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Sample records for program indiana indiana

  1. Forests of Indiana, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale D. Gormanson

    2014-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Indiana based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized strategic sample design and...

  2. Slowly but Surely: How Indiana Is Building a Pre-K Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Abbie; Loewenberg, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, Indiana was one of only a few states in the nation without a state-funded pre-K program. Recently, however, The Hoosier State has slowly begun to build pre-K offerings by investing in pilot programs in a handful of counties throughout the state. Now, Indiana lawmakers are looking ahead to a 2017 legislative session in which…

  3. Regional cooperation and performance-based planning and programming in Indiana : a regional models of cooperation peer exchange summary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This report highlights key themes identified at the Regional Cooperation and Performance-Based Planning and Programming in Indiana Peer Exchange held on May 25, 2016 in Indianapolis, Indiana. The Regional Models of Cooperation Initiative, which...

  4. Indiana Dzhons vozvrashtshajetsja / Melor Sturua

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sturua, Melor

    2008-01-01

    22 mail esilinastub Steven Spielbergi järjekordne Indiana Jones'i film, kaasstsenaristiks ja produtsendiks George Lucas ja Harrison Fordiga nimiosas "Indiana Jones ja kristallpealuu kuningriik" ("Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull")

  5. Koltunud Indiana Jones / Kutt Kommel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kommel, Kutt

    2008-01-01

    Steven Spielbergi neljas Indiana Jones'i film Harrison Fordiga nimiosas "Indiana Jones ja kristallpealuu kuningriik" ("Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull") : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2008

  6. Indiana forest statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Brad Smith; Mark F. Golitz

    1988-01-01

    The third inventory of Indiana's timber resource shows that timberland area in Indiana climbed from 3.9 to 4.3 million acres between 1967 and 1986, an increase of more than 10%. During the same period growing-stock volume increased 43%. Highlights and statistics are presented on area, volume, growth, mortality, and removals.

  7. The Amish in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvin, Isobel S.

    Four lesson plans for teaching elementary students about the Amish in Indiana are presented in this document. The lessons include: (1) using periodicals to learn about Amish life; (2) using the budget to learn about Amish life; (3) simulating a day in an Amish school; and (4) visiting the Amish. A 14-item list of resources for teaching about the…

  8. Methods and Challenges Related to Implementing the New National School Lunch Program Regulations in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajah, Krisha; Getty, Victoria M.; Johnson, Hattie L.; Case, Megan; Herr, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 resulted in updated National School Lunch Program (NSLP) regulations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The purpose of this research was to investigate the approaches used by school foodservice managers and directors in Indiana in complying with the new regulations and to identify…

  9. Coal resources of Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Frank Darwyn

    1953-01-01

    The Indiana coal field forms the eastern edge of the eastern interior coal basin, which is near some of the most densely populated and highly productive manufacturing areas of the United States. (See fig. 1. ) For this reason Indiana coal reserves are an important State and National asset. In dollar value the coal mining industry is the largest of Indiana's natural-resource-producing industries. The total value of coil production for the year 1950 was more than 100 million dollars, or more than that of all other natural-resource industries in the State combined. As estimated herein, the original coal reserves of Indiana total 37,293 million tons, of which 27,320 million tons is contained in beds more than 42 inches thick; 7,632 million tons in beds 28 to 49. inches thick; and 2,341 million tons in beds 14 to 28 inches thick. The remaining reserves as of January 1951, total 35,806 million tons, of which 18,779 million tons is believed to be recoverable. The distribution of the reserves in these several categories is summarized by counties in table 1. Of the total original reserves of 37,293 million tons, 6,355 million tons can be classified as measured; 8,657 million tons as indicated; and 22,281 million tons as inferred. Strippable reserves constitute 3,524 million tons, or 9.5 percent of the total original reserves. The distribution of the strippable and nonstrippable original reserves is summarized in tables 2 and 3 by counties and by several categories, according to the thickness of the beds and the relative abundance and reliability of the information available for preparing the estimates. The distribution of the estimated 18,779 million tons of recoverable strippable and nonstrippable reserves in Indiana is further summarized by counties in table 4, and the information is presented graphically in figures 2 and 3. The tables i to 4 and figures 2 and 3 include beds in the 14- to 28-inch category, because thin beds have been mined in many places. However, many

  10. Indiana protiv KGB / Anna Fedina, Pjotr Obraztsov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Fedina, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Steven Spielbergi neljas Indiana Jones'i film Harrison Fordiga nimiosas "Indiana Jones ja kristallpealuu kuningriik" ("Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull") : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2008

  11. Indiana Jones ja kristallpealuu kuningriik / Jaanus Noormets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Noormets, Jaanus

    2008-01-01

    Steven Spielbergi neljas Indiana Jones'i film Harrison Fordiga nimiosas "Indiana Jones ja kristallpealuu kuningriik" ("Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull") : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2008

  12. Cultivating Leaders of Indiana

    OpenAIRE

    yaryyeva, Annagul; Sdunzik, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    "Cultivating Leaders of Indiana" was developed to establish connections between the Purdue student body and the Frankfort community. By engaging high school students in workshops that focused on local, national, and global identities, the goal of the project was to encourage students to appreciate their individuality and to motivate them to translate their skills into a global perspective.Moreover, workshops centering on themes such as culture, citizenship, media, and education were designed ...

  13. Indiana's Forests 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher W. Woodall; Mark N. Webb; Barry T. Wilson; Jeff Settle; Ron J. Piva; Charles H. Perry; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Susan J. Crocker; Brett J. Butler; Mark Hansen; Mark Hatfield; Gary Brand; Charles. Barnett

    2011-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of Indiana's forests reports more than 4.75 million acres of forest land with an average volume of more than 2,000 cubic feet per acre. Forest land is dominated by the white oak/red oak/hickory forest type, which occupies nearly a third of the total forest land area. Seventy-six percent of forest land consists of sawtimber, 16...

  14. 2011-2013 Indiana Statewide Imagery and LiDAR Program: Lake Michigan Watershed Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Indiana's Statewide LiDAR data is produced at 1.5-meter average post spacing for all 92 Indiana Counties covering more than 36,420 square miles. New LiDAR data was...

  15. Indiana State Nurses Assistance Program: identifying gender differences in substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNelis, Angela M; Horton-Deutsch, Sara; O'Haver Day, Pamela; Gavardinas, Tara; Outlaw, Christina; Palmer, Rhonda; Schroeder, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the population of nurses in the Indiana State Nurses Assistance Program (ISNAP) as an initial step toward making recommendations for future program improvement efforts. Secondary analysis of data collected for non-research purpose. Male nurses represented a proportionately higher percentage than female nurses in ISNAP and used alcohol two times more often than opiates, the second most abused substance. Data need to be systematically collected to provide evidence for monitoring and treatment programs to address the needs of impaired nurses based on characteristics, including gender. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Clean coal initiatives in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, B.H.; Irwin, M.W.; Sparrow, F.T.; Mastalerz, Maria; Yu, Z.; Kramer, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose - Indiana is listed among the top ten coal states in the USA and annually mines about 35 million short tons (million tons) of coal from the vast reserves of the US Midwest Illinois Coal Basin. The implementation and commercialization of clean coal technologies is important to the economy of the state and has a significant role in the state's energy plan for increasing the use of the state's natural resources. Coal is a substantial Indiana energy resource and also has stable and relatively low costs, compared with the increasing costs of other major fuels. This indigenous energy source enables the promotion of energy independence. The purpose of this paper is to outline the significance of clean coal projects for achieving this objective. Design/methodology/approach - The paper outlines the clean coal initiatives being taken in Indiana and the research carried out at the Indiana Center for Coal Technology Research. Findings - Clean coal power generation and coal for transportation fuels (coal-to-liquids - CTL) are two major topics being investigated in Indiana. Coking coal, data compilation of the bituminous coal qualities within the Indiana coal beds, reducing dependence on coal imports, and provision of an emissions free environment are important topics to state legislators. Originality/value - Lessons learnt from these projects will be of value to other states and countries.

  17. Schools' Responses to Voucher Policy: Participation Decisions and Early Implementation Experiences in the Indiana Choice Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Megan J.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the supply side of voucher programs, despite schools' central role in program effectiveness. Using survey and interview data on the Indiana Choice Scholarship Program (ICSP), I analyze schools' participation decisions and early implementation experiences to understand better how schools respond to program regulations. I find…

  18. Indiana Department of Transportation research program peer exchange, June 17-20, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    This report summarizes the outcomes of a Peer Exchange conducted at : the request of the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) on June 17-20, 2002. Peer : exchanges are required of State Departments of Transportation as a condition of receipt ...

  19. Libraries in Indiana: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/indiana.html Libraries in Indiana To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Evansville Deaconess Hospital Health Science Library 600 Mary Street Evansville, IN 47747 812-450- ...

  20. Fuel alcohol opportunities for Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenglass, Bert

    1980-08-01

    Prepared at the request of US Senator Birch Bayh, Chairman of the National Alcohol Fuels Commission, this study may be best utilized as a guidebook and resource manual to foster the development of a statewide fuel alcohol plan. It examines sectors in Indiana which will impact or be impacted upon by the fuel alcohol industry. The study describes fuel alcohol technologies that could be pertinent to Indiana and also looks closely at how such a fuel alcohol industry may affect the economic and policy development of the State. Finally, the study presents options for Indiana, taking into account the national context of the developing fuel alcohol industry which, unlike many others, will be highly decentralized and more under the control of the lifeblood of our society - the agricultural community.

  1. Indiana Distributive Education Competency Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rod; And Others

    This Indiana distributive education competency-based curriculum model is designed to help teachers and local administrators plan and conduct a comprehensive marketing and distributive education program. It is divided into three levels--one level for each year of a three-year program. The competencies common to a variety of marketing and…

  2. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Energy used by Indiana single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  3. No More Indiana Jones Warehouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannapacker, William

    2012-01-01

    In "Raiders of the Lost Ark," Indiana Jones--perhaps the last heroic professor to appear in a major Hollywood film--survives a series of adventures involving spiders, snakes, treacherous colleagues, and countless Nazis who are determined to recover the ark of the covenant for their "Fuhrer." Apparently the ark has mystical powers. Ultimately,…

  4. "Salatoimikud" Indiana Jonesi moodi / Inna-Katrin Hein

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hein, Inna-Katrin

    2008-01-01

    Steven Spielbergi neljas Indiana Jones'i film Harrison Fordiga nimiosas "Indiana Jones ja kristallpealuu kuningriik" ("Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull") : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2008

  5. Quarry Quest. A Field Trip Guide to the Indiana Limestone District, Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmaker, Sherman N.

    This guide provides information for planning a field trip to the Indiana Limestone District. This district, located in Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana, is responsible for material that has dominated the building-limestone market in the United States for nearly a century. A few of the many well-known buildings using Indiana limestone are the…

  6. Indiana residents' perceptions of woodland management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Witter; Shannon M. Amberg; David J. Case; Phillip T. Seng

    2013-01-01

    A 2009 telephone survey of 1,402 Indiana adults was conducted to assess opinions regarding woodland management. Forty-eight percent said they were "very concerned" about the health and productivity of Indiana's woodlands, and 45 percent, "somewhat concerned." Almost half (47 percent) thought that the state's woodlands are held in about...

  7. Snapshots of Indiana's Full-Day Kindergarten Programs before and after the State's Funding Increase for the Program. REL Technical Brief. REL 2009-No. 013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Rachel; Kochanek, Julie; Mathers, Carrie; Burke, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The Indiana General Assembly increased the state grant funds for full-day kindergarten from $8.5 million for 2006/07 to $33.5 million for 2007/08. Following the increase in funding, the Indiana Department of Education and the Indiana State Board of Education requested assistance from Regional Educational Laboratory Midwest to analyze Indiana…

  8. Indiana continent catheterizable urinary reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, O A; Aranguren, G; Campos-Juanatey, F

    2014-01-01

    Radical pelvic surgery requires continent or incontinent urinary diversion. There are many techniques, but the orthotopic neobladder is the most used. A continent catheterizable urinary reservoir is sometimes a good alternative when this derivation is not possible or not indicated. This paper has aimed to present our experience with the Indiana pouch continent urinary reservoir. The series is made up of 85 patients, 66 women and 19 men, with a mean age of 56 years (31-77 years). Variables analyzed were operating time, estimated blood loss, transfusion rate, hospital stay and peri-operatory complications. The main indication in 49 cases was resolution of complications related to the treatment of cervical cancer. Average operation time was 110.5 minutes (range 80-130 minutes). Mean blood loss was 450 cc (100-1000 cc). Immediate postoperative complications, all of which were treated medically, occurred in 16 patients (18.85%). One patient suffered anastomotic leakage. Hospital stay was 19 days (range 5-60 days) and there was no mortality in the series. Late complications occurred in 26 patients (32%), these being ureteral anastomotic stenosis in 11 cases, cutaneous stoma stenosis in 9 cases and reservoir stones in 6 cases. The Indiana continent catheterizable urinary reservoir is a valid option for the treatment of both urological and gynecological malignancies as well as for the management of pelvic morbidity related to the treatment of pelvic cancers. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Career Pathways in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Steve; Johnson, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    The revisions to the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 require that career and technical education (CTE) programs provide students with a clear pathway from secondary to postsecondary education, and into high-wage, high-skill and high-demand careers. States nationwide are developing programs, called career pathways, to…

  10. 2008 US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) Topobathy Lidar - Indiana (Lake Michigan shoreline)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data contained in these files contain topographic data collected by the CHARTS system along Lake Michigan, Indiana. The data are broken into boxes. The box...

  11. Eclipse '17 at Indiana University Bloomington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Karna Mahadev; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    August 21, 2017, is the first day of fall classes at Indiana University Bloomington. On campus, we will host viewing stations to assist students, faculty, and community members to watch the eclipse safely. The Kirkwood Observatory solar telescope will provide an online view of the event. Science teachers of Indiana will be surveyed to understand their needs to be prepared for the first week of classes. Working this spring with K12 educators and other local organizations involved in science outreach, we will help to prepare Indiana classrooms to take advantage of the August event to meet the goals of Indiana’s state science standards with eclipse-related activities at all grade levels. These activities are aimed at increasing the scientific literacy in rural Indiana.

  12. Implementation of an Education-Focused PhD Program in Anatomy and Cell Biology at Indiana University: Lessons Learned and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, James J.; O'Loughlin, Valerie D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the Indiana University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the School of Education, admitted its first student to a newly approved PhD program in Anatomy and Cell Biology focusing on educational research rather than biomedical research. The goal of the program is twofold: (1) to provide students with extensive training in all of the…

  13. Analyzing the attributes of Indiana's STEM schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltz, Jeremy

    "Primary and secondary schools do not seem able to produce enough students with the interest, motivation, knowledge, and skills they will need to compete and prosper in the emerging world" (National Academy of Sciences [NAS], 2007a, p. 94). This quote indicated that there are changing expectations for today's students which have ultimately led to new models of education, such as charters, online and blended programs, career and technical centers, and for the purposes of this research, STEM schools. STEM education as defined in this study is a non-traditional model of teaching and learning intended to "equip them [students] with critical thinking, problem solving, creative and collaborative skills, and ultimately establishes connections between the school, work place, community and the global economy" (Science Foundation Arizona, 2014, p. 1). Focusing on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education is believed by many educational stakeholders to be the solution for the deficits many students hold as they move on to college and careers. The National Governors Association (NGA; 2011) believes that building STEM skills in the nation's students will lead to the ability to compete globally with a new workforce that has the capacity to innovate and will in turn spur economic growth. In order to accomplish the STEM model of education, a group of educators and business leaders from Indiana developed a comprehensive plan for STEM education as an option for schools to use in order to close this gap. This plan has been promoted by the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE, 2014a) with the goal of increasing STEM schools throughout Indiana. To determine what Indiana's elementary STEM schools are doing, this study analyzed two of the elementary schools that were certified STEM by the IDOE. This qualitative case study described the findings and themes from two elementary STEM schools. Specifically, the research looked at the vital components to accomplish STEM

  14. Geophysical Features - STRUCTURAL_FEATURES_IN: Structural Features of Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — STRUCTURAL_FEATURES_IN is a line shapefile that shows the location of known structural features in Indiana; source data scales range from 1:12,000 to 1:500,000 (only...

  15. A survey of bees (hymenoptera: Apoidea) of the Indiana dunes and Northwest Indiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundel, R.; Jean, R.P.; Frohnapple, K.J.; Gibbs, J.; Glowacki, G.A.; Pavlovic, N.B.

    2011-01-01

    The Indiana Dunes, and nearby natural areas in northwest Indiana, are floristically rich Midwest U.S. locales with many habitat types. We surveyed bees along a habitat gradient ranging from grasslands to forests in these locales, collecting at least 175 bee species along this gradient plus 29 additional species in other nearby habitats. About 25% of all species were from the genus Lasioglossum and 12% of the species were associated with sandy soils. Several bumblebee (Bombus) species of conservation concern that should occur in this region were not collected during our surveys. Similarity of the northwest Indiana bee fauna to other published U.S. faunas decreased about 1.3% per 100 km distance from northwest Indiana. Thirty percent of bees netted from flowers were males. Males and females differed significantly in their frequency of occurrence on different plant species. For bees collected in bowl traps, the percentage captured in fluorescent yellow traps declined and in fluorescent blue traps increased from spring to late summer. Capture rates for different bee genera varied temporally, with about a quarter of the genera being captured most frequently in late spring and a quarter in late summer. Capture rates for most genera were higher in more open than in more closed canopy habitats. The maximum number of plant species on which a single bee species was captured plateaued at 24, on average. Forty-nine percent of bee species known to occur in Indiana were found at these northwest Indiana sites. Having this relatively high proportion of the total Indiana bee fauna is consistent with Indiana Dunes existing at a biogeographic crossroads where grassland and forest biomes meet in a landscape whose climate and soils are affected by proximity to Lake Michigan. The resulting habitat, plant, edaphic, and climatic diversity likely produces the diverse bee community documented.

  16. Fire and the endangered Indiana bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Michael J. Lacki; Daniel R. Cox

    2009-01-01

    Fire and Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) have coexisted for millennia in the central hardwoods region, yet past declines in populations of this endangered species, and the imperative of fire use in oak silviculture and ecosystem conservation, call for an analysis of both the risks and opportunities associated with using fires on landscapes in...

  17. Summer ecology of Indiana bats in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) is a tree roosting species found throughout the eastern United States that is federally listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. A more detailed understanding of summer roosting and foraging habitat...

  18. Indiana forest management history and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam F. Carman

    2013-01-01

    Indiana's landscape and forests today are largely the result of Ice Age glaciations, Native Americans' use of fire, and over-harvesting in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Any intentional management of the forest was not generally apparent until the early 1900s. Early visionaries at that time recognized the future impact forest depletion would have on...

  19. A Design Case Featuring the Graduate Design Studio at Indiana University Bloomington’s Human-Computer Interaction Design Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Callison

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author illustrates the design of a physical space that was created to serve as a performance intervention for graduate students in the Human-Computer Interaction Design (HCId program in the School of Informatics, Indiana University Bloomington. Opened in Fall 2010, the HCId Graduate Design Studio was designed to help facilitate collaboration between students and faculty in the HCId Program. An effort was made to document the Studio and students working in the Studio over an extended period of time. The author visited the Design Studio a minimum of ten times between late January and late April 2011. Visits were conducted on different days of the week (Monday - Friday and at different times of the day to capture a variety of students and activity level in the Studio. In order to gain a perspective on the two distinct groups of students who utilize the Studio, interviews of graduate students from both the HCId Master of Science and Doctoral program were conducted. In addition interviews were conducted of two other important stakeholders, the HCId Program Director and the Director of Facilities for the School of Informatics, both of whom were heavily involved in the design of the Studio. Through faculty and student interviews, text descriptions, photographs, and audio and video recordings this article addresses the design features and their impact, both successful and unsuccessful, on student and faculty collaboration of the HCId Graduate Design Studio.

  20. 78 FR 2986 - Northern Indiana Public Service Company; Notice of Application for Temporary Variance of License...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Northern Indiana Public Service Company; Notice of Application for Temporary...-056. c. Date Filed: November 28, 2012. d. Applicant: Northern Indiana Public Service Company (licensee.... Justin Darling, Hydro Supervisor-- Chemical and Environmental Compliance, Northern Indiana Public Service...

  1. Väike psühhoanalüüs Indiana Jonesile / Aarne Ruben

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ruben, Aarne, 1971-

    2008-01-01

    Steven Spielbergi neljas Indiana Jones'i film Harrison Fordiga nimiosas "Indiana Jones ja kristallpealuu kuningriik" ("Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull") : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2008

  2. National Forest Health Monitoring Program, Monitoring Urban Forests in Indiana: Pilot Study 2002, Part 1: Analysis of Field Methods and Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Northeastern Area, State and Private Forestry

    2006-01-01

    This report highlights findings from the first statewide urban forest health monitoring pilot study conducted in the State of Indiana in 2002. The report is in two parts. Part One summarizes analysis of the field methods and data collected on the urban nonforest plots of one panel in Indiana, and Part Two expands these data to statewide urban forest estimates with the...

  3. Sun Coke heat recovery coke technology at Indiana Harbor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.N. [Sun Coke Company (USA). Operations

    1999-12-01

    Sun Coke heat recovery coke technology was fully established for the first time at Indiana Harbor Coke Company, East Chicago, Indiana (USA). The plant supplies continuous heat to waste heat boilers which provide steam for a 94 MW turbine generator whilst producing 1,350,00 NT per year of metallurgical coke. The paper briefly describes the development of the technology and discusses specific design aspects of the Indiana Harbor plant. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. SNAP-Ed (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education) Increases Long-Term Food Security among Indiana Households with Children in a Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rebecca L; Maulding, Melissa K; Abbott, Angela R; Craig, Bruce A; Eicher-Miller, Heather A

    2016-11-01

    Food insecurity is negatively associated with US children's dietary intake and health. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) aims to alleviate food insecurity by offering nutrition, budgeting, and healthy lifestyle education to low-income individuals and families. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term impact of the Indiana SNAP-Ed on food security among households with children. A randomized, controlled, parallel study design with SNAP-Ed as an intervention was carried out during a 4- to 10-wk intervention period. Intervention group participants received the first 4 Indiana SNAP-Ed curriculum lessons. Study participants (n = 575) were adults aged ≥18 y from low-income Indiana households with ≥1 child living in the household. Both treatment groups completed an assessment before and after the intervention period and 1 y after recruitment. The 18-item US Household Food Security Survey Module was used to classify the primary outcomes of food security for the household and adults and children in the household. A linear mixed model was used to compare intervention with control group effects over time on food security. Mean ± SEM changes in household food security score and food security score among household adults from baseline to 1-y follow-up were 1.2 ± 0.4 and 0.9 ± 0.3 units lower, respectively, in the intervention group than in the control group (P food security score from baseline to 1-y follow-up among household children was not significantly different in the intervention group compared with the control group. SNAP-Ed improved food security over a longitudinal time frame among low-income Indiana households with children in this study. SNAP-Ed may be a successful intervention to improve food security. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Examining the Cross-Roads: School Segregation in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jodi S.; Krull, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    Demographics in the U.S. have changed dramatically over the last three decades. Indiana's demographics are changing, too--albeit less dramatically. To explore how demographic shifts are changing the composition of Indiana's schools, the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy (CEEP) uses Common Core of Data (CCD) school enrollment data from the…

  6. Indiana Regional Transfer Study: The Student Experience of Transfer Pathways between Ivy Tech Community College and Indiana University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, Alison; Gupta, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    This report details findings from focus groups with college students across Indiana. All of these students were planning to transfer or had transferred from the state community college system, Ivy Tech, to a school in the Indiana University system. We wanted to find out what these students had to say about their experiences preparing for and…

  7. 75 FR 73026 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Clean Air Interstate Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Clean Air... June 29, 2009, to revise the Indiana State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Clean Air Act (CAA). The State has submitted amendments to the Indiana Administrative Code (IAC), which supplement Indiana's...

  8. Superfund and Toxic Release Inventory Sites - INSTITUTIONAL_CONTROLS_IDEM_IN.SHP: Institutional Control Sites in Indiana (Indiana Department of Environmental Management, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — INSTITUTIONAL_CONTROLS_IDEM_IN is a polygon shapefile that contains Institutional Control (IC) site locations in Indiana, provided by personnel of Indiana Department...

  9. Road and Street Centerlines - COUNTY_STREET_CENTERLINES_IDHS_IN: Street Centerlines Maintained by County Agencies in Indiana (Indiana Department of Homeland Security, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — COUNTY_STREET_CENTERLINES_IDHS_IN is a line feature class that contains street centerlines maintained by county agencies in Indiana, provided by personnel of Indiana...

  10. Summer ecology of Indiana bats in Ohio : executive summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) is a small, tree roosting species found throughout the eastern United States that is federally listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Although their major hibernacula are protected, information on...

  11. Radiological Final Status Survey of the Hammond Depot, Hammond, Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.J. Vitkus

    2008-04-07

    ORISE conducted extensive scoping, characterization, and final status surveys of land areas and structures at the DNSC’s Hammond Depot located in Hammond, Indiana in multiple phases during 2005, 2006 and 2007.

  12. Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis) Draft Recovery Plan: First Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Draft recovery plan for Indiana bats, a Federally endangered species. First revision. The purpose of this draft recovery plan is to...

  13. Opportune Landing Site Program: Opportune Landing Site Southeastern Indiana Field Data Collection and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), and Syngen- ics Corporation. Dr. Charles C. Ryerson was Program Manager at ERDC/CRREL, and James McDowell...ERDC. Dr. James R. Houston was Director. ERDC/CRREL TR-08-22 x Unit Conversion Factors Multiply By To Obtain millimeters 3.93701 x 10–2...was not flat, but had a beveled edge. Loose, diffi- cult-to-remove soil would collect at the bottom of the hole, possibly inter- fering with the

  14. Kolm tundi päevas jõusaalis ja dieet : nii voolis Harrison Ford end taas Indiana Jonesiks / Triin Tael

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tael, Triin

    2008-01-01

    Steven Spielbergi neljas Indiana Jones'i film Harrison Fordiga nimiosas "Indiana Jones ja kristallpealuu kuningriik" ("Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull") : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2008. Indiana Jonesi tähestik

  15. Hydrogeology - HYDROGEOL_SETTINGS_IN: Hydrogeologic Terrains and Settings of Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:100,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — HYDROGEOL_SETTINGS_IN is a polygon shapefile that shows hydrogeologic terrains and settings of Indiana. The methodology of the investigation and definitions of terms...

  16. Landfills - LANDFILL_BOUNDARIES_IDEM_IN: Waste Site Boundaries in Indiana (Indiana Department of Environmental Management, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — LANDFILL_BOUNDARIES_IDEM_IN.SHP is a polygon shapefile that contains boundaries for open dump sites, approved landfills, and permitted landfills in Indiana, provided...

  17. Fuel Processing Plants - ETHANOL_PRODUCTION_FACILITIES_IN: Ethanol Production Facilities in Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — This GIS layer shows the locations of ethanol production facilities in the state of Indiana. Attributes include the name and address of the facility, and information...

  18. Rural Decline and Revival: State and Local Partnerships in Creating “Stellar Communities” in Rural Indiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JoAnna Mitchell-Brown

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, public-public and public-private partnerships have become a topic of increasing interest in efforts to establish and implement holistic community revitalization initiatives. One example of this effort is Indiana’s Stellar Communities program. The program is a multi-agency partnership designed to fund comprehensive community development projects in Indiana’s smaller communities. This innovative program entails three participating state agencies, the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority, Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs, and Indiana Department of Transportation. This research paper explores the progress, issues, and impacts of the Indiana Stellar Communities Program. It focuses specifically on describing program goals, planning, and implementation in the first four communities designated as “Stellar” between 2011 and 2012. In doing so, it highlights community context, best practices, and lessons learned (to date, while providing an assessment of current economic and social impacts to local communities, as well as regional implications.

  19. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V.; Zhao, Mingjie; Taylor, Zachary T.; Poehlman, Eric A.

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Indiana. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Indiana.

  20. Changes In The Horse Racing Industry And Impacts On The Indiana Economy: 2010 - 2014

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jonathan M. Furdek; Susan Conners

    2015-01-01

      A survey of the horse racing and horse breeding industry in Indiana was conducted in 2014 and the economic impact of this industry on the Indiana economy determined utilizing an input-output model...

  1. 77 FR 45992 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Indiana; Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ... regulations necessary to meet ambient air quality standards. Additionally, the Illinois Pollution Control...; Illinois; Indiana; Michigan; Minnesota; Ohio; Wisconsin; Infrastructure SIP Requirements for the 2006 PM 2... elements, of State Implementation Plan (SIP) submissions by Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio...

  2. Spatial earthquake hazard assessment of Evansville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockaway, T.D.; Frost, J.D.; Eggert, D.L.; Luna, R.

    1997-01-01

    The earthquake hazard has been evaluated for a 150-square-kilometer area around Evansville, Indiana. GIS-QUAKE, a system that combines liquefaction and ground motion analysis routines with site-specific geological, geotechnical, and seismological information, was used for the analysis. The hazard potential was determined by using 586 SPT borings, 27 CPT sounding, 39 shear-wave velocity profiles and synthesized acceleration records for body-wave magnitude 6.5 and 7.3 mid-continental earthquakes, occurring at distances of 50 km and 250 km, respectively. The results of the GIS-QUAKE hazard analyses for Evansville identify areas with a high hazard potential that had not previously been identified in earthquake zonation studies. The Pigeon Creek area specifically is identified as having significant potential for liquefaction-induced damage. Damage as a result of ground motion amplification is determined to be a moderate concern throughout the area. Differences in the findings of this zonation study and previous work are attributed to the size and range of the database, the hazard evaluation methodologies, and the geostatistical interpolation techniques used to estimate the hazard potential. Further, assumptions regarding the groundwater elevations made in previous studies are also considered to have had a significant effect on the results.

  3. An Evaluation of the Effect of Correctional Education Programs on Post-Release Recidivism and Employment: An Empirical Study in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nally, John; Lockwood, Susan; Knutson, Katie; Ho, Taiping

    2012-01-01

    In order to examine the effect of correctional education on post-release employment and recidivism, the Education Division of the Indiana Department of Correction (IDOC) has established a study group of 1,077 offenders and a comparison group of 1,078 offenders to evaluate the outcome measures (e.g, post-release recidivism). All offenders in the…

  4. 30 CFR 914.25 - Approval of Indiana abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STATE INDIANA § 914.25 Approval of Indiana abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Indiana abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 914.25 Section 914.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND...

  5. 30 CFR 914.20 - Approval of Indiana abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 914.20 Approval of Indiana abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary approved the Indiana abandoned mine land reclamation plan, as submitted on December 7, 1981, on July 26, 1982, effective July 29... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Indiana abandoned mine land...

  6. Indiana Jones on tagasi ja näitab, kuidas käituda / Kristiina Davidjants

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Davidjants, Kristiina, 1974-

    2008-01-01

    22 mail esilinastub Steven Spielbergi järjekordne Indiana Jones'i film, kaasstsenaristiks ja produtsendiks George Lucas ja Harrison Fordiga nimiosas "Indiana Jones ja kristallpealuu kuningriik" ("Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull"). Saaga varasemast kolmest filmist

  7. 75 FR 72956 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Clean Air Interstate Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Clean Air... Management (IDEM) on June 29, 2009, to revise the Indiana State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Clean Air Act (CAA). The State has submitted amendments to the Indiana Administrative Code (IAC), which...

  8. Water resources research program. Pollution of coastal waters off Chicago by sinking plumes from the Indiana Harbor Canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, W.; McCown, D.L.; Raphaelian, L.A.; Saunders, K.D.

    1977-12-01

    On March 2, 1977, during sinking-plume conditions, a portion of the water of the Indiana Harbor Canal (IHC) was injected with samarium and rhodamine-dye tags and a section of the IHC's surface was covered with simulated oily waste tagged with dysprosium. Water samples were taken downcurrent, over a 54-hr period, from a vessel and from the raw-water streams from the intakes at Chicago's South Water Filtration Plant (SWFP). Bottom currents and water temperatures were measured almost continuously at four Lake Michigan stations located between the IHC and the SWFP. Unequivocal evidence is presented for transport of the tagged IHC water and oily waste to the SWFP's intakes. Organic contaminants from the IHC were present in trace concentrations in the SWFP's raw water. A model for the transport and mixing of the entire IHC effluent, for the environmental conditions during the experiment, indicates a minimum dilution of 4 in the plume offshore of the SWFP and, for the assumed plume trajectory, values of 5 x 10/sup 2/ and 10/sup 5/ at the shore and crib intakes, respectively. A similar model applied to the experimental situation of tagged effluent showed reasonable agreement with measurements. Analysis of historical data indicates that the worst-case pollution event that might be experienced at the SWFP, assuming constant pollutant loading in the IHC, would be due to 24 hr of northwest wind followed by a 3.0-in. (7.6 cm), 24-hr rainfall that coincides with 3.0 x 10/sup 6/ m of total wind movement from the southerly quadrants.

  9. An Analysis of Factors Influencing the Earnings of Indiana High School Vocational Graduates. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, William B.

    The study was made to determine the earnings of a sample group of Indiana high school vocational program graduates to ascertain the effect hypothesized training has on earnings of high school vocational graduates. The sample was randomly selected from 1972-73 graduates, stratified according to vocational program. Of the 18 independent variables…

  10. Could Land-Only Taxation Save Local Government in Indiana?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Ross

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper articulates a case for Indiana to exempt all non-land property from the taxable portion of the property tax base. This moves the state closer to a tax system that has great support among economists for its advantages in encouraging economic growth, progressivity, and reducing environmental damage from urban sprawl. Indiana might particularly benefit from a land only tax because of its unique system of property tax caps. The merits of this approach hinge on driving a wedge between gross assessed value and net taxable value. Future empirical research is needed to determine the distributional impact that would result from such a policy change.

  11. Perfluorinated compounds and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in great blue heron eggs from Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, T.W.; Kannan, K.; Tao, L.; Saxena, A.R.; Route, B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2007 archived great blue heron (Ardea herodias) eggs collected from Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, IN, (Indiana Dunes) in 1993 were analyzed for 11 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and 7 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate, the major contributor to total PFC concentrations, were below the toxicity thresholds estimated for bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), but within the toxicity threshold estimated for white leghorn chickens (Gallus domesticus). The ranking of PBDE congener concentrations by percent concentration (PBDE-47 > -99 > -100 > -153 > -154 > -28 > -183) was consistent with the Penta-PBDE formulation. Total PBDE concentrations in great blue heron eggs from Indiana Dunes were elevated and probably reflect local contamination from highly urbanized and industrialized inputs into Lake Michigan. Polybrominated diphenyl ether concentrations were within levels associated with altered reproductive behavior in other avian species and based on trends in other Great Lakes birds are probably higher today.

  12. Oral Cancer Risk Behaviors among Indiana College Students: A Formative Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychowdhury, Swati; Lohrmann, David K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: In fall 2004, the authors used a survey to assess the knowledge, attitudes, motivations, and behaviors of college students relative to oral cancer prevention to inform development of targeted prevention programming. Participants: A convenience sample of 1,003 undergraduate students at one public university in Indiana participated.…

  13. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory SciDAC-2 Closeout Report Indiana University Component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlieb, Steven Arthur [Indiana University; DeTar, Carleton [University of Utah; Tousaint, Doug [University of Arizona

    2014-07-24

    This is the closeout report for the Indiana University portion of the National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory project supported by the United States Department of Energy under the SciDAC program. It includes information about activities at Indian University, the University of Arizona, and the University of Utah, as those three universities coordinated their activities.

  14. Family Forest Ownerships with 10+ Acres in Indiana, 2011-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett J. Butler; Sarah M. Butler

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis program conducts the National Woodland Owner Survey in order to better understand: who owns America's forests, why they own it, what they have done with it in the past, and what they intend to do with it in the future. This document summarizes data on family forest ownerships with 10+ acres in Indiana. These...

  15. Staffing Patterns in the Wholesale and Retail Trade Industry in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana State Employment Security Div., Indianapolis. Research and Statistics Section.

    Directed towards designers of vocational education training programs, the document presents statistical data and discussion concerning employment trends in Indiana for various industries in the wholesale and retail trade sector. Data are based on a survey conducted in 1973-74, covering 5,986 establishments and 202,070 employees, with a usable…

  16. Biology Teachers' Attitudes toward and Use of Indiana's Evolution Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Lisa A.; Boone, William J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between biology teachers' evolution teaching practices and their regard and use of Indiana state evolution standards. A survey developed by the authors contained five subscales: use of standards; attitude toward standards; attitude toward evolution standards; evolution teaching practices; and demographic…

  17. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Indiana's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Indiana is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures…

  18. Salmonella serovars in the herpetofauna of Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David L; Hulse, Arthur C

    2006-05-01

    Herpetofaunal Salmonella enterica serovars have not been fully examined in any U.S. region. Thirty-three Salmonella serovars were isolated from 156 samples from 34 species, all within Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Results suggest that herpetofaunas could potentially pose a threat to humans. Further understanding of Salmonella in herpetofaunas may prevent future human cases.

  19. The Customer Connection: Data Transfer at Indiana University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Diana

    1989-01-01

    Indiana University has over 300 microcomputers connected to the administrative mainframe. The issue of micro/mainframe data transfer is discussed and guidelines for planning this capability are provided. Types of micro/mainframe data transfer products, product choice, and how the product works in the transfer environment are described. (Author/MLW)

  20. Indiana Youth Poll: Youths' Views of Racism, Sexism and Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Judith B.; And Others

    Nearly 1,600 youths from across Indiana took part in this poll about prejudicial attitudes and behaviors toward others. More than 8 in 10 students reported that racist attitudes were found among students in their schools. Many described tensions and some open conflict as outcomes of racist attitudes held by both white students and students of…

  1. Indiana intelligent transportation systems commercial vehicle operations business plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This business plan was developed by the Motor Carrier Services (MCS) division of the Indiana Department of Revenue. It is the result of a nine month study of the various state departments and agencies that directly and indirectly support the intersta...

  2. Engineering study for a demonstration program to consider high and low technology solutions for solid waste disposal and energy conservation in Laporte County, Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of providing a solid waste resource recovery system for LaPorte County, Indiana. This was accomplished by determining the quantities and composition of the solid waste in the County, projecting these quantities, analyzing the potential markets for the recovered materials and energy, and making an economic analysis of the possible resource recovery systems available and suitable for the quantities of solid waste available.

  3. Education and Outreach with the Northwest Indiana Robotic Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengstorf, Adam W.; Slavin, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    The Northwest Indiana Robotic (NIRo) Telescope is being used to completely revise the introductory astronomy laboratory experiments at Purdue University Calumet (PUC). The NIRo telescope is a new 20-inch RC telescope. It was dedicated in Aug 2010, is designed to be operated remotely and/or robotically, and is located 30 miles south of PUC's campus in rural Lake county, IN. A suite of laboratory experiments is being developed and piloted during the 2010-2011 academic year. Lab experiments will progress from introductions to instruments and software, through simple data visualization and analysis, to developing and submitting an observing plan to complete multi-week laboratories. Experiments for both the solar system course and the stars & galaxies are being developed. Students in the solar system course will request and analyze images for such experiments as recreating Aristarchus’ relative size & distance calculations, establishing an observing strategy to monitor the Galilean satellites & determine Jupiter's mass, an ongoing `asteroid hunt', Martian retrograde motion, and Venusian phases. The stars & galaxies course will complete labs on galaxy morphology, eclipsing binaries, building an HR-diagram, cluster aging, and distances to Cepheid variables. The main outreach component is the development of a primary education program. In conjunction with the PUC School of Education and area middle-school science teachers, we are in the process of identifying the subset of laboratory ideas best suited to the State of Indiana Earth & Space Science teaching standards from grades 6 - 8. These laboratories are being developed into finished data products, curricula, and learning modules appropriate for the middle school classroom. The middle school classroom will be able to request observations and retrieve reduced images via an internet portal, currently in development. This project has been funded by NSF award #DUE-0736592.

  4. Problems Encountered by Women and Minority Students at Indiana University. Indiana Studies in Higher Education, Number Forty-Six.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Lucy Cheser

    The problems encountered by undergraduate women and minority students at Indiana University were identified to determine whether the difficulties were perceived as race or sex discrimination. Questionnaire responses were obtained from students in the departments of Afro-American Studies (100) and Chicano Studies (42) and in a general cross-section…

  5. Loads of nitrate, phosphorus, and total suspended solids from Indiana watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Aubrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Transport of excess nutrients and total suspended solids (TSS) such as sediment by freshwater systems has led to degradation of aquatic ecosystems around the world. Nutrient and TSS loads from Midwestern states to the Mississippi River are a major contributor to the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone, an area of very low dissolved oxygen concentration in the Gulf of Mexico. To better understand Indiana’s contribution of nutrients and TSS to the Mississippi River, annual loads of nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen, total phosphorus, and TSS were calculated for nine selected watersheds in Indiana using the load estimation model, S-LOADEST. Discrete water-quality samples collected monthly by the Indiana Department of Environmental Management’s Fixed Stations Monitoring Program from 2000–2010 and concurrent discharge data from the U. S. Geological Survey streamflow gages were used to create load models. Annual nutrient and TSS loads varied across Indiana by watershed and hydrologic condition. Understanding the loads from large river sites in Indiana is important for assessing contributions of nutrients and TSS to the Mississippi River Basin and in determining the effectiveness of best management practices in the state. Additionally, evaluation of loads from smaller upstream watersheds is important to characterize improvements at the local level and to identify priorities for reduction.

  6. The Indiana Choice Scholarship Program: Legal Challenges, Program Expansion, and Participation. Informing Policy and Improving Practice. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cierniak, Katherine; Billick, Rebecca; Ruddy, Anne-Maree

    2015-01-01

    School choice programs can take a variety of forms, from the provision of various public school options, such as charter schools, to programs which provide funds to offset the cost of students' attendance at a private school. The provision of funds is most often accomplished in two ways: through the provision of state educational funds to be used…

  7. Flood-inundation maps for White River at Petersburg, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2015-08-20

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 7.7-mile reach of the White River at Petersburg, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at White River at Petersburg, Ind. (03374000). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (PTRI3).

  8. Maple Syrup Urine Disease in a Central Indiana Hereford Herd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Robarge

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD and further cases were identified in herd mates of a small Hereford herd in Indiana based on history, clinical signs, microscopic lesions, and biochemical and genetic testing. This aminoacidopathy has been diagnosed in polled Shorthorn, polled Hereford, and Hereford cattle in Australia, Uruguay, Argentina, and Canada and is the result of a mutation of the branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex. The Indiana index calf case was confirmed by showing the classic accumulation of ketoacids in liver that results from a defect in the E1-alpha subunit (248 C/T haplotype in the mitochondrial branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex. The presence of the mutation was confirmed in the index case, the dam, and four related herd mates that represent the first confirmed cases of bovine MSUD mutation in United States cattle.

  9. Liquefaction hazard for the region of Evansville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Jennifer S.; Choi, Yoon S.; Nowack, Robert L.; Cramer, Chris H.; Boyd, Oliver S.; Bauer, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    We calculated liquefaction potential index for a grid of sites in the Evansville, Indiana area for two scenario earthquakes-a magnitude 7.7 in the New Madrid seismic zone and a M6.8 in the Wabash Valley seismic zone. For the latter event, peak ground accelerations range from 0.13 gravity to 0.81 gravity, sufficiently high to be of concern for liquefaction.

  10. Cultivating Leaders of Indiana: Global Collaborations and Local Impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Sdunzik, Jennifer; Yaryyeva, Annagul

    2017-01-01

    “Cultivating Leaders of Indiana” was developed to establish connections between the Purdue student body and the Frankfort, Indiana, community. By engaging high school students in workshops that focused on local, national, and global identities, the goal of the project was to encourage students to appreciate their individuality and to motivate them to translate their skills into a global perspective. Moreover, workshops centering on themes such as culture, citizenship, media, and education wer...

