapt an evidence-based parenting program for a child welfare population, we conducted a series of focus groups with child welfare staff, foster caregivers, and young adults who were involved in the foster system as teens. From these focus groups we learned that, although there is a need for evidence-based parenting programs for families involved in the child welfare setting, one of the significant barriers to program implementation is the lack of meaningful connection between caregivers and youth in their care. We will provide an in-depth discussion on the proposed adaptations to make Staying Connected more relevant for foster families, including the addition of skills training to help overcome some of the barriers to connection. Staying Connected holds the promise of cultivating more supportive home environments that have the capacity to nurture youths' healthy development, including the avoidance of high-risk behaviors.

  19. NSF CAREER: Establishing at the University of New Mexico a Student Residential College/Honors Program with Extensive Faculty Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    As the educational component of my CAREER grant, I proposed integrating in an organized and widespread manner aspects of a Residential College / Honors Program into the culture of the University of New Mexico (UNM). Having such a program would provide UNM students the benefit of enhanced interactions with a variety of professors outside the classroom on a regular and personal basis. It would result not only in more visibility of professors' research and knowledge to students, but also in additional personal mentoring and encouragement. Similar programs already exist at Northwestern, Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, Yale, and Princeton Universities, to name a few. As a student, I myself experienced the benefits of a Residential College Program at Northwestern University. In the first year of my CAREER award, I volunteered and served on a campus-wide Honors College Task Force wherein we generated a report for the Provost as to whether UNM should pursue establishing an Honors College having a residential component. Through this experience, I learned that there are many other faculty across campus excited about the possibilities offered by a Residential College / Honors Program, but also about the hurdles involved in gaining momentum and campus-wide and administrative support for such an endeavor. Here, I will present what I see as the benefits of a Residential College / Honors Program at Universities, my vision for one at UNM, and the challenges encountered and lessons learned thus far.

  20. Role of logic programming in computer studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae PELIN

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains the analysis of the opinions of a number of scholars and specialists on the importance and the role in logic programming methodology of studying computer science, philosophy about the logic programs and interpreter, concerning the burden of which is opposite to the programmer if there is logic interpreter. The presented material is meant, according to the author, to help the reader to understand more easily the analyzed multilateral problem.

  1. Studying creativity training programs: A methodological analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsdóttir, Dagný; Onarheim, Balder

    2017-01-01

    published since the seminal 2004 review. Focusing on quantitative studies of creativity training programs for adults, our systematic review resulted in 22 publications. All studies were analyzed, but comparing the reported effectiveness of training across studies proved difficult due to methodological...... inconsistencies, variations in reporting of results as well as types of measures used. Thus a consensus for future studies is called for to answer the question: Which elements make one creativity training program more effective than another? This is a question of equal relevance to academia and industry......, as creativity training is a tool that can contribute to enhancement of organizational creativity and subsequently innovation. However, to answer the question, future studies of creativity training programs need to be carefully designed to contribute to a more transparent landscape. Thus this paper proposes...

  2. Why evolutionary biologists should get seriously involved in ecological monitoring and applied biodiversity assessment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, Jakob; Seehausen, Ole

    2014-11-01

    While ecological monitoring and biodiversity assessment programs are widely implemented and relatively well developed to survey and monitor the structure and dynamics of populations and communities in many ecosystems, quantitative assessment and monitoring of genetic and phenotypic diversity that is important to understand evolutionary dynamics is only rarely integrated. As a consequence, monitoring programs often fail to detect changes in these key components of biodiversity until after major loss of diversity has occurred. The extensive efforts in ecological monitoring have generated large data sets of unique value to macro-scale and long-term ecological research, but the insights gained from such data sets could be multiplied by the inclusion of evolutionary biological approaches. We argue that the lack of process-based evolutionary thinking in ecological monitoring means a significant loss of opportunity for research and conservation. Assessment of genetic and phenotypic variation within and between species needs to be fully integrated to safeguard biodiversity and the ecological and evolutionary dynamics in natural ecosystems. We illustrate our case with examples from fishes and conclude with examples of ongoing monitoring programs and provide suggestions on how to improve future quantitative diversity surveys.

  3. Prospective randomized clinical studies involving reirradiation. Lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Langendijk, Johannes A. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Groningen (Netherlands); Guckenberger, Matthias [University Hospital Zuerich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Grosu, Anca L. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Reirradiation is a potentially useful option for many patients with recurrent cancer. The purpose of this study was to review all recently published randomized trials in order to identify methodological strengths and weaknesses, comment on the results, clinical implications and open questions, and give advice for the planning of future trials. Systematic review of trials published between 2000 and 2015 (databases searched were PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science). We reviewed 9 trials, most of which addressed reirradiation of head and neck tumours. The median number of patients was 69. Trial design, primary endpoint and statistical hypotheses varied widely. The results contribute mainly to decision making for reirradiation of nasopharynx cancer and bone metastases. The trials with relatively long median follow-up confirm that serious toxicity remains a concern after high cumulative total doses. Multi-institutional collaboration is encouraged to complete sufficiently large trials. Despite a paucity of large randomized studies, reirradiation has been adopted in different clinical scenarios by many institutions. Typically, the patients have been assessed by multidisciplinary tumour boards and advanced technologies are used to create highly conformal dose distributions. (orig.) [German] Eine Rebestrahlung kann fuer viele Patienten mit rezidivierenden Malignomen eine nuetzliche Option bieten. Der Zweck dieser Studie bestand darin, alle in der juengeren Vergangenheit publizierten randomisierten Studien zu beurteilen, da deren methodische Staerken und Schwaechen, Ergebnisse und resultierende Implikationen bzw. offene Fragen die Planung kuenftiger Studien wesentlich beeinflussen koennen. Systematische Uebersicht aller zwischen 2000 und 2015 veroeffentlichten Studien (Literatursuche ueber PubMed, Scopus und Web of Science). Ausgewertet wurden 9 Studien, in die vor allem Patienten mit Kopf-Hals-Tumoren eingeschlossen waren. Im Median hatten 69 Patienten teilgenommen. Das

  4. Involving Medical Students in Informed Consent: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Costanza; Meyer, Frank; Jannasch, Olof; Arndt, Stephan; Stübs, Patrick; Bruns, Christiane J

    2015-09-01

    Studies have reported that patients often sign consent documents without understanding the content. Written paperwork, audio-visual materials, and decision aids have shown to consistently improve patients' knowledge. How informed consent should be taken is not properly taught at most universities in Germany. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated how much information about their procedure our patients retain. In particular, it should be elucidated whether an additional conversation between patients and properly prepared medical students shortly before surgery as an adjunct to informed consent can be introduced as a new teaching unit aimed to increase the understanding of surgery by patients and students. Informed consent of all patients had been previously obtained by three surgical residents 1-3 days in advance. All patients had received a copy of their consent form. The same residents developed assessment forms for thyroidectomy, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, umbilical hernia repair, and Lichtenstein procedure for inguinal hernia, respectively, containing 3-4 major common complications (e.g., bile duct injury, hepatic artery injury, stone spillage, and retained stones for laparoscopic cholecystectomy) and briefed the medical students before seeing the patients. Structured one-to-one interviews between students (n = 9) and patients (n = 55) based on four different assessment forms were performed and recorded by students. Both patients and students were asked to assess the new teaching unit using a short structured questionnaire. Although 100% of patients said at the beginning of their interview to have understood and memorized the risks of their imminent procedure, 5.8% (3/55) were not even able to indicate the correct part of the body where the incision would take place. Only 18.2% (10/55) of the patients were able to mention 2 or more complications, and 45.3% (25/55) could not even recall a single one. 96.4% (53/55) of the patients and 100% (9/9) of the

  5. Factors Involved in Vocal Fatigue: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'haeseleer, Evelien; Behlau, Mara; Bruneel, Laura; Meerschman, Iris; Luyten, Anke; Lambrecht, Stien; Cassol, Mauriceia; Corthals, Paul; Kryshtopava, Maryna; Wuyts, Floris L; Claeys, Sofie; Van Lierde, Kristiane

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the vocal characteristics of a treatment-seeking population with the primary complaint of vocal fatigue (VF). Forty-three men (mean age 42 years, range 19-69) and 145 women (mean age 34 years, range 18-68) were included. None of the subjects had received voice therapy or previous laryngeal surgery. A questionnaire, laryngeal and perceptual evaluations, aerodynamic and acoustic parameters, and the Dysphonia Severity Index (DSI) were used to determine vocal characteristics. In 74% of the subjects, flexible laryngeal videostroboscopic evaluation revealed a vocal pathology, with vocal nodules and muscle tension dysphonia as the most frequently diagnosed pathologies. Vocal abuse/misuse was present in 65% of the subjects. A median DSI value of -0.4 and -0.8 was found in female and male patients, respectively. Aerodynamic and acoustic parameters and DSI scores were significantly different from normative data. VF is a vocal sign with a significant need for medical consultation, especially in future professional voice users. Understanding the occurrence and the influencing variables of VF may help to close the gap between early stages of a vocal problem and the starting point of a well-established disorder. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Case study: an ethical dilemma involving a dying patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacsi, Alsacia L

    2008-01-01

    Nursing often deals with ethical dilemmas in the clinical arena. A case study demonstrates an ethical dilemma faced by healthcare providers who care for and treat Jehovah's Witnesses who are placed in a critical situation due to medical life-threatening situations. A 20-year-old, pregnant, Black Hispanic female presented to the Emergency Department (ED) in critical condition following a single-vehicle car accident. She exhibited signs and symptoms of internal bleeding and was advised to have a blood transfusion and emergency surgery in an attempt to save her and the fetus. She refused to accept blood or blood products and rejected the surgery as well. Her refusal was based on a fear of blood transfusion due to her belief in Bible scripture. The ethical dilemma presented is whether to respect the patient's autonomy and compromise standards of care or ignore the patient's wishes in an attempt to save her life. This paper presents the clinical case, identifies the ethical dilemma, and discusses virtue ethical theory and principles that apply to this situation.

  7. Weatherization program: a study of progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-11-01

    Progress of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) and other weatherization activities toward national energy conservation goals is reported. Low-income people are among the first to feel the pinch of rising fuel prices, particularly for home heating fuel. WAP installs insulation, storm windows and doors, and other energy efficiency improvements to reduce heat loss in the homes of low-income people, especially with the elderly and the handicapped. The weatherization activities of Federal agencies are described. The study addresses the question of the adequacy and cost of the materials used in weatherization. The series of policy and regulation change questions introduced in the agency-specific section is discussed from a broader perspective. The conclusions are summarized. The appendices present a legislative history of the Program, discuss the operational level of the Program, and describe a cost-benefit analysis of the Program.

  8. Exact solutions to robust control problems involving scalar hyperbolic conservation laws using Mixed Integer Linear Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yanning

    2013-10-01

    This article presents a new robust control framework for transportation problems in which the state is modeled by a first order scalar conservation law. Using an equivalent formulation based on a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, we pose the problem of controlling the state of the system on a network link, using boundary flow control, as a Linear Program. Unlike many previously investigated transportation control schemes, this method yields a globally optimal solution and is capable of handling shocks (i.e. discontinuities in the state of the system). We also demonstrate that the same framework can handle robust control problems, in which the uncontrollable components of the initial and boundary conditions are encoded in intervals on the right hand side of inequalities in the linear program. The lower bound of the interval which defines the smallest feasible solution set is used to solve the robust LP (or MILP if the objective function depends on boolean variables). Since this framework leverages the intrinsic properties of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation used to model the state of the system, it is extremely fast. Several examples are given to demonstrate the performance of the robust control solution and the trade-off between the robustness and the optimality. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Changes in Families' Caregiving Experiences through Involvement as Participants then Facilitators in a Family Peer-Education Program for Mental Disorders in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Masako; Yokoyama, Keiko; Nakamura, Yukako; Kobayashi, Sayaka

    2017-06-01

    A family peer-education program for mental disorders was developed in Japan, similar to existing programs in the United States and Hong Kong. Families that serve as facilitators in such programs may enhance their caregiving processes and, thereby, their well-being. This study's aim was to describe how families' caregiving experiences change, beginning with the onset of a family member's mental illness, through their involvement in a family group or peer-education program as participants then facilitators. Thus, this study was conducted in a family peer-education program for mental disorders in Japan. Group interviews were conducted with 27 facilitators from seven program sites about their experiences before, during, and after becoming facilitators. Interview data were coded and categorized into five stages of caregiving processes: (1) withdrawing and suppressing negative experiences with difficulty and regret; (2) finding comfort through being listened to about negative experiences; (3) supporting participants' sharing as facilitators; (4) understanding and affirming oneself through repeated sharing of experiences; and (5) finding value and social roles in one's experiences. The third, fourth, and fifth stages were experienced by the facilitators. The value that the facilitators placed on their caregiving experiences changed from negative to positive, which participants regarded as helpful and supportive. We conclude that serving as facilitators may improve families' caregiving processes. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  10. Drosophila caspases involved in developmentally regulated programmed cell death of peptidergic neurons during early metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyunghee; Wang, Zixing; Sehgal, Ritika; Chen, Chun-Hong; Kikuno, Keiko; Hay, Bruce; Park, Jae H

    2011-01-01

    A great number of obsolete larval neurons in the Drosophila central nervous system are eliminated by developmentally programmed cell death (PCD) during early metamorphosis. To elucidate the mechanisms of neuronal PCD occurring during this period, we undertook genetic dissection of seven currently known Drosophila caspases in the PCD of a group of interneurons (vCrz) that produce corazonin (Crz) neuropeptide in the ventral nerve cord. The molecular death program in the vCrz neurons initiates within 1 hour after pupariation, as demonstrated by the cytological signs of cell death and caspase activation. PCD was significantly suppressed in dronc-null mutants, but not in null mutants of either dredd or strica. A double mutation lacking both dronc and strica impaired PCD phenotype more severely than did a dronc mutation alone, but comparably to a triple dredd/strica/dronc mutation, indicating that dronc is a main initiator caspase, while strica plays a minor role that overlaps with dronc's. As for effector caspases, vCrz PCD requires both ice and dcp-1 functions, as they work cooperatively for a timely removal of the vCrz neurons. Interestingly, the activation of the Ice and Dcp-1 is not solely dependent on Dronc and Strica, implying an alternative pathway to activate the effectors. Two remaining effector caspase genes, decay and damm, found no apparent functions in the neuronal PCD, at least during early metamorphosis. Overall, our work revealed that vCrz PCD utilizes dronc, strica, dcp-1, and ice wherein the activation of Ice and Dcp-1 requires a novel pathway in addition to the initiator caspases.

  11. Program Evaluation of a Distance Master's Degree Dental Hygiene Program: A Program Effectiveness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensabaugh, Cynthia F; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando; Overman, Pamela R; Van Ness, Christopher J; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a program evaluation of the University of Missouri-Kansas City Master of Science in Dental Hygiene Education Program (MSDH). This evaluation examined long-term outcomes in the context of stakeholders (the profession, the student, and the degree-granting institution).Methods: A mixed-methods approach was used to gather data from the 28 graduates from the MSDH program. An electronic questionnaire included both open- and closed-ended questions including demographic and practice data, and data related to alumni preparedness to reach their career goals. Virtual focus groups provided valuable insight into whether the program has achieved its goals, and prepared the graduates to meet their program competencies and future goals.Results: Out of a total of 28 individuals who have successfully completed the distance program (2001-2011), 19 participated in an online survey (67.8%). The majority of the participants (73.7%) participated in one of 3 focus groups. Sixty-three percent of the graduates are currently employed in dental hygiene education. Eighty-four percent of the respondents have published their research conducted while in the program, thereby contributing to the dental hygiene body of knowledge. Sixty-eight percent indicated that had the distance option not existed, they would not have been able to obtain their advanced degree in dental hygiene. Twenty-one percent of the respondents report either being currently enrolled in a doctoral program, or having completed a doctoral degree.Conclusion: These results suggest that the University of Missouri-Kansas City Master of Science in Dental Hygiene Education Program is meeting its goals from the perspective of all stakeholders and providing its graduates with access to education and educational resources to meet the program competencies and ultimately achieve their career goals. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  12. An assessment of opportunities and challenges for public sector involvement in the maternal health voucher program in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okal, Jerry; Kanya, Lucy; Obare, Francis; Njuki, Rebecca; Abuya, Timothy; Bange, Teresah; Warren, Charlotte; Askew, Ian; Bellows, Ben

    2013-10-18

    Continued inequities in coverage, low quality of care, and high out-of-pocket expenses for health services threaten attainment of Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in many sub-Saharan African countries. Existing health systems largely rely on input-based supply mechanisms that have a poor track record meeting the reproductive health needs of low-income and underserved segments of national populations. As a result, there is increased interest in and experimentation with results-based mechanisms like supply-side performance incentives to providers and demand-side vouchers that place purchasing power in the hands of low-income consumers to improve uptake of facility services and reduce the burden of out-of-pocket expenditures. This paper describes a reproductive health voucher program that contracts private facilities in Uganda and explores the policy and implementation issues associated with expansion of the program to include public sector facilities. Data presented here describes the results of interviews of six district health officers and four health facility managers purposefully selected from seven districts with the voucher program in southwestern Uganda. Interviews were transcribed and organized thematically, barriers to seeking RH care were identified, and how to address the barriers in a context where voucher coverage is incomplete as well as opportunities and challenges for expanding the program by involving public sector facilities were investigated. The findings show that access to sexual and reproductive health services in southwestern Uganda is constrained by both facility and individual level factors which can be addressed by inclusion of the public facilities in the program. This will widen the geographical reach of facilities for potential clients, effectively addressing distance related barriers to access of health care services. Further, intensifying ongoing health education, continuous monitoring and evaluation, and integrating the voucher

  13. ANALISIS KESIAPAN PROGRAM STUDI DALAM PRODUCTION BASED EDUCATION: STUDI PADA PROGRAM STUDI D3 AKUNTANSI POLINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Noor Ardiansah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been no clear studies to identify, verify and analyze readiness program resources in order to study the implementation of PBE resulted in initial position (existing point is not clear that the priority programs and activities that are carried out per year tend to be responsive and not directed priorities. These conditions resulted in analysis of resource readiness courses in the management of production-based learning pattern PBE draw conducted This study aims to identify and verify and analyze readiness resources management courses in the pattern of production based learning, particularly in the Accounting Studies Program. This research is expected to be used to increase the effectiveness of learning and vocational education to improve the quality and relevance of polytechnic graduates. Total score was 33 the existence of resources from the scale of 12-60. The average score is 2.75. The average score was shown the position of Prodi's resources have been used, but its role is unclear (repeatable tend to have clearly defined functions, communicated and documented (defined. Resources have been managed, monitored and evaluated well (managed are: curriculum resources, networking courses, lab facilities, ISO-based management. Resources have been used but not optimal role: resources module practice, the formulation of an internship, practice material / TA, the performance of IC-based lecturer

  14. ANALISIS KESIAPAN PROGRAM STUDI DALAM PRODUCTION BASED EDUCATION: STUDI PADA PROGRAM STUDI D3 AKUNTANSI POLINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Noor Ardiansah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been no clear studies to identify, verify and analyze readiness program resources in order to study the implementation of PBE resulted in initial position (existing point is not clear that the priority programs and activities that are carried out per year tend to be responsive and not directed priorities. These conditions resulted in analysis of resource readiness courses in the management of production-based learning pattern PBE draw conducted This study aims to identify and verify and analyze readiness resources management courses in the pattern of production based learning, particularly in the Accounting Studies Program. This research is expected to be used to increase the effectiveness of learning and vocational education to improve the quality and relevance of polytechnic graduates. Total score was 33 the existence of resources from the scale of 12-60. The average score is 2.75. The average score was shown the position of Prodi's resources have been used, but its role is unclear (repeatable tend to have clearly defined functions, communicated and documented (defined. Resources have been managed, monitored and evaluated well (managed are: curriculum resources, networking courses, lab facilities, ISO-based management. Resources have been used but not optimal role: resources module practice, the formulation of an internship, practice material / TA, the performance of IC-based lecturer

  15. Focus on Youth. National Symposium to Decreasee Violence: Youth Involvement and Juvenile Justice Programs (2nd, Reno, Nevada, January 9-12, 1983).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Adele, Ed.; And Others

    This monograph presents summaries of the presentations and of the outstanding youth involvement programs which were described at the National Symposium to Decrease Violence, which was held to recognize the importance of youths' involvement in the solution of their own problems. These summaries, from program directors, educators, and youths, deal…

  16. Filamentation Involves Two Overlapping, but Distinct, Programs of Filamentation in the Pathogenic Fungus Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadmanesh, Jahaun; Gowen, Austin M; Creger, Paul E; Schafer, Nichole D; Blankenship, Jill R

    2017-11-06

    The ability of the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans to switch between yeast-like and filamentous forms of growth has long been linked to pathogenesis. Numerous environmental conditions, including growth at high temperatures, nutrient limitation, and exposure to serum, can trigger this morphological switch and are frequently used in in vitro models to identify genes with roles in filamentation. Previous work has suggested that differences exist between the various in vitro models both in the genetic requirements for filamentation and transcriptional responses to distinct filamentation-inducing media, but these differences had not been analyzed in detail. We compared 10 in vitro models for filamentation and found broad genetic and transcriptomic differences between model systems. The comparative analysis enabled the discovery of novel media-independent genetic requirements for filamentation as well as a core filamentation transcriptional profile. Our data also suggest that the physical environment drives distinct programs of filamentation in C. albicans, which has significant implications for filamentation in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Azadmanesh et al.

  17. Filamentation Involves Two Overlapping, but Distinct, Programs of Filamentation in the Pathogenic Fungus Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahaun Azadmanesh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans to switch between yeast-like and filamentous forms of growth has long been linked to pathogenesis. Numerous environmental conditions, including growth at high temperatures, nutrient limitation, and exposure to serum, can trigger this morphological switch and are frequently used in in vitro models to identify genes with roles in filamentation. Previous work has suggested that differences exist between the various in vitro models both in the genetic requirements for filamentation and transcriptional responses to distinct filamentation-inducing media, but these differences had not been analyzed in detail. We compared 10 in vitro models for filamentation and found broad genetic and transcriptomic differences between model systems. The comparative analysis enabled the discovery of novel media-independent genetic requirements for filamentation as well as a core filamentation transcriptional profile. Our data also suggest that the physical environment drives distinct programs of filamentation in C. albicans, which has significant implications for filamentation in vivo.

  18. Genomic and epigenomic responses to chronic stress involve miRNA-mediated programming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Babenko

    Full Text Available Stress represents a critical influence on motor system function and has been shown to impair movement performance. We hypothesized that stress-induced motor impairments are due to brain-specific changes in miRNA and protein-encoding gene expression. Here we show a causal link between stress-induced motor impairment and associated genetic and epigenetic responses in relevant central motor areas in a rat model. Exposure to two weeks of mild restraint stress altered the expression of 39 genes and nine miRNAs in the cerebellum. In line with persistent behavioural impairments, some changes in gene and miRNA expression were resistant to recovery from stress. Interestingly, stress up-regulated the expression of Adipoq and prolactin receptor mRNAs in the cerebellum. Stress also altered the expression of Prlr, miR-186, and miR-709 in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. In addition, our findings demonstrate that miR-186 targets the gene Eps15. Furthermore, we found an age-dependent increase in EphrinB3 and GabaA4 receptors. These data show that even mild stress results in substantial genomic and epigenomic changes involving miRNA expression and associated gene targets in the motor system. These findings suggest a central role of miRNA-regulated gene expression in the stress response and in associated neurological function.

  19. Does parental involvement make a difference? The impact of parent interactive activities on students in a school-based AIDS prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, K; Levy, S R; Gordon, A K; Handler, A; Perhats, C; Flay, B R

    1997-02-01

    In this study, we test the effectiveness of involving parents in school-based AIDS education with respect to altering AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, behavioral intentions, communications patterns, and behavior of students. Fifteen high risk school districts (pre-test N = 2,392) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: parent-interactive (classroom curricula + parent-interactive component); parent non-interactive (classroom curricula only); control (basic AIDS education ordinarily provided by the school). Students were tested over time in grades 7, 8 and 9. Results indicate that both treatment conditions (parent-interactive and non-interactive) had a strong positive impact in enhancing student's knowledge, attitudes, communication patterns and behavioral intentions. Further, results indicate that there were no behavioral outcome differences between the treatment groups and the control condition. Results demonstrate few outcome differences between the two experimental conditions. In the two treatment groups (parent-interactive and parent non-interactive), the program effects appear to be the result of school-based curricula and of student self-determined intentions and behaviors, rather than the presence or absence of planned parental involvement. Whether or not structured or planned parental involvement becomes part of a school-based educational activity should perhaps be determined by (a) the existing level of parent-school interaction based on the nature of the community, (b) the amount of money readily available to follow through on a program of parent involvement without compromising on student programs, (c) the age of the child and the sensitivity of the issue, and (d) the ability of the parent/family to be involved effectively without extraordinary expense or sacrifice by either parent or school. Our findings speak to the positive role of the school regardless of parent participation.

  20. Do Youth Learn Life Skills through Their Involvement in High School Sport? A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Nicholas L.; Tink, Lisa N.; Mandigo, James L.; Fox, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examined whether and how youth learned life skills through their involvement on a high school soccer team. We collected data from fieldwork and interviews with 12 male student-athletes and the head coach from one team. Results showed that the coach's philosophy involved building relationships and involving student-athletes in…

  1. The Management of Parental Involvement in Multicultural Schools in South Africa: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Sathiapama; Wolhuter, Charl C.; van Wyk, Noleen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the management of parental involvement in three multicultural schools in the Umlazi District in Durban, South Africa. A literature survey resulting in a theoretical framework on parental involvement in schools, multicultural schools, and the managing of parental involvement in schools has been done. The…

  2. A Multidimensional Study of School-Family-Community Partnership Involvement: School, School Counselor, and Training Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Julia A.; Griffin, Dana

    2010-01-01

    A multidimensional study examines both the dimensions of school counselors' involvement in school-family-community partnerships and the factors related to their involvement in partnerships. The School Counselor Involvement in Partnerships Survey was revised and its factor structure examined. Principal factor analyses revealed three dimensions of…

  3. Outcomes of group-based treatment program with parental involvement for the management of childhood and adolescent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiprabhob, Jeerunda; Leewanun, Chanin; Limprayoon, Kawewan; Kiattisakthavee, Pornpimol; Wongarn, Renu; Aanpreung, Prapun; Likitmaskul, Supawadee

    2014-10-01

    An uncontrolled study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a group-based program on weight control, metabolic profiles, and obesity-related complications in obese youth. The program consisted of an initial in-patient session and five group sessions, one, two, three, six, and nine months into the study, providing participants and their parents with information about the consequences of obesity and lifestyle modifications. The severity of obesity and obesity-related complications were evaluated at baseline and 12 months after the intervention. The participants' and their parents' perceptions of the program were assessed. Of the obese youth recruited (n=126), 115 completed the study. Their percentage weight for height and percentage body fat decreased significantly (both pparents perceived the program as valuable. A group-based program is effective in managing childhood obesity, improving metabolic profiles, and alleviating certain obesity-related complications. A group-based program that provides education and raises the awareness of obese children and their parents about the consequences of obesity is an effective model for treating childhood obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gender Differences in Context: The Impact of Track Position on Study Involvement in Flemish Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtte, Mieke

    2017-01-01

    This study examines whether the influence of track position on study involvement is gendered and whether gender differences in study involvement according to track position are associated with school misconduct and rather poor future perspectives. Three-level analyses (HLM 6) of data gathered in 2004-2005 from 11,872 third- and fifth-grade…

  5. Assisted reproduction involving gestational surrogacy: an analysis of the medical, psychosocial and legal issues: experience from a large surrogacy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Shir; Lazer, Tal; Swanson, Sonja; Silverman, Jan; Wasser, Cindy; Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Sojecki, Agata; Librach, Clifford L

    2015-02-01

    What are the medical, psychosocial and legal aspects of gestational surrogacy (GS), including pregnancy outcomes and complications, in a large series? Meticulous multidisciplinary teamwork, involving medical, legal and psychosocial input for both the intended parent(s) (IP) and the gestational carrier (GC), is critical to achieve a successful GS program. Small case series have described pregnancy rates of 17-50% for GS. There are no large case series and the medical, legal and psychological aspects of GS have not been addressed in most of these studies. To our knowledge, this is the largest reported GS case series. A retrospective cohort study was performed. Data were collected from 333 consecutive GC cycles between 1998 and 2012. There were 178 pregnancies achieved out of 333 stimulation cycles, including fresh and frozen transfers. The indications for a GC were divided into two groups. Those who have 'failed to carry', included women with recurrent implantation failure (RIF), recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) and previous poor pregnancy outcome (n = 96; 132 cycles, pregnancy rate 50.0%). The second group consisted of those who 'cannot carry' including those with severe Asherman's syndrome, uterine malformations/uterine agenesis and maternal medical diseases (n = 108, 139 cycles, pregnancy rate 54.0%). A third group, of same-sex male couples and single men, were analyzed separately (n = 52, 62 cycles, pregnancy rate 59.7%). In 49.2% of cycles, autologous oocytes were used and 50.8% of cycles involved donor oocytes. The 'failed to carry' group consisted of 96 patients who underwent 132 cycles at a mean age of 40.3 years. There were 66 pregnancies (50.0%) with 17 miscarriages (25.8%) and 46 confirmed births (34.8%). The 'cannot carry pregnancy' group consisted of 108 patients who underwent 139 cycles at a mean age of 35.9 years. There were 75 pregnancies (54.0%) with 15 miscarriages (20.0%) and 56 confirmed births (40.3%). The pregnancy, miscarriage and live birth

  6. Factors Associated with Male Partner Involvement in Programs for the Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV in Rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motlagabo G. Matseke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Male partner involvement (MPI can contribute to the success of programs aimed at preventing mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT of HIV. However, the definition and measures of MPI differ according to context. This study utilized secondary cross-sectional data to investigate the prevalence and determinants of MPI among 463 male partners of HIV-infected pregnant women in rural South Africa. Results indicated that 44.1% of male partners reported involvement in most or all specified male partner involvement activities (i.e., scores of 7 to 9. Descriptive, correlation and multiple linear-regression analyses were conducted. Positive predictors of MPI included relationship status, own HIV status, awareness of female partner’s positive HIV status, female partner’s desire to have more children, having family planning discussions with provider, condom use to prevent HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs, and partner reasoning skills. Negative predictors included partner verbal aggression. Overall, although MPI is low, the study underlines important information that could be used to develop interventions aimed at improving maternal and infant health in PMTCT programs in South Africa.

  7. Factors Associated with Male Partner Involvement in Programs for the Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV in Rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matseke, Motlagabo G; Ruiter, Robert A C; Rodriguez, Violeta J; Peltzer, Karl; Setswe, Geoffrey; Sifunda, Sibusiso

    2017-11-01

    Male partner involvement (MPI) can contribute to the success of programs aimed at preventing mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV. However, the definition and measures of MPI differ according to context. This study utilized secondary cross-sectional data to investigate the prevalence and determinants of MPI among 463 male partners of HIV-infected pregnant women in rural South Africa. Results indicated that 44.1% of male partners reported involvement in most or all specified male partner involvement activities (i.e., scores of 7 to 9). Descriptive, correlation and multiple linear-regression analyses were conducted. Positive predictors of MPI included relationship status, own HIV status, awareness of female partner's positive HIV status, female partner's desire to have more children, having family planning discussions with provider, condom use to prevent HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and partner reasoning skills. Negative predictors included partner verbal aggression. Overall, although MPI is low, the study underlines important information that could be used to develop interventions aimed at improving maternal and infant health in PMTCT programs in South Africa.

  8. The Impact of Early Involvement in a Postdischarge Support Program for Ostomy Surgery Patients on Preventable Healthcare Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanasarot, Sirikan

    2017-11-20

    To evaluate the impact of a postdischarge ostomy support program as an adjunct to nurse-led ostomy care on preventable healthcare utilization. A cross-sectional study. A postdischarge support program offered by an ostomy product's manufacturer provides persons living with an ostomy with patient-centered and easily accessible assistance. Individuals who underwent ostomy surgery within 18 months prior to the survey date were selected from an ostomy patient database maintained by the ostomy patient support program provider. Of 7026 surveys sent to program enrollees, 493 (7%) responded, compared with 225 (5%) out of 4149 surveys sent to individuals in a comparison group. The 2 groups were similar in demographics. A majority of the survey respondents were female (60% of program enrollees vs 55% of respondents in the comparison group). Among the program enrollees, 44% had colostomy, 43% had ileostomy, 10% had urostomy, and 4% had at least 2 types of ostomy surgery compared with 52%, 32%, 12%, and 4% of the respondents in a comparison group, respectively. The study compared hospital readmission and emergency room (ER) visit rates attributable to ostomy complications between program enrollees and respondents in the comparison group. The event rates were measured in 2 study periods: within the first month of discharge and after the first month of discharge. Eligible individuals received an online survey that included the following domains: characteristics of ostomy surgery; readmissions and ER visits within the first month or after the first month of discharge, including reasons for preventable events; and level of health care access. Multivariate logistic regressions controlling for covariates were applied to investigate associations between program enrollment and ostomy-related readmission or ER visit rates. Logistic regression analyses showed that, when compared with respondents in the comparison group, program enrollees had a significantly lower likelihood of being

  9. A Study On English Reading Habits Of Students Of English Study Program Of Riau University

    OpenAIRE

    Al Nazhari, Hafiz; Delfi, Syofia; ', Syafri K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the habits of English reading among the students of English Study Program of Riau University. The method used in this research is quantitative research and the design is survey study. A questionnaire was used as the instrument of this research. The questionnaire involved seven indicators of reading habits: attitudes toward reading, reading frequency, reading materials read, time spend on academic reading, time spend on non-academic reading, motivation in t...

  10. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang [Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Yuanzhen [Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Center for Reproductive Medicine, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Feng, Jianghua, E-mail: jianghua.feng@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Science, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg · d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose–effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time–course study were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine exposure elevated maternal blood glucocorticoid levels. • Prenatal caffeine exposure altered maternal blood metabonomes. • Maternal

  11. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Implementation of an interprofessional team-based learning program involving seven undergraduate health and social care programs from two universities, and students' evaluation of their readiness for interprofessional learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap Ki; Ganotice, Fraide; Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Lau, Chak Sing; Bridges, Susan M; Chan, Celia Hoi Yan; Chan, Namkiu; Chan, Phoebe Wing Lam; Chen, Hai Yong; Chen, Julie Yun; Chu, Jody Kwok Pui; Ho, Charlene C; Ho, Jacqueline Mei Chi; Lam, Tai Pong; Lam, Veronica Suk Fun; Li, Qingyun; Shen, Jian Gang; Tanner, Julian Alexander; Tso, Winnie Wan Yee; Wong, Arkers Kwan Ching; Wong, Gordon Tin Chun; Wong, Janet Yuen Ha; Wong, Nai Sum; Worsley, Alan; Yu, Lei King; Yum, Tin Pui

    2017-11-21

    Interprofessional learning is gaining momentum in revolutionizing healthcare education. During the academic year 2015/16, seven undergraduate-entry health and social care programs from two universities in Hong Kong took part in an interprofessional education program. Based on considerations such as the large number of students involved and the need to incorporate adult learning principles, team-based learning was adopted as the pedagogy for the program, which was therefore called the interprofessional team-based learning program (IPTBL). The authors describe the development and implementation of the IPTBL program and evaluate the effectiveness of the program implementation. Eight hundred and one students, who are predominantly Chinese, participated in the IPTBL. The quantitative design (a pretest-posttest experimental design) was utilized to examine the students' gains on their readiness to engage in interprofessional education (IPE). Three instructional units (IUs) were implemented, each around a clinical area which could engage students from complementary health and social care disciplines. Each IU followed a team-based learning (TBL) process: pre-class study, individual readiness assurance test, team readiness assurance test, appeal, feedback, and application exercise. An electronic platform was developed and was progressively introduced in the three IUs. The students' self-perceived attainment of the IPE learning outcomes was high. Across all four subscales of RIPLS, there was significant improvement in student's readiness to engage in interprofessional learning after the IPTBL. A number of challenges were identified: significant time involvement of the teachers, difficulty in matching students from different programs, difficulty in making IPTBL count towards a summative assessment score, difficulty in developing the LAMS platform, logistics difficulty in managing paper TBL, and inappropriateness of the venue. Despite some challenges in developing and

  13. Implementation of an interprofessional team-based learning program involving seven undergraduate health and social care programs from two universities, and students’ evaluation of their readiness for interprofessional learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lap Ki Chan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interprofessional learning is gaining momentum in revolutionizing healthcare education. During the academic year 2015/16, seven undergraduate-entry health and social care programs from two universities in Hong Kong took part in an interprofessional education program. Based on considerations such as the large number of students involved and the need to incorporate adult learning principles, team-based learning was adopted as the pedagogy for the program, which was therefore called the interprofessional team-based learning program (IPTBL. The authors describe the development and implementation of the IPTBL program and evaluate the effectiveness of the program implementation. Methods Eight hundred and one students, who are predominantly Chinese, participated in the IPTBL. The quantitative design (a pretest-posttest experimental design was utilized to examine the students’ gains on their readiness to engage in interprofessional education (IPE. Results Three instructional units (IUs were implemented, each around a clinical area which could engage students from complementary health and social care disciplines. Each IU followed a team-based learning (TBL process: pre-class study, individual readiness assurance test, team readiness assurance test, appeal, feedback, and application exercise. An electronic platform was developed and was progressively introduced in the three IUs. The students’ self-perceived attainment of the IPE learning outcomes was high. Across all four subscales of RIPLS, there was significant improvement in student’s readiness to engage in interprofessional learning after the IPTBL. A number of challenges were identified: significant time involvement of the teachers, difficulty in matching students from different programs, difficulty in making IPTBL count towards a summative assessment score, difficulty in developing the LAMS platform, logistics difficulty in managing paper TBL, and inappropriateness of the

  14. HOUSEHOLD PARTICIPATION IN RECYCLING PROGRAMS: A CASE STUDY FROM MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azilah M Akil

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The increase in per capita income and rapid urbanization, have contributed significantly to changes in consumption behaviour leading to increased waste generation.  Waste disposed to landfill sites is fast becoming unfeasible thus requiring a more effective management of waste material involving waste reduction, reuse and recycling. The success of recycling program, however, is largely dependent on household participation activities which are essentially behaviour driven. The recycling performance of Malaysian households is still low as it stands at 5.5% compared to Singapore and Vietnam which are 56% and 22% respectively. This study examines recycling behaviour among households and the influence of socioeconomic, demographic and behavioural characteristics on households’ participation in recycling program in Malaysia.  A sample of 300 randomly selected household were surveyed.  The findings revealed that most of the households (70% claim that they are practicing recycling particularly types of paper and old clothes. The factors of participation in recycling show equal results both for environmental concerns and economic benefits. Those who did not participate in recycling, listed household issues or behaviour, namely lack of time and materials to recycle, inconvenient, lack of space, lack of facilities and information as well as laziness, as barriers. The paper finally highlights the factors which can encourage household to be involved in recycling and give recommendations to the authorities in terms of facilities and infrastructures to facilitate the program.

  15. A national study of male involvement among families in contact with the child welfare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Jennifer L

    2009-08-01

    Few studies inform the frequency and type of adult male involvement in families in contact with child welfare, and even fewer explore how male involvement relates to child welfare outcomes. This study employed data from a sample of 3,978 families in contact with the U.S. child welfare system, drawn from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being. The nature of male involvement in these families and its relationship to (a) caseworkers' perception of children's risk for maltreatment rereport and (b) entry into out-of-home care were explored. Results indicate that most caregivers report male involvement, distinct types of male involvement are related to the likelihood of out-of-home care, and households that include nonparental adult males are perceived by caseworkers as relatively risky. No male involvement indicator tested, however, was related to maltreatment rereport. Implications include the need to appropriately assess, include, and engage adult male family members across diverse family systems.

  16. Comprehensive study report Devon Beaufort Sea exploration drilling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-08-01

    The potential biophysical and socio-economic effects of the proposed Beaufort Sea Exploration Drilling Program were summarized in this comprehensive study report. The project, proposed by Devon Canada Corporation, involves exploration drilling in the southern Beaufort Sea, north of the Mackenzie River Delta to evaluate hydrocarbon reserves. In addition to the regulatory context of the project, this paper described the project and its setting, and the public engagement and consultation process. Impact assessment methodology was also outlined along with the baseline conditions and mitigation measures for air quality, noise, ice, geology, coastal processes, chemical oceanography, plankton, benthos, fish and fish habitat, birds, marine mammals, and socio economic conditions. The paper also addressed issues such as land use, heritage resources and resource use. The effects of the environment on the program were also outlined along with the impact of accidents such as spill incidences. 63 tabs., 22 figs.

  17. Collaborative Learning Processes in the Context of a Public Health Professional Development Program: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Chiocchio, François; Beaudet, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    The health promotion laboratory (HPL-Canada) is a public health professional development program building on a collaborative learning approach in order to support long-term practice change in local health services teams. This study aims to analyse the collaborative learning processes of two teams involved in the program during the first year of…

  18. Feeling Our Way: Emotions and the Politics of Global Citizenship in Study Abroad Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, Nicole; Waddell, Charlene

    2017-01-01

    The terms "solidarity" and "ethical travel" were used to frame a one-week study abroad program to Guatemala. The students involved came from a Canadian university and were primed through pretrip meetings and program materials to expect their trip to produce good feelings of connection and support. However, many of the students…

  19. A Supplement to Understanding Evaluation: The Way to Better Prevention Programs. A College Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Bryn

    This case study was developed as a supplement to the U. S. Department of Education publication Understanding Evaluation: The Way to Better Prevention Programs. Its purpose is to help readers get a feel for what is involved in setting up an evaluation of a college alcohol and other drug (AOD) prevention program. Although Understanding Evaluation…

  20. Communication Barriers: A Study of Eastern Mediterranean University Students' and Teachers' of Online Program and Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Altinay, Fahriye

    2005-01-01

    This research study defines communication barriers in online programs and courses by determining the perceptions of students and teachers at Eastern Mediterranean University. It aims to get the answers to the questions of what sorts of problems students and teachers face while being involved in online courses and online programs. Distance…

  1. 34 CFR 477.1 - What is the State Program Analysis Assistance and Policy Studies Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the State Program Analysis Assistance and Policy Studies Program? 477.1 Section 477.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE PROGRAM ANALYSIS ASSISTANCE AND POLICY STUDIES PROGRAM...

