WorldWideScience

Sample records for program immigration status

  1. Employment of Undocumented Immigrants and the Prospect of Legal Status: Evidence from an Amnesty Program

    OpenAIRE

    Devillanova, Carlo; Fasani, Francesco; Frattini, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper estimates the causal effect of the prospect of legal status on the employment outcomes of undocumented immigrants. Our identification strategy exploits a natural experiment provided by the 2002 amnesty program in Italy that introduced an exogenous discontinuity in eligibility based on date of arrival. We find that the prospect of legal status significantly increases the employment probability of immigrants that are potentially eligible for the amnesty relative to other undocumented...

  2. 49 CFR 1572.105 - Immigration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Immigration status. 1572.105 Section 1572.105... ASSESSMENTS Standards for Security Threat Assessments § 1572.105 Immigration status. (a) An individual... to an order of removal under the immigration laws of the United States is not eligible to apply for a...

  3. 75 FR 10809 - Agency Information Collection Activities: United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT); Biometric Data Collection at the.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT..., entitled ``United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology Program (US-VISIT); Enrollment...

  4. Legal Status and Wage Disparities for Mexican Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Matthew; Greenman, Emily; Farkas, George

    2010-01-01

    This paper employs a unique method of imputing the legal status of Mexican immigrants in the 1996-1999 and 2001-2003 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation to provide new evidence of the role of legal authorization in the U.S. on workers’ wages. Using growth curve techniques, we estimate wage trajectories for four groups: documented Mexican immigrants, undocumented Mexican immigrants, U.S-born Mexican Americans, and native non-Latino whites. Our estimates reveal a 17 percent...

  5. 24 CFR 5.512 - Verification of eligible immigration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... immigration status. 5.512 Section 5.512 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of... Noncitizens § 5.512 Verification of eligible immigration status. (a) General. Except as described in paragraph...) Primary verification—(1) Automated verification system. Primary verification of the immigration status of...

  6. Undocumented immigration status and diabetes care among Mexican immigrants in two immigration "sanctuary" areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iten, A Elizabeth; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Lahiff, Maureen; Fernández, Alicia

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between immigration status and the patient experience of health care, diabetes self-management, and clinical outcomes among Mexican immigrants with diabetes receiving health care in two immigration sanctuary cities. We used data from the Immigration, Culture and Health Care study, a cross-sectional survey and medical record study of low-income patients with diabetes recruited from public hospitals and community clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area and Chicago. Undocumented Mexican, documented Mexican immigrants, and US-born Mexican-Americans' health care experiences, diabetes self-management, and clinical outcomes were compared using multivariate linear and logistic regressions. We found no significant differences in reports of physician communication, or in measures of diabetes management between undocumented and documented immigrants. All three groups had similar clinical outcomes in glycemic, systolic blood pressure, and lipid control. These results indicate that, at least in some settings, undocumented Mexican immigrants with diabetes can achieve similar clinical outcomes and report similar health care experiences as documented immigrants and US-born Mexican-Americans.

  7. Psychosocial Empowerment and Social Support Factors Associated with the Employment Status of Immigrant Welfare Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ramirez, Manuel; Martinez, Manuel F.; Balcazar, Fabricio E.; Suarez-Balcazar, Yolanda; Albar, Maria-Jesus; Dominguez, Eugenia; Santolaya, Francisco J.

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the role that psychosocial empowerment and social support factors play in the employment status of immigrants who participate in job-readiness programs financed by the European Social Funds and the Welfare Services of Andalusia, a region in the south of Spain. The goal of these programs is to find new ways to improve immigrants'…

  8. 24 CFR 5.510 - Documents of eligible immigration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Documents of eligible immigration... Noncitizens § 5.510 Documents of eligible immigration status. (a) General. A responsible entity shall request and review original documents of eligible immigration status. The responsible entity shall retain...

  9. Social Exclusion among Peers: The Role of Immigrant Status and Classroom Immigrant Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenty, Stephanie; Jonsson, Jan O

    2017-06-01

    Increasing immigration and school ethnic segregation have raised concerns about the social integration of minority students. We examined the role of immigrant status in social exclusion and the moderating effect of classroom immigrant density among Swedish 14-15-year olds (n = 4795, 51 % females), extending conventional models of exclusion by studying multiple outcomes: victimization, isolation, and rejection. Students with immigrant backgrounds were rejected more than majority youth and first generation non-European immigrants were more isolated. Immigrants generally experienced more social exclusion in immigrant sparse than immigrant dense classrooms, and victimization increased with higher immigrant density for majority youth. The findings demonstrate that, in addition to victimization, subtle forms of exclusion may impede the social integration of immigrant youth but that time in the host country alleviates some risks for exclusion.