  11. 76 FR 63574 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Miscellaneous Metal and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Metal and Plastic Parts Surface Coating Rules AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION..., the applicability sections for Indiana's miscellaneous metal and plastic parts surface coating rules...

  12. Coal Fields - COAL_COLCHESTER_ELEVATION_IN: Elevation Ranges of the Colchester Coal Member (Linton Formation, Pennsylvanian) in West-Central Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:126,720, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — From 1985 to 1994, a series of reports on coal resources of selected counties in Indiana was published as part of the Special Report series of the Indiana Geological...

  13. Coal Fields - COAL_HOUCHIN_CREEK_ELEVATION_IN: Elevation Ranges of the Houchin Creek Coal Member (Petersburg Formation, Pennsylvanian) in West-Central Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:126,720, Polygon Coverage)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — From 1985 to 1994, a series of reports on coal resources of selected counties in Indiana was published as part of the Special Report series of the Indiana Geological...

  14. Coal Fields - COAL_HYMERA_THICKNESS_IN: Thickness Ranges of the Hymera Coal Member (Dugger Formation, Pennsylvanian) in West-Central Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:126,720, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — From 1988 to 1994, a series of reports on coal resources of selected counties in Indiana was published as part of the Special Report series of the Indiana Geological...

  15. Coal Fields - COAL_DANVILLE_THICKNESS_IN: Thickness Ranges of the Danville Coal Member (Dugger Formation, Pennsylvanian) in West-Central Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:126,720, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — From 1985 to 1994, a series of reports on coal resources of selected counties in Indiana was published as part of the Special Report series of the Indiana Geological...

  16. Coal Fields - COAL_DANVILLE_ELEVATION_IN: Elevation Ranges of the Danville Coal Member (Dugger Formation, Pennsylvanian) in West-Central Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:126,720, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — From 1985 to 1994, a series of reports on coal resources of selected counties in Indiana was published as part of the Special Report series of the Indiana Geological...

  17. Coal Fields - COAL_SPRINGFIELD_THICKNESS_IN: Thickness Ranges of the Springfield Coal Member (Petersburg Formation, Pennsylvanian) in West-Central Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:126,720, Polygon Coverage)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — From 1985 to 1994, a series of reports on coal resources of selected counties in Indiana was published as part of the Special Report series of the Indiana Geological...

  18. Low-flow characteristics for selected streams in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Wilson, John T.

    2015-01-01

    The management and availability of Indiana’s water resources increase in importance every year. Specifically, information on low-flow characteristics of streams is essential to State water-management agencies. These agencies need low-flow information when working with issues related to irrigation, municipal and industrial water supplies, fish and wildlife protection, and the dilution of waste. Industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) requires low-flow statistics in order to administer the NPDES permit program. Low-flow-frequency characteristics were computed for 272 continuous-record stations. The information includes low-flow-frequency analysis, flow-duration analysis, and harmonic mean for the continuous-record stations. For those stations affected by some form of regulation, low-flow frequency curves are based on the longest period of homogeneous record under current conditions. Low-flow-frequency values and harmonic mean flow (if sufficient data were available) were estimated for the 166 partial-record stations. Partial-record stations are ungaged sites where streamflow measurements were made at base flow.

  19. Implementation of the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997: The Indiana Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathleen S. Graham

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 (ASFA is expected to have a profound impact on children and families the child welfare system serves. This article provides information about Indiana’s experience in implementing ASFA, including policy decisions made by the legislative and executive branches of government and the involvement of the judiciary. A multidisciplinary task force addressed training and program needs for positive implementation. Initial outcomes for Indiana children and remaining challenges are discussed.

  20. 76 FR 44591 - Notice of Hearing: Reconsideration of Disapproval of Indiana State Plan Amendments (SPA) 11-011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Disapproval of Indiana State Plan Amendments (SPA) 11-011 AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services..., Chicago, IL 60601, to reconsider CMS' decision to disapprove Indiana SPA 11-011. DATES: Closing Date... announces an administrative hearing to reconsider CMS' decision to disapprove Indiana SPA 11-011, which...

  1. 76 FR 66775 - Emergency Temporary Closure of the I-64 Sherman-Minton Bridge Over the Ohio River Between Indiana...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ...-Minton Bridge over the Ohio River between Indiana and Kentucky for an indefinite period of time due to... Sherman-Minton Bridge over the Ohio River between Indiana and Kentucky which the Indiana Governor closed... eastbound to I-65 southbound to cross the Ohio River and rejoin I-64 eastbound in Kentucky. The KYTC is...

  2. The Hoosier Newsman and the Hooded Order: Indiana Press Reaction to the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharlott, Bradford W.

    Coverage in a sample of ten Indiana daily newspapers was analyzed, documentary evidence was gathered, and interviews with surviving newswriters were conducted to determine how the Indiana press reported the Ku Klux Klan during the 1920s. The study found that Indiana papers gave the Klan, while it was powerful, more favorable coverage than…

  3. 77 FR 24734 - Final White-tailed Deer Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement for Indiana Dunes National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... National Park Service Final White-tailed Deer Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement for Indiana.... SUMMARY: The National Park Service announces the availability of the Final White-tailed Deer Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Indiana. DATES: The Final White...

  4. 78 FR 54200 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Maintenance Plan Update...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Maintenance...). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve a maintenance plan update for the Lake County, Indiana sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) maintenance area. This plan update demonstrates that Lake County will...

  5. 78 FR 54173 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Maintenance Plan Update...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Maintenance...). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is approving a maintenance plan update for the Lake County, Indiana sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) maintenance area. This plan update demonstrates that Lake County will...

  6. 75 FR 8786 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... interchanges, grade separations, and access roads (which include new roads, road relocations, and realignments... Indiana bat and was not likely to adversely modify the bat's designated Critical Habitat. These USFWS... concluded that the Section 3 project was not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of the Indiana bat...

  7. 77 FR 51071 - Indiana Michigan Power Company, Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 2, Environmental Assessment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... COMMISSION Indiana Michigan Power Company, Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 2, Environmental Assessment and... Indiana Michigan Power Company (the licensee), for operation of Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 2 (CNP... exemption, these proposed actions do not result in changes to land use or water use, or result in changes to...

  8. 77 FR 9225 - Pioneer Transmission, LLC v. Northern Indiana Public Service Company Midwest Independent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Pioneer Transmission, LLC v. Northern Indiana Public Service Company Midwest... (Pioneer) filed a formal complaint against Northern Indiana Public Service Company (NIPSCO) and Midwest... available for review in the Commission's Public Reference Room in Washington, DC. There is an ``e...

  9. 78 FR 57374 - Northern Indiana Public Service Company v. Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc., PJM...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Northern Indiana Public Service Company v. Midcontinent Independent System... CFR 385.206 (2013), Northern Indiana Public Service Company (Complainant) filed a formal complaint... and is available for review in the Commission's Public Reference Room in Washington, DC. There is an...

  10. 77 FR 58828 - Northern Indiana Public Service Company; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Northern Indiana Public Service Company; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order September 17, 2012. Take notice that on September 12, 2012, Northern Indiana Public Service... Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58, 119Stat. 594, 315 and 1283 (2005). \\2\\ Promoting Transmission...

  11. 77 FR 19279 - Northern Indiana Public Service Company; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Northern Indiana Public Service Company; Notice of Petition for Declaratory... Act, 16 U.S.C. 824e, and 824s(a), and Order No. 679,\\1\\ Northern Indiana Public Service Company... and is available for review in the Commission's Public Reference Room in Washington, DC. There is an...

  12. 76 FR 52356 - Indiana Michigan Power Company, Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 1; Environmental Assessment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... COMMISSION Indiana Michigan Power Company, Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 1; Environmental Assessment and... to Indiana Michigan Power Company (the licensee), for operation of Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit... Statement for Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 1, or the Generic Environmental Impact Statement for...

  13. Predicting Early College Success for Indiana's High School Class of 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elisabeth; Guarino, Nicole; Lindsay, Jim

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between receiving Pell Grants and 21st Century Scholarships and early college success among the 2014 cohort of Indiana public high school graduates entering public Indiana colleges in the fall after graduation. Early college success for these students was defined using three measures plus a…

  14. 75 FR 24404 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... approved volatile organic compound (VOC) automobile refinishing rules to all persons in Indiana who sell or..., Volatile organic compounds. Dated: March 31, 2010. Walter W. Kovalick Jr., Acting Regional Administrator... revisions extend the applicability of Indiana's approved volatile organic compound (VOC) automobile...

  15. 78 FR 78726 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ..., Volatile organic compounds. Dated: December 6, 2013. Susan Hedman, Regional Administrator, Region 5. 40 CFR... Organic Compound Emission Control Measures for Industrial Solvent Cleaning for Northwest Indiana AGENCY... approving a request from the Indiana Department of Environmental Management to revise its volatile organic...

  16. A Peek Into the Classrooms of Indiana's Best-Performing Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Marilynn; Conrad, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on how successful Indiana charter schools implemented their planned goals and how their instructional strategies supported sound, research-based practices for improving student achievement. After identifying the three charter schools that consistently earned Indiana's academic designation of "exemplary progress" over a…

  17. Draft Framework for Initial Licensure of Professional Educators in the State of Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis. Professional Standards Board.

    Another step in the process of teacher education reform under the leadership of the Indiana Professional Standards Board (IPSB), this paper presents the draft framework for the initial licensure of professional educators in the state of Indiana. The preface discusses the composition of the committee, the process, selections, the "house"…

  18. 75 FR 42069 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 152, Burns Harbor, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 152, Burns Harbor, Indiana Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), the Foreign- Trade Zones Board (the Board) adopts the following Order: Whereas, the Ports of Indiana, grantee...

  19. 76 FR 21940 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... additional right-of-way areas (including right-of-way changes to accommodate transmission tower relocation.... 50 east of the city of Washington, Indiana to U.S. 231 near the Crane NSWC, Daviess and Greene... the city of Washington, Indiana to U.S. 231 near the Crane NSWC. Section 3 is a new alignment, fully...

  20. 78 FR 53781 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of...: Notice. SUMMARY: The Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and... Natural Resources DHPA through the University of Indianapolis. If no additional requestors come forward...

  1. A Demographic Analysis of the Impact of Property Tax Caps on Indiana School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Marilyn A.; Lagoni, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the Indiana legislature passed and the governor signed into law House Enrolled Act No. 1001, now referred to as Public Law 146-2008, which capped Indiana school districts' ability to raise revenues from the local property tax without local voter approval. To phase in the impact of the law, the state provided school districts with levy…

  2. 78 FR 55234 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... analysis of the revisions? IV. What action is EPA taking? V. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews I. What... organize comments by referencing a Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part or section number. 3. Explain why... are Indiana's submitted VOC rule revisions and what is EPA's analysis of the revisions? Indiana has...

  3. 75 FR 12087 - Determination of Attainment, Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... several related actions under the Clean Air Act (CAA) affecting the Indiana portion (Lake and Porter... Indiana to exempt sources of Nitrogen Oxides (NO X ) in Lake and Porter Counties from CAA Reasonably... request for Lake and Porter Counties, also published in today's Federal Register, the Chicago-Gary-Lake...

  4. 78 FR 28503 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Lake and Porter Counties...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... Porter Counties, Indiana, 1997 8-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan and 1997 Annual Fine Particulate Matter... Porter Counties State Implementation Plans (SIPs) for the 1997 8-hour ozone standard, and the 1997 annual... MOVES2010a-based budgets for the Lake and Porter County, Indiana 1997 8-hour ozone maintenance area and the...

  5. 76 FR 76302 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Redesignation of Lake and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    ...; Redesignation of Lake and Porter Counties to Attainment of the Fine Particulate Matter Standard AGENCY... affecting Lake and Porter Counties and the State of Indiana for the 1997 annual fine particulate matter (PM... State of Indiana for the redesignation of Lake and Porter Counties to attainment of the 1997 annual PM 2...

  6. 76 FR 41075 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Indiana; Michigan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... and `automatic stay' provisions that are applicable to Illinois Pollution Control Board hearings... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Indiana.... SUMMARY: EPA is taking final action to approve elements of submissions by Illinois, Indiana, Michigan...

  7. County and Parish Boundaries - COUNTY_GOVERNMENT_BOUNDARIES_IDHS_IN: Governmental Boundaries Maintained by County Agencies in Indiana (Indiana Department of Homeland Security, Polygon feature class)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — COUNTY_GOVERNMENT_BOUNDARIES_IDHS_IN is a polygon feature class that contains governmental boundaries maintained by county agencies in Indiana, provided by personnel...

  8. Geology, Bedrock - BEDROCK_TOPOGRAPHY_MM36_IN: Bedrock Topography Contours, Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:500,000, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Bedrock topography was converted from the original published map, Indiana Geological Survey Miscellaneous Map 36. The contours define the elevation/topography of the...

  9. Hydrogeology - AQUIFER_SYSTEMS_BEDROCK_IDNR_IN: Bedrock Aquifer Systems of Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, 1:500,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — AQUIFER_SYSTEMS_BEDROCK_IDNR_IN is a polygon shapefile that shows bedrock aquifer systems of the State of Indiana. The source scale of the map depicting the aquifers...

  10. Hydrogeology - AQUIFER_SYSTEMS_UNCONSOLIDATED_IDNR_IN: Unconsolidated Aquifer Systems of Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, 1:48,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — AQUIFER_SYSTEMS_UNCONSOLIDATED_IDNR_IN is a polygon shapefile that shows unconsolidated aquifer systems of the state of Indiana at a scale of 1:48,000. The following...

  11. Land Use and Land Cover - LAND_COVER_PRESETTLEMENT_IDNR_IN: Generalized Presettlement Vegetation Types of Indiana, Circa 1820 (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — LAND_COVER_PRESETTLEMENT_IDNR_IN.SHP is a polygon shapefile showing generalized presettlement vegetation types of Indiana, circa 1820. The work was based on original...

  12. Address Points - COUNTY_ADDRESS_POINTS_IDHS_IN: Address Points Maintained by County Agencies in Indiana (Indiana Department of Homeland Security, Point feature class)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — COUNTY_ADDRESS_POINTS_IDHS_IN is an ESRI Geodatabase point feature class that contains address points maintained by county agencies in Indiana, provided by personnel...

  13. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  14. Neglected leptospirosis in raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Indiana, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ching Giap; Dharmarajan, Guha; Beasley, James; Rhodes, Olin; Moore, George; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a globally important zoonotic disease occurring clinically and subclinically in humans and animals. To determine whether raccoons in Indiana carried leptospires in their kidneys. Thirty-four raccoons were live-trapped from two forest patches in central Indiana. Following euthanasia, a portion of kidney (2 cm(2)) from each raccoon was homogenized and used for leptospiral culture. Leptospiral cultures were subjected to DNA extraction and various polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures reported previously. Serum sample from each raccoon was collected and antibody titers to leptospiral serovars were determined by microscopic agglutination test (MAT). All leptospiral cultures were positive for Leptospira by various PCR procedures. The PCR with the primers targeting the conservative region of LipL32 gene was the most sensitive PCR in the detection of pathogenic leptospires. The variable LipL32 PCR amplicons were sequenced and compared to the reference strains available in GenBank. Twelve kidney cultures had Leptospira interrogans, eight had Leptospira kirschneri and two had Leptospira borgpetersenii. They were predominantly Grippotyphosa serogroup. Antileptospire antibodies were detected in 16 out of 34 raccoons (47.1%) by MAT. There were titers ≥ 1:80 in 16 raccoons (47.1%) and titers ≥ 1:400 in 3 raccoons (8.8%). The highest leptospiral serovar-specific seroreactivity among 34 raccoons was L. interrogans Bratislava (38.2%) and L. interrogans Grippotyphosa (32.4%). Raccoons in Indiana carry leptospiral organisms in kidneys and the leptospires are predominantly L. interrogans species and of the Grippotyphosa serogroup. The raccoons serve as reservoir hosts that exposure sources to wildlife, livestock, pets and humans.

  15. A Comparison of Linear and Systems Thinking Approaches for Program Evaluation Illustrated Using the Indiana Interdisciplinary GK-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyehouse, Melissa; Bennett, Deborah; Harbor, Jon; Childress, Amy; Dark, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Logic models are based on linear relationships between program resources, activities, and outcomes, and have been used widely to support both program development and evaluation. While useful in describing some programs, the linear nature of the logic model makes it difficult to capture the complex relationships within larger, multifaceted…

  16. Sunrise coal, an innovative New Indiana player continues to grow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-07-15

    Sunrise Coal LLC's Carliste (Indiana) underground mine began development in 2006. Today, the room and pillar operation has grown to a 3 million tpy four unit continuous miner mine. Its coal has low (0.06%) chlorine level and is now being purchased to blend down high chlorine in Illinois Basin coal. The article describes the mining operation and equipment traces the growth of the company, founded in the 1970s by Row and Steve Laswell, emphasizing its focus on employee safety. 5 photos.

  17. Solar energy retrofit for Clarksville Middle School, Clarksville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The solar energy retrofit heating system installed to provide heating for two gymnasiums at the Clarksville Middle School located in Clarksville, Indiana is described in detail. The system type is hot water using existing chilled water piping and chilled water coils in an air handler system. Flat plate, single-glazed selectively coated solar collectors were installed on the roof of each gymnasium. Total collector area covers 6,520 square feet. The liquid is stored in a 10,000 gallon steel tank installed below grade.

  18. A comparison of linear and systems thinking approaches for program evaluation illustrated using the Indiana Interdisciplinary GK-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyehouse, Melissa; Bennett, Deborah; Harbor, Jon; Childress, Amy; Dark, Melissa

    2009-08-01

    Logic models are based on linear relationships between program resources, activities, and outcomes, and have been used widely to support both program development and evaluation. While useful in describing some programs, the linear nature of the logic model makes it difficult to capture the complex relationships within larger, multifaceted programs. Causal loop diagrams based on a systems thinking approach can better capture a multidimensional, layered program model while providing a more complete understanding of the relationship between program elements, which enables evaluators to examine influences and dependencies between and within program components. Few studies describe how to conceptualize and apply systems models for educational program evaluation. The goal of this paper is to use our NSF-funded, Interdisciplinary GK-12 project: Bringing Authentic Problem Solving in STEM to Rural Middle Schools to illustrate a systems thinking approach to model a complex educational program to aid in evaluation. GK-12 pairs eight teachers with eight STEM doctoral fellows per program year to implement curricula in middle schools. We demonstrate how systems thinking provides added value by modeling the participant groups, instruments, outcomes, and other factors in ways that enhance the interpretation of quantitative and qualitative data. Limitations of the model include added complexity. Implications include better understanding of interactions and outcomes and analyses reflecting interacting or conflicting variables.

  19. Indiana University High Energy Physics Group, Task C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz, R.M.; Mufson, S.L.; Musser, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Indiana University High Energy Physics Group, Task C has been actively involved in the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso and the SSC experiment L during the current contract year. MACRO is a large US-Italian Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory being built under the Gran Sasso Mountain outside of Rome. Indiana University is in charge of organizing the United States software effort. We have built a state-of-the-art two-meter spectrophotometer for the MACRO liquid scintillator. We are in charge of ERP, the Event Reconstruction Processor online trigger processor for muons and stellar collapse. We are designing an air Cerenkov array to be placed on top of the Gran Sasso. Our other activity involves participation in the SSC experiment L. As long-standing members of L we have done proposal writing and have worked on important L planning and organization matters. We are now doing development work on the L Central Tracker straw drift tubes, including gas optimization, readout, and Monte Carlos. 12 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Integrating undergraduate research into the electro-optics and laser engineering technology program at Indiana University of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Andrew F.

    2014-07-01

    Bringing research into an undergraduate curriculum is a proven and powerful practice with many educational benefits to students and the professional rewards to faculty mentors. In recent years, undergraduate research has gained national prominence as an effective problem-based learning strategy. Developing and sustaining a vibrant undergraduate research program of high quality and productivity is an outstanding example of the problem-based learning. To foster student understanding of the content learned in the classroom and nurture enduring problem-solving and critical-thinking abilities, we have created a collaborative learning environment by building research into the Electro-Optics curriculum for the first- and second-year students. The teaching methodology is described and examples of the research projects are given. Such a research-integrated curriculum effectively enhances student learning and critical thinking skills, and strengthens the research culture for the first- and second-year students.

  1. Economic Impacts from Indiana's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.; Flores-Espino, F.; Hauser, R.

    2014-08-01

    The magnitude of Indiana's available wind resource indicates that the development of wind power infrastructure has the potential to support millions of dollars of economic activity in the state. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, are tools used to estimate some of the economic impacts of energy projects at the state level. JEDI calculates results in the form of jobs, earnings, and economic output in three categories: project development and onsite labor, local revenue and supply chain, and induced impacts. According to this analysis, the first 1,000 MW of wind power development in Indiana (projects built between 2008 and 2011): supported employment totaling more than 4,400 full-time-equivalent jobs in Indiana during the construction periods; supports approximately 260 ongoing Indiana jobs; supported nearly $570 million in economic activity for Indiana during the construction periods; supported and continues to support nearly $40 million in annual Indiana economic activity during the operating periods; generates more than $8 million in annual property taxes; generates nearly $4 million annually in income for Indiana landowners who lease their land for wind energy projects.

  2. The Impact of an Indiana (United States Drug Court on Criminal Recidivism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Gallagher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated a drug court located in a metropolitan area of Indiana (United States, focusing specifically on identifying variables that predicted recidivism among drug court participants and comparing criminal recidivism patterns among drug court and probation participants. Drug court participants were most likely to recidivate if they were younger, had a violation within the first 30 days of the program, had a previous criminal record, and were terminated unsuccessfully from the program. Furthermore, drug court participants were less likely to recidivate than probationers who had similar offense and demographic characteristics. Implications for drug court practice, policy advocacy, and future research are discussed.

  3. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Indiana based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Indiana census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  4. Color Infrared Aerial Photosmosaics for Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Color infrared (CIR) aerial photographs were acquired as baseline imagery data to produce vegetation spatial database coverages of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore...

  5. 77 FR 3975 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Regional Haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ...-subject unit PM Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP). SO2 Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) with 91% emission... electrostatic precipitators with an emission limit equal to 0.03 lbs/ MMBtu for boilers 2 and 3. Indiana...

  6. Coastal Change Potential (CPI) Assessment of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (indu_shore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A coastal change potential index (CPI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future lake-level change within Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in...

  7. 78 FR 28550 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Lake and Porter Counties...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... Porter Counties, Indiana, 1997 8-Hour Ozone Maintenance Plan and 1997 Annual Fine Particulate Matter... and Porter State Implementation Plans (SIPs) for the 1997 8-hour ozone standard, and the 1997 annual...

  8. The Overmyer mastodon (Mammut americanum) from Fulton County, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, N.; Branstrator, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    In June 1978 the partial skeleton of an American mastodon, Mammut americanum, was salvaged from a drainage ditch in Fulton County, north-central Indiana. The remains were recovered mostly from ca. 170-260 cm below the current land surface in marl overlain by peat and peaty marl. The stratigraphy of the site indicates that the remains were deposited in a small, open-water pond that subsequently filled. The skeleton, which is 41-48% complete, is that of a mature female, ca. 30-34 y old at death based on dental eruption and wear. Postcranial bone measurements indicate that this individual was relatively large for a female. Radiocarbon dating of wood from under the pelvis of the mastodon provided a maximum date of 12,575 ? 260 14C y BP [15,550-13,850 cal y BP] for the animal, which is up to 2575 14C y before the species is believed to have become extinct. Pollen samples from the site corroborate the interpretation that the regional climate was cooler and more humid than at present and supported a mixed spruce-deciduous parkland assemblage. The relatively small size of the molars of this and other mastodons from Indiana supports the hypothesis that late-glacial mastodons - just prior to their extinction - were smaller in size relative to earlier, full-glacial conspecifics. The relationship between molar size and body size is not clear, however, and there may be geographical factors as well as a temporal influence to size variation in these animals.

  9. Handbook of Traffic Control Practices for Low-Volume Roads in Indiana

    OpenAIRE

    HERPICC

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the Handbook on Traffic Control Practices for Low Volume Roads in Indiana is to provide a guide to supplement the existing Manuals on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD ). Both the National and the Indiana MUTCDs provide general guidelines for the design, installation, and use of traffic control devices (signs, signals, and markings) on all roads and streets, but their main concern is with higher volume highways. Neither specifically addresses the operational and guidance p...

  10. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Achievement, Problem-Solving Skills, Computer Skills, and Attitude. A Study of an Experimental Program at Marrs Elementary School, Mount Vernon, Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, David A.; Brantley, Tamara

    Two self-contained fourth grade classrooms were compared during a 1-year study conducted in a small rural community in Indiana. Pre-test measures consisted of the previous year's third grade scores on the Cognitive Abilities test and a self-developed inventory of attitude toward school and computers. The control group (n=28) received instruction…

  11. Indiana Advanced Electric Vehicle Training and Education Consortium (I-AEVtec)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruthers, James; Dietz, J.; Pelter, Libby; Chen, Jie; Roberson, Glen; McGinn, Paul; Kizhanipuram, Vinodegopal

    2013-01-31

    The Indiana Advanced Electric Vehicle Training and Education Consortium (I-AEVtec) is an educational partnership between six universities and colleges in Indiana focused on developing the education materials needed to support electric vehicle technology. The I-AEVtec has developed and delivered a number of degree and certificate programs that address various aspects of electric vehicle technology, including over 30 new or significantly modified courses to support these programs. These courses were shared on the SmartEnergyHub. The I-AEVtec program also had a significant outreach to the community with particular focus on K12 students. Finally, the evGrandPrix was established which is a university/college student electric go-kart race, where the students get hands-on experience in designing, building and racing electric vehicles. The evGrandPrix now includes student teams from across the US as well as from Europe and it is currently being held on Opening Day weekend for the Indy500 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

  12. Flood-Inundation Maps for Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Zachary W.

    2016-06-06

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.5-mile reach of Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 03339500, Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Ind. Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS site CRWI3).Flood profiles were computed for the USGS streamgage 03339500, Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Ind., reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater hydraulic modeling software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the current stage-discharge rating at the USGS streamgage 03339500, Sugar Creek at Crawfordsville, Ind., and high-water marks from the flood of April 19, 2013, which reached a stage of 15.3 feet. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 13 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 4.0 ft (the NWS “action stage”) to 16.0 ft, which is the highest stage interval of the current USGS stage-discharge rating curve and 2 ft higher than the NWS “major flood stage.” The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar]) data having a 0.49-ft root mean squared error and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each stage.The availability

  13. Indiana Wesleyan University SPS Physics Outreach to Rural Middle School and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, Joshua; Rose, Heath; Burchell, Robert; Ramos, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    The Society of Physics Students chapter at Indiana Wesleyan University is unusual in that it has no physics major, only physics minors. Yet while just over a year old, IWU-SPS has been active in performing physics outreach to middle school and high school students, and the rural community of Grant County. Our year-old SPS chapter consists of majors from Chemistry, Nursing, Biology, Exercise Science, Computer Science, Psychology, Pastoral Studies, and Science Education, who share a common interest in physics and service to the community. IWU currently has a physics minor and is currently working to build a physics major program. Despite the intrinsic challenges, our multi-disciplinary group has been successful at using physics demonstration equipment and hands-on activities and their universal appeal to raise the interest in physics in Grant County. We report our experience, challenges, and successes with physics outreach. We describe in detail our two-pronged approach: raising the level of physics appreciation among the IWU student community and among pre-college students in a rural community of Indiana. Acknowledgements: We acknowledge the support of the Society of Physics Students through a Marsh White Outreach Award and a Blake Lilly Prize.

  14. 36Cl in shallow, perched aquifers from central Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, S.; Elmore, D.; Fritz, S. J.

    1994-06-01

    36Cl/Cl ratios and chloride concentrations were measured in several shallow, perched aquifers situated within glacial till in west-central Indiana (USA). Most of these aquifers show 36Cl/Cl ratios which have to be attributed to admixed 36Cl from nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s and 1960s. Two wells from Purdue's Horticultural Farm tap perched aquifers uninfluenced by anthropogenic sources of chloride, and their 36Cl/Cl ratios are comparable with ratios measured in modern, local precipitation. As such, the chloride contents of these wells (1 to 3 ppm) reflect evaporative concentration of the precipitation's chloride contents (averaging 0.17 ppm) in the vadose zone. Since one of these two wells (HA-2a) does not contain any detectable tritium, we conclude that recent pre-bomb 36Cl/Cl ratios and 36Cl deposition in precipitation are quite similar to those in modern precipitation. We attribute the slight 36Cl excess of about 20% in both of these wells largely to 36Cl deposition associated with dry fall-out. As much as 2 × 10 4 at. 36Cl/cm 2 might reach the surface via dry fall-out annually.

  15. Psychosocial correlates of smokeless tobacco use among Indiana adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Colwell, Brian; Forté, Chanese A; Pulczinski, Jairus C; McKyer, E Lisako J

    2015-04-01

    Adolescent tobacco use is influenced by intrapersonal (e.g., impulse control) and external factors, such as behaviors of friends and peers. The relationships of these factors to smokeless tobacco (ST) use are not yet fully understood. This is especially true as it pertains to the simultaneous examination of psychological and normative perceptions. Using constructs of the Biopsychosocial Model, this study investigates factors associated with lifetime ST use among middle and high school students. Data were analyzed from 938 Indiana middle and high school students. Binary sequential logistic regression was performed to examine the relationship of personal characteristics and psychosocial measures to adolescent lifetime ST use. Approximately 9 % reported having ever used ST, among which 78.6 % were male. Females and younger students were less likely to have used ST in their lifetime, whereas participants with a sibling smoker and those who compared their life to the lives of others were more likely to report lifetime ST usage. In the presence of psychological and normative variables, sex, age, and comparing one's life to others remained significant. Additionally, participants who perceived higher friend approval of substance use were significantly more likely to report lifetime ST use. Understanding the normative perceptions of adolescents may lend insight into the drivers of ST use adolescent subgroups and, which may enable community and school officials to tailor interventions to prevent ST initiation and promote cessation.

  16. We the People: Indiana and the United States Constitution. Lectures in Observance of the Bicentennial of the Constitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Partick J.; And Others

    These lectures, presented in observance of the U.S. Constitution bicentennial celebration, consider selected constitutionally significant law cases that occurred in Indiana. These cases are representative of U.S. constitutional development and of the relationship of Indiana to the U.S. Constitution. Patrick Furlong, in "The South Bend…

  17. Superintendent Perceptions of the Success and Failure of School Construction Referendums from 2008-2010 in the State of Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Walter Albert

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the perceptions of superintendents who have conducted both successful and unsuccessful school construction referendums in the state of Indiana from 2008-2010. This research will serve as a guide for superintendents who will undergo a school construction referendum, especially in Indiana. This study will…

  18. USA valimiste võitja võib selguda varakult - kui Obama võtab Indiana / Kaivo Kopli

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kopli, Kaivo

    2008-01-01

    USA presidendivalimistel suletakse valimisjaoskonnad esimesena Indianas. Demokraatide kampaania konsultandi Doug Schoeni hinnangul viitab isegi tasavägine tulemus Indianas ilmselt Barack Obama suurele üleriigilisele võidule. Reutersi vaatlejate hinnanguid. Vt. samas: Kas populaarsusküsitlused ikka ennustavad valimistulemuse õigesti? Kaart, tabelid, graafikud: Barack Obama läheb võitma

  19. 77 FR 3325 - Emergency Temporary Closure of the I-64 Sherman-Minton Bridge Over the Ohio River Between Indiana...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... No. FHWA-2011-0104] Emergency Temporary Closure of the I-64 Sherman-Minton Bridge Over the Ohio River... Transportation to continue temporary closure of the I-64 Sherman-Minton Bridge over the Ohio River between...-64 Sherman-Minton Bridge over the Ohio River between Indiana and Kentucky which the Indiana Governor...

  20. Hydrologic data and groundwater flow simulations in the vicinity of Long Lake, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, near Gary, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, David C.; Bayless, E. Randall

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected data and simulated groundwater flow to increase understanding of the hydrology and the effects of drainage alterations to the water table in the vicinity of Long Lake, near Gary, Indiana. East Long Lake and West Long Lake (collectively known as Long Lake) make up one of the largest interdunal lakes within the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The National Park Service is tasked with preservation and restoration of wetlands in the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore along the southern shoreline of Lake Michigan. Urban development and engineering have modified drainage and caused changes in the distribution of open water, streams and ditches, and groundwater abundance and flow paths. A better understanding of the effects these modifications have on the hydrologic system in the area will help the National Park Service, the Gary Sanitary District (GSD), and local stakeholders manage and protect the resources within the study area.This study used hydrologic data and steady-state groundwater simulations to estimate directions of groundwater flow and the effects of various engineering controls and climatic conditions on the hydrology near Long Lake. Periods of relatively high and low groundwater levels were examined and simulated by using MODFLOW and companion software. Simulated hydrologic modifications examined the effects of (1) removing the beaver dams in US-12 ditch, (2) discontinuing seepage of water from the filtration pond east of East Long Lake, (3) discontinuing discharge from US-12 ditch to the GSD sewer system, (4) decreasing discharge from US-12 ditch to the GSD sewer system, (5) connecting East Long Lake and West Long Lake, (6) deepening County Line Road ditch, and (7) raising and lowering the water level of Lake Michigan.Results from collected hydrologic data indicate that East Long Lake functioned as an area of groundwater recharge during October 2002 and a “flow-through” lake during March 2011, with the

  1. Development and validation of the Chinese Version of Indiana Job Satisfaction Scale (CV-IJSS) for people with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Hector W H; Wong, Alvin

    2005-06-01

    Job satisfaction has been increasingly regarded as an important outcome of vocational rehabilitation programs among people with mental illness. Chinese measures of job satisfaction for individuals with mental illness are however extremely scarce. The aim of this study was to translate the 32-item Indiana Job Satisfaction Scale to Chinese. By means of the expert panel method, the culturally relevant 28-item Chinese Version of Indiana Job Satisfaction Scale (CV-IJSS) was then finalized. A validation study among a group of 125 individuals with mental illness showed that the scale had acceptable psychometric properties. Coefficient alpha of the total score was 0.81 with subscales ranging from 0.63 to 0.87. Test re-test reliability as measured by ICC was 0.77 for the total score and ranged from 0.54 to 0.72 for the subscales. Factorial analysis yielded a four factor solution (general satisfaction, job ambiguity and stress, advancement and security, and job recognition) accounting for 44% of the total variance. The factor solution had similarities as well as differences when compared with the Indiana Job Satisfaction Scale. The differences are discussed in the light of cultural differences. Relationship between scores of CV-IJSS and work performance, quality of life and self-esteem was positive in general which may act as evidence to its concurrent validity. The Chinese Version of Indiana Job Satisfaction Scale is ready for use by rehabilitation professionals to assess vocational rehabilitation outcome for individuals with mental illness in Hong Kong and other Chinese societies. Directions for further studies are suggested.

  2. Laboratory colonization of Mansonia uniformis, Ma. indiana and Ma. bonneae in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, G L; Cheong, W H; Loong, K P; Eng, K L; Samarawickrema, W A

    1985-06-01

    Methods are described for the laboratory colonization of Mansonia uniformis, Ma. indiana and Ma. bonneae in Malaysia. Gravid females oviposited in 500 ml beakers with a layer of water covered with small leaves of Salvinia. Newly hatched larvae were set up in a basal medium of guinea pig dung and water or liver powder, yeast powder and water. Larvae attached to aquatic plants or 'Keaykolour' ruffia snow white paper. The cultures with paper gave better yields than those with plants. Production of Ma. uniformis was higher than the other two species. Twelve generations of Ma. uniformis and 11 generations of Ma. indiana and Ma. bonneae were monitored in the laboratory.

  3. Assessment of Student Learning in SocialWork Education: The Indiana Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry R. Cournoyer

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the author discusses assessment of student learning in light of evolving accreditation standards. The author describes the Indiana Model—a comprehensive approach that includes: (a a Course-Learning Objectives (CLO classification system to organize and analyze the total array of course learning objectives addressed in a curriculum, (b a direct Assessment of Student Learning system to demonstrate student learning outcomes, and (c an indirect Assessment of Student Learning system to provide for the perspectives of consumers and other stakeholders. When integrated, the three systems may be used for curriculum analysis and development, assessment of student learning, and program evaluation—particularly in terms of student learning outcomes. The proposed integrated approach to student learning assessment addresses both university and professional accreditation standards.

  4. Environmental Setting of the Sugar Creek and Leary Weber Ditch Basins, Indiana, 2002-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Timothy R.

    2006-01-01

    The Leary Weber Ditch Basin is nested within the Sugar Creek Basin in central Indiana. These basins make up one of the five study sites in the Nation selected for the Agricultural Chemicals: Sources, Transport, and Fate topical study, a part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Quality Assessment Program. In this topical study, identifying the natural factors and human influences affecting water quality in the Leary Weber Ditch and Sugar Creek Basins are the focus of the assessment. A detailed comparison between the environmental settings of these basins is presented. Specifics of the topical study design as implemented in the Leary Weber Ditch and Sugar Creek Basins are described.

  5. Hydrologic data and groundwater-flow simulations in the Brown Ditch Watershed, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, near Beverly Shores and Town of Pines, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, David C.

    2016-03-15

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected data and simulated groundwater flow to increase understanding of the hydrology and the effects of drainage alterations on the water table in the vicinity of Great Marsh, near Beverly Shores and Town of Pines, Indiana. Prior land-management practices have modified drainage and caused changes in the distribution of open water, streams and ditches, and groundwater abundance and flow paths.

  6. Surficial Geologic Map of the Evansville, Indiana, and Henderson, Kentucky, Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David W.; Lundstrom, Scott C.; Counts, Ronald C.; Martin, Steven L.; Andrews, William M.; Newell, Wayne L.; Murphy, Michael L.; Thompson, Mark F.; Taylor, Emily M.; Kvale, Erik P.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2009-01-01

    deposits in the quadrangle are probably no older than about 55,000 years. Lithologic logs, shear-wave velocities, and other cone penetrometer data are used to interpret depositional environments and geologic history of the surficial deposits. This map, which includes an area of slightly more than seven 7.5-minute quadrangles, serves several purposes. It is a tool for assessing seismic and flood hazards of a major urban area; aids urban planning; conveys geologic history; and locates aggregate resources. The map was produced concurrently with research by seismologists to determine places where the surficial deposits may tend to liquefy and (or) to amplify ground motions during strong earthquakes. Such hazardous responses to shaking are related to the characteristics of the geologic materials and topographic position, which the geologic map depicts. The geologic map is an element in the cooperative seismic hazard assessment program among the States of Indiana, Kentucky, and Illinois and the U.S. Geological Survey, funded by the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program and National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program of the U.S. Geological Survey.

  7. Different histories but similar genetic diversity and structure for black walnut in Indiana and Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin R. Victory; Jeffrey C. Glaubitz; Jennifer A. Fike; Olin E. Rhodes; Keith E. Woeste

    2008-01-01

    Missouri and Indiana have markedly different histories of glaciation and recolonization by forest trees. These states also differ in land use patterns and degree of anthropogenic landscape change such as forest fragmentation. To determine the overall effects of these and other demographic differences on the levels of genetic diversity and structure in black walnut (...

  8. REPORT ON THE LEXICOGRAPHY CONFERENCE, INDIANA UNIVERSITY, NOVEMBER 11-12, 1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HOUSEHOLDER, FRED S.; SAPORTA, SOL

    DISCUSSION TOPICS AND CONFEREE OPINIONS OF A LEXICOGRAPHY CONFERENCE HELD AT INDIANA UNIVERSITY UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION IN 1960 ARE BRIEFLY SUMMARIZED IN THIS DOCUMENT. THE REPORT IS ONE OF A SERIES OF 13 PAPERS RESULTING FROM THE CONFERENCE. (JH)

  9. MOOCs for Research: The Case of the Indiana University Plagiarism Tutorials and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Theodore; Dagli, Cesur

    2016-01-01

    We illustrate a very recent research study that demonstrates the value of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as vehicles for research. We describe the development of the Indiana University Plagiarism Tutorials and Tests (IPTAT). Our new design has been guided by "First Principles of Instruction": authentic problems, activation,…

  10. Ballads of the Romanian Immigrants. Romanian Americans in Lake County, Indiana: An Ethnic Heritage Curriculum Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuca, Mary, Comp.

    Twelve Romanian immigrant ballads with musical scores, Romanian lyrics, and English translations are presented. Following a description of early 20th Century Romanian immigrants in Lake County, Indiana, a pronunciation guide, descriptions of the ballads, and suggestions for classroom use are provided. English titles include "Lament from…

  11. 77 FR 68197 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... project was not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of the Indiana bat and was not likely to adversely modify the bat's designated Critical Habitat. These USFWS decisions were described in the.... 231 (near Crane Naval Surface Warfare Center) to near the intersection of State Road 37 and Victor...

  12. 75 FR 49547 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Indiana bat and was not likely to adversely modify the bat's designated Critical Habitat. These USFWS... . The Section 2 ROD also approved the locations of the interchanges, grade separations, and access roads (which include new roads, road relocations, and realignments). The FHWA had previously issued a Tier 1...

  13. 76 FR 32110 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ... the 1997 PM 2.5 NAAQS based upon air quality monitoring data from those monitors for calendar years... Indiana) fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) nonattainment area (hereafter referred to as ``the Cincinnati... annual average PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). This proposed determination of...

  14. Competencies in Entomology Needed by Agribusiness Teachers and Extension Agents in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, William H.; Walker, Leon

    1975-01-01

    The analysis of the data from an 84.2 percent questionnaire response by Indiana extension agents and agribusiness teachers provides 12 conclusions regarding their competency needs and five recommendations regarding inservice teacher training and courses needed in the areas of entomology. (BP)

  15. 76 FR 8808 - Supplemental Final Environmental Impact Statement: Clark County, Indiana, and Jefferson County, KY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... elements and using innovative financing sources, including collecting tolls. A Final Environmental Impact...; engineering design and right-of-way acquisition activities began; the Louisville and Southern Indiana Bridges... addition, a formal comment period for the public and agencies will be provided following the publication of...

  16. Summer Home Range Size of Female Indiana Bats (Myotis Sodalis) in Missouri, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn M. Womack; Sybill K. Amelon; Frank R. Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of space use by wildlife that are a conservation concern is critical to ensure that management and conservation provides adequate resources to ensure survival and reproductive success. We radio tracked 13 pregnant and 12 lactating Myotis sodalis (Indiana bat) during the maternity season in northern Missouri. Mean (± SE) home range...

  17. MANAGING THE CORN ROOTWORM VARIANT: EMPIRICAL RESULTS FROM AN INDIANA FARMER SURVEY

    OpenAIRE

    Harbor, Anetra L.; Martin, Marshall A.

    2002-01-01

    The emergence of a corn rootworm "variant" has reduced the effectiveness of a corn-soybean rotation in some areas of Indiana. This research identifies potential control alternatives. Empirical results suggest that younger, more educated managers of larger farms would be the most likely to adopt transgenic corn for rootworm control.

  18. The Coping Strategies of Nontraditional Female Students in Southwest Michigan and Northern Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Desiree

    2017-01-01

    Problem: The purpose of this research study was to examine the coping strategies of nontraditional female students in a private university in Southwest Michigan, and a public university in Northern Indiana. According to Carney-Compton & Tan (2002), nontraditional female students characterize the leading emergent set of students beginning…

  19. 76 FR 59600 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Redesignation of Lake and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... of catalytic converters. Lowering the sulfur content of gasoline improves the emission reduction resulting from the use of catalytic converters and results in significantly lowered NO X emissions. In... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 52 and 81 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana...

  20. The Use of Construction Management by Indiana School Districts: Frequency and Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Theodore J.; Cooperman, John T.