  2. 34 CFR 668.39 - Study abroad programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Study abroad programs. 668.39 Section 668.39 Education..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Student Eligibility § 668.39 Study abroad programs. A student enrolled in a program of study abroad is eligible to receive title IV, HEA program...

  3. Applying the Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) approach to a large pragmatic study involving safety net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coury, Jennifer; Schneider, Jennifer L; Rivelli, Jennifer S; Petrik, Amanda F; Seibel, Evelyn; D'Agostini, Brieshon; Taplin, Stephen H; Green, Beverly B; Coronado, Gloria D

    2017-06-19

    The Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycle is a commonly used improvement process in health care settings, although its documented use in pragmatic clinical research is rare. A recent pragmatic clinical research study, called the Strategies and Opportunities to STOP Colon Cancer in Priority Populations (STOP CRC), used this process to optimize the research implementation of an automated colon cancer screening outreach program in intervention clinics. We describe the process of using this PDSA approach, the selection of PDSA topics by clinic leaders, and project leaders' reactions to using PDSA in pragmatic research. STOP CRC is a cluster-randomized pragmatic study that aims to test the effectiveness of a direct-mail fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) program involving eight Federally Qualified Health Centers in Oregon and California. We and a practice improvement specialist trained in the PDSA process delivered structured presentations to leaders of these centers; the presentations addressed how to apply the PDSA process to improve implementation of a mailed outreach program offering colorectal cancer screening through FIT tests. Center leaders submitted PDSA plans and delivered reports via webinar at quarterly meetings of the project's advisory board. Project staff conducted one-on-one, 45-min interviews with project leads from each health center to assess the reaction to and value of the PDSA process in supporting the implementation of STOP CRC. Clinic-selected PDSA activities included refining the intervention staffing model, improving outreach materials, and changing workflow steps. Common benefits of using PDSA cycles in pragmatic research were that it provided a structure for staff to focus on improving the program and it allowed staff to test the change they wanted to see. A commonly reported challenge was measuring the success of the PDSA process with the available electronic medical record tools. Understanding how the PDSA process can be applied to pragmatic

  4. GPs' views on involvement of older patients: an European qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, R.V.; Geest, T.A.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Ferreira, P.L.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Baker, R.

    2004-01-01

    Involvement of older patients in general practice care is regarded as important, but is not widespread. To determine specific barriers to the involvement of older patients in general practice care and to identify variations between countries, we performed an international comparative study based on

  5. A Prospective Longitudinal Study of Children's Theory of Mind and Adolescent Involvement in Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Sania; Jaffee, Sara R.; Bowes, Lucy; Ouellet-Morin, Isabelle; Andreou, Penelope; Happe, Francesca; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Theory of mind (ToM) allows the understanding and prediction of other people's behaviours based on their mental states (e.g. beliefs). It is important for healthy social relationships and thus may contribute towards children's involvement in bullying. The present study investigated whether children involved in bullying during early…

  6. A Study of the Relationship between Parental Involvement and Mental Health of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake Payne, Ruthanna

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of parental involvement and mental health in a sample of traditionally aged college students and investigate the variance parental involvement predicts in mental health. Five hundred and eighty-eight freshmen at a large research university responded to a 97 question survey. Parental…

  7. Sport Involvement and Educational Outcomes of High School Students: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seunghyun; Feltz, Deborah L.; Kietzmann, Laura A.; Diemer, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relations among sport involvement and social and personal influences on high school students' educational expectations and attainment, using National Education Longitudinal Survey-88. Athletic engagement, educational expectations of significant others, peer support for academics, parental involvement in academics, and…

  8. School, Neighborhood, and Family Factors Are Associated with Children's Bullying Involvement: A Nationally Representative Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, Lucy; Arseneault, Louise; Maughan, Barbara; Taylor, Alan; Caspi, Ashalom; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2009-01-01

    School size and problems with neighbors is associated with a greater risk of being a bullying victim while family factors such as maltreatment and domestic violence are associated with involvement in bullying. The findings are based on the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study that involves 2,232 children.

  9. Classroom Climate, Parental Educational Involvement, and Student School Functioning in Early Adolescence: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan Toren, Nurit; Seginer, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    In this 2-year longitudinal study, we examine the effects of perceived classroom climate and two aspects of parental educational involvement (home-based and school-based) on junior high school students' self-evaluation and academic achievement. Our main hypothesis was that perceived parental educational involvement mediates students' perceived…

  10. Involvement of temporomandibular joint in systemic joint disorders: A clinical and radiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D B Gandhi Babu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many reports on the involvement of temporomandibular joint in certain specific joint diseases, in medical and dental literature. However, not many comprehensive studies have been undertaken to study the involvement of TMJ in systemic joint disorders to establish the cause and effect relationship between the two. This report aims to study the involvement of TMJ in patients affected with systemic joint diseases. A total of 106 patients have been examined; 55 suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (R.A and the rest suffering from related arthropathies. The results are significant and useful in the diagnosis and management of TMJ. in patients suffering from various arthropathies.

  11. A knowledge synthesis of patient and public involvement in clinical practice guidelines: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapp Sylvie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Failure to reconcile patient preferences and values as well as social norms with clinical practice guidelines (CPGs recommendations may hamper their implementation in clinical practice. However, little is known about patients and public involvement programs (PPIP in CPGs development and implementation. This study aims at identifying what it is about PPIP that works, in which contexts are PPIP most likely to be effective, and how are PPIP assumed to lead to better CPGs development and implementation. Methods and design A knowledge synthesis will be conducted in four phases. In phase one, literature on PPIP in CPGs development will be searched through bibliographic databases. A call for bibliographic references and unpublished reports will also be sent via the mailing lists of relevant organizations. Eligible publications will include original qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods study designs reporting on a PPIP pertaining to CPGs development or implementation. They will also include documents produced by CPGs organizations to describe their PPIP. In phase two, grounded in the program's logic model, two independent reviewers will extract data to collect information on the principal components and activities of PPIP, the resources needed, the contexts in which PPIP were developed and tested, and the assumptions underlying PPIP. Quality assessment will be made for all retained publications. Our literature search will be complemented with interviews of key informants drawn from of a purposive sample of CPGs developers and patient/public representatives. In phase three, we will synthesize evidence from both the publications and interviews data using template content analysis to organize the identified components in a meaningful framework of PPIP theories. During a face-to-face workshop, findings will be validated with different stakeholder and a final toolkit for CPGs developers will be refined. Discussion The proposed

  12. Parent and Family Involvement in Education: Results from the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016. First Look. NCES 2017-102

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuiggan, Meghan; Megra, Mahi

    2017-01-01

    This report presents findings from the Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey of the National Household Education Surveys Program of 2016 (NHES:2016). The Parent and Family Involvement in Education Survey collected data on children enrolled in public or private school for kindergarten through 12th grade or homeschooled for these grades.…

  13. Paradigms of artificial intelligence programming case studies in common Lisp

    CERN Document Server

    Norvig, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Paradigms of AI Programming is the first text to teach advanced Common Lisp techniques in the context of building major AI systems. By reconstructing authentic, complex AI programs using state-of-the-art Common Lisp, the book teaches students and professionals how to build and debug robust practical programs, while demonstrating superior programming style and important AI concepts. The author strongly emphasizes the practical performance issues involved in writing real working programs of significant size. Chapters on troubleshooting and efficiency are included, along with a discussion of th

  14. Programmed subcellular release to study the dynamics of cell detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildt, Bridget

    -terminated C6 or C11 thiols and the regeneration of individual electrodes using different molecules. Programmed release of small molecules has applications in drug delivery, while programmed subcellular release has the potential to study the full cascade of events that involve the extracellular matrix, actin rearrangement, and protein signaling pathways.

  15. A Successful Course of Study in Computer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, David H.

    1977-01-01

    Three keys to the successful development of the program of the computer programming department of the Technical Institute of Oklahoma State University are discussed: Community involvement, faculty/administration commitment to the basic principles of technical career education, and availability of appropriate equipment for student use. (HD)

  16. Paternal involvement and fetal morbidity outcomes in HIV/AIDS: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alio, Amina P; Mbah, Alfred K; Shah, Krupa; August, Euna M; Dejoy, Sharon; Adegoke, Korede; Marty, Phillip J; Salihu, Hamisu M; Aliyu, Muktar H

    2015-01-01

    Prior research indicates that infants with absent fathers are vulnerable to unfavorable fetal birth outcomes. HIV is a recognized risk factor for adverse birth outcomes. However, the influence of paternal involvement on fetal morbidity outcomes in women with HIV remains poorly understood. Using linked hospital discharge data and vital statistics records for the state of Florida (1998-2007), the authors assessed the association between paternal involvement and fetal growth outcomes (i.e., low birth weight [LBW], very low birth weight [VLBW], preterm birth [PTB], very preterm birth [VPTB], and small for gestational age [SGA]) among HIV-positive mothers (N=4,719). Propensity score matching was used to match cases (absent fathers) to controls (fathers involved). Conditional logistic regression was employed to generate adjusted odds ratios (OR). Mothers of infants with absent fathers were more likely to be Black, younger (absent paternal involvement during pregnancy had elevated risks for adverse fetal outcomes (LBW: OR=1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.05-1.60; VLBW: OR=1.72, 95% CI=1.05-2.82; PTB: OR=1.38, 95% CI=1.13-1.69; VPTB: OR=1.81, 95% CI=1.13-2.90). Absence of fathers increases the likelihood of adverse fetal morbidity outcomes in women with HIV infection. These findings underscore the importance of paternal involvement during pregnancy, especially as an important component of programs for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. The Army Study Program, FY 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-31

    ARMY COMMAND AND CONTROL MASTER PLAN TRADOC IN-HOUSE DA700359 *ARMY MODEL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM- MOBA /MOUT TRADOC IN-HOUSE DACG9534 *ARMY MODEL...3 IN-HOUSE 8102553 *ARMY MODEL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM- MOBA /MOUT 3 IN-HOUSE 8112536 DAOG9534 *ARMY STRATEGIC BALLISTIC MISSILE 5 BOTH 8202738 .40 DEFENSE...WORKING PARTY/TRAINING DEVELOPMENT WORK *ARMY MODEL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM- MOBA /MOUT TRADOC IN-HOUSE DAOG9534 *ARMY MODEL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM-CASTFOREM

  18. Study on reduction of accessory horsepower requirements. Program summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefferts, C.H.

    1977-06-15

    The objective of this program was to define, evaluate and develop automotive accessory systems to minimize engine power consumption and significantly improve fuel economy. All tasks have been completed and the program objectives have been accomplished. Information is presented on each phase of the program which involved: conceptual design to recommended component improvement and accessory drive systems; performance and sizing analyses; detail design and specifications; fabrication, and performance testing; evaluation of integrated hybrid drive, improved accessories; and an advanced air conditioning concept.

  19. A devolved model for public involvement in the field of mental health research: Case study learning

    OpenAIRE

    Moule, P.; Davies, R

    2016-01-01

    Abstract \\ud \\ud Background: Patient and public involvement in all aspects of research is espoused and there is a continued interest in understanding its wider impact. Existing investigations have identified both beneficial outcomes and remaining issues. This paper presents the impact of public involvement in one case study led by a mental health charity conducted as part of a larger research project. The case study used a devolved model of working, contracting with service user-led organisat...

  20. Cigarette smoking initiation during college predicts future alcohol involvement: A matched-samples study

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, MG; Doran, NM; Edland, SD; Amanda Schweizer, C; Wall, TL

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the relationship between cigarette smoking initiation and subsequent alcohol involvement. To address this question, the present study compared alcohol use between students who initiated smoking during college and a matched sample of never-smoking students. We hypothesized greater increases in alcohol involvement among smoking initiators, mediated by exposure to cigarette use situations. Method: Included in the present study were 104 Chinese American and Korean...

  1. PSYCHOLOGICAL FEATURES IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE (MEN AND WOMEN PRIOR TO CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFTING DEPENDING ON THEIR INVOLVEMENT IN THE INDIVIDUAL PSYCHO-CORRECTION PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Starunskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance. The study of psychological characteristics of patients is important for the creation and planning of psychological correction and improve the efficiency of the treatment of coronary heart disease.Тhe purpose. This research is devoted to the study of the psychological features in patients with coronary artery disease (CHD in the preoperative period, depending on their involvement in psycho-correction program.Material and methods. We observed 30 patients with coronary heart disease before coronary bypass surgery. Clinical-psychological method (observation, conversation and psychological testing were used.Results  and conclusions. We found that patients who participated in psycho-correction program had lower values of «anxiety», «phobic anxiety» and «obsessive-compulsive» symptoms. In both groups of patients, on average, we identified the prevalence  of the coping-strategies «self-control» and «planning solution». Furthermore, on average, the «self-awareness» and «extraversion» were more manifested features in the structure of the personality traits of the surveyed patients. The revealed features should be taken into account in planning the programs of psycho-correction for patients with CHD prior to CABG surgery.

  2. Compatibility studies for the waste packaging program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1969-03-01

    A program is now underway by Battelle-Northwest to develop the technology required for a waste packaging plant. Cesium chloride and strontium fluoride have been selected as the prime candidates for packaging. Cesium diuranate and strontium pyrophosphate have been selected as backup compounds for packaging in case either or both of the prime candidates should be rejected for any reason. No detailed studies of CsCl compatibility have been reported and long term data are needed. As in the case with CsCl, no detailed studies have been made on SrF{sub 2} compatibility. As a result of the lack of pertinent compatibility data, it is readily apparent that detailed studies are required on CsCl and SrF{sub 2} compatibility and at least scouting studies must be made on the compatibility of the backup packaging compounds. This report summarizes the compatibility studies that are underway at PNL using non-radioactive compounds. Capsule fabrication procedures and tests schedules are outlined.

  3. US country studies program: Results from mitigation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Country Studies Program which was implemented to support the principles and objectives of the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). There were three principle objectives in this program: to enhance capabilities to conduct climate change assessments, prepare action plans, and implement technology projects; to help establish a process for developing and implementing national policies and measures; to support principles and objective of the FCCC. As a result, 55 countries are completing studies, more than 2000 analysts engaged in the studies have been trained, and there is a much broader understanding and support for climate change concerns. The article describes experiences of some countries, and general observations and conclusions which are broadly seperated into developed countries and those with economies in transition.

  4. The Involvement of Adolescents With Chronic Health Conditions in Medical Education: An Exploratory Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Eady, Kaylee

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we explored the involvement of adolescents with chronic health conditions in medical education. We focused specifically on adolescents' desired level of involvement in the education of medical students and residents, strategies for involving them in it, and topics on which they would feel comfortable educating these learners. We used a community-based participatory research approach and qualitative one-on-one semistructured interviews. Adolescents (ages 13-18) with chronic health conditions lasting >3 months who were admitted on inpatient wards and were well enough to participate in an interview were eligible. Two investigators analyzed the interview transcripts to identify common categories across the interview data. A total of 17 adolescents participated. Data analysis revealed that adolescents want to be regularly involved in medical education, compensated in some way for their time and effort, and receive support and oversight in their activities. Adolescents discussed the following 5 strategies for involving them in the education of medical students and residents: face-to-face presentations, shadowing and mentoring, videos, handouts and books, and assessment feedback. Adolescents want to educate learners on their experiences and coping strategies as well as on how to interact and develop rapport with adolescents. The adolescents with chronic health conditions who participated in this study want to be actively involved in medical education and can provide innovative insights and strategies for doing so. However, future researchers need to explore the benefits and limitations of such involvement. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Genomic Expression Program Involving the Haa1p-Regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Response to Acetic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jorg D.; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The alterations occurring in yeast genomic expression during early response to acetic acid and the involvement of the transcription factor Haa1p in this transcriptional reprogramming are described in this study. Haa1p was found to regulate, directly or indirectly, the transcription of approximately 80% of the acetic acid-activated genes, suggesting that Haa1p is the main player in the control of yeast response to this weak acid. The genes identified in this work as being activated in response to acetic acid in a Haa1p-dependent manner include protein kinases, multidrug resistance transporters, proteins involved in lipid metabolism, in nucleic acid processing, and proteins of unknown function. Among these genes, the expression of SAP30 and HRK1 provided the strongest protective effect toward acetic acid. SAP30 encode a subunit of a histone deacetylase complex and HRK1 encode a protein kinase belonging to a family of protein kinases dedicated to the regulation of plasma membrane transporters activity. The deletion of the HRK1 gene was found to lead to the increase of the accumulation of labeled acetic acid into acid-stressed yeast cells, suggesting that the role of both HAA1 and HRK1 in providing protection against acetic acid is, at least partially, related with their involvement in the reduction of intracellular acetate concentration. PMID:20955010

  6. A Comparative Study of Parental Involvement and Its Effect on African-American Male and Overall Student Achievement at Single Gender and Coeducational Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellums, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if Parental Involvement influenced academic performance at single gender and co-educational schools. This study also compared African American male academic achievement with all students enrolled in two single gender, and one coeducational, middle school programs. Although all three schools reflected a…

  7. Public involvement in integrated resource planning: A study of demand-side management collaboratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, J. (Raab (J.), Boston, MA (United States)); Schweitzer, M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Many utilities and nonutility parties (NUPs) across the country have tried a new approach to reaching agreement on Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design and policy issues. Through this, which is called the DSM collaborative process, parties who have often been adversaries in the past attempt to reach consensus rather than using traditional litigation to resolve differences. We examined nine cases of DSM collaboration involving 24 utilities and approximately 50 NUPs in 10 states. This is the first comprehensive, in-depth review and assessment of collaboratives and it allows conclusions to be drawn about the collaborative process and the factors that contribute to successful efforts of this type. Collaboratives are described in terms of four major contextual and organizational characteristics: regulatory and legal history, parties involved and parties excluded, collaborative scope, and the collaborative process itself.

  8. A Taiwan Study Abroad Program on Aging, Culture, and Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Su-I

    2018-01-01

    This article introduces a Taiwan Study Abroad program on aging, culture, and healthcare. The program is a short-term academic summer program (6 credits) to bring U.S. students to Taiwan. During 2011 ~ 2015, a total of four groups including over 54 students and faculty members participated. This program partnered with multiple universities,…

  9. Model Pemberdayaan Masyarakat Bidang Kesehatan, Studi Program Desa Siaga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Sutisna Sulaeman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sejak tahun 2006, Departemen Kesehatan meluncurkan kebijakan program Desa Siaga. Tampaknya, kebijakan tersebut tidak mampu memberdayakan masyarakat dalam mengidentifikasi dan memecahkan masalah kesehatan pada level komunitas (desa. Penelitian ini bertujuan merumuskan model pemberdayaan masyarakat bidang kesehatan pada program Desa Siaga. Sasaran penelitian adalah Forum Kesehatan Desa dan Pos Kesehatan Desa Siaga di 30 desa di Kabupaten Karanganyar, Jawa Tengah. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah survei dan studi kasus. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan faktor-faktor yang berhubungan dengan kemampuan masyarakat dalam mengidentifikasi masalah kesehatan dan kemampuan masyarakat dalam memecahkan masalah kesehatan. Model pemberdayaan masyarakat bidang kesehatan meliputi kemampuan mengidentifikasi dan memecahkan masalah kesehatan. Faktor-faktor internal dan eksternal komunitas pada level anggota masyarakat, institusi masyarakat, kepemimpinan masyarakat, dan akses informasi kesehatan memiliki peran penting dalam pemberdayaan masyarakat bidang kesehatan. Kata kunci: Desa siaga, kebijakan, pemberdayaan masyarakat Abstract Since 2006, the Health Department had launched the Village Preparedness program policy. But, this policy apparently not capable of empowering the community in identifying and solving the health problem at community (village level. The objective of research is to formulate the community empowerment model in health in the Village Preparedness program. The targets of research were the Village Health Forum and Village Health Post in 30 Village Preparedness in Karanganyar Regency, Central Java. The method involving survey and case study. The case study showed factors related to community capability of identifying health problem and community capability of solving the health problems. The community empowerment model in health including the capabilities of identifying and of solving the health problems. The community internal and

  10. Parental Motivational Practice, Parent Involvement, and Students' Choice of Study Field in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Lian

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes data of the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 to examine the association between parental provision of task-extrinsic rewards for academic performance, parent involvement in students' learning, and students' choice of study field in college. Results show that frequent receipt of task-extrinsic rewards for good grades from…

  11. At-Risk Youth in After-School Programs: How Does Their Use of Media for Learning About Community Issues Relate to Their Perceptions of Community Connectedness, Community Involvement, and Community Support?

    OpenAIRE

    Rosemary V. Barnett; Jeffrey C. Neely; Caroline Payne-Purvis; Gerald R. Culen

    2014-01-01

    This paper highlights a study examining the impact of various media formats on at-risk youth to identify forms of media technology that might impact their community connectedness, community involvement, and community support. Over a three-year period, a sample of 133 youth enrolled in after-school programs in two communities completed a questionnaire annually consisting of the following areas: community support, community involvement, community connectedness, and media use for learning. Line...

  12. The influence of food involvement on fish consumption: An Australian case study

    OpenAIRE

    Birch, Dawn; Lawley, M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of\\ud food involvement as a means of understanding differences in\\ud fish consumption levels. This study presents the findings of an online survey of 899 Australian consumers which investigated drivers and barriers to fish consumption among regular, light and very light fish consumers. The findings reveal that higher food involvement leading to increased fish consumption is associated with reduced perceived risk, higher perceived hedon...

  13. Study of upper gastrointestinal tract involvement in pemphigus by esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Involvement of upper gastrointestinal tract in pemphigus vulgaris is not uncommon. Aim: To study the involvement of upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT with the help of esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD in patients of vesiculobullous dermatoses with emphasis on pemphigus vulgaris. Methods: Forty-two patients (M-22, F-20 with vesiculobullous dermatoses, diagnosed on the basis of clinical features and skin histopathology as pemphigus vulgaris (PV-40 patients and pemphigus foliaceus (PF-2 patients were included in the study. The EGD was performed and mucosa of the esophagus, stomach and first part of the duodenum were examined. Mucosal biopsies were taken from the lower esophagus in 26 patients of PV and studied after H and E staining. Results: On EGD, esophageal involvement was seen in 67% patients of PV (27/40. Of these, Grade I esophagitis was observed in seven, Grade II in 11, Grade III in four and Grade IV involvement was seen in five patients of PV. Three PV patients had associated esophageal candidiasis. Involvement of esophageal mucosa was also observed in one out of two patients of PF. Gastric mucosa was involved in 52% and duodenal mucosa in 20% of PV patients. Acantholysis was observed in seven out of 26 (27% esophageal biopsies of PV patients. Two patients of PV vomited a tube-like structure, indicative of ′esophagitis dissecans superficialis′. The involvement of the gastric mucosa in patients with history of oral corticosteroid intake (60% was compared to the group without history of oral corticosteroids (30%. Conclusion: Among PV patients under study, significant involvement of oral (87%, esophageal (67%, gastric (52% and duodenal mucosa (20% was observed.

  14. Can the impact of public involvement on research be evaluated? A mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Rosemary; Boote, Jonathan D; Parry, Glenys D; Cooper, Cindy L; Yeeles, Philippa; Cook, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  Public involvement is central to health and social research policies, yet few systematic evaluations of its impact have been carried out, raising questions about the feasibility of evaluating the impact of public involvement. Objective  To investigate whether it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on health and social research. Methods  Mixed methods including a two‐round Delphi study with pre‐specified 80% consensus criterion, with follow‐up interviews. UK and international panellists came from different settings, including universities, health and social care institutions and charitable organizations. They comprised researchers, members of the public, research managers, commissioners and policy makers, self‐selected as having knowledge and/or experience of public involvement in health and/or social research; 124 completed both rounds of the Delphi process. A purposive sample of 14 panellists was interviewed. Results  Consensus was reached that it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on 5 of 16 impact issues: identifying and prioritizing research topics, disseminating research findings and on key stakeholders. Qualitative analysis revealed the complexities of evaluating a process that is subjective and socially constructed. While many panellists believed that it is morally right to involve the public in research, they also considered that it is appropriate to evaluate the impact of public involvement. Conclusions  This study found consensus among panellists that it is feasible to evaluate the impact of public involvement on some research processes, outcomes and on key stakeholders. The value of public involvement and the importance of evaluating its impact were endorsed. PMID:21324054

  15. Reasons for family involvement in elective surgical decision-making in Taiwan: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mei-Ling; Huang, Chuen-Teng; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2017-07-01

    To inquire into the reasons for family involvement in adult patients' surgical decision-making processes from the point of view of the patients' family. Making a patient the centre of medical decision-making is essential for respecting individual's autonomy. However, in a Chinese society, family members are often deeply involved in a patient's medical decision-making. Although family involvement has long been viewed as an aspect of the Chinese culture, empirical evidence of the reasons for family involvement in medical decision-making has been lacking. A qualitative study. In order to record and examine reasons for family involvement in adult patients' surgical decision-making, 12 different family members of 12 elective surgery patients were interviewed for collecting and analysing data. Three major reasons for family involvement emerged from the data analyses: (1) to share responsibility; (2) to ensure the correctness of medical information; and (3) to safeguard the patient's well-being. These findings also reveal that culture is not the only reason for family involvement. Making decision to undergo a surgery is a tough and stressful process for a patient. Family may provide the patient with timely psychological support to assist the patient to communicate with his or her physician(s) and other medical personnel to ensure their rights. It is also found that due to the imbalanced doctor-patient power relationship, a patient may be unable, unwilling to, or even dare not, tell the whole truth about his or her illness or feelings to the medical personnel. Thus, a patient would expect his or her family to undertake such a mission during the informed consent and decision-making processes. The results of this study may provide medical professionals with relevant insights into family involvement in adult patients' surgical decision-making. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Managing Supplier Involvement in New Product Development: A Multiple-Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.E.A. van Echtelt (Ferrie); J.Y.F. Wynstra (Finn); A.J. van Weele (Arjan); G.M. Duysters (Geert)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractExisting studies of supplier involvement in new product development have mainly focused on project-related short-term processes and success-factors. This study validates and extends an existing exploratory framework, which comprises both long-term strategic processes and short-term

  17. Involvement in Bullying and Suicide-Related Behavior at 11 Years: A Prospective Birth Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsper, Catherine; Lereya, Tanya; Zanarini, Mary; Wolke, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the prospective link between involvement in bullying (bully, victim, bully/victim), and subsequent suicide ideation and suicidal/self-injurious behavior, in preadolescent children in the United Kingdom. Method: A total of 6,043 children in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort were assessed to…

  18. Maternal glucocorticoid elevation and associated blood metabonome changes might be involved in metabolic programming of intrauterine growth retardation in rats exposed to caffeine prenatally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Hao; Liu, Yansong; Liang, Gai; Huang, Jing; Hu, Jieqiong; Yan, You-e; Li, Xiaojun; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Zhang, Yuanzhen; Feng, Jianghua; Wang, Hui

    2014-03-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that prenatal caffeine exposure causes intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), fetuses are over-exposed to high levels of maternal glucocorticoids (GC), and intrauterine metabolic programming and associated metabonome alteration that may be GC-mediated. However, whether maternal metabonomes would be altered and relevant metabolite variations might mediate the development of IUGR remained unknown. In the present studies, we examined the dose- and time-effects of caffeine on maternal metabonome, and tried to clarify the potential roles of maternal GCs and metabonome changes in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Pregnant rats were treated with caffeine (0, 20, 60 or 180 mg/kg·d) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20, or 180 mg/kg·d caffeine from GD9. Metabonomes of maternal plasma on GD20 in the dose-effect study and on GD11, 14 and 17 in the time-course study were analyzed by ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Caffeine administration reduced maternal weight gains and elevated both maternal and fetal corticosterone (CORT) levels. A negative correlation between maternal/fetal CORT levels and fetal bodyweight was observed. The maternal metabonome alterations included attenuated metabolism of carbohydrates, enhanced lipolysis and protein breakdown, and amino acid accumulation, suggesting GC-associated metabolic effects. GC-associated metabolite variations (α/β-glucoses, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate) were observed early following caffeine administration. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine exposure induced maternal GC elevation and metabonome alteration, and maternal GC and relevant discriminatory metabolites might be involved in the metabolic programming of caffeine-induced IUGR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Experiences of service users involved in recruitment for nursing courses: A phenomenological research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Katie; Bernal, Cathy; Devis, Kate; Southgate, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into service users' experiences of participating in recruitment for Adult, Mental Health and Child nursing studies at the authors' university; to establish potential motivations behind such participation; and to make suggestions for improved future practice. The involvement of service users in nurse education and recruitment has for some years been required by the Nursing and Midwifery Council, but there is a dearth of publications on the meaning of that involvement to participating service users. It is hoped that this study will contribute to this body of knowledge. A phenomenological approach was selected, field-specific focus groups of service users being facilitated using a semi-structured interview format; these were audio recorded and transcribed. The data was analysed using thematic analysis. Participation was subject to the service users having been involved in recruitment to nursing studies at the authors' university and the focus groups took place either at the university or at the child participants' school. Themes identified demonstrated largely positive experiences and a sense of meaningful involvement for all concerned. Findings indicated a close link between the values of the participants and those of the wider NHS, benefits to a sense of wellbeing and achievement, as well as the need for greater ownership of the recruitment process by service users. Potential lessons for academics wishing to promote greater service user involvement in student recruitment are articulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Parental involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Ezra S Simon

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted in Ghana to investigate, (1) factors that predict parental involvement, (2) the relationship between parental home and school involvement and the educational achievement of adolescents, (3) the relationship between parental authoritativeness and the educational achievement of adolescent students, (4) parental involvement serving as a mediator between their authoritativeness and the educational achievement of the students, and (5) whether parental involvement decreases...

  1. New study program: Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Simić, Diana; Božikov, Jadranka; Vondra, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Paper presents an overview of the EU funded Project of Curriculum Development for Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics named MEDINFO to be introduced in Croatia. The target group for the program is formed by professionals in any of the areas of medicine, IT professionals working on applications of IT for health and researchers and teachers in medical informatics. In addition to Croatian students, the program will also provide opportunity for enrolling students from a wider region of Southeast Europe. Project partners are two faculties of the University of Zagreb - Faculty of Organization and Informatics from Varaždin and School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health from Zagreb with the Croatian Society for Medical Informatics, Croatian Chamber of Economy, and Ericsson Nikola Tesla Company as associates.

  2. The effect of parental involvement in CBT of anxious children: Preliminary results from a RCT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Breinholst, Sonja; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2011-01-01

    Esbjørn, B. H., Breinholst, S., Reinholdt-Dunne, M. L., & Leth, I. (2011). The effect of parental involvement in CBT of anxious children: Preliminary results from a RCT study. Poster accepted for the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Toronto, Canada.......Esbjørn, B. H., Breinholst, S., Reinholdt-Dunne, M. L., & Leth, I. (2011). The effect of parental involvement in CBT of anxious children: Preliminary results from a RCT study. Poster accepted for the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, Toronto, Canada....

  3. Syracuse/NASA program: A historical critique: Multidisciplinary studies in management and development programs in the public sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzelay, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    A historical critique is presented of the Syracuse/NASA program on management and development programs. Brief summaries are included of each of the major projects undertaken, including identification of the principal investigators and the university departments and disciplines involved.

  4. State Grade Crossing Programs : A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-09-01

    This report reviews the California Railroad-Highway Grade Crossing Program, analyzing the factors influencing the reduction in grade crossing accidents. The repor concludes that the greater than average success in grade crossing installation and main...

  5. Evaluating Environmental Education Programs Using Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian G.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the evaluation of the Master of Environmental Science program at Monash University (Australia). The design of the evaluation is discussed, and the use of multiple sources of data and an innovative style are highlighted. (Author/CW)

  6. National Estuary Program Study Area Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — There are 28 National Estuary Programs (NEPs) in the U.S.that implement habitat protection and restoration projects with their partners. This work takes place within...

  7. Evaluating the Application of Program Outcomes to Study Abroad Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patricia Joanne; Mrozek, Lawrence J.

    2016-01-01

    A search through the 2015 annual conference program of the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) turned up a dozen sessions focusing on the topic of study abroad, demonstrating that a growing number of honors programs and colleges are encouraging or requiring study abroad. Many programs now offer and support honors semesters abroad or…

  8. Study on the ocean drilling program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jae Ho; Han, Hyun Chul; Chin, Jae Wha; Lee, Sung Rok; Park, Kwan Soon; Lee, Young Joo; Park, Young Soo [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Geoscience research trend of the world nations is focusing on the study of climate changes and preventing people from the natural hazards such as earthquakes and volcanic activities. For this study, it is necessary for scientists to interpret ancient climate changes preserved in ocean sediments, and to observe plate motions. Thus, geological and geophysical studies should be proceeded for the core samples recovered from the deep sea sediments and basement. It is essential to join the ODP(Ocean Drilling Program) that drills ocean basins and crusts using the drilling vessel with the ability of deploying almost 9 km of drilling string. The first year (1995) was focused on the analyzing the appropriateness Korea to join the ODP. The second year (1996) has been stressed on being an ODP member country based on results of the first year study, and planning the future activities as a member. The scope of study is joining the ODP as a Canada-Australia Consortium member and to set up the Korean ODP organization and future activities. The results and suggestions are as follows. 1) Necessities of Korea joining the ODP: If Korea becomes a member of the ODP, the benefits could be obtained based on the activities of other ODP members through academic, social and economic sectors. 2) Korean membership of ODP: Korea becomes a member of the Australia-Canada Consortium for ODP. AGSO (Austrian Geological Survey Organization), GSC (Geological Survey of Canada), and KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geology, Mining and Materials) on behalf of their own countries will each pay a share of the full member financial contribution to the ODP. AGSO and GSC will pay one third of the full member financial contribution, and KIGAM will pay one twelfth. 3) Korean ODP structure and future activities: To enhance the efficiency of initial activities after joining the ODP, it has been decided to have a relatively simple organization. The primary governing arm of the Korean ODP organizations is the Korean ODP

  9. Students at risk of educational exclusion in secondary education. Perceptions of teachers involved in special programs about prevention of school failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier AMORES FERNÁNDEZ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available School failure in Secondary Education is one of the most serious problems that carries the Spanish educational system today. Initial vocational qualification programs (pcpi were designed to offer a second chance to failed students (or at risk of educational exclusion in this educational stage. This study, for which has been used a mixed or hybrid method research, has provided a number of results that offer a more complete vision on the usefulness of these «Educational reclosing» programs (now Vocational Basic Training, in the centers of the province of Granada, showing viewpoints as interesting as the teachers and students involved in the study. Here the perception of teachers is summarized on these students at risk who, due to several reasons, have been excluded from the mainstream educational system, and doomed to failure. Students that fail not only for learning difficulties or personal problems related to their family, also crash into an educational system that has not been able to provide adequate answers to their needs. 

  10. AMOP (Arctic Marine Oil Spill Program) studies reviewed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-05

    A discussion of the Arctic Marine Oil Spill Program organized in 1976 by the Canadian Federal Government includes: an Arctic Atlas compiled by Fenco Consultants Ltd. to give background information necessary for developing marine oil spill countermeasures for the Arctic north of 60/sup 0/ including the west Greenland coast and the Labrador shelf (geology, meteorology and oceanography, ice conditions, biology, and social factors); program in emergency transport of spill-combatting equipment; and the factors which influence the choice of conveyance, i.e., accessibility of the site, urgency for response, and quantity of material required; laboratory studies involving the release of oil under artificial sea ice in simulated ice formation and decay purposes to determine the interaction of crude oil and first-year sea ice; inability of companies and government to control a major spill in the Labrador Sea because of poor and inadequate transport facilities, communications, and navigational aids, severe environmental conditions, and logistics problems; and studies on the effects of oil-well blowouts in deep water, including formation of oil and gas hydrates, design of oil skimmers, the use of hovercraft, and specifications for an airborne multisensor system for oil detection in ice-infested waters.

  11. STUDI LINTAS BUDAYA OPTIMISME PADA MAHASISWA PROGRAM STUDI KEBIDANAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiarti Musabiq

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Optimism is a critical aspect influencing midwive candidate in their educational phase because it could affect midwifery students in overcoming any obstacles during their study. One of the factors associated with optimism is culture. This study was conducted to examine the differences of optimism given various ethnicities on midwifery students. The study sample was the 476 vocational students majoring in midwifery that were located in the provinces of DKI Jakarta, West Java, Banten, and West Sumatra (women only, age ranged 19-20 years. The LOT-R questionnaire was used to collect data on optimism. The results of One-Way ANOVA test showed that there was no significant difference on optimism in view of ethnicity (F=1.040; p>.05. The future studies should involve more participants from various ethnicities in Indonesia, especially ethnicities in the eastern region of Indonesia.

  12. Perspectives of clinicians involved in the RESTART-Study : Outcomes of a focus group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Sonneville-Koedoot, Caroline; Adams, Samantha A; Stolk, Elly A; Franken, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and beliefs of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) with regard to the Lidcombe Program and Demands and Capacities-based treatment and to examine how these attitudes and beliefs might have changed as a result of participating in the

  13. The Role of Jahoda's Latent and Financial Benefits for Work Involvement: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglbauer, Barbara; Batinic, Bernad

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of the latent and financial benefits of work as defined by Marie Jahoda (1982) in explaining a person's work involvement. Drawing upon theoretical frameworks on work commitment and work motivation, the latent benefits were expected to have a positive, whereas the financial benefits were expected to have a negative…

  14. Parent Involvement in Children's Education: An Exploratory Study of Urban, Chinese Immigrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cheng Shuang; Koblinsky, Sally A.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the involvement of Chinese immigrant parents in children's elementary and secondary education. Participants were 29 low-income, urban parents of public school children working primarily in the hospitality sector. Parents were interviewed about their academic expectations, knowledge of school performance, parent…

  15. Social Influence In a High-Ego-Involvement Situation: A Field Study of Petition Signing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keasey, Charles Blake; Keasey, Carol T.

    This study used the national crisis following President Nixon's decision to send troops into Cambodia as an opportunity to investigate the effectiveness of social influence variables (sex and clothing attire) under conditions of high ego-involvement. Four hundred and forty-six adult passersby were presented an antiwar petition by the authors (one…

  16. Department Involvement in Instructional Materials Development for ODL Study at the Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyanyiwa, Vincent Itai; Mutambanengwe, Betty

    2015-01-01

    The teaching and designing of modules at Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU) is the principal responsibility of a single body of teaching staff, although some authors and content reviewers could be sourced from elsewhere if they are not available in ZOU. This survey, through a case study, examines the involvement of lecturers and staff in the…

  17. Interhemispheric Communication Involving Multiple Tasks: A Study of Children with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotozaki, Hiroko; Parlow, Shelley

    2006-01-01

    The study investigated whether inefficient interhemispheric communication is involved in developmental dyslexia using multiple tasks. A finger localization task, rhyming judgment task, primed lexical decision task, and a visual half-field presentation paradigm were used. Nineteen dyslexic children (mean age = 13.1 years) were compared with 26…

  18. A Study of Lipscomb University Students' Internet Use and Involvement in Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Samuel Aarron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Lipscomb University students' Internet use and involvement in extracurricular activities. A survey of students at Lipscomb University was conducted. As confirmed by the data the research was able to determine that the type of extracurricular activity a student participates in most often is related to the…

  19. DOES FATHER INVOLVEMENT INFLUENCE THE AFFECT, LANGUAGE ACQUISITION, SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT AND BEHAVIOR IN YOUNG AUTISTIC CHILDREN? AN EARLY INTERVENTION STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Tabitha LOUIS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study adopts a randomized experimental design to evaluate the impact of a father-mediated therapy to improve the play skills, affect, language, social skills and behavior among 30 clinically diagnosed autistic children at the age of 3-5 years. Standardized inventories such as, The Play Based Observation (PBO, The Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales (GMDS, The Vineland Social Maturity Scale (VSMS and the Rendel Shorts Questionnaire were administered pre and post intervention. A special program that involved fathers in the caregiving and nurturing processes of these children was designed and implemented for 6 months after which the children were reassessed. Prior to the intervention, deficits in play skills and developmental delays across expressive and receptive language were observed Scores on the Vineland Social Maturity Scale and the Rendel Shorts revealed behavioral markers. Post intervention, we noticed significant differences in the play, language acquisition, social engagement and behavior in the treatment group in comparison to the control group. The results suggested that father-mediated therapeutic involvement significantly has proven to positively foster development in young autistic children and this is an important implication for practitioners in developing early intervention programs.