  10. Consequences of Arizona's Immigration Policy on Social Capital among Mexican Mothers with Unauthorized Immigration Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Padilla, Brian; Valentine, Jessa Lewis

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the consequences of increasingly restrictive immigration policies on social capital among Mexican mothers with unauthorized immigrant status in Arizona. Three focus groups conducted in Arizona explore how mothers' experiences with immigration policies have affected their neighborhood, community, and family ties. Focus group…

  11. Immigrant College Scholars in STEM: Generational Status, Family Achievement-Orientation, and Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beason, Tiffany S.

    Previous research has demonstrated that higher academic achievement among children of immigrants is related to higher academic expectations and aspirations among immigrant parents as compared to U.S.-born parents. The current study sought to further explore how family environment impacts the relation between immigrant generational status and academic outcomes. Specifically, it was hypothesized that family achievement-orientation, or family attitudes towards success at work or school, mediates the relation between immigrant generational status and academic outcomes (i.e. college GPA and career choice as indicated by graduate program entry). Results indicate that family achievement-orientation is higher among African American/Black children of immigrants than African Americans with US-born parents. Furthermore, African American/Black children of immigrants pursue the M.D. over the Ph.D. more often than their counterparts with US-born parents. The study concludes with a discussion of implications for future research.

  12. Effects of Health Status and Health Behaviors on Depression Among Married Female Immigrants in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung A; Yang, Sook Ja; Chee, Yeon Kyung; Kwon, Kyoung Ja; An, Jisook

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the effects of health status and health behaviors on depression in married female immigrants in South Korea. Sampling 316 immigrant women from the Philippines, Vietnam, China, and other Asian countries, a cross-sectional research design was used with self-report questionnaires that assessed sociodemographic characteristics, health status, health behaviors, and depression. There were significant differences in stillbirth experience, induced abortion, morbidity, perceived health status, meal skipping, and physical activity between depressed and nondepressed immigrant women. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, stillbirth experience, poorer perceived health status, more meal skipping, and less physical activity were associated with greater depressive symptoms. Both health status and health behaviors had significant impacts on depression, suggesting that development of nursing interventions and educational programs should be targeted towards improving maternal health, healthy lifestyle, and subjective health perception to promote married female immigrants' psychological well-being. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. A longitudinal study of immigrants' peer acceptance and rejection: Immigrant status, immigrant composition of the classroom, and acculturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asendorpf, Jens B; Motti-Stefanidi, Frosso

    2017-10-01

    In multiethnic classrooms, acceptance and rejection by classmates of one's own versus other ethnicity is influenced by in-group preference, the societal status of the ethnicities, and composition of classrooms. We aimed at (a) confirming these effects for immigrant versus nonimmigrant adolescents in newly formed classrooms, (b) longitudinally studying the change of these effects over the next 2 years, and (c) studying the longitudinal links between immigrants' acculturation and acceptance/rejection by (non)immigrants. This was a multilevel, longitudinal study of 1,057 13-year-old students nested in 49 classrooms over the first 3 years of middle school in Greece. Immigrant composition of classrooms varied strongly (average 44%), and immigrants in a classroom were ethnically homogeneous (78% same-ethnic). Students' acceptance and rejection by Greek and immigrant students were sociometrically assessed every year. Multilevel analyses were conducted for questions a and b and cross-lagged analyses for question c. Initially, immigrants were less accepted and more rejected by their classmates than Greeks. However, in classrooms with more than 66% immigrants, they were more accepted and less rejected. Over time, (a) immigrants and Greeks did not differ in being rejected and (b) immigrants in classrooms with few immigrants became increasingly more accepted. Finally, immigrants with higher involvement with the Greek culture were more accepted by their Greek classmates. Immigrants' peer relations with Greeks were positively affected by increasing opportunity for intergroup contact and involvement with the Greek culture. Interventions supporting acculturation and intergroup contact may prove beneficial for immigrant students. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. The 1998-99 immigration program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birrell, B; Rapson, V