    2000-01-01

    Examines school construction management (CM), the extent of its use in Indiana school corporations and the fees that are charged for these services. Results suggest a lack of consistency in deciding whether to use CM and the amount of the fee to be paid for the service. (GR)

  1. Las remesas indianas en Gran Canaria en el primer cuarto del siglo XVII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa TORRES SANTANA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El estudio de las remesas indianas, del dinero que bien en efectivo o en joyas afluía a la isla de Gran Canaria procedente del continente americano, ha sido un problema que ha preocupado en gran medida a los historiadores canarios. Sin embargo, su análisis siempre ha resultado problemático, por varias razones.

  2. 75 FR 8246 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Plan (SIP) several volatile organic compound (VOC) control rules. The purpose of these rules is to... requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Dated: January 14, 2010. Walter W. Kovalick Jr., Acting Regional... several volatile organic compound rules for approval into the Indiana State Implementation Plan for the...

  3. Four Star School Awards: Key Factors that Predict High Performance among Indiana School Corporations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veracco, Lawrence H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the Four Star status of Indiana school corporations in order to determine if certain variables currently existing among school corporations could be predictive of Four Star status. Differences in Four Star status were examined with respect to school corporation size, school corporation average teacher…

  4. Habitat use by bats in two Indiana forests prior to silvicultural treatments for oak regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy J. Sheets; Joseph E. Duchamp; Megan K. Caylor; Laura D' Acunto; John O. Whitaker; Virgil Jr. Brack; Dale W. Sparks

    2013-01-01

    As part of a study examining the effects of silvicultural treatments for oak regeneration on habitat use by bats, we surveyed forest stands prior to the implementation of treatments in two state forests in Indiana. Interior forest sites corresponding to areas designated for silvicultural treatments were surveyed for 2 nights each during the summers of 2007 and 2008....

  5. WWC Quick Review of the Report: "Charter School Performance in Indiana"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The study featured in this What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) Quick Review examined the effect of charter school attendance on annual student achievement growth in math and reading. The study analyzed data from a large sample of students in grades 4 through 9 in Indiana from 2004 to 2008. The study found that charter school students' annual math score…

  6. 75 FR 25204 - Foreign-Trade Zone 125 - South Bend, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 125 - South Bend, Indiana Application for Reorganization under Alternative Site Framework An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board (the Board) by the St. Joseph County Airport Authority, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 125...

  7. Death in Indiana: "The Massacre at Fall Creek" by Jessamyn West.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Kathleen

    1985-01-01

    Interpreted is the novel, "The Massacre at Fall Creek," that dramatizes an event that occurred in Indiana in 1824 in which White men killed unarmed Seneca Indians. The Whites were brought to trial, convicted, and hanged. The novel demonstrates the moral ambiguity that often characterizes responses toward crime and punishment. (RM)

  8. Examining Economies of Scale in School Consolidation: Assessment of Indiana School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Timothy; DeBoer, Larry; Hirth, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the potential for reducing costs through school district consolidation by employing economies of scale. Utilizing Indiana school district data primarily from 2004 through 2006, we find evidence for scale economies with optimal enrollment being 1,942 students, with a per pupil estimated cost at $9,414. The 95% confidence…

  9. Urban and community forests of the North Central East region: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Eric J. Greenfield

    2010-01-01

    This report details how land cover and urbanization vary within the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin by community (incorporated and census designated places), county subdivision, and county. Specifically this report provides critical urban and community forestry information for each state including human population characteristics and trends,...

  10. Indiana timber industry: an assessment of timber product output and use, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian F. Walters; Jeff Settle; Ronald J. Piva

    2012-01-01

    Presents recent Indiana forest industry trends; production and receipts of industrial roundwood; and production of saw logs, veneer logs, pulpwood, and other products in 2008. Logging residue generated from timber harvest operations is reported, as well as wood and bark residue generated at primary wood-using mills and disposition of mill residues.

  11. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana from chickens in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance of Salmonella Indiana isolated from chickens in China. A total of 130 Salmonella isolates were obtained from chicken farms and slaughterhouses in the Shandong Province of China. All isolate serotypes were tested according to the Kauf...

  12. Mexican American Women's Activism at Indiana University in the 1990s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Ebelia

    2013-01-01

    This article offers a historical analysis of documents and narratives from Mexican American women that reflect the tumultuous 1990s at Indiana University. Their recollections reveal how they became activists, the racist incidents that compelled them into activism, and the racial tensions and backlash towards identity politics felt by students of…

  13. 77 FR 41914 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-17

    ... State Implementation Plan (SIP). The submission revises the Indiana Administrative Code (IAC) definition... your identity or contact information unless you provide it in the body of your comment. If you send an... 326 IAC 1-1-3, definition of ``References to Code of Federal Regulations.'' IDEM updated the reference...

  14. 77 FR 12524 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Lead Ambient Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Lead Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule...) under the Clean Air Act (CAA). This submittal incorporates the National Ambient Air Quality Standards...

  15. 77 FR 12482 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Lead Ambient Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Lead Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule... Clean Air Act (CAA). This submittal incorporates the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for...

  16. The Gary, Indiana Public School Curriculum, 1940-1970: A Local History. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, William Lynn; Westbury, Ian

    Curriculum change and the dynamics of this change were explored by means of a case study of secondary social studies, science, and vocational education curriculums in Gary, Indiana, between 1940 and 1970. The time period is characterized by both unprecedented effort to produce change and slow change in schools. Talcott Parson's hierarchy of…

  17. 75 FR 2090 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... deleted references to control technology requirements. ] III. What Is EPA's Analysis of Indiana's... methods of spray gun cleaning, the type of application equipment that can be used (which reduces the... Definitions--The definitions of ``control device,'' ``control device efficiency'' and ``control system'' have...

  18. Dominant height-based height-diameter equations for trees in southern Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    John A., Jr. Kershaw; Robert C. Morrissey; Douglass F. Jacobs; John R. Seifert; James B. McCarter

    2008-01-01

    Height-diameter equations are developed based on dominant tree data collected in 1986 in 8- to 17-year-old clearcuts and the phase 2 Forest Inventory and Analysis plots on the Hoosier National Forest in south central Indiana. Two equation forms are explored: the basic, three-parameter Chapman-Richards function, and a modification of the three-parameter equation...

  19. 77 FR 33985 - Proposed Establishment of the Indiana Uplands Viticultural Area and Modification of the Ohio...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... area boundary; A copy of the appropriate United States Geological Survey (USGS) map(s) showing the... Huber, in an April 2006 interview with the petitioner). During that same era, five miles south of the... Physiographic Divisions,'' Henry H. Gray, Indiana Geological Survey, 2001). The western portion of the boundary...

  20. Becoming a Community of Middle Grades Readers: A Blueprint for Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle Grades Reading Network, University of Evansville, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This "Blueprint" describes the actions everyone needs to take if they are to nourish Indiana's young adolescents so that they will be able to develop their reading skills to their full potential. This document spells out the ways that everyone can make books available, provide middle grades students with the time for reading, provide…

  1. 76 FR 20846 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... concrete plant, grain elevators, foundries, mineral aggregate operations; modification by commissioner. 6.8... be filed in the United States Court of Appeals for the appropriate circuit by June 13, 2011. Filing a... 4/30/2008, 73 FR 23356. 6.8-2-17 Mittal Steel--Indiana 2/22/2008 4/30/2008, 73 FR Harbor East Inc...

  2. Instrumentation, methods of flood-data collection and transmission, and evaluation of streamflow-gaging network in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatfelter, D.R.; Butch, G.K.

    1994-01-01

    Floods are the number one natural disaster in the Nation, based on loss of life and property. In Indiana, several major floods have occurred during this century. Flooding can occur at any time in any geographic area in Indiana. The degree of flooding can vary from a minor inconvenience to major flooding that results in loss of life and extensive damage. In this study, the existing streamflow-gaging networks in Indiana are evaluated on the basis of meeting flood-data needs of various governmental agencies.

  3. Large-scale climate variation modifies the winter grouping behavior of endangered Indiana bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thogmartin, Wayne E.; McKann, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    Power laws describe the functional relationship between 2 quantities, such as the frequency of a group as the multiplicative power of group size. We examined whether the annual size of well-surveyed wintering populations of endangered Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis) followed a power law, and then leveraged this relationship to predict whether the aggregation of Indiana bats in winter was influenced by global climate processes. We determined that Indiana bat wintering populations were distributed according to a power law (mean scaling coefficient α = −0.44 [95% confidence interval {95% CI} = −0.61, −0.28). The antilog of these annual scaling coefficients ranged between 0.67 and 0.81, coincident with the three-fourths power found in many other biological phenomena. We associated temporal patterns in the annual (1983–2011) scaling coefficient with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index in August (βNAOAugust = −0.017 [90% CI = −0.032, −0.002]), when Indiana bats are deciding when and where to hibernate. After accounting for the strong effect of philopatry to habitual wintering locations, Indiana bats aggregated in larger wintering populations during periods of severe winter and in smaller populations in milder winters. The association with August values of the NAO indicates that bats anticipate future winter weather conditions when deciding where to roost, a heretofore unrecognized role for prehibernation swarming behavior. Future research is needed to understand whether the three-fourths–scaling patterns we observed are related to scaling in metabolism.

  4. Characterization of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovars Indiana and Enteritidis from Chickens in Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Liu, Yuqi; Zhou, Xuping; Beier, Ross C.; Wu, Guojuan; Hou, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    A total of 310 Salmonella isolates were isolated from 6 broiler farms in Eastern China, serotyped according to the Kauffmann-White classification. All isolates were examined for susceptibility to 17 commonly used antimicrobial agents, representative isolates were examined for resistance genes and class I integrons using PCR technology. Clonality was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). There were two serotypes detected in the 310 Salmonella strains, which included 133 Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolates and 177 Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis isolates. Antimicrobial sensitivity results showed that the isolates were generally resistant to sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, tetracycline, doxycycline and trimethoprim, and 95% of the isolates sensitive to amikacin and polymyxin. Among all Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolates, 108 (81.2%) possessed the blaTEM, floR, tetA, strA and aac (6')-Ib-cr resistance genes. The detected carriage rate of class 1 integrons was 66.5% (206/310), with 6 strains carrying gene integron cassette dfr17-aadA5. The increasing frequency of multidrug resistance rate in Salmonella was associated with increasing prevalence of int1 genes (rs = 0.938, P = 0.00039). The int1, blaTEM, floR, tetA, strA and aac (6')-Ib-cr positive Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolates showed five major patterns as determined by PFGE. Most isolates exhibited the common PFGE patterns found from the chicken farms, suggesting that many multidrug-resistant isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana prevailed in these sources. Some isolates with similar antimicrobial resistance patterns represented a variety of Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana genotypes, and were derived from a different clone. PMID:24788434

  5. Land Use and Land Cover - CEMETERY_AREAS_IDNR_IN: Cemetery Site Areas in Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology, 1:5,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — IDNR documentation states - “This dataset contains locations of cemetery sites in Indiana, regardless of age, number of graves, or size of the cemetery. Is it not...

  6. Land Use and Land Cover - CEMETERY_SITES_IDNR_IN: Cemetery Site Locations in Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology, 1:5,000, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — IDNR documentation states - “This dataset contains locations of cemetery sites in Indiana, regardless of age, number of graves, or size of the cemetery. Is it not...

  7. Historic Sites and National Register of Historic Places - BRIDGES_HISTORIC_IDNR_IN: Historic Bridge Locations in Indiana (Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology, 1:5,000, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — IDNR documentation states - “This dataset contains point locations of historic bridges in Indiana. It includes buildings, districts, sites, structures and objects...

  8. Hospitals - HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN: Hospitals and Clinics in Indiana, Derived from HAZUS (Federal Emergency Management Agency, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN is a point shapefile that shows locations of hospitals and clinics in Indiana. HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN was derived from the shapefile named "HOSPITAL."...

  9. 75 FR 4840 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Indiana Bat; 30-Day Scoping Period for a National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ...) 416-8993, extension 16. Individuals who are hearing-impaired or speech-impaired may call the Federal... groups of 100 or more. Indiana bats forage for insects in and along the edges of forested areas and...

  10. Roost tree selection and use by the Indiana Bat on Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge: First year progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) was first reported in Iowa in 1959 (Bowles, 1975). This first record was of three hibernating individuals, in a Dubuque County cave....

  11. New distribution record for the Indiana cave crayfish, Orconectes inermis inermis cope, from the Patoka River drainage

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Two specimens of the Indiana cave crayfish, Orconectes (Orconectes) inermis inermis Cope, were collected from a cave referred to as Audrey’s Cave on May 21, 2001...

  12. Cambarus (Tubericambarus) polychromatus (Decapoda: Cambaridae) a new species of crayfish from Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois and Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A new species of crayfish Cambarus (Tubericambarus) polychromatus is described from western Ohio, Indiana, southern and east-central Illinois, western Kentucky, and...

  13. Description and effects of 1988 drought on ground-water levels, streamflow, and reservoir levels in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, K.K.

    1992-01-01

    Documentation of the 1988 drought in Indiana was undertaken to aid water-management agencies and planners concerned with periods of below-normal precipitation and their effect on commercial, agricultural, and residential water use. Precipitation, temperature, Palmer Drought Severity Indices, and ground- and surface-water levels from water years 1988 and 1989 were compared to the historical record to evaluate severity, extent, and duration of the 1988 drought in Indiana.

  14. A Few More Laps to Go: Tobacco Industry Political Influence, Public Health Advocacy and Tobacco Control Policy Making in Indiana

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, Daniel J. BA; Barnes, Richard L. JD; Glantz, Stanton A. PhD

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco policy has been an issue in Indiana since 1893, when the legislature passed a law prohibiting selling tobacco to people under 16. Beginning as early as 1969, Indiana General Assembly members and tobacco control advocates launched uncoordinated efforts to pass a law restricting smoking in government buildings. The tobacco industry responded with a well-financed and well-connected network of lobbyists, campaign contributions and third-party allies which's lobbyists that defeated every s...

  15. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.4-mile reach of the East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana, from where the Flatrock and Driftwood Rivers combine to make up East Fork White River to just upstream of the confluence of Clifty Creek with the East Fork White River, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03364000, East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana. Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv/?site_no=03364000&agency_cd=USGS&). The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs for the East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana at their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system Website (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/), that may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at USGS streamgage 03364000, East Fork White River at Columbus, Indiana. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 15 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data), having a 0.37-ft vertical accuracy and a 1.02 ft

  16. Application of EREP imagery to fracture-related mine safety hazards in coal mining and mining-environmental problems in Indiana. [Indiana and Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wier, C. E. (Principal Investigator); Powell, R. L.; Amato, R. V.; Russell, O. R.; Martin, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. This investigation evaluated the applicability of a variety of sensor types, formats, and resolution capabilities to the study of both fuel and nonfuel mined lands. The image reinforcement provided by stereo viewing of the EREP images proved useful for identifying lineaments and for mined lands mapping. Skylab S190B color and color infrared transparencies were the most useful EREP imagery. New information on lineament and fracture patterns in the bedrock of Indiana and Illinois extracted from analysis of the Skylab imagery has contributed to furthering the geological understanding of this portion of the Illinois basin.

  17. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Sixteen. Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Indiana governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  18. Who knew? First Myotis sodalis (Indiana Bat) maternity colony in the coastal plain of Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Germain, Michael J.; Kniowski, Andrew B.; Silvis, Alexander; Ford, W. Mark

    2017-01-01

    We report the first confirmed Myotis sodalis (Indiana Bat) maternity colony in Virginia, discovered at Fort A.P. Hill Military Reservation in Caroline County along the Piedmont-Coastal Plain Fall Line. Acoustic surveys conducted in 2014 indicated likely presence of Indiana Bats on the installation. Subsequent focal mist-netting during May–June 2015 resulted in capture of 4 lactating females that we subsequently radio tracked to a maternity colony site containing at least 20 individuals. The core roosting-area was comprised of Pinus taeda (Loblolly Pine) snags with abundant exfoliating bark and high solar exposure. This forest patch was adjacent to a large emergentshrub wetland and within a larger matrix of mature, mid-Atlantic hardwood forests. The site where we found the colony location is 140 km east of the nearest known hibernaculum and is outside of the previously documented extent of this species' occurrence.

  19. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Disposal and Reuse of Portions of Grissom Air Force Base, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    and the surrounding portions of central Indiana consists of level plains or gently rolling hills, with streams and small closed depressions ...in enclosed areas, such as basements. The cancer risk caused by exposure, through the inhalation of radon, is currently a topic of concern. 3-70...enter quality should he Implemented. Additional mitigative eggecimnetely 20 Fredetral endeavored, thraetened and candidate mamas should alao he

  20. Hardwood timber sales on state forests in Indiana: characteristics influencing costs and prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Michael Vasievich; W. L., Jr. Mills; Heidi R. Cherry

    1997-01-01

    Timber sales conducted on State-owned forests in INdiana from 1982 to 1994 were analyzed to determine changes in costs and prices and the effect of sale conditions on costs and prices. The data set included 445 sales that ranged in size from less than 1 acre to more than 500 acres. Sales were predominantly partial cuts in mature hardwood timber. Marked timber volume...

  1. The Impact of Management on the Movement and Home Range Size of Indiana's Eastern Hellbender Salamanders

    OpenAIRE

    McCallen, Emily B.; Kraus, Bart T.; Burgmeier, Nick G.; Williams, Rod N.

    2016-01-01

    Eastern hellbenders (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis) are a large, fully aquatic salamander species distributed throughout watersheds in the eastern United States. In Indiana, hellbenders were once found in tributaries of the Ohio River and the Wabash River but are now restricted to a single river in the southern portion of the state. Monitoring within the Blue River over twenty years has revealed a steady decrease in the total abundance of hellbenders and a shift towards older ind...

  2. Sediment Budget on the Indiana Shore at Burns Harbor, Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-15

    1960s, and the USACE was well aware of potential littoral disruptions. Burns Waterway Harbor is located within a longshore littoral drift system with...formation of the Indiana Dunes 146 20/03/2015 16 pp 3 National Lakeshore (Engel 1983, Franklin and Schaeffer 1983, Higgs 1995). The Harbor is a...shores of Lake Michigan,” University of Illinois Press, Urbana, IL, 278 p. Higgs , S. (1995). “Eternal Vigilance: Nine Tales of Environmental

  3. Keynote Speech: 90th Anniversary Symposium Indiana University School of Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Cuomo

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available In celebration of 90 years of social work education at Indiana University, the School of Social Work sponsored an Anniversary Symposium on April 12, 2002. Andrew Cuomo, former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and current candidate for New York State Governor, delivered the keynote address. In his address,Mr. Cuomo recognized the history and growth of Indiana University School of Social Work from its origin in 1911 to its current status as a state-wide, multi-campus enterprise. He discussed the formation of Project Help (Housing Enterprise for the Less Privileged and shared some of his experiences as Secretary of HUD. He also explored several contemporary social, political, and philosophical issues, including the potential long-term effects of the tragic events of September 11, 2001. Introduced by Ms. Jane Schlegel, M.S.W., Chair of the Indiana University School of Social Work Campaign Committee, Mr. Cuomo interspersed his prepared remarks with spontaneous reflections.His comments are presented here in unedited fashion.

  4. Assessing Climate Change Perceptions, Management Strategies, and Information Needs for Indiana Agricultural and Forestry Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkauer, K. A.; Chin, N.

    2016-12-01

    The agricultural and forestry sectors in the state of Indiana are highly dependent on climate and, subsequently, highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Higher temperatures, shifts in precipitation patterns, more widespread prevalence of pests and pathogens, and increased frequency and severity of extreme weather events could all have negative effects on these two sectors in the future. Agricultural and forest producers are already modifying their management strategies in response to perceptions of changes in climate risk, but such responses have been primarily reactive in nature and, in many cases, demonstrate a disconnect between scientific findings and stakeholder perceptions of the greatest climate risks. This research has been conducted to help improve understanding of climate change risks to agriculture and forestry in Indiana; stakeholder perceptions of climate risks and their current management strategies; and the effectiveness of these management strategies for dealing with current and future climate risk. Sector-specific focus groups, expert panel assessments and surveys have all been utilized in this work, which will also contribute to the new Indiana Climate Change Impacts Assessment report.

  5. Comparing Sustainable Universities between the United States and China: Cases of Indiana University and Tsinghua University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Zou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that universities can play critical roles in promoting sustainability. In the United States and China, many universities have initiated sustainability programs. Employing Indiana University, Bloomington, the U.S. (IUB and Tsinghua University, Beijing, China (Tsinghua as two cases, we examine the conceptualization and implementation of university sustainability programs through a comparison of their respective definitions, goals, organizational dynamics, and strategies. We find that IUB’s sustainability scheme is more detailed and specific, while Tsinghua’s is more general; this is principally attributable to differences in national and local contexts. Furthermore, IUB values the environmental, economic, and social aspects of university sustainability equally, while Tsinghua focuses more on the environmental aspect. In addition, IUB has a more loosely-structured and more inclusive sustainability organizational dynamic while Tsinghua has a more hierarchical one. This comparative study helps us to understand how these two research universities understand and implement sustainability within the respective cultural, political, and institutional contexts of the United States and China.

  6. Evolution of a tobacco cessation curriculum for dental hygiene students at Indiana University School of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, Lorinda L; Christen, Arden; Romito, Laura

    2007-06-01

    Barriers to consistent implementation of tobacco cessation strategies by dental hygiene students in practice may be overcome through mentoring by expert faculty members. This article describes a pilot study using an innovative method to achieve higher levels of student-perceived confidence and skill in delivering cessation messages to patients. Following completion of the didactic course content, each student selected a tobacco user to complete the Indiana University Nicotine Dependence Program Patient Assessment Questionnaire (PAQ). Detailed analysis of the questionnaire and development of specific cessation strategies were accomplished in a one-to-one interchange with expert faculty members. Students provided suggestions to patients, wrote papers summarizing their experiences, and were asked to complete an anonymous survey. Forty-four of forty-six students completed the survey. Eighty percent reported the mentored session was useful in learning specific cessation strategies; 83 percent reported the session helped to boost their confidence levels in approaching patients in tobacco cessation; 83 percent believed they would use learned strategies with other patients; and 86 percent recommended this educational approach for future students. Additional mentoring may overcome barriers to approaching patients in tobacco cessation by increasing levels of confidence and skill when delivering cessation messages. This may translate into continued application of these strategies in private practice, resulting in potential benefits to the health of the public.

  7. Probablilistic evaluation of earthquake detection and location capability for Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauk, F.J.; Christensen, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    Probabilistic estimations of earthquake detection and location capabilities for the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia are presented in this document. The algorithm used in these epicentrality and minimum-magnitude estimations is a version of the program NETWORTH by Wirth, Blandford, and Husted (DARPA Order No. 2551, 1978) which was modified for local array evaluation at the University of Michigan Seismological Observatory. Estimations of earthquake detection capability for the years 1970 and 1980 are presented in four regional minimum m/sub b/ magnitude contour maps. Regional 90% confidence error ellipsoids are included for m/sub b/ magnitude events from 2.0 through 5.0 at 0.5 m/sub b/ unit increments. The close agreement between these predicted epicentral 90% confidence estimates and the calculated error ellipses associated with actual earthquakes within the studied region suggest that these error determinations can be used to estimate the reliability of epicenter location. 8 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. National Forest Health Monitoring Program, Monitoring Urban Forests in Indiana: Pilot Study 2002, Part 2: Statewide Estimates Using the UFORE Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Nowak; Anne Buckelew Cumming; Daniel Twardus; Robert Hoehn; Manfred Mielke

    2007-01-01

    Trees in cities can improve environmental quality and human health. Unfortunately, little is known about the urban forest resource and what and how it contributes to local, regional, and national societies and economies. To better understand the urban forest resource and its value, the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Health Monitoring Program...

  9. Overhauling Indiana Teacher Evaluation Systems: Examining Planning and Implementation Issues of School Districts. Education Policy Brief, Volume 10, Number 4, Summer 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Cassandra M.; Robinson, James N.; Ansaldo, Jim; Whiteman, Rodney S.; Spradlin, Terry E.

    2012-01-01

    As one part of a broad reform package, the 2011 Indiana General Assembly passed Senate Enrolled Act 001 (Public Law 90), a bill that significantly changed the way Indiana teachers will be evaluated and compensated. An earlier Center for Evaluation & Education Policy (CEEP) policy brief, "Revamping the Teacher Evaluation Process"…

  10. How disease surveillance systems can serve as practical building blocks for a health information infrastructure: the Indiana experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grannis, Shaun J; Biondich, Paul G; Mamlin, Burke W; Wilson, Greg; Jones, Linda; Overhage, J Marc

    2005-01-01

    Although many organizations are beginning to develop strategies to implement and study regional and national health information exchanges, there are few operational examples to date. The Indiana Network for Patient Care (INPC) is an example of a currently operational Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO) built upon a foundation of open, robust healthcare information standards. Having demonstrated the scalability of this design, the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) contracted with the Regenstrief Institute to implement a statewide disease surveillance system incorporating encounter data from all 114 Indiana hospitals with emergency departments. We describe the 4-year implementation plan, including our design rationale and how we plan to address the specific implementation challenges of data collection, connectivity in diverse environments and current hospital buy-in. To date, 36 hospitals are in various stages of engagement, with 19 hospitals actively providing real-time surveillance data. We will discuss how this project creates the foundation for a potential statewide health information exchange.

  11. Circumstances and Outcomes of a Firearm Seizure Law: Marion County, Indiana, 2006-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, George F

    2015-06-01

    Indiana statute allows police to seize firearms without a warrant if the officer believes a person meets the law's definition of "dangerous." Review of the use of this law in Marion County (Indianapolis), Indiana, showed that prosecutors filed petitions in court to retain weapons seized by police under this law 404 times between 2006 and 2013. Police removed weapons from people due to identification of a risk of suicide (68%) or violence (21%), or the presence of psychosis (16%). The firearm seizures occurred in the context of domestic disputes in 28% of cases and intoxication was noted in 26% of cases. There were significant demographic differences in the circumstances of firearm seizures and the firearms seized. The seized firearms were retained by the court at the initial hearing in 63% of cases; this retention was closely linked to the defendant's failure to appear at the hearing. The court dismissed 29% of cases at the initial hearing, closely linked to the defendant's presence at the hearing. In subsequent hearings of cases not dismissed, the court ordered the destruction of the firearms in 72% of cases, all when the individual did not appear in court, and dismissed 24% of the cases, all when the individual was present at the hearing. Overall, the Indiana law removed weapons from a small number of people, most of whom did not seek return of their weapons. The firearm seizure law thus functioned as a months-long cooling-off period for those who did seek the return of their guns. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Probabilistic seismic hazard estimates incorporating site effects - An example from Indiana, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, J.S.; Park, C.H.; Nowack, R.L.; Hill, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has published probabilistic earthquake hazard maps for the United States based on current knowledge of past earthquake activity and geological constraints on earthquake potential. These maps for the central and eastern United States assume standard site conditions with Swave velocities of 760 m/s in the top 30 m. For urban and infrastructure planning and long-term budgeting, the public is interested in similar probabilistic seismic hazard maps that take into account near-surface geological materials. We have implemented a probabilistic method for incorporating site effects into the USGS seismic hazard analysis that takes into account the first-order effects of the surface geologic conditions. The thicknesses of sediments, which play a large role in amplification, were derived from a P-wave refraction database with over 13, 000 profiles, and a preliminary geology-based velocity model was constructed from available information on S-wave velocities. An interesting feature of the preliminary hazard maps incorporating site effects is the approximate factor of two increases in the 1-Hz spectral acceleration with 2 percent probability of exceedance in 50 years for parts of the greater Indianapolis metropolitan region and surrounding parts of central Indiana. This effect is primarily due to the relatively thick sequence of sediments infilling ancient bedrock topography that has been deposited since the Pleistocene Epoch. As expected, the Late Pleistocene and Holocene depositional systems of the Wabash and Ohio Rivers produce additional amplification in the southwestern part of Indiana. Ground motions decrease, as would be expected, toward the bedrock units in south-central Indiana, where motions are significantly lower than the values on the USGS maps.

  13. HIV Infection Linked to Injection Use of Oxymorphone in Indiana, 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Philip J; Pontones, Pamela; Hoover, Karen W; Patel, Monita R; Galang, Romeo R; Shields, Jessica; Blosser, Sara J; Spiller, Michael W; Combs, Brittany; Switzer, William M; Conrad, Caitlin; Gentry, Jessica; Khudyakov, Yury; Waterhouse, Dorothy; Owen, S Michele; Chapman, Erika; Roseberry, Jeremy C; McCants, Veronica; Weidle, Paul J; Broz, Dita; Samandari, Taraz; Mermin, Jonathan; Walthall, Jennifer; Brooks, John T; Duwve, Joan M

    2016-07-21

    In January 2015, a total of 11 new diagnoses of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were reported in a small community in Indiana. We investigated the extent and cause of the outbreak and implemented control measures. We identified an outbreak-related case as laboratory-confirmed HIV infection newly diagnosed after October 1, 2014, in a person who either resided in Scott County, Indiana, or was named by another case patient as a syringe-sharing or sexual partner. HIV polymerase (pol) sequences from case patients were phylogenetically analyzed, and potential risk factors associated with HIV infection were ascertained. From November 18, 2014, to November 1, 2015, HIV infection was diagnosed in 181 case patients. Most of these patients (87.8%) reported having injected the extended-release formulation of the prescription opioid oxymorphone, and 92.3% were coinfected with hepatitis C virus. Among 159 case patients who had an HIV type 1 pol gene sequence, 157 (98.7%) had sequences that were highly related, as determined by phylogenetic analyses. Contact tracing investigations led to the identification of 536 persons who were named as contacts of case patients; 468 of these contacts (87.3%) were located, assessed for risk, tested for HIV, and, if infected, linked to care. The number of times a contact was named as a syringe-sharing partner by a case patient was significantly associated with the risk of HIV infection (adjusted risk ratio for each time named, 1.9; PHIV. (Funded by the state government of Indiana and others.).

  14. Indiana University receives grant from National Science Foundation to help build global grid network

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The NSF awarded a consortium of 15 universities $13.65 million to build the International Virtual Data Grid Laboratory, or iVDGL. The iVDGL will consist of a seamless network of thousands of computers at 40 locations in the US, Europe and Asia. These computers will work together as a powerful grid capable of handling petabytes of data. Indiana University will make significant contributions to this project by providing a prototype Tier-2 Data Center for the ATLAS high energy physics experiment and the International Grid Operations Center.

  15. Flood-inundation maps for the White River at Spencer, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.3-mile reach of the White River at Spencer, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage White River at Spencer, Indiana (sta. no. 03357000). Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. National Weather Service (NWS)-forecasted peak-stage inforamation may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at the White River at Spencer, Indiana, streamgage and documented high-water marks from the flood of June 8, 2008. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 20 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from the NWS action stage (9 feet) to the highest rated stage (28 feet) at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The availability of these maps along with Internet information regarding the current stage from the Spencer USGS streamgage and forecasted stream stages from the NWS will provide emergency management personnel and residents with information that is critical for flood response activities, such as evacuations and road

  16. New Chicago-Indiana computer network prepared to handle massive data flow

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The Chicago-Indiana system is ont of five Tier-2 (regional) centers in the United States that will receive data from one of four massive detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory in Geneva. When the new instrument begins operating late next year, beams of protons will collide 40 million times a second. When each of those proton beams reaches full intensity, each collision will produce approximately 23 interactions between protons that will create various types of subatomic particles." (1,5 page)

  17. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Wind Turbine Generators at the Newport Indiana Chemical Depot Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Joseph Owen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mosey, Gail [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Newport Indiana Chemical Depot site in Newport, Indiana, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was contacted to provide technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the sitefor possible wind turbine electrical generator installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different wind energy options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a wind system at the site.

  18. Two years of heat recovery coke production at Sun Coke Company's Indiana Harbor facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, R.W.; Schuett, K.J. [Sun Coke Company, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2000-07-01

    In March of 1998, the first battery of Sun Coke Company's newest facility, the Indiana Harbor Coke Company, was brought on line in East Chicago, Indiana. By June of 1998, the last of four batteries began pushing coke and producing power. The plant provides Ispat-Inland with coke for their No. 7 blast furnace and waste heat to Cokenergy for steam production, 94 megawatts of power generation, and flue gas cleaning. Annual production will be more than 1.2 million tons of high quality furnace coke. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Comparison of Indiana High School Football Injury Rates by Inclusion of the USA Football "Heads Up Football" Player Safety Coach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Dalton, Sara L; Roos, Karen G; Djoko, Aristarque; Phelps, Jennifer; Dompier, Thomas P

    2016-05-01

    In Indiana, high school football coaches are required to complete a coaching education course with material related to concussion awareness, equipment fitting, heat emergency preparedness, and proper technique. Some high schools have also opted to implement a player safety coach (PSC). The PSC, an integral component of USA Football's Heads Up Football (HUF) program, is a coach whose primary responsibility is to ensure that other coaches are implementing proper tackling and blocking techniques alongside other components of the HUF program. To compare injury rates in Indiana high school football teams by their usage of a PSC or online coaching education only. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Athletic trainers (ATs) evaluated and tracked injuries at each practice and game during the 2015 high school football season. Players were drawn from 6 teams in Indiana. The PSC group, which used the PSC component, was comprised of 204 players from 3 teams. The "education only" group (EDU), which utilized coaching education only, was composed of 186 players from 3 teams. Injury rates and injury rate ratios (IRRs) were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During 25,938 athlete-exposures (AEs), a total of 149 injuries were reported, of which 54 (36.2%) and 95 (63.8%) originated from the PSC and EDU groups, respectively. The practice injury rate was lower in the PSC group than the EDU group (2.99 vs 4.83/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.40-0.95). The game injury rate was also lower in the PSC group than the EDU group (11.37 vs 26.37/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.25-0.74). When restricted to concussions only, the rate was lower in the PSC group (0.09 vs 0.73/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.01-0.94), although only 1 concussion was reported in the PSC group. No differences were found in game concussion rates (0.60 vs 4.39/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.02-1.11). Findings support the PSC as an effective method of injury mitigation in high school football. Future research

  20. Landscape consequences of natural gas extraction in Armstrong and Indiana Counties, Pennsylvania, 2004–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, Terry E.; Milheim, Lesley E.; Roig-Silva, Coral M.; Malizia, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Increased demands for cleaner burning energy, coupled with the relatively recent technological advances in accessing unconventional hydrocarbon-rich geologic formations, have led to an intense effort to find and extract natural gas from various underground sources around the country. One of these sources, the Marcellus Shale, located in the Allegheny Plateau, is currently undergoing extensive drilling and production. The technology used to extract gas in the Marcellus Shale is known as hydraulic fracturing and has garnered much attention because of its use of large amounts of fresh water, its use of proprietary fluids for the hydraulic-fracturing process, its potential to release contaminants into the environment, and its potential effect on water resources. Nonetheless, development of natural gas extraction wells in the Marcellus Shale is only part of the overall natural gas story in this area of Pennsylvania. Conventional natural gas wells are commonly located in the same general area as the Marcellus Shale and are frequently developed in clusters across the landscape. The combined effects of these two natural gas extraction methods create potentially serious patterns of disturbance on the landscape. This document quantifies the landscape changes and consequences of natural gas extraction for Armstrong County and Indiana County in Pennsylvania between 2004 and 2010. Patterns of landscape disturbance related to natural gas extraction activities were collected and digitized using National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery for 2004, 2005/2006, 2008, and 2010. The disturbance patterns were then used to measure changes in land cover and land use using the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) of 2001. A series of landscape metrics is also used to quantify these changes and is included in this publication.

  1. Flood-inundation maps for the St. Marys River at Decatur, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Kellan R.

    2015-08-24

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 8.9-mile reach of the St. Marys River at Decatur, Indiana, were developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site (http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/), depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) of the St. Marys River at Decatur (USGS station number 04181500). The maps are useful for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation by referencing concurrent USGS streamgage information at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. In addition, the streamgage information was provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service flood warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed during this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.

  2. Flood-inundation maps for the Tippecanoe River at Winamac, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Chad D.; Bunch, Aubrey R.

    2015-09-25

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.2 mile reach of the Tippecanoe River at Winamac, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 03331753, Tippecanoe River at Winamac, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=03331753. In addition, information has been provided by the USGS to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS AHPS forecasts flood hydrographs at many sites that are often collocated with USGS streamgages, including the Tippecanoe River at Winamac, Ind. NWS AHPS forecast peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation and forecasts of flood hydrographs at this site.

  3. Flood-inundation maps for the White River at Indianapolis, Indiana, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.4-mile reach of the White River in Indianapolis, Indiana, from 0.3 miles upstream of Michigan Street to the Harding Street Generating Station dam (at the confluence with Lick Creek), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the White River at Indianapolis, Ind. (station number 03353000). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service athttp://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site.

  4. Mineral precipitation and dissolution at two slag-disposal sites in northwestern Indiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E.R.; Schulz, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    Slag is a ubiquitous byproduct of the iron- and steel-refining industries. In northwestern Indiana and northeastern Illinois, slag has been deposited over more than 52 km2 of land surface. Despite the widespread use of slag for fill and construction purposes, little is known about its chemical effects on the environment. Two slagdisposal sites were examined in northwestern Indiana where slag was deposited over the native glacial deposits. At a third site, where slag was not present, background conditions were defined. Samples were collected from cores and drill cuttings and described with scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. Ground-water samples were collected and used to assess thermodynamic equilibria between authigenic minerals and existing conditions. Differences in the mineralogy at background and slag-affected sites were apparent. Calcite, dolomite, gypsum, iron oxides, and clay minerals were abundant in native sediments immediately beneath the slag. Mineral features indicated that these minerals precipitated rapidly from slag drainage and co-precipitated minor amounts of non-calcium metals and trace elements. Quartz fragments immediately beneath the slag showed extensive pitting that was not apparent in sediments from the background site, indicating chemical weathering by the hyperalkaline slag drainage. The environmental impacts of slag-related mineral precipitation include disruption of natural ground-water flow patterns and bed-sediment armoring in adjacent surface-water systems. Dissolution of native quartz by the hyperalkaline drainage may cause instability in structures situated over slag fill or in roadways comprised of slag aggregates.

  5. Utilization of stainless steel crowns by general dentists and pediatric dental specialists in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowolik, Joan; Kozlowski, Diana; Jones, James E

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate utilization of the stainless steel crown by both the general and pediatric dentists in Indiana. Although reports indicate that there has been a dramatic reduction in dental caries in the US, almost 20 percent of children have dental decay by age four, with almost 80 percent having a cavity by 17 years of age. After reviewing the literature, Seale has recommended that the stainless steel crown is the most successful restoration for children with a rate of high caries. All dental schools in North America teach the value of using stainless steel crowns and the method of tooth preparation. We hypothesized that greater use of the stainless steel crowns would be made by specialists than by general dentists. In this study, of the 200 questionnaires distributed, 62.5 percent were returned and analyzed. The results imply that stainless steel crowns are being significantly underutilized in general dental practice. It is interesting, and perhaps of concern, that the general dentists are not interested in continuing education courses about this subject. Over the next few years, with the aging of the pediatric dental community in Indiana, general (not specialty) dentists will treat most of the children. Because of this, pre-doctoral education needs to place more emphasis on preparation and utilization of the stainless steel crown.

  6. Serologic survey for selected infectious diseases in raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Indiana, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizman, Eran A; Dharmarajan, Guha; Beasley, James C; Wu, Ching C; Pogranichniy, Roman M; Rhodes, Olin E

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the antibody prevalence of important livestock and domestic animal pathogens in raccoons (Procyon lotor) trapped and sampled in 39 forest patches in north-central Indiana, USA, between 2004 and 2005. A total of 459 serum samples were tested for antibodies to Leptospira serovars, 512 for Canine distemper virus (CDV) antibodies, and 340 for antibodies to Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). In total, 47, 16, and 0% of the samples were seropositive for at least one Leptospira serovar, CDV, and PRRSV, respectively. Most of the positive Leptospira results were to serovars grippotyphosa (36%), autumnalis (22%), and hardjo (22%). No statistically significant correlation was found between antibody prevalence estimates for different Leptospira serovars. A significant association was found between body weight and antibodies for Leptospira serovars and CDV. In addition, age (adult vs. juvenile) was significantly associated with the presence of CDV antibody, with adults exhibiting a higher prevalence than juveniles. This study confirmed that raccoons in Indiana, USA, are exposed to different Leptospira interrogans serovars and CDV and that age and weight are associated with the presence of antibodies for both pathogens.

  7. Effects of cave gating on population trends at individual hibernacula of the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalist)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, Shawn M.; McKann, Patrick C.; Szymanski, Jennifer A.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.

    2014-01-01

    Installing gates at cave entrances to protect hibernating bat colonies is a widespread conservation action, particularly for endangered bat species such as the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). However, there is surprisingly little evidence on the efficacy of gates for improving population growth rates. We used change-point models to determine the effects of gate construction on Indiana bats. We estimated population growth rates at 20 hibernacula pre- and post-gating and quantified the change in population growth rates after gate installation. Hibernacula with increasing growth rates prior to gate placement all experienced decreased growth rates after installation. For hibernacula with declining growth rates prior to construction, growth rates increased moderately after installation. When weighted by population size, average change in growth rates across all 20 hibernacula was negative. Our results suggest that use of gates at hibernacula with growing populations may relate to unintended declines in growth rates but that, at hibernacula with declining populations, installation of gates may lead to moderate increases in local population growth rates.

  8. Vulnerable transportation and utility assets near actively migrating streams in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperl, Benjamin J.

    2017-11-02

    An investigation was completed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs that found 1,132 transportation and utility assets in Indiana are vulnerable to fluvial erosion hazards due to close proximity to actively migrating streams. Locations of transportation assets (bridges, roadways, and railroad lines) and selected utility assets (high-capacity overhead power-transmission lines, underground pipelines, water treatment facilities, and in-channel dams) were determined using aerial imagery hosted by the Google Earth platform. Identified assets were aggregated by stream reach, county, and class. Accompanying the report is a polyline shapefile of the stream reaches documented by Robinson. The shapefile, derived from line work in the National Hydrography Dataset and attributed with channel migration rates, is released with complete Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata. The data presented in this report are intended to help stakeholders and others identify high-risk areas where transportation and utility assets may be threatened by fluvial erosion hazards thus warranting consideration for mitigation strategies.

  9. Population-level impact of white-nose syndrome on the endangered Indiana bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thogmartin, Wayne E.; King, R. Andrew; McKann, Patrick C.; Szymanski, Jennifer A.; Pruitt, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Establishing status and trend for an endangered species is critical to recovery, especially when it is faced with a nascent extinction agent. We calculated, with hierarchical log-linear change-point models, hibernaculum-level population trends between 1983 and 2009 for the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) now subjected to the fast-spreading fungal disease white-nose syndrome. We combined trends from 222 wintering populations before and after onset of the disease to determine trend for clusters of interacting wintering populations, recovery units, and the species. Before onset of the disease, a west-to-east gradient in trends existed, with westernmost populations declining and easternmost populations increasing in abundance. The species as a whole, however, was stationary between 1983 and 2005 (-0.5% mean annual change; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.8, +1.8%). Estimated mean population size in 2009 was 377,124 bats (195,398-957,348), with large variance apparently caused by white-nose syndrome. With the onset of white-nose syndrome (2006-2009), the species exhibited a 10.3% annual decline (95% CI = -21.1, +2.0%). White-nose syndrome is having an appreciable influence on the status and trends of Indiana bat populations, stalling and in some cases reversing population gains made in recent years.

  10. A statewide collaboration to initiate mental health screening and assess services for detained youths in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalsma, Matthew C; Schwartz, Katherine; Perkins, Anthony J

    2014-10-01

    We describe a statewide effort to implement detention-based mental health screening and assess follow-up services offered to detained youths in Indiana. A total of 25,265 detention stays (15,461 unique youths) occurred between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011, across 16 detention centers participating in the Indiana Juvenile Mental Health Screening Project. We collected screening results and reports of detention-based follow-up mental health services and referrals from justice system records. Approximately 21% of youths screened positive for mental health issues requiring follow-up. A positive screen significantly predicted that youths would receive a follow-up mental health service or referral while detained or upon detention center discharge, compared with youths who did not screen positive (61% vs 39%). Logistic regression models indicated that a positive screen was associated with (1) contact with a mental health clinician within 24 hours of detention center intake and (2) a mental health referral upon discharge. White youths were more likely than minorities to receive both follow-up services. Future statewide efforts to improve the mental health of detained youths should incorporate standards for providing appropriate follow-up services in detention centers.