  20. Male involvement in reproductive, maternal and child health: a qualitative study of policymaker and practitioner perspectives in the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jessica; Vyankandondera, Joseph; Luchters, Stanley; Simon, David; Holmes, Wendy

    2016-07-16

    The importance of involving men in reproductive, maternal and child health programs is increasingly recognised globally. In the Pacific region, most maternal and child health services do not actively engage expectant fathers and fathers of young children and few studies have been conducted on the challenges, benefits and opportunities for involving fathers. This study explores the attitudes and beliefs of maternal and child health policymakers and practitioners regarding the benefits, challenges, risks and approaches to increasing men's involvement in maternal and child health education and clinical services in the Pacific. In-depth interviews were conducted with 17 senior maternal and child health policymakers and practitioners, including participants from five countries (Cook Island, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Island, and Vanuatu) and four regional organisations in the Pacific. Qualitative data generated were analysed thematically. Policymakers and practitioners reported that greater men's involvement would result in a range of benefits for maternal and child health, primarily through greater access to services and interventions for women and children. Perceived challenges to greater father involvement included sociocultural norms, difficulty engaging couples before first pregnancy, the physical layout of clinics, and health worker workloads and attitudes. Participants also suggested a range of strategies for increasing men's involvement, including engaging boys and men early in the life-cycle, in community and clinic settings, and making health services more father-friendly through changes to clinic spaces and health worker recruitment and training. These findings suggest that increasing men's involvement in maternal and child health services in the Pacific will require initiatives to engage men in community and clinic settings, engage boys and men of all ages, and improve health infrastructure and service delivery to include men. Our findings also suggest

  1. Governing integration through sports. A case study of civil society involvement in welfare policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Sine; Michelsen la Cour, Annette

    2012-01-01

    To an increasing extent, civil sports associations are becoming entangled in welfare policies of the Danish state. This article problematises the ways in which non-state actors are involved in the conduct of integration policy in order to discuss the ways in which sports associations take over...... governing techniques of the welfare state. To do so, a case study approach is applied. First of all, the article will describe the ways in which the issues of enhancing ethnic integration through sports is represented (thought of as a problem) by the involved public authorities and non-state actors using...

  2. The Industry Coupled Case Study Program final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stringfellow, J. [ed.

    1982-10-01

    The Industry Coupled Case Study Program was conceived as a short-term cooperative program between the Federal government and private industry. Federal funds were committed to stimulate geothermal exploration and development between 1977 and 1979, although some work under the program continues into 1982. Federal funding has been phased out and the remaining information developed during the program is being disseminated and reported. This report presents an overview of the program and documents the technical results and open-file data base resulting from the program.

  3. Cigarette smoking initiation during college predicts future alcohol involvement: a matched-samples study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Mark G; Doran, Neal M; Edland, Steven D; Schweizer, C Amanda; Wall, Tamaral L

    2013-11-01

    Little is known about the relationship between cigarette smoking initiation and subsequent alcohol involvement. To address this question, the present study compared alcohol use between students who initiated smoking during college and a matched sample of never-smoking students. We hypothesized greater increases in alcohol involvement among smoking initiators, mediated by exposure to cigarette use situations. Included in the present study were 104 Chinese American and Korean American undergraduates who at baseline (freshman year) reported never having smoked a cigarette. Subjects were drawn from 433 participants in a naturalistic longitudinal study of tobacco use who were assessed annually each year in college. Cigarette smoking status was assessed annually as part of a structured interview. Initiators and never-smokers were matched on gender, ethnicity, baseline alcohol use, parental smoking status, and behavioral undercontrol. As predicted, participants who initiated smoking during college reported significantly greater increases in the number of past-30-day total drinks consumed (p alcohol consumption over and above the effect of exposure. Students who initiate smoking during college appear at risk for increased alcohol involvement. Part of this risk is explained by environmental contextual factors, specifically exposure to situations involving other smokers that also may result in greater exposure to alcohol use.

  4. Parental Involvement and Student Motivation: A Quantitative Study of the Relationship between Student Goal Orientation and Student Perceptions of Parental Involvement among 5th Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Christine Daryabigi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a possible relationship between student perceptions of parental involvement and student goal orientation for an ethnically diverse fifth grade elementary population from high-poverty schools. This study was quantitative in nature and employed the Patterns of Adaptive Learning Scales (PALS) to assess the…

  5. Renal and perirenal space involvement in acute pancreatitis: An MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xing Hui, E-mail: lixinghui1005@126.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Zhang, Xiao Ming, E-mail: cjr.zhxm@vip.163.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Ji, Yi Fan, E-mail: 526504036@qq.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Jing, Zong Lin, E-mail: jzl325@163.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Huang, Xiao Hua, E-mail: nc_hxh1966@yahoo.com.cn [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Yang, Lin, E-mail: linyangmd@163.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Zhai, Zhao Hua, E-mail: zhaizhaohuada@163.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Objectives: To study the prevalence and characteristics of renal and perirenal space involvement and its relation to the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) using MRI. Methods: 115 patients with AP who underwent MRI with the clinical kidney function test were retrospectively analyzed in this study. MRI sequences included conventional and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) sequences. The renal and perirenal space involvement in AP was noted on MRI. The renal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on DWI was measured for each kidney. The severity of AP on MRI was graded using MR severity index (MRSI). The relationships among the renal and perirenal space involvement on MRI, the renal ADC, MRSI and the results of the kidney function test were analyzed. Results: In the 115 patients with AP, the renal and perirenal space abnormalities detected included renal parenchymal abnormalities (0.8%), abnormalities of the renal collecting system (2.6%), renal vascular abnormalities (1.7%), thickened renal fascia (99%), perirenal stranding (62%) and perirenal fluid collection (40%). The prevalence of perirenal space abnormalities was correlated with the severity of AP based on MRSI (P < 0.05). The renal ADC values were lower in patients with abnormal kidney function than in those without kidney injury (P < 0.05). The prevalence of kidney function abnormalities was 9.4%, 32% and 100% in mild, moderate, and severe AP cases, respectively (P = 0.00). Conclusion: Perirenal space involvement is much more than renal parenchymal involvement in AP. The prevalence of perirenal space involvement in AP on MRI has a positive correlation with the severity of AP according to MRSI.

  6. Study Gives Edge to 2 Math Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that two programs for teaching mathematics in the early grades--Math Expressions and Saxon Math--emerged as winners in early findings released last week from a large-scale federal experiment that pits four popular, and philosophically distinct, math curricula against one another. But the results don't promise to end the…

  7. Agency-Sponsored Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, James S.

    1976-01-01

    Sponsors of these programs include nonprofit organizations, proprietary agencies, wholly owned subsidiaries of U.S. corporations, and foreign-based institutions catering to North American students. Problems arising from their non-accredited status are examined and a criterion instrument for evaluating them is developed. (LBH)

  8. Cardiovascular involvement in severe malaria: A prospective study in Ranchi, Jharkhand

    OpenAIRE

    Hemant Narayan Ray; Darshit Doshi; Appu Rajan; Singh, Amit K.; S B Singh; Das, M. K.

    2017-01-01

    Background & objectives: Malaria is considered as the most important parasitic disease of humans, causing seri- ous illness that can be fatal, if not diagnosed and treated immediately. It is a multisystem disorder affecting nearly every system of the body. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the involvement of cardiovascular system in severe malaria using non-invasive methods. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on patients of severe malaria who were admitted between Ju...

  9. A study of Generation Z’s involvement in virtual reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puchkova E.B.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study analyzes the characteristics of modern teenagers’ involvement in virtual reality (VR. It also examines various approaches to VR in Russian science. In the current study the concept of virtual reality is defined as a particular informational environment in which a person can exist and develop. It is created by a special class of technical systems, formed on the basis of computer hypertext technology, and has a number of social and psychological characteristics. We pay special attention to the significance of virtual space for generation Z (according to the William Strauss and Neil Howe generational theory. The main factor determining the unique psychological features of the generation Z is its active involvement in virtual reality from the moment of birth. Involvement in a virtual reality is measurable by a teenager’s activity on the Internet. Objective. Our study set out to determine the level of Russian generation Z’s involvement in virtual reality. Design. We analyzed the results of a survey conducted among Moscow adolescents using multivariate profiles. Two hundred fifty-four teenagers 12-14 years old were interviewed during the study. Results and conclusion. Analysis of the data revealed the following: Modern teenagers are involved in VR with varying degrees of depth; their main type of activity on the Internet is searching for educational information and news; and no significant differences by gender in the purposes of using the Internet were found. However, it was also determined that girls’ activity in VR is more related to communication and interpersonal interaction, even though it’s indirect via the Internet, while boys prefer the “gaming” possibilities of VR; that teenagers are rather critical of the information they obtain by the Internet, and that their level of trust in the online information is low. The same trend is evident in the fact that students prefer not to make new friends in virtual

  10. An Assessment of Restructured Social Studies Program in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Tarman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Turkish education system has been developed taking into consideration a different perspective by setting a constructivist approach from the traditional concept of education since the 2005-2006 academic year. The restructured program has been implemented for 5 years. Research shows that many problems encountered during the implementation of the program. The encountered problems have been identified through a nationwide research study carried by EARGED in 2006 along with some other local level research studies. The purpose of this research is to determine how many of the problems, identified by EARGED’s study done in 2006, have been solved or addressed while how many of them have been still remaining. The data is collected from participants who are 6, 7 and 8th grade students who had taken social studies courses and their teachers in 16 public elementary schools located in Konya, Turkey. The collected data through this research study is compared with the findings of the EARGED’s research and a general assessment is made. asemi-structured interview schedule and a questionnaire were used to collect data from teachers and students. In qualitative analysis of the data literature which is related is scanned and descriptive analysis was conducted. Findings of this research reveals that teachers' training needs are observed mostly in areas such as “measurement and evaluation”,“knowledge about special education”, “use of information technologies” and “activity preparation” etc. and these problems still continue. At the same time the students’ problems are observed with “access to research resources”, “participation in activities or active involvement,” “teacher-student relations” and problems in such areas are still continuing

  11. Using a Web-Based Program to Increase Parental Involvement: Teachers' and Administrators' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle, Grace B.

    2011-01-01

    Parental involvement is an important factor for improving academic performance. Communication between the school and parents constitutes one of the basic types of parental involvement. Schools struggle to find effective ways to communicate effectively with parents and are recently using technology to facilitate this communication. This qualitative…

  12. Brain involvement in myotonic dystrophies: neuroimaging and neuropsychological comparative study in DM1 and DM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Vincenzo; Pegoraro, E; Ferrati, C; Squarzanti, F; Sorarù, G; Palmieri, A; Zucchetta, P; Antunovic, L; Bonifazi, E; Novelli, G; Trevisan, C P; Ermani, M; Manara, R; Angelini, C

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the degree of brain involvement in a cohort of myotonic dystrophy type 1 and type 2 (DM1, DM2) patients by brain studies and functional tests and to compare the results of the two groups. DM1, DM2 are multisystemic disorders due to polynucleotide expansions. Previous studies on brain involvement by neuroimaging and functional methods have led to contradictory results. Fifty molecularly defined DM1 patients and 14 DM2 patients, were recruited for the study. Age at recruitment, age at disease onset, disease duration and educational level were recorded. Neuromuscular assessment was done by MIRS. An extensive neuropsychological battery was performed in 48/50 DM1 and in a control group of 44 healthy matched subjects. Forty six of 50 DM1 and 12/14 DM2 underwent brain MRI; 21/50 DM1 and 9/14 DM2 underwent brain perfusion SPECT, with semiquantitative analysis of the results. MRI images were classified by ARWMC (age-related white matter changes) score, in order to quantify recurrence, localization and patterns of distribution of white matter hyperintense lesions (WMHLs) in our two cohorts. MRI results were matched to SPECT and to neuropsychological results. Thirty-seven of 46 DM1 and 10/12 DM2 had abnormal MRI imaging, showing scattered supratentorial, bilateral, symmetrical focal or diffuse WMHLs. A typical temporo-insular diffuse subcortical pattern was seen in DM1 subjects only, with no correlation with cognitive involvement. Major cognitive involvement was seen in the case of diffuse frontal lesions. A relationship with CTG expansion size was documented for DM1 subjects. SPECT showed minimal hypoperfusion in the posterior cortex planes in DM1 and, to a lesser extent, in DM2. Very mild degrees of involvement in the DM2 cohort were seen. Neuroimaging and functional investigations confirmed a more severe involvement of the brain in DM1 compared to DM2. A temporo-insular diffuse lesional pattern, specific for DM1, was found on

  13. Comprehension of implicit meanings in social situations involving irony: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakusawa, Keisuke; Sugiura, Motoaki; Sassa, Yuko; Jeong, Hyeonjeong; Horie, Kaoru; Sato, Shigeru; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Inuma, Kazuie; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2007-10-01

    To understand implicit social meanings, the interaction of literal meanings and relevant information in a situational context is important. However, previous studies have not investigated such contextual interactions. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated cortical mechanisms underlying the processing of implicit meanings, particularly irony, in realistic social situations, focusing on contextual interactions. Healthy subjects were shown pictures depicting daily communicative situations during judgment tasks involving situational appropriateness and literal correctness. The left medial prefrontal cortex showed significantly greater activation during tasks involving situational judgments than during literal judgments. The right temporal pole was activated task-independently during irony-specific processing. The medial orbitofrontal cortex was activated task-dependently during irony processing in situational judgment tasks. These regions have been reported to be involved in theory of mind, and have not been implicated in previous studies on the linguistic processing of implicit meanings. This suggests that the intentional assessment of situational appropriateness for task execution is carried out in the left medial prefrontal cortex, whereas irony is processed in the right temporal pole by assessing situational context automatically, and is judged based on the situational context in the medial orbitofrontal cortex. Our results show that the processing of implicit meanings and irony in contextually rich situations depends on brain mechanisms involved in the "theory of mind," based on processing relevant information in a situational context, and suggest different functions in each region.

  14. Involvement in bullying and suicidal ideation in middle adolescence: a 2-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Hanna-Kaisa; Väänänen, Juha; Helminen, Mika; Fröjd, Sari; Marttunen, Mauri; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu

    2013-02-01

    The objective of the study was to ascertain whether involvement in bullying increases the risk for subsequent suicidal ideation. A total of 2,070 Finnish girls and boys aged 15 were surveyed in the ninth grade (age 15) in schools, and followed up 2 years later in the Adolescent Mental Health Cohort Study. Involvement in bullying was elicited at age 15 by two questions focusing on being a bully and being a victim of bullying. Suicidal ideation was elicited by one item of the short Beck Depression Inventory at age 17. Baseline depressive symptoms and externalizing symptoms, age and sex were controlled for. Statistical analyses were carried out using cross-tabulations with Chi-square/Fisher's exact test and logistic regression. Suicidal ideation at age 17 was 3-4 times more prevalent among those who had been involved in bullying at age 15 than among those not involved. Suicidal ideation at age 17 was most prevalent among former victims of bullying. Being a victim of bullying at age 15 continued to predict subsequent suicidal ideation when depressive and externalizing symptoms were controlled for. Being a bully at age 15 also persisted as borderline significantly predictive of suicidal ideation when baseline symptoms were controlled for. Findings indicate adolescent victims and perpetrators of bullying alike are at long-term risk for suicidal ideation.

  15. Father’s Perceptions of their Role and Involvement in the Family: A Qualitative Study in a Colombian Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Carrillo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore fathers’ perceptions about their role in the family, and the characteristics of their involvement in their children’s lives in the Colombian context. The sample consisted of 12 Colombian fathers. The study used a qualitative methodology, one-hour in depth interviews were conducted with the participants. Results indicated important changes in the role of fathers and mothers in Colombian families. Fathers’ perceptions departed to some extent from the traditional pattern attributed to nuclear families, where men are considered as the only economic provider and authority figure in the family. This departure places fathers in a category we would call “in transition”, which includes perceptions of more equitable parental roles within the family and a combination of features from other typologies of fatherhood proposed in the literature. Fathers also reported a desire to participate more at home and to be more involved in their children’s lives; they also emphasized the importance of expressing love and affection to their children. Work-family conflict and the impact of the quality of the father-child relationship emerged as important categories in the fathers’ perceptions of their role and involvement in the family. In Colombia research on fathers is scarce and family policies mainly focus on mothers as the principal caregiver. A better understanding of fathers’ roles and involvement in the family and with children will contribute to the development of programs and policies oriented toward all family members and family relationship systems.

  16. Quench Simulation Studies: Program documentation of SPQR

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnemann, F

    2001-01-01

    Quench experiments are being performed on prototypes of the superconducting magnets and busbars to determine the adequate design and protection. Many tests can only be understood correctly with the help of quench simulations that model the thermo-hydraulic and electrodynamic processes during a quench. In some cases simulations are the only method to scale the experimental results of prototype measurements to match the situation of quenching superconducting elements in the LHC. This note introduces the theoretical quench model and the use of the simulation program SPQR (Simulation Program for Quench Research), which has been developed to compute the quench process in superconducting magnets and busbars. The model approximates the heat balance equation with the finite difference method including the temperature dependence of the material parameters. SPQR allows the simulation of longitudinal quench propagation along a superconducting cable, the transverse propagation between adjacent conductors, heat transfer i...

  17. Factors associated with sex work involvement among transgender women in Jamaica: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Wang, Ying; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Jones, Nicolette; Ahmed, Uzma; Levermore, Kandasi; Neil, Ava; Ellis, Tyrone; Bryan, Nicolette; Marshall, Annecka; Newman, Peter A

    2017-04-06

    Transgender women are disproportionately impacted by HIV. Transgender women involved in sex work may experience exacerbated violence, social exclusion, and HIV vulnerabilities, in comparison with non-sex work-involved transgender women. Scant research has investigated sex work among transgender women in the Caribbean, including Jamaica, where transgender women report pervasive violence. The study objective was to examine factors associated with sex work involvement among transgender women in Jamaica. In 2015, we implemented a cross-sectional survey using modified peer-driven recruitment with transgender women in Kingston and Ocho Rios, Jamaica, in collaboration with a local community-based AIDS service organization. We conducted multivariable logistic regression analyses to identify factors associated with paid sex and transactional sex. Exchanging oral, anal or vaginal sex for money only was categorized as paid sex. Exchanging sex for survival needs (food, accommodation, transportation), drugs or alcohol, or for money along with survival needs and/or drugs/alcohol, was categorized as transactional sex. Among 137 transgender women (mean age: 24.0 [SD: 4.5]), two-thirds reported living in the Kingston area. Overall, 25.2% reported being HIV-positive. Approximately half (n = 71; 51.82%) reported any sex work involvement, this included sex in exchange for: money (n = 64; 47.06%); survival needs (n = 27; 19.85%); and drugs/alcohol (n = 6; 4.41%). In multivariable analyses, paid sex and transactional sex were both associated with: intrapersonal (depression), interpersonal (lower social support, forced sex, childhood sexual abuse, intimate partner violence, multiple partners/polyamory), and structural (transgender stigma, unemployment) factors. Participants reporting transactional sex also reported increased odds of incarceration perceived to be due to transgender identity, forced sex, homelessness, and lower resilience, in comparison with participants reporting

  18. Ideal and actual involvement of community pharmacists in health promotion and prevention: a cross-sectional study in Quebec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laliberté Marie-Claude

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increased interest is observed in broadening community pharmacists' role in public health. To date, little information has been gathered in Canada on community pharmacists' perceptions of their role in health promotion and prevention; however, such data are essential to the development of public-health programs in community pharmacy. A cross-sectional study was therefore conducted to explore the perceptions of community pharmacists in urban and semi-urban areas regarding their ideal and actual levels of involvement in providing health-promotion and prevention services and the barriers to such involvement. Methods Using a five-step modified Dillman's tailored design method, a questionnaire with 28 multiple-choice or open-ended questions (11 pages plus a cover letter was mailed to a random sample of 1,250 pharmacists out of 1,887 community pharmacists practicing in Montreal (Quebec, Canada and surrounding areas. It included questions on pharmacists' ideal level of involvement in providing health-promotion and preventive services; which services were actually offered in their pharmacy, the employees involved, the frequency, and duration of the services; the barriers to the provision of these services in community pharmacy; their opinion regarding the most appropriate health professionals to provide them; and the characteristics of pharmacists, pharmacies and their clientele. Results In all, 571 out of 1,234 (46.3% eligible community pharmacists completed and returned the questionnaire. Most believed they should be very involved in health promotion and prevention, particularly in smoking cessation (84.3%; screening for hypertension (81.8%, diabetes (76.0% and dyslipidemia (56.9%; and sexual health (61.7% to 89.1%; however, fewer respondents reported actually being very involved in providing such services (5.7% [lifestyle, including smoking cessation], 44.5%, 34.8%, 6.5% and 19.3%, respectively. The main barriers to the

  19. Does implementing a general surgery residency program and resident involvement affect patient outcomes and increase care-associated charges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexner, Trevor; Rosales-Velderrain, Armando; Wexner, Steven D; Rosenthal, Raul J

    2017-07-01

    Variable results regarding general surgery residency program (GSRP) impact on patient outcomes and charges are reported. The aim of this study was to determine any significant differences in patient outcomes and cost with a new GSRP. We analyzed all laparoscopic appendectomies (lap-ap), cholecystectomies (lap-chole), and inguinal hernia repairs (IHR) performed before and after implementing a GRSP. Operative time significantly increased for lap-ap (p < 0.0001), lap-chole (p < 0.0001) and IHR (p = 0.03). Time to close the incision significantly increased for lap-ap (p < 0.0001), lap-chole (p = 0.006) and IHR (p = 0.03). Length of stay only increased for lap-ap (p = 0.04). Complication rates did not increase for any procedure. However, charges significantly increased for lap-ap (p < 0.0001), lap-chole (p < 0.0001), and IHR (p = 0.03). Although a newly implemented GSRP caused increases in overall operative times, times to close incisions, and charges, it did not negatively impact patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [An intergenerational health promotion program involving older adults in urban areas. "Research of Productivity by Intergenerational Sympathy (REPRINTS)": first-year experience and short-term effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Nishi, Mariko; Watanabe, Naoki; Lee, Sangyoon; Inoue, Kazuko; Yoshida, Hiroto; Sakuma, Naoko; Kureta, Youichi; Ishii, Kenji; Uchida, Hayato; Kakuno, Fumihiko; Shinkai, Shoji

    2006-09-01

    We have launched a new intervention study, called "Research of Productivity by Intergenerational Sympathy (REPRINTS)" in which senior volunteers engage in reading picture books to children. The "REPRINTS" program consistently involves social roles and intellectual activity, two higher-level functional capacities. This study reported findings and problems experienced through "REPRINTS" during the first year, ascertained potential effectiveness of social activity, and proposed methods for continued activity. Basic concepts of "REPRINTS"program include "contribution to society", "life-long learning", and "group activity." Sixty seven volunteers and 74 controls, all aged 60 years and over living in three areas, ie., Chuo-ku, central Tokyo, Kawasaki city, suburb of Tokyo and Nagahama city, a local city, participated in a baseline health check-up in June, 2004. After completion of 3-month training seminars (once a week, 2 hr per session), volunteers visited public elementary schools and kindergartens in groups of 6-10 persons for 6 months. They were assessed again by follow-up health check-up in March, 2005. At baseline, the proportion of those who had no grand children (41.8% vs. 20.3%, P= 0.006), average school years (13.4 +/- 2.5 vs. 12.3 +/- 2.5 years, P= 0.008), having any experience of volunteer activities (79.1% vs. 52.7%, P=0.001), and an usual walking speed (86.7 +/- 12.3 vs. 81.3 +/- 12.9 m/min, P=0.012) were significantly higher in volunteers than in controls. There was no significant difference in other baseline characteristics between the two groups. At follow-up, social network scores for 56 volunteers were significantly improved: frequency of contact with grandchildren and others around neighborhood and size of circles of friends and acquaintances were increased, as compared to controls. Social support scores for the volunteers significantly decreased in the receiving aspect, while increased in the giving aspect. In addition, consciousness of loving

  1. Header: Do adult DTC programs prevent child maltreatment? Parental criminal justice involvement and children’s involvement with child protective services: Do adult drug treatment courts prevent child maltreatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldred, Lindsey M.; Sloan, Frank A.; Evans, Kelly E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In light of evidence showing reduced criminal recidivism and cost savings, adult drug treatment courts have grown in popularity. However, the potential spillover benefits to family members are understudied. Objectives To examine: 1) the overlap between parents who were convicted of a substance-related offense and their children’s involvement with child protective services (CPS); and 2) whether parental participation in an adult drug treatment court program reduces children’s risk for CPS involvement. Methods Administrative data from North Carolina courts, birth records, and social services were linked at the child level. First, children of parents convicted of a substance-related offense were matched to (a) children of parents convicted of a non-substance-related offense and (b) those not convicted of any offense. Second, we compared children of parents who completed a DTC program with children of parents who were referred but did not enroll, who enrolled for Children of parents convicted of a substance-related offense were at greater risk of CPS involvement than children whose parents were not convicted of any charge, but DTC participation did not mitigate this risk. Conclusion/Importance The role of specialty courts as a strategy for reducing children’s risk of maltreatment should be further explored. PMID:26789656

  2. Service user involvement in mental health system strengthening in a rural African setting: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayneh, Sisay; Lempp, Heidi; Alem, Atalay; Alemayehu, Daniel; Eshetu, Tigist; Lund, Crick; Semrau, Maya; Thornicroft, Graham; Hanlon, Charlotte

    2017-05-18

    It is essential to involve service users in efforts to expand access to mental health care in integrated primary care settings in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, there is little evidence from LMICs to guide this process. The aim of this study was to explore barriers to, and facilitators of, service user/caregiver involvement in rural Ethiopia to inform the development of a scalable approach. Thirty nine semi-structured interviews were carried out with purposively selected mental health service users (n = 13), caregivers (n = 10), heads of primary care facilities (n = 8) and policy makers/planners/service developers (n = 8). The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed in Amharic, and translated into English. Thematic analysis was applied. All groups of participants supported service user and caregiver involvement in mental health system strengthening. Potential benefits were identified as (i) improved appropriateness and quality of services, and (ii) greater protection against mistreatment and promotion of respect for service users. However, hardly any respondents had prior experience of service user involvement. Stigma was considered to be a pervasive barrier, operating within the health system, the local community and individuals. Competing priorities of service users included the need to obtain adequate individual care and to work for survival. Low recognition of the potential contribution of service users seemed linked to limited empowerment and mobilization of service users. Potential health system facilitators included a culture of community oversight of primary care services. All groups of respondents identified a need for awareness-raising and training to equip service users, caregivers, service providers and local community for involvement. Empowerment at the level of individual service users (information about mental health conditions, care and rights) and the group level (for advocacy and representation) were considered

  3. Wegener Granulomatosis with Oral Involvement as Primary Manifestation: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdokht Rashed

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wegener Granulomatosis is a rare multisystemic disease with an unknown cause, characterized by necrotic granulomatous lesions in respiratory tract, systemic vasculitis in small arteries and veins and necrotizing glomerulonephritis. Wegener can affect any organ including kidneys, eyes or other organs but classically affects upper and lower respiratory tract. One of the rare but important signs of this disease is oral involvement, generally occurring in 6-13% of patients, however, oral involvement as the primary manifestation of disease, occurs in only 5-6% of cases. The most common oral manifestation is strawberry gingivitis. Patients: Our patient was a 35 year-old man with gingival bleeding during brushing which began approximately 45 days before referring to the department of oral and maxillofacial diseases, Mashhad Dental School. In intraoral examination, his gingiva had a papillomatous appearance and was purple in color (strawberry appearance. Due to the presence of strawberry appearance in absence of plaque, primary diagnosis of Wegener granulomatosis was established and the patient was referred for histopathological evaluation. In laboratory tests, C-ANCA was positive and P-ANCA was negative. Finally, diagnosis of Wegener granulomatosis was confirmed and his treatment was started. Rheumatologic condition of patient's lungs was evaluated by chest X-ray and CT-scan and blood tests, biochemistry tests and urine analysis were performed for the patient. He did not have pulmonary or renal involvement. In our study, the patient was followed up after 1, 2 and 11 months from the first visit. Discussion: Up to now, few reports have been published on Wegener disease with oral involvement and in most of these articles, Wegener was diagnosed after respiratory symptoms and kidney or other organs involvement. Only in few studies was Wegener diagnosis confirmed on the basis of oral symptoms and gingival involvement. Immediate and aggressive

  4. [Evaluation of brachial plexus fascicles involvement on infraclavicular block: unfixed cadaver study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmão, Luiz Carlos Buarque de; Lima, Jacqueline Silva Brito; Ramalho, Jeane da Rosa Oiticica; Leite, Amanda Lira Dos Santos; Silva, Alberson Maylson Ramos da

    2015-01-01

    This study shows how occurs the diffusion of the anesthetic into the sheath through the axiliary infraclavicular space and hence prove the efficacy of the anesthetic block of the brachial plexus, and may thereby allow a consolidation of this pathway, with fewer complications, previously attached to the anesthesia. 33 armpits of adult cadavers were analyzed and unfixed. We injected a solution of neoprene with latex dye in the infraclavicular space, based on the technique advocated by Gusmão et al., and put the corpses in refrigerators for three weeks. Subsequently, the specimens were thawed and dissected, exposing the axillary sheath along its entire length. Was demonstrated involvement of all fasciculus of the plexus in 51.46%. In partial involvement was 30.30%, and 18.24% of cases the acrylic was located outside the auxiliary sheath involving no issue. The results allow us to establish the infraclavicular as an effective and easy way to access plexus brachial, because the solution involved the fascicles in 81.76% partially or totally, when was injected inside the axillary sheath. We believe that only the use of this pathway access in practice it may demonstrate the efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of brachial plexus fascicles involvement on infraclavicular block: unfixed cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gusmão, Luiz Carlos Buarque; Lima, Jacqueline Silva Brito; Ramalho, Jeane da Rosa Oiticica; Leite, Amanda Lira dos Santos; da Silva, Alberson Maylson Ramos

    2015-01-01

    This study shows how the diffusion of the anesthetic into the sheath occurs through the axillary infraclavicular space and hence proves the efficacy of the anesthetic block of the brachial plexus, and may thereby allow a consolidation of this pathway, with fewer complications, previously attached to the anesthesia. 33 armpits of adult cadavers were analyzed and unfixed. We injected a solution of neoprene with latex dye in the infraclavicular space, based on the technique advocated by Gusmão et al., and put the corpses in refrigerators for three weeks. Subsequently, the specimens were thawed and dissected, exposing the axillary sheath along its entire length. Was demonstrated involvement of all fasciculus of the plexus in 51.46%. In partial involvement was 30.30%, 18.24% of cases the acrylic was located outside the auxiliary sheath involving no issue. The results allow us to establish the infraclavicular as an effective and easy way to access plexus brachial, because the solution involved the fascicles in 81.76% partially or totally, when it was injected inside the axillary sheath. We believe that only the use of this pathway access in practice it may demonstrate the efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Swedish pediatric diabetes teams' perception of fathers' involvement: A Grounded Theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, Ase; Povlsen, Lene; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth; Borup, Ina

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze how Swedish pediatric diabetes teams perceived and discussed fathers' involvement in the care of their child with type 1 diabetes. It also aimed to discuss how the teams' attitudes towards the fathers' involvement developed during the data collection process. The Constructivist Grounded Theory design was used and data were collected during three repeated focus group discussions with three Swedish pediatric diabetes teams. The core category of the teams' perception of fathers' involvement emerged as: If dad attends, we are happy - if mom doesn't, we become concerned. Initially the teams balanced their perception of fathers' involvement on the mother's role as the primary caregiver. In connection with the teams' directed attention on fathers, in the focus group discussions, the teams' awareness of the importance of fathers increased. As a consequence, the team members began to encourage fathers' engagement in their child's care. We conclude that by increasing the teams' awareness of fathers as a health resource, an active health promotion perspective could be implemented in pediatric diabetes care. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county's future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  8. Final report on the public involvement process phase 1, Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L.; Shanteau, C.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the pubic involvement component of Phase 1 of the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility (NM) Feasibility Study in San Juan County, Utah. Part of this summary includes background information on the federal effort to locate a voluntary site for temporary storage of nuclear waste, how San Juan County came to be involved, and a profile of the county. The heart of the report, however, summarizes the activities within the public involvement process, and the issues raised in those various forums. The authors have made every effort to reflect accurately and thoroughly all the concerns and suggestions expressed to us during the five month process. We hope that this report itself is a successful model of partnership with the citizens of the county -- the same kind of partnership the county is seeking to develop with its constituents. Finally, this report offers some suggestions to both county officials and residents alike. These suggestions concern how decision-making about the county`s future can be done by a partnership of informed citizens and listening decision-makers. In the Appendix are materials relating to the public involvement process in San Juan County.

  9. Evaluation of brachial plexus fascicles involvement on infraclavicular block: unfixed cadaver study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Buarque de Gusmão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study shows how the diffusion of the anesthetic into the sheath occurs through the axillary infraclavicular space and hence proves the efficacy of the anesthetic block of the brachial plexus, and may thereby allow a consolidation of this pathway, with fewer complications, previously attached to the anesthesia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 33 armpits of adult cadavers were analyzed and unfixed. We injected a solution of neoprene with latex dye in the infraclavicular space, based on the technique advocated by Gusmão et al., and put the corpses in refrigerators for three weeks. Subsequently, the specimens were thawed and dissected, exposing the axillary sheath along its entire length. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Was demonstrated involvement of all fasciculus of the plexus in 51.46%. In partial involvement was 30.30%, 18.24% of cases the acrylic was located outside the auxiliary sheath involving no issue. CONCLUSIONS: The results allow us to establish the infraclavicular as an effective and easy way to access plexus brachial, because the solution involved the fascicles in 81.76% partially or totally, when it was injected inside the axillary sheath. We believe that only the use of this pathway access in practice it may demonstrate the efficiency.

  10. Phylogenetic Study of Polyketide Synthases and Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Involved in the Biosynthesis of Mycotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Ferrara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyketide synthase (PKSs and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPSs are large multimodular enzymes involved in biosynthesis of polyketide and peptide toxins produced by fungi. Furthermore, hybrid enzymes, in which a reducing PKS region is fused to a single NRPS module, are also responsible of the synthesis of peptide-polyketide metabolites in fungi. The genes encoding for PKSs and NRPSs have been exposed to complex evolutionary mechanisms, which have determined the great number and diversity of metabolites. In this study, we considered the most important polyketide and peptide mycotoxins and, for the first time, a phylogenetic analysis of both PKSs and NRPSs involved in their biosynthesis was assessed using two domains for each enzyme: β-ketosynthase (KS and acyl-transferase (AT for PKSs; adenylation (A and condensation (C for NRPSs. The analysis of both KS and AT domains confirmed the differentiation of the three classes of highly, partially and non-reducing PKSs. Hybrid PKS-NRPSs involved in mycotoxins biosynthesis grouped together in the phylogenetic trees of all the domains analyzed. For most mycotoxins, the corresponding biosynthetic enzymes from distinct fungal species grouped together, except for PKS and NRPS involved in ochratoxin A biosynthesis, for which an unlike process of evolution could be hypothesized in different species.

  11. High School Students Participate in a CAI Study Skills Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.

    A 10-module computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program on study skills was field tested to determine its effectiveness with high school students, using 50 advanced seniors in a large Texas high school as subjects. The program consisted of a study skills pretest, the CAI modules, a notebook on study skills, and a posttest. The modules were…

  12. Do Study Abroad Programs Enhance the Employability of Graduates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Using data on a large sample of recent Italian graduates, this paper investigates the extent to which participation in study abroad programs during university studies impacts subsequent employment likelihood. To address the problem of endogeneity related to participation in study abroad programs, I use a combination of fixed effects and…

  13. Study Abroad Programs: A Golden Opportunity for Academic Library Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denda, Kayo

    2013-01-01

    Study abroad programs in higher education increasingly play a major role in training students for global citizenship. This case study, conducted in a large research university in the United States, identifies the information needs of students and faculty in study abroad programs. Of particular interest is how awareness of library resources and…

  14. Factors Influencing Student Participation in College Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Soumava; Bandyopadhyay, Kakoli

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical framework to investigate the factors that influence student participation in college study abroad programs. The authors posit that students' general perceptions regarding the study abroad experience and their expectations of intercultural awareness from study abroad programs will impact their perceptions of…

  15. Risk management in the different phases of a construction project:a study of actors' involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Osipova, Ekaterina

    2007-01-01

    The results from a questionnaire survey of risk management in the different phases of a construction project are presented. The participants of the study were clients, contractors and consultants working in Sweden. We analysed the involvement of these actors in the project phases, their roles in the risk management process in particular and their influence on risk management. We show that the planning and production phases of a construction project are the most important for risk management, ...

  16. Prevalence and patterns of neurological involvement in Behcet's disease: a prospective study from Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Araji, A; Sharquie, K; Al-Rawi, Z

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of neurological involvement in Behcet's disease in a prospective study, and to describe the clinical patterns of neurological presentation in this disease in patients attending a multidisciplinary clinic in Baghdad. Methods: All patients attending the clinic who fulfilled the international study group criteria for the diagnosis of Behcet's disease were studied during a two year period starting in April 1999. Patients were assessed neurologically by a neuro-Behcetologist. All those with clinical neurological manifestations were sent for CSF examination, cranial magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance venography and were followed up to explore the patterns of neurological relapse. Results: 140 patients with Behcet's disease were studied. Their mean age was 34.2 years (range 16 to 66); 105 (75%) were men and 35 (25%) were women. The mean duration of the disease was 4.2 years (range 0.4 to 26). Twenty patients (14%) had neurological involvement (neuro-Behcet's disease); 14 of these (70%) were men and six (30%) women. The mean age at the first neurological presentation was 34.1 years. The mean duration of follow up of patients with neuro-Behcet's disease was 20.7 months. Ten patients with neuro-Behcet's disease (50%) presented with parenchymal CNS involvement, six (30%) with intracranial hypertension, and four (20%) with a mixed pattern of both parenchymal CNS involvement and intracranial hypertension. Conclusions: Careful neurological assessment of patients with Behcet's disease may show a relatively high prevalence of neuro-Behcet features, and though the clinical patterns of presentation are characteristic a mixed pattern may occur. PMID:12700303

  17. A Study on the Relationship between Sports Involvement and Social Stratifcation of Adults

    OpenAIRE

    丸山, 富雄; 日下, 裕弘; Tomio, Maruyama; Yuko, KUSAKA; 仙台大学; SENDAI COLLEGE

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between sports involvement and social stratification of adults. As a result of cluster analysis of four status variables (occupational prestige, academic career, annual income and life style), 815 sample cases were divided into six stratificational clusters. These were the upper and the lower stratum in Japan, and four middle strata having various status patterns. The results were summarized as follows; 1. There were not stratification...

  18. Dental trauma involving root fracture and periodontal ligament injury: a 10-year retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Sônia Regina Panzarini; Denise Pedrini; Wilson Roberto Poi; Celso Koogi Sonoda; Daniela Atili Brandini; José Carlos Monteiro de Castro

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the cases of traumatic dental injuries involving root fracture and/or periodontal ligament injury (except avulsion) treated at the Discipline of Integrated Clinic, School of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Brazil, from January 1992 to December 2002. Clinical and radiographic records from 161 patients with 287 traumatized teeth that had sustained root fracture and/or injuries to the periodontal ligament were exa...

  19. Substance Use among Adolescents Involved in Bullying: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Gaete; Bernardita Tornero; Daniela Valenzuela; Cristian A. Rojas-Barahona; Christina Salmivalli; Eduardo Valenzuela; Ricardo Araya

    2017-01-01

    Being involved in bullying as a victim or perpetrator could have deleterious health consequences. Even though there is some evidence that bullies and victims of bullying have a higher risk for drug use, less is known about bystanders. The aim of this research was to study the association between bullying experience (as victims, bullies, or bystanders) and substance use. We gathered complete information from a nationally representative sample of 36,687 students (51.4% female) attending 756 sch...

  20. A psychological study of spinal cord injured patients involved in the Madras Paraplegia Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, O; Balakrishnan, S; Ravindran, O S; Shanmugasundaram, T K

    1992-11-01

    The psychological features of spinal cord injured (SCI) patients involved in the Madras Paraplegia Project are described. Three hundred and twenty-eight patients were studied. Based on personality tests, 11% were extroverts, 14% were introverts and 76% were neither extroverts nor introverts. Twenty-four percent of the subjects were neurotic, 11% had a depressive illness, and 26% had pathological anxiety. The study has highlighted the psychological status of SCI patients, and the usefulness of a psychiatric team in the multidisciplinary care of such patients. This is probably the first large psychological study of SCI patients from a developing country.

  1. Impact of Aspect-Oriented Programming on the Quality of Novices’ Programs: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Katic

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspect-oriented programming has been introduced in order to increase the modularity of object-oriented programs and is claimed to improve software quality. Although there are various researches on this claim, the question to what extent aspect-oriented programming improves the quality of programs depending on a developer’s experience still remains. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether aspect-oriented programming used by novice programmers improves the quality of programs, in terms of software flexibility and readability (consequently reusability and maintainability as well. As a part of an undergraduate course in programming paradigms and languages, a systematic comparison between students’ object-oriented and aspect-oriented solutions of the same problem was driven. In order to drive this comparison we have established the basis for the development of the new quality assessment model consisting of software metrics for an objective evaluation and student survey for subjective evaluation. The results show that the use of aspect-oriented programming lead to novices’ programs that are easier to change and read (flexible and readable compared to object-oriented programs. What is more, administered survey showed that students perceive their programs as more flexible and readable.

  2. Managing Ethical Problems in Qualitative Research Involving Vulnerable Populations, Using a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalina van Wijk RN, PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the researcher's study was to examine the meaning that intimate partners of female rape victims attached to their lived experiences after the rape. The conduct of qualitative research concerning non-offending partners of female rape victims, however, often involves multifaceted ethical and practical challenges, which can be managed through the use of pilot studies. The pilot study described in this report had three objectives. The first was to pretest and refine the proposed method for locating, accessing, and recruiting intimate partners of female rape victims, within the first two weeks after the rape, for participation in a six-month longitudinal study. The second objective was to identify and prevent all possible risk factors in the proposed recruitment and data collection methods that could harm the participants' safety during the main study. The third objective was to determine the feasibility of the main study, in terms of the limited financial and human resources available. The pilot phase was valuable in identifying ethical and methodological problems during the recruitment of participants and collection of data. It allowed for methodological adjustments prior to the main study and confirmed the feasibility of the overall research design. A pilot, pretesting phase is therefore seen as an essential component of a qualitative study involving a vulnerable population.