    1998-01-01

    This article evaluates the Australian 1998-99 proposed immigration program. The 1998-99 annual plan seeks to rebalance migration intake by reducing family reunification and increasing the number of skilled migrants. The size of the Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs (DIMA) has been reduced. The program includes restrictions on eligibility, tougher administrative procedures on legitimate applicants, and limits on access to welfare benefits among recently arrived family members. Australia's program is now similar to those of the US and Western Europe. Immigration planning is still debating whether there is a need to restore a vigorous "nation building" immigration program. Corporate interests and the building industry strongly support high immigration. In March 1998, the DIMA Minister affirmed support for the reform agenda. The agenda includes a target of 80,000 for family reunion, 30,000 for Preferential Family components, and a 2-year waiting period for labor market payments to New Zealanders. Reforms will eventually include selection policies for skilled migrants. Fraud within the spouse/fiance category is a serious issue. The implications of the reforms include a major financial burden for taxpayers for the high intake of parents during 1996-97. Special Benefits mostly went to Vietnamese and Chinese elderly migrants. The number of spouse/fiance intakes declined due to the program's more effective fraud reduction measures. During the 1990s, the flow of New Zealanders increased. The 1998-99 program's waiting period is slowing budget savings on benefits to New Zealanders.

  15. Legal Status and Educational Transitions for Mexican and Central American Immigrant Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Emily; Hall, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This study uses the Survey of Income and Program Participation to infer the legal status of Mexican and Central American immigrant youth and to investigate its relationship with educational attainment. We assess differences by legal status in high school graduation and college enrollment, decompose differences in college enrollment into the…

  16. Legal status, emotional well-being and subjective health status of Latino immigrants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A; Zayas, Luis H; Spitznagel, Edward L

    2007-01-01

    Among the many stresses that undocumented Latino immigrants experience, worries about their legal status and preoccupation with disclosure and deportation can heighten the risk for emotional distress...

  17. Adolescent Body Image Distortion: A Consideration of Immigrant Generational Status, Immigrant Concentration, Sex and Body Dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimber, Melissa; Georgiades, Katholiki; Couturier, Jennifer; Jack, Susan M; Wahoush, Olive

    2015-11-01

    Immigrant adolescents represent a significant and growing proportion of the population in the United States. Yet, little is known about their experiences of body image distortion. This is particularly concerning given that body image distortion has been identified as a significant and modifiable risk factor for a number of mental illnesses, including depression and eating disorders. This study uses multi-level modeling to examine the associations between immigrant generational status, neighborhood immigrant concentration, sex, body dissatisfaction and risk for body image distortion. Data come from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and includes 10,962 11-19 year olds (49.6 % female). First generation immigrant females were significantly more likely than 3rd generation-or-later adolescents to experience underweight body image distortion. There was no association between neighborhood immigrant concentration and risk for body image distortion. Body dissatisfaction was associated with greater risk for underweight and overweight body image distortion, with the magnitude of underweight distortion risk significantly greater among 1st generation immigrants. Interventions that encourage the development of a healthy body image have the potential to reduce the onset and duration of body image distortion among immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents.

  18. Migration Status and Political Knowledge Among Latino Immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K. Brown

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper invokes a membership-exclusion theoretical model of immigrant integration to investigate political incorporation. Specifically, we examine the extent to which unauthorized migration status is associated with general and particular political knowledge and with other kinds of structural incorporation. In the analyses, we use data from the initial wave of the 2012 Latino Immigrant National Election Study (LINES targeting adult immigrants from Spanish-speaking countries in Latin America. Consistent with theoretical expectations, we find that unauthorized Latino immigrants have significantly lower levels of general political knowledge than green card holders, those with other government IDs, or naturalized citizens, and that the difference between the unauthorized and the legal groups holds up when controls are introduced for exposure (quantity and quality of time in the country and various kinds of structural incorporation, although differences among the legal groups do not. Thus, forms of structural integration mediate the effects of exposure on acquisition of general political knowledge by legal immigrants, but they do not for unauthorized immigrants, providing evidence that membership exclusion severely restricts political incorporation. At the same time, unauthorized immigrants show more awareness about changes in the unemployment rate than legal immigrants do, a result consistent both with their main reason for migration (to work and with their having recourse only to collective action as a form of political expression.