  11. Managing the risks: An analysis of bird strike reporting at Part 139 Airports in Indiana 2001-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Mendonca

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the current study was fourfold: to identify bird strike reporting trends at Part 139 airports in Indiana (2001-2014 for comparison to national data; to determine which quarter of the year yields the most bird strike data; to gain a clearer understanding of the relationship between altitude and bird strikes, and to develop information based upon the data analyzed that can be used for the safety management of birds including comparisons to national data.  Design/methodology: The researchers in this study answered the research questions by reviewing, sorting, and analyzing existing data.  The data collection took place from March 01 to May 02, 2016. Two data sets were utilized for data collection. The National Wildlife Strike Database (NWSD and the FAA Air Traffic Activity System (ATADS. Findings: When compared to national data, Indiana Part 139 airports have seen a faster increase in bird strike reporting during 2012 and 2014. Aggregate data indicated June through September (Quarter 3 had a significantly higher frequency of bird strikes reported.  When examining bird strikes and altitude of occurrences, the exponential equation explained 95 % of the variation in number of strikes by 1,000-foot intervals from 1000 to 10,000 feet. Not surprisingly, the risk of bird strikes appears to decrease as altitude increases. Originality/value: This study adds to the body of knowledge by addressing the lack of published bird strike report analyses at a regional level.  It also connects data analyses to safety management system (SMS concepts and Wildlife Hazards Management Programs (WHMP. The aviation community can use regional bird strike data and information to develop or enhance existing wildlife hazard management programs, increase pilot awareness, and offers airport managerial implications.

  12. U.S. EPA Reaches Agreement with SIGECO to Reduce Air Pollution from Southern Indiana Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    For Immediate Release No. 15-OPA172 (CHICAGO-December 16, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced an agreement with the Southern Indiana Gas and Electric Company that will reduce air pollution from the company's F.B. Cul

  13. Variation in catchment areas of Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) hibernacula inferred from stable hydrogen (δ2H) isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.R. Britzke; S.C. Loeb; C.S. Romanek; K.A. Hobson; M.J. Vonhof

    2013-01-01

    Understanding seasonal movements of bats is important for effective conservation efforts. Although female Indiana bats (Myotis sodalis Miller and Allen, 1928) have been documented to migrate >500 km, knowledge of their migratory patterns is still extremely limited. We used the relationship between latitude and stable hydrogen isotope ratio in bat hair (δ...

  14. How Property Tax Caps and Funding Formulas Have Changed the Role of the School Superintendent in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Patrick L.; Hirth, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    There has been debate among states as to how to properly fund schools. The debate has been focused on how much funding is supplied through property tax and is motivated by tax payer anger over fluctuating tax bills. Many of the policies have been implemented without looking at the effects that they will have on schools, especially in Indiana,…

  15. "El Miedo y El Hambre": Understanding the Familial, Social, and Educational Realities of Undocumented Latino Families in North Central Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viramontez Anguiano, Ruben P.; Lopez, Anayeli

    2012-01-01

    This study explored how different ecological factors, within and outside the family, affected the educational success of the children of undocumented families. The sample consisted of 63 immigrant Latino parents (40 families) who resided in North Central Indiana. This study utilized an ethnographic research design. Findings demonstrated that…

  16. 77 FR 40914 - In the Matter of Indiana Michigan Power Company, D. C. Cook Nuclear Power Plant; Confirmatory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... individual, who was offsite when selected for Fitness-for-Duty (FFD) testing, was tested at the earliest...-2060-SFI-411, ``Fitness-for-Duty (FFD) Random Selection and Notification Process,'' to include a... and time constraints. Indiana Michigan Power Company will make this presentation at an industry FFD...

  17. 78 FR 8018 - Establishment of the Indiana Uplands Viticultural Area and Modification of the Ohio River Valley...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Viticultural Area and Modification of the Ohio River Valley Viticultural Area AGENCY: Alcohol and Tobacco Tax... mile Ohio River Valley viticultural area to eliminate a potential overlap with the Indiana Uplands viticultural area. The modification decreases the size of the Ohio River Valley viticultural area by...

  18. Salient Environmental and Perceptual Correlates of Current and Established Smoking for 2 Representative Cohorts of Indiana Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Bodde, Amy E.; Torabi, Mohammad R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A secondary analysis of 2000 and 2004 Indiana Youth Tobacco Survey (IYTS) data was conducted to investigate salient environmental and perceptual correlates of adolescents' current and established smoking while controlling for demographic variables such as gender, grade, and race/ethnicity and to compare the pattern of significant…

  19. Introducing Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to Undergraduate Geology Curricula: Insights from the Indiana University G429 Field Course, Summer 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, B. J.; Phillips, D. A.; Meertens, C. M.; Simmons, W.

    2010-12-01

    Bruce J. Douglas, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, 1001 East 10th Street Bloomington, IN 47405, douglasb@indiana.edu David A. Phillips, UNAVCO, 6350 Nautilus Drive, Boulder, CO 80301, phillips@unavco.org Charles M. Meertens, UNAVCO, meertens@unavco.org William H. Simmons, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Indiana University, 1001 East 10th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 During the summer of 2010, a pilot version of a week-long module designed to apply Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to various problems encountered while conducting field geology applications was embedded within the Indiana University G429 field course. The format followed that of a successful module developed to concentrate on surface and groundwater hydrology known as G429e. The TLS module was implemented with the aid of UNAVCO, which provided both equipment and professional staff to complement the faculty and staff working in G429. The students who participated in the program were all volunteers aware of the experimental nature of the module. The students' backgrounds varied from those with extensive field instrumentation and surveying experience to those with only the prior field experience provided by the first three weeks of the G429 field course. The targets selected for the TLS work were directly related to scientific questions that arose from projects previously completed by the students. This was critical in that the motivation for the work was scientifically driven and not strictly an exercise in instrument use. The activities for the week built from an initial survey in a small highly constrained location to a final project where the students had to design a plan and deploy all of the instruments, collect the various data types, and analyze the data based on a simple set of criteria, to produce a TLS data set that would allow others to explore the Judson Mead Geologic Field Station. The other problems selected included determining the magnitude and type of normal fault

  20. Flood-inundation maps for the Driftwood River and Sugar Creek near Edinburgh, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Kim, Moon H.; Menke, Chad D.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 11.2 mile reach of the Driftwood River and a 5.2 mile reach of Sugar Creek, both near Edinburgh, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center, Edinburgh, Indiana. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 03363000 Driftwood River near Edinburgh, Ind. Current conditions at the USGS streamgage in Indiana may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/current/?type=flow. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/. The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often collocated at USGS streamgages. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at the USGS streamgage 03363000 Driftwood River near Edinburgh, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to determine elevations throughout the study reaches for nine water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-ft intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to nearly the highest recorded water level at the USGS streamgage 03363000 Driftwood River near Edinburgh, Ind. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geospatial digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to

  1. Flood-inundation maps for the Elkhart River at Goshen, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Kellan R.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs, created digital flood-inundation maps for an 8.3-mile reach of the Elkhart River at Goshen, Indiana, extending from downstream of the Goshen Dam to downstream from County Road 17. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to nine selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Elkhart River at Goshen (station number 04100500). Current conditions for the USGS streamgages in Indiana may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. In addition, stream stage data have been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relation at the Elkhart River at Goshen streamgage. The hydraulic model was then used to compute nine water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from approximately bankfull (5 ft) to greater than the highest recorded water level (13 ft). The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital-elevation model (DEM), derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data having a 0.37-ft vertical accuracy and 3.9-ft horizontal resolution in order to delineate the area flooded at each

  2. Flood-inundation maps for the Mississinewa River at Marion, Indiana, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 9-mile (mi) reach of the Mississinewa River from 0.75 mi upstream from the Pennsylvania Street bridge in Marion, Indiana, to 0.2 mi downstream from State Route 15 were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Mississinewa River at Marion (station number 03326500). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site. Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the current stage-discharge relation at the Mississinewa River streamgage, in combination with water-surface profiles from historic floods and from the current (2002) flood-insurance study for Grant County, Indiana. The hydraulic model was then used to compute seven water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-fo (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 10 ft, which is near bankfull, to 16 ft, which is between the water levels associated with the estimated 10- and 2-percent annual exceedance probability floods (floods with recurrence interval between 10 and 50 years) and equals the “major flood stage” as defined by the NWS. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) data having a 0.98 ft vertical accuracy and 4.9 ft

  3. Flood-inundation maps for the Tippecanoe River near Delphi, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Chad D.; Bunch, Aubrey R.; Kim, Moon H.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 11-mile reach of the Tippecanoe River that extends from County Road W725N to State Road 18 below Oakdale Dam, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03333050, Tippecanoe River near Delphi, Ind. Current conditions at the USGS streamgages in Indiana may be obtained online at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/current/?type=flow. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often co-located at USGS streamgages. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, water-surface profiles were simulated for the stream reach by means of a hydraulic one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at USGS streamgage 03333050, Tippecanoe River near Delphi, Ind., and USGS streamgage 03332605, Tippecanoe River below Oakdale Dam, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to simulate 13 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals reference to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the

  4. Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Indiana flood-inundation geospatial datasets​

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2017-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 4.1-mile reach of the Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Indiana (station number 03361500). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (SBVI3).Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at the Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Ind., streamgage. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to compute 12 water-surface profiles for flood stages referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 9.0 feet, or near bankfull, to 19.4 feet, the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar] data having a 0.98-foot vertical accuracy and 4.9-foot horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each water level.The attached files on this landing page are the inputs and outputs for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers HEC-RAS model used to create flood-inundation maps for the referenced report, https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20165166. There are two child items that contain final geospatial datasets for the flood-inundation maps

  5. Plan of study for the Ohio-Indiana carbonate-bedrock and glacial- aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugliosi, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    The major aquifers of 35,000 sq mi area in western Ohio and eastern Indiana consist of Silurian and Devonian carbonate bedrock and Quaternary glacial deposits. These bedrock units and glacial deposits have been designated for study as part of the U.S. Geological Survey 's Regional Aquifer System Analysis program, a nationwide program to assess the regional hydrology, geology and water quality of the Nation 's most important aquifers. The purpose of the study is to define the hydrology, geochemistry, and geologic framework of the aquifer system within the Silurian and Devonian rocks and glacial deposits, with emphasis on describing the groundwater flow patterns and characterizing the water quality. The study, which began in 1988 , is expected to be completed in 1993. In 1980, the aquifers in the study area supplied more than 280 million gallons of water/day to industry, agriculture, and a population of more than 6.3 million people. With a projected future population growth to 7.1 million in 1990, and with intensified agricultural and industrial uses, water withdrawals from these bedrock and glacial aquifers are expected to be increased. The most significant groundwater problems in the study area result from the pronounced areal differences in availability and quality of the groundwater. These differences are related to the lateral discontinuity of many of the glacial deposits and to variations in secondary permeability of the bedrock aquifers associated with patterns of fracturing. Planned activities of the study include compilation of available geohydrologic and water quality data, such as groundwater levels, geohydrologic properties of aquifers, chemical analyses, land use and water use data, and ancillary data such as digital satellite images. Additional geohydrologic and water quality data may be collected from existing wells or wells that may be drilled for this study. A computerized, geographic information system will be used as a data base management tool and

  6. Flood-inundation maps for the White River near Edwardsport, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 3.3-mile reach of the White River near Edwardsport, (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03360730, White River near Edwardsport, Ind. Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (site EDWI3.)

  7. Indiana pouch continent urinary reservoir in patients with previous pelvic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannel, R.S.; Braly, P.S.; Buller, R.E. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Little information exists on the use of continent urinary reservoirs in patients with previous pelvic irradiation. We report the use of the Indiana pouch urinary reservoir in ten women with a history of pelvic irradiation for cervical cancer, of whom eight underwent a total pelvic exenteration for recurrent pelvic tumor and two had diversion for radiation-induced vesicovaginal fistula. All ten women achieved daytime continence, with a median time between catheterizations of 4.5 hours and a median pouch capacity of 500 mL. There was no evidence of leakage from the reservoir or significant ureteral reflux or obstruction on postoperative radiographic evaluation. No patient has required reoperation or had significant postoperative complications with the technique described.

  8. Narratives of Stress in Health Meanings of African Americans in Lake County, Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Mohan; Sastry, Shaunak; Dillard, Sydney; Kumar, Rati; Anaele, Agaptus; Collins, William; Roberson, Calvin; Dutta, Uttaran; Jones, Christina; Gillespie, Tony; Spinetta, Christine

    2017-10-01

    Across the life course, African Americans bear an unequal burden of disease compared to other racial groups. In spite of the widespread acknowledgment of racial health disparities, the voices of African Americans, their articulations of health and their local etiologies of health disparities are limited. In this article, we highlight the important role of communication scholarship to understand the everyday enactment of health disparities. Drawing upon the culture-centered approach (CCA) to co-construct narratives of health with African Americans residents of Lake County, Indiana, we explore the presence of stress in the everyday narratives of health. These narratives voice the social and structural sources of stress, and articulate resistive coping strategies embedded in relationship to structures.

  9. Meteorological Conditions Associated with the ATR72 Aircraft Accident near Roselawn, Indiana, on 31 October 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwitz, J.; Politovich, M.; Bernstein, B.; Ralph, F.; Neiman, P.; Ashenden, R.; Bresch, J.

    1997-01-01

    An ATR72 commuter aircraft crashed near Roselawn, Indiana, on 31 October 1994 killing all 68 people on board. Available weather data, including those from a Next Generation Radar, a radar wind profiler, a Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, and pilot reports of icing have been examined in combination with analysis fields from the Rapid Update Cycle model and forecast fields from the Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research MM5 numerical model. Synthesis of this information provides a relatively complete and consistent picture of the ambient meteorological conditions in the region of the ATR72 holding pattern at 3.1 km above mean sea level. Of particular interest is the evidence that these conditions favored the development of supercooled drizzle drops within a strong frontal zone, as indicated by cloud-top temperatures of 10° to 15°C, weak radar reflectivity, and strong, vertical wind shear within the cloud and warm front.

  10. The art, history, and geoscience of Hindostan whetstone gravestones in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, E.P.; Powell, R.L.; McNerney, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Cemeteries can be intriguing places to people, in part because of a fascination with death but also because of the quiet solitude and artistic beauty found there. Many grave monuments are really works of art and can be appreciated on that basis alone. Cemeteries can also serve as teaching laboratories for geologists. Monument types, carving styles, ornamentation, and durability are all related, to some extent, to the type of rock used. The older the monument dates the more variability one can see in the character of the stones. Pioneer cemeteries in southern Indiana, some of which date back to the early 1800s, can be used to teach concepts in mineralogy, depositional environments, and paleoastronomy. This can be very useful to someone teaching some of the basic concepts of geology.

  11. The art, history, and geoscience of hindustan whetstone gravestones in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, E.P.; Powell, R.L.; McNerney, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Cemeteries can be intriguing places to people, in part because of a fascination with death but also because of the quiet solitude and artistic beauty found there. Many grave monuments are really works of art and can be appreciated on that basis alone. Cemeteries can also serve as teaching laboratories for geologists. Monument types, carving styles, ornamentation, and durability are all related, to some extent, to the type of rock used. The older the monument dates the more variability one can see in the character of the stones. Pioneer cemeteries in southern Indiana, some of which date back to the early 1800s, can be used to teach concepts in mineralogy, depositional environments, and paleoastronomy. This can be very useful to someone teaching some of the basic concepts of geology.

  12. Floods of March 1978, in the Maumee River basin, northeastern Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, Richard Earl

    1981-01-01

    Floods in the Maumee River basin in northeastern Indiana in March 1978 resulted in heavy damage in Fort Wayne and surrounding areas. Flood damage in Fort Wayne was estimated by the Mayor to be 11 million dollars. Approximately 15 percent of the city was inundated, and 2,400 of its 190,000 residents were forced to leave their homes. The estimate of damage in Adams and Allen Counties by Civil Defense officials was 44 million dollars. The Maumee River at New Haven exceeded the peak stage of record, 21.4 feet, by 2.2 feet. The peak discharge at this stream-gaging station, 22,400 cubic feet per second, was about equal to that of a 75-year flood. Recurrence intervals of peak flows on streams tributary to the Maumee River ranged from 5 to 50 years. Records of peak and daily discharges and some precipitation data are given in this report. 

  13. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Indiana Consumer's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-03-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Indiana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  14. The Pipe Creek Sinkhole biota, a diverse late tertiary continental fossil assemblage from Grant County, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlow, J.O.; Sunderman, J.A.; Havens, J.J.; Swinehart, A.L.; Holman, J.A.; Richards, R.L.; Miller, N.G.; Martin, R.A.; Hunt, R.M.; Storrs, G.W.; Curry, B. Brandon; Fluegeman, R.H.; Dawson, M.; Flint, M.E.T.

    2001-01-01

    Quarrying in east-central Indiana has uncovered richly fossiliferous unconsolidated sediment buried beneath Pleistocene glacial till. The fossiliferous layer is part of a sedimentary deposit that accumulated in a sinkhole developed in the limestone flank beds of a Paleozoic reef. Plant and animal (mostly vertebrate) remains are abundant in the fossil assemblage. Plants are represented by a diversity of terrestrial and wetland forms, all of extant species. The vertebrate assemblage (here designated the Pipe Creek Sinkhole local fauna) is dominated by frogs and pond turtles, but fishes, birds; snakes and small and large mammals are also present; both extinct and extant taxa are represented. The mammalian assemblage indicates an early Pliocene age (latest Hemphillian or earliest Blancan North American Land Mammal Age). This is the first Tertiary continental biota discovered in the interior of the eastern half of North America.

  15. Geodatabase of the datasets that represent the three subareas of the Silurian-Devonian aquifer, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, Tennessee, and Wisconsin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets that represent the Silurian-Devonian aquifers in the States of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri,...

  16. Watershed Boundaries - WATERSHEDS_HUC06_USGS_IN: 6-Digit Accounting Units, Hydrologic Units, in Indiana, (Derived from US Geological Survey, 1:24,000 Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — WATERSHEDS_HUC06_USGS_IN is a polygon shapefile showing the boundaries of accounting units (HUA) in Indiana. Accounting units are noted by a 6-digit hydrologic unit....

  17. Hydrography - RIVERS_OUTSTANDING_NRC_IN: Outstanding Rivers in Indiana Listed by the Natural Resource Commission (Bernardin-Lochmueller and Associates, 1:100,000, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — RIVERS_OUTSTANDING_NRC_IN represents river and stream segments on the NRC’s Outstanding Rivers list for Indiana. The source data was last updated in October 1997....

  18. Geodatabase of the available top and bottom surface datasets that represent the Mississippian aquifer, Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase includes spatial datasets that represent the Mississippian aquifer in the States of Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri,...

  19. Index Grids - QUADRANGLES_24K_USGS_IN: Boundaries of 7.5-Minute Quadrangles in Indiana, (United States Geological Survey, 1:24,000 Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — QUADRANGLES_24K_USGS_IN is a polygon shapefile defining the boundaries of the USGS 7.5-minute (1:24,000-scale) quadrangles which cover the state of Indiana. Dates of...

  20. Identification of Heterobilharzia americana infection in a dog residing in Indiana with no history of travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jessica Y; Camp, Joseph W; Lenz, Stephen D; Kazacos, Kevin R; Snowden, Karen F

    2016-04-01

    A 1-year-old castrated male dog residing in Indiana was examined because of intermittent vomiting of 4 months' duration. The dog's condition did not resolve with medication. Diagnostic imaging revealed a possible partial obstruction at the ileocecal junction. An exploratory laparotomy was performed. The jejunum contained diffusely distributed, nodular, intramural lesions; 2 biopsy specimens were collected from representative lesions. The pancreas was grossly swollen, and pancreatitis was presumed present. No other abnormalities were observed in the abdomen. Histologic examination of the submitted biopsy specimens revealed infection with Heterobilharzia americana. After diagnosis, the dog was treated with fenbendazole suspension (48 mg/kg [21.8 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) for 10 days. This treatment was subsequently repeated 11 and 80 days later. One week after the end of the last fenbendazole treatment, several H americana eggs were detected in a fecal sample via saline sedimentation, and the dog was given praziquantel (25 mg/kg [11.4 mg/lb], PO, q 8 h) for 2 days. No gastrointestinal signs were evident 4 months after that treatment. The dog described in this report was the first autochthonous canine case of H americana infection in Indiana, to the authors' knowledge; this case has confirmed that the distribution of this parasite in the Midwestern United States is broader than previously known. Increased awareness of the distribution of H americana should aid veterinarians in early, noninvasive diagnosis and appropriate treatment of affected animals. Repeated treatments and recheck fecal examinations may be necessary when managing these cases.

  1. Roosting and foraging social structure of the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvis, Alexander; Kniowski, Andrew B; Gehrt, Stanley D; Ford, W Mark

    2014-01-01

    Social dynamics are an important but poorly understood aspect of bat ecology. Herein we use a combination of graph theoretic and spatial approaches to describe the roost and social network characteristics and foraging associations of an Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) maternity colony in an agricultural landscape in Ohio, USA. We tracked 46 bats to 50 roosts (423 total relocations) and collected 2,306 foraging locations for 40 bats during the summers of 2009 and 2010. We found the colony roosting network was highly centralized in both years and that roost and social networks differed significantly from random networks. Roost and social network structure also differed substantially between years. Social network structure appeared to be unrelated to segregation of roosts between age classes. For bats whose individual foraging ranges were calculated, many shared foraging space with at least one other bat. Compared across all possible bat dyads, 47% and 43% of the dyads showed more than expected overlap of foraging areas in 2009 and 2010 respectively. Colony roosting area differed between years, but the roosting area centroid shifted only 332 m. In contrast, whole colony foraging area use was similar between years. Random roost removal simulations suggest that Indiana bat colonies may be robust to loss of a limited number of roosts but may respond differently from year to year. Our study emphasizes the utility of graphic theoretic and spatial approaches for examining the sociality and roosting behavior of bats. Detailed knowledge of the relationships between social and spatial aspects of bat ecology could greatly increase conservation effectiveness by allowing more structured approaches to roost and habitat retention for tree-roosting, socially-aggregating bat species.

  2. An economic analysis of the electricity generation potential from biogas resources in the state of Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Juan S.

    Anaerobic digestion is a process that is a common part of organic waste management systems and is used in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The process produces biogas, which contains methane, and it can be burned to generate electricity. Previous reports have indicated that based on the availability of feedstocks there is a large potential for biogas production and use for electricity generation in the state of Indiana. However, these reports varied in their consideration of important factors that affect the technical and economic feasibility of being able to develop the resources available. The goal of this thesis is to make a more targeted assessment of the electricity generation potential from biogas resources at CAFOs, WWTPs, and MSW landfills in Indiana. A capital budgeting model is used to estimate the net present value (NPV) of biogas electricity projects at facilities that are identified as technically suitable. A statewide estimate of the potential generation capacity is made by estimating the number of facilities that could profitably undertake a biogas electricity project. In addition this thesis explored the impact that different incentive policies would have on the economic viability of these projects. The results indicated that the electricity generation potential is much smaller when technical and economic factors are taken into account in addition to feedstock availability. In particular it was found that projects at hog farms are unlikely to be economically feasible in the present even when financial incentives are considered. In total, 47.94 MW of potential generating capacity is estimated from biogas production at CAFOs, WWTPs, and MSW landfills. Though results indicated that 37.10 MW of capacity are economically feasible under current operating conditions, sensitivity analysis reveals that these projects are very sensitive to capital cost assumptions

  3. Botulism associated with commercially canned chili sauce--Texas and Indiana, July 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-03

    On July 7 and July 11, 2007, public health officials in Texas and Indiana, respectively, reported to CDC four suspected cases of foodborne botulism, two in each state. Investigations conducted by state and local health departments revealed that all four patients had eaten brands of Castleberry's hot dog chili sauce before illness began. Botulinum toxin type A was detected in the serum of one Indiana patient and in a leftover chili mixture obtained from his home. CDC informed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the apparent link between illness and consumption of the chili sauce. On July 18, FDA issued a consumer advisory, and the manufacturer, Castleberry's Food Company (Augusta, Georgia), subsequently recalled the implicated brand and several other products produced in the same set of retorts (commercial-scale pressure cookers for processing canned foods) at the same canning facility. Examination of the canning facility in Georgia during the outbreak investigation had identified deficiencies in the canning process. On July 19, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) issued a press release that announced a recall of chili and certain meat products from the Castleberry canning facility and provided recommendations to consumers. That recall was expanded on July 21 to include additional canned products. A fifth case of botulism potentially linked to one of the recalled products is under investigation in California. This report describes the ongoing investigation by members of OutbreakNet and others and the measures undertaken to control the outbreak, which is the first outbreak of foodborne botulism in the United States associated with a commercial canning facility in approximately 30 years. Clinicians should be vigilant for symptoms of botulism, including symmetric cranial nerve palsies, especially if accompanied by descending flaccid paralysis. Consumers should not eat any of the recalled chili sauce or other recalled

  4. Roosting and foraging social structure of the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Silvis

    Full Text Available Social dynamics are an important but poorly understood aspect of bat ecology. Herein we use a combination of graph theoretic and spatial approaches to describe the roost and social network characteristics and foraging associations of an Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis maternity colony in an agricultural landscape in Ohio, USA. We tracked 46 bats to 50 roosts (423 total relocations and collected 2,306 foraging locations for 40 bats during the summers of 2009 and 2010. We found the colony roosting network was highly centralized in both years and that roost and social networks differed significantly from random networks. Roost and social network structure also differed substantially between years. Social network structure appeared to be unrelated to segregation of roosts between age classes. For bats whose individual foraging ranges were calculated, many shared foraging space with at least one other bat. Compared across all possible bat dyads, 47% and 43% of the dyads showed more than expected overlap of foraging areas in 2009 and 2010 respectively. Colony roosting area differed between years, but the roosting area centroid shifted only 332 m. In contrast, whole colony foraging area use was similar between years. Random roost removal simulations suggest that Indiana bat colonies may be robust to loss of a limited number of roosts but may respond differently from year to year. Our study emphasizes the utility of graphic theoretic and spatial approaches for examining the sociality and roosting behavior of bats. Detailed knowledge of the relationships between social and spatial aspects of bat ecology could greatly increase conservation effectiveness by allowing more structured approaches to roost and habitat retention for tree-roosting, socially-aggregating bat species.

  5. Roosting and foraging social structure of the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvis, Alexander; Kniowski, Andrew B.; Gehrt, Stanley D.; Ford, W. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Social dynamics are an important but poorly understood aspect of bat ecology. Herein we use a combination of graph theoretic and spatial approaches to describe the roost and social network characteristics and foraging associations of an Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) maternity colony in an agricultural landscape in Ohio, USA. We tracked 46 bats to 50 roosts (423 total relocations) and collected 2,306 foraging locations for 40 bats during the summers of 2009 and 2010. We found the colony roosting network was highly centralized in both years and that roost and social networks differed significantly from random networks. Roost and social network structure also differed substantially between years. Social network structure appeared to be unrelated to segregation of roosts between age classes. For bats whose individual foraging ranges were calculated, many shared foraging space with at least one other bat. Compared across all possible bat dyads, 47% and 43% of the dyads showed more than expected overlap of foraging areas in 2009 and 2010 respectively. Colony roosting area differed between years, but the roosting area centroid shifted only 332 m. In contrast, whole colony foraging area use was similar between years. Random roost removal simulations suggest that Indiana bat colonies may be robust to loss of a limited number of roosts but may respond differently from year to year. Our study emphasizes the utility of graphic theoretic and spatial approaches for examining the sociality and roosting behavior of bats. Detailed knowledge of the relationships between social and spatial aspects of bat ecology could greatly increase conservation effectiveness by allowing more structured approaches to roost and habitat retention for tree-roosting, socially-aggregating bat species.

  6. Probabilistic seismic hazard assessment including site effects for Evansville, Indiana, and the surrounding region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Jennifer S.; Bowling, Tim; Nowack, Robert L.; Choi, Yoon S.; Cramer, Chris H.; Boyd, Oliver S.; Bauer, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    We provide a probabilistic seismic hazard assessment for the Evansville, Indiana region incorporating information from new surficial geologic mapping efforts on the part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Kentucky and Indiana State Geological Surveys, as well as information on the thickness and properties of near surface soils and their associated uncertainties. The subsurface information has been compiled to determine bedrock elevation and reference depth-dependent shear-wave velocity models for the different soil types. The probabilistic seismic hazard calculation applied here follows the method used for the 2008 U.S. Geological Survey National Seismic Hazard Maps, with modifications to incorporate estimates of local site conditions and their uncertainties, in a completely probabilistic manner. The resulting analysis shows strong local variations of acceleration with 2 percent probability of exceedance in 50 years, particularly for 0.2-second (s) period spectral acceleration (SA), that are clearly correlated with variations in the thickness of unconsolidated soils above bedrock. These values are much greater than the USGS national seismic hazard map values, which assume B/C site conditions. When compared to the national maps with an assumed uniform site D class amplification factor applied, the high-resolution seismic hazard maps have higher amplitudes for peak ground acceleration and 0.2-s SA for most of the map region. However, deamplification relative to the D class national seismic hazard maps appears to play an important role within the limits of the ancient bedrock valley underlying Evansville where soils are thickest. For 1.0-s SA, the new high-resolution seismic hazard maps show levels consistent with D class site response within the limits of this ancient bedrock valley, but levels consistent with B/C site conditions outside.

  7. A Few More Laps to Go: Tobacco Industry Political Influence, Public Health Advocacy and Tobacco Control Policy Making in Indiana 1893-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, Daniel J. BA; Barnes, Richard L. JD; Glantz, Stanton A. PhD

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco policy has been an issue in Indiana since 1893, when the legislature passed a law prohibiting selling tobacco to people under 16. Beginning as early as 1969, Indiana General Assembly members and tobacco control advocates launched uncoordinated efforts to pass a law restricting smoking in government buildings. The tobacco industry responded with a well-financed and well-connected network of lobbyists, campaign contributions and third-party allies which defeated every ...

  8. Indiana Humanities Council Request for the Indianapolis Energy Conversion Inst. For Phase I of the Indianapolis Energy Conservation Res Initiative also called the smartDESKTOP Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, John B.

    2007-12-06

    The smartDESKTOP Initiative at the Indiana Humanities Council received critical support in building and delivering a digital desktop for Indiana educators through the Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-06ER64282. During the project period September 2006 through October of 2007, the number of Indiana educators with accounts on the smartDESKTOP more than tripled from under 2,000 to more than 7,000 accounts. An external review of the project conducted for the purposes of understanding the impact of the service in Indiana schools revealed that the majority of respondents felt that using the smartDESKTOP did reduce the time they spent managing paper. The same study revealed the challenges of implementing a digital desktop meant to help teachers leverage technology to improve their teaching and ultimately student learning. The most significant outcome of this project is that the Indiana Department of Education expressed interest in assuming responsibility for sustaining this project. The transition of the smartDESKTOP to the Indiana Department of Education was effective on November 1, 2007.

  9. Comparison of benthos and plankton for Waukegan Harbor Area of Concern, Illinois, and Burns Harbor-Port of Indiana non-Area of Concern, Indiana, in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenberry, Barbara C. Scudder; Olds, Hayley T.; Burns, Daniel J.; Dobrowolski, Edward G.; Schmude, Kurt L.

    2017-06-06

    During two seasonal sampling events in spring (June) and fall (August) of 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey collected benthos (benthic invertebrates) and plankton (zooplankton and phytoplankton) at three sites each in the Waukegan Harbor Area of Concern (AOC) in Illinois and in Burns Harbor-Port of Indiana, a non-AOC comparison site in Indiana. The study was done in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. Samples were collected concurrently for physical and chemical parameters (specific conductance, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll-a, total and volatile suspended solids in water samples; particle size and volatile-on-ignition solids of sediment in dredge samples). The purpose of the study was to assess whether or not aquatic communities at the AOC were degraded in comparison to communities at the non-AOC, which was presumed to be less impaired than the AOC. Benthos were collected by using Hester-Dendy artificial substrate samplers and a Ponar® dredge sampler to collect composited grabs of bottom sediment; zooplankton were collected by using tows from depth to the surface with a 63-micrometer mesh plankton net; phytoplankton were collected by using whole water samples composited from set depth intervals. Aquatic communities at the AOC and the non-AOC were compared by use of univariate statistical analyses with metrics such as taxa richness (number of unique taxa), diversity, and a multimetric Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI, for artificial-substrate samples only) as well as by use of multivariate statistical analyses of taxa relative abundances.Although benthos communities at Waukegan Harbor AOC were not rated as degraded in comparison to the non-AOC, metrics for zooplankton and phytoplankton communities did show some impairment for the 2015 sampling. Across seasons, benthos richness and diversity were significantly higher and rated as less degraded at the AOC compared to the non

  10. Hydrology and geochemistry of a slag-affected aquifer and chemical characteristics of slag-affected ground water, northwestern Indiana and northeastern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E. Randall; Greeman, T.K.; Harvey, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    ?aquifer interface. The solid-phase analyses indicated that calcite, dolomite, and quartz generally were present throughout the slag?aquifer system; barian celestite, cristobalite, manganese-bearing calcite, and minrecordite were present in fewer samples. Trace elements that are liberated from the slag may be incorporated as impurities during precipitation of major minerals, sorbed onto clays and other grainsize fractions not analyzed as part of this study, or present in low-abundance minerals that were not detected by the X-ray analysis. Mass-balance and speciation programs were used to identify geochemical processes that may be occurring as water infiltrates through the slag, flows into the aquifer, and discharges into Lake George. The geochemical models indicate that precipitation of calcite may be occurring where slag-affected water enters the aquifer. Models also indicate that dolomite precipitation and clay-mineral dissolution may be occurring at the slag?aquifer interface; however, dolomite precipitation is generally believed to require geologically long time periods. Silica may be dissolving where slag-affected ground water enters the aquifer and may be precipitating where slag-affected ground water discharges to the lakebed of Lake George. In addition to the site-specific study, a statistical analysis of regional water quality was done to compare ground water in wells affected and unaffected by slag. When com-pared to wells in background locations in the Calumet aquifer, wells screened in slag across northwestern Indiana and northeastern Illinois generally had relatively higher pH and specific-conductance values and relatively higher concentrations of alkalinity, dissolved solids, suspended solids, total organic carbon, calcium, potassium, sodium, chloride, aluminum, barium, and possibly magnesium, sulfate, chromium, cobalt, copper, cyanide, manganese, mercury, nickel, and vanadium. When compared to wells in slag and wells in background locations, ground water from immediat

  11. Evaluation of Koontz Lake (North Indiana) Ecological Restoration Options - Comparison of Dredging and Aeration - and Broad Application to USACE Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    considered unacceptable from a management perspective (pers. comm. Kurt Getsinger 5/2017). Additionally, aeration may not feasibly be applied over...other noxious aquatic weeds. Though from a management perspective , this is not an ideal stand-alone treatment; it has several attributes that make it...Environmental Restoration Options” ERDC/EL-TR-18-2 ii Abstract Koontz Lake is located in northern Indiana. The lake has had problems with

  12. Coordinated study of the Devonian black shale in the Illinois Basin: Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lineback, J.A.

    1980-12-31

    An evaluation of the resource potential of the Devonian shales, called the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) was begun. A study of the stratigraphy, structure, composition, and gas content of the Devonian shale in the Illinois Basin was undertaken by the State Geological Surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, under contract to the U.S. DOE as a part of the EGSP. Certain additional data were also developed by other research organizations (including Monsanto Research Corporation-Mound Facility and Battelle-Columbus Laboratory) on cores taken from the Illinois Basin. This report, an overview of geological data on the Illinois basin and interpretations of this data resulting from the EGSP, highlights areas of potential interest as exploration targets for possible natural gas resources in the Devonian shale of the basin. The information in this report was compiled during the EGSP from open file data available at the three State Geological surveys and from new data developed on cores taken by the DOE from the basin specifically for the EGSP. The organically richest shale is found in southeastern Illinois and in most of the Indiana and Kentucky portions of the Illinois Basin. The organic-rich shales in the New Albany are thickest near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky portions of the Illinois Basin. The organic-rich shales in the New Albany are thickest near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky. Natural fractures in the shale may aid in collecting gas from a large volume of shale. These fractures may be more abundant and interconnected to a greater degree in the vicinity of major faults. Major faults along the Rough Creek Lineament and Wabash Valley Fault System cross the deeper part of the basin.

  13. Do Family Caps Reduce Out-of-Wedlock Births? Evidence from Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, New Jersey and Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, Wendy Tanisha; Fairlie, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    Using Current Population Survey (CPS) data from 1989 to 1999, we examine the impact of family cap policies, which deny incremental welfare benefits, on out-of-wedlock birth rates. We use the first five states that were granted waivers from the Department of Health and Human Services to implement family caps as 'natural experiments.' Specifically, we compare trends in out-of-wedlock birth rates in Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, New Jersey and Virginia to trends in states that did not implement fa...

  14. Observed and forecast flood-inundation mapping application-A pilot study of an eleven-mile reach of the White River, Indianapolis, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon H.; Morlock, Scott E.; Arihood, Leslie D.; Kiesler, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Near-real-time and forecast flood-inundation mapping products resulted from a pilot study for an 11-mile reach of the White River in Indianapolis. The study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Indiana Silver Jackets hazard mitigation taskforce members, the National Weather Service (NWS), the Polis Center, and Indiana University, in cooperation with the City of Indianapolis, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, the Indiana Department of Homeland Security, and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water. The pilot project showed that it is technically feasible to create a flood-inundation map library by means of a two-dimensional hydraulic model, use a map from the library to quickly complete a moderately detailed local flood-loss estimate, and automatically run the hydraulic model during a flood event to provide the maps and flood-damage information through a Web graphical user interface. A library of static digital flood-inundation maps was created by means of a calibrated two-dimensional hydraulic model. Estimated water-surface elevations were developed for a range of river stages referenced to a USGS streamgage and NWS flood forecast point colocated within the study reach. These maps were made available through the Internet in several formats, including geographic information system, Keyhole Markup Language, and Portable Document Format. A flood-loss estimate was completed for part of the study reach by using one of the flood-inundation maps from the static library. The Federal Emergency Management Agency natural disaster-loss estimation program HAZUS-MH, in conjunction with local building information, was used to complete a level 2 analysis of flood-loss estimation. A Service-Oriented Architecture-based dynamic flood-inundation application was developed and was designed to start automatically during a flood, obtain near real-time and forecast data (from the colocated USGS streamgage and NWS flood forecast point within the study reach

  15. Geologic characterization and carbon storage resource estimates for the knox group, Illinois Basin, Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, David; Ellett, Kevin; Rupp, John; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Research documented in this report includes (1) refinement and standardization of regional stratigraphy across the 3-state study area in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, (2) detailed core description and sedimentological interpretion of Knox cores from five wells in western Kentucky, and (3) a detailed calculation of carbon storage volumetrics for the Knox using three different methodologies. Seven regional cross sections document Knox formation distribution and thickness. Uniform stratigraphic nomenclature for all three states helps to resolve state-to-state differences that previously made it difficult to evaluate the Knox on a basin-wide scale. Correlations have also refined the interpretation of an important sandstone reservoir interval in southern Indiana and western Kentucky. This sandstone, a CO2 injection zone in the KGS 1 Blan well, is correlated with the New Richmond Sandstone of Illinois. This sandstone is over 350 ft (107 m) thick in parts of southern Indiana. It has excellent porosity and permeability at sufficient depths, and provides an additional sequestration target in the Knox. The New Richmond sandstone interval has higher predictability than vuggy and fractured carbonates, and will be easier to model and monitor CO2 movement after injection.

  16. Environmental Setting and Effects on Water Quality in the Great and Little Miami River Basins, Ohio and Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrewer, Linda M.; Rowe, Gary L.; Reutter, David C.; Moore, Rhett C.; Hambrook, Julie A.; Baker, Nancy T.

    2000-01-01

    The Great and Little Miami River Basins drain approximately 7,354 square miles in southwestern Ohio and southeastern Indiana and are included in the more than 50 major river basins and aquifer systems selected for water-quality assessment as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Principal streams include the Great and Little Miami Rivers in Ohio and the Whitewater River in Indiana. The Great and Little Miami River Basins are almost entirely within the Till Plains section of the Central Lowland physiographic province and have a humid continental climate, characterized by well-defined summer and winter seasons. With the exception of a few areas near the Ohio River, Pleistocene glacial deposits, which are predominantly till, overlie lower Paleozoic limestone, dolomite, and shale bedrock. The principal aquifer is a complex buried-valley system of sand and gravel aquifers capable of supporting sustained well yields exceeding 1,000 gallons per min-ute. Designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a sole-source aquifer, the Buried-Valley Aquifer System is the principal source of drinking water for 1.6 million people in the basins and is the dominant source of water for southwestern Ohio. Water use in the Great and Little Miami River Basins averaged 745 million gallons per day in 1995. Of this amount, 48 percent was supplied by surface water (including the Ohio River) and 52 percent was supplied by ground water. Land-use and waste-management practices influence the quality of water found in streams and aquifers in the Great and Little Miami River Basins. Land use is approximately 79 percent agriculture, 13 percent urban (residential, industrial, and commercial), and 7 percent forest. An estimated 2.8 million people live in the Great and Little Miami River Basins; major urban areas include Cincinnati and Dayton, Ohio. Fertilizers and pesticides associated with agricultural activity, discharges from municipal and

  17. Flood-inundation maps for Cedar Creek at 18th Street at Auburn, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2018-02-27

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 1.9-mile reach of Cedar Creek at Auburn, Indiana (Ind.), from the First Street bridge, downstream to the streamgage at 18th Street, then ending approximately 1,100 feet (ft) downstream of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science web site at https://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on Cedar Creek at 18th Street at Auburn, Ind. (station number 04179520). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained from the USGS National Water Information System at https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, although forecasts of flood hydrographs are not available at this site (ABBI3).Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at the Cedar Creek at 18th Street at Auburn, Ind. streamgage and the documented high-water marks from the flood of March 11, 2009. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to compute seven water-surface profiles for flood stages referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 7 ft, or near bankfull, to 13 ft, in 1-foot increments. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar] data having a 0.98-ft vertical accuracy and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each water level.The availability of these maps, along with internet information regarding current stage from the USGS streamgage at Cedar Creek

  18. Flood-inundation maps for the Patoka River in and near Jasper, southwestern Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2018-01-23

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 9.5-mile reach of the Patoka River in and near the city of Jasper, southwestern Indiana (Ind.), from the streamgage near County Road North 175 East, downstream to State Road 162, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science web site at https://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage Patoka River at Jasper, Ind. (station number 03375500). The Patoka streamgage is located at the upstream end of the 9.5-mile river reach. Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained from the USGS National Water Information System at https://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, although flood forecasts and stages for action and minor, moderate, and major flood stages are not currently (2017) available at this site (JPRI3).Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at the Patoka River at Jasper, Ind., streamgage and the documented high-water marks from the flood of April 30, 2017. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to compute five water-surface profiles for flood stages referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 15 feet (ft), or near bankfull, to 19 ft. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar] data having a 0.98 ft vertical accuracy and 4.9 ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each water level.The availability of these flood-inundation maps, along with real

  19. Flood-inundation maps for the White River at Noblesville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Zachary W.