  3. Teachers' Perceptions of Georgia's Early Reading Intervention Program: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobby, Patti Tennant

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study used an ethnographic method to investigate teachers' perceptions of reading interventions delivered in a state-funded early intervention program (EIP). Academically at-risk students struggle to meet grade-level standards year after year, even with interventions involving small group, targeted assistance. Teacher perceptions…

  4. A Follow-Up Study of Eco Education's Environmental Service-Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobert, Thomas Milton

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine student views of the influence of the Eco Education Urban Stewards program's impact on their involvement in community environmental initiatives. Eco Education is a non-profit organization in St. Paul that facilitates an urban, environmental, year-long science curriculum delivered in middle schools in…

  5. Novel participatory methods of involving patients in research: naming and branding a longitudinal cohort study, BRIGHTLIGHT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Mohain, Jasjeet; Gibson, Faith; Solanki, Anita; Whelan, Jeremy; Fern, Lorna A

    2015-03-14

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) is central to research and service planning. Identifying effective, meaningful ways of involvement is challenging. The cohort study 'Do specialist services for teenagers and young adults with cancer add value?' follows young people for three years, examining outcomes associated with specialist care. Participant retention in longitudinal research can be problematic potentially jeopardising study completion. Maximising study awareness through high impact branding and publicity may improve study retention. Study names are typically generated by researchers rather than designed with patients. We aimed to involve young people in developing a brand identity and name to 'Do specialist services for teenagers and young adults with cancer add value?'. Nine young people aged 17-26 years diagnosed with cancer when aged 14-25 years participated in a one day workshop with further data collection at a patient conference. Methodology was similar to conventional branding and naming exercises and was divided into six stages. The workshop comprised five stages. Stage 1: 'What's in a brand' allowed young people to enquire why brands/logos are important, Stage 2: 'Brand Transformation' identified what young people needed to know and believe about the study when approached about participation, Stage 3: 'Brand Essence' determined how we wanted the study to be perceived by young people, Stage 4: 'What's in a name' identified potential names for the study. Stage 5: 'Logo creation' assembled the mood and feel of logos. Stage 6 was logo design and an electronic survey of 249 young people attending a patient conference. BRIGHTLIGHT was the final study name and the brand essence (or study personality) was friendly, supportive and inspiring. Four logos were designed and the final logo received 47% (n = 115) of votes. Acceptance and retention to BRIGHTLIGHT is higher than anticipated (80% versus 60%), this may be related to our integral PPI strategy. We

  6. A Case Study on Jerudong Primary School Adoption Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Sukardi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this case study were to describe comprehensively how the SEAMEO-VOCTECH Regional Center conducted the school adoption program, to gain information from teachers and related persons on the implementation of the programs, and to identify various interventions for achieving maximum outputs. The study employed a naturalistic qualitative method with Jerudong primary school and the VOCTECH Center as the major sites of the study. Three methods of data collection were enumeration techniques, participant observation and in-depth interview. The findings indicate how beneficial the program was to the school, and the program appears to be suitable to Indonesian schools, whose communities, conditions, and potencies vary

  7. Participation of adolescent girls in a study of sexual behaviors: balancing autonomy and parental involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Mary B; Wiemann, Constance; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2009-04-01

    The process of research with adolescents should balance parental involvement and adolescent autonomy. The attendance of parents and peers at research study visits of girls participating in a 6-month study of topical microbicide acceptability is described, as well as the participants' conversations with their parents. Girls, 14 through 21 years, were recruited from previous studies (3%), advertisements (14%), clinics (17%), and recommendations by friends (66%) to participate. Girls under 18 years were required to have parental consent, but parents could provide verbal phone consent as long as a signed consent form was returned before participation. The 208 participants were 41% African-American, 30% Hispanic, and 29% Caucasian. Girls averaged 18 years of age, and 95 (46%) were under 18. Seventeen percent of parents attended the first visit; only 1 parent attended with a daughter older than 18 years of age. The mothers of older adolescents were less likely to attend the appointment with them. More Caucasian than African-American girls came with a mother. Parental attendance decreased at follow-up visits. Thirty-seven percent of girls brought a peer to the first visit; there were no age or race/ethnic differences. There was no relationship between attending with a parent or peer and talking to a parent about the study. Some adolescents obtained parental consent to participate in the study while keeping their sexual behaviors private. Parental attendance at study visits may not be marker of parental involvement with the study. Creative ways for balancing concerns about confidentiality, promotion of autonomy, and adult involvement should be considered.

  8. Somatisation in primary care: experiences of primary care physicians involved in a training program and in a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salazar Agustín

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new intervention aimed at managing patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS based on a specific set of communication techniques was developed, and tested in a cluster randomised clinical trial. Due to the modest results obtained and in order to improve our intervention we need to know the GPs' attitudes towards patients with MUS, their experience, expectations and the utility of the communication techniques we proposed and the feasibility of implementing them. Physicians who took part in 2 different training programs and in a randomised controlled trial (RCT for patients with MUS were questioned to ascertain the reasons for the doctors' participation in the trial and the attitudes, experiences and expectations of GPs about the intervention. Methods A qualitative study based on four focus groups with GPs who took part in a RCT. A content analysis was carried out. Results Following the RCT patients are perceived as true suffering persons, and the relationship with them has improved in GPs of both groups. GPs mostly valued the fact that it is highly structured, that it made possible a more comfortable relationship and that it could be applied to a broad spectrum of patients with psychosocial problems. Nevertheless, all participants consider that change in patients is necessary; GPs in the intervention group remarked that that is extremely difficult to achieve. Conclusion GPs positively evaluate the communication techniques and the interventions that help in understanding patient suffering, and express the enormous difficulties in handling change in patients. These findings provide information on the direction in which efforts for improving intervention should be directed. Trial registration US ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00130988

  9. Sustaining patient and public involvement in research: A case study of a research centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinks, Clare; Carter, Pam; Rhodes, Carol; Beech, Roger; Dziedzic, Krysia; Hughes, Rhian; Blackburn, Steven; Ong, Bie Nio

    2013-12-01

    The literature on patient and public involvement (PPI) in research covers a wide range of topics. However, one area of investigation that appears under developed is the sustainability and impact of PPI beyond involvement in time-limited research projects. This paper presents a case study of PPI development in one primary care research centre in England, and its approach to making this sustainable using documentary sources and material from a formal evaluation. We provide narrative accounts of the set-up, operation and main processes of PPI, and its perceived impact. PPI requires a long-term perspective with participation and trust growing over time, and both users and researchers learning what approaches work best. PPI is a complex interplay of clarity of purpose, defined roles and relationships, organised support (paid PPI staff) and a well-funded infrastructure. 'Soft systems' are equally important such as flexible and informal approaches to meetings, adapting timetables and environments to meet the needs of lay members and to create spaces for relationships to develop between researchers and lay members that are based on mutual trust and respect. This case study highlights that the right combination of ethos, flexible working practices, leadership, and secure funding goes a long way to embedding PPI beyond ad hoc involvement. This allows PPI in research to be integrated in the infrastructure and sustainable.

  10. Men's involvement in antenatal screening: a qualitative pilot study using e-mail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert Alan; Dheensa, Sandi; Metcalfe, Alison

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to explore and analyse men's involvement in antenatal genetic screening and testing in England, and evaluate the use of e-mail communication as a method of health research with men. After receiving a favourable ethical opinion, a longitudinal qualitative pilot study was undertaken. Eight men, whose partners were pregnant, were recruited by purposive sampling. Findings indicated that the men experienced ambivalence, doubts and uncertainty about medically identified genetic risks, and also experienced an 'emotional rollercoaster', which was associated with their involvement in antenatal genetic screening and testing. Although connectedness with their partners and shared decision making were highly valued, men's involvement was mediated by their partners and health professionals, including midwives. The implications of findings for medicalisation theory and future research are discussed. Using e-mail was a success in that the strong pilot data produced provides a stimulus for future research. In addition, implications for policy and practice are also considered, specifically the importance of addressing ambivalence and mediation if midwives are to communicate effectively when working with men and women regarding antenatal genetic screening and testing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Qualitative Study of Smoking Behaviors among Newly Released Justice-Involved Men and Women in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Pamela; Bachman, Lauren; Rucker, A Justin

    2016-05-01

    Long-term effects of cigarette smoking result in an estimated 443,000 deaths each year, including approximately 49,400 deaths due to exposure to secondhand smoke. Tobacco is a major risk factor for a variety of chronic health problems, including certain cancers and heart disease. In this article, authors present qualitative findings derived from individual interviews with men and women who were incarcerated in New York state and New York City. Participants were 60 racially and ethnically diverse men and women ages 21 through 60 (M = 46.42, SD = 6.88). Of the participants interviewed, 91.7 percent released from a smoke-free correctional facility resumed cigarette smoking and 8.3 percent remained abstinent. Daily consumption ranged from smoking four cigarettes to 60 cigarettes. The four themes that emerged from the study were (1) lifetime exposure to cigarette smoking influences smoking behavior; (2) cigarettes help relieve stress and are pleasurable; (3) there is a relationship between access, availability, and relapse; and (4) smoking cessation strategies are available. Negative influences from participants' families and peers, stressful housing situations, and mandated programs emerged from this study as key challenges to abstaining from smoking cigarettes. Involving family members and partners in smoking cessation interventions could influence newly released justice-involved men and women not to resume cigarette smoking and possibly maintain long-term abstinence.

  12. An Exploratory Study to Measure Excessive Involvement in Multitasking Interaction with Smart Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yubo; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick

    2016-06-01

    This study developed a scale measuring excessive involvement in multitasking interaction with smart devices. An online questionnaire was designed and surveyed in a sample of 380 respondents. The sample was split into two groups for exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, respectively. A four-factor structure was identified with an acceptable goodness of fit. The first two factors, "Obsession and neglect" and "Problematic control," described the obsessive feelings, neglect behaviors, and behavior control problems accompanied by excessive multitasking interaction with smart devices. The latter two factors, "Multitasking preference" and "Polychronic orientation," referred to multitaskers' preference of engaging in multiple media use or interaction tasks rather than a single task from the time orientation perspective. The four-factor structure indicates that excessive involvement in multitasking interaction with smart devices shares some similarities with other behavioral addiction types, but demonstrates uniqueness compared with excessive engagement in single media use.

  13. Involvement of the larynx motor area in singing-voice perception: a TMS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohana eLévêque

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has reported that the motor system has a role in speech or emotional vocalization discrimination. In the present study we investigated the involvement of the larynx motor representation in singing perception. Twenty-one non-musicians listened to short tones sung by a human voice or played by a machine and performed a categorization task. Thereafter continuous theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied over the right larynx pre-motor area or on the vertex and the test administered again. Overall, reaction times were shorter after stimulation over both sites. Nonetheless and most importantly, reaction times became longer for sung than for machine sounds after stimulation on the larynx area. This effect suggests that the right premotor region is functionally involved in singing perception and that sound humanness modulates motor resonance.

  14. A Roadmap for Recovery/Decontamination Plan for Critical Infrastructure after CBRN Event Involving Drinking Water Utilities: Scoping Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    INFORMATIVE STATEMENTS CSSP -2012-CD-1020 A Roadmap for Recovery/Decontamination Plan for Critical Infrastructure after CBRN Event Involving...Drinking Water Utilities was supported by the Canadian Safety and Security Program ( CSSP ) which is led by Defence Research and Development Canada’s Centre...Section. CSSP is a federally-funded program to strengthen Canada’s ability to anticipate, prevent/mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover

  15. A prospective longitudinal study of children’s theory of mind and adolescent involvement in bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sania, Shakoor; Jaffee, Sara R; Bowes, Lucy; Ouellet-Morin, Isabelle; Andreou, Penelope; Happé, Francesca; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Background Theory of mind allows the understanding and prediction of other people’s behaviours based on their mental states (e.g. beliefs). It is important for healthy social relationships and thus may contribute towards children’s involvement in bullying. The present study investigated whether children involved in bullying during early adolescence had poor theory of mind in childhood. Method Participants were members of the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, a nationally-representative sample of 2,232 children and their families. Families were visited by the authors when children were 5, 7, 10 and 12 years. Theory of mind was assessed when the children were 5 years using eight standardized tasks. Identification of those children who were involved in bullying as victims, bullies and bully-victims using mothers’, teachers’ and children’s reports was carried out when they were 12 years’ old. Results Poor theory of mind predicted becoming a victim (effect size, d=0.26), bully (d=0.25) or bully-victim (d=0.44) in early adolescence. These associations remained for victims and bully-victims when child-specific (e.g., IQ) and family factors (e.g., child maltreatment) were controlled for. Emotional and behavioural problems during middle childhood did not modify the association between poor theory of mind and adolescent bullying experiences. Conclusion Identifying and supporting children with poor theory of mind early in life could help reduce their vulnerability for involvement in bullying and thus limit its adverse effects on mental health. PMID:22081896

  16. Dropout from exercise programs for seniors: A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiggelbout, M.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Tak, E.; Lechner, L.; Mechelen, W. van

    2005-01-01

    This study examines dropout incidence, moment of dropout, and switching behavior in organized exercise programs for seniors in the Netherlands, as determined in a prospective cohort study (with baseline measurements at the start of the exercise program and follow-up after 6 months; N = 1,725,

  17. Male College Student Perceptions of Intercultural and Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirolf, Kathryn Q.

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to understand why men participate in study abroad at much lower rates than women, this study examines how male college students at a large research university perceive a university-run global education program, especially in terms of the expected costs and benefits of participating in such programs, and the extent to which gender…

  18. The Role of Scholarships in Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the role of scholarships in study abroad programs. Suppose that a university attempts to maximize the average ability of its student body by encouraging students to participate in study abroad programs. It is shown that the ideal scholarship vehicle to accomplish this is a fixed-amount award independent of a student's ability…

  19. SHPPS 2006: School Health Policies and Programs Study--Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. This brief reports study results in the following areas, as they relate to nutrition: (1) Health Education; (2) Health Services and Mental Health and…

  20. Strategies and Challenges for Creating an Inclusive Study Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Tanja C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, 14,304,467 U.S. students participated in a study abroad program related to their academic course work, marking an average increase of 5.2% to the previous year among the reporting institutions. Students with disabilities continue to be significantly underrepresented in such programs. Given the consistent popularity of studying abroad, its…

  1. Modeling the effects of study abroad programs on college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvin H. Yu; Garry E. Chick; Duarte B. Morais; Chung-Hsien Lin

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the possibility of modeling the effects of a study abroad program on students from a university in the northeastern United States. A program effect model was proposed after conducting an extensive literature review and empirically examining a sample of 265 participants in 2005. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA),...

  2. Compassion and Caring: Missing Concepts in Social Studies Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliner, Pearl

    1979-01-01

    Current social studies programs do not include the study of prosocial behaviors such as altruism, generosity, and compassion. This omission legitimizes the view that human behaviors are self-serving. Curriculum developers should fashion programs which provide prosocial models and opportunities for students to conceptualize such behaviors and…

  3. The ethics of human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides: unanswered dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The controversy about the use of data from human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides as part of regulatory risk assessment has been widely discussed, but the complex and interrelated scientific and ethical issues remain largely unresolved. This discussion paper, generated by authors who comprised a workgroup of the ICOH Scientific Committee on Rural Health, reviews the use of human experimental studies in regulatory risk assessment for pesticides with a view to advancing the debate as to when, if ever, such studies might be ethically justifiable. The discussion is based on three elements: (a) a review of discussion papers on the topic of human testing of pesticides and the positions adopted by regulatory agencies in developed countries; (b) an analysis of published and unpublished studies involving human testing with pesticides, both in the peer-reviewed literature and in the JMPR database; and (c) application of an ethical analysis to the problem. The paper identifies areas of agreement which include general principles that may provide a starting point on which to base criteria for judgements as to the ethical acceptability of such studies. However, the paper also highlights ongoing unresolved differences of opinion inherent in ethical analysis of contentious issues, which we propose should form a starting point for further debate and the development of guidelines to achieve better resolution of this matter. PMID:20718963

  4. The ethics of human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides: unanswered dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London Leslie

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The controversy about the use of data from human volunteer studies involving experimental exposure to pesticides as part of regulatory risk assessment has been widely discussed, but the complex and interrelated scientific and ethical issues remain largely unresolved. This discussion paper, generated by authors who comprised a workgroup of the ICOH Scientific Committee on Rural Health, reviews the use of human experimental studies in regulatory risk assessment for pesticides with a view to advancing the debate as to when, if ever, such studies might be ethically justifiable. The discussion is based on three elements: (a a review of discussion papers on the topic of human testing of pesticides and the positions adopted by regulatory agencies in developed countries; (b an analysis of published and unpublished studies involving human testing with pesticides, both in the peer-reviewed literature and in the JMPR database; and (c application of an ethical analysis to the problem. The paper identifies areas of agreement which include general principles that may provide a starting point on which to base criteria for judgements as to the ethical acceptability of such studies. However, the paper also highlights ongoing unresolved differences of opinion inherent in ethical analysis of contentious issues, which we propose should form a starting point for further debate and the development of guidelines to achieve better resolution of this matter.

  5. Care of the dialysis patient: Primary provider involvement and resource utilization patterns - a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Bjorg; Ramar, Priya; Hickson, LaTonya J; Reinalda, Megan S; Albright, Robert C; Tilburt, Jon C; Williams, Amy W; Takahashi, Paul Y; Jeffery, Molly M; Shah, Nilay D

    2017-10-25

    Efficient and safe delivery of care to dialysis patients is essential. Concerns have been raised regarding the ability of accountable care organizations to adequately serve this high-risk population. Little is known about primary care involvement in the care of dialysis patients. This study sought to describe the extent of primary care provider (PCP) involvement in the care of hemodialysis patients and the outcomes associated with that involvement. In a retrospective cohort study, patients accessing a Midwestern dialysis network from 2001 to 2010 linked to United States Renal Database System and with >90 days follow up were identified (n = 2985). Outpatient visits were identified using Current Procedural Terminology (CPT)-4 codes, provider specialty, and grouped into quartiles-based on proportion of PCP visits per person-year (ppy). Top and bottom quartiles represented patients with high primary care (HPC) or low primary care (LPC), respectively. Patient characteristics and health care utilization were measured and compared across patient groups. Dialysis patients had an overall average of 4.5 PCP visits ppy, ranging from 0.6 in the LPC group to 6.9 in the HPC group. HPC patients were more likely female (43.4% vs. 35.3%), older (64.0 yrs. vs. 60.0 yrs), and with more comorbidities (Charlson 7.0 vs 6.0). HPC patients had higher utilization (hospitalizations 2.2 vs. 1.8 ppy; emergency department visits 1.6 vs 1.2 ppy) and worse survival (3.9 vs 4.3 yrs) and transplant rates (16.3 vs. 31.5). PCPs are significantly involved in the care of hemodialysis patients. Patients with HPC are older, sicker, and utilize more resources than those managed primarily by nephrologists. After adjusting for confounders, there is no difference in outcomes between the groups. Further studies are needed to better understand whether there is causal impact of primary care involvement on patient survival.

  6. Census study of fatal car-to-car intersection crashes in Sweden involving modern vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnevång, Cecilia; Boström, Ola; Lie, Anders; Stigson, Helena

    2011-08-01

    Intersections are challenging for many road users. According to US, European, and global statistics, intersection-related crashes with fatal outcome represent approximately 20 percent of all traffic fatalities. The aim of this study was to use Swedish data to investigate and characterize fatal car-to-car intersection crashes for modern cars equipped with frontal and side air bags. The Swedish Transport Administration (STA) national database on fatal crashes was searched to find vehicle-to-vehicle intersection crashes involving modern cars that occurred between 2003 and 2009 that resulted in fatal injuries for at least one of the involved passengers. From all intersection crashes, the car-to-car crashes from the sample were analyzed at an occupant level. Occupant location in the target vehicle with respect to impact direction as well as AIS3+ injuries to body regions was examined for the total car-to-car sample. Crashes involving a target vehicle equipped with front and side air bags were then selected for an in-depth study. In the STA database, 39 vehicle-to-vehicle crashes matched the search criteria. Of 39 crashes, 17 involved a heavy goods vehicle (HGV) as the striking vehicle, and 17 were car-to-car crashes. All car-to-car crashes were side impacts, occurring at rural intersections, involving 20 (12 female and 8 male) fatally injured occupants, 15 of whom were 61 years or older and classified as senior occupants. A majority of fatally injured occupants sustained combined AIS3+ injuries to more than one body region. All modern car-to-car crashes with a fatal outcome occurring at Swedish intersections from 2003 to 2009 were side impacts. The crashes were characterized by a senior front seat driver, traveling with a front seat passenger, hit on the left side at approximately 70 km/h. In this study all fatal crashes occurred at severities beyond those currently evaluated in side impact rating procedures but were within survivable limits for a non-senior occupant in

  7. CDIO Projects in Civil Engineering Study Program at DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Simonsen, Claus; Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2011-01-01

    or a design build project on each of the first four semesters. In this paper the four projects in the civil engineering study program are described along with a brief description of the entire study program. The aim is to provide additional information and documentation to accompany an exposition where......In 2008 all Bachelor of engineering study programs at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) have been adopted to the “Conceive – Design – Implement – Operate” approach. As part of the necessary changes it was decided that all seven study programs should have a cross disciplinary project...... students present their projects. Learning outcomes, training and assessment of personal, professional and social engineering skills are described from a project point of view. Progression of engineering skills is discussed from a study program perspective. The interrelation between the various elements...

  8. Handling ethical, legal and social issues in birth cohort studies involving genetic research: responses from studies in six countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeGrandeur Jane

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research involving minors has been the subject of much ethical debate. The growing number of longitudinal, pediatric studies that involve genetic research present even more complex challenges to ensure appropriate protection of children and families as research participants. Long-term studies with a genetic component involve collection, retention and use of biological samples and personal information over many years. Cohort studies may be established to study specific conditions (e.g. autism, asthma or may have a broad aim to research a range of factors that influence the health and development of children. Studies are increasingly intended to serve as research platforms by providing access to data and biological samples to researchers over many years. This study examines how six birth cohort studies in North America and Europe that involve genetic research handle key ethical, legal and social (ELS issues: recruitment, especially parental authority to include a child in research; initial parental consent and subsequent assent and/or consent from the maturing child; withdrawal; confidentiality and sample/data protection; handling sensitive information; and disclosure of results. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out in 2008/09 with investigators involved in six birth cohort studies in Canada, Denmark, England, France, the Netherlands and the United States. Interviewees self-identified as being knowledgeable about ELS aspects of the study. Interviews were conducted in English. Results The studies vary in breadth of initial consent, but none adopt a blanket consent for future use of samples/data. Ethics review of new studies is a common requirement. Studies that follow children past early childhood recognise a need to seek assent/consent as the child matures. All studies limit access to identifiable data and advise participants of the right to withdraw. The clearest differences among studies concern

  9. Research involvement among undergraduate health sciences students: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovijn, J; Kajee, N; Esterhuizen, T M; Van Schalkwyk, S C

    2017-10-16

    The development of research capacity among undergraduates is an important intervention in countering the documented decrease in medical and health sciences researchers. The literature on undergraduate research generally emanates from smaller scale studies that have been conducted in high income countries, with a focus on medical students. This cross-sectional study was conducted in a Sub-Saharan country, included a population of medical and allied health professions (AHP) students, and aimed to improve our understanding of the factors influencing undergraduate student research. A questionnaire was distributed to all students enrolled in an undergraduate programme at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa (including Medicine and four AHP programmes). Data was collected on a number of demographic characteristics and on 3 major outcome-themes: "voluntary research involvement", "self-perceived research competence" and "future research participation". Associations between characteristics and outcome themes were explored. In total, 1815 students participated in the study (response rate 80.2%). Of all the demographic variables, discipline (AHP programmes vs. Medicine), male gender and prior undergraduate experience in a science degree were significantly associated with voluntary research involvement. Significantly higher levels of self-perceived research competence and greater interest in future research participation, were seen among participants from AHP programmes; males; and those with previous or current voluntary research involvement. Ethnicity and geographic background were not significantly associated with any of our outcomes. Our results offer important new evidence in support of the imperative to diversify the research work-force, in Sub-Saharan Africa and globally. Enhanced efforts aimed at achieving better academic representation in terms of gender, ethnicity, geographical and socio-economic backgrounds

  10. A Pilot Study Involving the Effect of Two Different Complex Training Protocols on Lower Body Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Chad E.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Complex training (CT involves the coupling of two exercises ostensibly to enhance the effect of the second exercise. Typically, the first exercise is a strength exercise and the second exercise is a power exercise involving similar muscles. In most cases, CT is designed to enhance power. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, this study was designed to determine if lower body power could be enhanced using complex training protocols. Second, this study investigated whether the inclusion of a power exercise instead of a strength exercise as the first exercise in CT would produce differences in lower body power. Methods. Thirty-six recreationally-trained men and women aged 20 to 29 years attending a college physical education course were randomly assigned to one of three groups: squat and countermovement squat jumps (SSJ, kettlebell swings and countermovement squat jumps (KSJ, and a control (CON. Training involving CT lasted 6 weeks. All participants were pre- and posttested for vertical jump performance in order to assess lower body power. Results. Vertical jump scores improved for all groups (p < 0.01. The results also indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between group scores across time (p = 0.215. The statistical power for this analysis was low (0.312, most likely due to the small sample size. However, the results did reveal a trend suggesting that the training improvements were greater for both the SSJ and KSJ groups compared with the CON (by 171% and 107%, respectively although significance was not reached. Conclusions. Due to the observed trend, a replication of this study with a greater number of participants over a longer period of time is warranted.

  11. Phytoremediation potential of the novel atrazine tolerant Lolium multiflorum and studies on the mechanisms involved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merini, Luciano J. [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bobillo, Cecilia [Servicio de Huellas Digitales Geneticas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, BS As (Argentina); Cuadrado, Virginia [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Corach, Daniel [Servicio de Huellas Digitales Geneticas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, BS As (Argentina); Giulietti, Ana M., E-mail: agiule@ffyb.uba.a [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-11-15

    Atrazine impact on human health and the environment have been extensively studied. Phytoremediation emerged as a low cost, environmental friendly biotechnological solution for atrazine pollution in soil and water. In vitro atrazine tolerance assays were performed and Lolium multiflorum was found as a novel tolerant species, able to germinate and grow in the presence of 1 mg kg{sup -1} of the herbicide. L. multiflorum presented 20% higher atrazine removal capacity than the natural attenuation, with high initial degradation rate in microcosms. The mechanisms involved in atrazine tolerance such as mutation in psbA gene, enzymatic detoxification via P{sub 450} or chemical hydrolysis through benzoxazinones were evaluated. It was demonstrated that atrazine tolerance is conferred by enhanced enzymatic detoxification via P{sub 450}. Due to its atrazine degradation capacity in soil and its agronomical properties, L. multiflorum is a candidate for designing phytoremediation strategies for atrazine contaminated agricultural soils, especially those involving run-off avoiding. - Finding of a novel atrazine-tolerant species, as a potential candidate for phytoremediating herbicide-contaminated agriculture soils and elucidation of the mechanisms involved in tolerance.

  12. Technology-Aided Programs for Assisting Communication and Leisure Engagement of Persons with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Two Single-Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Ferlisi, Gabriele; Ferrarese, Giacomina; Zullo, Valeria; Addante, Luigi M.; Spica, Antonella; Oliva, Doretta

    2012-01-01

    Technology-aided programs for assisting communication and leisure engagement were assessed in single-case studies involving two men with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Study I involved a 51-year-old man with a virtually total loss of his motor repertoire and assessed a technology-aided program aimed at enabling him to (a) write and send out…

  13. Research agendas involving patients: Factors that facilitate or impede translation of patients’ perspectives in programming and implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pittens, C.A.C.M.; Elberse, J.E.; Visse, M.A.; Abma, T.A.; Broerse, J.E.W.

    2014-01-01

    Patients are increasingly involved in agenda setting in health research policy, but little is known about whether or not patients' topics are translated into a funding programme and taken up by researchers. A qualitative evaluation of nine multi-stakeholder agenda-setting projects in the Netherlands

  14. The Super Efficient Refrigerator Program: Case study of a Golden Carrot program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, J B

    1995-07-01

    The work in this report was conducted by the Analytic Studies Division (ASD) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technologies. This case study describes the development and implementation of the Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP), which awarded $30 million to the refrigerator manufacturer that developed and commercialized a refrigerator that exceeded 1993 federal efficiency standards by at least 25%. The program was funded by 24 public and private utilities. As the first Golden Carrot program to be implemented in the United States, SERP was studied as an example for future `market-pull` efforts.

  15. Cardio-pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis: A study at a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetakiran Arakkal

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In our patients, pulmonary involvement was more common than cardiac involvement. Interstitial lung disease and cardiac involvement were more commonly seen in diffuse systemic sclerosis whereas pulmonary hypertension was more frequent in limited systemic sclerosis. Hence, it is important to screen the patients for cardiopulmonary involvement for early diagnosis and treatment and a better prognostic outcome.

  16. Improving the active involvement of stakeholders and the public in flood risk management - tools of an involvement strategy and case study results from Austria, Germany and Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischhauer, M.; Greiving, S.; Flex, F.; Scheibel, M.; Stickler, T.; Sereinig, N.; Koboltschnig, G.; Malvati, P.; Vitale, V.; Grifoni, P.; Firus, K.

    2012-09-01

    The EU Flood Risk Management Directive 2007/60/EC aims at an active involvement of interested parties in the setting up of flood risk management plans and thus calls for more governance-related decision-making. This requirement has two perspectives. On the one hand, there is (1) the question of how decision-makers can improve the quality of their governance process. On the other hand, there is (2) the question of how the public shall be appropriately informed and involved. These questions were the centre of the ERA-Net CRUE-funded project IMRA (integrative flood risk governance approach for improvement of risk awareness) that aimed at an optimisation of the flood risk management process by increasing procedural efficiency with an explicit involvement strategy. To reach this goal, the IMRA project partners developed two new approaches that were implemented in three case study areas for the first time in flood risk management: 1. risk governance assessment tool: An indicator-based benchmarking and monitoring tool was used to evaluate the performance of a flood risk management system in regard to ideal risk governance principles; 2. social milieu approach: The concept of social milieus was used to gain a picture of the people living in the case study regions to learn more about their lifestyles, attitudes and values and to use this knowledge to plan custom-made information and participation activities for the broad public. This paper presents basic elements and the application of two innovative approaches as a part of an "involvement strategy" that aims at the active involvement of all interested parties (stakeholders) for assessing, reviewing and updating flood risk management plans, as formulated in the EU Flood Risk Management Directive 2007/60/EC.

  17. Improving the active involvement of stakeholders and the public in flood risk management – tools of an involvement strategy and case study results from Austria, Germany and Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vitale

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The EU Flood Risk Management Directive 2007/60/EC aims at an active involvement of interested parties in the setting up of flood risk management plans and thus calls for more governance-related decision-making. This requirement has two perspectives. On the one hand, there is (1 the question of how decision-makers can improve the quality of their governance process. On the other hand, there is (2 the question of how the public shall be appropriately informed and involved. These questions were the centre of the ERA-Net CRUE-funded project IMRA (integrative flood risk governance approach for improvement of risk awareness that aimed at an optimisation of the flood risk management process by increasing procedural efficiency with an explicit involvement strategy. To reach this goal, the IMRA project partners developed two new approaches that were implemented in three case study areas for the first time in flood risk management: 1. risk governance assessment tool: An indicator-based benchmarking and monitoring tool was used to evaluate the performance of a flood risk management system in regard to ideal risk governance principles; 2. social milieu approach: The concept of social milieus was used to gain a picture of the people living in the case study regions to learn more about their lifestyles, attitudes and values and to use this knowledge to plan custom-made information and participation activities for the broad public. This paper presents basic elements and the application of two innovative approaches as a part of an "involvement strategy" that aims at the active involvement of all interested parties (stakeholders for assessing, reviewing and updating flood risk management plans, as formulated in the EU Flood Risk Management Directive 2007/60/EC.

  18. Service user involvement in giving mental health students feedback on placement: A participatory action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speers, Janey; Lathlean, Judith

    2015-09-01

    Although the drive to engage service users in service delivery, research and education has mainstream acceptance, it is not easy to achieve meaningful involvement. The contribution that could potentially be made by users whilst accessing services is often overlooked. This study involved stakeholders (mentors, service users and a lecturer) working together to design, evaluate and refine a system enabling students to seek feedback from service users. The feedback concerned mental health students' interpersonal skills and occurred whilst on practice placement. This research aimed to explore the experiences of those concerned when nine students attempted to learn from rather than about service users. A 2-year study, encompassing five cycles of participatory action research (PAR). A small island community in the British Isles, adopting UK standards for pre-registration nurse education. Data came from interviews with service users and mentors and a series of reflective group discussions with students who volunteered to try out the feedback mechanism. The deliberations of the PAR stakeholder group informed the research cycles and added to the data, which were subject to thematic analysis. Findings indicated that service users volunteering to give feedback had unanimously positive experiences. Students' experience lay on a continuum: those with a stronger sense of self were more willing and able to ask for feedback than less confident students. Cultural adjustment to the role change needed was challenging, requiring self-awareness and courage. Over time, all students achieved deep learning and, for some, learning appeared transformative. Although contextual, the study concluded that the feedback initiative encouraged the development of more equitable relationships, in which mental health nurses respected the expertise of service users. This potentially benefits student development, recovery-orientated practice, service users and HEIs searching for meaningful ways to

  19. Experiences of general practices with a participatory pay-for-performance program: a qualitative study in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, K.; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Jacobs, J.E.; Grol, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of target users in the design choices of a pay-for-performance program may enhance its impact, but little is known about the views of participants in these programs. To explore general practices' experiences with pay-for-performance in primary care we conducted a qualitative study in

  20. An Evaluative Study of a Distance Teacher Education Program in a University in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwasi Addo Sampong

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The study used an adaptation of Provus’ discrepancy evaluation model to evaluate a distance teacher education program in the University of Cape Coast, the premier teacher education institution in Ghana. The study involved comparing performance data of the program as perceived by students and faculty/administrators to standards prepared from the program’s design. Performance data was obtained by administering two survey instruments to a random sample of students and faculty/administrators. Discrepancies between performance and standards were reported. The study concluded that although there were some discrepancies between program standards and performance the program is fulfilling its purpose of upgrading the professional and academic performance of a large number of teachers in the public K-8 schools in Ghana.

  1. A theoretical study of the molecular mechanism of the GAPDH Trypanosoma cruzi enzyme involving iodoacetate inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Agnaldo Silva; Lameira, Jerônimo; Alves, Cláudio Nahum

    2011-10-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme (GAPDH) is an important biological target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents against Chagas disease. In this Letter, the inhibition mechanism of GAPDH involving iodoacetate (IAA) inhibitor was studied using the hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach and molecular dynamic simulations. Analysis of the potential energy surface and potential of mean force show that the covalent attachment of IAA inhibitor to the active site of the enzyme occurs as a concerted process. In addition, the energy terms decomposition shows that NAD+ plays an important role in stabilization of the reagents and transition state.

  2. The Impact of a School-Based Weight Management Program Involving Parents via mHealth for Overweight and Obese Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Regina Lai-Tong Lee; Cynthia Leung; Hong Chen; Louie, Lobo H.T.; Michael Brown; Jyu-Lin Chen; Gordon Cheung; Paul H Lee

    2017-01-01

    There is a scarcity of resources and studies that utilize targeted weight management interventions to engage parents via mHealth tools targeting obese children and adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities (MIDs) extended from school to a home setting. To test the feasibility and acceptability of a school-based weight program (SBWMP) involving parents via mHealth tools designed to reduce weight, enhance knowledge and adopt healthy lifestyles, and thereby achieve better psychosocial well...

  3. Compulsory Project-Level Involvement and the Use of Program-Level Evaluations: Evaluating the Local Systemic Change for Teacher Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kelli; Weiss, Iris R.

    2011-01-01

    In 1995, the National Science Foundation (NSF) contracted with principal investigator Iris Weiss and an evaluation team at Horizon Research, Inc. (HRI) to conduct a national evaluation of the Local Systemic Change for Teacher Enhancement program (LSC). HRI conducted the core evaluation under a $6.25 million contract with NSF. This program…

  4. Transgenic Studies on the Involvement of Cytokinin and Gibberellin in Male Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shihshieh; Cerny, R. Eric; Qi, Youlin; Bhat, Deepti; Aydt, Carrie M.; Hanson, Doris D.; Malloy, Kathleen P.; Ness, Linda A.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous plant hormones interact during plant growth and development. Elucidating the role of these various hormones on particular tissue types or developmental stages has been difficult with exogenous applications or constitutive expression studies. Therefore, we used tissue-specific promoters expressing CKX1 and gai, genes involved in oxidative cytokinin degradation and gibberellin (GA) signal transduction, respectively, to study the roles of cytokinin and GA in male organ development. Accumulation of CKX1 in reproductive tissues of transgenic maize (Zea mays) resulted in male-sterile plants. The male development of these plants was restored by applications of kinetin and thidiazuron. Similarly, expression of gai specifically in anthers and pollen of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Arabidopsis resulted in the abortion of these respective tissues. The gai-induced male-sterile phenotype exhibited by the transgenic plants was reversible by exogenous applications of kinetin. Our results provide molecular evidence of the involvement of cytokinin and GA in male development and support the hypothesis that the male development is controlled in concert by multiple hormones. These studies also suggest a potential method for generating maintainable male sterility in plants by using existing agrochemicals that would reduce the expense of seed production for existing hybrid crops and provide a method to produce hybrid varieties of traditionally non-hybrid crops. PMID:12644677

  5. From (Un)Willingness to InvolveMENt: Development of a Successful Study Brand for Recruitment of Diverse MSM to a Longitudinal HIV Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Paula M; Williams, Victoria A; Shapiro, Eve T; Sanchez, Travis; Rosenberg, Eli S; Fenimore, Vincent L; Sullivan, Patrick S

    2013-11-21

    HIV continues to be a major concern among MSM, yet Black MSM have not been enrolled in HIV research studies in proportionate numbers to White MSM. We developed an HIV prevention research brand strategy for MSM. Questionnaires and focus groups were conducted with 54 participants. Descriptive statistics and chi-square analyses were performed and qualitative data were transcribed and content analyzed to identify common themes. Formative research results indicated that younger Black MSM (18-29 years) were less likely to think about joining prevention studies compared to older (≥30 years) Black MSM (x2 = 5.92, P = 0.015). Qualitative and quantitative results indicate four prominent themes related to brand development: (1) communication sources (message deliverer), (2) message (impact of public health messaging on perceptions of HIV research), (3) intended audience (underlying issues that influence personal relevance of HIV research), and (4) communication channels (reaching intended audiences). The findings highlight the importance of behavioral communication translational research to effectively engage hard-to-reach populations. Despite reservations, MSM in our formative study expressed a need for active involvement and greater education to facilitate their engagement in HIV prevention research. Thus, the brand concept of "InvolveMENt" emerged.

  6. Exact solutions to traffic density estimation problems involving the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards traffic flow model using mixed integer programming

    KAUST Repository

    Canepa, Edward S.

    2012-09-01

    This article presents a new mixed integer programming formulation of the traffic density estimation problem in highways modeled by the Lighthill Whitham Richards equation. We first present an equivalent formulation of the problem using an Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Then, using a semi-analytic formula, we show that the model constraints resulting from the Hamilton-Jacobi equation result in linear constraints, albeit with unknown integers. We then pose the problem of estimating the density at the initial time given incomplete and inaccurate traffic data as a Mixed Integer Program. We then present a numerical implementation of the method using experimental flow and probe data obtained during Mobile Century experiment. © 2012 IEEE.

  7. Does involvement of local NGOs enhance public service delivery? Cautionary evidence from a malaria-prevention program in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ashis; Friedman, Jed; Kandpal, Eeshani

    2018-01-01

    Partnerships between government and non-state actors that aim to enhance the quality or efficiency of service delivery are increasingly common in today's development policy landscape. We investigate the impacts of such an approach using data from an experimental supportive intervention to India's malaria control program that leveraged local non-state capacity in order to promote mosquito net usage and recommended fever care-seeking patterns. The supportive activities were conducted simultaneously by 3 NGOs, contracted out by the Indian government, in 2 endemic districts in the state of Odisha. We find that program impact significantly varied by location. Examining 3 potential sources of this variation (differential population characteristics, differential health worker characteristics, and differential implementer characteristics), we provide evidence that both population and NGO characteristics significantly affected the success of the program. Specifically, the results suggest that the quality and effort of the local implementer played a key role in the differential effectiveness. We discuss these findings as they relate to the external validity of development policy evaluations and, specifically, for the ability of health and other service delivery systems to benefit from limited non-state capacity in underresourced areas. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Effectiveness of Subsidies in Technology Adoption: A Case Study Involving Reverse Osmosis (RO Membrane Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Laili

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Adoption of new technologies is a process that involves technological learning and penetration of new products into the market. Within the process of new technologies adoption, government usually intervened by providing incentives, in order to support the technology adoption to be succeed. This paper examines the effectiveness of incentives for the sustainability of reverse osmosis (RO membrane technology adoption. The study conducted through single case study on SWRO installation in Mandangin Island, East Java, Indonesia. Results of case study indentify the existence of government incentive in the form of direct subsidies to decrease the price of clean water. Although successful in reducing the price of water, but effectiveness of the subsidy on the sustainability of SWRO is still low, which is operates only 30% in a year. Further analysis shows that these subsidies actually be counter-productive to the sustainability of SWRO installation.