  19. Health-related quality of life among Mexican-origin Latinos: the role of immigration legal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcini, Luz M; Renzaho, Andre M N; Molina, Marisa; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2017-02-03

    To assess the relationship between immigration legal status and related vulnerabilities and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among Mexican-origin Latinos living in a U.S.-Mexico border region. Data were obtained using multistage sampling from 393 Latino adults who took part in the 2009 San Diego Prevention Research Center community survey. Significant differences in HRQoL were found across immigration legal status subgroups. Vulnerabilities associated with HRQoL varied across immigration legal status subgroups, and only depression was associated with HRQoL regardless of immigration legal status. Results from this study emphasize the need for policies and programs to facilitate access to preventive services, including mental health services, in order to maintain the health of at-risk Latino immigrants.

  20. Effects of Health Status and Health Behaviors on Depression Among Married Female Immigrants in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung A Kim, PhD

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Both health status and health behaviors had significant impacts on depression, suggesting that development of nursing interventions and educational programs should be targeted towards improving maternal health, healthy lifestyle, and subjective health perception to promote married female immigrants' psychological well-being.

  1. [Self-perceived health status among immigrants in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, Alessio; Di Napoli, Anteo; Rossi, Alessandra; Gargiulo, Lidia; Mirisola, Concetta; Costanzo, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    to evaluate self-perceived health status of immigrants in Italy. cross-sectional study based on the representative national samples of the multipurpose surveys "Health conditions and use of health services" conducted in 2005 and 2013 by the Italian National Institute of Statistics (Istat). the study was conducted on the age group of 18-64: No. 80,661 in 2005, among which 3.2% were immigrants, and No. 72,476 in 2013, among which 7.1% were immigrants. prevalence rate ratios (PRR) calculated through log-binomial regression models, stratified by survey edition and gender, by evaluating the association between the Physical Component Score (PCS), the Mental Component Score (MCS), and the overall health index and citizenship. Adjustment for the following confounding factors was performed: age, educational level, working condition, perceived economic resources, body mass index (BMI). in 2005, immigrants had a lower probability of poor-perceived physical health, both among men (PRR: 0.79; 95%CI 0.70-0.89) and women (PRR: 0.89; 95%CI 0.82- 0.97), compared to Italians. In 2013, the perceived health advantage of immigrants was reduced for both genders (PRR males: 0.87; 95%CI 0.80-0.95; PRR females: 0.94; 95%CI 0.88-0.99). In the considered period, the prevalence of people with worse mental health conditions increases, with lower PRR among immigrants, compared to Italians. Higher probability of «NOT good» overall perceived health was also observed among immigrants residing in Italy for at least 10 years (PRR men: 1.24; PRR women: 1.15) and among immigrants men from America (PRR: 1.35). from 2005 to 2013, immigrants seemed to maintain a better perception of health status than Italians. Nevertheless, study results show a decrease in self-perceived health, particularly mental health, in the considered period - apart from demographic, socioeconomic, and lifestyle factors - as well as a worse overall self-perceived health status among immigrants who stayed in Italy longer. Such

  2. Trends in food insecurity among California residents from 2001 to 2011: Inequities at the intersection of immigration status and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsemann, Katrina M; Ro, Annie; Gee, Gilbert C

    2017-12-01

    Although immigrants are healthier than non-immigrants on numerous outcomes, the reverse appears to be true with regards to food insecurity. Most studies ignore heterogeneity in the risk for food insecurity within immigration status and by ethnicity, even though significant variation likely exists. We consider how immigration status and ethnicity are related to trends in food insecurity among Latinos and Asians in California from 2001 through 2011. Data come from the 2001 to 2011 restricted California Health Interview Survey (n=245,679). We categorized Latinos and Asians as US-born, naturalized/legal permanent residents (naturalized/LPR), and non-LPRs (students, temporary workers, refugees, and undocumented persons). Multivariable weighted logistic regression analyses assessed temporal trends over the 10-year period after adjustment for demographics, socioeconomic characteristics, and program participation. Across this period, US-born Asians reported similar levels of food insecurity as US-born Whites. Conversely, Latinos, regardless of immigration status or nativity, and Asian immigrants (i.e., naturalized/LPR and non-LPR) reported greater food insecurity than US-born Whites. Further, from 2001 through 2009, non-LPR Latinos reported higher risk of food insecurity than naturalized/LPR Latinos. Thus, food insecurity differs between ethnic groups, but also differs within ethnic group by immigration status. Efforts to reduce food insecurity should consider the additional barriers to access that are faced by immigrants, particularly those without legal permanent residency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 24 CFR 5.508 - Submission of evidence of citizenship or eligible immigration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... citizenship or eligible immigration status. 5.508 Section 5.508 Housing and Urban Development Office of the... Restrictions on Assistance to Noncitizens § 5.508 Submission of evidence of citizenship or eligible immigration... or eligible immigration status, the family members may exercise the election not to contend to have...