    2017-11-02

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 7.5-mile reach of the White River at Noblesville, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science website at https://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the White River at Noblesville, Ind., streamgage (USGS station number 03349000). Real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained from the USGS National Water Information System at https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at the same site as the USGS streamgage (NWS site NBLI3).Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional, step-backwater hydraulic modeling software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the current (2016) stage-discharge rating at the USGS streamgage 03349000, White River at Noblesville, Ind., and documented high-water marks from the floods of September 4, 2003, and May 6, 2017. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 15 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 10.0 ft (the NWS “action stage”) to 24.0 ft, which is the highest stage interval of the current (2016) USGS stage-discharge rating curve and 2 ft higher than the NWS “major flood stage.” The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging data having a 0.98-ft vertical accuracy and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each stage.The availability of these maps, along with internet

  20. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River at Shoals, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Justin A.

    2016-05-06

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5.9-mile reach of the East Fork White River at Shoals, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the East Fork White River at Shoals, Ind. (USGS station number 03373500). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS AHPS site SHLI3). NWS AHPS forecast peak stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation.Flood profiles were computed for the East Fork White River reach by means of a one-dimensional, step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the current stage-discharge relation (USGS rating no. 43.0) at USGS streamgage 03373500, East Fork White River at Shoals, Ind. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to compute 26 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from approximately bankfull (10 ft) to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve (35 ft). The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM), derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) data, to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The areal extent of the 24-ft flood-inundation map was

  1. Flood-inundation maps for the Iroquois River at Rensselaer, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Bunch, Aubrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 4.0-mile reach of the Iroquois River at Rensselaer, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 05522500, Iroquois River at Rensselaer, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=05522500). In addition, the National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs at the Rensselaer streamgage. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/), may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the Iroquois River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current (June 27, 2012) stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 05522500, Iroquois River at Rensselaer, Ind., and high-water marks from the flood of July 2003. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine nine water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The availability of these maps, along with Internet information regarding

  2. Flood-inundation maps for the Wabash River at Terre Haute, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.3-mi reach of the Wabash River from 0.1 mi downstream of the Interstate 70 bridge to 1.1 miles upstream of the Route 63 bridge, Terre Haute, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to select water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage Wabash River at Terre Haute (station number 03341500). Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv/?site_no=03341500&agency_cd=USGS&p"). In addition, the same data are provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps//). Within this system, the NWS forecasts flood hydrographs for the Wabash River at Terre Haute that may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relation at the Wabash River at the Terre Haute streamgage. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 22 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-ft interval referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bank-full to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data having a 0.37-ft vertical accuracy and a 1.02-ft horizontal accuracy) to delineate the area flooded at each water

  3. Flood inundation maps for the Wabash River at New Harmony, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2016-10-11

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 3.68-mile reach of the Wabash River extending 1.77 miles upstream and 1.91 miles downstream from streamgage 03378500 at New Harmony, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage at Wabash River at New Harmony, Ind. (station 03378500). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http://water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NHRI3).Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at the Wabash River at New Harmony, Ind., streamgage and the documented high-water marks from the flood of April 27–28, 2013. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to compute 17 water-surface profiles for flood stages at approximately 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 10.0 feet, or near bankfull, to 25.4 feet, the highest stage of the stage-discharge rating curve used in the model. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) data having a 0.98-ft vertical accuracy and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each water level.The availability of these maps along with Internet information regarding current stage from the USGS streamgage at Wabash River at New

  4. Flood-inundation maps for the White River at Newberry, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Kim, Moon H.; Menke, Chad D.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 4.9-mile reach of the White River at Newberry, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03360500, White River at Newberry, Ind. Current conditions at the USGS streamgage may be obtained on the Internet (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=03360500). The National Weather Service (NWS) forecasts flood hydrographs at the Newberry streamgage. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the White River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at USGS streamgage 03360500, White River at Newberry, Ind., and high-water marks from a flood in June 2008.The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 22 water-surface profiles for flood stages a1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The availability of these maps, along with Internet information regarding current stage from the USGS streamgage at Newberry, Ind., and forecasted stream stages from the NWS, provide emergency management personnel and

  5. Flood-inundation maps for the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 1.8-mile reach of the East Fork White River near Bedford, Indiana (Ind.) were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selectedwater levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=03371500. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http://water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages, including the East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the East Fork White River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 03371500, East Fork White River near Bedford, Ind., and documented high-water marks from the flood of June 2008. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 20 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM, derived from

  6. Flood-inundation maps for the Yellow River at Plymouth, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Chad D.; Bunch, Aubrey R.; Kim, Moon H.

    2016-11-16

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 4.9-mile reach of the Yellow River at Plymouth, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 05516500, Yellow River at Plymouth, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=05516500. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood-warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS AHPS forecasts flood hydrographs at many sites that are often collocated with USGS streamgages, including the Yellow River at Plymouth, Ind. NWS AHPS-forecast peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood and forecasts of flood hydrographs at this site.For this study, flood profiles were computed for the Yellow River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the current stage-discharge relations at the Yellow River streamgage, in combination with the flood-insurance study for Marshall County (issued in 2011). The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine eight water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The 1-percent annual exceedance probability flood profile elevation (flood elevation with recurrence intervals within 100 years) is within

  7. Flood-inundation maps for the Flatrock River at Columbus, Indiana, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 5-mile reach of the Flatrock River on the western side of Columbus, Indiana, from County Road 400N to the river mouth at the confluence with Driftwood River, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ and the Federal Flood Inundation Mapper Web site at http://wim.usgs.gov/FIMI/FloodInundationMapper.html, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Flatrock River at Columbus (station number 03363900). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service, which also presents the USGS data, at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/. Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at the Flatrock River streamgage, high-water marks that were surveyed following the flood of June 7, 2008, and water-surface profiles from the current flood-insurance study for the City of Columbus. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 12 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 9 ft or near bankfull to 20 ft, which exceeds the stages that correspond to both the estimated 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability flood (500-year recurrence interval flood) and the maximum recorded peak flow. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data having a 0.37 ft

  8. Flood-inundation maps for the St. Marys River at Fort Wayne, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Chad D.; Kim, Moon H.; Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2012-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 9-mile reach of the St. Marys River that extends from South Anthony Boulevard to Main Street at Fort Wayne, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Fort Wayne. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site, depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 04182000 St. Marys River near Fort Wayne, Ind. Current conditions at the USGS streamgages in Indiana may be obtained from the National Water Information System: Web Interface. In addition, the information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system. The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often collocated at USGS streamgages. That forecasted peak-stage information, also available on the Internet, may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. In this study, water-surface profiles were simulated for the stream reach by means of a hydraulic one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relation at the USGS streamgage 04182000 St. Marys River near Fort Wayne, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to simulate 11 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-ft intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to approximately the highest recorded water level at the streamgage. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level. A flood inundation map was generated for each water-surface profile stage (11 maps in all) so that for any given flood stage users will be

  9. Flood-inundation maps for the St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Zachary W.

    2017-02-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.6-mile reach of the St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at https://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind. Real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS site EKMI3).Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional, step-backwater hydraulic modeling software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the current stage-discharge rating at the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind., and the documented high-water marks from the flood of March 1982. The hydraulic model was then used to compute six water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 23.0 ft (the NWS “action stage”) to 28.0 ft, which is the highest stage interval of the current USGS stage-discharge rating curve and 1 ft higher than the NWS “major flood stage.” The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar] data having a 0.49-ft root mean squared error and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution, resampled to a 10-ft grid) to delineate the area flooded at each stage.The availability of these maps, along with Internet information

  10. Cap-and-trade policy: The influence on investments in carbon dioxide reducing technologies in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahie, Monique

    With most of the energy produced in the state of Indiana coming from coal, the implementation of policy instruments such as cap-and-trade, which is included in the most recent climate bill, will have significant effects. This thesis provides an analysis of the effects that a cap-and-trade policy might have on the investment decisions for alternative technologies in the power plant sector in Indiana. Two economic models of representative coal-fired power plants, Gallagher (600MW) and Rockport (2600MW), are selected and used to evaluate the repowering decision of a plant for several technologies: integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), wind farm combined with natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) and supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC). The firm will make its decisions based on the net present value (NPV) of cost estimates for these CO2 reducing technologies, the cost of purchasing offsets and CO 2 allowances. This model is applied to a base case and three American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 cases derived from the Energy Information Administration (EIA, 2009b). A sensitivity analysis is done on the discount rate and capital costs. The results of the study indicate that a SCPC plant without carbon capture and storage (CCS) is the least costly compliance option for both plants under all of the cases while retrofitting the existing plant with CCS is the most expensive. Gallagher's three least expensive options across most scenarios were SCPC without CCS, the operation of the existing plant as is and investment in wind plus NGCC. Rockport's three least expensive compliance options across most scenarios were SCPC without CCS, the operation of the existing plant as is and IGCC without CCS. For both plants, when a 12% discount rate is utilized, NPV of costs are generally lower and the operation of the existing plant technology with the aid of allowances and offsets to be in compliance is the cheapest option. If capital costs were to decrease by 30%, a SCPC

  11. Flood-inundation maps for North Fork Salt Creek at Nashville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Zachary W.

    2017-11-13

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 3.2-mile reach of North Fork Salt Creek at Nashville, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Transportation. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science website at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding that correspond to selected water levels (stages) at the North Fork Salt Creek at Nashville, Ind., streamgage (USGS station number 03371650). Real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also shows observed USGS stages at the same site as the USGS streamgage (NWS site NFSI3).Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional, step-backwater hydraulic modeling software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the current (2015) stage-discharge rating at the USGS streamgage 03371650, North Fork Salt Creek at Nashville, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 12 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals, except for the highest profile of 22.9 ft, referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 12.0 ft (the NWS “action stage”) to 22.9 ft, which is the highest stage of the current (2015) USGS stage-discharge rating curve and 1.9 ft higher than the NWS “major flood stage.” The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging data having a 0.98-ft vertical accuracy and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each stage.The availability of these maps, along with information regarding current stage from the USGS

  12. Flood-inundation maps for the Wabash River at Memorial Bridge at Vincennes, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.; Menke, Chad D.

    2017-08-23

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 10.2-mile reach of the Wabash River from Sevenmile Island to 3.7 mile downstream of Memorial Bridge (officially known as Lincoln Memorial Bridge) at Vincennes, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 03343010, Wabash River at Memorial Bridge at Vincennes, Ind. Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site.For this study, flood profiles were computed for the Wabash River reach by means of a one-dimensional stepbackwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 03343010, Wabash River at Memorial Bridge at Vincennes, Ind., and preliminary high-water marks from a high-water event on April 27, 2013. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine 19 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 10 feet (ft) or near bankfull to 28 ft, the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System (GIS) digital elevation model (DEM, derived from Light Detection and Ranging [lidar] data having a 0.98-ft vertical accuracy and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) in order to delineate the area flooded at each water level.The availability of these maps—along with Internet information

  13. Flood-inundation maps for the Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2017-02-13

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 4.1-mile reach of the Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Indiana, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The floodinundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at https://water. usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Ind. (station number 03361500). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained from the USGS National Water Information System at https://waterdata. usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at https://water.weather.gov/ ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (SBVI3). Flood profiles were computed for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relation at the Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Ind., streamgage. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to compute 12 water-surface profiles for flood stages referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from 9.0 feet, or near bankfull, to 19.4 feet, the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar] data having a 0.98-foot vertical accuracy and 4.9-foot horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each water level. The availability of these maps, along with Internet information regarding current stage from the USGS streamgage at the Big Blue River at Shelbyville, Ind., and forecasted stream stages from the NWS, will provide emergency management personnel and residents with information that is critical for flood response

  14. Prevalence of conservation design in an agriculture-dominated landscape: the case of Northern Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Julie; Prokopy, Linda Stalker

    2009-06-01

    We examined the prevalence of residential development that occurs with consideration of the natural features of the site, known as conservation design, within county-level planning jurisdictions across Northern Indiana. Using data from telephone interviews with representatives of planning departments, jurisdictions were ranked based on reported use of conservation design. Three categories of use emerged from the data: no use, use of individual practices associated with conservation design, and integration of multiple conservation design practices. Qualitative data analysis revealed that conservation design practices were not being used widely and, when used, were often used to fulfill stormwater requirements. Statistical analysis, using data from interviews, spatial data sets, and the U.S. Census Bureau, identified several significant positive predictors of the levels of conservation design use including conversion of forest or agricultural land cover to urban uses and education levels in the jurisdiction. Many of the interviewees noted that agricultural land is perceived to meet open space needs within their counties. Given that agricultural land does not fully meet all ecosystem needs, education about the benefits of other types of open space is suggested.

  15. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Indiana. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  16. Monitoring Tracer Stones in Fall Creek Gorge of Warren County, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaven, S.; Anders, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Fall Creek, in western Indiana, is an incised ravine, draining a ~25 km2 rolling upland. The pothole section of Fall Creek Gorge is a bedrock-incised step-pool system consisting of a 70 meter long reach which drops approximately 3 meters over a series of 12 hydraulic jumps. Repeated surveys of bed topography are used to estimate sediment transport through this reach. In addition, we track the motion of locally-collected cobble to boulder sized particles using passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We observed a large change in bed morphology associated with a heavy rainfall event. Specifically, there was a net transport of sediment into the potholes reach. During the same event, tagged particles moved into and through the study area. The mobility of large particles supports the possibility that they act as tools shaping the potholes. Through ongoing monitoring we will assess the relationship between precipitation events and sediment transport and estimate the residence time of large particles within potholes. The ultimate goal is to understand the relationship between large sediment transport and pothole formation.;

  17. Stand characteristics and productivity potential of Indiana surface mines reclaimed under SMCRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groninger, J.W.; Fillmore, S.D.; Rathfon, R.A. [South Illinois University, Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Forestry

    2006-06-15

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) addresses a wide range of environmental concerns. However, its impacts on forest stand development and productive potential have only recently been investigated. We surveyed the vegetation and forest productivity on 22 surface mine sites throughout the coal-bearing region of Indiana that were reclaimed to forest cover under the provisions of SMCRA 7-14 years prior to sampling. Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) and green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) were the most widely occurring tree species. Tall fescue and goldenrod were the most widely occurring nonarborescent species. Median site index (base age 50 for black oak) was 30 ft. Although satisfying forest cover stocking requirements for bond release, these reclaimed surface mines almost always displayed a level of productivity far below those of native forests typical of this region. Reclamation techniques differing from those used on these study sites are needed to restore forest productivity to surface-mined lands while still complying with SMCRA.

  18. Producing fired bricks using coal slag from a gasification plant in indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.-M.; Chou, I.-Ming; Chou, S.-F.J.; Stucki, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is a promising power generation technology which increases the efficiency of coal-to-power conversion and enhances carbon dioxide concentration in exhaust emissions for better greenhouse gas capture. Two major byproducts from IGCC plants are bottom slag and sulfur. The sulfur can be processed into commercially viable products, but high value applications need to be developed for the slag material in order to improve economics of the process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of incorporating coal slag generated by the Wabash River IGCC plant in Indiana as a raw material for the production of fired bricks. Full-size bricks containing up to 20 wt% of the coal slag were successfully produced at a bench-scale facility. These bricks have color and texture similar to those of regular fired bricks and their water absorption properties met the ASTM specifications for a severe weathering grade. Other engineering properties tests, including compressive strength tests, are in progress.

  19. Preliminary survey report: control technology for formaldehyde emissions at Jasper Laminates, Jasper, Indiana, October 19, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, V.D.

    1983-07-29

    An onsite visit was made to Jasper Laminates, Jasper, Indiana to observe the processes used in veneering wood panels by a heater platen press method, and methods of controlling formaldehyde emissions. The facility produced panels for pianos, organs, office furniture and other wood products, using primarily the hot press process along with some radiofrequency (RF) pressing of curved panels and small parts. The glue most often used was a urea/formaldehyde resin adhesive. The hot presses were located under one large ventilated enclosure, measuring about 20 by 150 feet. There were also eight ventilation fans in the ceiling and auxiliary fans used to provide additional cooling air for workers and for the caul plates. Therefore, the primary methods of controlling formaldehyde exposure were dispersion, using auxiliary fans, and area ventilation. No partial-shift-time weighted-average formaldehyde concentrations were measured at over 1 part per million (ppm). For two workers unloading different hot presses, short-term breathing-zone concentrations occasionally reached 2 ppm. The author concludes that this facility offers the opportunity to study large-scale area ventilation with passive make-up air supply, and the appropriate use of auxiliary fans.

  20. Preliminary survey report: control technology for formaldehyde emissions at Hoosier Panel, New Albany, Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, V.D.

    1982-12-01

    An onsite visit was made to the Hoosier Panel Company, New Albany, Indiana to observe processes and controls in the veneering of wood panels. Most of the bonding of the veneer to the core was accomplished through use of a urea/formaldehyde resin and a hot press method. Some work was done using a cold-press process in which the glue was heated with radio-frequency radiation. Banding of the core with solid-wood edges prior to veneering also used an adhesive that may contain formaldehyde. At least five different recipes were used for panel glue, all of which involve the Perkins L-100 urea/formaldehyde resin. A canopy hood was installed over each press. There were six wall fans in the plate cooling rooms. Airflow across the glue room was also aided by auxiliary fans. Routine air sampling was not performed. A safety committee inspected the site monthly. The local exhaust ventilation hoods had an insufficient flow rate to capture vapors beyond the boundary of the canopy openings. The facility offered a unique approach to caul plate cooling which also provided a large quantity of the general ventilation airflow. The author recommends that the auxiliary fans might be better positioned to contribute more effectively to controlling exposures.

  1. Do Wind Turbines Affect Weather Conditions?: A Case Study in Indiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan F. Henschen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbines are becoming increasingly widespread in the United States as the world looks for cleaner sources of energy. Scientists, policymakers, and citizens have strong opinions regarding the positive and negative effects of wind energy projects, and there is a great deal of misinformation about wind energy circulating on the Web and other media sources. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of how the rotation of hundreds of turbines can influence local weather conditions within a wind farm and in the surrounding areas. This experiment measures temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity, and evaporation with five weather instruments at Meadow Lake Wind Farm located in White, Jasper, and Benton Counties, Indiana, from November 4 through November 18, 2010. The data show that as wind passes throughout the wind farm, the air warms during the overnight and early morning hours and cools during daytime hours. Observed lower humidity rates and higher evaporation rates downwind also demonstrate that the air dries out as it travels through the wind farm. Further research over multiple seasons is necessary to examine the effects of warmer nighttime temperatures and drier conditions progressively downwind of the installation. Nevertheless, wind turbines did not negatively affect local weather patterns in our small-scale research and may actually prevent frost, which could have important positive implications for farmers by potentially prolonging the growing season.

  2. St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Indiana, flood-inundation HEC-RAS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Zachary W.

    2017-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a 6.6-mile reach of the St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Indiana were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind. Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at this site (NWS site EKMI3). Flood profiles were computed for the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind., reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater hydraulic modeling software developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated using the current stage-discharge rating at the USGS streamgage 04101000, St. Joseph River at Elkhart, Ind. The hydraulic model was then used to compute 6 water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot (ft) intervals referenced to the streamgage datum ranging from 23.0 ft (the NWS “action stage”) to 28.0 ft, which is the highest stage interval of the current USGS stage-discharge rating curve and 1 ft higher than the NWS “major flood stage.” The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a Geographic Information System digital elevation model (derived from light detection and ranging [lidar]) data having a 0.49-ft root mean squared error and 4.9-ft horizontal resolution) to delineate the area flooded at each stage. The availability of these maps, along with Internet information regarding current stage from the USGS streamgage

  3. Flood inundation maps for the Wabash and Eel Rivers at Logansport, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an 8.3-mile reach of the Wabash River and a 7.6-mile reach of the Eel River at Logansport, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage Wabash River at Logansport, Ind. (sta. no. 03329000) and USGS streamgage Eel River near Logansport, Ind. (sta. no. 03328500). Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages. NWS-forecasted peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the stream reaches by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgages 03329000, Wabash River at Logansport, Ind., and 03328500, Eel River near Logansport, Ind. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine five water-surface profiles for flood stage at 1-foot intervals referenced to the Wabash River streamgage datum, and four water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the Eel River streamgage datum. The stages range from bankfull to approximately the highest

  4. A Large Block Experiment for Measurement of the Effective Permeability of Indiana Limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Selvadurai, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    The measurement of permeability of large specimens of a rock specimen is bound to provide a clearer picture of the distribution of permeability of predominantly sedimentary rocks. Such distributions can be the basis for evaluating the effective permeability of the rock specimen in the presence of permeability inhomogeneity. This paper discusses the development of a patch permeability test that can be used to measure the near surface permeability characteristics of a large cuboidal block of Indiana Limestone measuring 508 mm. The test is used to generate the near surface permeability of six faces of the cuboid and these estimates are used to generate, via a kriging procedure, the interior permeability distributions of permeability. These permeability distributions are used to examine the validity of theoretical estimates that have been developed in the literature to determine the effective permeability of the material. The classical Wiener (1912) bounds, the estimates provided by Matheron (1967) and Journel et al. (1993) are developed using the experimentally derived data. The procedure is also validated by conducting computational experiments involving one-dimensional flow along three orthogonal directions. References: Wiener, O. (1912) Die Theorie des Mischkörpers für das Feld des stationaären Strömung. Erste Abhandlung die Mittelswertesätsze für Kraft, Polarisation und Energie. Abh. Math.-Physischen Klasse Königl. Säcsh Gesell. Wissen, 32: 509-604. Matheron, G. (1967) Eléments pour une Théorie des Milieux Poroeux, Masson, Paris. Journel, A.G, Deutsch, C.V. and Desbrats, A.J. (1986) Power averaging for block effective permeability, SPE 15128, Society of Petroleum Engineers.

  5. Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Tianhuan [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  6. Quantitative multiplex assay for simultaneous detection and identification of Indiana and New Jersey serotypes of vesicular stomatitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Fernandez, Jovita

    2005-01-01

    In order to establish a rapid and reliable system for the detection of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), we developed a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay for the detection, quantification, and differentiation of the major serotypes, VSV Indiana and VSV New Jersey, using a closed......-tube multiplex format. The detection system is based on the recently invented primer-probe energy transfer (PriProET) system. A region of the gene encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was amplified by using VSV-specific primers in the presence of two serotype-specific fluorescent probes. By incorporating...... identification of VSV....

  7. Occurrence and trends of selected nutrients, other chemical constituents, diatoms, and cyanobacteria in bottom sediment, Lake Maxinkuckee, northern Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2015-01-01

    Bottom-sediment cores collected in 2013 were used to investigate the recent and predevelopment (pre-1863) occurrence of selected nutrients (total nitrogen and total phosphorus), carbon, 39 trace elements, diatoms, cyanobacterial akinetes, and 3 radionuclides in the bottom sediment of Lake Maxinkuckee, a kettle lake in northern Indiana. Total nitrogen concentrations in the recent sediment (since about 1970) were variable with no consistent trend indicated. Total phosphorus concentrations in the recent sediment generally were uniform from about 1970 to about 2000 and indicated consistent inputs to the lake during that time. Subsequently, the history of total phosphorus deposition apparently was obscured by postdepositional upward diffusion.

  8. THE TRUE IDENTITY OF COPELAND'S AQUATIC SCUTTLE FLY (DIPTERA: PHORIDAE) FROM INDIANA AND RECOGNITION OF A SIBLING SPECIES FROM TEXAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, R. Henry L.; Copeland, Robert S.; Murrell, Ebony

    2012-01-01

    Among the insects reported by Copeland (1989) breeding in the waters retained by treeholes in Indiana was a scuttle fly identified by W. H. Robinson as Megaselia scalaris (Loew). It is here reported that in fact this fly, along with fresh material from Illinois and Missouri, is M. imitatrix Borgmeier, whose type series was from Puerto Rico. An aquatic species reported from Texas is recognized as a sibling species of M. imitatrix and is named M. hansonix Disney, sp. nov. A single female from Brazil represents a third species of this complex, thus raising doubts about the identity of specimens from Brazil attributed to M. imitatrix by Benton and Claugher (2000). PMID:22879679

  9. Prevalence of Salmonella Isolates from Chicken and Pig Slaughterhouses and Emergence of Ciprofloxacin and Cefotaxime Co-Resistant S. enterica Serovar Indiana in Henan, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bai

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Salmonella from chicken and pig slaughterhouses in Henan, China and antimicrobial susceptibility of these isolates to antibiotics was determined. From 283 chicken samples and 240 pig samples collected, 128 and 70 Salmonella isolates were recovered with an isolation rate of 45.2 and 29.2% respectively. The predominant serovars in chicken samples were S. enterica serovar Enteritidis, S. enterica serovar Hadar and S. enterica serovar Indiana, while those in pig samples were S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, S. enterica serovar Derby and S. enterica serovar Enteritidis. Resistance to ciprofloxacin was 8.6 and 10.0% for isolates from chickens and pigs respectively, whereas resistance to cefotaxime was 5.5 and 8.6%, respectively. Multidrug resistance (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agent was markedly higher in pig isolates (57.1% than in chicken isolates (39.8%. Of particular concern was the detection of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates, which pose risk to public health. All 16 S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates detected were resistant to ciprofloxacin, among which 11 were co-resistant to cefotaxime. The S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates accumulated point mutations in quinolone resistance determination regions of gyrA (S83F/D87G or S83F/D87N and parC (T57S/S80R. Two plasmid mediated quinolone resistant determinants were found with aac (6'-Ib-cr and oqxAB in 16 and 12 S. enterica serovar Indiana isolates respectively. Cefotaxime-resistance of S. enterica serovar Indiana was associated with the acquisition of a blaCTX-M-65 gene. The potential risk of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. enterica serovar Indiana infection is a significant concern due to limited alternative treatment options. Reduction of Salmonella in chicken and pig slaughterhouses, in particular, ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. enterica serovar Indiana will be an important

  10. [Epidemic condition and molecular subtyping of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant Salmonella Indiana isolated from retail chicken carcasses in six provinces, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yujie; He, Yingying; Wang, Yeru; Cui, Shenghui; Chen, Qiuxia; Liu, Guihua; Chen, Qian; Zhou, Gang; Yang, Baowei; Huang, Jinlin; Yu, Hongxia; Li, Fengqin

    2015-08-01

    To elucidate the epidemic condition and molecular subtyping of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant Salmonella Indiana (S. Indiana) isolated from retail chicken carcasses in six provinces of China. A total of 2 647 Salmonella strains isolated from retail chicken carcasses collected from six provinces of China were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. All Salmonella isolates co-resistant to ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime were further characterized by serotyping, extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) producing strains screening and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. Among 2 629 Salmonella isolates tested, 227 (8.52%) isolates were co-resistant to ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime/cefotaxime (Beijing: 11.67% (99/874), Jilin: 8.20% (60/726), Guangdong: 1.39% (7/502), Jiangsu: 15.61% (42/260), Shaanxi: 8.56% (16/186), Inner Mongolia: 0 (0/81)), and 224 of them were identified as S. Indiana. 213 (95.10%) isolates of S. Indiana were ESBLs producing strains. All ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. Indiana isolates developed a multi-drug resistant profile and 17.86% (40/224) of them were resistant to all antibiotics tested except carbapenems, and 50.89% (114/224) of them resistant to 9 antibiotics, additionally, 25.45% (57/224) of them showed multi-drug resistance to 8 antibiotics. All ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. Indiana isolates were divided into 32 PFGE clusters and 150 PFGE patterns. Strains of S. Indiana from same or different sampling site and time seemed to either share the same PFGE patterns or be differential to each other in different regions. The results indicated that chicken carcasses collected from parts of China were heavily contaminated by ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant S. Indiana and could serve as an important reservoir of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime co-resistant Salmonella. Molecular subtyping results indicated that cross contamination or common pollution source might be in these strains.

  11. Comparison of Indiana High School Football Injury Rates by Inclusion of the USA Football “Heads Up Football” Player Safety Coach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Dalton, Sara L.; Roos, Karen G.; Djoko, Aristarque; Phelps, Jennifer; Dompier, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Indiana, high school football coaches are required to complete a coaching education course with material related to concussion awareness, equipment fitting, heat emergency preparedness, and proper technique. Some high schools have also opted to implement a player safety coach (PSC). The PSC, an integral component of USA Football’s Heads Up Football (HUF) program, is a coach whose primary responsibility is to ensure that other coaches are implementing proper tackling and blocking techniques alongside other components of the HUF program. Purpose: To compare injury rates in Indiana high school football teams by their usage of a PSC or online coaching education only. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Athletic trainers (ATs) evaluated and tracked injuries at each practice and game during the 2015 high school football season. Players were drawn from 6 teams in Indiana. The PSC group, which used the PSC component, was comprised of 204 players from 3 teams. The “education only” group (EDU), which utilized coaching education only, was composed of 186 players from 3 teams. Injury rates and injury rate ratios (IRRs) were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: During 25,938 athlete-exposures (AEs), a total of 149 injuries were reported, of which 54 (36.2%) and 95 (63.8%) originated from the PSC and EDU groups, respectively. The practice injury rate was lower in the PSC group than the EDU group (2.99 vs 4.83/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.40-0.95). The game injury rate was also lower in the PSC group than the EDU group (11.37 vs 26.37/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.25-0.74). When restricted to concussions only, the rate was lower in the PSC group (0.09 vs 0.73/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.01-0.94), although only 1 concussion was reported in the PSC group. No differences were found in game concussion rates (0.60 vs 4.39/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.02-1.11). Conclusion: Findings support the PSC as an effective

  12. Biological assessment and streambed-sediment chemistry of streams in the Indianapolis metropolitan area, Indiana, 2003–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, David C.

    2012-01-01

    During 2003–2008, the U.S. Geological Survey sampled 13 sites in the Indianapolis metropolitan area in Indiana for benthic invertebrates, fish communities, and streambed-sediment chemistry. Data from seven White River sites and six tributary sites complement surface-water chemistry data collected by the Indianapolis Department of Public Works. The information is being used to assess changes in water quality in conjunction with the City's programs to reduce combined sewer overflows and other point and nonpoint sources of pollution in the Indianapolis area. During the study, 233 benthic-invertebrate taxa were identified from which the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) Index, the Hilsenhoff Biotic Index (HBI), and the Invertebrate Community Index (ICI) were calculated. EPT index scores ranged from 2 to 16 on the White River and from 2 to 17 on the tributaries. EPT index scores indicate that these pollution-intolerant taxa are more prevalent upstream from and away from the combined-sewer areas of Indianapolis. HBI scores from sites on the White River ranged from 4.67 (good) to 9.55 (very poor), whereas on the tributaries, scores ranged from 4.21 (very good) to 8.14 (poor). Lower HBI scores suggest that less organic pollution was present and, like the EPT scores, indicate better conditions where combined-sewer overflows (CSOs) are not present. Similarly, ICI scores indicated better conditions upstream from the CSO outfalls on the White River. White River scores ranged from 12 to 46, where higher ICI scores indicate better conditions in the benthic-invertebrate community. ICI scores at the tributary sites ranged from 12 to 52, with the highest scores on streams without CSOs.

  13. Iron and steel foundries manual emissions testing of cupola baghouse at Waupaca Foundry in Tell City, Indiana: Volume 1 -- Report text and appendices A and B. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, F.; Scheffel, D.F.

    1999-06-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Emission Standards Division (ESD) is investigating iron and steel foundries to identify and quantify hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) emitted from cupolas; electric arc furnaces; and pouring, cooling and shakedown operations of sand mold casting processes. The Waupaca Foundry, located in Tell City, Indiana, uses a baghouse and was the subject of this test program. Testing at the Waupaca Foundry was conducted by two EMAD contractors to address the following ESD requirements: (1) characterize HAP emissions from cupolas that are controlled by baghouses; (2) characterize uncontrolled HAP emissions from pouring, cooling, and shakeout (PCS) processes; (3) determine baghouse performance in controlling HAP emissions from cupolas; and (4) identify surrogates for estimating HAP emissions from the subject foundry processes.

  14. A county-level cross-sectional analysis of positive deviance to assess multiple population health outcomes in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendryx, Michael; Guerra-Reyes, Lucia; Holland, Benjamin D; McGinnis, Michael Dean; Meanwell, Emily; Middlestadt, Susan E; Yoder, Karen M

    2017-10-11

    To test a positive deviance method to identify counties that are performing better than statistical expectations on a set of population health indicators. Quantitative, cross-sectional county-level secondary analysis of risk variables and outcomes in Indiana. Data are analysed using multiple linear regression to identify counties performing better or worse than expected given traditional risk indicators, with a focus on 'positive deviants' or counties performing better than expected. Counties in Indiana (n=92) constitute the unit of analysis. Per cent adult obesity, per cent fair/poor health, low birth weight per cent, per cent with diabetes, years of potential life lost, colorectal cancer incidence rate and circulatory disease mortality rate. County performance that outperforms expectations is for the most part outcome specific. But there are a few counties that performed particularly well across most measures. The positive deviance approach provides a means for state and local public health departments to identify places that show better health outcomes despite demographic, social, economic or behavioural disadvantage. These places may serve as case studies or models for subsequent investigations to uncover best practices in the face of adversity and generalise effective approaches to other areas. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Flood-inundation maps for the North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon H.; Johnson, Esther M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a reach of the North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Indiana (Ind.), were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at USGS streamgage 04100222, North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Ind. Current conditions for estimating near-real-time areas of inundation using USGS streamgage information may be obtained on the Internet at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/in/nwis/uv?site_no=04100222. In addition, information has been provided to the National Weather Service (NWS) for incorporation into their Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) flood warning system (http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/). The NWS AHPS forecasts flood hydrographs at many places that are often colocated with USGS streamgages, including the North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Ind. NWS AHPS-forecast peak-stage information may be used in conjunction with the maps developed in this study to show predicted areas of flood inundation. For this study, flood profiles were computed for the North Branch Elkhart River reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The hydraulic model was calibrated by using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgage 04100222, North Branch Elkhart River at Cosperville, Ind., and preliminary high-water marks from the flood of March 1982. The calibrated hydraulic model was then used to determine four water-surface profiles for flood stages at 1-foot intervals referenced to the streamgage datum and ranging from bankfull to the highest stage of the current stage-discharge rating curve. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system (GIS

  16. Seasonal geomorphic processes and rates of sand movement at Mount Baldy dune in Indiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilibarda, Zoran; Kilibarda, Vesna

    2016-12-01

    Winds are very strong, frequent, and have high energy (annual DP ∼800 VU) along the southern shores of Lake Michigan, allowing the coexistence of fixed and active dunes. Six years (2007-13) of monitoring Mount Baldy in the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore reveals that this is the most active coastal dune in the Great Lakes region. This paper documents aeolian processes and changes in the dune's morphology that occur temporarily, following storms, or seasonally, due to weather (climate) variations. Most of the sand transport in this area takes place during strong storms with gale force (>17.5 m/s) winds, which occur in the autumn and winter months. A single storm, such as the October 28-31, 2013 event, can contribute 25% of the annual sand transport and dune movement inland. In its most active year (June 1, 2011 through May 31, 2012), Mount Baldy moved inland on average 4.34 m, with a maximum of 6.52 m along the blowout's axis (155° azimuth). During this particularly active season, there were six storms with sustained gale force winds, winter air temperatures were warmer than average, and shelf ice on Lake Michigan lasted only one day. The dune is least active during the summer season, when the winds are weakest. The late fall and winter winds are the strongest. But in a typical year, most of the dune's advance inland takes place during the spring thaw when sand is released from over-steepened and lumpy slip face, allowing it to avalanche to the toe of the slip face. However, with a warming air temperatures, a reduction in the duration of winter shelf ice, and rising Lake Michigan levels, the annual rates of sand transport and dune movement may increase. The recent Mount Baldy management strategy, which includes planting vegetation and installing wind barriers on the dune's stoss side in an effort to fix the dune and stop its further movement inland, may potentially cause the destruction of the mobile sand, open dune habitat, resulting in the extinction of rare

  17. Barrier-relevant crash modification factors and average costs of crashes on arterial roads in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yaotian; Tarko, Andrew P

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop crash modification factors (CMFs) and estimate the average crash costs applicable to a wide range of road-barrier scenarios that involved three types of road barriers (concrete barriers, W-beam guardrails, and high-tension cable barriers) to produce a suitable basis for comparing barrier-oriented design alternatives and road improvements. The intention was to perform the most comprehensive and in-depth analysis allowed by the cross-sectional method and the crash data available in Indiana. To accomplish this objective and to use the available data efficiently, the effects of barrier were estimated on the frequency of barrier-relevant (BR) crashes, the types of harmful events and their occurrence during a BR crash, and the severity of BR crash outcomes. The harmful events component added depth to the analysis by connecting the crash onset with its outcome. Further improvement of the analysis was accomplished by considering the crash outcome severity of all the individuals involved in a crash and not just drivers, utilizing hospital data, and pairing the observations with and without road barriers along same or similar road segments to better control the unobserved heterogeneity. This study confirmed that the total number of BR crashes tended to be higher where medians had installed barriers, mainly due to collisions with barriers and, in some cases, with other vehicles after redirecting vehicles back to traffic. These undesirable effects of barriers were surpassed by the positive results of reducing cross-median crashes, rollover events, and collisions with roadside hazards. The average cost of a crash (unit cost) was reduced by 50% with cable barriers installed in medians wider than 50ft. A similar effect was concluded for concrete barriers and guardrails installed in medians narrower than 50ft. The studied roadside guardrails also reduced the unit cost by 20%-30%. Median cable barriers were found to be the most effective

  18. AERMOD performance evaluation for three coal-fired electrical generating units in Southwest Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Kali D

    2014-03-01

    An evaluation of the steady-state dispersion model AERMOD was conducted to determine its accuracy at predicting hourly ground-level concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) by comparing model-predicted concentrations to a full year of monitored SO2 data. The two study sites are comprised of three coal-fired electrical generating units (EGUs) located in southwest Indiana. The sites are characterized by tall, buoyant stacks,flat terrain, multiple SO2 monitors, and relatively isolated locations. AERMOD v12060 and AERMOD v12345 with BETA options were evaluated at each study site. For the six monitor-receptor pairs evaluated, AERMOD showed generally good agreement with monitor values for the hourly 99th percentile SO2 design value, with design value ratios that ranged from 0.92 to 1.99. AERMOD was within acceptable performance limits for the Robust Highest Concentration (RHC) statistic (RHC ratios ranged from 0.54 to 1.71) at all six monitors. Analysis of the top 5% of hourly concentrations at the six monitor-receptor sites, paired in time and space, indicated poor model performance in the upper concentration range. The amount of hourly model predicted data that was within a factor of 2 of observations at these higher concentrations ranged from 14 to 43% over the six sites. Analysis of subsets of data showed consistent overprediction during low wind speed and unstable meteorological conditions, and underprediction during stable, low wind conditions. Hourly paired comparisons represent a stringent measure of model performance; however given the potential for application of hourly model predictions to the SO2 NAAQS design value, this may be appropriate. At these two sites, AERMOD v12345 BETA options do not improve model performance. A regulatory evaluation of AERMOD utilizing quantile-quantile (Q-Q) plots, the RHC statistic, and 99th percentile design value concentrations indicates that model performance is acceptable according to widely accepted regulatory performance

  19. Clinical Benefit of Ablating Localized Sources for Human Atrial Fibrillation: The Indiana University FIRM Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John M; Kalra, Vikas; Das, Mithilesh K; Jain, Rahul; Garlie, Jason B; Brewster, Jordan A; Dandamudi, Gopi

    2017-03-14

    Mounting evidence shows that localized sources maintain atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear in unselected "real-world" patients if sources drive persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF), long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (LPeAF), or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF); if right atrial sites are important; and what the long-term success of source ablation is. The aim of this study was to analyze the role of rotors and focal sources in a large academic registry of consecutive patients undergoing source mapping for AF. One hundred seventy consecutive patients (mean age 59 ± 12 years, 79% men) with PAF (37%), PeAF (31%), or LPeAF (32%). Of these, 73 (43%) had undergone at least 1 prior ablation attempt (mean 1.9 ± 0.8; range: 1 to 4). Focal impulse and rotor modulation (FIRM) with an endocardial basket catheter was used in all cases. FIRM analysis revealed sources in the right atrium in 85% of patients (1.8 ± 1.3) and in the left atrium in 90% of patients (2.0 ± 1.3). FIRM ablation terminated AF to sinus rhythm or atrial flutter or tachycardia in 59% (PAF), 37% (PeAF), and 19% (LPeAF) of patients, with 15 of 67 terminations due to right atrial ablation. On follow-up, freedom from AF after a single FIRM procedure for the entire series was 95% (PAF), 83% (PeAF), and 82% (LPeAF) at 1 year and freedom from all atrial arrhythmias was 77% (PAF), 75% (PeAF), and 57% (LPeAF). In the Indiana University FIRM registry, FIRM-guided ablation produced high single-procedure success, mostly in patients with nonparoxysmal AF. Data from mapping, acute terminations, and outcomes strongly support the mechanistic role of biatrial rotors and focal sources in maintaining AF in diverse populations. Randomized trials of FIRM-guided ablation and mechanistic studies to determine how rotors form, progress, and regress are needed. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of land use and surficial geology on flow and water quality of streams in the coal-mining region of southwestern Indiana, October 1979 through September 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, William G.; Renn, Danny E.; Crawford, Charles G.

    1985-01-01

    An assessment of streams in the coal-mining region of southwestern Indiana was done from October 1979 through September 1980 during stable stream flows to provide baseline hydrologic and water-quality information and to document the effect of several natural and human-induced factors on water quality in the region.

  1. Cost-Effective Pavement Performance Management of Indiana's Enhanced National Highway System through Strategic Modification of the Pavement Rehabilitation Treatment Trigger Values

    OpenAIRE

    Noureldin, Menna; Fricker, Jon D; Sinha, Kumares C.

    2015-01-01

    Cost-Effective Pavement Performance Management of Indiana's Enhanced National Highway System through Strategic Modification of the Pavement Rehabilitation Treatment Trigger Values Presented during Session 3: Policy and Funding, moderated by Magdy Mikhail, at the 9th International Conference on Managing Pavement Assets (ICMPA9) in Alexandria, VA. Includes conference paper and PowerPoint slides.

  2. The Effect of Correctional Education on Postrelease Employment and Recidivism: A 5-Year Follow-Up Study in the State of Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Susan; Nally, John M.; Ho, Taiping; Knutson, Katie

    2012-01-01

    Research has consistently revealed that released offenders, if unemployed and uneducated, would likely become recidivist offenders. This study was a 5-year follow-up study (2005-2009) of 6,561 offenders who were released from the Indiana Department of Correction (IDOC) to five metropolitan counties during the calendar year 2005. It examined the…

  3. Disking and mid- and understory removal following an above-average acorn crop in three mature oak forests in southern Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald A. Rathfon; Nathanael I. Lichti; Robert K. Swihart

    2008-01-01

    We disked using small-scale equipment in the understory of three mature upland oak (Quercus) forests in southern Indiana immediately following acorn dispersal in an aboveaverage seed crop year as a means of improving oak seedling establishment. Three different mid- and understory removal treatments were also applied to create favorable light...

  4. A checklist of the mosquitoes of Indiana with notes on the cryptic species complexes Anopheles quadrimaculatus s.l. and Anopheles punctipennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Catherine L E; Chaon, Benjamin C; Shan, Qiuqi A; Lobo, Neil F; Collins, Frank H

    2008-09-01

    The checklist of the mosquito species reported to occur in the state of Indiana is updated to include a number of new records and new classifications. Specimens of the cryptic species complex Anopheles quadrimaculatus s.1. are identified as An. quadrimaculatus s.s., and specimens of An. punctipennis are identified as the Eastern form of the species.