  9. Energy Justice and the Stakeholders Involved: A Case Study of Solar Power in Rural Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romulus, Elijah Rey Asse

    This paper explores and analyzes energy justice and the stakeholders involved. Energy insecurity, specifically the lack of access to electricity effects over 1.3 billion people worldwide and energy justice is a way to address it. This paper is supported by a case study with data collected in the southern rural regions of Haiti regarding energy justice communities. Three cities were studied: Les Cayes, Anse-a-Veau, and Les Anglais. It examines how solar businesses can aid energy justice communities seeking access to electricity. Stakeholders such as the communities themselves, solar businesses, and nonprofits in the region are studied and analyzed. The paper concludes solar businesses are helping said communities but needs participation from other stakeholders to be successful. Finally, there are five recommendations to build capacity, develop infrastructure in the region, explore the possibility of solar cooperatives, strengthen the solar economy in Haiti, and demand reparations.

  10. Exploring the experiences of bereaved families involved in assisted suicide in Southern Switzerland: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamondi, Claudia; Pott, Murielle; Forbes, Karen; Payne, Sheila

    2015-06-01

    In Switzerland, helping with assisted suicide under certain conditions is not prosecuted. With approximately 300 cases annually, this leaves behind a large group of bereaved people where its consequences are mostly unknown. The study aimed to explore family involvement in decision making prior to assisted suicide, and to examine their ways of coping during the bereavement period. A qualitative interview study used the principles of Grounded Theory analysis. Eleven relatives of eight patients, who died in Southern Switzerland after assisted suicide, participated in semistructured interviews. The large majority of family members faced moral dilemmas during the decision-making phase. Their respect for patient's autonomy was a key justification to resolve dilemmas. Two types of involvement were identified: categorised as 'passive' when the decision making was located with the patient, and 'active' when assisted suicide was proposed by the family member and/or the relative was involved in some way. The relatives reported feelings of isolation during and after assisted suicide. Family members reported fear of social stigma and did not openly disclose assisted suicide as the cause of death. None of those interviewed received formal psychological support. Bereaved families express moral dilemmas, feelings of isolation and secrecy in the management of assisted suicide in Southern Switzerland. These features seem underestimated and not sufficiently recognised by the healthcare professionals. Management of assisted suicide requests should include consideration of family members' needs, in addition to those of the patient. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Are media still the message? A comparative study of high and low involvement brands in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Neda

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the importance of media choice for branding of high and low involvement products. Given the magnitude of branding today and the complexity of the media environment, the lack of modern studies comparing different media from the consumers' perspective especially in different cultural settings, is both profound and surprising. Studies of Larkin (1978 and Stephens (1981 are not only outdated but also US-specific. Furthermore, although McLuhan (2002 has famously claimed that the medium is the message, there is no contemporary marketing study examining this claim in relation to major branding elements such as brand awareness perceived quality, brand attitude, and brand image. The study's major contribution is that it attempts to fill in this research gap by investigating if and how consumers differentiate brands, with respect to the media that they appear in. A comparison between low and high involvement brands was considered apparent for a more comprehensive research approach. This study is a deductive and a quantitative one. Sample consisted of 160 respondents in Serbia, ranging from 18 to 59 years old, and the data collection method was a self-administered e-mail questionnaire. Major findings suggest that different media indeed affect various aspects of branding, with magazines favoring most of brand image characteristics, and television favoring brand awareness. However, analysis also indicated a clustering of television, magazine, and outdoor as media with similar scores in almost every aspect. This clustering has the potential to affect both branding and media planning decisions. Internet is found to be a promising medium for the future in Serbia but not so much for the present.

  12. Morning Report in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncharapu, Indumathi; Cass, Alvah R.; Carlson, Carol A.; Scott, Jack R.

    Morning Report (MR) is a frequently held case conference in most Family Medicine (FM) residency programs among medical learners who discuss recent inpatient admissions before the day's care of patients. This study conducted a national survey of FM residency program directors to describe the roles of faculty and residents in facilitating MR.…

  13. University completes self study for NCAA certification program

    OpenAIRE

    Hincker, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Virginia Tech has completed a year-long, comprehensive self study as part of the NCAA Division I Athletics Certification program, which is required of all NCAA member schools to ensure integrity in the operation of athletics programs at the university.

  14. Nutrition education program for food bank clients: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many low income families depend on foods from food banks. The objective of the study was to determine program content and examine feasibility of a pilot nutrition education program for food bank clients. Formative research was conducted with staff at a local food bank and its pantries and adult clie...

  15. [PROFAMILIA studies the effectiveness of contraceptive marketing programs in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    A recent study by PROFAMILIA, the private Colombian family planning organization, indicates that community based distribution programs and social marketing programs are not totally interchangeable forms of contraceptive distribution. Comparison of the efficacy of different systems in making contraceptives more accessible to the low income population led the researchers to conclude that social marketing programs work as well as community based distribution programs in rural areas which already have high rates of contraceptive usage. Community based distribution programs appear more effective than social marketing programs in areas where contraceptive usage is not yet well established. PROFAMILIA researchers conducted operational studies in 3 different states, each of which had a community based distribution program. In the first state the community based distribution program was suspended and a vender who had previously supplied only urban outlets added rural pharmacies to his route. The vender handled 3 kinds of pills, 2 types of spermicidal suppositories, and condoms. In a neighboring state, 3 instructors belonging to the community based distribution program were offered commissions of about 10% of the value of the products if the distributors they supervised met monthly sales quotas. The community based distribution program was left unchanged in the third state but a 2-member mobile team was trained to travel through the region by jeep, talking to community groups about the advantage of contraception. At the end of 18 months, sales of contraceptives had declined in the state where the community based distribution program was replaced by the social marketing program. The decline was believed to be related to unforeseen price increases for pills and devaluation of the Colombian peso. The social marketing project was however much more cost effective than the other 2, which continued to require PROFAMILIA subsidies. Contraceptive usage increased in the other 2 areas

  16. Institutional ethical review and ethnographic research involving injection drug users: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Will; Maher, Lisa; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Ethnographic research among people who inject drugs (PWID) involves complex ethical issues. While ethical review frameworks have been critiqued by social scientists, there is a lack of social science research examining institutional ethical review processes, particularly in relation to ethnographic work. This case study describes the institutional ethical review of an ethnographic research project using observational fieldwork and in-depth interviews to examine injection drug use. The review process and the salient concerns of the review committee are recounted, and the investigators' responses to the committee's concerns and requests are described to illustrate how key issues were resolved. The review committee expressed concerns regarding researcher safety when conducting fieldwork, and the investigators were asked to liaise with the police regarding the proposed research. An ongoing dialogue with the institutional review committee regarding researcher safety and autonomy from police involvement, as well as formal consultation with a local drug user group and solicitation of opinions from external experts, helped to resolve these issues. This case study suggests that ethical review processes can be particularly challenging for ethnographic projects focused on illegal behaviours, and that while some challenges could be mediated by modifying existing ethical review procedures, there is a need for legislation that provides legal protection of research data and participant confidentiality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. In Utero Exposure to Opioids: An Observational Study of Mothers Involved in the Child Welfare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushman, Gregory; Victor, Bryan G; Ryan, Joseph P; Perron, Brian E

    2017-12-05

    Women are underrepresented in the current substance abuse research; however, women are a particularly vulnerable population when it comes to opioid use and abuse. Pregnant women are even more so, because of the potential that exists for in utero exposure (IUE) to substances. To identify trends in IUE to opioids in order to ensure that resources are allocated effectively to address the current opioid epidemic and to assist the populations most affected by it. This study draws on 15 years' worth of clinical assessment data collected from 3598 child welfare-involved mothers to assess for trends in IUE to substances over time. Data from the last 5 year period (N = 852) are then analyzed to identify recent demographic correlates associated with IUE to opioid substances. A substantial increase in the rates of IUE to opioids over the past 15 years is observed among child welfare-involved mothers. Moreover, we find that race is a significant correlate of IUE to opioids. Study findings are consistent with other recent research that demonstrates racial differences in the populations that are most affected by the opioid epidemic; however, more research is needed to determine how these racial differences in rates of IUE to opioids affect child welfare outcomes.

  18. A Review of the Human Clinical Studies Involving Citrus aurantium (Bitter Orange) Extract and its Primary Protoalkaloid p-Synephrine

    OpenAIRE

    Stohs, Sidney J.; Preuss, Harry G.; Shara, Mohd

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes the published as well as unpublished human studies involving Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract and its primary protoalkaloid p-synephrine, providing information and an assessment of the safety and efficacy of these widely used products. The results of over 20 studies involving a total of approximately 360 subjects that consumed p-synephrine alone or in combination with other ingredients are reviewed and critiqued. Over 50 % of the subjects involved in these studi...

  19. Progress report on the Grand Junction uranium mill tailings remedial action program. [Program to reduce humane exposure from buildings involving the use of mill tailings in their construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-01

    The report provides a history of the program, an analysis of the current status of the program, problems encountered and measures being taken to solve them, and a forecast of future effort required. From the start of remedial efforts in 1973 through September 30, 1978, remedial action has been done on 325 individual structures, including 289 private residences, 14 schools, and 22 commercial business/church locations. As recently as one year ago, the total number of structures requiring remedial action was estimated to be about 600. However, continuing measurements of radon daughter concentrations in structures which previously showed only slightly elevated gamma radiation have resulted in identificaion of additional structures exceeding the Surgeon General's guidelines for radon daughters. Because radon daughter concentrations in structures are highly variable depending on the season of the year and the level of activity, annual averages are used for determining eligibility under the guidelines. Based on this recent experience the estimate of the total number of structures which will eventually qualify for remedial action has been increased from 600 to 800, and the estimated total program cost has been increased from $12,670,000 to $16,960,000. It must be emphasized that these estimates are based only on experience ratios of past measurements and are highly uncertain. It is not expected that further funding, if necessary, will be required before fiscal year 1982.

  20. Emergency Department Involvement in Accountable Care Organizations in Massachusetts: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nissa J; McWilliams, J Michael; Epstein, Stephen K; Smulowitz, Peter B

    2017-11-01

    We assess Massachusetts emergency department (ED) involvement and internal ED constructs within accountable care organization contracts. An online survey was distributed to 70 Massachusetts ED directors. Questions attempted to assess involvement of EDs in accountable care organizations and the structures in place in EDs-from departmental resources to physician incentives-to help achieve accountable care organization goals of decreasing spending and improving quality. Of responding ED directors, 79% reported alignment between the ED and an accountable care organization. Almost all ED groups (88%) reported bearing no financial risk as a result of the accountable care organization contracts in which their organizations participated. Major obstacles to meeting accountable care organization objectives included care coordination challenges (62%) and lack of familiarity with accountable care organization goals (58%). The most common cost-reduction strategies included ED case management (85%) and information technology (61%). Limitations of this study include that information was self-reported by ED directors, a focus limited to Massachusetts, and a survey response rate of 47%. The ED directors perceived that the majority of physicians were not familiar with accountable care organization goals, many challenges remain in coordinating care for patients in the ED, and most EDs have no financial incentives tied to accountable care organizations. EDs in Massachusetts have begun to implement strategies aimed at reducing admissions, utilization, and overall cost, but these strategies are not widespread apart from case management, even in a state with heavy accountable care organization penetration. Our results suggest that Massachusetts EDs still lack clear directives and direct involvement in meeting accountable care organization goals. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Qualitative Study of Labour Market Precarisation and Involved Fatherhood in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majda Hrženjak

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Discussions about the reconciliation of work and family are often considered to be focussing on women and middle class people with safe employments. By identifying the differences among men in their capacities to engage in involved fatherhood that stem from their positions in the labour market, this article introduces the perspective of a deprivileged marginalised group in the labour market and critically reflects on the impact of labour flexibilisation on caring masculinity and gender equality. Men as employees have heterogeneous positions in the labour market, which impacts their access to social – including parental – rights and possibilities for balancing work and care. Given that the precarisation of the labour market is a salient problem in Slovenia, this qualitative study based on explorative in-depth semi-structured interviews with fathers in diverse forms of precarious employments analysed how insecure and flexible work arrangements shape fatherhood practices, impact the chances for involved fatherhood and structure gender relations. The fathers’ experiences showed that precarious working conditions enable fathers to be intensely involved in children’s care mainly when their employment approaches standard employment in terms of stability and predictability of working hours and guaranteed workload. When work is entirely flexible and unpredictable and the employee is faced with either taking such a job or losing it, the reconciliation of work and fatherhood is aggravated as the organisation of everyday life is fully subordinated to paid work. In conclusion, precarious working relations were indicated to foster the strengthening of the breadwinner model and retraditionalisation of gender relations.

  2. Heel fat pad involvement in rheumatoid arthritis and in spondyloarthropathies: an ultrasonographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsetti, P; Frediani, B; Acciai, C; Baldi, F; Filippou, G; Marcolongo, R

    2004-01-01

    Heel fat pad inflammation and degeneration have been frequently proved to cause talalgia. Painful heel fat pad is often confused with plantar fasciitis, and only magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasonography (US) can differentiate these conditions. Scanty data are available about heel fat pad involvement in the course of chronic polyarthritis. To investigate with US the heel fat pad involvement in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthropathies (SpA); to describe and compare the clinical and sonographic features of this lesion in the two groups. The heels of 181 consecutive outpatients with RA and 160 with SpA were studied by US and radiography. A control group of 60 healthy subjects was examined by US. Two different patterns of involvement of the heel fat pad were observed. The inflammatory-oedematous pattern was more frequent in patients with RA (6.6%) than in those with SpA (1.8%), and was associated with talalgia--even if it was not associated with plantar fasciitis or enthesophyte (bony spur). The degenerative-atrophic pattern was less frequent (1.1% in RA, 1.9% in SpA), and was associated with plantar fasciitis and subcalcaneal enthesophyte. The inflammatory-oedematous lesion of the heel fat-pad is relatively frequent in RA and causes subcalcaneal pain. Degenerative-atrophic changes of the heel fat pad can be observed in RA and SpA, and seem to be associated with chronic abnormalities of the plantar fascia and of its enthesis.

  3. Lower leg muscle involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an MR imaging and spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Townsend, Elise [MGH Institute of Health Professions and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Thomas, Bijoy J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Ghomi, Reza H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Tseng, Brian S. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinic, Boston, MA (United States); Novartis Institute of Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-04-15

    To describe the involvement of lower leg muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by using MR imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) correlated to indices of functional status. Nine boys with DMD (mean age, 11 years) and eight healthy age- and BMI-matched boys (mean age, 13 years) prospectively underwent lower leg MRI, 1H-MRS of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) for lipid fraction measures, and 31P-MRS for pH and high-energy phosphate measures. DMD subjects were evaluated using the Vignos lower extremity functional rating, and tests including 6 min walk test (6MWT) and 10 m walk. DMD subjects had highest fatty infiltration scores in peroneal muscles, followed by medial gastrocnemius and soleus. Compared to controls, DMD boys showed higher intramuscular fat (P = 0.04), lipid fractions of TA and SOL (P = 0.02 and 0.003, respectively), pH of anterior compartment (P = 0.0003), and lower phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphorus ratio of posterior compartment (P = 0.02). The Vignos rating correlated with TA (r = 0.79, P = 0.01) and SOL (r = 0.71, P = 0.03) lipid fractions. The 6MWT correlated with fatty infiltration scores of SOL (r = -0.76, P = 0.046), medial (r = -0.80, P = 0.03) and lateral (r = -0.84, P = 0.02) gastrocnemius, intramuscular fat (r = -0.80, P = 0.03), and SOL lipid fraction (r = -0.89, P = 0.007). Time to walk 10 m correlated with anterior compartment pH (r = 0.78, P = 0.04). Lower leg muscles of boys with DMD show a distinct involvement pattern and increased adiposity that correlates with functional status. Lower leg MRI and 1H-MRS studies may help to noninvasively demonstrate the severity of muscle involvement. (orig.)

  4. Sensory-motor networks involved in speech production and motor control: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Shebek, Rachel; Hansen, Daniel R; Oya, Hiroyuki; Robin, Donald A; Howard, Matthew A; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2015-04-01

    Speaking is one of the most complex motor behaviors developed to facilitate human communication. The underlying neural mechanisms of speech involve sensory-motor interactions that incorporate feedback information for online monitoring and control of produced speech sounds. In the present study, we adopted an auditory feedback pitch perturbation paradigm and combined it with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recordings in order to identify brain areas involved in speech production and motor control. Subjects underwent fMRI scanning while they produced a steady vowel sound /a/ (speaking) or listened to the playback of their own vowel production (playback). During each condition, the auditory feedback from vowel production was either normal (no perturbation) or perturbed by an upward (+600 cents) pitch-shift stimulus randomly. Analysis of BOLD responses during speaking (with and without shift) vs. rest revealed activation of a complex network including bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG), Heschl's gyrus, precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), Rolandic operculum, postcentral gyrus and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Performance correlation analysis showed that the subjects produced compensatory vocal responses that significantly correlated with BOLD response increases in bilateral STG and left precentral gyrus. However, during playback, the activation network was limited to cortical auditory areas including bilateral STG and Heschl's gyrus. Moreover, the contrast between speaking vs. playback highlighted a distinct functional network that included bilateral precentral gyrus, SMA, IFG, postcentral gyrus and insula. These findings suggest that speech motor control involves feedback error detection in sensory (e.g. auditory) cortices that subsequently activate motor-related areas for the adjustment of speech parameters during speaking. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnetisation reversal in cylindrical nickel nanobars involving magnetic vortex structure: A micromagnetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barpanda, Prabeer, E-mail: prabeer.barpanda@u-picardie.f [Laboratoire de Reactivite et Chimie des Solides, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, Amiens Cedex 80039 (France); Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 3J5 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    A three-dimensional, Fast-Fourier-Transformed (3D-FFT) micromagnetic simulation was employed to study the magnetization reversal mechanisms in cylindrical nickel nanobars possessing magnetic vortices. Individual Ni nanobars of height 150-250 nm with aspect ratio varying from 2.1 to 2.5 were considered, all of them supporting magnetic vortices domains. Magnetization reversal in these nanobars involves the vortex-creation-annihilation (VCA) mechanism with an inversion symmetry feature observed mid-way during reversal process. The effect of incidence angle of externally applied field on overall magnetization reversal process is examined in detail. The corresponding variations in coercivity, squareness, exchange energy and vortex parameters are described by the micromagnetic study that can shed insights for building practical Ni nanobars magnetic nanostructures/devices.

  6. Patients’ Perception toward Medical Students’ Involvement in Their Surgical Care: Single Center Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talal Al-Khatib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate patients’ perception regarding medical students’ role in the operating theatre. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a randomly selected sample at King Abdulaziz University Hospital. Results. 131 participated in this study. 77 of the participants were females and 50 participants were males. 46.4% think that it was important for the future doctors to be in theater during surgery. 60.2% thought that medical students only observed surgeons in the theatre and 39% thought that medical students performed minor procedures in the theatre. Conclusion. Patients underestimated the importance of medical students’ attendance and involvement in theatre compared to bedside teaching and outpatient clinics. Patients believed that medical students should obtain their consent prior to observing them in the theatre.

  7. New theoretical methods for studies on electrons and positrons scattering involving multichannel processes

    CERN Document Server

    Lara, O

    1995-01-01

    continued fractions are now in progress. It is well known that multichannel effects strongly influence the low-energy electron scattering by atoms and molecules. Nevertheless, the inclusion of such effects on the calculations of scattering cross sections remains a considerable task for the area researches due to the complexity of the problem. In the present study we aim to develop a new theoretical method which can be efficiently applied to the multichannel scattering studies. Two new theoretical formalisms namely the Multichannel sup - C-Functional Method have been proposed. Both methods were developed on the base of well-known distorted-wave method combined with Schwinger variational principle. In addition, an integrative method proposed by Horacek and Sasakawa in 1983, the method of continued fractions is adapted by the first time to multichannel scatterings. Numerical test of these three methods were carried out through applications to solve the multichannel scattering problems involving the interaction o...

  8. The continuing search for Mycobacterium tuberculosis involvement in sarcoidosis: a study on archival biopsy specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Claus Bo; Milman, Nils; Rasmussen, Erik Michael

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that mycobacteria may be involved in the aetiology and pathophysiology of sarcoidosis.......Increasing evidence indicates that mycobacteria may be involved in the aetiology and pathophysiology of sarcoidosis....

  9. Strategi Komunikasi Program Internet Sehat Dan Aman Kementerian Komunikasi Dan Informatika Republik Indonesia (Studi Kasus Evaluasi Program Incakap Tahun 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucianty Dyah Astuti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Internet has become a lifestyle in community along with the development of internet technology in the life and social relationship. The high number of internet users in Indonesia gave rise to a variety of impacts on society, both positive and negative. Relates with these impacts, to create an understanding in the community against the use of the internet the Government through the Ministry of communications and Informatics of the Republic of Indonesia create program, that is Internet healthy and safe in order to socialize the use of the internet for healthy and safe through the ethics of the Internet learning healthy by involving all components of society.The research focused on the evaluation of healthy and safe internet programme conducted by the Ministry of communications and Informatics of the Republic of Indonesia in 2015. The objective of the research is to perceive the communication strategy and the achievement of the objectives of the healthy and safe internet program by KemKominfo. This research used the qualitative method with descriptive case study research. The data obtained through interviews and literature studies, while informants in this study was KemKominfo staff on to the various Directorate General Application Infomatika sub direktotar empowerment of informatics as many as three people. Through the whole concatenation of process research obtained results that indicate that: (1 the achievement of healthy and safe Internet Programme until 2015 has achieved the target but not 100%. (2 in the implementation of the program there are some obstacles faced by KemKominfo, specifically: (i the limitation of APBN, (ii affordability limitations due to the geographical of indonesia as an archipelago state. (3\tthe evaluation needs to be done about the use of online media in the communication strategy of healthy and secure internet program. There were some changes since the beginning of the implementation of the Insan program in the year

  10. Social Studies Program: [Grade] 3. Updated Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    This updated New York social studies curriculum guide for third grade has 10 key concepts that include change, citizenship, culture, empathy, environment, identity, interdependence, nation-state, scarcity, and technology. These concepts are taught in 23 lessons through social, political, economic, geographic, and historic perspectives. Each lesson…

  11. Cardiovascular involvement in severe malaria: A prospective study in Ranchi, Jharkhand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Hemant Narayan; Doshi, Darshit; Rajan, Appu; Singh, Amit K; Singh, S B; Das, M K

    2017-01-01

    Malaria is considered as the most important parasitic disease of humans, causing seri- ous illness that can be fatal, if not diagnosed and treated immediately. It is a multisystem disorder affecting nearly every system of the body. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the involvement of cardiovascular system in severe malaria using non-invasive methods. This prospective study was conducted on patients of severe malaria who were admitted between June and November 2015 in the Department of Medicine, Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences and Hospital, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India. A total of 27 cases (18 males and 9 females; age ranging between 15 and 70 yr) of severe malaria (P. falciparum 24; P. vivax 1; mixed 2) were diagnosed by microscopic examination of peripheral blood smear and bivalent rapid diagnostic test (RDT) kit. The assessment of cardiovascular system was done by clinical examination, chest X-ray, ECG and transthoracic echocardiography. In all, 7 (26%) patients were found to be suffering from circulatory failure, out of which one was P. vivax case and rest were cases of P. falciparum infection with high parasite density. One patient died due to cardiovascular collapse. ECG revealed sinus bradycardia [Heart rate (HR): 40-60] in 7% of the cases, extreme tachycardia (HR: 120-150) in 3.7% of cases and premature arterial ectopic with tachycardia in 3.7% of patients (p malaria. The present study indicated involvement of cardiovascular system in severe malaria as evidenced from ECG and echocardiography. The study also revealed that cardiovascular instabilities are common in falciparum malaria, but can also be observed in vivax malaria.

  12. Qualitative research building real-life interventions: user-involving development of a mindfulness-based lifestyle change support program for overweight citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, N V; Brændgaard, P; Hjørnholm, C; la Cour, S

    2014-10-01

    This study is an experiment of putting social sciences to work in developing a support intervention for healthy lifestyle changes that would be attractive and manageable in real-life settings. Starting with a hypothesis that a class of intervention methods based on an unconventional 'low-tension' strategy may offer an effective support of stable, long-term changes well integrated in everyday life, difficult to maintain with conventional dieting and self-control approaches, this study focuses on designing and optimizing an intervention model combining several low-tension methods: mindfulness, small steps and group support. In three consecutive 'action research' cycles, the intervention was run in practice with groups of 20 overweight or obese citizens. Qualitative data, mainly in the form of recorded group sessions and individual interviews with group participants and group leaders, were systematically collected and analyzed, using a framework of social psychological theory to focus on difficulties, resources and meanings connected with habits and everyday life. This information was recycled into the design process for the next version of the intervention. We describe the user-involving development processes toward a more attractive and manageable intervention model. The model now exists as a well-articulated package whose effectiveness is being tested in a randomized controlled trial study. Social science can be put to work in systematically integrating real-life experience in a development process. It answers a very different kind of question than clinical trials-filling another place in an overall research program to create useful knowledge of what helps-in complex, everyday, real life.

  13. More mentoring needed? A cross-sectional study of mentoring programs for medical students in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Störmann Sylvère

    2011-09-01

    last 2 years. Six programs (27% offer mentoring in a one-on-one setting. 18 programs (82% feature faculty physicians as mentors. Nine programs (41% involve students as mentors in a peer-mentoring setting. The most commonly reported goals of the mentoring programs include: establishing the mentee's professional network (13 programs, 59%, enhancement of academic performance (11 programs, 50% and counseling students in difficulties (10 programs, 45%. Conclusions Despite a clear upsurge of mentoring programs for German medical students over recent years, the overall availability of mentoring is still limited. The mentoring models and goals of the existing programs vary considerably. Outcome data from controlled studies are needed to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of different forms of mentoring for medical students.

  14. More mentoring needed? A cross-sectional study of mentoring programs for medical students in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    programs (27%) offer mentoring in a one-on-one setting. 18 programs (82%) feature faculty physicians as mentors. Nine programs (41%) involve students as mentors in a peer-mentoring setting. The most commonly reported goals of the mentoring programs include: establishing the mentee's professional network (13 programs, 59%), enhancement of academic performance (11 programs, 50%) and counseling students in difficulties (10 programs, 45%). Conclusions Despite a clear upsurge of mentoring programs for German medical students over recent years, the overall availability of mentoring is still limited. The mentoring models and goals of the existing programs vary considerably. Outcome data from controlled studies are needed to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of different forms of mentoring for medical students. PMID:21943281

  15. Exploring Managers' Perspectives on MNCH Program in Pakistan: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariyam Sarfraz

    Full Text Available Pakistan's Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (MNCH Program is faced with multiple challenges in service delivery, financial and logistic management, training and deployment of human resources, and integration within the existing health system. There is a lack of evidence on managerial aspects of the MNCH program management and implementation.This study used qualitative methods to explore the challenges national, provincial and district program managers have faced in implementing a community midwifery program in province of Punjab while also exploring future directions for the program under a devolved health system. While the program had been designed in earnest, the planning lacked critical elements of involving relevant stakeholders in design and implementation, socio-demographic context and capacity of the existing health system. Financial limitations, weak leadership and lack of a political commitment to the problem of maternal health have also had an impact on program implementation.Our study results suggest that there is a need to re-structure the program while ensuring sustainability and collaboration within the health sector to increase uptake of skilled birth attendance and improve maternal health care in Pakistan.

  16. Occupational therapy integrated with a self-administered stretching program on systemic sclerosis patients with hand involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanantoni, Katia; Sciarra, Iliana; Iannace, Nicoletta; Vasile, Massimiliano; Caucci, Martina; Sili Scavalli, Antonio; Massimiani, Maria Pia; Passi, Laura; Maset, Lucia; Riccieri, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of occupational therapy (OT) intervention, integrated with a self-administered stretching program on the hands of patients with SSc, after one and three months of treatment. We enrolled 31 patients with SSc, randomly allocated to the occupational group (15 patients) or to the control group (16 patients). Each patient received specific outcome measures: Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), HAQ, Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), Duruoz Hand Index (DHI), reassessed after 1 (T1) and three months (T2). At T1 and T2 we found a statistically significant improvement from baseline values of COPM Performance and COPM Satisfaction in the OT group compared to baseline. At T2 HAQ values and Mental SF36 were also significantly improved. In the control group we found a statistically significant improvement of HAQ values and Mental SF36 at T1, confirmed at T2. COPM Performance was also significantly improved. The comparison between the two groups showed a greater improvement in the OT group concerning COPM Performance at T1 and T2. Mental SF-36 score greater improved in the control group at T1. Our results indicate that a rehabilitation program including OT and self-administered stretching exercises may be effective to improve and maintain hand function in patients with SSc.

  17. Industrial Water Analysis Program: A Critical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    The effect that time has on the boiler water constituents is an important aspect which must be considered when reviewing the results of the independent...an independent laboratory [2:441. Research Objectives The objectives of this study are the following: 1. Review the current Air Force practice of...any substance which tends to keep a compound, mixture, or solution from changing its form or chemical nautre [6:964]. Quebracho tannin : [a chemical

  18. EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN A CHANGE PROCESS - A CASE STUDY FOR ROMANIAN ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prediscan Mariana

    2015-07-01

    's perception towards change and the way they perceive the need of involving employees when decisions are made. In order to answer those questions we have based our results on a study made on Romanian organizations from the western side of the country. The sample included managers and employees from organizations operating in industries such as: trade, manufacturing and services.

  19. Kinetic study on thermal denaturation of hen egg-white lysozyme involving precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, D; Mizutani, A; Sakai, T

    1999-01-01

    A kinetic study on the thermal denaturation accompanying precipitation of hen egg-white lysozyme was performed at temperatures between 50 and 90 degrees C. Visible precipitation occurred at lysozyme concentrations higher than 10(-5)M. Even at the concentration of 10(-6)M where no visible precipitation was observed, irreversible and reversible denaturation could be clearly discriminated. The former involves two different reactions with activation energies of approximately 93 and 50 kJ x mol(-1). On the other hand, enthalpy and entropy changes in the latter are 443 kJ x mol(-1) and 1280 J x K(-1) x mol(-1), respectively, indicating a large conformational change. The contradiction that the denaturation or deactivation reaction fitted first-order reaction kinetics while its rate constant depended on the protein concentration, was resolved by newly proposed schemes. The apparent first-order rate constant obtained experimentally depended on the initial protein concentration being on the order of almost unity. Moreover, it was revealed that the apparent first-order reaction involved a second-order reaction that characterized the aggregation of denatured protein molecules. The theory developed here explained reasonably the thermal denaturation accompanying precipitation that occurs at high protein concentration and at high temperature, and was also successfully applied to the lower concentration range with no accompanying precipitation.

  20. A comparative modeling and molecular docking study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhar, Zeynab; Naiker, Suhashni; Alves, Claudio N; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Lameira, Jeronimo; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Kruger, Hendrik G; Honarparvar, Bahareh

    2016-11-01

    An alarming rise of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and the continuous high global morbidity of tuberculosis have reinvigorated the need to identify novel targets to combat the disease. The enzymes that catalyze the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan in M. tuberculosis are essential and noteworthy therapeutic targets. In this study, the biochemical function and homology modeling of MurI, MurG, MraY, DapE, DapA, Alr, and Ddl enzymes of the CDC1551 M. tuberculosis strain involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan cell wall are reported. Generation of the 3D structures was achieved with Modeller 9.13. To assess the structural quality of the obtained homology modeled targets, the models were validated using PROCHECK, PDBsum, QMEAN, and ERRAT scores. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate root mean square deviation (RMSD) and radius of gyration (Rg) of MurI and MurG target proteins and their corresponding templates. For further model validation, RMSD and Rg for selected targets/templates were investigated to compare the close proximity of their dynamic behavior in terms of protein stability and average distances. To identify the potential binding mode required for molecular docking, binding site information of all modeled targets was obtained using two prediction algorithms. A docking study was performed for MurI to determine the potential mode of interaction between the inhibitor and the active site residues. This study presents the first accounts of the 3D structural information for the selected M. tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  1. Study on musculoskeletal complaints involving the back, neck and upper limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, O Y; Ho, S F

    1998-08-01

    A mail questionnaire survey was conducted among designated factory doctors (DFDs) to determine the nature and extent of musculoskeletal aches/pains in patients attending their clinics over one working week. Information was recorded for all patients aged 15 years and above presenting with aches or pains in the back, neck or upper limbs, as the main complaint or as one of the presenting symptoms. For the 155 doctors participating in the survey, the total attendance of patients aged 15 years and above during the study period was 35,010. Of these, 3.9% presented with the symptoms studied and 1.8% had work-related complaints. The commonest site affected was the back (55.7%), followed by the neck (21.4%) and shoulders (19.2%). A higher proportion of males than females had back complaints with the reverse for complaints involving hands/wrists and arms/forearms. 82.3% of the affected were employed, 60.3% being production workers, compared to 33.3% professional/office workers and 6.4% service workers. Of the patients who were working, 51.3% had work-related symptoms and 54.4% were given medical leave. Production workers had the highest proportion with work-related symptoms while service workers had the highest proportion given medical leave. The "medical certificate rate" was highest for back symptoms -57.6%, while work-related symptoms was highest for complaints involving hands/wrists. The study findings are consistent with those of a 1993 morbidity survey of outpatients in Singapore and indicate that the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal aches/pains is not high.

  2. Measuring Community Programs and Policies in the Healthy Communities Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Stephen B.; Collie-Akers, Vicki L.; Schultz, Jerry A.; Kelley, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a challenging public health issue facing communities throughout the U.S. Local efforts are believed to be essential to assuring environments that support physical activity and healthy food/beverage consumption among children and their families. However, little is known about how broadly and intensively communities are implementing combinations of programs and policies that address childhood nutrition, physical activity, and weight control. The Healthy Communities Study is a nationwide scientific study in diverse communities to identify characteristics of communities and programs that may be associated with childhood obesity. Data collection occurred in 2013–2015; data analysis will be completed in 2016. As part of the Healthy Communities Study, researchers designed a measurement system to assess the number and scope of community programs and policies and to examine possible associations between calculated “intensity” scores for these programs and policies and behavioral and outcome measures related to healthy weight among children. This report describes the protocol used to capture and code instances of community programs and policies, to characterize attributes of community programs and policies related to study hypotheses, and to calculate the intensity of combinations of community programs and policies (i.e., using the attributes of change strategy, duration, and reach). PMID:26384934

  3. SISTEM PENDUKUNG KEPUTUSAN UNTUK MENGEVALUASI INTERNAL PROGRAM STUDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indhitya Rahman Padiku

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of major and study program cannot be separated by some internal factors weather directly influenced number of new registration students or indirectly. It needs a method to both know and to analyze internal evaluation variables in major or study program. Naive Bayes Clasifier (NBC method is the simple form of Bayesian network that assume all features are independent each other. NBC shows us a great performance entirely in accuracy and error level classification. NBC is able to differentiate irrelevance attribute and also classified some attributes in prediction needs. This research hopefully can be useful for major internal evaluating and study program in order to increase the number of new registration students. The classification by influenced of variables to evaluate the condition of both major and study program for the new registration students.

  4. Northeast Cooperative Research Study Fleet (SF) Program Biological Sampling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Northeast Cooperative Research Study Fleet (SF) Program partners with a subset of commercial fishermen to collect high quality, high resolution, haul by haul...

  5. What have we learned about the processes involved in the Iowa Gambling Task from developmental studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu eCassotti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Developmental studies using the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT or child-friendly adaptations of the IGT converged in showing that children and adolescents exhibit a strong bias in favor of disadvantageous choices whereas adults learn to decide advantageously during the course of the task. In the present article, we reviewed developmental studies that used the IGT or child-friendly adaptations of the IGT to show how these findings provide a better understanding of the processes involved in decision-making under uncertainty. For instance, developmental studies have underlined that until late adolescence, the dominant strategy is to focus only on the frequency of punishment and to choose among options with infrequent losses. Indeed, school-aged children and adolescents’ choices in the IGT seem to be guided by the loss frequency leading them to fail in distinguishing between advantageous and disadvantageous options. In addition, recent developmental studies revealed that adults switch less often after losses than school-aged children and adolescents. These findings suggest that psychological tolerance to loss may facilitate learning the characteristics of each option, which in turn improves the ability to choose advantageously. In conclusion, developmental studies help us refine our understanding of decision-making.

  6. Center for Advanced Energy Studies Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Kostelnik

    2005-09-01

    The world is facing critical energy-related challenges regarding world and national energy demands, advanced science and energy technology delivery, nuclear engineering educational shortfalls, and adequately trained technical staff. Resolution of these issues is important for the United States to ensure a secure and affordable energy supply, which is essential for maintaining U.S. national security, continued economic prosperity, and future sustainable development. One way that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges is by tasking the Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) with developing the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). By 2015, CAES will be a self-sustaining, world-class, academic and research institution where the INL; DOE; Idaho, regional, and other national universities; and the international community will cooperate to conduct critical energy-related research, classroom instruction, technical training, policy conceptualization, public dialogue, and other events.

  7. Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year`s findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H{sub 2}. Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs.

  8. Climate studies in the Long-Term Ecological Program

    OpenAIRE

    Greenland, David

    1993-01-01

    Since the inception of the LTER Program in 1980, climate has been studied at individual LTER sites and an LTER Climate Committee has been responsible for inter-site activities. At individual sites, climate studies support ecological research, emphasize inter-site heterogeneity, and often relate to other national monitoring and research programs. In inter-site work, the Climate Committee has produced protocols for meteorological observations, described and compared climates of the first 11 sit...

  9. Study of $\\tau$ decays involving kaons, spectral functions and determination of the strange quark mass

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Park, I.C.; Riu, I.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Boix, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Halley, A.W.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Tournefier, E.; Wright, A.E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Robertson, N.A.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Etienne, F.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Thulasidas, M.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Schune, M.H.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foa, L.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Johnson, R.P.; Kim, H.Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Prange, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1999-01-01

    All ALEPH measurements of branching ratios of tau decays involving kaons are summarized including a combination of results obtained with K^0_S and K^0_L detection. The decay dynamics are studied, leading to the determination of contributions from vector K^*(892) and K^{*}(1410), and axial-vector K_1(1270) and K_1(1400) resonances. Agreement with isospin symmetry is observed among the different final states. Under the hypothesis of the conserved vector current, the spectral function for the K\\bar{K}\\pi mode is compared with the corresponding cross section for low energy e^+e^- annihilation, yielding an axial-vector fraction of (94^{+6}_{-8})% for this mode. The branching ratio for tau decay into all strange final states is determined to be B(\\tau^-\\to X^-(S=-1)\

  10. From (UnWillingness to InvolveMENt: Development of a Successful Study Brand for Recruitment of Diverse MSM to a Longitudinal HIV Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M. Frew

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. HIV continues to be a major concern among MSM, yet Black MSM have not been enrolled in HIV research studies in proportionate numbers to White MSM. We developed an HIV prevention research brand strategy for MSM. Methods. Questionnaires and focus groups were conducted with 54 participants. Descriptive statistics and chi-square analyses were performed and qualitative data were transcribed and content analyzed to identify common themes. Results. Formative research results indicated that younger Black MSM (18–29 years were less likely to think about joining prevention studies compared to older (≥30 years Black MSM (x2=5.92, P=0.015. Qualitative and quantitative results indicate four prominent themes related to brand development: (1 communication sources (message deliverer, (2 message (impact of public health messaging on perceptions of HIV research, (3 intended audience (underlying issues that influence personal relevance of HIV research, and (4 communication channels (reaching intended audiences. Conclusion. The findings highlight the importance of behavioral communication translational research to effectively engage hard-to-reach populations. Despite reservations, MSM in our formative study expressed a need for active involvement and greater education to facilitate their engagement in HIV prevention research. Thus, the brand concept of “InvolveMENt” emerged.

  11. The university of queensland medical leadership program: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Lynnette; O'Dowd, Corina; Hewett, David G; Schafer, Jennifer; Fracgp, Dranzcog; Wilkinson, David

    2012-01-01

    Changes in modern healthcare's provision, complexity, and workforce demands provide a compelling rationale for an increasing emphasis on leadership development at all levels of training within the medical profession. Undergraduate medical education has traditionally focused on the development of clinical acumen with little emphasis on the development of leadership skills or on the operational and systemic issues surrounding healthcare delivery. Incorporating leadership education and competencies presents a number of challenges to medical schools, including defining the subject area, determining the specific skills and knowledge bases that should constitute the basis of the program, and optimizing training to be integrated into the existing clinical curriculum. We present a case study of the Medical Leadership Program at The University of Queensland School of Medicine that runs concurrent to the undergraduate medical degree. We outline the inception of the program, its aims, participant selection, and program components and reflect on the program to date.

  12. Human Resources Policy. Case Study: Continuing Education Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin BABA

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Life-long education programs are rather new in Romania, and there is much confusion about their structure, meaning, purposes and usefulness; although there is a clear necessity for these kinds of programs, they were implemented in our country only after recommendations were made by the European institutions. The Babeş-Bolyai University is one of the first and few Romanian universities that actually develop continuing education programs, directed at public services for the use of the local community. In this paper we present a particular case, the Program of Continuous Learning – Defense and Security Studies, designed to assist the 4th Territorial Army Corps based in Cluj-Napoca in its efforts to meet NATO standards. The program offers courses for military personnel in fields like strategic management, decision making processes, human resources management, and, of course, European security, and represents the first project of cooperation between a university and the Romanian army.