  4. Maternal immigrant status and high birth weight: implications for childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M; Galea, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity, a growing epidemic, is associated with greater risk of several chronic diseases in adulthood. Children of immigrant mothers are at higher risk for obesity than children of non-immigrant mothers. High birth weight is the most important neonatal predictor of childhood obesity in the general population. To understand the etiology of obesity in children of immigrant mothers, we assessed the relation between maternal immigrant status and risk for high birth weight. Data about all births in Michigan (N = 786,868) between 2000-2005 were collected. We used bivariate chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression models to assess the relation between maternal immigrant status and risk for neonatal high birth weight. The prevalence of high birth weight among non-immigrant mothers was 10.6%; the prevalence among immigrant mothers was 8.0% (P maternal age, education, marital status, parity, and tobacco use, children of immigrant mothers had lower odds (odds ratio = 0.69, 95% confidence interval = 0.67-0.70) of high birth weight compared to those of non-immigrant mothers. Although maternal immigrant status has been shown to be associated with greater childhood obesity, surprisingly, children of immigrant mothers have lower risk of high birth weight than children of non-immigrant mothers. This suggests that factors in early childhood, potentially cultural or behavioral factors, may play a disproportionately important role in the etiology of childhood obesity in children of immigrant vs non-immigrant mothers.

  5. Acculturation, immigration status and cardiovascular risk factors among Portuguese immigrants to Luxembourg: findings from ORISCAV-LUX study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkerwi, Ala'a; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Pagny, Sybil; Beissel, Jean; Delagardelle, Charles; Lair, Marie-Lise

    2012-10-11

    No previous study has examined the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and explored the influence of immigration status and acculturation on overweight/obesity among the Portuguese immigrants to Luxembourg. Our objectives were to (1) compare the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors between native Luxembourgers and Portuguese immigrants, (2) examine the relationship between immigrant generation status, proportion of life spent in Luxembourg and language proficiency or preference (as proxy variables of acculturation) and overweight/obesity among Portuguese immigrants, and (3) elucidate the role of underlying socioeconomic, behavioral and dietary factors in overweight/obesity differences among the two populations. Recent national cross-sectional data from ORISCAV-LUX survey 2007-2008, composed of 843 subjects were analyzed. Overweight/obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m(2). Acculturation score was measured by using immigrant generation status, proportion of life spent in Luxembourg, and language proficiency or preference. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between acculturation markers and overweight/obesity. Further, a series of successive models were fitted to explore the separated and added impact of potential mediators (socioeconomic status, physical activity, dietary factors) on overweight/obesity among Luxembourgers and Portuguese immigrants. Compared to Luxembourgers, Portuguese immigrants of first and second generation were younger and currently employed. About 68% of first generation Portuguese had only primary school, and about 44% were living below poverty threshold. Although the cardiovascular risk factors were comparable, Portuguese immigrants were more frequently overweight and obese than Luxembourgers, even after age and gender standardization to the European population. Overweight/obesity was significantly higher among Portuguese of first generation compared

  6. Acculturation, immigration status and cardiovascular risk factors among Portuguese immigrants to Luxembourg: findings from ORISCAV-LUX study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkerwi Ala’a

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No previous study has examined the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and explored the influence of immigration status and acculturation on overweight/obesity among the Portuguese immigrants to Luxembourg. Our objectives were to (1 compare the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors between native Luxembourgers and Portuguese immigrants, (2 examine the relationship between immigrant generation status, proportion of life spent in Luxembourg and language proficiency or preference (as proxy variables of acculturation and overweight/obesity among Portuguese immigrants, and (3 elucidate the role of underlying socioeconomic, behavioral and dietary factors in overweight/obesity differences among the two populations. Methods Recent national cross-sectional data from ORISCAV-LUX survey 2007–2008, composed of 843 subjects were analyzed. Overweight/obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI >25kg/m2. Acculturation score was measured by using immigrant generation status, proportion of life spent in Luxembourg, and language proficiency or preference. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between acculturation markers and overweight/obesity. Further, a series of successive models were fitted to explore the separated and added impact of potential mediators (socioeconomic status, physical activity, dietary factors on overweight/obesity among Luxembourgers and Portuguese immigrants. Results Compared to Luxembourgers, Portuguese immigrants of first and second generation were younger and currently employed. About 68% of first generation Portuguese had only primary school, and about 44% were living below poverty threshold. Although the cardiovascular risk factors were comparable, Portuguese immigrants were more frequently overweight and obese than Luxembourgers, even after age and gender standardization to the European population. Overweight/obesity was significantly