  5. Value-Oriented Teaching in a Contemporary Indiana Amish Parochial School: Preparation for Adult Life Through Faith, Responsible Behavior, and Community Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harroff, Stephen Bowers

    1998-01-01

    Discusses several qualitative benchmarks of Amish schools underlying the movement's growth in Indiana. Surveys Amish cultural history and cultural values relevant to schooling and discusses the Old Order Amish school setting and curriculum. Analyzes this unique educational environment from perspectives of three Amish cultural values: the…

  6. Genomic characterization of an extensively-drug resistance Salmonella enterica serotype Indiana strain harboring blaNDM-1 gene isolated from a chicken carcass in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Peng, Zixin; Baloch, Zulqarnain; Hu, Yujie; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Wenhui; Fanning, Séamus; Li, Fengqin

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to genetically characterize the antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of Salmonella enterica serotype Indiana C629 isolated from a chicken carcass in China in 2014. Antimicrobial susceptibility against a panel of 23 antimicrobial agents was carried out on Salmonella enterica serotype Indiana C629 and assessed according to CLSI standards. Whole-genome sequencing of this isolate was conducted to obtain the complete genome of S. Indiana. Salmonella Indiana C629 expressed an XDR phenotype being resistant to more than 20 antimicrobial agents, including imipenem and meropenem. From the analysis of the resistance mechanisms, two mutations were identified in subunit A of DNA gyrase within the quinolone resistance determining region, in addition to the acquisition of mobile efflux pumps encoding oqxA/B/R. Additionally, four beta-lactamases resistance genes (blaCTX-M-65, blaTEM-1, blaOXA-1, and blaNDM-1), five aminoglycosides resistance genes (aac(3)-IV, aac(6')-Ib-cr, aadA2, aadA5, and aph(4)-Ia), two phenicol resistance genes (catB3 and floR), and five trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance genes (sul1/2/3 and dfrA12/17) were also identified. A total of 191 virulence genes were identified. Among them, 57 belonged to type-three secretion system (T3SS) encoding genes, 55 belonged to fimbrial adherence encoding genes, and 39 belonged to flagella-encoding genes CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that multi-resistance mechanisms consistent with an XDR-phenotype, along with various virulence encoding genes of a S. Indiana strain in China These findings highlight the importance of cooperation among different sectors in order to monitor the spread of resistant pathogens among food animal, foods of animal origin and human beings that might further take measures to protect consumers' health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Memoria antica e memoria indiana: discorso sulle divinità indigene nell’opera di Fray Juan Torquemada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Botta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Monarquía indiana - published in Seville in 1615 by Fray Juan de Torquemada - represented one of the most significant efforts to include Indigenous religions within a global view of religious diversity. As a product of a modern process of “mondialization”, the work of Torquemada reflected on the nature of Mesoamerican gods from a ground-breaking point of view. The Franciscan produced an evolution of the missionary methods and strategies used during the first part of colonial history. In the context of modern discourses on religion, the work of Torquemada does not represent only an "ethnographic" attempt to understand the complexity of Indigenous religions in order to promote evangelization. On the contrary, the missionary reflection on Indigenous gods established a key stage in the modern construction of a global theory of polytheism.

  8. Estimating selected low-flow frequency statistics and harmonic-mean flows for ungaged, unregulated streams in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary R.; Fowler, Kathleen K.; Arihood, Leslie D.

    2016-09-06

    Information on low-flow characteristics of streams is essential for the management of water resources. This report provides equations for estimating the 1-, 7-, and 30-day mean low flows for a recurrence interval of 10 years and the harmonic-mean flow at ungaged, unregulated stream sites in Indiana. These equations were developed using the low-flow statistics and basin characteristics for 108 continuous-record streamgages in Indiana with at least 10 years of daily mean streamflow data through the 2011 climate year (April 1 through March 31). The equations were developed in cooperation with the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.Regression techniques were used to develop the equations for estimating low-flow frequency statistics and the harmonic-mean flows on the basis of drainage-basin characteristics. A geographic information system was used to measure basin characteristics for selected streamgages. A final set of 25 basin characteristics measured at all the streamgages were evaluated to choose the best predictors of the low-flow statistics.Logistic-regression equations applicable statewide are presented for estimating the probability that selected low-flow frequency statistics equal zero. These equations use the explanatory variables total drainage area, average transmissivity of the full thickness of the unconsolidated deposits within 1,000 feet of the stream network, and latitude of the basin outlet. The percentage of the streamgage low-flow statistics correctly classified as zero or nonzero using the logistic-regression equations ranged from 86.1 to 88.9 percent.Generalized-least-squares regression equations applicable statewide for estimating nonzero low-flow frequency statistics use total drainage area, the average hydraulic conductivity of the top 70 feet of unconsolidated deposits, the slope of the basin, and the index of permeability and thickness of the Quaternary surficial sediments as explanatory variables. The average standard error of

  9. Waste-indicator and pharmaceutical compounds in landfill-leachate-affected ground water near Elkhart, Indiana, 2000-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszka, P.M.; Yeskis, D.J.; Kolpin, D.W.; Furlong, E.T.; Zaugg, S.D.; Meyer, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Four wells downgradient from a landfill near Elkhart, Indiana were sampled during 2000-2002 to evaluate the presence of waste-indicator and pharmaceutical compounds in landfill-leachate-affected ground water. Compounds detected in leachate-affected ground water included detergent metabolites (p-nonylphenol, nonylphenol monoethoxylate, nonylphenol diethoxylate, and octylphenol monoethoxylate), plasticizers (ethanol-2-butoxy-phosphate and diethylphthalate), a plastic monomer (bisphenol A), disinfectants (1,4-dichlorobenzene and triclosan), an antioxidant (5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole), three fire-retardant compounds (tributylphosphate and tri(2-chloroethyl)phosphate, and tri(dichlorisopropyl)phosphate), and several pharmaceuticals and metabolites (acetaminophen, caffeine, cotinine, 1,7-dimethylxanthine, fluoxetine, and ibuprofen). Acetaminophen, caffeine, and cotinine detections confirm prior indications of pharmaceutical and nicotinate disposal in the landfill. ?? 2009 Springer Science + Business Media, LLC.

  10. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Uncorrected - CROPS_2006_USDA_IN: Crops in Indiana for 2006, Derived from National Agricultural Statistics Service (United States Department of Agriculture, 1:100,000, 56-Meter TIFF Image)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — The following is excerpted from the metadata provided by NASS (USDA) for the source data set CDL_AWIFS_R_IN_2006.tif: "The USDA-NASS 2006 Indiana Cropland Data Layer...

  11. Long-term video surveillance and automated analyses of hibernating bats in Virginia and Indiana, winters 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, David T.S.; Cryan, Paul; Fricker, Paul D.; Dannemiller, Nicholas G.

    2017-01-01

    This data release includes video files and image-processing results used to conduct the analyses of hibernation patterns in groups of bats reported by Hayman et al. (2017), "Long-term video surveillance and automated analyses reveal arousal patterns in groups of hibernating bats.”  Thermal-imaging surveillance video cameras were used to observe little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) in a cave in Virginia and Indiana bats (M. sodalis) in a cave in Indiana during three winters between 2011 and 2014.  There are 740 video files used for analysis (‘Analysis videos’), organized into 7 folders by state/site and winter.  Total size of the video data set is 14.1 gigabytes.  Each video file in this analysis set represents one 24-hour period of observation, time-lapsed at a rate of one frame per 30 seconds of real time (video plays at 30 frames per second).  A folder of illustrative videos is also included, which shows all of the analysis days for one winter of monitoring merged into a single video clip, time-lapsed at a rate of one frame per two hours of real time.  The associated image-processing results are included in 7 data files, each representing computer derived values of mean pixel intensity in every 10th frame of the 740 time-lapsed video files, concatenated by site and winter of observation.  Details on the format of these data, as well as how they were processed and derived are included in Hayman et al. (2017) and with the project metadata on Science Base.Hayman, DTS, Cryan PM, Fricker PD, Dannemiller NG. 2017. Long-term video surveillance and automated analyses reveal arousal patterns in groups of hibernating bats. Methods Ecol Evol. 2017;00:1-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-210X.12823

  12. Indiana high school science teachers' beliefs about the intended and actual impacts of standards-based reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Joseph W.

    Teachers' beliefs about educational policy are essential components of successful, local implementation. Policies not accounting for teachers' beliefs about learning, instruction, and effective reform risk being ignored or ineffectually implemented. In this research, I characterize the beliefs that science teachers from three high schools in Indiana have about general aspects of standards-based reforms and about the Indiana Academic Standards for Science (IASS). On-site focus group interviews were the primary method of data collection. An amalgam of Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics and narrative representation of qualitative data guided the inquiry by defining the researcher as the voice of the 23 participating teachers, locating the teachers' beliefs in their specific historical contexts, and displaying the results in a storied form unified by plots. I synthesized the data sources into a single narrative organized around the participants' personal teaching philosophies, their perceptions of students and administration, and their visions of standards beyond their own beliefs and school contexts. Based on the narrative, I concluded that (a) teachers with affective or preparative beliefs had neutral stances toward the IASS, (b) scientifically-oriented teachers believed the IASS contradicted their work, (c) less experienced teachers and those with affective-preparative philosophies were willing to compromise their autonomy and curricular depth to implement the IASS, (d) a continuum of administrative oversight existed across the three schools, (e) teachers at the urban high school adapted the standards to their students' personal needs and future plans, and (f) teachers almost universally recommended broader, flexible standards to allow more autonomy in making curricular decisions, to better reflect scientific inquiry in their classrooms, and to promote continuity across the high school science curriculum.

  13. Variations in Withdrawal, Return Flow, and Consumptive Use of Water in Ohio and Indiana, with Selected Data from Wisconsin, 1999-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Kimberly H.

    2009-01-01

    This report contains an analysis of water withdrawal and return-flow data for Ohio and withdrawal data for Indiana and Wisconsin to compute consumptive-use coefficients and to describe monthly variability of withdrawals and consumptive use. Concurrent data were available for most water-use categories from 1999 through 2004. Average monthly water withdrawals are discussed for a variety of water-use categories, and average water use per month is depicted graphically for Ohio, Indiana, and Wisconsin (public supply only). For most water-use categories, the summer months were those of highest withdrawal and highest consumptive use. For public supply, average monthly withdrawals ranged from 1,380 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) (November) to 1,620 Mgal/d (July) in Ohio, 621 Mgal/d (December) to 816 Mgal/d (July) in Indiana, and 515 Mgal/d (December) to 694 Mgal/d (July) in Wisconsin. Ohio and Indiana thermoelectric facilities had large increases in average monthly withdrawals in the summer months (5,520 Mgal/d in March to 7,510 Mgal/d in August for Indiana; 7,380 Mgal/d in February to 10,040 Mgal/d in July for Ohio), possibly because of increased electricity production in the summer, a need for additional cooling-water withdrawals when intake-water temperature is high, or use of different types of cooling methods during different times of the year. Average industrial withdrawals ranged from 2,220 Mgal/d (December) to 2,620 Mgal/d (August) in Indiana and from 707 Mgal/d (January) to 787 Mgal/d (August) in Ohio. The Ohio and Indiana irrigation data showed that most withdrawals were in May through October for golf courses, nurseries, and crop irrigation. Commercial water withdrawals ranged from 30.4 Mgal/d (January) to 65.0 Mgal/d (September) in Indiana and from 23.2 Mgal/d (November) to 49.5 Mgal/d (August) in Ohio; commercial facilities that have high water demand in Ohio and Indiana are medical facilities, schools, amusement facilities, wildlife facilities, large stores

  14. Coordination of study of the Devonian black shale in the Illinois Basin (Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky). Quarterly progress report, 1 March--1 June 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lineback, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The Illinois State Geological Survey is coordinating the collection, organization, and storage of data and evaluation of results in the U.S. DOE Devonian black shale project in the Illinois Basin, involving the states of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky. The result of this coordination study will be a plan to systematically create a data base for the Devonian black shale in the Illinois Basin and to integrate analyses and results in summaries of the results. A necessary part of the coordination will be the extensions of the ILLIMAP computer mapping system of the ISGS to parts of Indiana and Kentucky that lie within the Illinois Basin. When this is completed, mineral resource data in the MINERS data storage system can be used in conjunction with ILLIMAP to plot data on computer drawn base maps and to prepare maps of various types showing various combinations of results. The ILLIMAP system will then become a permanent part of the Illinois Basin data system.

  15. Surface-water-quality assessment of the upper Illinois River basin in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin; project description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mades, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    In 1986, the U.S. Geological Survey began a National Water-Quality Assessment program to (1) provide nationally consistent descriptions of the current status of water quality for a large, diverse, and geographically distributed part of the Nation's surface- and ground-water resources; (2) define, where possible, trends in water quality; and (3) identify and describe the relations of both status and trends in water quality to natural factors and the history of land use and land- and waste-management activities. The program is presently in a pilot phase that will test and modify, as necessary, concepts and approaches in preparation for possible full implementation of the program in the future. The upper Illinois River basin is one of four basins selected to test the concepts and approaches of the surface-water-quality element of the national program. The basin drains 10,949 square miles of Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin. Three principal tributaries are the Kankakee and Des Plaines Rivers that join to form the Illinois River and the Fox River. Land use is predominantly agricultural; about 75 percent of the basin is cultivated primarily for production of corn and soybeans. About 13 percent of the basin is urban area, most of which is located in the Chicago metropolitan area. The population of the basin is about 7 million. About 6 million people live in the Des Plaines River basin. Many water-quality issues in the upper Illinois River basin are related to sediment, nutrients, potentially toxic inorganic and organic constituents, and to water-management practices. Occurrence of sediment and the chemical constituents in the rivers and lakes within the basin has the potential to adversely affect the water's suitability for aquatic life, recreation, or, through the consumption of fish, human health. The upper Illinois River basin project consists of five major activities. The first activity--analysis of existing information and preparation of a report that describes

  16. Chemical and biological quality of surface water at the U.S. Army Atterbury Reserve Forces Training Area near Edinburgh, Indiana, September 2000 through July 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risch, Martin R.

    2004-01-01

    A base-wide assessment of surface-water quality at the U.S. Army Atterbury Reserve Forces Training Area near Edinburgh, Indiana, examined short-term and long-term quality of surface water flowing into, across, and out of a 33,760-acre study area. The 30-day geometric-mean concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli) in water samples from all 16 monitoring sites on streams in the study area were greater than the Indiana recreational water-quality standard. None of the bacteria concentrations in samples from four lakes exceeded the standard. Half the samples with bacteria concentrations greater than the single-sample standard contained chemical tracers potentially associated with human sewage. Increased turbidity of water samples was related statistically to increased bacteria concentration. Lead concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 micrograms per liter were detected in water samples at seven monitoring sites. Lead in one sample collected during high-streamflow conditions was greater than the calculated Indiana water-quality standard. With the exception of Escherichia coli and lead, 211 of 213 chemical constituents analyzed in water samples did not exceed Indiana water-quality standards. Out of 131 constituents analyzed in streambed-sediment and fish-tissue samples from three sites in the Common Impact Area for weapons training, the largest concentrations overall were detected for copper, lead, manganese, strontium, and zinc. Fish-community integrity, based on diversity and pollution tolerance, was rated poor at one of those three sites. Compared with State criteria, the fish-community data indicated 8 of 10 stream reaches in the study area could be categorized as "fully supporting" aquatic-life uses.

  17. Measurements of OH and HO2 concentrations during the MCMA-2006 field campaign - Part 1: Deployment of the Indiana University laser-induced fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    S. Dusanter; D. Vimal; P. S. Stevens; R. Volkamer; Molina, Luisa Tan

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of tropospheric hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals were made during the MCMA (Mexico City Metropolitan Area) field campaign as part of the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) project during March 2006. These radicals were measured using a laser-induced fluorescence instrument developed at Indiana University. This new instrument takes advantage of the Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion technique (FAGE) together w...

  18. Methods Used to Assess the Susceptibility to Contamination of Transient, Non-Community Public Ground-Water Supplies in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arihood, Leslie D.; Cohen, David A.

    2006-01-01

    The Safe Water Drinking Act of 1974 as amended in 1996 gave each State the responsibility of developing a Source-Water Assessment Plan (SWAP) that is designed to protect public-water supplies from contamination. Each SWAP must include three elements: (1) a delineation of the source-water protection area, (2) an inventory of potential sources of contaminants within the area, and (3) a determination of the susceptibility of the public-water supply to contamination from the inventoried sources. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) was responsible for preparing a SWAP for all public-water supplies in Indiana, including about 2,400 small public ground-water supplies that are designated transient, non-community (TNC) supplies. In cooperation with IDEM, the U.S. Geological Survey compiled information on conditions near the TNC supplies and helped IDEM complete source-water assessments for each TNC supply. The delineation of a source-water protection area (called the assessment area) for each TNC ground-water supply was defined by IDEM as a circular area enclosed by a 300-foot radius centered at the TNC supply well. Contaminants of concern (COCs) were defined by IDEM as any of the 90 contaminants for which the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established primary drinking-water standards. Two of these, nitrate as nitrogen and total coliform bacteria, are Indiana State-regulated contaminants for TNC water supplies. IDEM representatives identified potential point and nonpoint sources of COCs within the assessment area, and computer database retrievals were used to identify potential point sources of COCs in the area outside the assessment area. Two types of methods-subjective and subjective hybrid-were used in the SWAP to determine susceptibility to contamination. Subjective methods involve decisions based upon professional judgment, prior experience, and (or) the application of a fundamental understanding of processes without the collection and

  19. Relationship between maternal obesity and prenatal, metabolic syndrome, obstetrical and perinatal complications of pregnancy in Indiana, 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feresu, Shingairai A; Wang, Yi; Dickinson, Stephanie

    2015-10-16

    Obesity is a serious medical condition affecting more than 30% of Indiana, and 25% of Unites States pregnant women. Obesity is related to maternal complications, and significantly impacts the health of pregnant women. The objective of this study was to describe the relationship between maternal complications and pre-pregnancy maternal weight. Using logistic regression models, we analyzed 2008 to 2010 birth certificate data, for 255,773 live births abstracted from the Indiana Vital Statistics registry. We examined the risk of reproductive factors, obstetrical complications and perinatal (intrapartum) complications for underweight, healthy weight, overweight and obese women for this population. Women who received prenatal care were more likely to be obese [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.82 (1.56-2.13)]. While women with parity of zero (0) were less likely to be obese [AOR = 0.89, 95% CI (0.86-0.91)]. Women giving birth to twins [AOR = 1.25, 95% CI (1.17- 1.33)], women delivering by Caesarian section [AOR = 2.31, 95% CI ( 2.26-2.37)], and women who previously had a Caesarian section [AOR = 1.95, 95% CI (1.88-2.02)] were more likely to be obese. There was evidence of metabolic like complication in this population, due to obesity. Obesity was significantly associated with obstetrical conditions of the metabolic syndrome, including pre-pregnancy diabetes, gestational diabetes, pre-pregnancy hypertension, pregnancy-induced hypertension and eclampsia [AOR = 5.12, 95% CI (4.47-5.85); AOR = 3.87, 95% CI (3.68-4.08); AOR = 7.66, 95% CI (6.77-8.65); AOR = 3.23, 95% CI (3.07-3.39); and AOR = 1.77, 95% CI (1.31-2.40), respectively. Maternal obesity modestly increased the risk of induction, epidural, post-delivery bleeding, and prolonged labor [AOR = 1.26, 95% CI (1.23-1.29); AOR = 1.15, 95% CI (1.13-1.18); AOR = 1.20, 95% CI (1.12-1.28); and AOR = 1.44, 95% CI (1.30-1.61)], respectively. Obese women were less likely to have blood transfusions [AOR

  20. Geochemical and γ ray characterization of Pennsylvanian black shales: Implications for elevated home radon levels in Vanderburgh County, Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Kent W; Elliott, William S

    2015-10-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) is a radioactive gas that results from the decay of uranium ((238)U) in the Earth's crust. This study characterizes the presence and relative quantity of radon precursors in the Pennsylvanian black shales of southwest Indiana. Cores were drilled on the campus of the University of Southern Indiana to a depth of 237.7 m (780 ft) during exploration for coal-bed methane. Gamma ray logs were taken to measure radioactive activity as a function of depth in the bore hole. Activity readings of 270, 467, 555, and 388 GAPI (American Petroleum Institute γ ray units) were measured at depths of 124.3 m (408 ft), 154.0 m (505 ft), 187.1 m (614 ft) and 214.0 m (702 ft) in four separate shale layers of the Pennsylvanian stratigraphic column. GAPI units are used in the petroleum industry when drilling to represent the relative intensities of γ radiation from (40)K, (232)Th, and (238)U in bore holes (Belknap et al., 1959). For purposes of this study, the high activity readings on the gamma ray logs were used only to identify at which depths further gamma ray spectroscopy of the cores would be completed in the laboratory. Gamma ray spectroscopic studies of these cores were conducted with a large volume NaI crystal detector to observe γ rays of specific energies. Characteristic γ rays from various isotopes were identified confirming the presence and relative quantity of radon precursors in core samples. Geochemical analysis of cores was also conducted to measure presence and quantity of trace metals and radon precursors. Of 744 homes tested in Vanderburgh County from 2007 to 2013, 169 homes (22.7 percent) had elevated radon levels greater than 148 mBq L(-1) (4.0 pCi L(-1)). Additionally, 246 homes (33.1 percent) had measured radon levels of 74-145 mBq L(-1) (2.0-3.9 pCi L(-1)). About 80 percent of elevated radon levels greater than 148 mBq L(-1) (4.0 pCi L(-1)) are located in proximity to depositional contacts between the Dugger and Shelburn formations, or the

  1. Field measurements and modeling to resolve m2 to km2 CH4 emissions for a complex urban source: An Indiana landfill study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Obiminda L. Cambaliza

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Large spatial and temporal uncertainties for landfill CH4 emissions remain unresolved by short-term field campaigns and historic greenhouse gas (GHG inventory models. Using four field methods (aircraft-based mass balance, tracer correlation, vertical radial plume mapping, static chambers and a new field-validated process-based model (California Landfill Methane Inventory Model, CALMIM 5.4, we investigated the total CH4 emissions from a central Indiana landfill as well as the partitioned emissions inclusive of methanotrophic oxidation for the various cover soils at the site. We observed close agreement between whole site emissions derived from the tracer correlation (8 to 13 mol s–1 and the aircraft mass balance approaches (7 and 17 mol s–1 that were statistically indistinguishable from the modeling result (12 ± 2 mol s–1 inclusive of oxidation. Our model calculations indicated that approximately 90% of the annual average CH4 emissions (11 ± 1 mol s–1; 2200 ± 250 g m–2 d–1 derived from the small daily operational area. Characterized by a thin overnight soil cover directly overlying a thick sequence of older methanogenic waste without biogas recovery, this area constitutes only 2% of the 0.7 km2 total waste footprint area. Because this Indiana landfill is an upwind source for Indianapolis, USA, the resolution of m2 to km2 scale emissions at various temporal scales contributes to improved regional inventories relevant for addressing GHG mitigation strategies. Finally, our comparison of measured to reported CH4 emissions under the US EPA National GHG Reporting program suggests the need to revisit the current IPCC (2006 GHG inventory methodology based on CH4 generation modeling. The reasonable prediction of emissions at individual U.S. landfills requires incorporation of both cover-specific landfill climate modeling (e.g., soil temperature/moisture variability over a typical annual cycle driving CH4 transport and oxidation rates as

  2. Indiana 2008 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along Lake Michigan in the summer of 2008. The data types...

  3. Indiana 2006 Lidar Coverage, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) has performed a coastal survey along the Lake Michigan coastline in the summer of 2006....

  4. Application of EREP imagery to fracture-related mine safety hazards and environmental problems in mining. [Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wier, C. E.; Wobber, F. J.; Amato, R. V.; Russell, O. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. All Skylab 2 imagery received to date has been analyzed manually and data related to fracture analysis and mined land inventories has been summarized on map-overlays. A comparison of the relative utility of the Skylab image products for fracture detection, soil tone/vegetation contrast mapping, and mined land mapping has been completed. Numerous fracture traces were detected on both color and black and white transparencies. Unique fracture trace data which will contribute to the investigator's mining hazards analysis were noted on the EREP imagery; these data could not be detected on ERTS-1 imagery or high altitude aircraft color infrared photography. Stream segments controlled by fractures or joint systems could be identified in more detail than with ERTS-1 imagery of comparable scale. ERTS-1 mine hazards products will be modified to demonstrate the value of this additional data. Skylab images were used successfully to update a mined land map of Indiana made in 1972. Changes in mined area as small as two acres can be identified. As the Energy Crisis increases the demand for coal, such demonstrations of the application of Skylab data to coal resources will take on new importance.

  5. Trace elements, organochlorines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, dioxins, and furans in lesser scaup wintering on the Indiana Harbor Canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Hines, R.K.; Sparks, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    During the winter of 1993a??94, male lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) were collected on the heavily polluted Indiana Harbor Canal (IHC), East Chicago, IN, USA, and examined for tissue contaminant levels. Lesser scaup collected on the IHC had higher concentrations of cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), selenium (Se), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), selected organchlorine pesticides, polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and aliphatic hydrocarbons than reference birds. Of the scaup collected on the IHC, 44% had Cd concentrations in the liver considered above background for freshwater waterfowl (>3 I?g/g dry wt.), 50% had Se concentrations in the liver above a level possibly harmful to the health of young and adult birds (>33 I?g/g dry wt.), and 88% of the scaup carcasses exceeded the PCB human consumption guidelines for edible poultry in the USA (>3.0 I?g/g lipid wt.). The ratio of pristane:n-heptadecane concentrations in 47% of lesser scaup collected on IHC was elevated above 1.0, which is indicative of chronic exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons. Copyright A? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Hydrologic data collected in and around a surface coal mine, Clay and Vigo counties, Indiana, 1977-80

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Linda L.; Eikenberry, Stephen E.

    1982-01-01

    Few data are available for evaluating water-quality and other hydrologic properties in and around surface coal mines, particularly in areas where material having a high potential for acid-production is selectively buried. This report contains hydrologic data collected in an active coal mining area in Clay and Vigo Counties, Indiana, from September 1977 through February 1980. Methods of sampling and analysis used in collecting the data also are summarized. The data include field and laboratory measurements of water at 41 wells and 24 stream sites. Variables measured in the field include water temperature, specific conductance, pH, Eh, dissolved oxygen, ground-water levels, and streamflow; and in the laboratory, concentrations of major ions, alkalinity, hardness, trace elementsl, organic carbon, phosphorus, and dissolved solids. Other variables measured in the laboratory include ferrous iron concentration of water samples from selected wells, percent sulfur by weight and the potential acidity of core samples of reclaimed cast overburden, concentrations of elements absorbed on streambed materials, concentrations and particle size of suspended sediment in water, and populations and Shannon diversity indices of phytoplankton in water. Dissolved-solids concentrations and pH of ground water ranged from 173 to 5,130 milligrams per liter and from 6.1 to 8.9, respectively, and of surface water, from 120 to 4,100 milligrams per liter and from 6.1 to 8.8 respectively. 

  7. Environments of deposition of coal balls, cuticular shale and gray shale floras in Fountain and Parke counties, Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, D.L.; Phillips, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    The western part of Indiana is included in the Illinois basin whose coal content is confined to the central Pennsylvania series. The authors make a detailed examination of the coal deposits of the region of the Roaring Creek Mine, Parke County and the region of the Maple Grove Mine, Fountain Country, focusing especial attention on questions of stratigraphy, palinology, coal petrography, paleobotany with the establishment of the species composition of the coal-forming plants and determination of the conditions for their growth, as well as the quality of the coals. The two studies regions are characterized by considerable differences in the coals and the surrounding deposits. In the opinion of the authors, the deposits in the region of Roaring Creek are formations of the upper delta with characteristic interrelationship with the overlying and underlying rocks, reduced content of sulfur in the coals and definite species composition of the paleoflora. On the contrary, the deposits in the region of Maple-Grove can be viewed as lower delta for which the listed signs have a different nature. With comparison of the conditions for sedimentation in the two regions, differences are also found in the quantity of atmospheric precipitation. This also has a definite influence on the nature of the forming deposits.

  8. Effects of wind energy generation and white-nose syndrome on the viability of the Indiana bat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Erickson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy generation holds the potential to adversely affect wildlife populations. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range. One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis, which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States. In addition to mortality from wind energy generation, the species also faces range-wide threats from the emerging infectious fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS. White-nose syndrome, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans, disturbs hibernating bats leading to high levels of mortality. We used a spatially explicit full-annual-cycle model to investigate how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect population dynamics of this species. In the simulation, wind turbine mortality impacted the metapopulation dynamics of the species by causing extirpation of some of the smaller winter colonies. In general, effects of wind turbines were localized and focused on specific spatial subpopulations. Conversely, WNS had a depressive effect on the species across its range. Wind turbine mortality interacted with WNS and together these stressors had a larger impact than would be expected from either alone, principally because these stressors together act to reduce species abundance across the spectrum of population sizes. Our findings illustrate the importance of not only prioritizing the protection of large winter colonies as is currently done, but also of protecting metapopulation dynamics and migratory connectivity.

  9. Effects of wind energy generation and white-nose syndrome on the viability of the Indiana bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Richard A; Thogmartin, Wayne E; Diffendorfer, Jay E; Russell, Robin E; Szymanski, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Wind energy generation holds the potential to adversely affect wildlife populations. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range. One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat ( Myotis sodalis ), which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States. In addition to mortality from wind energy generation, the species also faces range-wide threats from the emerging infectious fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS). White-nose syndrome, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans , disturbs hibernating bats leading to high levels of mortality. We used a spatially explicit full-annual-cycle model to investigate how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect population dynamics of this species. In the simulation, wind turbine mortality impacted the metapopulation dynamics of the species by causing extirpation of some of the smaller winter colonies. In general, effects of wind turbines were localized and focused on specific spatial subpopulations. Conversely, WNS had a depressive effect on the species across its range. Wind turbine mortality interacted with WNS and together these stressors had a larger impact than would be expected from either alone, principally because these stressors together act to reduce species abundance across the spectrum of population sizes. Our findings illustrate the importance of not only prioritizing the protection of large winter colonies as is currently done, but also of protecting metapopulation dynamics and migratory connectivity.

  10. Effect of road salt application on seasonal chloride concentrations and toxicity in south-central Indiana streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Kristin M; Royer, Todd V

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary information on road salt runoff is needed for management of water resources in regions experiencing urbanization and increased road density. We investigated seasonal Cl(-) concentrations among five streams in south-central Indiana that drained watersheds varying in degree of urbanization and ranging in size from 9.3 to 27 km(2). We also conducted acute toxicity tests with Daphnia pulex to assess the potential effects of the observed Cl(-) concentrations on aquatic life. Periods of elevated Cl(-) concentrations were observed during the winters of 2007-08 and 2008-09 at all sites except the reference site. The highest Cl(-) concentration observed during the study was 2100 mg L(-1) and occurred at the most urbanized site. The Cl(-) concentration at the reference site never exceeded 22 mg L(-1). The application of road salt caused large increases in stream Cl(-) concentrations, but the elevated Cl(-) levels did not appear to be a significant threat to aquatic life based on our toxicity testing. Only the most urbanized site showed evidence of salt retention within the watershed, whereas the other sites exported the road salt relatively quickly after its application, suggesting storm drains and impervious surfaces minimized interaction between soils and salt-laden runoff. During winter at these sites, the response in stream Cl(-) concentrations appeared to be controlled by the timing and intensity of road salt application, the magnitude of precipitation, and the occurrence of air temperatures that caused snowmelt and generated runoff.

  11. Effects of wind energy generation and white-nose syndrome on the viability of the Indiana bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Richard A.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Diffendorfer, James E.; Russell, Robin E.; Szymanski, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Wind energy generation holds the potential to adversely affect wildlife populations. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range. One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States. In addition to mortality from wind energy generation, the species also faces range-wide threats from the emerging infectious fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS). White-nose syndrome, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans, disturbs hibernating bats leading to high levels of mortality. We used a spatially explicit full-annual-cycle model to investigate how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect population dynamics of this species. In the simulation, wind turbine mortality impacted the metapopulation dynamics of the species by causing extirpation of some of the smaller winter colonies. In general, effects of wind turbines were localized and focused on specific spatial subpopulations. Conversely, WNS had a depressive effect on the species across its range. Wind turbine mortality interacted with WNS and together these stressors had a larger impact than would be expected from either alone, principally because these stressors together act to reduce species abundance across the spectrum of population sizes. Our findings illustrate the importance of not only prioritizing the protection of large winter colonies as is currently done, but also of protecting metapopulation dynamics and migratory connectivity.

  12. Incorporating emotions specific to the sexual response into theories of emotion using the Indiana Sexual and Affective Word Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan A; Stevenson, Laurel D; Rupp, Heather A; Kim, Sunah; Janssen, Erick; James, Thomas W

    2011-02-01

    The sexual response includes an emotional component, but it is not clear whether this component is specific to sex and whether it is best explained by dimensional or discrete emotion theories. To determine whether the emotional component of the sexual response is distinct from other emotions, participants (n = 1099) rated 1450 sexual and non-sexual words according to dimensional theories of emotion (using scales of valence, arousal, and dominance) and according to theories of basic emotion (using scales of happiness, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust). In addition, ratings were provided for newly developed scales of sexual valence, arousal, and energy. A factor analysis produced four factors, together accounting for 91.5% of the variance in participant ratings. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that one word category or factor, labeled "sexual," was predicted only by the new sexual arousal and energy scales. The remaining three factors, labeled "disgusting," "happy," and "basic aversive" were best predicted by basic (or discrete) emotion ratings. Dimensional ratings of valence, sexual valence, and arousal were not predictive of any of the four categories. These results suggest that the addition of sexually specific emotions to basic emotion theories is justified and needed to account fully for emotional responses to sexual stimuli. In addition, the findings provide initial validation for the Indiana Sexual and Affective Words Set (ISAWS), supporting its use in future studies.

  13. Biological Diversity, Ecological Health and Condition of Aquatic Assemblages at National Wildlife Refuges in Southern Indiana, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Simon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Wildlife Refuge system is a vital resource for the protection and conservation of biodiversity and biological integrity in the United States. Surveys were conducted to determine the spatial and temporal patterns of fish, macroinvertebrate, and crayfish populations in two watersheds that encompass three refuges in southern Indiana. The Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge had the highest number of aquatic species with 355 macroinvertebrate taxa, six crayfish species, and 82 fish species, while the Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge had 163 macroinvertebrate taxa, seven crayfish species, and 37 fish species. The Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge had the lowest diversity of macroinvertebrates with 96 taxa and six crayfish species, while possessing the second highest fish species richness with 51 species. Habitat quality was highest in the Muscatatuck River drainage with increased amounts of forested habitats compared to the Patoka River drainage. Biological integrity of the three refuges ranked the Patoka NWR as the lowest biological integrity (mean IBI reach scores = 35 IBI points, while Big Oaks had the highest biological integrity (mean IBI reach score = 41 IBI points. The Muscatatuck NWR had a mean IBI reach score of 31 during June, which seasonally increased to a mean of 40 IBI points during summer. Watershed IBI scores and habitat condition were highest in the Big Oaks NWR.

  14. A comparison of seed banks across a sand dune successional gradient at Lake Michigan dunes (Indiana, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht-Young, S. A.; Pavlovic, N.B.; Grundel, R.; Frohnapple, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    In habitats where disturbance is frequent, seed banks are important for the regeneration of vegetation. Sand dune systems are dynamic habitats in which sand movement provides intermittent disturbance. As succession proceeds from bare sand to forest, the disturbance decreases. At Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, we examined the seed banks of three habitat types across a successional gradient: foredunes, secondary dunes, and oak savanna. There were differences among the types of species that germinated from each of the habitats. The mean seed bank density increased across the successional gradient by habitat, from 376 to 433 to 968 seeds m-2, but with foredune and secondary dune seed bank densities being significantly lower than the savanna seed bank density. The number of seeds germinated was significantly correlated with soil organic carbon, demonstrating for this primary successional sequence that seed density increases with stage and age. The seed bank had much lower species richness than that of the aboveground vegetation across all habitats. Among sites within a habitat type, the similarity of species germinated from the seed banks was very low, illustrating the variability of the seed bank even in similar habitat types. These results suggest that restoration of these habitats cannot rely on seed banks alone. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  15. Surface-water and karst groundwater interactions and streamflow-response simulations of the karst-influenced upper Lost River watershed, Orange County, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E. Randall; Cinotto, Peter J.; Ulery, Randy L.; Taylor, Charles J.; McCombs, Gregory K.; Kim, Moon H.; Nelson, Hugh L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the Indiana Office of Community and Rural Affairs (OCRA), conducted a study of the upper Lost River watershed in Orange County, Indiana, from 2012 to 2013. Streamflow and groundwater data were collected at 10 data-collection sites from at least October 2012 until April 2013, and a preliminary Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER)-TOPMODEL based hydrologic model was created to increase understanding of the complex, karstic hydraulic and hydrologic system present in the upper Lost River watershed, Orange County, Ind. Statistical assessment of the optimized hydrologic-model results were promising and returned correlation coefficients for simulated and measured stream discharge of 0.58 and 0.60 and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency values of 0.56 and 0.39 for USGS streamflow-gaging stations 03373530 (Lost River near Leipsic, Ind.), and 03373560 (Lost River near Prospect, Ind.), respectively. Additional information to refine drainage divides is needed before applying the model to the entire karst region of south-central Indiana. Surface-water and groundwater data were used to tentatively quantify the complex hydrologic processes taking place within the watershed and provide increased understanding for future modeling and management applications. The data indicate that during wet-weather periods and after certain intense storms, the hydraulic capacity of swallow holes and subsurface conduits is overwhelmed with excess water that flows onto the surface in dry-bed relic stream channels and karst paleovalleys. Analysis of discharge data collected at USGS streamflow-gaging station 03373550 (Orangeville Rise, at Orangeville, Ind.), and other ancillary data-collection sites in the watershed, indicate that a bounding condition is likely present, and drainage from the underlying karst conduit system is potentially limited to near 200 cubic feet per second. This

  16. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for Cedar Creek, Dekalb and Allen counties, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, William G.; Peters, J.G.; Ayers, M.A.; Crawford, Charles G.

    1979-01-01

    A digital model calibrated to conditions in Cedar Creek was used to develop alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The model indicates that the dissolved-oxygen concentration of the Auburn wastewater effluent and nitrification are the most significant factors affecting the dissolved-oxygen concentration in Cedar Creek during summer low flows. The observed dissolved-oxygen concentration of the Auburn wastewater effluent was low and averaged 30 percent of saturation. Projected nitrogenous biochemical-oxygen demand loads, from the Indiana State Board of Health, for the Auburn and Waterloo wastewater-treatment facilities will result in violations of the current instream dissolved-oxygen standard (5 mg/l), even with an effluent dissolved-oxygen concentration of 80 percent saturation. Natural streamflow for Cedar Creek upstream from the confluence of Willow and Little Cedar Creeks is small compared with the waste discharge, so benefits of dilution for Waterloo and Auburn are minimal. The model also indicates that, during winter low flows, ammonia toxicity, rather than dissolved oxygen, is the limiting water-quality criterion in the reach of Cedar Creek downstream from the wastewater-treatment facility at Auburn and the confluence of Garrett ditch. Ammonia-nitrogen concentrations predicted for 1978 through 2000 downstream from the Waterloo wastewater-treatment facility do not exceed Indiana water-quality standards for streams. Calculations of the stream 's assimilative capacity indicate that future waste discharge in the Cedar Creek basin will be limited to the reaches between the Auburn wastewater-treatment facility and County Road 68. (Kosco-USGS)

  17. Varietas Indiana: le cas de la Miscelánea Antártica de Miguel Cabello Valboa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available La notion de varietas est reprise par la culture de l’Humanisme et érigée en principe générateur de formes de pensée et d’écriture. Compte tenu de ceci, il y a lieu de se demander quel fut son rôle dans l’appréhension intellectuelle du Nouveau Monde et dans les divers discours sur celui-ci, aussi bien ceux qui furent élaborés depuis l’Europe que ceux qui le furent depuis les Indes Occidentales. Il s'agit ici de réfléchir sur un cas particulier, celui de la fonction de la varietas dans la Miscelánea Antártica de Miguel Cabello Valboa, pour essayer de démontrer comment l’auteur se sert doublement de ce principe pour insérer le lecteur, aussi bien local que peninsulaire, au sein de la matière américaine et, en même temps, assimiler celle-ci au fonds commun du savoir, rattachant l’histoire indigène à l’Histoire universelle. VARIETAS INDIANA: EL CASO DE LA MISCELÁNEA ANTÁRTICA DE MIGUEL CABELLO VALBOA La noción de varietas se erige como principio generador de formas de pensamiento y de escritura y, en un sentido general, como eje de la cultura del Humanismo. Teniendo en cuenta lo anterior, cabe preguntarse sobre la función que ésta cumplió en la aprensión intelectual de los territorios ultamarinos dentro del imaginario europeo y en la formación de un imaginario local. En el presente artículo hemos examinado esta cuestión en un caso particular, el de la Miscelánea Antártica de Miguel Cabello Valboa, intentando mostrar cómo el autor se sirve doblemente del principio de la varietas para insertar al lector, tanto local como peninsular, en el ámbito de la materia americana y de la historia indígena, pero sobre todo para asimilarlas al fondo común del saber y engarzarlas, en un plano de igualdad, dentro de la historia universal. VARIETAS INDIANA: THE CASE OF MISCELÁNEA ANTÁRTICA DE MIGUEL CABELLO VALBOA The age of Humanism revived the notion of varietas and established it as a generating force of thought and

  18. Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow at the Green Valley reclaimed coal refuse site near Terre Haute, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E. Randall; Arihood, Leslie D.; Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2011-01-01

    The Green Valley reclaimed coal refuse site, near Terre Haute, Ind., was mined for coal from 1948 to 1963. Subsurface coal was cleaned and sorted at land surface, and waste material was deposited over the native glacial till. Approximately 2.7 million cubic yards of waste was deposited over 159 acres (92.3 hectares) in tailings ponds and gob piles. During 1993, the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Reclamation, improved the site by grading gob piles, filling tailings ponds, and covering the refuse with a layer of glacial drift. During 2008, the Division of Reclamation and U.S. Geological Survey initiated a cooperative investigation to characterize the hydrogeology of the site and construct a calibrated groundwater flow model that could be used to simulate the results of future remedial actions. In support of the modeling, a data-collection network was installed at the Green Valley site to measure weather components, geophysical properties, groundwater levels, and stream and seep flow. Results of the investigation indicate that (1) there is negligible overland flow from the site, (2) the prevailing groundwater-flow direction is from northeast to southwest, with a much smaller drainage to the northeast, (3) there is not a direct hydraulic connection between the refuse and West Little Sugar Creek, (4) about 24 percent of the groundwater recharge emerges through seeps, and water from the seeps evaporates or eventually flows to West Little Sugar Creek and the Green Valley Mine Pond, and (5) about 72 percent of groundwater recharge moves vertically downward from the coal refuse into the till and follows long, slow flow paths to eventual dischage points.

  19. Experts correctly describe demography associated with historical decline of the endangered Indiana bat, but not recent period of stationarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Sanders-Reed, Carol A.; Szymanski, Jennifer; Pruitt, Lori; Runge, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    Demographic characteristics of bats are often insufficiently described for modeling populations. In data poor situations, experts are often relied upon for characterizing ecological systems. In concert with the development of a matrix model describing Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) demography, we elicited estimates for parameterizing this model from 12 experts. We conducted this elicitation in two stages, requesting expert values for 12 demographic rates. These rates were adult and juvenile seasonal (winter, summer, fall) survival rates, pup survival in fall, and propensity and success at breeding. Experts were most in agreement about adult fall survival (3% Coefficient of Variation) and least in agreement about propensity of juveniles to breed (37% CV). The experts showed greater concordance for adult ( mean CV, adult = 6.2%) than for juvenile parameters ( mean CV, juvenile = 16.4%), and slightly more agreement for survival (mean CV, survival = 9.8%) compared to reproductive rates ( mean CV, reproduction = 15.1%). However, survival and reproduction were negatively and positively biased, respectively, relative to a stationary dynamic. Despite the species exhibiting near stationary dynamics for two decades prior to the onset of a potential extinction-causing agent, white-nose syndrome, expert estimates indicated a population decline of -11% per year (95% CI = -2%, -20%); quasi-extinction was predicted within a century ( mean = 61 years to QE, range = 32, 97) by 10 of the 12 experts. Were we to use these expert estimates in our modeling efforts, we would have errantly trained our models to a rapidly declining demography asymptomatic of recent demographic behavior. While experts are sometimes the only source of information, a clear understanding of the temporal and spatial context of the information being elicited is necessary to guard against wayward predictions.