  13. Substance Use among Adolescents Involved in Bullying: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Gaete

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Being involved in bullying as a victim or perpetrator could have deleterious health consequences. Even though there is some evidence that bullies and victims of bullying have a higher risk for drug use, less is known about bystanders. The aim of this research was to study the association between bullying experience (as victims, bullies, or bystanders and substance use. We gathered complete information from a nationally representative sample of 36,687 students (51.4% female attending 756 schools in Chile. We used a self-reported questionnaire which was developed based on similar instruments used elsewhere. This questionnaire was piloted and presented to an expert panel for approval. We used multilevel multivariate logistic regression analyses, controlling for several variables at the individual (e.g., school membership, parental monitoring and school levels (e.g., school type, school denomination. This study shows that bullies and bully-victims have a high risk for cigarette, alcohol, and cannabis use than bystanders. This is one of the few studies exploring the association between witnessing bullying and substance use. These findings add new insights to the study of the co-occurrence of bullying and substance use. Other factors, such as higher academic performance, stronger school membership, and better parental monitoring reduced the risk of any substance use, while the experience of domestic violence and the perception of social disorganization in the neighborhood, increased the risk. These findings may help the design of preventive interventions.

  14. Substance Use among Adolescents Involved in Bullying: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Jorge; Tornero, Bernardita; Valenzuela, Daniela; Rojas-Barahona, Cristian A; Salmivalli, Christina; Valenzuela, Eduardo; Araya, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Being involved in bullying as a victim or perpetrator could have deleterious health consequences. Even though there is some evidence that bullies and victims of bullying have a higher risk for drug use, less is known about bystanders. The aim of this research was to study the association between bullying experience (as victims, bullies, or bystanders) and substance use. We gathered complete information from a nationally representative sample of 36,687 students (51.4% female) attending 756 schools in Chile. We used a self-reported questionnaire which was developed based on similar instruments used elsewhere. This questionnaire was piloted and presented to an expert panel for approval. We used multilevel multivariate logistic regression analyses, controlling for several variables at the individual (e.g., school membership, parental monitoring) and school levels (e.g., school type, school denomination). This study shows that bullies and bully-victims have a high risk for cigarette, alcohol, and cannabis use than bystanders. This is one of the few studies exploring the association between witnessing bullying and substance use. These findings add new insights to the study of the co-occurrence of bullying and substance use. Other factors, such as higher academic performance, stronger school membership, and better parental monitoring reduced the risk of any substance use, while the experience of domestic violence and the perception of social disorganization in the neighborhood, increased the risk. These findings may help the design of preventive interventions.

  15. Clinical Pharmacists as Educators in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A CERA Study of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Jennie B; Lounsbery, Jody L; D'Amico, Frank; Dickerson, Lori M; Franko, John; Nagle, John; Seehusen, Dean A; Wilson, Stephen A

    2016-03-01

    The clinical pharmacist's role within family medicine residency programs (FMRPs) is well established. However, there is limited information regarding perceptions of program directors (PDs) about clinical pharmacy educators. The study objectives were (1) to estimate the prevalence of clinical pharmacists within FMRPs and (2) to determine barriers and motivations for incorporation of clinical pharmacists as educators. The Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) distributed an electronic survey to PDs. Questions addressed formalized pharmacotherapy education, clinical pharmacists in educator roles, and barriers and benefits of clinical pharmacists in FMRPs. The overall response rate was 50% (224/451). Seventy-six percent (170/224) of the responding PDs reported that clinical pharmacists provide pharmacotherapy education in their FMRPs, and 57% (97/170) consider clinical pharmacists as faculty members. In programs with clinical pharmacists, 72% (83/116) of PDs reported having a systematic approach for teaching pharmacotherapy versus 22% (21/95) in programs without. In programs without clinical pharmacists, the top barrier to incorporation was limited ability to bill for clinical services 48% (43/89) versus 29% (32/112) in programs with clinical pharmacists. In both programs with and without clinical pharmacists, the top benefit of having clinical pharmacists was providing a collaborative approach to pharmacotherapy education for residents (35% and 36%, respectively). Less than half of FMRPs incorporate clinical pharmacists as faculty members. Despite providing collaborative approaches to pharmacotherapy education, their limited ability to bill for services is a major barrier.

  16. An ecological approach to prospective and retrospective timing of long durations: a study involving gamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Simon; Bisson, Nicolas; Grondin, Simon

    2010-02-17

    To date, most studies comparing prospective and retrospective timing have failed to use long durations and tasks with a certain degree of ecological validity. The present study assessed the effect of the timing paradigm on playing video games in a "naturalistic environment" (gaming centers). In addition, as it involved gamers, it provided an opportunity to examine the effect of gaming profile on time estimation. A total of 116 participants were asked to estimate prospectively or retrospectively a video game session lasting 12, 35 or 58 minutes. The results indicate that time is perceived as longer in the prospective paradigm than in the retrospective one, although the variability of estimates is the same. Moreover, the 12-minute session was perceived as longer, proportionally, than the 35- and 58-minute sessions. The study also revealed that the number of hours participants spent playing video games per week was a significant predictor of time estimates. To account for the main findings, the differences between prospective and retrospective timing are discussed in quantitative terms using a proposed theoretical framework, which states that both paradigms use the same cognitive processes, but in different proportions. Finally, the hypothesis that gamers play more because they underestimate time is also discussed.

  17. Muscle involvement in rheumatoid arthritis: clinicopathological study of 21 symptomatic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, O; Pedrol, E; Casademont, J; García-Carrasco, M; Sanmartí, R; Cebrián, M; Grau, J M

    1996-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to analyze the frequency and characteristics of symptomatic myopathies occurring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, to correlate these findings with clinical data, and to evaluate their therapeutic implications. All RA patients from a cohort of 350 RA patients from a single institution who developed muscular symptomatology during an 8-year period were included in the study (n = 21). Clinical and laboratory data and electromyographic results were recorded in all cases, and an open muscle biopsy was performed. Weakness and muscle atrophy were the most common symptoms. Serum creatine kinase was increased in 8 cases (38%). Histopathologic study showed type 2 atrophy in 12 cases. In 13 cases, a treatable disease was diagnosed: dermatomyositis (n = 2), d-penicillamine-related dermatomyositis (n = 2), polymyositis (n = 1), muscular mononuclear cell infiltration (n = 3), polyarteritis nodosa (n = 1), glucocorticoid myopathy (n = 3), and toxic chloroquine myopathy (n = 1). In all but 1 patient, muscular clinical response to new therapy and/or drug withdrawal was satisfactory. Although symptomatic muscular involvement in RA is low (6% in the current series), we have found that nearly two thirds of cases were caused by potentially treatable conditions, mainly myositis or toxic myopathies.

  18. An ecological approach to prospective and retrospective timing of long durations: a study involving gamers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Tobin

    Full Text Available To date, most studies comparing prospective and retrospective timing have failed to use long durations and tasks with a certain degree of ecological validity. The present study assessed the effect of the timing paradigm on playing video games in a "naturalistic environment" (gaming centers. In addition, as it involved gamers, it provided an opportunity to examine the effect of gaming profile on time estimation. A total of 116 participants were asked to estimate prospectively or retrospectively a video game session lasting 12, 35 or 58 minutes. The results indicate that time is perceived as longer in the prospective paradigm than in the retrospective one, although the variability of estimates is the same. Moreover, the 12-minute session was perceived as longer, proportionally, than the 35- and 58-minute sessions. The study also revealed that the number of hours participants spent playing video games per week was a significant predictor of time estimates. To account for the main findings, the differences between prospective and retrospective timing are discussed in quantitative terms using a proposed theoretical framework, which states that both paradigms use the same cognitive processes, but in different proportions. Finally, the hypothesis that gamers play more because they underestimate time is also discussed.

  19. Multivariate analysis of variance of designed chromatographic data. A case study involving fermentation of rooibos tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Federico; de Beer, Dalene; Walters, Nico A; de Villiers, André; Joubert, Elizabeth; Walczak, Beata

    2017-03-17

    An ultimate goal of investigations of rooibos plant material subjected to different stages of fermentation is to identify the chemical changes taking place in the phenolic composition, using an untargeted approach and chromatographic fingerprints. Realization of this goal requires, among others, identification of the main components of the plant material involved in chemical reactions during the fermentation process. Quantitative chromatographic data for the compounds for extracts of green, semi-fermented and fermented rooibos form the basis of preliminary study following a targeted approach. The aim is to estimate whether treatment has a significant effect based on all quantified compounds and to identify the compounds, which contribute significantly to it. Analysis of variance is performed using modern multivariate methods such as ANOVA-Simultaneous Component Analysis, ANOVA - Target Projection and regularized MANOVA. This study is the first one in which all three approaches are compared and evaluated. For the data studied, all tree methods reveal the same significance of the fermentation effect on the extract compositions, but they lead to its different interpretation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of the Genes and Mechanism Involved in the Radioadaptive Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Pushan R.

    2009-01-01

    The radioadaptive response is a phenomenon where exposure to a prior low dose of radiation reduces the level of damage induced by a subsequent high radiation dose. The molecular mechanism behind this is still not well understood. Learning more about the radioadaptive response is critical for long duration spaceflight since astronauts are exposed to low levels of cosmic radiation. The micronucleus assay was used to measure the level of damage caused by radiation. Although cells which were not washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) after a low priming dose of 5cGy did not show adaptation to the challenge dose, washing the cells with PBS and giving the cells fresh media after the low dose did allow radioadaptation to occur. This is consistent with the results of a previous publication by another research group. In the present study, genes involved in DNA damage signaling and the oxidative stress response were studied using RT PCR techniques in order to look at changes in expression level after the low dose with or without washing. Our preliminary results indicate that upregulation of oxidative stress response genes ANGPTL7, NCF2, TTN, and SRXN1 may be involved in the radioadaptive response. The low dose of radiation alone was found to activate the oxidative stress response genes GPR156 and MTL5, whereas, washing the cells alone caused relatively robust upregulation of the oxidative stress response genes DUSP1 and PTGS2. Washing after the priming dose showed some changes in the expression level of several DNA damage signaling genes. In addition, we studied whether washing the cells after the priming dose has an effect on the level of nitric oxide in both the media and cells, since nitric oxide levels are known to increase in the media of the cells after a high dose of radiation only if the cells were already exposed to a low priming dose. Based on this preliminary study, we propose that washing the cells after priming exposure actually eliminates some factor

  1. Upper and extra-motoneuron involvement in early motoneuron disease: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van der Graaff, Maaike M; Sage, Caroline A; Caan, Matthan W. A; Akkerman, Erik M; Lavini, Cristina; Majoie, Charles B; Nederveen, Aart J; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Vos, Frans; Brugman, Frans; van den Berg, Leonard H; de Rijk, Maarten C; van Doorn, Pieter A; van Hecke, Wim; Peeters, Ronald R; Robberecht, Wim; Sunaert, Stefan; de Visser, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Motoneuron disease is a term encompassing three phenotypes defined largely by the balance of upper versus lower motoneuron involvement, namely amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, primary lateral sclerosis...

  2. Changes in upper and lower body muscle involvement at increasing double poling velocities: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppirolli, C; Pellegrini, B; Modena, R; Savoldelli, A; Bortolan, L; Schena, F

    2017-11-01

    This study evaluated muscle activity changes in different body compartments during on-snow double poling at increasing velocities. 21 well-trained, male cross-country skiers performed five 3-min double poling trials on a snowy track at 15, 16.5, 18, 19.5, and 21 km/h (set by an audio-pace system). A sixth trial was performed by maintaining a constant maximal speed. Actual skiing velocities were verified using a photocell system. Only 11 subjects met the pre-defined inclusion criteria during the trials and were included in the data analysis. Electromyographical signals from seven muscles, wrist acceleration and heart rate during the last minute of each trial were recorded. Cycle and poling times were measured from acceleration signals; mean muscular activation over a cycle was calculated for each muscle. With increasing double poling velocities from aerobic to maximal intensity (from 65% to 100% of maximal heart rate), upper limb muscles activation was maintained constant (P > 0.05), while trunk and lower limb involvement increased significantly (P < 0.01) with a linear trend. Rectus abdominis and rectus femoris muscles showed the higher rate of change. Trunk and lower limbs provide a progressively greater contribution to the propulsion when increasing double poling velocities are performed, to support the limited capacity of exercise response of upper body muscles. The remarkable rate of involvement of the muscles near the core region of the body becomes strategic to cope with the increased demands of propulsive power. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Early-stage hip involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: A Chinese study based on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongying; Yuan, Shiwen; Zhan, Zhongping; Xiao, Youjun; Li, Hao; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the clinical characteristics and identify potential factors of the early-stage hip involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) based on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A cross-sectional retrospective study of 655 consecutive patients was performed. Patients with hip pain or limited hip function but lacking definitive evidence of hip involvement on radiography underwent hip MRI. Based on the results of the imaging tests, the patients were classified into three categories: (1) no hip involvement; (2) early-stage hip involvement according to MRI but not radiography; (3) advanced-stage hip involvement according to a Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Index-hip score ≥2. One hundred and sixty-eight patients had early-stage hip involvement and 103 patients had advanced-stage hip involvement. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that younger age at onset, worse BASMI score, and more active inflammation in the sacroiliac joints were associated with the occurrence of early-stage hip involvement. Negative plain radiography results cannot be used to rule out hip involvement. MRI was superior to radiography for the detection of early-stage hip involvement. Susceptible AS patients with symptoms or risk factors for hip involvement should undergo hip MRI to test for lesions in the early stage.

  4. [The social role of the faculties of medicine: physicians' perception of the dominant orientation of their medical studies and social involvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopelt, Keren; Yahav, Zehava; Urkin, Jacob; Bachner, Yaacov; Davidovitch, Nadav

    2014-02-01

    Medical education, based on the principles of social medicine, has the ability to contribute to reducing health disparities through the "creation" of doctors who are more involved in community programs. To compare the social and community orientation of graduates from the various medical schools. An online cross-sectional survey among 12,000 physicians who are graduates of Israeli medical schools was conducted in May 2011. The study encompassed 1,050 physicians, Israeli medical school graduates living in Israel and practicing medicine: 36% were Hebrew University graduates, 26% were Tel Aviv University graduates, 22% were Technion graduates and 16% were Ben-Gurion University (BGU) graduates. Higher rates of physicians who studied at the Technion and BGU are working or have worked in the periphery (approximately 50% vs. approximately 30% average of Hebrew and Tel-Aviv University schools). Among BGU graduates, 47% are active in community programs vs. 34-38% in other schools. Among physicians active in community programs, 32% of BGU alumni estimated that their medical education greatly influenced their community involvement vs. 8-15% in other schools. Hebrew University alumni graded their studies as having a higher research orientation. In contrast, BGU graduates graded their studies as having a higher social orientation, and had more positive attitudes on the role of the physician in reducing health disparities. Medical education with a social orientation will induce a socialization process that reinforces human values regarding the doctor-patient relationship and produce positive attitudes among future doctors regarding their social involvement. The findings emphasize the need to develop educational programs with a social orientation and to strengthen medical schools in the periphery.

  5. Differential involvement of cortical and cerebellar areas using dominant and nondominant hands: An FMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Matteo; Samson, Rebecca S.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Friston, Karl J.; Toosy, Ahmed T.; Gandini Wheeler‐Kingshott, Claudia A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Motor fMRI studies, comparing dominant (DH) and nondominant (NDH) hand activations have reported mixed findings, especially for the extent of ipsilateral (IL) activations and their relationship with task complexity. To date, no study has directly compared DH and NDH activations using an event‐related visually guided dynamic power‐grip paradigm with parametric (three) forces (GF) in healthy right‐handed subjects. We implemented a hierarchical statistical approach aimed to: (i) identify the main effect networks engaged when using either hand; (ii) characterise DH/NDH responses at different GFs; (iii) assess contralateral (CL)/IL‐specific and hemisphere‐specific activations. Beyond confirming previously reported results, this study demonstrated that increasing GF has an effect on motor response that is contextualised also by the use of DH or NDH. Linear analysis revealed increased activations in sensorimotor areas, with additional increased recruitments of subcortical and cerebellar areas when using the NDH. When looking at CL/IL‐specific activations, CL sensorimotor areas and IL cerebellum were activated with both hands. When performing the task with the NDH, several areas were also recruited including the CL cerebellum. Finally, there were hand‐side‐independent activations of nonmotor‐specific areas in the right and left hemispheres, with the right hemisphere being involved more extensively in sensori‐motor integration through associative areas while the left hemisphere showing greater activation at higher GF. This study shows that the functional networks subtending DH/NDH power‐grip visuomotor functions are qualitatively and quantitatively distinct and this should be taken into consideration when performing fMRI studies, particularly when planning interventions in patients with specific impairments. Hum Brain Mapp 36:5079–5100, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26415818

  6. A study of the costs and benefits of a Formal Safety Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crites, T.R.

    1993-03-01

    This study reports on a review of the safety programs and performance at 13 Department of Energy contractor facilities, involving over one-half million man-years of experience. Safety performance was compared with the size of staff and safety department funding over an 11-year period (1980-1990). Indicators of safety performance were taken as lost workdays, recordable injuries, accidental dollar losses, worker radiation dose, and worker`s compensation expenditures. Safety performance was found to be independent of, or even inversely related to, safety investment. Those organizations with the largest safety programs also experienced the greatest accidental losses.

  7. Evidence for bilateral involvement in idiom comprehension: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zempleni, Monika-Zita; Haverkort, Marco; Renken, Remco; A Stowe, Laurie

    2007-02-01

    The goal of the current study was to identify the neural substrate of idiom comprehension using fMRI. Idioms are familiar, fixed expressions whose meaning is not dependent on the literal interpretation of the component words. We presented literally plausible idioms in a sentence forcing a figurative or a literal interpretation and contrasted them with sentences containing idioms for which no literal interpretation was available and with unambiguously literal sentences. The major finding of the current study is that figurative comprehension in the case of both ambiguous and unambiguous idioms is supported by bilateral inferior frontal gyri and left middle temporal gyrus. The right middle temporal gyrus is also involved, but seems to exclusively process the ambiguous idioms. Therefore, our data suggest a bilateral neural network underlying figurative comprehension, as opposed to the exclusive participation of the right hemisphere. The data also provide evidence against proposed models of idiom comprehension in which literal processing is by-passed, since figurative processing demanded more resources than literal processing in the language network.

  8. General Practitioners involvement in enteral tube feeding at home: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Marion E

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex medical treatment is moving from hospital to primary care and General Practitioners (GPs are increasingly asked to undertake new roles. There are now an estimated 19,500 patients being fed in the UK in the community on enteral tube feeding using a variety of different feeding tubes (Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG, Jejunostomy, or nasogastric (NG. The majority of patients are over the age of 65 years when they had artificial feeding initiated and mainly because of dysphagia. The aim of this study was to explore GPs knowledge, attitudes and skills relating to enteral feeding in the community. Methods Semi-structured one-to-one interviews with a convenience sample of GPs in Northern Ireland. Results Twenty-three GPs in three health boards in Northern Ireland participated in the study. Most found dealing with enteral feeding to be a predominantly negative experience. They had little involvement in patient selection for the procedure and poor or no discharge information. GPs felt inadequately trained, there was poor communication between primary and secondary care and little support. There was anger and frustration among GPs about lack of resources (funding and training, and the perception that primary care was used as a dumping ground. Conclusion Moving complex medical treatment from secondary to primary care has major implications for GPs who should be included in the patient selection process, have adequate discharge information about their patients, be adequately resourced and have appropriate support and training.

  9. Dental trauma involving root fracture and periodontal ligament injury: a 10-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Regina Panzarini

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the cases of traumatic dental injuries involving root fracture and/or periodontal ligament injury (except avulsion treated at the Discipline of Integrated Clinic, School of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP, Brazil, from January 1992 to December 2002. Clinical and radiographic records from 161 patients with 287 traumatized teeth that had sustained root fracture and/or injuries to the periodontal ligament were examined. The results of this survey revealed that subluxation (25.09% was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury, followed by extrusive luxation (19.86%. There was a predominance of young male patients and most of them did not present systemic alterations. Among the etiologic factors, the most frequent causes were falls and bicycle accidents. Injuries on extraoral soft tissues were mostly laceration and abrasion, while gingival and lip mucosa lacerations prevailed on intraoral soft tissues injuries. Radiographically, the most common finding was an increase of the periodontal ligament space. The most commonly performed treatment was root canal therapy. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that traumatic dental injuries occur more frequently in young male individuals, due to falls and bicycle accidents. Subluxation was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury. Root canal therapy was the type of treatment most commonly planned and performed.

  10. Dental trauma involving root fracture and periodontal ligament injury: a 10-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Pedrini, Denise; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Brandini, Daniela Atili; Monteiro de Castro, José Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the cases of traumatic dental injuries involving root fracture and/or periodontal ligament injury (except avulsion) treated at the Discipline of Integrated Clinic, School of Dentistry of Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Brazil, from January 1992 to December 2002. Clinical and radiographic records from 161 patients with 287 traumatized teeth that had sustained root fracture and/or injuries to the periodontal ligament were examined. The results of this survey revealed that subluxation (25.09%) was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury, followed by extrusive luxation (19.86%). There was a predominance of young male patients and most of them did not present systemic alterations. Among the etiologic factors, the most frequent causes were falls and bicycle accidents. Injuries on extraoral soft tissues were mostly laceration and abrasion, while gingival and lip mucosa lacerations prevailed on intraoral soft tissues injuries. Radiographically, the most common finding was an increase of the periodontal ligament space. The most commonly performed treatment was root canal therapy. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that traumatic dental injuries occur more frequently in young male individuals, due to falls and bicycle accidents. Subluxation was the most common type of periodontal ligament injury. Root canal therapy was the type of treatment most commonly planned and performed.

  11. Effect of citric acid, tetracycline, and doxycycline on instrumented periodontally involved root surfaces: A SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurparkash Singh Chahal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A surface smear layer consisting of organic and inorganic material is formed on the root surface following mechanical instrumentation and may inhibit the formation of new connective tissue attachment to the root surface. Modification of the tooth surface by root conditioning has resulted in improved connective tissue attachment and has advanced the goal of reconstructive periodontal treatment. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of citric acid, tetracycline, and doxycycline on the instrumented periodontally involved root surfaces in vitro using a scanning electron microscope. Settings and Design: A total of 45 dentin samples obtained from 15 extracted, scaled, and root planed teeth were divided into three groups. Materials and Methods: The root conditioning agents were applied with cotton pellets using the "Passive burnishing technique" for 5 minutes. The samples were then examined by the scanning electron microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analysis was carried out using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, version 15.0 for Windows. For all quantitative variables means and standard deviations were calculated and compared. For more than two groups ANOVA was applied. For multiple comparisons post hoc tests with Bonferroni correction was used. Results: Upon statistical analysis the root conditioning agents used in this study were found to be effective in removing the smear layer, uncovering and widening the dentin tubules and unmasking the dentin collagen matrix. Conclusion: Tetracycline HCl was found to be the best root conditioner among the three agents used.

  12. LANGUAGE SCHOOLS AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDYING PROGRAMS IN PORTUGAL

    OpenAIRE

    Hritchenko, Iryna

    2017-01-01

    The article is devoted to the description and characterizing of language schools and foreign language studying programs in Portugal. The relevance of language learning for professional, mobility, self-developing means is shown. The main courses and programs are observed and the advantages and disadvantages of each of them are given. It is stated that Portuguese courses mostly follow the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. A small synopsis of the abilities for each level is p...

  13. Exploring the relationships between high involvement work system practices, work demands and emotional exhaustion : A multi-level study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppenauer, V.; van de Voorde, F.C.

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the impact of enacted high involvement work systems (HIWS) practices on employee emotional exhaustion. This study hypothesized that work overload and job responsibility mediate the relationship between HIWS practices (ability, motivation, opportunity and work design HIWS

  14. Exploring the relationships between high involvement work system practices, work demands and emotional exhaustion : A multi-level study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppenauer, V.; van de Voorde, F.C.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the impact of enacted high involvement work systems (HIWS) practices on employee emotional exhaustion. This study hypothesized that work overload and job responsibility mediate the relationship between HIWS practices (ability, motivation, opportunity and work design HIWS

  15. Parental Involvement in U.S. Study Abroad: Helicopters or Helpers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal Dauer, Kevin Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    Parental involvement in higher education has received much attention since the 1990s, though mostly through mainstream media sources. The term "helicopter parents" is now used to describe over-involved parents who "hover" over their children, intent on ensuring that their children's needs are addressed. The perception within…

  16. Active Involvement of Software Developers in Usability Engineering: Two Small-Scale Case Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornoe, Nis; Stage, Jan

    2017-01-01

    approach is to train and involve developers in all phases of usability activities from evaluations, to problem reporting, and making redesign proposals. Only limited work has previously investigated the impact of actively involving developers in usability engineering. In this paper, we present two small...

  17. The pedagogy of Short-Term Study-Abroad Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Gonsalvez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on establishing guidelines on the pedagogy of short term study abroad programs. This study follows 33 students who participated in a short-term study-abroad program to India with the researcher from 2006 through 2011. The study relies heavily on the student reflections and expressions as they experienced them. It is qualitative in nature. Focus groups were the main method of data collection, where participants were invited to reflect, express, and share their experiences with one another. This provided an opportunity for the participants to come together, relive their experiences, and help provide information as to how and what type of an influence this short-term study-abroad program provided.

  18. Involvement of patients with cancer in patient safety: a qualitative study of current practices, potentials and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Helle Max; Navne, Laura Emdal; Lipczak, Henriette

    2013-10-01

    Patient involvement in patient safety is widely advocated but knowledge regarding implementation of the concept in clinical practice is sparse. To investigate existing practices for patient involvement in patient safety, and opportunities and barriers for further involvement. A qualitative study of patient safety involvement practices in patient trajectories for prostate, uterine and colorectal cancer in Denmark. Observations from four hospital wards and interviews with 25 patients with cancer, 11 hospital doctors, 10 nurses, four general practitioners and two private practicing gynaecologists were conducted using ethnographic methodology. Patient safety was not a topic of attention for patients or dominant in communication between patients and healthcare professionals. The understanding of patient safety in clinical practice is almost exclusively linked to disease management. Involvement of patients is not systematic, but healthcare professionals and patients express willingness to engage. Invitation and encouragement of patients to become involved could be further systematised and developed. Barriers include limited knowledge of patient safety, of specific patient safety involvement techniques and concern regarding potential negative impact on doctor-patient relationship. Involvement of patients in patient safety must take into account that despite stated openness to the idea of involvement, patients and health professionals may not in practice show immediate concern. Lack of systematic involvement can also be attributed to limited knowledge about how to implement involvement beyond the focus of self-monitoring and compliance and a concern about the consequences of patient involvement for treatment outcomes. To realise the potential of patients' and health professionals' shared openness towards involvement, there is a need for more active facilitation and concrete guidance on how involvement can be practiced by both parties.

  19. Tendon involvement in patients with gout: an ultrasound study of prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Ríos, Lucio; Sánchez-Bringas, Guadalupe; Pineda, Carlos; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Reginato, Anthony; Alva, Magaly; Audisio, Marcelo; Bertoli, Ana; Cazenave, Tomas; Gutiérrez, Marwin; Mora, Claudia; Py, Guillermo; Sedano, Oscar; Solano, Carla; de Miguel, Eugenio

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate, by ultrasonography (US), the prevalence in the quadriceps, patellar, and Achilles tendon involvement of gout compared to that of patients with osteoarthritis and asymptomatic marathon runners. This is a multicenter, multinational, transverse cross-sectional, and comparative study comprising 80 patients with the diagnosis of gout according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, compared with two control groups: 35 patients with generalized osteoarthritis according to the ACR criteria and 35 subjects who were healthy marathon runners. Demographics and clinical characteristics, such as age, gender, comorbidity, disease duration, pain at the enthesis in the knee and ankle, frequency of disease exacerbations, uric acid level more than 7.2 mg at the time of evaluation, and type of treatment, were recorded. All participants were examined by ultrasound at the quadriceps, the patellar at its proximal and distal insertion, and the Achilles tendon to detect intra-tendinous tophus or aggregates according to the OMERACT definitions. Descriptive statistics and differences between groups were analyzed by chi-square test. Sensitivity and specificity by US were calculated. The prevalence of intra-tendinous aggregates and tophi in gout was significant compared with the other groups. Both lesions were the most frequent at the distal patellar insertion, followed by the quadriceps, Achilles, and proximal patellar insertion ones. In patients with osteoarthritis (OA), intra-tendinous hyperechoic aggregates were observed in 20 % of quadriceps tendons and in 11 % of patellar tendons at its proximal insertion, while in the healthy marathon runner group, the Achilles tendon had this kind of lesion in 17 % of the subjects. Neither the OA nor the healthy marathon runners had intra-tendinous tophi. The sensitivity and specificity of US to detect tophi or aggregates were 69.6 and 92 %, respectively, tendon involvement at

  20. Opportunities for involving men and families in chronic disease management: a qualitative study from Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Meredith P; Castro, Maricruz; Peña, Liz; López Hernández, Sergio Hernán; Arreola Camacho, Gabriel; Ramírez-Zea, Manuel; Martínez, Homero

    2015-10-05

    A healthy lifestyle intervention was implemented in primary care health centers in urban parts of Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, Mexico with an aim of reducing cardiovascular disease risk for patients with type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension. During implementation, research questions emerged. Considerably fewer men participated in the intervention than women, and an opportunity was identified to increase the reach of activities aimed at improving disease self-management through strategies involving family members. A qualitative study was conducted to identify strategies to involve men and engage family members in disease management and risk reduction. Nine men with hypertension and/or type 2 diabetes with limited to no participation in disease self-management and health promotion activities, six families in which at least one family member had a diagnosis of one or both conditions, and nine health care providers from four different government health centers were recruited for the study. Participants took part in semi-structured interviews. During interviews with families, genograms and eco-maps were used to diagram family composition and structure, and capture the nature of patients' relationships to the extended family and community resources. Transcripts were coded and a general inductive analytic approach was used to identify themes related to men's limited participation in health promotion activities, family support and barriers to disease management, and health care providers' recommendations. Participants reported barriers to men's participation in chronic disease management and healthy lifestyle education activities that can be grouped into two categories: internal and external factors. Internal factors are those for which they are able to make the decision on their own and external factors are those that are not related solely to their decision to take part or not. Four primary aspects were identified related to families' relationships with disease: different

  1. Program coordinators' perceptions of effective national citizen science programs and their impacts: An exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, K. C.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    The increasing desire to engage the public in science and research has advanced citizen science as a valuable and popular means to this end. Citizen science, a process by which concerned individuals, agencies, industries or community groups collaborate to monitor, track, and respond to issues of common community concerns, has evolved and grown over the past decade. Much of the citizen science research thus far has primarily focused on the public participants (citizen scientists) and/or organizations themselves. This study looks instead at the people, the coordinators, implementing or coordinating citizen science programs and activities, specifically in the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail & Snow Network (CoCoRaHS), and their perceptions for program effectiveness. CoCoRaHS is a national program in which citizens monitor, record, and report precipitation conditions from backyard observations. Semi-structured interviews and an online survey completed by the program's coordinators in the state of Colorado found that the effectiveness of CoCoRaHS depends less on the interactions of the coordinators with each other or funding impacts on program activities, but rather on the interactions between coordinators and citizen scientists. The effectiveness of CoCoRaHS was perceived to depend more significantly on the connections coordinators have with the community of program users and citizen scientists, and a supportive culture within the program. The next step therefore is to explore these interactions between the coordinators and citizen scientists to develop a better understanding of their nature of participation in the citizen science program, and to describe the characteristics of all participants.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of renal involvement in genetically studied patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompili, Giovanni [Department of Radiology, University of Milan School of Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, Via A. di Rudini 8, 20142 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: gpompili@sirm.org; Zirpoli, Salvatore [Department of Radiology, University of Milan School of Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, Via A. di Rudini 8, 20142 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: szirpoli@sirm.org; Sala, Chiara [Department of Radiology, University of Milan School of Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, Via A. di Rudini 8, 20142 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: chiarasala@alice.it; Flor, Nicola [Department of Radiology, University of Milan School of Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, Via A. di Rudini 8, 20142 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: flornic@hotmail.com; Alfano, Rosa Maria [Department of Pathology, University of Milan School of Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, Via A. di Rudini 8, 20142 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: rosa.alfano@ao-sanpaolo.it; Volpi, Angela [Department of Nephrology, University of Milan School of Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, Via A. di Rudini 8, 20142 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: gianfer2004@libero.it; Brancaccio, Diego [Department of Nephrology, University of Milan School of Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, Via A. di Rudini 8, 20142 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: diego.brancaccio@unimi.it; Sardanelli, Francesco [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato Unit of Radiology, University of Milan School of Medicine (Italy)], E-mail: francesco.sardanelli@unimi.it; Cornalba, Gianpaolo [Department of Radiology, University of Milan School of Medicine, San Paolo Hospital, Via A. di Rudini 8, 20142 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: gianpaolo.cornalba@unimi.it

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate renal involvement in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Materials and methods: A series of 24 TSC patients (19 with genetically demonstrated disease), underwent abdominal 1.0-T MR imaging with axial/coronal T1- and T2-weighted scans, with/without fat saturation. We looked for angyomiolipomas (AMLs) and cysts in 47 kidneys of 24 patients. We evaluated the percentage of parenchymal involvement by manual contouring on the coronal scans in 39 kidneys of 20 patients. Results: We detected AMLs in 15/24 (63%) patients and in 27/47 (57%) kidneys, cysts in 14/24 (58%) and in 26/47 (55%); respectively. AMLs were found in 2/4 TSC1 and in 11/15 TSC2 patients, cysts were found in 2/4 TSC1 and in 9/15 TSC2 patients. The global renal involvement ranged from 0 to 32% (median, 18%) in TSC1 and from 0 to 100% (median, 39%) in TSC2 patients. A fair correlation (r = .464) was found between patient's age and renal involvement, a good correlation (r = 0.655) between renal involvement and creatinine clearance. Conclusion: Renal parenchyma of TSC patients can be evaluated with MR imaging. A detectable renal involvement was found in 83% of patients, higher in TSC2 than in TSC1. Renal function seems to correlate with renal involvement quantified with MR imaging.

  3. Genes involved in systemic and arterial bed dependent atherosclerosis--Tampere Vascular study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Levula

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is a complex disease with hundreds of genes influencing its progression. In addition, the phenotype of the disease varies significantly depending on the arterial bed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized the genes generally involved in human advanced atherosclerotic (AHA type V-VI plaques in carotid and femoral arteries as well as aortas from 24 subjects of Tampere Vascular study and compared the results to non-atherosclerotic internal thoracic arteries (n=6 using genome-wide expression array and QRT-PCR. In addition we determined genes that were typical for each arterial plaque studied. To gain a comprehensive insight into the pathologic processes in the plaques we also analyzed pathways and gene sets dysregulated in this disease using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA. According to the selection criteria used (>3.0 fold change and p-value <0.05, 235 genes were up-regulated and 68 genes down-regulated in the carotid plaques, 242 genes up-regulated and 116 down-regulated in the femoral plaques and 256 genes up-regulated and 49 genes down-regulated in the aortic plaques. Nine genes were found to be specifically induced predominantly in aortic plaques, e.g., lactoferrin, and three genes in femoral plaques, e.g., chondroadherin, whereas no gene was found to be specific for carotid plaques. In pathway analysis, a total of 28 pathways or gene sets were found to be significantly dysregulated in atherosclerotic plaques (false discovery rate [FDR] <0.25. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes comprehensively the gene expression changes that generally prevail in human atherosclerotic plaques. In addition, site specific genes induced only in femoral or aortic plaques were found, reflecting that atherosclerotic process has unique features in different vascular beds.

  4. Testing the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in lucid dreaming: a tDCS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumbrys, Tadas; Erlacher, Daniel; Schredl, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that lucid dreaming (awareness of dreaming while dreaming) might be associated with increased brain activity over frontal regions during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. By applying transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), we aimed to manipulate the activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during REM sleep to increase dream lucidity. Nineteen participants spent three consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. On the second and third nights they randomly received either 1 mA tDCS for 10 min or sham stimulation during each REM period starting with the second one. According to the participants' self-ratings, tDCS over the DLPFC during REM sleep increased lucidity in dreams. The effects, however, were not strong and found only in frequent lucid dreamers. While this indicates some preliminary support for the involvement of the DLPFC in lucid dreaming, further research, controlling for indirect effects of stimulation and including other brain regions, is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions Involving Polymers and Silane Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo L. Oréfice

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Silane coupling agents have been frequently used as interfacial agents in polymer composites to improve interfacial strength and resistance to fluid migration. Although the capability of these agents in improving properties and performance of composites has been reported, there are still many uncertainties regarding the processing-structure-property relationships and the mechanisms of coupling developed by silane agents. In this work, an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM was used to measure interactions between polymers and silica substrates, where silane networks with a series of different structures were processed. The influence of the structure of silane networks on the interactions with polymers was studied and used to determine the mechanisms involved in the coupling phenomenon. The AFM results showed that phenomena such as chain penetration, entanglements, intersegment bonding, chain conformation in the vicinities of rigid surfaces were identified as being relevant for the overall processes of adhesion and adsorption of polymeric chains within a silane network. AFM adhesion curves showed that penetration of polymeric chains through a more open silane network can lead to higher levels of interactions between polymer and silane agents.

  6. Delivering Rural Health in a Changing Health Model: A Qualitative Study Involving Four Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Debajyoti; Gaines, Kristi; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-10-01

    An exploratory examination of rural hospital staff experiences to determine whether the physical state of rural healthcare facilities influence the healthcare experience and perception of care quality. Rural hospitals have served as the backbone of rural communities in the United States. Over time, these facilities have witnessed enhanced expectations, expanding their scope of operations from acute care to diversified services through linked provider networks and disaster management. Simultaneously, financial challenges, increasing emphasis on safety and quality, and the Affordable Care Act have introduced new challenges for rural hospitals. Currently, there is little empirical knowledge in this domain from a facility perspective. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted, involving semistructured interviews of upper and mid-level administrators in four rural hospitals located in West Texas. All questions attempted to obtain the subject's knowledge, ideas, and opinions concerning the physical design of the hospitals and the hospital experience. According to data on staff experiences, two classes of factors surfaced as potential influencers of hospital experience and care quality: (1) care configuration and (2) outdated building. Care configuration pertains to positioning facilities designed with inpatient care focus to a market expanding in outpatient services. Outdated buildings affect several issue including perceived provider quality and spatial accommodations for safe/efficient care and thereby also affecting the healthcare experience. Physical infrastructure of rural hospitals may have important and meaningful implications for population health performance in rural America. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Poliovirus Studies during the Endgame of the Polio Eradication Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Minetaro

    2017-01-24

    Since the beginning of Global Polio Eradication Initiative in 1988, poliomyelitis cases caused by wild poliovirus (PV) have been drastically reduced, with only 74 cases reported in 2 endemic countries in 2015. The current limited PV transmission suggests that we are in the endgame of the polio eradication program. However, specific challenges have emerged in the endgame, including tight budget, switching of the vaccines, and changes in biorisk management of PV. To overcome these challenges, several PV studies have been implemented in the eradication program. Some of the responses to the emerging challenges in the polio endgame might be valuable in other infectious diseases eradication programs. Here, I will review challenges that confront the polio eradication program and current research to address these challenges.

  8. Energy Systems Studies Program annual report, fiscal year 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, M. (ed.)

    1976-06-01

    This is the fourth annual progress report of the Energy Systems Studies Program supported at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), Office of the Assistant Administrator for Planning and Analysis. The program is coordinated under the designation of a National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems (NCAES). Five working groups with specific program responsibilities are: policy analysis, economic analysis, biomedical and environmental assessment, technology assessment, and energy data and models. Future scenarios of the implementation of groups of technologies and new resources are developed. The socio-economic and environmental consequences are analyzed in detail and impact analyses are performed. Progress during FY 1976 is summarized in the following areas: energy system model development; energy-economic model development; technology assessments and support; economic analyses; and energy model data base activities. The program plan for FY 1977 is presented. (MCW)

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies CAMKID variants involved in blood pressure response to losartan: the SOPHIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frau, Francesca; Zaninello, Roberta; Salvi, Erika; Ortu, Maria Francesca; Braga, Daniele; Velayutham, Dinesh; Argiolas, Giuseppe; Fresu, Giovanni; Troffa, Chiara; Bulla, Emanuela; Bulla, Patrizia; Pitzoi, Silvia; Piras, Daniela Antonella; Glorioso, Valeria; Chittani, Martina; Bernini, Giampaolo; Bardini, Michele; Fallo, Francesco; Malatino, Lorenzo; Stancanelli, Benedetta; Regolisti, Giuseppe; Ferri, Claudio; Desideri, Giovanbattista; Scioli, Giuseppe Antonio; Galletti, Ferruccio; Sciacqua, Angela; Perticone, Francesco; Degli Esposti, Ezio; Sturani, Alessandra; Semplicini, Andrea; Veglio, Franco; Mulatero, Paolo; Williams, Tracy A; Lanzani, Chiara; Hiltunen, Timo P; Kontula, Kimmo; Boerwinkle, Eric; Turner, Stephen T; Manunta, Paolo; Barlassina, Cristina; Cusi, Daniele; Glorioso, Nicola

    2014-09-01

    Essential hypertension arises from the combined effect of genetic and environmental factors. A pharmacogenomics approach could help to identify additional molecular mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. The aim of SOPHIA study was to identify genetic polymorphisms regulating blood pressure response to the angiotensin II receptor blocker, losartan, with a whole-genome approach. We performed a genome-wide association study on blood pressure response in 372 hypertensives treated with losartan and we looked for replication in two independent samples. We identified a peak of association in CAMK1D gene (rs10752271, effect size -5.5 ± 0.94 mmHg, p = 1.2 × 10(-8)). CAMK1D encodes a protein that belongs to the regulatory pathway involved in aldosterone synthesis. We tested the specificity of rs10752271 for losartan in hypertensives treated with hydrochlorothiazide and we validated it in silico in the GENRES cohort. Using a genome-wide approach, we identified the CAMK1D gene as a novel locus associated with blood pressure response to losartan. CAMK1D gene characterization may represent a useful tool to personalize the treatment of essential hypertension.