  20. In Vitro Development of Ciprofloxacin Resistance of Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium, Enteritidis, and Indiana Isolates from Food Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Chuan-Zhen; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Gu, Xi-Xi; Li, Wan; Yang, Ling; Liu, Ya-Hong; Zeng, Zhen-Ling; Jiang, Hong-Xia

    2017-09-01

    Difference in the development of resistance may be associated with the epidemiological spread and drug resistance of different Salmonella enterica serovar strains. In the present study, three susceptible S. enterica serovars, Typhimurium (ST), Enteritidis (SE), and Indiana (SI) strains, were subjected to stepwise selection with increasing ciprofloxacin concentrations. The results indicated that the mutation frequencies of the SI group were 10 1 -10 4 higher and developed resistance to ciprofloxacin more rapidly compared with the ST and SE groups. Ciprofloxacin accumulation in the SI strain was also higher than the other two strains in the presence of an efflux pump inhibitor. The development of ciprofloxacin resistance was quite different among the three serovar strains. In SI, increasing AcrAB-TolC efflux pump expression and single or double mutations in gyrA with or without a single parC mutation (T57S) were found in the development of ciprofloxacin resistance. In SE, an increase in the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump regulatory gene ramA gradually decreased as resistant bacteria developed; then resistance resulted from gyrA D87G and gyrB E466D mutations and/or in other active efflux pumps besides AcrAB-TolC. For ST, ramA expression increased rapidly along with gyrA D87 N and/or gyrB S464F mutations. In conclusion, persistent use of ciprofloxacin may aggravate the resistance of different S. enterica serovars and prudent use of the fluoroquinolones is needed. The quicker resistance and higher mutation frequency of the SI isolates present a potential public health threat.

  1. Gonadal intersex in smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu from northern Indiana with correlations to molecular biomarkers and anthropogenic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Moneim, Ahmed; Deegan, Daragh; Gao, Jiejun; De Perre, Chloe; Doucette, Jarrod S; Jenkinson, Byron; Lee, Linda; Sepúlveda, Maria S

    2017-11-01

    Over the past decade, studies have shown that exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can cause gonadal intersex in fish. Smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) males appear to be highly susceptible to developing testicular oocytes (TO), the most prevalent form of gonadal intersex, as observed in various areas across the U.S. In this study, prevalence and severity of TO was quantified for smallmouth bass sampled from the St. Joseph River in northern Indiana, intersex biomarkers were developed, and association between TO prevalence and organic contaminants were explored. At some sites, TO prevalence reached maximum levels before decreasing significantly after the spawning season. We examined the relationship between TO presence and expression of gonadal and liver genes involved in sex differentiation and reproductive functions (esr1, esr2, foxl2, fshr, star, lhr and vtg). We found that vitellogenin (vtg) transcript levels were significantly higher in the liver of males with TO, but only when sampled during the spawning season. Further, we identified a positive correlation between plasma VTG levels and vtg transcript levels, suggesting its use as a non-destructive biomarker of TO in this species. Finally, we evaluated 43 contaminants in surface water at representative sites using passive sampling to look for contaminants with possible links to the observed TO prevalence. No quantifiable levels of estrogens or other commonly agreed upon EDCs such as the bisphenols were observed in our contaminant assessment; however, we did find high levels of herbicides as well as consistent quantifiable levels of PFOS, PFOA, and triclosan in the watershed where high TO prevalence was exhibited. Our findings suggest that the observed TO prevalence may be the result of exposures to mixtures of nonsteroidal EDCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Benthic-invertebrate, fish-community, and streambed-sediment-chemistry data for streams in the Indianapolis metropolitan area, Indiana, 2009–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic-biology and sediment-chemistry data were collected at seven sites on the White River and at six tributary sites in the Indianapolis metropolitan area of Indiana during the period 2009 through 2012. Data collected included benthic-invertebrate and fish-community information and concentrations of metals, insecticides, herbicides, and semivolatile organic compounds adsorbed to streambed sediments. A total of 120 benthic-invertebrate samples were collected, of which 16 were replicate samples. A total of 26 fish-community samples were collected in 2010 and 2012. Thirty streambed-sediment chemistry samples were collected in 2009 and 2011, of which four were concurrent duplicate samples

  3. Dynamic properties of Indiana, Fort Knox and Utah test range limestones and Danby Marble over the stress range 1 to 20 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, M.D.

    1994-12-01

    The responses of the following carbonate materials to shock loading and release have been measured: Indiana limestone (18% porosity; saturated and dry), Jeffersonville/Louisville Limestones (Fort Knox limestone) (variable dolomitization, low porosity), Danby Marble (essentially pure calcite; low porosity), and a limestone from the Utah Test and Training Range (low porosity, with 22% silica). Various experimental configurations were used, some optimized to yield detailed waveform information, others to yield a clean combination of Hugoniot states and release paths. All made use of velocity interferometry as a primary diagnostic. The stress range of 0 - 20 GPa was probed (in most cases, emphasizing the stress range 0 -10 GPa). The primary physical processes observed in this stress regime were material strength, porosity, and polymorphic phase transitions between the CaCO{sub 3} phases I, II, III and VI. Hydration was also a significant reaction under certain conditions. The Indiana Limestone studies in particular represent a significant addition to the low-pressure database for porous limestone. Temperature dependence and the effect of freezing were assessed for the Fort Knox limestone. Experimental parameters and detailed results are provided for the 42 impact tests in this series.

  4. Deep sequencing of H7N8 avian influenza viruses from surveillance zone supports H7N8 high pathogenicity avian influenza was limited to a single outbreak farm in Indiana during 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    In mid-January 2016, an outbreak of H7N8 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus in commercial turkeys occurred in Indiana. The outbreak was first detected by an increase in mortality followed by laboratory confirmation of H7N8 HPAI virus. Surveillance within the 10 km Control Zone detected...

  5. Our Lady of Hungary Catholic School, Indiana. School Achieves Double-Digit Growth with the Help of Interim and Classroom Formative Assessment Data. Case Study: Measures of Academic Progress & Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, South Bend's Our Lady of Hungary Catholic School welcomed its third principal in four years: Kevin Goralczyk, an Indiana native and seasoned educator. Together with the parish's pastor, Reverend Kevin Bauman, Principal Goralczyk began exploring how OLH could raise its pre-K-8 student achievement and better support teachers and staff…

  6. 76 FR 59512 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Redesignation of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ..., Environmental Scientist, Attainment Planning and Maintenance Section, Air Programs Branch (AR-18J... from new cars and light duty trucks, including sport utility vehicles. The Federal rules were phased in...); light duty trucks, minivans, and sports utility vehicles (86 percent); and larger sports utility...

  7. Updating Indiana Annual Forest Inventory and Analysis Plot Data Using Eastern Broadleaf Forest Diameter Growth Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronica C. Lessard

    2001-01-01

    The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the North Central Research Station (NCRS), USDA Forest Service, has developed nonlinear, individual-tree, distance-independent annual diameter growth models. The models are calibrated for species groups and formulated as the product of an average diameter growth component and a modifier component. The regional models...

  8. SOCIAL DIALECTS AND LANGUAGE LEARNING, PROCEEDINGS OF THE BLOOMINGTON, INDIANA, CONFERENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAVIS, ALVA L.; AND OTHERS

    A CONFERENCE WAS HELD ON AUGUST 3-5, 1964 TO BRING TOGETHER SCHOLARS IN DIALECTOLOGY AND RELATED FIELDS. THE ENTIRE CONFERENCE WAS TAPE RECORDED AND A TYPESCRIPT MADE. THE CONTENTS OF THE REPORT ENCOMPASS BOTH THE PANEL PAPERS PRESENTED AND DISCUSSIONS ON (1) SOCIAL DIALECTOLOGY, (2) FIELD PROJECTS, (3) SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEACHING PROGRAMS, (4)…

  9. Sediment Budget for the Indiana Shore from Michigan City Harbor to Burns Waterway Harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    former sand dunes and slag (the vitreous residue left after smelting ore)). USACE Chicago (2010) summarized the history of the NIPSCO Bailly Generating...lakefill disposal site for slag . Along the shoreline, additional sand had been trapped east of the NIPSCO BGS outfall canal, and the shore had...Baldy has averaged 45,000 yd3/year since the annual nourishment program began in 1996, and the beach and shoreface have stabilized . Sand now covers the

  10. Generation and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Carbon Sequestration in Northwest Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Peavey; Norm Bessette

    2007-09-30

    The objective of the project is to develop the technology capable of capturing all carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from natural gas fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system. In addition, the technology to electrochemically oxidize any remaining carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide will be developed. Success of this R&D program would allow for the generation of electrical power and thermal power from a fossil fuel driven SOFC system without the carbon emissions resulting from any other fossil fueled power generationg system.

  11. Award ER25750: Coordinated Infrastructure for Fault Tolerance Systems Indiana University Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    2013-03-08

    The main purpose of the Coordinated Infrastructure for Fault Tolerance in Systems initiative has been to conduct research with a goal of providing end-to-end fault tolerance on a systemwide basis for applications and other system software. While fault tolerance has been an integral part of most high-performance computing (HPC) system software developed over the past decade, it has been treated mostly as a collection of isolated stovepipes. Visibility and response to faults has typically been limited to the particular hardware and software subsystems in which they are initially observed. Little fault information is shared across subsystems, allowing little flexibility or control on a system-wide basis, making it practically impossible to provide cohesive end-to-end fault tolerance in support of scientific applications. As an example, consider faults such as communication link failures that can be seen by a network library but are not directly visible to the job scheduler, or consider faults related to node failures that can be detected by system monitoring software but are not inherently visible to the resource manager. If information about such faults could be shared by the network libraries or monitoring software, then other system software, such as a resource manager or job scheduler, could ensure that failed nodes or failed network links were excluded from further job allocations and that further diagnosis could be performed. As a founding member and one of the lead developers of the Open MPI project, our efforts over the course of this project have been focused on making Open MPI more robust to failures by supporting various fault tolerance techniques, and using fault information exchange and coordination between MPI and the HPC system software stack from the application, numeric libraries, and programming language runtime to other common system components such as jobs schedulers, resource managers, and monitoring tools.

  12. Reconnaissance of surface-water and ground-water quality at the Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial near Lincoln City, Indiana, 2001-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszka, Paul M.; Fowler, Kathleen K.

    2005-01-01

    In cooperation with the National Park Service, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated water quality of key water bodies at the Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial near Lincoln City in southwestern Indiana. The key water bodies were a stock pond, representing possible nonpoint agricultural effects on water quality; an ephemeral stream, representing the water quality of drainage from forested areas of the park; parking-lot runoff, representing water quality related to roads and parking lots; an unnamed ditch below the parking lot, representing the water quality of drainage from the parking lot and from an adjacent railroad track; and Lincoln Spring, a historical ground-water source representing ground-water conditions near a former diesel-fuel-spill site along a rail line. Water samples were analyzed for pH, temperature, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen and for concentrations of selected major ions and trace metals, nutrients, organic constituents, and Escherichia coli bacteria. Surface-water-quality data of water samples from the park represent baseline conditions for the area in relation to the data available from previous studies of area streams. Specific-conductance values and concentrations of most major ions and various nutrients in surface-water samples from the park were smaller than those reported for samples collected in other USGS studies in areas adjacent to the park. Water-quality-management issues identified by this investigation include potentially impaired water quality from parking-lot runoff, unknown effects on surface-water quality from adjacent railroads, and the potential impairment of water quality in Lincoln Spring from human influences. Parking-lot runoff is a source of calcium, alkalinity, iron, lead, and organic carbon in the water samples from the unnamed ditch. Detection of small concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in water from Lincoln Spring could indicate residual contamination from a 1995 diesel-fuel spill and cleanup

  13. State Geodatabase for Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2015 TIGER Geodatabases are extracts of selected nation based and state based geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  14. Indiana's Water Shortage Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Unterreiner, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Indiana’s Water Shortage Plan was recently updated (2009) and established criteria to identify drought conditions and associated “Water Shortage Stages” designated as Normal, Watch, Warning, and Emergency. The three drought triggers are the 1-month Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM), and Percentage of Average Streamflow (28 streamflow gaging sites). The Water Shortage Stage is defined as Normal if no more than one indicator is outside of the normal ra...

  15. Orthophotography of Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  16. Gene and antigen markers of Shiga-toxin producing E. coli from Michigan and Indiana river water: Occurrence and relation to recreational water quality criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, J.W.; Haack, S.K.; Fogarty, L.R.

    2009-01-01

    The relation of bacterial pathogen occurrence to fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations used for recreational water quality criteria (RWQC) is poorly understood. This study determined the occurrence of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) markers and their relation to FIB concentrations in Michigan and Indiana river water. Using 67 fecal coliform (FC) bacteria cultures from 41 river sites in multiple watersheds, we evaluated the occurrence of five STEC markers: the Escherichia coli (EC) O157 antigen and gene, and the STEC virulence genes eaeA, stx1, and stx2. Simple isolations from selected FC cultures yielded viable EC O157. By both antigen and gene assays, EC O157 was detected in a greater proportion of samples exceeding rather than meeting FC RWQC (P decision-making. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  17. Geohydrology, water quality, and simulation of ground-water flow in the vicinity of a former waste-oil refinery near Westville, Indiana, 1997-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwelius, Richard F.; Yeskis, Douglas J.; Wilson, John T.; Robinson, Bret A.

    2002-01-01

    Geohydrologic and water-quality data collected during 1997 through 2000 in the vicinity of a former waste-oil refinery near Westville, Indiana, define a plume of 1,4-dioxane in ground water that extends to the southwest approximately 0.8 miles from the refinery site. Concentrations of 1,4-dioxane in the plume ranged from 3 to 31,000 micrograms per liter. Ground water containing 1,4-dioxane is discharged to Crumpacker Ditch, approximately one-half mile west of the refinery site. Concentrations of 1,4-dioxane detected in surface water ranged from 8 to 140 micrograms per liter; 1,4-dioxane also is transported in ground water beneath the ditch.

  18. Crianças muito más: "tortura indiana" e o relatório da comissão sobre Tortura de Madras de 1855

    OpenAIRE

    Bhuwania, Anuj

    2009-01-01

    Embora seja comumente defendida a idéia de que a tortura policial constitui uma prática institucionalizada na Índia, o único estudo confiável apoiado pelo governo na história moderna indiana é o Relatório da Comissão sobre Tortura de Madras, de 1855. No contexto do silêncio que encobre a violência policial atualmente praticada na Índia, o curioso fenômeno de uma Comissão investigativa, instituída por um Estado colonial há mais de cento e cinquenta anos atrás, é particularmente intrigante. Nes...

  19. Opinions and experiences of Indiana pharmacists and student pharmacists: the need for addiction and substance abuse education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenthur, Cody J; Cross, Bethany S; Vernon, Veronica P; Shelly, Jamie L; Harth, Brielle N; Lienhoop, Adam D; Madison, Nicholas R; Murawski, Matthew M

    2013-01-01

    Substance abuse and addiction are growing public health problems. Pharmacists are potentially in a position to be of great assistance in ameliorating these threats yet might not be receiving the education and training to do so effectively. To assess the relative perceived importance of substance abuse topics in pharmacy education among student pharmacists and pharmacy practitioners in the state of Indiana. Questionnaires were administered in class to students at Purdue University College of Pharmacy and via direct mail to the home addresses of randomly selected licensed Indiana pharmacists in 2009 to elicit information on the relevance and interest for particular topics within addiction education, prior education received regarding addiction, and the frequency of professional interactions that involved addiction. Three hundred fifty students (74%) and 625 pharmacists (26%) responded to the survey. The average interest across all surveyed topics was 3.18/4.00 for students and 3.47/4.00 for practitioners. Areas rated highly by both groups included withdrawal, pain management, and recognition of signs and symptoms of addiction in patients. Qualitative responses from practitioners suggest strong interest in further education in this area and a perceived need for increased educational exposure during the student pharmacist experience. The average pharmacist respondent spent 6.94% of the time dealing with people who were addicted, and 22.2% had independent addiction education. Pharmacists and pharmacy student respondents overwhelmingly felt that educational preparation in this area is important. A significant portion of time in practice is spent managing addiction-related issues, and further educational opportunities are being pursued beyond graduation to fulfill the educational needs of the practitioner respondents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Colonization of Artificially Stressed Black Walnut Trees by Ambrosia Beetle, Bark Beetle, and Other Weevil Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Indiana and Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sharon E; Juzwik, Jennifer; English, James T; Ginzel, Matthew D

    2015-12-01

    Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a new disease of black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) in the eastern United States. The disease is caused by the interaction of the aggressive bark beetle Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman and the canker-forming fungus, Geosmithia morbida M. Kolarik, E. Freeland, C. Utley & Tisserat, carried by the beetle. Other insects also colonize TCD-symptomatic trees and may also carry pathogens. A trap tree survey was conducted in Indiana and Missouri to characterize the assemblage of ambrosia beetles, bark beetles, and other weevils attracted to the main stems and crowns of stressed black walnut. More than 100 trees were girdled and treated with glyphosate (Riverdale Razor Pro, Burr Ridge, Illinois) at 27 locations. Nearly 17,000 insects were collected from logs harvested from girdled walnut trees. These insects represented 15 ambrosia beetle, four bark beetle, and seven other weevil species. The most abundant species included Xyleborinus saxeseni Ratzburg, Xylosandrus crassiusculus Motschulsky, Xylosandrus germanus Blandford, Xyleborus affinis Eichhoff, and Stenomimus pallidus Boheman. These species differed in their association with the stems or crowns of stressed trees. Multiple species of insects were collected from individual trees and likely colonized tissues near each other. At least three of the abundant species found (S. pallidus, X. crassiusculus, and X. germanus) are known to carry propagules of canker-causing fungi of black walnut. In summary, a large number of ambrosia beetles, bark beetles, and other weevils are attracted to stressed walnut trees in Indiana and Missouri. Several of these species have the potential to introduce walnut canker pathogens during colonization. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Method for estimating potential wetland extent by utilizing streamflow statistics and flood-inundation mapping techniques: Pilot study for land along the Wabash River near Terre Haute, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon H.; Ritz, Christian T.; Arvin, Donald V.

    2012-01-01

    Potential wetland extents were estimated for a 14-mile reach of the Wabash River near Terre Haute, Indiana. This pilot study was completed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The study showed that potential wetland extents can be estimated by analyzing streamflow statistics with the available streamgage data, calculating the approximate water-surface elevation along the river, and generating maps by use of flood-inundation mapping techniques. Planning successful restorations for Wetland Reserve Program (WRP) easements requires a determination of areas that show evidence of being in a zone prone to sustained or frequent flooding. Zone determinations of this type are used by WRP planners to define the actively inundated area and make decisions on restoration-practice installation. According to WRP planning guidelines, a site needs to show evidence of being in an "inundation zone" that is prone to sustained or frequent flooding for a period of 7 consecutive days at least once every 2 years on average in order to meet the planning criteria for determining a wetland for a restoration in agricultural land. By calculating the annual highest 7-consecutive-day mean discharge with a 2-year recurrence interval (7MQ2) at a streamgage on the basis of available streamflow data, one can determine the water-surface elevation corresponding to the calculated flow that defines the estimated inundation zone along the river. By using the estimated water-surface elevation ("inundation elevation") along the river, an approximate extent of potential wetland for a restoration in agricultural land can be mapped. As part of the pilot study, a set of maps representing the estimated potential wetland extents was generated in a geographic information system (GIS) application by combining (1) a digital water-surface plane representing the surface of inundation elevation that sloped in the downstream

  2. Coordination of study of the Devonian black shale in the Illinois Basin (Illinois, Indiana, and Western Kentucky). Quarterly progress report, 1 July to 30 September, 1978--3 October 1978. [Geological data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lineback, J.A.

    1978-10-01

    Coordination is being performed on data being collected, organized, and stored for the DOE Devonian black shale project. Results of coordination of the work by contractors will be a plan to create a data base for the Devonian black shale in the Illinois Basin. Part of the coordination will be the extensions of the ILLIMAP computer mapping system to parts of Indiana and Kentucky that lie within the Illinois Basin. (DLC)

  3. The Indiana University Center for Healthcare Innovation and Implementation Science: Bridging healthcare research and delivery to build a learning healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Jose; Adams, Nadia; Boustani, Malaz

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, it is estimated that 75,000 deaths every year could be averted if the healthcare system implemented high quality care more effectively and efficiently. Patient harm in the hospital occurs as a consequence of inadequate procedures, medications and other therapies, nosocomial infections, diagnostic evaluations and patient falls. Implementation science, a new emerging field in healthcare, is the development and study of methods and tools aimed at enhancing the implementation of new discoveries and evidence into daily healthcare delivery. The Indiana University Center for Healthcare Innovation and Implementation Science (IU-CHIIS) was launched in September 2013 with the mission to use implementation science and innovation to produce great-quality, patient-centered and cost-efficient healthcare delivery solutions for the United States of America. Within the first 24 months of its initiation, the IU-CHIIS successfully scaled up an evidence-based collaborative care model for people with dementia and/or depression, successfully expanded the Accountable Care Unit model positively impacting the efficiency and quality of care, created the first Certificate in Innovation and Implementation Science in the US and secured funding from National Institutes of Health to investigate innovations in dementia care. This article summarizes the establishment of the IU-CHIIS, its impact and outcomes and the lessons learned during the journey. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. Influence of water chemistry on the distribution of an acidophilic protozoan in an acid mine drainage system at the abandoned Green Valley coal mine, Indiana, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Dannelly, H.K.; Connors, K.A.; Hasiotis, S.T. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States). Dept. of Geography Geology & Anthropology

    2001-07-01

    Euglena mutabilis, a benthic photosynthetic protozoan that intracellularly sequesters Fe, is variably abundant in the main effluent channel that contains acid mine drainage (AMD) discharging from the Green Valley coal mine site in western Indiana. Samples of effluent (pH 3.0-4.6) taken from the main channel and samples of contaminated stream water (pH 3.3 to 8.0) collected from an adjacent stream were analyzed to evaluate the influence of water chemistry on E. mutabilis distribution. E. mutabilis communities were restricted to areas containing unmixed effluent with the thickest (up to 3 mm) benthic communities residing in effluent containing high concentrations of total Fe (up to 12110 mg/l), SO{sub 4}(up to 2940 mg/l), Al (up to 1846 mg/l), and Cl (up to 629 mg/l). Communities were also present, but much less abundant, in areas with effluent containing lower concentrations of these same constituents. In effluent where SO{sub 4} was most highly concentrated, E. mutabilis was largely absent, suggesting that extremely high concentrations of SO{sub 4} may have an adverse effect on this potentially beneficial Fe-mediating, acidophilic protozoan.

  5. Sensitivity of Subjective Decisions in the GLUE Methodology for Quantifying the Uncertainty in the Flood Inundation Map for Seymour Reach in Indiana, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younghun Jung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE is one of the widely-used methods for quantifying uncertainty in flood inundation mapping. However, the subjective nature of its application involving the definition of the likelihood measure and the criteria for defining acceptable versus unacceptable models can lead to different results in quantifying uncertainty bounds. The objective of this paper is to perform a sensitivity analysis of the effect of the choice of likelihood measures and cut-off thresholds used in selecting behavioral and non-behavioral models in the GLUE methodology. By using a dataset for a reach along the White River in Seymour, Indiana, multiple prior distributions, likelihood measures and cut-off thresholds are used to investigate the role of subjective decisions in applying the GLUE methodology for uncertainty quantification related to topography, streamflow and Manning’s n. Results from this study show that a normal pdf produces a narrower uncertainty bound compared to a uniform pdf for an uncertain variable. Similarly, a likelihood measure based on water surface elevations is found to be less affected compared to other likelihood measures that are based on flood inundation area and width. Although the findings from this study are limited due to the use of a single test case, this paper provides a framework that can be utilized to gain a better understanding of the uncertainty while applying the GLUE methodology in flood inundation mapping.

  6. Polyoxyethylene tallow amine, a glyphosate formulation adjuvant: Soil adsorption characteristics, degradation profile, and occurrence on selected soils from agricultural fields in Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Mississippi, and Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tush, Daniel L.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Polyoxyethylene tallow amine (POEA) is an inert ingredient added to formulations of glyphosate, the most widely applied agricultural herbicide. POEA has been shown to have toxic effects to some aquatic organisms making the potential transport of POEA from the application site into the environment an important concern. This study characterized the adsorption of POEA to soils and assessed its occurrence and homologue distribution in agricultural soils from six states. Adsorption experiments of POEA to selected soils showed that POEA adsorbed much stronger than glyphosate; calcium chloride increased the binding of POEA; and the binding of POEA was stronger in low pH conditions. POEA was detected on a soil sample from an agricultural field near Lawrence, Kansas, but with a loss of homologues that contain alkenes. POEA was also detected on soil samples collected between February and early March from corn and soybean fields from ten different sites in five other states (Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Mississippi). This is the first study to characterize the adsorption of POEA to soil, the potential widespread occurrence of POEA on agricultural soils, and the persistence of the POEA homologues on agricultural soils into the following growing season.

  7. Polyoxyethylene Tallow Amine, a Glyphosate Formulation Adjuvant: Soil Adsorption Characteristics, Degradation Profile, and Occurrence on Selected Soils from Agricultural Fields in Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Mississippi, and Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tush, Daniel; Meyer, Michael T

    2016-06-07

    Polyoxyethylene tallow amine (POEA) is an inert ingredient added to formulations of glyphosate, the most widely applied agricultural herbicide. POEA has been shown to have toxic effects to some aquatic organisms making the potential transport of POEA from the application site into the environment an important concern. This study characterized the adsorption of POEA to soils and assessed its occurrence and homologue distribution in agricultural soils from six states. Adsorption experiments of POEA to selected soils showed that POEA adsorbed much stronger than glyphosate; calcium chloride increased the binding of POEA; and the binding of POEA was stronger in low pH conditions. POEA was detected on a soil sample from an agricultural field near Lawrence, Kansas, but with a loss of homologues that contain alkenes. POEA was also detected on soil samples collected between February and early March from corn and soybean fields from ten different sites in five other states (Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Mississippi). This is the first study to characterize the adsorption of POEA to soil, the potential widespread occurrence of POEA on agricultural soils, and the persistence of the POEA homologues on agricultural soils into the following growing season.

  8. Diagenetic mineralization in Pennsylvanian coals from Indiana, USA: 13C/12C and 18O/16O implications for cleat origin and coalbed methane generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Acosta, W.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Arango, I.

    2008-01-01

    Cleats and fractures in southwestern Indiana coal seams are often filled with authigenic kaolinite and/or calcite. Carbon- and oxygen-stable isotope ratios of kaolinite, calcite, and coalbed CO2 were evaluated in combination with measured values and published estimates of ??18O of coalbed paleowaters that had been present at the time of mineralization. ??18Omineral and ??18Owater values jointly constrain the paleotemperature of mineralization. The isotopic evidence and the thermal and tectonic history of this part of the Illinois Basin led to the conclusion that maximum burial and heat-sterilization of coal seams approximately 272??Ma ago was followed by advective heat redistribution and concurrent precipitation of kaolinite in cleats at a burial depth of < 1600??m at ??? 78 ?? 5????C. Post-Paleozoic uplift, the development of a second generation of cleats, and subsequent precipitation of calcite occurred at shallower burial depth between ??? 500 to ??? 1300??m at a lower temperature of 43 ?? 6????C. The available paleowater in coalbeds was likely ocean water and/or tropical meteoric water with a ??18Owater ??? - 1.25??? versus VSMOW. Inoculation of coalbeds with methanogenic CO2-reducing microbes occurred at an even later time, because modern microbially influenced 13C-enriched coalbed CO2 (i.e., the isotopically fractionated residue of microbial CO2 reduction) is out of isotopic equilibrium with 13C-depleted calcite in cleats. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Impacts of white-tailed deer on red trillium (Trillium recurvatum): defining a threshold for deer browsing pressure at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Noel B.; Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Grundel, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Overabundant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) have been a concern for land managers in eastern North America because of their impacts on native forest ecosystems. Managers have sought native plant species to serve as phytoindicators of deer impacts to supplement deer surveys. We analyzed experimental data about red trillium (Trillium recurvatum), large flowered trillium (T. grandiflorum), nodding trillium (T. cernuum), and declined trillium (T. flexipes) growth in paired exclosure (fenced) plots and control (unfenced) plots from 2002 to 2010 at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The latter two species lacked replication, so statistical analysis was not possible. All red trillium plants were surveyed for height-to-leaf, effects of browsing, and presence of flowers. Data from individuals in 2009 demonstrated a sigmoidal relationship between height-to-leaf and probability of flowering. The relationship on moraine soils was shifted to taller plants compared to those on sand substrates, with respectively 50 percent flowering at 18 and 16 cm and 33 percent flowering at 16 and 14 cm height-to-leaf. On a plot basis, the proportion of plants flowering was influenced by height to leaf, duration of protection, and deviation in rainfall. The proportion of plants flowering increased ninefold in exclosures (28 percent) compared to control plots (3 percent) over the 8 years of protection. The mean height-to-leaf was a function of the interaction between treatment and duration, as well as red trillium density. Changes in height-to-leaf in control plots from year to year were significantly influenced by an interaction between change in deer density and change in snowfall depth. There was a significant negative correlation between change in deer density and snowfall depth. Plants in the exclosures increased in height at a rate of 1.5 cm yr−1 whereas control plants decreased in height by 0.9 cm yr−1. In all, 78 percent of the control plots lacked flowering

  10. Display of disparate transcription phenotype by the phosphorylation negative P protein mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus, Indiana serotype, expressed in E. coli and eucaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, M; Das, T; Chen, J L; Chattopadhyay, D; Banerjee, A K

    1997-01-01

    The phosphoprotein (P) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a subunit of the RNA polymerase (L) that transcribes the negative strand genome RNA into mRNAs both in vitro and in vivo. We have recently shown that the P protein of VSV, New Jersey serotype (PNJ), expressed in E. coli, is biologically inactive unless phosphorylated at specific serine residues by cellular casein kinase II (CKII). In the present work, we are studying the role of phosphorylation in the activation of the P protein of Indiana serotype (PIND), which is highly nonhomologous in amino acid sequence yet structurally similar to its New Jersey counterpart. Despite the fact that E. coli-expressed PIND required phosphorylation by CKII for activation, the phosphorylation negative P protein mutants generated by altering the phosphate acceptors S and T to alanine, surprisingly, showed transcription activity similar to wild-type in vitro. Alteration of S and T residues to phenylalanine, similarly, supported substantial transcription activity (approx. 60% of wild-type), whereas substitution with arginine residue abrogated transcription (approx. 5% of wild-type). In contrast, the same mutants, when expressed in eucaryotic cells, exhibited greatly reduced transcription activity in vitro. This disparate display of transcription phenotype by the PIND mutants expressed in bacteria and eucaryotic cells suggests that these mutants are unique in assuming different secondary structure or conformation when synthesized in two different cellular milieu. The findings that, unless phosphorylated by CKII, the bacterially expressed unphosphorylated (P0) form of PIND, as well as the phosphorylation negative mutants expressed in eucaryotic cells, demonstrates transcription negative phenotype indicate that, like PNJ, phosphorylation of PIND is essential for its activity.

  11. Sowing the seeds for sustainable change: a community-based participatory research partnership for health promotion in Indiana, USA and its aftermath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkler, Meredith; Vásquez, Victoria Breckwich; Warner, Joanne Rains; Steussey, Helen; Facente, Shelley

    2006-12-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) increasingly is being used in both developed and developing countries to study and address community-identified issues through a collaborative and empowering action-oriented process. In 2003-2005, a study was undertaken to document the impacts of CBPR on healthy public policy in the US. From an initial review of 80 partnership efforts, 10 were selected as best capturing the range and diversity of projects meeting the study criteria, and were the subject of in-depth case study analysis. This article presents and analyzes one of these cases, a collaboration between researchers at the Indiana University School of Nursing and the Healthy Cities Committee of New Castle, IN, USA. With its action component still underway a decade after the formal study's completion, the partnership was selected to enable an examination of sustainable change through CBPR. Beginning with a participatory door-to-door health survey of 1000 households using a non-probability quota sampling strategy, the project involved community members in many stages of the research process. A smoking rate of twice the national average was among the study findings that helped to galvanize the community into action. A variety of health promoting environmental and 'small p policy' changes were undertaken ranging from a bill restricting indoor smoking in public places to an initiative to develop a system of trails throughout the county to promote physical fitness and decreased reliance on automobiles. This article examines the evolution of the original CBPR partnership, its research methods and findings, and the environmental changes it sought to promote healthier lifestyles. Success factors, barriers and sustainability benchmarks are discussed. The case study offers an example of the potential of CBPR for helping to lay the groundwork for long-term sustainable change in support of healthier communities.

  12. Eolian sand transport at three stations on a dune backed coastline in northern Indiana and their relationships to weather-related and site-specific controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, S.W.; Olyphant, G.A. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Continuous measurements of eolian sand transport (using Automated Sand Traps) and wind speed/direction at 1.5 m above the surface were achieved on a dune backed coastline near Gary, Indiana. Data were collected on an hourly basis for a 6 month period during which 55 major sand movement events were observed. The sandstorms lasted from 1 to 16 hours with an average length of 4 hours and produced total transport quantities of up to 227 kg/m. the largest sand movement totals occurred when the wind was northerly; indeed 75% of the total sand captured at the authors station in a small blowout occurred during periods when the wind was from north. Northerly winds also dominated overall sand movement at their station on the crest of a vegetated foredune, but the total amount of transported sand was only 6.5% of that in the blowout. Hourly sand transport efficiency, expressed as the ratio of measured transport to theoretical transport (based on Bagnold's equation), averaged 0.34 at the blowout station during the spring of 1992, whereas averages for the dune crest station and a station on the backshore were 0.04 and 0.15, respectively, during the same period. Efficiencies were highly variable, even during individual storms, and exhibited no obvious systematic trend. However, storm-wind direction, topography, and sand surface character (e.g. vegetation and surface moisture conditions) were all observed to have an influence on the efficiency of sand transport at the study site.

  13. A cross-sectional study to estimate prevalence of periodontal disease in a population of dogs (Canis familiaris) in commercial breeding facilities in Indiana and Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Judith L; Bauer, Amy E; Croney, Candace C

    2018-01-01

    The objectives of this cross-sectional study were: 1) to estimate the prevalence and characterize the severity of periodontal disease in a population of dogs housed in commercial breeding facilities; 2) to characterize PD preventive care utilized by facility owners; and 3) to assess inter-rater reliability of a visual scoring assessment tool. Adult dogs (N = 445) representing 42 breeds at 24 CB facilities in Indiana and Illinois were assessed. Periodontal disease was scored visually using the American Veterinary Dental Collage 0-IV scale. Inter-rater reliability was assessed on 198 dogs and facility owners were asked to provide information about the preventive care utilized. The overall prevalence of periodontal disease (Grades I-IV) was 86.3% (95% CI: 82.9, 89.3). An ordered logistic regression analysis found age (OR = 1.4; 95% CI 1.24, 1.54; Pperiodontal disease increased with increasing age. Additionally, a trend toward decreasing risk with increasing weight was also found, although it was not statistically significant. The trends identified agree with studies that have evaluated periodontal disease in the companion dog population and do not support the assumption that the dental health of dogs in commercial breeding facilities is worse than that of the population as a whole. Although there were few cases of severe periodontal disease and all facilities employed some type of preventive care in this sample, the large number of dogs with some degree of disease (Grades I-IV) suggests that further investigation of preventive care is warranted.

  14. Status and trends in suspended-sediment discharges, soil erosion, and conservation tillage in the Maumee River basin--Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Donna N.; Metzker, Kevin D.; Davis, Steven

    2000-01-01

    The relation of suspended-sediment discharges to conservation-tillage practices and soil loss were analyzed for the Maumee River Basin in Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana as part of the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Cropland in the basin is the largest contributor to soil erosion and suspended-sediment discharge to the Maumee River and the river is the largest source of suspended sediments to Lake Erie. Retrospective and recently-collected data from 1970-98 were used to demonstrate that increases in conservation tillage and decreases in soil loss can be related to decreases in suspended-sediment discharge from streams. Average annual water and suspended-sediment budgets computed for the Maumee River Basin and its principal tributaries indicate that soil drainage and runoff potential, stream slope, and agricultural land use are the major human and natural factors related to suspended-sediment discharge. The Tiffin and St. Joseph Rivers drain areas of moderately to somewhat poorly drained soils with moderate runoff potential. Expressed as a percentage of the total for the Maumee River Basin, the St. Joseph and Tiffin Rivers represent 29.0 percent of the basin area, 30.7 percent of the average-annual streamflow, and 9.31 percent of the average annual suspended-sediment discharge. The Auglaize and St. Marys Rivers drain areas of poorly to very poorly drained soils with high runoff potential. Expressed as a percentage of the total for the Maumee River Basin, the Auglaize and St. Marys Rivers represent 48.7 percent of the total basin area, 53.5 percent of the average annual streamflow, and 46.5 percent of the average annual suspended-sediment discharge. Areas of poorly drained soils with high runoff potential appear to be the major source areas of suspended sediment discharge in the Maumee River Basin. Although conservation tillage differed in the degree of use throughout the basin, on aver-age, it was used on 55.4 percent of all crop

  15. Design of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering instrument at the Indiana University Low Energy Neutron Source: Applications to the study of nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmes, Nicholas B.

    The Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) located at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) is a prototypical long-pulse accelerator-based neutron source. The Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) instrument is one of several planned instruments at the LENS facility. The SANS instrument is a time-of-flight instrument which utilizes a pinhole collimation system and neutron wavelengths up to 20A giving it a q range from about 0.006A-1 to 0.5A-1 with a maximum divergence at the sample of about +/-8mrad. The neutron flux on the sample at the anticipated 8kW mode of operation is anticipated to be greater than 2 x 104n/s.cm 2. The design, calibration, and testing of the LENS SANS instrument is discussed, including Monte-Carlo simulations and analytical calculations used to optimize the collimation design, the placement and design of the pulse-overlap chopper system, and other aspects of the instrument's geometry. The expected resolution, count rates, and other general performance parameters of the instrument are presented and, where possible, compared with experimental results. SANS measurements of a family of tripodal organo-silicon dendrimer molecules using the IPNS SAND and the NCNR NG3 SANS instruments are presented. Variations in the scattering curves are compared for solutions of the dendrimers at multiple concentrations in d-heptane, d-DCM, and d-toluene. Models of both the particle form factor and the structure factor are presented. The measurements suggest a distinct difference between the size and behavior of the highest generation dendrimer in two of the solvents (d-DCM and d-toluene) as compared to a third (d-heptane). Additionally, the dendrimer molecules appear to be forming short chains in solution. A brief study of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles is also presented. This study includes a presentation of the magnetic measurements of the nanoparticles using a SQUID magnetometer. The measurements indicate contributions by a larger dispersion of

  16. A cross sectional study evaluating the prevalence of Coxiella burnetii, potential risk factors for infection, and agreement between diagnostic methods in goats in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy E; Hubbard, Kirk R A; Johnson, April J; Messick, Joanne B; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Pogranichniy, Roman M

    2016-04-01

    Coxiella burnetii is the etiologic agent of the zoonotic disease Q fever and is considered to be endemic in domestic ruminants. Small ruminants in particular are important reservoirs for human infection. Serologic and molecular methods are both available for diagnosis of infection with C. burnetii, but there has been little research evaluating the prevalence of this organism in small ruminants outside of the context of clinical disease outbreaks. The objectives of this study were to estimate seroprevalence of C. burnetii and the prevalence of shedding of C. burnetii DNA in milk by goats in Indiana, USA, to evaluate potential risk factors for association with C. burnetii exposure and shedding, and to assess the level of agreement between the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests used to estimate prevalence. A total of 649 does over 1 year of age and not pregnant at the time of sampling were included in the study. Serum samples were collected from 608 does representing 89 farms. Milk samples were collected from 387 does representing 85 farms. Both milk and serum samples were collected from 356 does representing 80 farms. The estimated individual seroprevalence and shedding prevalence in milk adjusted for clustering were 3.1% (n=23/608, 95% CI: 1.2-7.0%) and 2.5% (n=9/387, 9.5% CI: 1.0-5.6%) respectively. Estimated adjusted herd level C. burnetii seroprevalence and herd level shedding prevalence were 11.5% (n=10/89, 95% CI: 6.4-20.1%) and 7.0% (n=6/85, 95% CI: 3.3-14.6%) respectively. Based on a generalized estimating equation model (GEE), meat breeds of goat had 7.0 times increased odds of shedding C. burnetii DNA in milk samples as compared to dairy breeds. Agreement between tests as determined by Cohen's kappa was poor at both the individual (kappa=0.04, 95% CI: -0.1 to 0.2) and herd (kappa=0.2, 95% CI: -0.1 to 0.5) levels. This indicates that serologic screening alone is unlikely to prevent the introduction

  17. La secularización de doctrinas en el arzobispado de México: realidades indianas y razones políticas, 1700-1749

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguirre, Rodolfo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work must like objective resist the arguments set out in the meetings of Madrid in charge to discuss the situation of the regular clergy in Indians, previous to the real law of 1749 on secularización of parishes, with the reality of the same in the Mexican region. The meetings, composed by ministers of king and the archbishops of Mexico and Lima, had as it puts to demonstrate the necessity to separate of the parishes to the friars due to the relaxation of his votes and the independence that showed before any authority. However, the reality showed that from 1700, in the archbishopric of Mexico, their prelates had managed to hold to the friars in charge of the parishes of Indians. When comparing the arguments spilled in Madrid and the law of 1749 with the changes happened in the archbishopric of Mexico during first half of century XVIII it is clear that the measures decreed by Fernando VI on the Indian parishes obeyed mainly to external political reasons to the New Spain, than more internal.El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo contrastar los argumentos expuestos en las juntas de Madrid encargadas de discutir la situación del clero regular en Indias, previas a la real cédula de 1749 sobre secularización de curatos, con la realidad de los mismos en la región mexicana. Las juntas, compuesta por ministros del rey y los arzobispos de México y Lima, tuvo como meta demostrar la necesidad de separar de los curatos a los frailes debido a la relajación de sus votos y la independencia que mostraban ante cualquier autoridad. No obstante, la realidad mostraba que desde 1700, en el arzobispado de México, sus prelados habían logrado sujetar a los frailes encargados de los curatos de indios. Al comparar los argumentos vertidos en Madrid y la cédula de 1749 con los cambios ocurridos en el arzobispado de México durante la primera mitad del siglo XVIII queda claro que las medidas decretadas por Fernando VI sobre las doctrinas indianas

  18. Education and Job Training: Preparing for the 21st Century Workforce. Hearing before the Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives. One Hundred Seventh Congress, Second Session (Angola, Indiana, March 22, 2002).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This is a congressional hearing on how vocational and technical education and job training work together to better prepare workers for the 21st century workforce and on successful educational and job training activities and initiatives in Indiana (IN). Testimony includes statements from United States representatives (Howard P. "Buck"…

  19. 76 FR 9832 - In the Matter of Superior Well Services, Ltd. Indiana, PA; Confirmatory Order Modifying License...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... how the material is secured in company trucks during transport by welding the plate with the source... training contractors, Applied Health Physics (AHP), for inclusion as an example in its radiological...), with oversight by the Health and Safety Engineers, to review the radiological safety programs and...