  10. Perceptions of user studies as a foundation for public programming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of user studies and the evaluation of services in the development of effective public programming initiatives by the public archives of east and southern Africa. Users of the archives are the backbone of effective archival services. Sadly, it appears that the records are more ...

  11. Rural Midwestern Public College Safe Ride Program Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohfeld, Kathy I.

    2017-01-01

    The central phenomenon researched in this case study was higher education administrators' decisions to institutionalize a safe ride program at a small, rural college. The purpose of this single/within-site case study was to describe the changes that happened at a rural public institution of higher education and the surrounding community in the…

  12. Participation in Tertiary Study Abroad Programs: The Role of Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalis, Steve; Joiner, Therese A.

    2004-01-01

    The increasing trend for the globalisation of business has highlighted the need for a better understanding of the factors that influence levels of intercultural awareness within organisations. Within the higher education sector, one initiative that aims to address this issue is student study abroad programs. This paper reports on a study that…

  13. Prospective study of post-traumatic stress disorder in children involved in road traffic accidents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stallard, Paul; Velleman, Richard; Baldwin, Sarah

    1998-01-01

    .... Setting: Accident and emergency department, Royal United Hospital, Bath. Subjects: 119 children aged 5-18 years involved in road traffic accidents and 66 children who sustained sports injuries...

  14. Upper and extra-motoneuron involvement in early motoneuron disease: A diffusion tensor imaging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. van der Graaff (Maaike); C.A. Sage (Caroline); M.W.A. Caan (Matthan); E.M. Akkerman (Erik); C. Lavini (Cristina); C.B. Majoie (Charles); A.J. Nederveen (Aart); A.H. Zwinderman (Ailko); F. Vos (Frans); F. Brugman (Frans); L.H. van den Berg (Leonard); M.C. de Rijk (Maarten); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); W. van Hecke (Wim); R.R. Peeters (Ronald); W. Robberecht (Wim); S.G. Sunaert (Stefan); M. de Visser (Marianne)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMotoneuron disease is a term encompassing three phenotypes defined largely by the balance of upper versus lower motoneuron involvement, namely amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, primary lateral sclerosis and progressive muscular atrophy. However, neuroradiological and pathological findings

  15. Upper and extra-motoneuron involvement in early motoneuron disease: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaff, Maaike M.; Sage, Caroline A.; Caan, Matthan W. A.; Akkerman, Erik M.; Lavini, Cristina; Majoie, Charles B.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Vos, Frans; Brugman, Frans; van den Berg, Leonard H.; de Rijk, Maarten C.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; van Hecke, Wim; Peeters, Ronald R.; Robberecht, Wim; Sunaert, Stefan; de Visser, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Motoneuron disease is a term encompassing three phenotypes defined largely by the balance of upper versus lower motoneuron involvement, namely amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, primary lateral sclerosis and progressive muscular atrophy. However, neuroradiological and pathological findings in these

  16. Participatory democracy, representative democracy, and the nature of diffuse and concentrated interests: A case study of public involvement on a national gorest district

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Overdevest

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate whether public involvement on a national forest district fairly represents the public's values, this article proposes four hypothesis tests. First, it is hypothesized that public-involvement programs operute according to a participatory democracy logic, in which broad cross sections of the public participate in public involvement opportunities. A...

  17. [Study of the types of matrix metalloproteinases involved in dentin bonding interface degradation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danyang; Zhang, Ling; Li, Fang; Xu, Shuai; Chen, Jihua

    2014-08-01

    To study the types of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) involved in dentin bonding interface degradation. Dentin slices were prepared and treated with two adhesive systems (Single Bond 2 or Clearfil S3 Bond). The dentin surface was bonded with composite resin. All specimens were immersed in sterile artificial saliva for 0 or 6 months, and their micro-shear bond strength (muSBS) were measured. The fracture modes were observed through field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Dentin slices with 4 mm x 3 mm x 1 mm dimensions were prepared. The slices were divided into three groups according to the treatment modes (negative control, Single Bond 2, and Clearfil S3 Bond). All specimens were stored in sterile artificial saliva for 0 or 6 months. The concentrations of MMP-1, -2, -3, -8, and -9 of each group were detected through fluorescent microsphere immunoassay. The muSBS of both adhesive systems significantly decreased after storage aging. Significant differences in failure modes within the four groups tested in this study were observed. Compared with the negative control, the concentrations of MMP-1 and MMP-3 in different adhesive groups showed no significant difference after storage aging. However, the concentrations of MMP-2, -8, and -9 in Single Bond 2 group and the concentrations of MMP-8 and -9 in Clearfil S3 Bond group significantly decreased after 6 months of storage aging. Significant degradation occur in the dentin bonding interface of both adhesive groups under 6 months aging challenge. The concentrations ofdentinal MMP-2, -8, and -9 significantly decrease after treatment with adhesives and aging, indicating that these MMPs have an important function in dentin bonding interface degradation.

  18. Proteins involved in platelet signaling are differentially regulated in acute coronary syndrome: a proteomic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Fernández Parguiña

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelets play a fundamental role in pathological events underlying acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Because platelets do not have a nucleus, proteomics constitutes an optimal approach to follow platelet molecular events associated with the onset of the acute episode. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed the first high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteome analysis of circulating platelets from patients with non-ST segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS. Proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and validations were by western blotting. Forty protein features (corresponding to 22 unique genes were found to be differentially regulated between NSTE-ACS patients and matched controls with chronic ischemic cardiopathy. The number of differences decreased at day 5 (28 and 6 months after the acute event (5. Interestingly, a systems biology approach demonstrated that 16 of the 22 differentially regulated proteins identified are interconnected as part of a common network related to cell assembly and organization and cell morphology, processes very related to platelet activation. Indeed, 14 of those proteins are either signaling or cytoskeletal, and nine of them are known to participate in platelet activation by αIIbβ3 and/or GPVI receptors. Several of the proteins identified participate in platelet activation through post-translational modifications, as shown here for ILK, Src and Talin. Interestingly, the platelet-secreted glycoprotein SPARC was down-regulated in NSTE-ACS patients compared to stable controls, which is consistent with a secretion process from activated platelets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study provides novel information on platelet proteome changes associated with platelet activation in NSTE-ACS, highlighting the presence of proteins involved in platelet signaling. This investigation paves the way for future studies in the search for novel platelet-related biomarkers and drug targets

  19. Posterior pharyngeal candidiasis in the absence of clinically overt oral involvement: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavey, Siobhan V; Keane, Niamh; Power, Maria; O'Regan, Anthony W

    2013-12-01

    Although oropharyngeal candidiasis is associated with inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) usage, there is sparse data on the prevalence of posterior pharyngeal candidiasis in those without any detectable oral candidiasis on clinical examination. We systematically investigated the relationship between oral candidiasis on clinical examination and the presence of posterior pharyngeal candidiasis at bronchoscopy. We conducted a cross-sectional study on a convenience sample of 100 patients undergoing bronchoscopy at our institution. Patients were assessed for symptoms of and risk factors for candida infection and had an examination of their oropharynx for evidence of candidiasis before bronchoscopy. They subsequently had a detailed assessment for posterior candidiasis at bronchoscopy. We performed a posteriori subgroup analysis, which focused solely on those patients on ICS maintenance therapy. Median age was 54.7 (27-84) years, and 55 patients were male; 47 % of patients were on ICS, and 20 % of this cohort received recent oral corticosteroids. Twenty-eight percent of this convenience sample had posterior pharyngeal candidiasis; however, only 10.7 % (3/28) of these patients had clinically detectable oral candidiasis on clinical examination before bronchoscopy. Factors that were independently associated with the presence of pharyngeal candidiasis at bronchoscopy were OR (95 % CI) ICS usage 6.9 (2.5-19.2), particularly fluticasone usage 6.8 (2.62-17.9) and the presence of dysphonia 3.2 (1.3-8.0). In the subgroup analysis of ICS usage, posterior pharyngeal candidiasis was correlated with the presence of dysphonia but was not independently associated with fluticasone or budesonide dosage. This study demonstrates that posterior pharyngeal candidiasis in the absence of clinically overt oral candidiasis is frequent amongst ICS users. A history of ICS use, particularly fluticasone usage, as well as the presence of dysphonia are associated with posterior pharyngeal candidiasis at

  20. Good prognosis for pericarditis with and without myocardial involvement: results from a multicenter, prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazio, Massimo; Brucato, Antonio; Barbieri, Andrea; Ferroni, Francesca; Maestroni, Silvia; Ligabue, Guido; Chinaglia, Alessandra; Cumetti, Davide; Della Casa, Giovanni; Bonomi, Federica; Mantovani, Francesca; Di Corato, Paola; Lugli, Roberta; Faletti, Riccardo; Leuzzi, Stefano; Bonamini, Rodolfo; Modena, Maria Grazia; Belli, Riccardo

    2013-07-02

    The natural history of myopericarditis/perimyocarditis is poorly known, and recently published studies have presented contrasting data on their outcomes. The aim of the present article is to assess the prognosis of myopericarditis/perimyocarditis in a multicenter, prospective cohort study. A total of 486 patients (median age, 39 years; range, 18-83 years; 300 men) with acute pericarditis or a myopericardial inflammatory syndrome (myopericarditis/perimyocarditis; 85% idiopathic, 11% connective tissue disease or inflammatory bowel disease, 5% infective) were prospectively evaluated from January 2007 to December 2011. The diagnosis of acute pericarditis was based on the presence of 2 of 4 clinical criteria (chest pain, pericardial rubs, widespread ST-segment elevation or PR depression, and new or worsening pericardial effusion). Myopericardial inflammatory involvement was suspected with atypical ECG changes for pericarditis, arrhythmias, and cardiac troponin elevation or new or worsening ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography and confirmed by cardiac magnetic resonance. After a median follow-up of 36 months, normalization of left ventricular function was achieved in >90% of patients with myopericarditis/perimyocarditis. No deaths were recorded, as well as evolution to heart failure or symptomatic left ventricular dysfunction. Recurrences (mainly as recurrent pericarditis) were the most common complication during follow-up and were recorded more frequently in patients with acute pericarditis (32%) than in those with myopericarditis (11%) or perimyocarditis (12%; P<0.001). Troponin elevation was not associated with an increase in complications. The outcome of myopericardial inflammatory syndromes is good. Unlike acute coronary syndromes, troponin elevation is not a negative prognostic marker in this setting.

  1. Uncertainties involved in the estimation of mean glandular dose for women in the Norwegian breast cancer screening program (NBCSP)

    OpenAIRE

    Hauge, Ingrid Helen Ryste; Olerud, Hilde Merete

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reflect on the estimation of the mean glandular dose for women in Norway aged 50–69 y. Estimation of mean glandular dose (MGD) has been conducted by applying the method of Dance et al. (1990, 2000, 2009). Uncertainties in the thickness of approximately ±10 mm adds uncertainties in the MGD of approximately ±10 %, and uncertainty in the glandularity of ±0 % will lead to an uncertainty in the MGD of ±4 %. However, the inherent uncertainty in the air kerma, given by t...

  2. Study on Nuclear Facility Cyber Security Awareness and Training Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Lee, Cheol-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Cyber security awareness and training, which is a part of operational security controls, is defined to be implemented later in the CSP implementation schedule. However, cyber security awareness and training is a prerequisite for the appropriate implementation of a cyber security program. When considering the current situation in which it is just started to define cyber security activities and to assign personnel who has responsibilities for performing those activities, a cyber security awareness program is necessary to enhance cyber security culture for the facility personnel to participate positively in cyber security activities. Also before the implementation of stepwise CSP, suitable education and training should be provided to both cyber security teams (CST) and facility personnel who should participate in the implementation. Since such importance and urgency of cyber security awareness and training is underestimated at present, the types, trainees, contents, and development strategies of cyber security awareness and training programs are studied to help Korean nuclear facilities to perform cyber security activities more effectively. Cyber security awareness and training programs should be developed ahead of the implementation of CSP. In this study, through the analysis of requirements in the regulatory standard RS-015, the types and trainees of overall cyber security training programs in nuclear facilities are identified. Contents suitable for a cyber security awareness program and a technical training program are derived. It is suggested to develop stepwise the program contents in accordance with the development of policies, guides, and procedures as parts of the facility cyber security program. Since any training programs are not available for the specialized cyber security training in nuclear facilities, a long-term development plan is necessary. As alternatives for the time being, several cyber security training courses for industrial control systems by

  3. Decision-Making Styles and Levels of Involvement Concerning Breast Reconstructive Surgery: An Israeli Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmon, Ilana; Noy, Sigal; Billig, Allan; Tzur, Tomer

    2016-01-01

    To address decision-making styles among breast cancer survivors considering breast reconstruction.
. A primary analysis of a cross-sectional sample among survivors who chose to have breast reconstruction to examine correlations among patient age, decision-making style, and the level of involvement of decision making.
. Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem, Israel.
. 70 women who had undergone breast reconstruction surgery in the past five years.
. Participants completed decision-making style and demographic questionnaires and an assessment of their level of involvement in the decision-making process. 
. Level of involvement in decision making, decision-making model between provider and patient, and decision-making styles were examined.
. No correlation was found between four main decision-making styles and patient age or the extent of patient decision-making involvement and age. A statistically significant correlation was found between the level of involvement in decision making and the decision-making style of the patient.
. Nurses should assess patient decision-making styles to ensure maximum patient involvement in the decision-making process based on personal desires regardless of age.
. Nurses working in breast cancer care must address the decision-making process of patients diagnosed with breast cancer, including the choice to undergo breast reconstruction after mastectomy. Nurses should understand the complex factors that influence a woman's decision-making style to best help with the decision.

  4. Factors influencing parental involvement among minors seeking an abortion: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbacher, Lee A; Dekleva, Anna; Tristan, Sigrid; Gilliam, Melissa L

    2014-11-01

    We explored factors that influenced whether minors involved or excluded a parent when seeking an abortion. In the summer of 2010, we conducted interviews with 30 minors who sought an abortion in a state that did not require parental involvement at the time. Interviews were coded and analyzed following the principles of the grounded theory method. The majority of minors involved a parent. Commonly cited factors were close or supportive parental relationships, a sense that disclosure was inevitable, a need for practical assistance, and compelled disclosure. Motivations for not wanting to involve a parent, although some minors ultimately did, included preservation of the parent-daughter relationship, fear or detachment, and preservation of autonomy. Minors were motivated to involve parents and other adults who were engaged in their lives at the time of the pregnancy, particularly those who supported them in obtaining an abortion. Motivations to exclude a parent were often based on particular family circumstances or experiences that suggested that involvement would not be helpful, might be harmful, or might restrict a minor's ability to obtain an abortion.

  5. Risk Management for Study Abroad Programs: Issues and Resources to Inform Program Development, Administration, and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Gary

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides a practical background to the health and safety risks and challenges for U.S. colleges and universities and other program providers. Potential risks, field-based guidelines, good practices, and resources to support the management of risks by study abroad offices will be covered.

  6. The Research Program of the Yale Child Study Center School Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, James P.; Emmons, Christine

    2006-01-01

    The Yale Child Study Center School Development Program (SDP) practices an action research approach to look into obstacles to good teaching and learning in schools, and to reduce or eliminate them. A discussion on the SDP explains how the pilot, field-test and dissemination aspects of the work evolved, the intervention methods used and their…

  7. OCULAR INVOLVEMENT IN MUCOCUTANEOUS DISORDERS- A STUDY IN TERTIARY HOSPITAL IN SOUTH ORISSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Panda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diseases of skin, mucous membrane and mucocutaneous junctions may also affect the eyes. Physical findings of dermatological disorders and eyes overlap due to three factors- (i Genodermatoses often affects both skin and eyes because of origin from embryonic ectodermal layers, (ii Acquired dermatological disorders may affect the mucocutaneous tissue of periorbital regions, (iii Systemic diseases can manifest as diseases of skin and periocular mucocutaneous tissue because of their superficial anatomical locations. The aim of the present study was observation and interpretation of changes in the eye in different mucocutaneous disorders and correlation of the eye changes with severity of the diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was undertaken in the Department of Ophthalmology, M.K.C.G. Medical College and Hospital, Berhampur, South Orissa, during the period of 2014 to 2016 including the referred patients after being diagnosed with mucocutaneous disease from Department of Dermatology, Paediatric and Medicine from the same hospital. A case study of 204 patients (M- 164, F-40 was done. All patients underwent detailed ophthalmic examination inclusive of ocular movements, VA, IOP, S/L exam, blood and urine investigation and fundus examination. RESULTS Out of 204 patients examined, i.e. 164 males and 40 females, the ocular involvement found was 132, i.e. 64%. Majority of patients having ocular lesions were affected by herpes (72.2% and leprosy (78.57%. Most common mucocutaneous syndrome in the study was herpes (35.29% and leprosy (27.45%. Most common ocular lesions in various mucocutaneous ocular syndrome was found to be conjunctivitis (45.4%, blepharitis (34.8% and periorbital vesicles (30.3%. The least common was found to be trichiasis and conjunctival membrane each 3%. After follow-up of 3 months, the following ocular sequelaes were observed, i.e. dry eye (9%, symblepharon (7.5%, corneal scar (4.5%, corneal vascularisation (3

  8. A Study of Nutrition in Entry-Level Dental Hygiene Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Deborah L; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Freudenthal, Jacqueline J

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to document the extent of nutritional content in U.S. dental hygiene program curricula; identify program directors' opinions, perceptions, and barriers to expanding nutritional content; and evaluate if a proposed nutrition curriculum model would be beneficial. This mixed methods study involved quantitative and qualitative aspects. An invitation letter was sent to all 335 directors of entry-level U.S. dental hygiene programs. In response, 55 directors submitted nutrition course syllabi from their programs (16.4% of the total) for the quantitative analysis. In addition, 14 nutrition instructors and ten program directors were interviewed regarding their perceptions and opinions of nutrition education for dental hygiene students. All aspects of the content analysis results revealed that nutrition content in entry-level dental hygiene programs is diverse. Some programs did not include nutrition content, while others provided oral and systemic nutrition intervention subject matter. Some programs offered multiple clinical nutrition applications and patient contact opportunities while most required none. The interview results disclosed a variety of opinions and perceptions of dental hygienists' role in nutrition. Several interviewees viewed dental hygienists' role in nutrition to be an integral part of patient care, while others indicated no role or providing caries prevention counseling only. Although dental hygienists are expected to provide nutrition assessments and interventions, no standards or standardized competencies exist for nutrition in dental hygiene education. A standardized nutrition model could be beneficial for entry-level programs to ensure dental hygienists possess basic knowledge to perform nutrition assessments and intervention to address Healthy People 2020's intervention initiatives.

  9. Uncertainties involved in the estimation of mean glandular dose for women in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, I H R; Olerud, H M

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to reflect on the estimation of the mean glandular dose for women in Norway aged 50-69 y. Estimation of mean glandular dose (MGD) has been conducted by applying the method of Dance et al. (1990, 2000, 2009). Uncertainties in the thickness of approximately ±10 mm adds uncertainties in the MGD of approximately ±10 %, and uncertainty in the glandularity of ±0 % will lead to an uncertainty in the MGD of ±4 %. However, the inherent uncertainty in the air kerma, given by the European protocol on dosimetry, will add an uncertainty of 12 %. The total uncertainty in the MGD is estimated to be ∼20 %, taking into consideration uncertainties in compressed breast thickness (±10 %), the air kerma (12 %), change in HVL by -0.05 mm (-9.0 %), uncertainty in the s-factor of ±2.1 % and changing the glandularity to an age-dependent glandularity distribution (+8.4 %).

  10. Alcohol involvement in aggression between intimate partners in New Zealand: a national cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Jennie L; Kypri, Kypros; Bell, Melanie L; Cousins, Kimberly

    2011-06-29

    To examine the role of alcohol at the time of aggressive incidents between intimate partners in the general population by gender, by estimating (1) prevalence and severity of aggression, and drinking at the time, (2) associations of drinking at the time of the aggression with reported severity, anger and fear, and (3) association of usual drinking patterns with partner aggression. A national survey of 18-70-year-olds using an electoral roll sample obtained self-reported alcohol consumption, partner's alcohol consumption and details of the most severe partner aggression by the respondent and towards the respondent in the past 2 years. The mean scores for associated severity, anger and fear were analysed by gender and alcohol involvement. Multinomial models estimated associations of drinking patterns with aggression to and from the respondent. The response rate was 49% (n=1925). Men and women reported similar prevalence of victimisation and perpetration of aggression (11-15%). Alcohol was involved in more than 25% of incidents, and reported more by women than by men, particularly male-only drinking when the respondent was the victim. Women reported greater severity, anger and fear with victimisation than men, and drinking was associated with greater reported severity. Heavy episodic drinking by respondents was associated with a threefold increase in victimisation and doubling of perpetration of aggression involving alcohol. Heavy episodic drinking by either partner was also associated with drinking being involved in reported aggression. The experience of intimate-partner aggression in a cross-section of households differs by gender and the involvement of alcohol, and 'counts' of aggressive acts in a population-based survey do not reflect the reality of gender differences. Heavy episodic drinking patterns are associated with more aggression involving alcohol within relationships, and alcohol involvement is associated with increased severity.

  11. Factors involved in nurses' responses to burnout: a grounded theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikravesh Mansoure

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intense and long-standing problems in burn centers in Tehran have led nurses to burnout. This phenomenon has provoked serious responses and has put the nurses, patients and the organization under pressure. The challenge for managers and nurse executives is to understand the factors which would reduce or increase the nurses' responses to burnout and develop delivery systems that promote positive adaptation and facilitate quality care. This study, as a part of more extensive research, aims to explore and describe the nurses' perceptions of the factors affecting their responses to burnout. Methods Grounded theory was used as the method. Thirty- eight participants were recruited. Data were generated by unstructured interviews and 21 sessions of participant observations. Constant comparison was used for data analysis. Results Nurses' and patients' personal characteristics and social support influenced nurses' responses to burnout. Personal characteristics of the nurses and patients, especially when interacting, had a more powerful effect. They altered emotional, attitudinal, behavioral and organizational responses to burnout and determined the kind of caring behavior. Social support had a palliative effect and altered emotional responses and some aspects of attitudinal responses. Conclusions The powerful effect of positive personal characteristics and its sensitivity to long standing and intense organizational pressures suggests approaches to executing stress reduction programs and refreshing the nurses' morale by giving more importance to ethical aspects of caring. Moreover, regarding palliative effect of social support and its importance for the nurses' wellbeing, nurse executives are responsible for promoting a work environment that supports nurses and motivates them.

  12. [Autism and associated pathologies. Clinical study of 295 cases involving development disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodier, C; Lenoir, P; Malvy, J; Barthélemy, C; Wiss, M; Sauvage, D

    2001-09-01

    Known since the first descriptions in 1943, diseases related to autism and associated disorders have incited a growing body of work. Both theoretical interrogations (what is the pathogenic role of autism?) and practical measures (management, screening) are implied. Nevertheless the frequency of autism-related disease has varied from 10 to 37% depending on the series reported. We studied the frequency of these factors in a population of children with major development disorders cared for at the Tours university hospital over a 39-month period. We reviewed retrospectively the medial features of 295 children examined in our psychiatry and neurophysiology unit for children at the Tours center for major development disorders (based on the DSM IV diagnostic criteria) between September 1995 and December 1998. We divided these factors into 4 categories: hereditary diseases, serious medical conditions, minimal physical disorders and ante- or perinatal antecedents. Among these 295 children, 26.5% had a proven or probable hereditary disease, 19% had a serious medical condition and 21.7% had minimal physical disorders. Among the children with a serious medical condition, 34.4% also had ante- or perinatal antecedents. Among the 33% without any medical factor, 77% also had ante- or perinatal antecedents. Our data point out the quantitative importance of medical factors associated with major development disorders. They imply a close multidisciplinary collaboration between child psychiatrists, pediatricians and geneticists in order to identify these disorders and develop an integrated management scheme. On a more theoretical level, it appears possible to identify subgroups of children among such a population based on associated diseases and neuropsychological patterns. This dimension would be useful for research into the pathogenic mechanisms involved.

  13. Potential Involvement of P2 Receptors in the Pathological Processes of Hyperthyroidism: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wu; Li, Guodong; Nie, Yijun; Zou, Lifang; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Shuangmei; Li, Guilin; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Liang, Shangdong

    2016-05-01

    Symptoms of hyperthyroidism manifest mainly as changes in the nervous and metabolic systems. Whether P2X receptors (ionotropic ATP purinergic receptors, including P2X3 receptor and P2X7 receptor) are involved in the alterations of these disorders still remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to assess the association of hyperthyroidism with the expression of P2X3 and P2X7 receptors and the concentrations of ATP in blood leukocytes and catecholamine. Twelve healthy subjects and twelve patients diagnosed with hyperthyroidism were recruited. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels had been detected by chemiluminescence method. Meanwhile, the catecholamine levels (including adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine) in plasma, ATP level and P2X receptors (including P2X3 receptor and P2X7 receptor) in peripheral blood had been detected by high performance liquid chromatography, bioluminescence method, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine were significantly higher in the hyperthyroidism group compared with the control group. The concentration of ATP in the hyperthyroidism group was significantly higher than its in the control group. The expression of P2X3 mRNA and P2X7 mRNA in hyperthyroidism group were significantly increased compared with those in control group. In a conclusion, there is a relationship between the elevated expression of P2X3 receptor and P2X7 receptor in peripheral blood leukocytes and high serum epinephrine and norepinephrine levels in hyperthyroidism patients. © 2016 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  14. Patient Involvement in Patient Safety: A Qualitative Study of Nursing Staff and Patient Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Andrea C; Macdonald, Marilyn

    2017-06-01

    The risk associated with receiving health care has called for an increased focus on the role of patients in helping to improve safety. Recent research has highlighted that patient involvement in patient safety practices may be influenced by patient perceptions of patient safety practices and the perceptions of their health care providers. The objective of this research was to describe patient involvement in patient safety practices by exploring patient and nursing staff perceptions of safety. Qualitative focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of nursing staff and patients who had previously completed a patient safety survey in 2 tertiary hospital sites in Eastern Canada. Six focus groups (June 2011 to January 2012) were conducted and analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Four themes were identified: (1) wanting control, (2) feeling connected, (3) encountering roadblocks, and (4) sharing responsibility for safety. Both patient and nursing staff participants highlighted the importance of building a personal connection as a precursor to ensuring that patients are involved in their care and safety. However, perceptions of provider stress and nursing staff workload often reduced the ability of the nursing staff and patient participants to connect with one another and promote involvement. Current strategies aimed at increasing patient awareness of patient safety may not be enough. The findings suggest that providing the context for interaction to occur between nursing staff and patients as well as targeted interventions aimed at increasing patient control may be needed to ensure patient involvement in patient safety.

  15. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: A national survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; de Veer, A.J.E.; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELDs) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  16. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: a national survey study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; Francke, A.L.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Bilsen, J.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELD) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Methods: Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals.

  17. A meta-analysis of experimental studies of diversion programs for juvenile offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Craig S; Gearing, Robin E; MacKenzie, Michael J; Brewer, Kathryne B; Ibrahim, Rawan

    2012-02-01

    Research to establish an evidence-base for the treatment of conduct problems and delinquency in adolescence is well established; however, an evidence-base for interventions with offenders who are diverted from the juvenile justice system has yet to be synthesized. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of experimental studies testing juvenile diversion programs and to examine the moderating effect of program type and implementation quality. A literature search using PsycINFO, Web of Science, and the National Criminal Justice Reference Service data-bases and research institute websites yielded 28 eligible studies involving 57 experimental comparisons and 19,301 youths. Recidivism was the most common outcome reported across all studies. Overall, the effect of diversion programs on recidivism was non-significant (k=45, OR=0.83, 95%CI=0.43-1.58). Of the five program types identified, including case management (k=18, OR=0.78), individual treatment (k=11, OR=0.83), family treatment (k=4, OR=0.57), youth court (k=6, OR=0.93), and restorative justice (k=6, OR=0.87), only family treatment led to a statistically significant reduction in recidivism. Restorative justice studies that were implemented with active involvement of researchers led to statistically significant reductions in recidivism (k=3, OR=0.69). Other outcomes, including frequency of offending, truancy, and psycho-social problems were reported infrequently and were not subjected to meta-analysis. High levels of heterogeneity characterize diversion research. Results of this study recommend against implementation of programs limited to case management and highlight the promise of family interventions and restorative justice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Microscopic study of muon-capture transitions in nuclei involved in double-beta-decay processes

    CERN Document Server

    Kortelainen, M

    2003-01-01

    Total and partial ordinary muon-capture (OMC) rates to 1 sup + and 2 sup - states are calculated in the framework of the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA) for several nuclei involved in double-beta-decay processes. The aim is to obtain information on intermediate states involved in double-beta-decay transitions having these nuclei as either daughter or parent nuclei. It is found that the OMC observables, just like the 2 nu beta beta-decay amplitudes, strongly depend on the particle-particle part of the proton-neutron interaction. First experiments measuring the partial OMC rates for nuclei involved in double beta decays have recently been performed.

  19. Communication of work accidents involving biological material: a study in the city of Santa Cruz do Sul/RS

    OpenAIRE

    Dayane Diehl; Karini da Rosa; Susimar Souza Rosa; Susane Beatriz Frantz Krug

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: Healthcare workers are constantly exposed to the risk of occupational accidents involving biological material. Thus the aim of the study was to develop a profile of workers involved in workplace accidents with biological materials in Santa Cruz do Sul, through the number of notifications made in information systems. Methods: Transversal retrospective study with a quantitative approach; data collection was carried out between the years 2008 and 2010 from medical recor...

  20. A Competence-Based Curriculum Design for Entrepreneurship Study Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska J.R. Siagian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is affected by global crisis. Increasing the number of entrepreneurs is one of many solutions to increase the economic growth in Indonesia. The number of entrepreneurs in Indonesia to leverage the economic growth is still limited. Entrepreneurs can be prepared through an Entrepreneurship Study Program. Entrepreneurship Study Program attempts to create qualified entrepreneurs who have relevant competences. In order to create a qualified entrepreneurs, the Entrepreneurial Studies Program requires a competency-based curriculum that will support the educational process and provide all the necessary to become future entrepreneurs who can survive through a global challenge. This research aims to design a competence-based curriculum for entrepreneurial study and uses Quality Function Deployment (QFD as the major tool to design the competence-based curriculum. From the QFD process, this research finds core and elective courses for the Entrepreneurship Study Program. The result shows the competences covered by the courses and sequence, credits, and teaching methods for each course. The competences prepared the potential entrepreneurs can be achieved through specific courses which can be acquired within 8 semesters.

  1. Educational self-care objectives within a functional spine restoration program. Retrospective study of 104 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares Figueiredo, Isabelle; Dupeyron, Arnaud; Tran, Bao; Duflos, Claire; Julia, Marc; Herisson, Christian; Coudeyre, Emmanuel

    2016-12-01

    Defining individual educational, or learning, targets is part of the initial educational assessment in rehabilitation programs, but no data are available on how to achieve these goals. We aimed to evaluate whether educational objectives established with the patient as part of a functional spine restoration program integrating self-care sessions were met after the program and associated therapy outcomes. This retrospective study involved 104 patients with chronic low-back pain who participated in a self-care rehabilitation program between 2008 and 2012. The program included both physical and educational approaches to dealing with the condition. The main evaluation criterion was achieving the educational objectives established with the patient at 6 months. Secondary criteria were a return to work, pain intensity and impact on function, satisfaction with the program and implementation of physical activity and self-rehabilitation at 6 months. At 6 months, 55% of the established educational objectives were fully achieved and satisfaction was close to 90%. Significantly, more patients were involved in a physical activity at 6 and 12 months and self-rehabilitation exercises at 6 months as compared with at inclusion. Overall, 43.4% were working at inclusion, 64.2% at 6 months and 58.2% at 12 months (Pinclusion). Pain intensity and scores from the Quebec, Dallas and FABQ questionnaires had significantly decreased at 6 months. For more than half of the patients in this self-care rehabilitation program, educational objectives established with the patient were achieved, with a positive effect on returning to work and both professional and physical activities at 6 and 12 months. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. STRATEGI PENINGKATAN KINERJA PROGRAM STUDI MELALUI OPTIMALISASI PERAN PIMPINAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Martono

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyze the influence of leadership styles on an organizational culture, teamwork and organizational performance. Behavior and how a head department plays a role of a leader will determine people work quality. There are findings that in universities, not all leaders are able to comprehensively understand what program department scope’s is. The sample was determined by proportional random sampling totaled 139 people. The variables of study include leadership styles, teamwork, organizational culture, and organizational performance. Data were collected by questionnaires, analysis using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM. The results showed leadership style variable does not directly influence organizational performance of program department, but indirectly through the influence of organizational culture and teamwork. Teamwork variables impact directly or indirectly through organizational culture to organizational performance of program department. Suggestions from this research are there is a need to develop the leadership culture through example, attitude and behavior in utilizing existing resources in the faculties, program departments and unit program.

  3. The Impact of a School-Based Weight Management Program Involving Parents via mHealth for Overweight and Obese Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lai-Tong Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a scarcity of resources and studies that utilize targeted weight management interventions to engage parents via mHealth tools targeting obese children and adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities (MIDs extended from school to a home setting. To test the feasibility and acceptability of a school-based weight program (SBWMP involving parents via mHealth tools designed to reduce weight, enhance knowledge and adopt healthy lifestyles, and thereby achieve better psychosocial well-being among children and adolescents with MIDs. Four special schools were randomly assigned as intervention or control schools. Students from the intervention group (n = 63 were compared to those in the control group (n = 52, which comprised those with usual school planned activities and no parental involvement. Demographics were considered as covariates in a general linear model, an ordinal regression model and a binary logistic regression model analyzing the relationships between the SBWMP and the outcome variables at baseline (T0 and six months later (T1. Body weight, body mass index, and triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness were lower in the intervention group compared to the control group, although the differences were not statistically significant. There was a positive and direct impact of the SBWMP on students’ health knowledge and psychological impacts in the intervention group. The SBWMP extended to the home involving parents via mHealth tools is a feasible and acceptable program for this group with MIDs and their parents.

  4. The Impact of a School-Based Weight Management Program Involving Parents via mHealth for Overweight and Obese Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Regina Lai-Tong; Leung, Cynthia; Chen, Hong; Louie, Lobo H T; Brown, Michael; Chen, Jyu-Lin; Cheung, Gordon; Lee, Paul H

    2017-10-05

    There is a scarcity of resources and studies that utilize targeted weight management interventions to engage parents via mHealth tools targeting obese children and adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities (MIDs) extended from school to a home setting. To test the feasibility and acceptability of a school-based weight program (SBWMP) involving parents via mHealth tools designed to reduce weight, enhance knowledge and adopt healthy lifestyles, and thereby achieve better psychosocial well-being among children and adolescents with MIDs. Four special schools were randomly assigned as intervention or control schools. Students from the intervention group (n = 63) were compared to those in the control group (n = 52), which comprised those with usual school planned activities and no parental involvement. Demographics were considered as covariates in a general linear model, an ordinal regression model and a binary logistic regression model analyzing the relationships between the SBWMP and the outcome variables at baseline (T0) and six months later (T1). Body weight, body mass index, and triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness were lower in the intervention group compared to the control group, although the differences were not statistically significant. There was a positive and direct impact of the SBWMP on students' health knowledge and psychological impacts in the intervention group. The SBWMP extended to the home involving parents via mHealth tools is a feasible and acceptable program for this group with MIDs and their parents.

  5. Fathers' and Mothers' Home Literacy Involvement and Children's Cognitive and Social Emotional Development: Implications for Family Literacy Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    The relations between fathers' and mothers' home literacy involvement at 24 months and children's cognitive and social emotional development in preschool were examined using a large sample of African American and Caucasian families ("N" = 5190) from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B). Hierarchical…

  6. Personal involvement is related to increased search motivation and associated with activity in left BA44 - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSchaefer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies explore consumer perception of brands in a more or less passive way. This may still be representative for many situations or decisions we make each day. Nevertheless, sometimes we often actively search for and use information to make informed and reasoned choices, thus implying a rational and thinking consumer. Researchers suggested describing this distinction as low relative to high involvement consumer behavior. Although the involvement concept has been widely used to explain consumer behavior, behavioral and neural correlates of this concept are poorly understood. The current study aims to describe a behavioral measure that is associated with high involvement, the length of search behavior. A second aim of this study was to explore brain activations associated with involvement by employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. We presented participants information cues for different products and told them that they had to answer questions with respect to these products at the end of the experiment. Participants were free to stop the information search if they think they gathered enough information or to continue with collecting information. Behavioral results confirmed our hypothesis of a relationship between searching behavior and personal involvement by demonstrating that the length of search correlated significantly with the degree of personal involvement of the participants. FMRI data revealed that personal involvement was associated with activation in BA44. Since this brain region is known to be involved in semantic memory, the results of this pilot study suggest that high involvement consumer behavior may be linked to cognitive load and attention towards a product.

  7. Decoupling among CSR policies, programs, and impacts : An empirical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafland, Johan; Smid, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    There are relatively few empirical studies on the impacts of corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies and programs. This article addresses the research gap by analyzing the incidence of, and the conditions that affect, decoupling (defined as divergence) among CSR policies, implementation of

  8. Connected Lighting System Interoperability Study Part 1: Application Programming Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaidon, Clement [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poplawski, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-10-31

    First in a series of studies that focuses on interoperability as realized by the use of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), explores the diversity of such interfaces in several connected lighting systems; characterizes the extent of interoperability that they provide; and illustrates challenges, limitations, and tradeoffs that were encountered during this exploration.

  9. Study program for constant current capacitor charging method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C.

    1978-10-04

    The objective of the study program was to determine the best method of charging 20,000 to 132,000 microfarads of capacitance to 22 kVdc in 14 to 15 sec. Component costs, sizes, weights, line current graphs, copies of calculations and manufacturer's data are included.

  10. Efficiency of Social Studies Integrated Character Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katilmis, Ahmet; Eksi, Halil; Ozturk, Cemil

    2011-01-01

    In this research, it is aimed to find out (i) the efficiency of a character education program based on overt values of Turkish 7th grade social studies lesson, and (ii) its hidden effects on the academic success. This research employed a semi-experimental design with pre-test, post-test and control group For this research primarily character…

  11. Using Home-Program Adherence App in Pediatric Therapy: Case Study of Sensory Processing Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Eynat; Steinberg, Oren

    2017-12-18

    Pediatric therapies adopt a family-centered approach that encourages a caregiver's involvement in therapy. Contextual interventions in the child's natural environment have been effective in generalization of skills and increasing of child participation in daily activities. The use of home programs is common across a variety of conditions, but adherence has been challenging. Apps have been demonstrated to promote medication adherence and physical activity maintenance. This study suggested and tested a construct for features required for caregivers' behavioral modification during home programs in pediatric therapy. SensoryTreat is an adherence promoting app for home-program treatments of children with sensory processing disorders. The app was evaluated by testing availability of desired features, usage frequency, impact on adherence with home programs, and parental sense of competence. Results suggest a strong significant correlation between SensoryTreat usage frequency and families' adherence with home programs, as well as a strong significant correlation between relevancy and usefulness of SensoryTreat's interventional content, and parental competence and their adherence with home programs. Using SensoryTreat twice or more per week increases parental adherence with home programs. Content plays an important role in promoting adherence and parental sense of competence, yet, as usage frequency grows the interventional content habituates, and other features as goal setting and feedback logs have significant impact on parental competence and adherence with home programs over time. These findings indicate that the content and features of SensoryTreat app have the potential to promote adherence of families with pediatric therapy home programs.

  12. Using Technology to Enhance Research-Based Best Practices for Increasing Parental Involvement: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesen, Rhonda L.

    2012-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) established guidelines pertaining to student achievement and included requirements regarding parental involvement and communication between the school and home. Various issues stand in the way of realizing the level of parental engagement desired by educators and ordered by NCLB. Parental participation…

  13. A Correlational Study of Extracurricular Involvement and Homework Performance of Third Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rachel; Moulden, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    There are many opportunities for students to participate in nonacademic activities. These activities can include: sports, clubs, private lessons, and religious activities. Participation in these activities enriches students' lives by encouraging social skills. Yet, if students are involved in activities requiring many hours of participation, does…

  14. Business unit controller involvement in management : An empirical study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwelaar, ten J.A. (Hans); Bots, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been much debate on the new business-oriented role of management accountants, also called controllers. The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent the involvement of the business unit (BU) controller in the decision-making process of business units is

  15. Family and Differential Involvement with Marihuana: A Study of Suburban Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tec, Nechama

    1970-01-01

    Results point to a negative association between degree of involvement with marihuana and: (1) quality of parental models; (2) high amount of recognition received within the family; (3) perceptions of the family as warm and not simply controlling and/or indifferent; (4) subjective feelings of satisfaction and the ability to rely upon the family as…

  16. Alternative utility conservation program designs: an evaluation based on case study program experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitler, V.

    1985-01-01

    Utilities around the nation are promoting residential conservation through a variety of program activities, ranging from customer education programs to financial incentive programs to direct installation programs. This report was undertaken to evaluate some of these alternative program designs, to compare their achievements against those of the RCS program, and to suggest program planning directions that seem most promising. Interviews with program managers were used to elucidate the rationale behind the alternative programs and to discuss program effectiveness. The experiences of nine utilities and one nonutility organization are reviewed. Program managers' opinions about RCS and their experiences with thirteen other programs are summarized. The effectiveness of the alternative program designs are compared and some implications for conservation program planning and implementation are highlighted.

  17. 75 FR 80827 - Compliance Policy Guide; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ...) Sec. 400.210 entitled ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs... ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs.'' Previous extensions of...; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs; Notice To Extend Expiration Date...

  18. Design of aging intervention studies: the NIA interventions testing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadon, N L; Strong, R; Miller, R A; Nelson, J; Javors, M; Sharp, Z D; Peralba, J M; Harrison, D E

    2008-12-01

    The field of biogerontology has made great strides towards understanding the biological processes underlying aging, and the time is ripe to look towards applying this knowledge to the pursuit of aging interventions. Identification of safe, inexpensive, and non-invasive interventions that slow the aging process and promote healthy aging could have a significant impact on quality of life and health care expenditures for the aged. While there is a plethora of supplements and interventions on the market that purport to slow aging, the evidence to validate such claims is generally lacking. Here we describe the development of an aging interventions testing program funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) to test candidate interventions in a model system. The development of this program highlights the challenges of long-term intervention studies and provides approaches to cope with the stringent requirements of a multi-site testing program.

  19. Ethics education in MSN programs: a study of national trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkemper, Jill E; DuBois, James M; Lavin, Mary Ann; Meyer, Geralyn A; McSweeney, Maryellen

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the manner in which master's of science in nursing programs, accredited by either the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, conduct ethics education. A survey method was employed to obtain requisite data. Among the main variables investigated were: the percentage of programs that require a course with formal ethics content; the average number of class hours a program or track dedicates to ethics education; required and actual credentials of instructors who teach ethics; and objectives, topics, teaching methods, and grading methods of required courses with formal ethics content. Results indicated that most programs do not require instructors to have completed formal ethics training. In terms of content, few common trends exist and there are important gaps in clinical ethics topics. Comparisons between school of medicine ethics content reported in the literature and MSN ethics content reported in this study indicate that medical schools are more exacting of their students. The study concludes with a call for the establishment of guidelines or standards relevant to ethics content in MSN curricula in the United States.

  20. Pilot Feasibility Study of an Oncology Financial Navigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Veena; Leahy, Tony; Steelquist, Jordan; Watabayashi, Kate; Linden, Hannah; Ramsey, Scott; Schwartz, Naomi; Kreizenbeck, Karma; Nelson, Judy; Balch, Alan; Singleton, Erin; Gallagher, Kathleen; Overstreet, Karen

    2018-02-01

    Few studies have reported on interventions to alleviate financial toxicity in patients with cancer. We developed a financial navigation program in collaboration with our partners, Consumer Education and Training Services (CENTS) and Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF), to improve patient knowledge about treatment costs, provide financial counseling, and to help manage out-of-pocket expenses. We conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility and impact of this program. Patients with cancer received a financial education course followed by monthly contact with a CENTS financial counselor and a PAF case manager for 6 months. We measured program adherence, self-reported financial burden and anxiety, program satisfaction, and type of assistance provided. Thirty-four patients (median age, 60.5 years) were consented (85% white and 50% commercially insured). Debt, income declines, and loans were reported by 55%, 55%, and 30% of patients, respectively. CENTS counselors assisted most often with budgeting, retirement planning, and medical bill questions. PAF case managers assisted with applications for appropriate insurance coverage, cost of living issues (eg, housing, transportation), and disability applications. High financial burden and anxiety about costs (4 or 5 on a Likert scale) were reported at baseline by 37% and 47% of patients, respectively. Anxiety about costs decreased over time in 33% of patients, whereas self-reported financial burden did not substantially change. Implementing an oncology financial navigation program is feasible, provides concrete assistance in navigating the cost of care, and mitigates anxiety about costs in a subset of patients. Future work will focus on measuring the program's impact on financial and clinical outcomes.

  1. Program Adherence and Effectiveness of a Commercial Nutrition Program: The Metabolic Balance Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Meffert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the effectiveness of a commercial nutrition program in improving weight, blood lipids, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Methods. Prospective observational study with followup after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months with data from questionnaires and blood samples. Subjects. After 12 months, we had data from 524 subjects (= 60.6% of the initial samples. 84.1% of the subjects were women. The average BMI at baseline was 30.3 (SD = 5.7. Results. After 12 months, the average weight loss was 6.8 kg (SD = 7.1 kg. Program adherence declined over time but was still high after 12 months and showed a positive linear correlation with weight loss. Relevant blood parameters as well as HRQOL improved significantly. Conclusion. After 12 months, nearly two thirds of the samples had achieved >5% reduction of their initial weights. The high degree of program adherence is probably due to personal counseling and individually designed nutrition plans provided by the program.

  2. STUDI DESKRIPTIF KEPUASAN MAHASISWA TERHADAP KINERJA LEMBAGA PROGRAM STUDI DAN PASCA SARJANA UNNES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Widodo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini mendeskripsikan kepuasan mahasiswa pada layanan akademik program studi (Prodi dan program pascasarjana (PPs , Mendeskripsikan kinerja akademik program studi dan program pascasarjana, Mendeskripsikan faktor-faktor yang mendukung kinerja akademik prodi dan PPs. Populasi penelitian ini adalah mahasiswa PPs aktif S2 semester 2 berjumlah 621 orang. Sedangkan sampel penelitian diambil secara simple random sampling berjumlah 102 orang. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan Kepuasan mahasiswa terhadap layanan akademik baik pada lingkup Prodi maupun lingkup PPs tergolong dalam kategori baik, Deskripsi hasil kinerja akademik Prodi, secara umum termasuk kategori baik, Berdasarkan hasil deskripsi enam indikator kinerja akademik PPs, secara umum rata-rata berada pada kategori baik.  Kinerja akademik PPs ditentukan oleh indikator sarana prasarana pendidikan (tangibles, kehandalan dosen dan staf (reliability, sikap tanggap dosen dan staf akademik (responsibility, perlakuan dosen dan staf pada mahasiswa (assurance, pemahaman terhadap kepentingan mahasiswa (emphaty, dan kepuasan mahasiswa (satisfaction. Saran yang diberikan hendaknya Program pascasarjana perlu mendorong peningkatan jumlah dosen dengan kualifikasi doktor (S3 sehingga layanan akademik perkuliahan dapat meningkat dan berdampak pula pada kinerja akademik secara keseluruhan.This study aimed to describe student satisfaction in the service of academic of study program  and graduate programs , describing the academic performance of study program and graduate program,  describes the factors that support academic performance of study program and graduate program. The population are active graduate students who are in second semester, the  total number is  621 people. While the study sample is taken by simple random sampling, total sample is 102 people. Results show that student satisfaction for academic services in both  study programs and graduate programs are  in  good

  3. Promoting father involvement in early home visiting services for vulnerable families: Findings from a pilot study of "Dads matter".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Neil B; Bellamy, Jennifer L; Banman, Aaron

    2018-02-01

    Despite mounting evidence on the importance of fathers in children's development, evidence-based perinatal home visitation programs have largely overlooked fathers in the design and delivery of services. This paper describes the design, development, and pilot testing of the "Dads Matter" enhancement to standard home visiting services. Dads Matter is a manualized intervention package designed to fully incorporate fathers into perinatal home visiting services. Twenty-four families were enrolled in a pilot study to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes of the intervention. Using a quasi-experimental time-lagged design, 12 families received standard home visiting services and completed baseline and four-month post-tests. Home visitor staff were then trained and supervised to implement the Dads Matter enhancement in addition to standard services. Twelve additional families were then enrolled and completed baseline and four-month post-tests. Implementation data indicated that Dads Matter was implemented as planned. Cohen's d scores on outcome measures indicate positive trends associated with Dads Matter in the quality of the mother-father relationship, perceived stress reported by both parents, fathers' involvement with the child, maltreatment indicators, and fathers' verbalizations toward the infant. Effect sizes generally ranged from moderate to large in magnitude and were larger than overall effect sizes of home visitation services alone reported in prior meta-analyses. Dads Matter appears to be a feasible, acceptable, and promising approach to improving fathers' engagement in home visiting services and promoting family and child well-being. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Supplemental Milestones for Emergency Medicine Residency Programs: A Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketterer, Andrew R; Salzman, David H; Branzetti, Jeremy B; Gisondi, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) residency programs may be 36 or 48 months in length. The Residency Review Committee for EM requires that 48-month programs provide educational justification for the additional 12 months. We developed additional milestones that EM training programs might use to assess outcomes in domains that meet this accreditation requirement. This study aims to assess for content validity of these supplemental milestones using a similar methodology to that of the original EM Milestones validation study. A panel of EM program directors (PD) and content experts at two institutions identified domains of additional training not covered by the existing EM Milestones. This led to the development of six novel subcompetencies: "Operations and Administration," "Critical Care," "Leadership and Management," "Research," "Teaching and Learning," and "Career Development." Subject-matter experts at other 48-month EM residency programs refined the milestones for these subcompetencies. PDs of all 48-month EM programs were then asked to order the proposed milestones using the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition for each subcompetency. Data analysis mirrored that used in the original EM Milestones validation study, leading to the final version of our supplemental milestones. Twenty of 33 subjects (58.8%) completed the study. No subcompetency or individual milestone met deletion criteria. Of the 97 proposed milestones, 67 (69.1%) required no further editing and remained at the same level as proposed by the study authors. Thirty milestones underwent level changes: 15 (15.5%) were moved one level up and 13 (13.4%) were moved one level down. One milestone (1.0%) in "Leadership and Management" was moved two levels up, and one milestone in "Operations and Administration" was moved two levels down. One milestone in "Research" was ranked by the survey respondents at one level higher than that proposed by the authors; however, this milestone was kept at its original level assignment

  5. Supplemental Milestones for Emergency Medicine Residency Programs: A Validation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketterer, Andrew R

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency medicine (EM residency programs may be 36 or 48 months in length. The Residency Review Committee for EM requires that 48-month programs provide educational justification for the additional 12 months. We developed additional milestones that EM training programs might use to assess outcomes in domains that meet this accreditation requirement. This study aims to assess for content validity of these supplemental milestones using a similar methodology to that of the original EM Milestones validation study. A panel of EM program directors (PD and content experts at two institutions identified domains of additional training not covered by the existing EM Milestones. This led to the development of six novel subcompetencies: “Operations and Administration,” “Critical Care,” “Leadership and Management,” “Research,” “Teaching and Learning,” and “Career Development.” Subject-matter experts at other 48-month EM residency programs refined the milestones for these subcompetencies. PDs of all 48-month EM programs were then asked to order the proposed milestones using the Dreyfus model of skill acquisition for each subcompetency. Data analysis mirrored that used in the original EM Milestones validation study, leading to the final version of our supplemental milestones. Twenty of 33 subjects (58.8% completed the study. No subcompetency or individual milestone met deletion criteria. Of the 97 proposed milestones, 67 (69.1% required no further editing and remained at the same level as proposed by the study authors. Thirty milestones underwent level changes: 15 (15.5% were moved one level up and 13 (13.4% were moved one level down. One milestone (1.0% in “Leadership and Management” was moved two levels up, and one milestone in “Operations and Administration” was moved two levels down. One milestone in “Research” was ranked by the survey respondents at one level higher than that proposed by the authors; however, this

  6. Collaborative Behavioral Management for Drug-Involved Parolees: Rationale and Design of the Step'n Out Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Peter D.; Katz, Elizabeth C.; Rhodes, Anne G.; Taxman, Faye S.; O'Connell, Daniel J.; Frisman, Linda K.; Burdon, William M.; Fletcher, Bennett W.; Litt, Mark D.; Clarke, Jennifer; Martin, Steven S.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rationale, study design, and implementation for the Step'n Out study of the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies. Step'n Out tests the relative effectiveness of collaborative behavioral management of drug-involved parolees. Collaborative behavioral management integrates the roles of parole officers and treatment…

  7. Community Involvement in Tourism Development: A Case Study of Lenggong Valley World Heritage Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khadar Nur Zafirah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the empirical relationship between the economic impact and community involvement in the Lenggong Valley. Recommendations for improvement in development effectiveness through the development of a community centre for economic and social activities, with specific attention given to types of activity and community involvement stimulating the economic development in the Lenggong Valley. Heritage tourism development is a tourism in which arts, culture and heritage form a key attraction for visitors and it can be represented as an area of significant economic benefit to heritage sites. The tourism industry in Hulu Perak became more widespread after Lenggong Valley is recognized as a World Heritage Site. There is shown a positive effect on the development and economic prosperity.

  8. Systematic Coupled Cluster Study of Noncovalent Interactions Involving Halogens, Chalcogens, and Pnicogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Vytor; Kraka, Elfi

    2017-12-14

    The noncovalent interactions of 32 complexes involving pnicogens, chalcogens, and halogens atoms were investigated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. Two different types of complexes could be distinguished on the basis of geometric parameters, electron difference densities, and the charge transfer mechanisms associated with each type. In the type I conformation, the monomers adopt a skewed orientation allowing charge to be transfer between both monomers, whereas in the type II conformation the monomers adopt a linear arrangement, maximizing charge transfer in only one direction. Type I complexes involving the interaction between pnicogens and chalcogens cannot be unambiguously defined as chalcogen or pnicogen bonds, they are an admixture of both. The charge transfer dependence on the conformation adopted by the complexes described in this work can serve as a novel conformationally driven design concept for materials.

  9. Dynamic Processes in Contingent Valuation: A Case Study Involving the Mahogany Glider

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clement A.; Wilson, Clevo; Swarna Nantha, Hemanath

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment involving a sample of 204 members of the public who were assessed on three occasions about their willingness to pay for the conservation of the mahogany glider. They were asked this question prior to information being provided to them about the glider and other focal wildlife species; after such information was provided, and finally after participants had had an opportunity to see live specimens of this glider. The mean willingness to pay of the...

  10. Viral-induced systemic necrosis in plants involves both programmed cell death and the inhibition of viral multiplication, which are regulated by independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Ozeki, Johji; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Maejima, Kensaku; Senshu, Hiroko; Himeno, Misako; Okano, Yukari; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Namba, Shigetou

    2010-03-01

    Resistant plants respond rapidly to invading avirulent plant viruses by triggering a hypersensitive response (HR). An HR is accompanied by a restraint of virus multiplication and programmed cell death (PCD), both of which have been observed in systemic necrosis triggered by a successful viral infection. Here, we analyzed signaling pathways underlying the HR in resistance genotype plants and those leading to systemic necrosis. We show that systemic necrosis in Nicotiana benthamiana, induced by Plantago asiatica mosaic virus (PlAMV) infection, was associated with PCD, biochemical features, and gene expression patterns that are characteristic of HR. The induction of necrosis caused by PlAMV infection was dependent on SGT1, RAR1, and the downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade involving MAPKKKalpha and MEK2. However, although SGT1 and RAR1 silencing led to an increased accumulation of PlAMV, silencing of the MAPKKKalpha-MEK2 cascade did not. This observation indicates that viral multiplication is partly restrained even in systemic necrosis induced by viral infection, and that this restraint requires SGT1 and RAR1 but not the MAPKKKalpha-MEK2 cascade. Similarly, although both SGT1 and MAPKKKalpha were essential for the Rx-mediated HR to Potato virus X (PVX), SGT1 but not MAPKKKalpha was involved in the restraint of PVX multiplication. These results suggest that systemic necrosis and HR consist of PCD and a restraint of virus multiplication, and that the latter is induced through unknown pathways independent from the former.

  11. Online Social Networks for Crowdsourced Multimedia-Involved Behavioral Testing: An Empirical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods.

  12. Online social networks for crowdsourced multimedia-involved behavioral testing: An empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ho eChoi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk, which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods.

  13. Online Social Networks for Crowdsourced Multimedia-Involved Behavioral Testing: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Online social networks have emerged as effective crowdsourcing media to recruit participants in recent days. However, issues regarding how to effectively exploit them have not been adequately addressed yet. In this paper, we investigate the reliability and effectiveness of multimedia-involved behavioral testing via social network-based crowdsourcing, especially focused on Facebook as a medium to recruit participants. We conduct a crowdsourcing-based experiment for a music recommendation problem. It is shown that different advertisement methods yield different degrees of efficiency and there exist significant differences in behavioral patterns across different genders and different age groups. In addition, we perform a comparison of our experiment with other multimedia-involved crowdsourcing experiments built on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk), which suggests that crowdsourcing-based experiments using social networks for recruitment can achieve comparable efficiency. Based on the analysis results, advantages and disadvantages of social network-based crowdsourcing and suggestions for successful experiments are also discussed. We conclude that social networks have the potential to support multimedia-involved behavioral tests to gather in-depth data even for long-term periods. PMID:26793137

  14. The optimum level of parent participation: A study of three intensity levels of parent involvement during three "Playtime is Science" units in three third-grade classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, Kelly Lynn

    participation in science instruction for this study. Although no level of involvement was significantly influential for student scores, there was a main effect for units, supporting the finding that teacher conceptions of science are more influential on student proficiency than parent participation at any level. The influence of teacher conceptions was unanticipated but is critical to consider when implementing any program or methodology to improve science instruction.

  15. Programming PHREEQC calculations with C++ and Python a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Scott R.; Parkhurst, David L.; Muller, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The new IPhreeqc module provides an application programming interface (API) to facilitate coupling of other codes with the U.S. Geological Survey geochemical model PHREEQC. Traditionally, loose coupling of PHREEQC with other applications required methods to create PHREEQC input files, start external PHREEQC processes, and process PHREEQC output files. IPhreeqc eliminates most of this effort by providing direct access to PHREEQC capabilities through a component object model (COM), a library, or a dynamically linked library (DLL). Input and calculations can be specified through internally programmed strings, and all data exchange between an application and the module can occur in computer memory. This study compares simulations programmed in C++ and Python that are tightly coupled with IPhreeqc modules to the traditional simulations that are loosely coupled to PHREEQC. The study compares performance, quantifies effort, and evaluates lines of code and the complexity of the design. The comparisons show that IPhreeqc offers a more powerful and simpler approach for incorporating PHREEQC calculations into transport models and other applications that need to perform PHREEQC calculations. The IPhreeqc module facilitates the design of coupled applications and significantly reduces run times. Even a moderate knowledge of one of the supported programming languages allows more efficient use of PHREEQC than the traditional loosely coupled approach.

  16. Technology-based programs to support forms of leisure engagement and communication for persons with multiple disabilities: two single-case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Green, Vanessa; Oliva, Doretta; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Biancardi, Emma M; Di Nuovo, Santo

    2012-01-01

    To extend the assessment of technology-based programs for promoting stimulus choice and staff/caregiver calls or radio operation and text messaging. In Study I, the program involved a portable computer, commercial software, and a microswitch to allow a man with motor impairment and moderate intellectual disability to choose among preferred stimuli (e.g., songs and film clips) and persons to call. In Study II, the programs involved (a) a radio device and an electronic control unit or (b) a net-book computer and a global system for mobile communication. A woman with blindness and moderate intellectual disability used a microswitch to operate the radio or send and listen to text messages. The participants succeeded in using the technology-aided programs through simple microswitch activations involving partial hand closure (Study I) or hand pressure (Study II). Technology-based programs can provide persons with multiple disabilities relevant leisure and communication opportunities.

  17. Adapting a robotics program to enhance participation and interest in STEM among children with disabilities: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sally; Hounsell, Kara Grace

    2017-10-01

    Youth with disabilities are under-represented in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in school and in the workforce. One encouraging approach to engage youth's interest in STEM is through robotics; however, such programs are mostly for typically developing youth. The purpose of this study was to understand the development and implementation of an adapted robotics program for children and youth with disabilities and their experiences within it. Our mixed methods pilot study (pre- and post-workshop surveys, observations, and interviews) involved 41 participants including: 18 youth (aged 6-13), 12 parents and 11 key informants. The robotics program involved 6, two-hour workshops held at a paediatric hospital. Our findings showed that several adaptations made to the robotics program helped to enhance the participation of children with disabilities. Adaptations addressed the educational/curriculum, cognitive and learning, physical and social needs of the children. In regards to experiences within the adapted hospital program, our findings highlight that children enjoyed the program and learned about computer programming and building robots. Clinicians and educators should consider engaging youth with disabilities in robotics to enhance learning and interest in STEM. Implications for Rehabilitation Clinicians and educators should consider adapting curriculum content and mode of delivery of LEGO ® robotics programs to include youth with disabilities. Appropriate staffing including clinicians and educators who are knowledgeable about youth with disabilities and LEGO ® robotics are needed. Clinicians should consider engaging youth with disabilities in LEGO ® to enhance learning and interest in STEM.

  18. Attitudes of nursing staff towards involvement in medical end-of-life decisions: a national survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Gwenda; Francke, Anneke L; de Veer, Anke J E; Bilsen, Johan; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2014-01-01

    To investigate nursing staff attitudes towards involvement and role in end-of-life decisions (ELDs) and the relationships with sociodemographic and work-related characteristics. Survey study among nationally representative Dutch research sample consisting of care professionals. Nursing staff working in hospitals, home care, nursing homes or homes for the elderly were sent ELD-questionnaire. 66% (n=587). Most respondents had been involved in ELD. Three quarters wanted to be involved in whole ELD process; 58% agreed that decisions to withhold/withdraw treatment ought to be discussed with the nurses involved; 64% believed patients would talk rather to nurses than physicians; 72% thought physicians are usually prepared to listen to nurses' opinions. Hospital and highly educated nursing staff indicated relatively more often that they want to be involved in ELD. Majority of nursing staff want to be involved in ELD. Work setting and educational level are determining factors in attitudes of nursing staff regarding involvement in ELD. Awareness on the important role nurses have and want to have in ELD should be raised, and taken into account in trainings on end-of-life care for nurses and physicians and development of guidelines for communication about ELD between patients, nursing staff and physicians. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sistem Panel Kinerja Untuk Program Studi Sarjana Berbasis BAN PT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Prasetyo Utomo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study program need to do monitoring and continuously measurements of performance to ensure achievement the goals set of its. The process of performance requires monitoring data and information was taken from all parts of the organization. The purpose of this research is to build a panel system performance (performance dashboard that can be used to help measure the performance of undergraduate degree courses based on BAN PT in order of quality assurance in higher education. The results of performance monitoring will be delivered to the parties concerned, efficiently and effectively. Panel System (Dashboard is a tool to present information at a glance. Dashboard inform using Key Performance Indicators (KPI an effective presentation media. KPIs are used in the construction panel system performance of these courses entirely using the instruments of the National Accreditation of Higher Education. The methodology can be applied either on a case study of the development of dashboards to support the efforts of quality assurance courses at the Stikubank University Semarang. This study emphasizes how the application is to provide easy information to Head of study program, Dean of faculty, Rector and Vice Rector of university to the achievement of the quality of undergraduate study program.   Keywords: Performance Dashboard; Key Performance Indicators; Accreditation.

  20. A case study of the Advanced Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAAV) program from a program management perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Scott R.

    1999-01-01

    This research effort focused on the program management issues of the U.S. Marine Corps' Advanced Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAAV) Program. The research answered the primary question of what were the critical program management decisions during the early phases of the program and how would an analysis of these decisions affect the future of the AAAV program. Interviews were conducted with key personnel from the AAAV office and General Dynamics Land Systems. Additionally, program documents and...

  1. [Environmental Hazards Assessment Program annual report, June 1992--June 1993]. Summer undergraduate research program: Environmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J. [ed.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the summer undergraduate internship program for research in environmental studies is to provide an opportunity for well-qualified students to undertake an original research project as an apprentice to an active research scientist in basic environmental research. Ten students from throughout the midwestern and eastern areas of the country were accepted into the program. These students selected projects in the areas of marine sciences, biostatistics and epidemiology, and toxicology. The research experience for all these students and their mentors was very positive. The seminars were well attended and the students showed their interest in the presentations and environmental sciences as a whole by presenting the speakers with thoughtful and intuitive questions. This report contains the research project written presentations prepared by the student interns.

  2. A Study of the Development of Students' Visualizations of Program State during an Elementary Object-Oriented Programming Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajaniemi, Jorma; Kuittinen, Marja; Tikansalo, Taina

    2008-01-01

    Students' understanding of object-oriented (OO) program execution was studied by asking students to draw a picture of a program state at a specific moment. Students were given minimal instructions on what to include in their drawings in order to see what they considered to be central concepts and relationships in program execution. Three drawing…

  3. Varicella-zoster infection with pleural involvement. A cytologic and ultrastructural study of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, R E; Katz, R L; Ordóñez, N G; MacKay, B

    1986-04-01

    Cytologic evidence of herpes viral infection within cells from body cavity effusions is extremely uncommon. The authors report the case of a 57-year-old woman who was treated with chemotherapy and irradiation for malignant lymphoma and subsequently developed disseminated varicella-zoster infection with pleural involvement. Cytologic examination of pleural fluid revealed cytopathic changes caused by the varicella-zoster virus, which were confirmed by electron microscopy and viral culture of the effusion. The cytologic and ultrastructural features of the virus-infected cells are described, and the pathogenesis of the effusion and sequence of events in varicella-zoster virus-cell interaction are discussed.

  4. Orbital involvement by basal cell carcinomas: computed tomography study; Comprometimento orbitario por carcinomas basocelulares: estudo por tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Ana Celia [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: edmarchiori@zipmail.com.br; Boasquevisque, Edson [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas; Cabral, Carlos Eduardo Lassance [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital do Cancer; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2003-03-01

    Basal cell carcinomas of the skin and subcutaneous tissue of the face can spread into to orbit directly through the anterior orbit. Nine patients with radiological evidence of orbital involvement by basal cell carcinoma were studied with computed tomography. None of the patients had any previous treatment of the tumor. Ulcerated lesion of the eyelid was the most common sign of the disease (67%) whereas the inferior eyelid was the most frequent site of origin of the neoplasm (44%). All carcinomas extended into the orbit through the anterior orbit, involving mainly the extraconal space (89%). The orbital regions most frequently involved were the anterior, medial and superior compartments. Orbital extension of these carcinomas can result in orbital exenteration. Computed tomography is a valuable method for evaluating tumoral extension into the orbit and should be done when there is clinical suspicion of orbital involvement. (author)

  5. The role of leadership and management in six southern public health partnerships: a study of member involvement and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Elisa S; Taber, Shahnaz K; Breslau, Erica S; Lillie, Sarah E; Li, Yuelin

    2010-10-01

    Research has led to greater understanding of what is needed to create and sustain well-functioning public health partnerships. However, a partnership's ability to foster an environment that encourages broad member involvement in discussions, decision making, and activities has received scant empirical attention. This study examined the relationship between partnership members' perceptions of how well leadership and management facilitated their involvement, and their satisfaction with their role and influence within the partnership. Data came from 60 individuals who participated in two waves of a quantitative process evaluation of six southern interorganizational partnerships, formed as part of a national pilot project to increase cervical and breast cancer screening rates. Results suggested that environments fostering broad partner involvement were associated with measures of member satisfaction, controlling for other partnership characteristics. Findings indicated that facilitation of member involvement deserves increased consideration from researchers and practitioners as an indicator of the quality of partnership functioning.

  6. Developing parent involvement in a school-based child obesity prevention intervention: a qualitative study and process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipping, R R; Jago, R; Lawlor, D A

    2012-06-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of parent involvement in school-based obesity prevention interventions. A qualitative study with parents of children aged 9-10 years was conducted to identify possible methods to involve them in a school-based obesity prevention intervention, followed by a process evaluation of homework and school newsletters to involve parents. Qualitative study: parents supported the use of homework and school newsletters to involve them and overcome the main barriers of their work and time. Process evaluation: Ten homeworks and inserts for the school newsletter about the obesity prevention intervention were developed and delivered. The majority of homeworks were given out (73%), completed by children (84%) and recalled by parents (60-68%). The majority of homeworks were enjoyed by parents and children. All the schools put information about the project in the newsletter and this was recalled by parents. Most parents felt the homeworks were a practical way of involving them. Homeworks are routinely given to children and provide a means of engaging potentially all parents if parental support is required. Homeworks which are novel, fun and involve activities and social contact are enjoyed by parents and children and may increase awareness of healthy diet and physical activity.

  7. STRATEGI PENINGKATAN KINERJA PROGRAM STUDI MELALUI OPTIMALISASI PERAN PIMPINAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Martono

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah mengungkap pengaruh gaya kepemimpinan terhadap budaya organsiasi, kerjasama tim dan kinerja organisasi. Tugas dan peran seorang pemimpin di tingkat unit organisasi sangat menentukan kualitas kerja. Fakta di lingkungan perguruan tinggi menunjukkan bahwa tidak semua pimpinan mampu memahami Prodi secara utuh. Sampel ditentukan dengan proportional random sampling berjumlah 139 orang. Variabel penelitian meliputi gaya kepemimpinan, kerjasama tim, budaya organisasi, dan kinerja organisasi. Data dikumpulkan dengan angket, analisis menggunakan Structural Equation Modeling (SEM. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan variabel gaya kepemimpinan tidak berpengaruh langsung terhadap kinerja organisasi prodi, tetapi berpengaruh tidak langsung melalui budaya organisasi dan kerjasama tim. Variabel kerjasama tim berpengaruh langsung maupun tidak langsung melalui budaya organisasi, terhadap kinerja organisasi Prodi. Saran dari penelitian ini adalah pimpinan mengembangkan budaya kerja melalui pemberian contoh, sikap dan perilaku dalam memanfaatkan sumber daya yang ada di fakultas, jurusan dan prodi. The objective of this study is to analyze the influence of leadership styles on an organizational culture, teamwork and organizational performance. Behavior and how a head department plays a role of a leader will determine people work quality. There are findings that in universities, not all leaders are able to comprehensively understand what program department scope’s is. The sample was determined by proportional random sampling totaled 139 people. The variables of study include leadership styles, teamwork, organizational culture, and organizational performance. Data were collected by questionnaires, analysis using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM. The results showed leadership style variable does not directly influence organizational performance of program department, but indirectly through the influence of organizational culture and

  8. Native flora rescue program: GASENE project case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serricchio, Claudio; Caldas, Flaviana V. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Akahori, Lisa [Telsan, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Jacomelli Junior, Jose Almir [AGF Engenharia, Araucaria, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Concerning the surrounding flora, the implementation of pipelines may cause fragmentation and isolation of the remaining natural vegetation, possibly changing the forest structure; thus raising the border effect; modifying the ratio of species and life forms, decreasing the vegetal diversity and/or causing a lack of connectivity among the remaining indigenous forest resources. In the case of pipelines, the most important environmental measure intended to mitigate the damage caused to the flora is the adoption of Indigenous Flora Rescue Programs. This paper is aimed at analyzing the programs currently applied during the implementation of the GASENE project, by conducting a case study. The main targets of such program are obtaining seeds and fruits with a view to subsidize the potential production of sapling to be further employed in the recovery of areas impacted by the pipeline works; and then relocate the most significant samples of species rescued from the suppressed areas in order to comprise forest areas adjacent to the pipeline's right-of-way. The programs had little differences in their methodology while being implemented, however, we consider that up to the present moment the results obtained in the preservation of species of native flora have been satisfactory. (author)

  9. Patient involvement in rheumatology outpatient service design and delivery: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Savia; Galloway, James; Simpson, Carol; Chura, Radka; Dobson, Joanne; Gullick, Nicola J; Steer, Sophia; Lempp, Heidi

    2017-06-01

    Patient involvement is increasingly recognized as important within the UK National Health Service to ensure that services delivered are relevant to users' needs. Organizations are encouraged to work with service users to achieve excellence in care. Patient education can improve health outcomes and reduce health-care costs. Mobile technologies could play a vital role in this. Patient-centred development of innovative strategies to improve the experience of rheumatology outpatients. The Group Rheumatology Initiative Involving Patients (GRIIP) project was set up in 2013 as a joint venture between patients, clinicians, academics and management at a London hospital. The project saw (i) the formation of an independent patient group which provided suggestions for service improvement - outcomes included clearer signs in the outpatient waiting area, extended phlebotomy opening hours and better access to podiatry; (ii) a rolling patient educational evening programme initiated in 2014 with topics chosen by patient experts - feedback has been positive and attendance continues to grow; and (iii) a mobile application (app) co-designed with patients launched in 2015 which provides relevant information for outpatient clinic attendees and data capture for clinicians - downloads have steadily increased as users adopt this new technology. Patients can effectively contribute to service improvement provided they are supported, respected as equals, and the organization is willing to undergo a cultural change. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Whistleblowing: An integrative literature review of data-based studies involving nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Debra; Hickman, Louise D; Hutchinson, Marie; Andrew, Sharon; Smith, James; Potgieter, Ingrid; Cleary, Michelle; Peters, Kath

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To summarise and critique the research literature about whistleblowing and nurses. Whistleblowing is identified as a crucial issue in maintenance of healthcare standards and nurses are frequently involved in whistleblowing events. Despite the importance of this issue, to our knowledge an evaluation of this body of the data-based literature has not been undertaken. An integrative literature review approach was used to summarise and critique the research literature. A comprehensive search of five databases including Medline, CINAHL, PubMed and Health Science: Nursing/Academic Edition, and Google, were searched using terms including: 'Whistleblow*,' 'nurs*.' In addition, relevant journals were examined, as well as reference lists of retrieved papers. Papers published during the years 2007-2013 were selected for inclusion. Fifteen papers were identified, capturing data from nurses in seven countries. The findings in this review demonstrate a growing body of research for the nursing profession at large to engage and respond appropriately to issues involving suboptimal patient care or organisational wrongdoing. Nursing plays a key role in maintaining practice standards and in reporting care that is unacceptable although the repercussions to nurses who raise concerns are insupportable. Overall, whistleblowing and how it influences the individual, their family, work colleagues, nursing practice and policy overall, requires further national and international research attention.

  11. A pilot study on factors involved with work participation in the early stages of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Van der Hiele

    Full Text Available Up to 30% of recently diagnosed MS patients lose their jobs in the first four years after diagnosis. Taking into account the personal and socio-economic importance of sustaining employment, it is of the utmost importance to examine factors involved with work participation.To investigate differences in self-reported functioning in recently diagnosed MS patients with and without a paid job.Self-reports of physical and cognitive functioning, depression, anxiety and fatigue were gathered from 44 relapsing-remitting MS patients diagnosed within 3 years.Patients with a paid job (57% reported better physical functioning (p<0.001, better memory functioning (p = 0.01 and a lower physical impact of fatigue (p = 0.018 than patients without a paid job. Physical functioning was the main predictor of employment status in a logistic regression model. In those with a paid job better memory functioning (r = 0.54, p = 0.005 and a lower social impact of fatigue (r =  -0.46, p = 0.029 correlated with an increased number of working hours.Better physical functioning is the primary factor involved with increased work participation in early MS. Better self-reported memory functioning and less social fatigue were associated with increased working hours. These findings highlight the importance of battling these symptoms in the early stages of MS.

  12. Tendencies of Comprehension and Acceptance of Theory of Evolution: A Study Involving Students from the Faculties of Education and Theology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilen, Kadir; Ercan, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to identify the views of students from the Faculty of Education and the Faculty of Theology from the University of Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam regarding their comprehension and acceptance of the theory of evolution. A survey model was used involving a quantitative research design. The working group of the study was composed of…

  13. Sustainability Management Program for Industries- A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Su Weng Alwin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research studied the effectiveness of Sustainability Management Program in improving production efficiency of the manufacturing site with verified result using the regression analysis. For this study, a dairy manufacturing industry located in Malaysia was selected and major energy consuming equipment in the industryplant were identified. Sustainability Management Program (SMP was carried out for three years and energy consumption and product has improved regression coefficients of 0.625 in 2013, 0.826 in 2014, and 0.878 in 2015 as the manufacturing site becomes more energy efficient. This suggests that the energy management should be carried out in a continuous manner with energy management team responsible for energy saving practices.

  14. Innovating engineering study programs for a sustainable society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Andersen, Birte Møller; Molin, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    in order to comply with society’s ambitions. Further, the new learning elements introduced in the curriculum of study programs are described and examples of theoretical and practical implementations of specific technical solutions developed by the students are presented. Focus is on such areas as wind, bio......The Danish government as well as regional and municipal authority has issued ambitious goals and plans for building a sustainable future by developing and implementing alternative practices and technological solutions to societal needs. As an educational institution Copenhagen University College...... of Engineering (IHK) supports this process by innovation of the engineering study programs offered by the institution to deliver on the necessary sustainable competences acquired by our engineering students. The paper describes the sustainability strategy developed to transform IHK into a sustainable institution...

  15. A Case Study of Prior Knowledge, Learning Approach and Conceptual Change in an Introductory College Chemistry Tutorial Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braathen, Per Christian; Hewson, Peter W.

    This paper presents a case study involving a small group of students enrolled in a tutorial program learning introductory college chemistry. The underlying theoretical framework of this investigation was a constructivist view of learning, but more specifically it was based on Ausubel's theory of meaningful learning. The findings of this…

  16. A Pilot Study of the Psychological Impact of the Mindfulness-Based Stress-Reduction Program On People Who Stutter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Veer, S.; Brouwers, A.; Evers, W.; Tomic, W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In general, people who stutter feel hampered in their communication with others and suffer from stress and anxiety when they have to speak. The Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program has proved to be successful in reducing stress, fear and anxiety in many studies involving a

  17. 'Only systems thinking can improve family planning program in Pakistan': A descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Saira; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem

    2014-12-01

    Family Planning (FP) program in Pakistan has been struggling to achieve the desired indicators. Despite a well-timed initiation of the program in late 50s, fertility decline has been sparingly slow. As a result, rapid population growth is impeding economic development in the country. A high population growth rate, the current fertility rate, a stagnant contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need remain challenging targets for population policies and FP programs. To accelerate the pace of FP programs and targets concerned, it is imperative to develop and adopt a holistic approach and strategy for plugging the gaps in various components of the health system: service delivery, information systems, drugs-supplies, technology and logistics, Human Resources (HRs), financing, and governance. Hence, World Health Organization (WHO) health systems building blocks present a practical framework for overall health system strengthening. This descriptive qualitative study, through 23 in-depth interviews, explored the factors related to the health system, and those responsible for a disappointing FP program in Pakistan. Provincial representatives from Population Welfare and Health departments, donor agencies and non-governmental organizations involved with FP programs were included in the study to document the perspective of all stakeholders. Content analysis was done manually to generate nodes, sub-nodes and themes. Performance of FP programs is not satisfactory as shown by the indicators, and these programs have not been able to deliver the desired outcomes. Interviewees agreed that inadequate prioritization given to the FP program by successive governments has led to this situation. There are issues with all health system areas, including governance, strategies, funding, financial management, service delivery systems, HRs, technology and logistic systems, and Management Information System (MIS); these have encumbered the pace of success of the program. All stakeholders

  18. ‘Only Systems Thinking Can Improve Family Planning Program in Pakistan’: A Descriptive Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saira Zafar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Family Planning (FP program in Pakistan has been struggling to achieve the desired indicators. Despite a well-timed initiation of the program in late 50s, fertility decline has been sparingly slow. As a result, rapid population growth is impeding economic development in the country. A high population growth rate, the current fertility rate, a stagnant contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need remain challenging targets for population policies and FP programs. To accelerate the pace of FP programs and targets concerned, it is imperative to develop and adopt a holistic approach and strategy for plugging the gaps in various components of the health system: service delivery, information systems, drugs-supplies, technology and logistics, Human Resources (HRs, financing, and governance. Hence, World Health Organization (WHO health systems building blocks present a practical framework for overall health system strengthening. Methods This descriptive qualitative study, through 23 in-depth interviews, explored the factors related to the health system, and those responsible for a disappointing FP program in Pakistan. Provincial representatives from Population Welfare and Health departments, donor agencies and non-governmental organizations involved with FP programs were included in the study to document the perspective of all stakeholders. Content analysis was done manually to generate nodes, sub-nodes and themes. Results Performance of FP programs is not satisfactory as shown by the indicators, and these programs have not been able to deliver the desired outcomes. Interviewees agreed that inadequate prioritization given to the FP program by successive governments has led to this situation. There are issues with all health system areas, including governance, strategies, funding, financial management, service delivery systems, HRs, technology and logistic systems, and Management Information System (MIS; these have encumbered the pace of

  19. A Study of Program Manager Effectiveness and Risk Taking Propensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    search for organizational effectiveness: a. Scientific Management - Taylor (1911). b. Principles of Management - Fayol (1916/1925). c. Human Relations... leadership . Management outcomes refer to the accomplishments of the organization or project team. This methodology is similiar to the model developed...C) W(IcFR Fl mp,’ II ~OF 4 A STUDY OF PROGRAM MANAGER EFFECTIVENESS AND RISK TAKING PROPENSITY THESIS Timothy P. McIntyre Captain, USAF AFIT/GSM/LSY

  20. Ground Robotic Hand Applications for the Space Program study (GRASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, William A.; Rafla, Nader I. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on a NASA-STDP effort to address research interests of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) through a study entitled, Ground Robotic-Hand Applications for the Space Program (GRASP). The primary objective of the GRASP study was to identify beneficial applications of specialized end-effectors and robotic hand devices for automating any ground operations which are performed at the Kennedy Space Center. Thus, operations for expendable vehicles, the Space Shuttle and its components, and all payloads were included in the study. Typical benefits of automating operations, or augmenting human operators performing physical tasks, include: reduced costs; enhanced safety and reliability; and reduced processing turnaround time.