  20. Organic wastewater compounds in water and sediment in and near restored wetlands, Great Marsh, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, 2009–11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egler, Amanda L.; Risch, Martin R.; Alvarez, David A.; Bradley, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    A cooperative investigation between the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service was completed from 2009 through 2011 to understand the occurrence, distribution, and environmental processes affecting concentrations of organic wastewater compounds in water and sediment in and near Great Marsh at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in Beverly Shores, Indiana. Sampling sites were selected to represent hydrologic inputs to the restored wetlands from adjacent upstream residential and less developed areas and to represent discharge points of cascading cells within the restored wetland. A multiphase approach was used for the investigation. Discrete water samples and time-integrated passive samples were analyzed for 69 organic wastewater compounds. Continuous water-level information and periodic streamflow measurements characterized flow conditions at discharge points from restored wetland cells. Wetland sediments were collected and analyzed for sorptive losses of organic wastewater compounds and to evaluate of the potential for wetland sediments to biotransform organic wastewater compounds. A total of 52 organic wastewater compounds were detected in discrete water samples at 1 or more sites. Detections of organic wastewater compounds were widespread, but concentrations were generally low and 95 percent were less than 2.1 micrograms per liter. Six compounds were detected at concentrations greater than 2.1 micrograms per liter—four fecal sterols (beta-sitosterol, cholesterol, beta-stigmastanol, and 2-beta coprostanol), one plasticizer (bis-2-ethylhex ylphthalate), and a non-ionic detergent (4-nonylphenol diethoxylate). Two 1-month deployments of time-integrative passive samplers, called polar organic chemical integrative samplers, detected organic wastewater compounds at lower concentrations than were possible with discrete water samples. Isopropyl benzene (solvent), caffeine (plant alkaloid, stimulant), and hexahydrohexamethyl cyclopentabenzopyran (fragrance

  1. Level III Ecoregions of Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  2. Level IV Ecoregions of Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  3. FLOODPLAIN, Indiana County, PA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This Floodplain Mapping Submission includes a new countywide FIS report and a revised flood hazard dataset. GG3 restudied all of the effective approximate studies...

  4. Adding Value to Indiana's Commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Mary A., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Food processing plants are adding value to bulk and intermediate products to sell overseas. The Asian Pacific Rim economies constituted the largest market for consumer food products in 1993. This shift toward consumer food imports in this area is due to more women working outside the home, the internationalization of populations, and dramatic…

  5. 77 FR 61326 - Indiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... checklist (and/or RCRA Analogous state , if relevant) statutory authority authority) Burning of Hazardous...- Furnaces Checklist 85. 2(2); 3.1-9-1; 3.1- 10-1; 3.1-10-2(13); 3.1-11-1; 3.1-11- 2(2); 3.1-13-1; 3.1- 13-2...

  6. 78 FR 33986 - Indiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... rule): Burning of Hazardous Wastes in Boilers and Industrial Furnaces, Checklist 85, February 21, 1991... Technical Amendments I, Checklist 94, July 17, 1991 (56 FR 32688); Burning of Hazardous Wastes in Boilers...

  7. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program]. [Purdue Univ. , West Lafayette, Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac[endash]Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  8. 2009-2012 Indiana Statewide Imagery and LiDAR Program: Maumee River Basin Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The counties comprised in this dataset have been chosen based on the relation to the Maumee River basin, a portion of the Lake Erie basin and correlated with the...

  9. Performance evaluation testing of wells in the gradient control system at a federally operated Confined Disposal Facility using single well aquifer tests, East Chicago, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, David C.; Unthank, Michael D.

    2016-12-08

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed tests to evaluate the hydrologic connection between the open interval of the well and the surrounding Calumet aquifer in response to fouling of extraction well pumps onsite. Two rounds of air slug testing were performed on seven monitoring wells and step drawdown and subsequent recovery tests on three extraction wells on a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Confined Disposal Facility (CDF) in East Chicago, Indiana. The wells were tested in 2014 and again in 2015. The extraction and monitoring wells are part of the gradient control system that establishes an inward gradient around the perimeter of the facility. The testing established a set of protocols that site personnel can use to evaluate onsite well integrity and develop a maintenance procedure to evaluate future well performance.The results of the slug test analysis data indicate that the hydraulic connection of the well screen to the surrounding aquifer material in monitoring wells on the CDF and the reliability of hydraulic conductivity estimates of the surrounding geologic media could be increased by implementing well development maintenance. Repeated air slug tests showed increasing hydraulic conductivity until, in the case of the monitoring wells located outside of the groundwater cutoff wall (MW–4B, MW–11B, MW–14B), the difference in hydraulic conductivity from test to test decreased, indicating the results were approaching the optimal hydraulic connection between the aquifer and the well screen. Hydraulic conductivity values derived from successive tests in monitoring well D40, approximately 0.25 mile south of the CDF, were substantially higher than those derived from wells on the CDF property. Also, values did not vary from test to test like those measured in monitoring wells located on the CDF property, which indicated that a process may be affecting the connectivity of the wells on the CDF property to the Calumet aquifer. Derived hydraulic conductivity

  10. 40 CFR 147.751 - EPA-administered program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, and 148 and the additional... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Indiana § 147.751 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for all classes of wells on Indian lands, and for Class I...

  11. Cavalgada ao centro da Terra: rotas para uma erótica árabe e indiana Riding to the center of Earth: routes for an arab and indian erotica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Venchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo trata de narrativas das tradições árabe-islâmica, indiana e persa sobre sagrado e sexualidade, discutindo a pertinência da inserção de tal objeto teórico e empírico em concepções ocidentais de erotismo nos interstícios entre gênero, religião e poder. Apresenta-se também a tese de que a Arábia pré-islâmica era um amálgama de crenças e rituais para além do discurso muçulmano que essencializa tal período histórico como jahiyylia, "época da ignorância".This paper discusses the relevancy of Western theoretical and empirical concepts such as eroticism, gender, power and religion regarding narratives from Arabic, Persian and Indian traditions dealing with sacred sexuality. Furthermore it argues about the Muslim and historical concept called jahiyylia or "age of ignorance" as an essentialist concept which hides an amalgam of beliefs and ritual practices.

  12. Comparación de la técnica seroneutralización con la inmunoenzimática competitiva en la detección de anticuerpos contra el virus de la estomatitis vesicular (serotipos New Jersey e Indiana) en equinos de Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    von Koeckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Dolz Wiedner, Gaby; Vinicio Herrero, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA) was compared to the serum neutralization test (SNT) for the detection of antibodies against vesicular stomatitis virus, New Jersey (VSV-NJ) and Indiana (VSV-IN) serotypes, using 214 equine serum samples from Costa Rica. In the c-ELISA for VSV-NJ 109 (50.93%) equine sera reacted positive, whereas in the SNT 138 (64.48%) serum samples reacted positive to VSV-NJ. In the c-ELISA for VSV-IN 26 (12.15%) sera reacted positive, whereas in the ...

  13. A Transdisciplinary Training Program for Behavioral Oncology and Cancer Control Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Anna M.; Champion, Victoria L.; Kroenke, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    Transdisciplinary health research training has been identified as a major initiative to achieve the vision for research teams of the future as articulated in the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. To address the need for scientists who can integrate diverse scientific approaches and work in transdisciplinary teams to solve complex health problems, Indiana University has designed an innovative training program that will provide the didactic and research experiences to enable trainees to establish productive careers in behavioral oncology and cancer control research. Development of a successful transdisciplinary training program requires mentorship, research, and a specialized curriculum that encompass a broad range of disciplines. The program capitalizes on a unique set of existing and emerging training opportunities resulting from the collaborative activities of the Indiana University (IU) Simon Cancer Center, the IU Schools of Nursing and Medicine, and multiple research institutes and academic centers located in Indiana and neighboring states. PMID:18501750

  14. English Camp: A Language Immersion Program in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugasken, Kris; Harris, Jacqueline A.

    2009-01-01

    A summer English camp language immersion program, which began in 2003, provided instruction by native English speakers to Thai college students via collaboration between Prince of Songkla University in Thailand and Ball State University in Indiana, USA. During this program, Thai students were exposed to English formally through classroom…

  15. Optimal selection and placement of green infrastructure to reduce impacts of land use change and climate change on hydrology and water quality: An application to the Trail Creek Watershed, Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaoze; Theller, Lawrence O; Pijanowski, Bryan C; Engel, Bernard A

    2016-05-15

    The adverse impacts of urbanization and climate change on hydrology and water quality can be mitigated by applying green infrastructure practices. In this study, the impacts of land use change and climate change on hydrology and water quality in the 153.2 km(2) Trail Creek watershed located in northwest Indiana were estimated using the Long-Term Hydrologic Impact Assessment-Low Impact Development 2.1 (L-THIA-LID 2.1) model for the following environmental concerns: runoff volume, Total Suspended Solids (TSS), Total Phosphorous (TP), Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN), and Nitrate+Nitrite (NOx). Using a recent 2001 land use map and 2050 land use forecasts, we found that land use change resulted in increased runoff volume and pollutant loads (8.0% to 17.9% increase). Climate change reduced runoff and nonpoint source pollutant loads (5.6% to 10.2% reduction). The 2050 forecasted land use with current rainfall resulted in the largest runoff volume and pollutant loads. The optimal selection and placement of green infrastructure practices using L-THIA-LID 2.1 model were conducted. Costs of applying green infrastructure were estimated using the L-THIA-LID 2.1 model considering construction, maintenance, and opportunity costs. To attain the same runoff volume and pollutant loads as in 2001 land uses for 2050 land uses, the runoff volume, TSS, TP, TKN, and NOx for 2050 needed to be reduced by 10.8%, 14.4%, 13.1%, 15.2%, and 9.0%, respectively. The corresponding annual costs of implementing green infrastructure to achieve the goals were $2.1, $0.8, $1.6, $1.9, and $0.8 million, respectively. Annual costs of reducing 2050 runoff volume/pollutant loads were estimated, and results show green infrastructure annual cost greatly increased for larger reductions in runoff volume and pollutant loads. During optimization, the most cost-efficient green infrastructure practices were selected and implementation levels increased for greater reductions of runoff and nonpoint source pollutants

  16. Surface-water-quality assessment of the upper Illinois River Basin in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin; results of investigations through April 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Arthur R.; Blanchard, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    ,p'-DDE was the most commonly detected organic compound in biota in both 1989 and 1990. In the nine fish-fillet samples collected in 1989, exceedances of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) fish tissue concentrations were noted for p,p'-DDE in all nine fillets and for dieldrin in five of the nine fillets. Nutrient concentrations in water in the study area generally were larger than concentrations typically found in natural waters. The Des Plaines River Basin contributed approximately 41 percent of the total nitrogen load to the upper Illinois River Basin, whereas the Kankakee River and Iroquois River Basins contributed about 34 and 14 percent of the total load, respectively. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations measured during a 1988 synoptic sampling exceeded State water-quality standards at 76 percent of the sampled sites. Bacteria densities greater than water-quality standards were observed at all of the fixed-monitoring stations, but densities greater than water-quality criteria and standards were observed more often at stations in the Des Plaines River Basin. Results from the analysis of changes in water quality following changes in wastewater-treatment practices indicated that current monitoring programs, although sufficient for their intended purposes, are not suitable for this type of retrospective assessment in large-scale water-quality assessments. Changes were not indicated in fish-community structure and population following changes in wastewater-treatment practices. A strong relation between the quality of the fish community and overall water-quality conditions was observed, although USEPA acute criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life were rarely exceeded. Analyses of fish-community data clearly showed that water quality in the urbanized parts of the study area were degraded relative to those in agricultural areas. Total chromium in streambed sediments and total recoverable sodium in water were highly correlated

  17. Nutrients and Suspended Solids in Surface Waters of the Upper Illinois River Basin in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin, 1978-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Daniel J.

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of selected data on nutrients and suspended solids in surface waters of the upper Illinois River Basin was done as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Approximately 91 percent of the upper Illinois River Basin is drained by three principal rivers: the Kankakee (and its major tributary, the Iroquois), the Des Plaines, and the Fox. The data analyzed were collected by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA), which operates 39 monitoring sites in the study area as part of its Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network, and included analyses for total ammonia nitrogen, total nitriteplus- nitrate nitrogen, total ammonia-plus-organic (total Kjeldahl) nitrogen, dissolved and total phosphorus, and total suspended solids and volatile solids. Nutrient and suspended-sediment data collected by the USGS as part of the upper Illinois River Basin NAWQA pilot study from 1987-90 were compared to IEPA data. For the 1978-97 period, in general, nutrient concentrations, with the exception of nitrate, were highest at streams in the urban areas of the Des Plaines River Basin. Streams in the Kankakee and Fox River Basins generally had lower concentrations, although the data indicate that concentrations increased in a downstream direction in these basins. These spatial patterns in nutrient concentrations correspond closely with land use in the respective basins. The elevated concentrations of ammonia and phosphorus in the urbanized Des Plaines River Basin, with respect to other sites in the study area, indicate that municipal- and industrial- waste discharges into streams of the basin increase concentrations of these nutrients in the receiving streams. In contrast, nitrate concentrations were highest in agricultural areas. Relatively large ratios of nitrogen to phosphorus and nitrate to ammonia are characteristic of agricultural drainage. On the other hand, urban tributaries were characterized by

  18. Gravity Data for Indiana (300 records compiled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity data (300 records) were compiled by Purdue University. This data base was received in February 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air...

  19. Forest Land In Indiana Counties, 1967

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton L. Essex

    1968-01-01

    Commercial forest land has declined slightly from 4.1 million acres in 1950 to 3.9 million acres in 1967. The more heavily forested counties are in the southern half of the State where forest land has been increasing

  20. 50 CFR 32.33 - Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... location the following day. We prohibit tree steps or screw-in steps (see § 32.2(i)). D. Sport Fishing. We.... We prohibit harvest of frog and turtle (see § 27.21 of this chapter). Patoka River National Wildlife..., ribbons, paper, paint, tacks, tree blazes, or other devices. D. Sport Fishing. We allow sport fishing on...

  1. High performance concrete pavement in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Until the early 1990s, curling and warping of Portland cement concrete pavement did not concern : pavement engineers in many transportation agencies. Since beginning construction of the interstate system in the : United States in the late 1950s throu...

  2. High Performance Concrete Pavement in Indiana

    OpenAIRE

    Nantung, Tommy E

    2011-01-01

    Until the early 1990s, curling and warping of Portland cement concrete pavement did not concern pavement engineers in many transportation agencies. Since beginning construction of the interstate system in the United States in the late 1950s through the late 1980s, the performance of Portland cement concrete pavement has been associated with properties of concrete as a pavement material. In those years developed standards and design guidelines emphasized better concrete materials and construct...

  3. 40 CFR 81.315 - Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... County X LaPorte County X Marion County X Porter County: An area bound on the north by Lake Michigan, on the west by the Lake-Porter County line, on the south by I-80 and 90 and on the east by the LaPorte-Porter County line ..... X The remainder of Porter County...... X Vigo County X Warrick County 1 X Wayne...

  4. 77 FR 51101 - Indiana Disaster #IN-00048

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    .../16/2012. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 10/15/2012. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application..., Posey, Vanderburgh, Warrick. Illinois: Wabash, White. The Interest Rates are: Percent For Physical... Credit Available Elsewhere 3.000 For Economic Injury: Businesses & Small Agricultural Cooperatives...

  5. 76 FR 59176 - Indiana Disaster #IN-00036

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    .../2011. Effective Date: 09/12/2011. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 11/14/2011. Economic Injury..., White. Kentucky: Henderson, Union. The Interest Rates are: Percent For Physical Damage: Homeowners With... Elsewhere 3.000 For Economic Injury: ] Businesses & Small Agricultural Cooperatives Without Credit 4.000...

  6. Mandatory Special Education Plan for the Administration and Implementation of Public School Programs for the Hearing Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Indianapolis. Div. of Special Education.

    Intended for public school administrators, teachers, and speech and hearing clinicians, the document contains guidelines for setting up programs to implement the statewide mandatory special education plan for hearing impaired children in Indiana. Outlined are procedures to follow in comprehensive programing for the following categories of the…

  7. 40 CFR 52.798 - Small business stationary source technical and environmental compliance assistance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small business stationary source technical and environmental compliance assistance program. 52.798 Section 52.798 Protection of Environment... PLANS Indiana § 52.798 Small business stationary source technical and environmental compliance...

  8. 76 FR 40242 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Modifications to Indiana...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ...-2-8, 326 IAC 2-2-10, and 326 IAC 2-3-1 through 2-3-3 also include corrections to grammatical errors... Review (NNSR) rules. The amendments include grammatical changes, corrections to numbering, addition of... grammatical changes, corrections to numbering notation, the addition of definitions consistent with Federal...

  9. Foundations in Science and Mathematics Program for Middle School and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Karna Mahadev; Yang, Jing; Hemann, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The Foundations in Science and Mathematics (FSM) is a graduate student led summer program designed to help middle school and high school students strengthen their knowledge and skills in mathematics and science. FSM provides two-week-long courses over a broad spectrum of disciplines including astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer programming, geology, mathematics, and physics. Students can chose two types of courses: (1) courses that help students learn the fundamental concepts in basic sciences and mathematics (e.g., "Precalculus"); and (2) knowledge courses that might be excluded from formal schooling (e.g., "Introduction to Universe"). FSM has served over 500 students in the Bloomington, IN, community over six years by acquiring funding from Indiana University and the Indiana Space Grant Consortium. FSM offers graduate students the opportunity to obtain first hand experience through independent teaching and curriculum design as well as leadership experience.We present the design of the program, review the achievements, and explore the challenges we face. We are open to collaboration with similar educational outreach programs. For more information, please visit http://www.indiana.edu/~fsm/ .

  10. Niveles de plomo elevados en sangre de niños que vivían en casas antiguas de Evansville, Indiana: asociación entre año de construcción de la casa, niveles de plomo en suelo y niveles de plomo en sangre de niños de 1-5 años, entre 1998-2006 Higher blood lead levels among children living in older homes in Evansville Indiana: associations between year house built, soil lead levels and blood lead levels among children aged 1-5 years - 1998 to 2006 Elevados níveis de chumbo no sangue de crianças que vivem em habitações antigas em Evansville, Indiana: associação entre o ano de construção da casa, níveis de chumbo no solo e níveis de chumbo no sangue de crianças de 1-5 anos, entre 1998 - 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Jackson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se evaluaron los niveles de plomo en 18.218 muestras de sangre. Las muestras de 11.719 niños de Evansville, Indiana, de edades comprendidas entre 1 y 5 años se obtuvieron de manera voluntaria entre los años 1998 y 2006. Se evaluaron además los niveles de plomo en el suelo de 35 jardines residenciales correspondientes al domicilio de 81 niños.Durante el periodo de estudio, tanto los niveles de plomo en sangre como el porcentaje de valores elevados para dichos niveles fueron descendiendo. A pesar de ello, los valores de plomo en sangre en Evansville siguieron estando por encima de los nacionales (mediana de niveles de plomo en sangre 3,0 frente a 1,5 μg/dL, respectivamente. Nuestro análisis dio como resultado que vivir en casas antiguas (presumiblemente con pintura que contiene plomo estaba asociado con niveles más elevados de plomo en sangre en los niños. No se encontró una asociación clara de los niveles elevados de plomo en sangre ni con el género ni con los niveles de plomo en el suelo de los jardines.A total of 18,218 blood lead levels (BLLs were assessed. The samples from 11,719 children aged 1-5 years in Evansville, Indiana, were obtained on a volunteer basis between 1998 and 2006. In addition, soil lead levels were also evaluated from 35 residential yards that were matched to the addresses of 81 children.During the study period, both average BLLs and the percentage of elevated BLLs declined. Even so, Evansville’s BLLs still remained higher than national levels (median BLLs of 3.0 vs.1.5 μg/dL, respectively. From our analysis, living in older houses (presumably containing lead paint was associated with higher BLLs in children. No clear association was found between higher BLLs and gender or residential soil lead levels.Neste estudo avaliaram-se os níveis de chumbo em 18.218 amostra de sangue. As amostras de 11.719 crianças de Evansville, Indiana, de idades compreendidas entre 1 e 5 anos obtiveram-se de forma

  11. Anatomical organization of aortic arch variations in the India: embryological basis and review Organização anatômica das variações do arco aórtico na população indiana: base e revisão embriológica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soubhagya R. Nayak

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the percentage and type of aortic arch variations in Indian subjects and their clinical and surgical importance and embryological basis. PATIENTS AND METHOD: In our investigation, branching patterns of the aortic arch were studied in 62 formalin-fixed cadavers of both sexes of Indian origin, aged 45-79. The dissections were carried out in formalin-preserved cadavers and the aortic arch variations were observed after exposing the thoracic and cervical region during routine dissection of undergraduate students of Indian origin in Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore. RESULTS: The usual three-branched aortic arch was found in 56 cadavers (91.4%; variations were found in six cadavers (9.6%; 4.8% presented common origin of the carotid arteries; 1.6% had bi-innominate sequence, and the same specimen had left coronary artery arising from arch of aorta directly; 1.6% presented right subclavian artery arising directly from the aorta; 1.6% had left vertebral artery a branch of aortic arch. Five out of six cadavers with anomalous aortic arch branching pattern were females. One male cadaver presented anomalous origin of left vertebral artery directly from the arch. CONCLUSION: The wide spectrum of variations in the anatomical arrangements of the aortic arch branches in the Indian population was at par with other populations of the world. Although anomalous origins of the aortic arch branches are merely anatomic variants, accurate information about them is vital for vascular surgery in the thorax, head and neck region.OBJETIVOS: Determinar a porcentagem e o tipo de variações do arco aórtico em indivíduos indianos, bem como sua importância clínica e cirúrgica e base embriológica. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Em nossa investigação, os padrões de ramificação do arco aórtico foram estudados em 62 cadáveres fixados em formalina de ambos os sexos, de origem indiana e com idade entre 45 e 79 anos. As dissecações foram realizadas em

  12. Outdoor Programs and Academic Departments Working Together: Examining the Benefits of Offering For-Credit Recreation Hard Skills Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poff, Raymond A.; Calvin, David A.; Stuessy, Thomas L.

    The relationship between Indiana University Outdoor Adventures (IUOA) and the Indiana University Department of Recreation and Park Administration began in the early 1980s with the department providing IUOA with lists of potential graduate-assistant employees. If a graduate assistant was hired, IUOA paid the student a stipend and the department…

  13. Recreation Hard Skills Courses for Credit: A Collaborative Effort between the Academic Department and the Outings Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, David M.; Stuessy, Thomas L.; Poff, Raymond A.

    At Indiana University, the Department of Recreation and Park Administration and Indiana University Outdoor Adventures (IUOA) work together to offer university students for-credit courses in recreation skills. Since 1997, graduate students trained and directed by IUOA have taught 1-credit courses in specific outdoor skills, based on nationally…

  14. Sexual Violence Prevention in Indiana: Toward Safer, Healthier Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cierniak, Katie; Heiman, Julia R.; Plucker, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    For roughly three decades, policymakers have sought to reduce sexual violence by reliance on a criminal justice approach in which sexually violent acts are dealt with after they occur. Recognizing that prevention efforts could be more valuable, as they work to stop the problem before it begins, researchers have begun to implement a primary…

  15. Gravity Data for Indiana-over 10,000 records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity data (10,629 records) were compiled by Purdue University. This data base was received in December 1989. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air...

  16. OrthoImagery submittal for Rush County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  17. Cultural Resources of the Ohio River Valley in Indiana,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-07-01

    with the varied fenestration , small but attractive entrance porch, and cupola crowning the very low pitched roof. Owner-lallack Anderson 4. ? 5. 400... crowned with an iron railing made by the original owner, who manufactured ornamental cast iron. Owner- C. 0. Sieglitz. 4. 1700 feet. 5. 480 feet a.s.l. 6

  18. OrthoImagery submittal for Fulton County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  19. L’importanza dei linguaggi non verbali nella cultura indiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Gallo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – Nonverbal languages are an integral part of human communication since they transmit substantial information such as emotions and psychological conditions, and therefore they contribute to understanding. Culture affects nonverbal behaviours. The Indian subcontinent is highly multicultural, multi-ethnic, multi-religious and multilingual, and language diversity often makes communication difficult. In India alone, there are 22 official languages besides about 400 other languages. The populations of the southern area, who speak languages of Dravidian origins, do not have a common language to communicate with people living in the North, who speak languages of Aryan origins, and even people living in the same village often speak different dialects. English, which has the status of an L2 in the country, is spoken appropriately only by those who can afford to go to English-medium schools. The majority of people can be placed in a continuum going from highly creolised forms of English to a number of ‘trade pidgins’. Yet, in spite of the inability to communicate in a common language, Indians make use of nonverbal languages, such as hand and head gestures, facial expressions, eye movements, as well as less evident messages such as dress and their colours, posture and the space between speakers. Nonverbal behaviours that Indians display in daily communication are related to those found in traditional performing and aesthetic arts. The purpose of this paper is to suggest how the knowledge of nonverbal languages is useful for an appropriate intercultural competence for interaction with migrants coming from the Indian subcontinent.

  20. Sy Montgomery: Part Indiana Jones and Part Emily Dickinson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Terrell A.

    2008-01-01

    As important as accuracy may be to nonfiction writers, few have taken such risks as Sy Montgomery in gathering information for her articles, books, and films. In this profile article, Young recounts many of the risks and adventures Montgomery has taken for the sake of accurate and impassioned writing. Montgomery says, "I consider my books love…

  1. Examination of Post-Tensioned Steel Bridges in Indiana

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Hung-I; Bowman, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the research study is to conduct an investigation to understand the performance of a relatively new type of bridge construction that involves prestressed (post-tensioned) steel-concrete composite bridge members. Strictly speaking, the technical and economical advantages of this type of structure have been understood for several decades. However, the application of this concept to practice is still very limited due to difficulties associated with the post-tensioning anchorage. T...

  2. OrthoImagery submittal for Huntington County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  3. College Enrollment Patterns for Rural Indiana High School Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Mathew R.; Davis, Elizabeth; Stephan, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Postsecondary education is a fundamental tool for achieving upward mobility and economic growth. Students with an associate's or bachelor's degree earn substantially more in a lifetime and experience better working conditions and job benefits than students with only a high school diploma. This study examines differences in public college…

  4. Updates to Indiana fuel tax and registration revenue projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Highway revenues both at the federal and state levels have failed to keep up with expected investments required for infrastructure : preservation and improvement. The reasons for this trend include the increasing fuel efficiency of vehicles, slowing ...

  5. Information Summary, Area of Concern: Grand Calumet River, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    RI, Table 12) 74 Percent Difference in Oxygen Liberation [ Photosynthesis ] and Oxygen Consumption [Respiration] Between Control and In Situ...Percent Difference in Oxygen Liberation [ Photosynthesis ] and Oxygen Consumption [Respiration] Between Control and In Situ Colonization Test Systems in...diatoms. Synedra ulna Several different algalgroups Asterionella formosa were observed, making the Oscillatoria sp. sample relatively diverse. Table 84

  6. Indiana State University Graduates to Advanced Plastic Cooling Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Perhaps more than many other industries, today's universities and colleges are beset by dramatically rising costs on every front. One of the areas where overhead can be contained or reduced is in the operation of the chilled water systems that support air conditioning throughout college campuses, specifically the cooling towers. Like many…

  7. OrthoImagery submittal for Greene County, Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth?s surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  8. High performance concrete pavement in Indiana : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Until the early 1990s, curling and warping of Portland cement concrete pavement did not concern pavement engineers in many transportation agencies. Since beginning construction of the interstate system in the United States in the late 1950s through t...

  9. Environmental Tradeoffs of Stover Removal and Erosion in Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alicia English; Wallace E. Tyner; Juan Sesmero; Phillip Owens; David J. Muth, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    When considering the market for biomass from corn stover resources erosion and soil quality issues are important to consider. Removal of stover can be beneficial in some areas, especially when coordinated with other conservation practices, such as vegetative barrier strips and cover crops. However, benefits are highly dependent on several factors, namely if farmers see costs and benefits associated with erosion and the tradeoffs with the removal of biomass. Although typically considered an internal cost, the implication is important to policy and contracting for biomass. This paper uses results from an integrated RUSLE2/WEPS model to incorporate six different regime choices, covering management, harvest and conservation, into a simple profit maximization model to show these tradeoffs explicitly. The results of this work show how different costs for erosion, biomass and conservation managements will affect behavior. If erosion prices are low and no conservation requirement exists, biomass removal will significantly increase erosion, but only in some areas. Alternatively, when erosion prices are high, farmers will parallel socially optimal levels of erosion and conservation management practices can be incentivized through access to a market for stover.

  10. Costs and revenues associated with overweight trucks in Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    This study estimated highway pavement and bridge damage costs, and analyzed the adequacy of permit revenues to cover these : costs. The study began with an extensive review of the literature on the subject, thus facilitating identification of the gap...

  11. Depleted uranium human health risk assessment, Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-04-29

    The risk to human health from fragments of depleted uranium (DU) at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG) was estimated using two types of ecosystem pathway models. A steady-state, model of the JPG area was developed to examine the effects of DU in soils, water, and vegetation on deer that were hunted and consumed by humans. The RESRAD code was also used to estimate the effects of farming the impact area and consuming the products derived from the farm. The steady-state model showed that minimal doses to humans are expected from consumption of deer that inhabit the impact area. Median values for doses to humans range from about 1 mrem ({plus_minus}2.4) to 0.04 mrem ({plus_minus}0.13) and translate to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments (excess cancers) in the population. Monte Carlo simulation of the steady-state model was used to derive the probability distributions from which the median values were drawn. Sensitivity analyses of the steady-state model showed that the amount of DU in airborne dust and, therefore, the amount of DU on the vegetation surface, controlled the amount of DU ingested by deer and by humans. Human doses from the RESRAD estimates ranged from less than 1 mrem/y to about 6.5 mrem/y in a hunting scenario and subsistence fanning scenario, respectively. The human doses exceeded the 100 mrem/y dose limit when drinking water for the farming scenario was obtained from the on-site aquifer that was presumably contaminated with DU. The two farming scenarios were unrealistic land uses because the additional risk to humans due to unexploded ordnance in the impact area was not figured into the risk estimate. The doses estimated with RESRAD translated to less than 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} detriments to about 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} detriments. The higher risks were associated only with the farming scenario in which drinking water was obtained on-site.

  12. Iglesia episcopal de San Agustín, Indiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dart, Edward D.

    1961-11-01

    Full Text Available Una congregación episcopal de Gary —ciudad industrial del acero en el Estado de Indiana— ha construido esta modesta iglesia que, sin duda, se aparta de la línea tradicional arquitectónica recta y severa para adoptar formas nuevas, originales y gratas que aporten ideas innovadoras y marquen nuevas directrices a las construcciones de nuestro tiempo.

  13. Spectral reflectance of five hardwood tree species in southern Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale R. Weigel; J.C. Randolph

    2013-01-01

    The use of remote sensing to identify forest species has been ongoing since the launch of Landsat-1 using MSS imagery. The ability to separate hardwoods from conifers was accomplished by the 1980s. However, distinguishing individual hardwood species is more problematic due to similar spectral and phenological characteristics. With the launch of commercial satellites...

  14. Analysis of travel time reliability on Indiana interstates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Travel-time reliability is a key performance measure in any transportation system. It is a : measure of quality of travel time experienced by transportation system users and reflects the efficiency : of the transportation system to serve citizens, bu...

  15. Baseline Contaminants Investigation of the Patoka River Watershed, Southwest Indiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment and fish tissue samples were collected from various locations within the Patoka River watershed (PRW) as part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's...

  16. Alison Kafer, Feminist Queer Crip (Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2013, pp. 258, ISBN: 9780253009340, £16.99, paperback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Lacey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Feminist Queer Crip, Alison Kafer endeavours to re-politicise disability and its relations to gender and sexuality. This entails a thorough examination of the ways in which time can be or become 'crip' – a critical term for 'imagining bodies and desires otherwise' – with a focus on those bodies that won't grow, age, labour or reproduce according to normal standards of growth and productivity. Kafer also examines bodies that are visually reproduced, or omitted, to facilitate the production of a political agenda, and how the continual reproduction of the able-bodied norm may be challenged or undone. She writes with an acute awareness of intersectionality and her understanding of reproductive politics repeatedly challenges ableist notions of care, future, and productivity. She first identifies problems with the medical model of disability, which constructs a timeline that can only lead to cure or failure, and with the social model, which risks ignoring the lived realities of pain until 'cure becomes the future no self-respecting disability activist or scholar wants' (p. 7. Kafer then arrives at a political and relational stance, one which prioritises coalition over diagnosis and which recognises that disability 'does not occur in isolation' (p. 8. Her relational model takes into account partnerships with carers and attendants and assisting animals, and a focus on political allegiance allows room for Robert McRuer's theory of a 'non-disabled claim to crip': an expansive identity politics which extends beyond diagnostics and towards the deconstructive principle that everyone is, has or will be disabled, and so has a stake in dismantling the ablebodied ideal. The bounds of these relations move from the social to the temporal – Feminist Queer Crip suggests that disability occurs in time, or out of it, and is often marked by a rupture in the rhythm of ableist lifetimes.

  17. Mechanic/maintenance training and certification program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) is divided into six districts, with district offices located in La Porte, Fort Wayne, : Crawfordsville, Greenfield, Vincennes, and Seymour. Each district includes multiple vehicle maintenance shops (to...

  18. A court-mandated workshop for adolescent children of divorcing parents: a program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D M

    1980-01-01

    This article provides a description and an empirical evaluation of a predivorce workshop established by the Family Court of Allen County, Indiana, for adolescent children (N = 48) of divorcing parents. Highlighted are the concerns of the adolescents, the approaches taken by the workshop staff, and the impact of the program on the participants. Viewpoints on the clinical, ethical, and legal issues involved in "required" predivorce counseling for adolescents are presented. The preventive nature of the program, its means of transforming initial resentment toward the workshop experience into positive feelings, and the implications for future practice and research are also discussed.

  19. Using existing programs as vehicles to disseminate knowledge, provide opportunities for scientists to assist educators, and to engage students in using real data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. C.; Wegner, K.; Branch, B. D.; Miller, B.; Schulze, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Many national and statewide programs throughout the K-12 science education environment teach students about science in a hands-on format, including programs such as Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE), Project Learning Tree (PLT), Project Wild, Project Wet, and Hoosier River Watch. Partnering with one or more of these well-known programs can provide many benefits to both the scientists involved in disseminating research and the K-12 educators. Scientists potentially benefit by broader dissemination of their research by providing content enrichment for educators. Educators benefit by gaining understanding in content, becoming more confident in teaching the concept, and increasing their enthusiasm in teaching the concepts addressed. This presentation will discuss an innovative framework for professional development that was implemented at Purdue University, Indiana in July 2013. The professional development incorporated GLOBE protocols with iPad app modules and interactive content sessions from faculty and professionals. By collaborating with the GLOBE program and scientists from various content areas, the Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences at Purdue University successfully facilitated a content rich learning experience for educators. Such activity is promoted and supported by Purdue University Libraries where activities such as Purdue's GIS Day are efforts of making authentic learning sustainable in the State of Indiana and for national consideration. Using iPads to visualize soil transitions on a field trip. Testing Water quality in the field.

  20. Road and Street Centerlines - FUNCTIONAL_CLASS_INDOTMODEL_IN: Functional Classification of Roadways in Indiana, 2015 (Indiana Department of Transportation, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — FUNCTIONAL_CLASS_INDOTMODEL_IN is a line shapefile that shows the Federal Highway Administration functional classification of roadways from the Road Inventory of the...

  1. Assisted Living Facilities - CARE_LONG_TERM_FACILITIES_ISDH_IN: Residential Care Facilities, Nursing Homes, and Hospices in Indiana in 2007 (Indiana State Department of Health, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — CARE_LONG_TERM_FACILITIES_ISDH_IN is a point shapefile showing the locations of 86 residential care facilities, 525 long-term care facilities (nursing homes), and 81...

  2. Establishing a Comprehensive Wind Energy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleeter, Sanford [Purdue University

    2012-09-30

    This project was directed at establishing a comprehensive wind energy program in Indiana, including both educational and research components. A graduate/undergraduate course ME-514 - Fundamentals of Wind Energy has been established and offered and an interactive prediction of VAWT performance developed. Vertical axis wind turbines for education and research have been acquired, instrumented and installed on the roof top of a building on the Calumet campus and at West Lafayette (Kepner Lab). Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations have been performed to simulate these urban wind environments. Also, modal dynamic testing of the West Lafayette VAWT has been performed and a novel horizontal axis design initiated. The 50-meter meteorological tower data obtained at the Purdue Beck Agricultural Research Center have been analyzed and the Purdue Reconfigurable Micro Wind Farm established and simulations directed at the investigation of wind farm configurations initiated. The virtual wind turbine and wind turbine farm simulation in the Visualization Lab has been initiated.

  3. A Family Day program enhances knowledge about medical school culture and necessary supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cushing Herbert E

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Family Day program was implemented at Indiana University School of Medicine to educate the families and friends of in-coming medical students about the rigors of medical school and the factors that contribute to stress. Methods Surveys that assessed knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes about medical school were administered to participants before and after the program. Results After the program, participants showed a significant improvement in their understanding of medical school culture and the importance of support systems for medical students. Post-test scores improved by an average of 29% (P Conclusions The inclusion of family members and other loved ones in pre-matriculation educational programs may serve to mitigate the stress associated with medical school by enhancing the students' social support systems.

  4. Nagu Indiana Jones / Riina Mägi ; komment. Märt Väljataga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mägi, Riina, 1957-

    2008-01-01

    Poola Vabariigi saatkonnas esitleti kahte Hendrik Lillepuu tõlkeraamatut: Herbert, Zbigniew. Valitud luuletused. - Jõgevamaa : H. Lindepuu, 2008 ja Szymborska, Wislawa. Oma aja lapsed. - Laiuse : H. Lindepuu, 2008

  5. 77 FR 52606 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... Transport Commission (OTC) establishing VOC limits for adhesives, sealants and primers. In addition, the...-reacted (non-liquid) traffic marking materials, or traffic marking materials that cannot be measured as a liquid at the time of application to 3.6 kilograms per stripe-kilometer, or 12.2 pounds per stripe-mile...

  6. The Religious Spirituality of an Indiana Public School Leader and Its Influence on the School

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Peters, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    As schools expand secularization and laws limiting religious expression increase, one must not forget the religious spirituality of the individual. Individual religious spirituality is still protected under the United States Constitution. Many researchers feel that this religious spirituality should be nurtured, not discouraged in public schools.…

  7. Transportation infrastructure implications of development of a cellulose ethanol industry for Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act calls for the US to produce 36 billion gallons of biofuels by 2022 of which no more than 15 billion would come from corn and 1 billion of biodiesel. Thus, the legislation envisions moving from no cellulos...

  8. International Conference on Phonon Physics, 31 August-3 September 1981. Bloomington, Indiana,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    Kalus, B. Dorner, V.K. Jindal, N. Karl , I. Natkaniec, G.S. Pawley, W. Press and E.F. Sheka; J. Phys. C submitted /11/ U. Schmelzer, E.L. Bokhenkov, B...1978). 4. A. Otto , Z. Physik 216, 398 (1968T. 5. H. Ibach, Phys. Rev. Letters 24, 1416 (1970). 6. T. Wolfram, Inelastic Electron Tunnel Spectroscopy...Incommnsurate recons- Fish(.,Des(oHrn truction of clean No(lOO) ... 06-846 RchG.),n Disce (E.).-~rn Fay D.) nd Apel (J.)- EfectAnharmonic

  9. Periodic Inspections of Cleveland Harbor East Breakwater, Ohio, and Burns Harbor North Breakwater, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    hyperspectral imagery, and aerial photographs using the Coastal Zone Mapping and Imaging Lidar (CZMIL) system ( Tuell et al. 2010; Reif et al. 2013...0.7 meters (m) on land and shallow water and is 2 m in optically deep water ( Tuell et al. 2010; Wozencraft 2013). A Compact Airborne Spectrographic...204. Tuell , G., K. Barbor, and J. M. Wozencraft. 2010. Overview of the coastal zone mapping and imaging lidar (CZMIL); A new multisensory airborne

  10. Diversity and Challenge in Teacher Education. Papers from the Illinois/Indiana ATE Mini-Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay-Mendez, Luis Felipe, Ed.

    The document presents the following papers: (1) "Eliot Wigginton: A "Shining Moment" of the Mini Clinic" (Luis Felipe Clay Mendez); (2) "Telling it Like it Is: Attitudes and Opinions of Beginning Teachers" (Erma Williams and others); (3) "Redesigning the Role of the Student Teacher Supervisor: Use of Reflective Techniques" (Barbara S. De Salvo);…

  11. Exploring the Implementation Effects of Response to Intervention on Rural Elementary Schools in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonts, Janet Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The rural elementary principal has the ultimate responsibility for bringing all stakeholders together to focus and improve student achievement. In doing so, they must be able to provide knowledge of national, state, and local policies that influence achievement. Response to Intervention is a tiered framework for school's to provide…

  12. What Indiana School Board Members Look for when Hiring a Superintendent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine whether there are any differences in what school board members look for in the areas of personal characteristics and professional skills when hiring a superintendent. A sample population of school board members who were serving at a school that had an opening for a superintendent during the…

  13. 77 FR 38725 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Environmental Management (IDEM) requested that EPA approve into its SIP the addition of a new rule that limits... product form or forms listed separately. --Identification of each product brand name and whether it is a... review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993...

  14. Grissom AFB, Indiana. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    month (tenths) C2R E DAILY SNOW DEPTH Ŕ- equals none for the month (whole inches) 3. The third set of two tables provides the total monthly amounts...E.[!/I/ AC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) :;: J 1, ’ AFL 1 ,z’ v SVT *t~ STATION SAR. TS ARSOS CLAS...sourly oboe .:atios rvcz :ded on surface observing forms or from automated data collections for alL- Air Force operated st.tions. For those stations

  15. 77 FR 55509 - Indiana Michigan Power Company; Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant, Unit 2; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ..., hydrogen concentration, and cladding oxidation from the metal/water reaction. The Baker-Just equation... states that the rates of energy release, hydrogen concentration, and cladding oxidation from the metal... reaction rates relative to the Baker-Just equation. Thus, the NRC staff agrees that application of Appendix...

  16. 75 FR 31465 - United States, State of Illinois, State of Colorado, and State of Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... several advantages of the theatre experience, including the size of screen, the sophistication of sound... to, all patents, licenses and sublicenses, intellectual property, copyrights, trademarks, trade names...

  17. De la encomienda indiana a la propiedad territorial en América

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Friede

    1963-08-01

    Full Text Available La relevante e ineluctable posición social de que gozaba la nobleza en España, quedó reflejada en la alta discusión que adquirió la propiedad territorial en la Península, base en que aquella fincaba su poderío político y económico.

  18. Antitobacco Media Awareness of Rural Youth Compared to Suburban and Urban Youth in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, Terrell W.; Saywell, Robert M., Jr.; Overgaard, Amanda D.; Przybylski, Michael J.; Dutta-Bergman, Mohan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the awareness and impact of antitobacco media messages among rural, suburban, and urban youth. Method: Self-administered questionnaires were received from 1,622, 1,059, and 1,177 middle school (sixth, seventh, and eighth grade) students in rural, suburban, and urban locations, respectively. Logistic regression compared…

  19. 75 FR 18757 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Alternate Monitoring...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... requirements allow the use of a particulate matter (PM) continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS) in place... IPL to use a particulate matter CEMS in place of a COMS to demonstrate compliance with applicable PM limits. IPL has installed a wet scrubber control device to control sulfur dioxide at its Harding Street...

  20. 76 FR 35273 - CSX Transportation, Inc.; Trackage Rights Exemption; The Indiana Rail Road Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ...: Between Belt Junction (milepost 181.7) and the south end of INRD's Martin Siding (milepost 185.2... trains from INRD on INRD's newly constructed Martin Siding south of Belt Junction. \\3\\ See CSX Transp...