  7. Acculturation, immigration status and cardiovascular risk factors among Portuguese immigrants to Luxembourg: findings from ORISCAV-LUX study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background No previous study has examined the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and explored the influence of immigration status and acculturation on overweight/obesity among the Portuguese immigrants to Luxembourg. Our objectives were to (1) compare the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors between native Luxembourgers and Portuguese immigrants, (2) examine the relationship between immigrant generation status, proportion of life spent in Luxembourg and language proficiency or preference (as proxy variables of acculturation) and overweight/obesity among Portuguese immigrants, and (3) elucidate the role of underlying socioeconomic, behavioral and dietary factors in overweight/obesity differences among the two populations. Methods Recent national cross-sectional data from ORISCAV-LUX survey 2007–2008, composed of 843 subjects were analyzed. Overweight/obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI) >25kg/m2. Acculturation score was measured by using immigrant generation status, proportion of life spent in Luxembourg, and language proficiency or preference. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between acculturation markers and overweight/obesity. Further, a series of successive models were fitted to explore the separated and added impact of potential mediators (socioeconomic status, physical activity, dietary factors) on overweight/obesity among Luxembourgers and Portuguese immigrants. Results Compared to Luxembourgers, Portuguese immigrants of first and second generation were younger and currently employed. About 68% of first generation Portuguese had only primary school, and about 44% were living below poverty threshold. Although the cardiovascular risk factors were comparable, Portuguese immigrants were more frequently overweight and obese than Luxembourgers, even after age and gender standardization to the European population. Overweight/obesity was significantly higher among Portuguese of

  8. Disentangling immigrant status in mental health: psychological protective and risk factors among Latino and Asian American immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick; Park, Yong S; Kalibatseva, Zornitsa

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to disentangle the psychological mechanisms underlying immigrant status by testing a model of psychological protective and risk factors to predict the mental health prevalence rates among Latino and Asian American immigrants based on secondary analysis of the National Latino and Asian American Study. The first research question examined differences on the set of protective and risk factors between immigrants and their U.S.-born counterparts and found that immigrants reported higher levels of ethnic identity, family cohesion, native language proficiency, and limited English proficiency than their U.S.-born counterparts. The second research question examined the effect of the protective and risk factors on prevalence rates of depressive, anxiety, and substance-related disorders and found that social networking served as a protective factor. Discrimination, acculturative stress, and family conflict were risk factors on the mental health for both ethnic groups. Clinical implications and directions for future research are provided. © 2013 American Orthopsychiatric Association.

  9. Weight status and perception of body image in children: the effect of maternal immigrant status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualdi-Russo Emanuela

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that body image perception is an important factor in weight control and may be influenced by culture and ethnicity. The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between immigrant status of the mother and weight status and body image perception of the child. Methods In total, 2706 schoolchildren (1405 boys and 1301 girls aged 8–9 years and their mothers participated in a cross-sectional survey in Emilia-Romagna region (northern Italy. Weight and height of the children were measured and Body Mass Index (BMI was calculated. Actual and ideal body image perception by the children and by the mothers with respect to their children was evaluated according to Collins’ body image silhouettes. Results The BMI values were significantly lower in children of immigrants than in children of Italian mothers (F:17.27 vs 17.99 kg/m2; M:17.77 vs 18.13 kg/m2. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was lower, and the prevalence of underweight higher, in children of immigrant mothers than in those of Italian mothers (overweight- F:21.3 vs 29.1%; M. 28.3 vs 31.4%; underweight- F:5.16 vs 3.84%; M:6.63 vs 2.82%. The children's body image perception was consistent with the differing pattern of nutritional status. In the comparison between actual and ideal figures, the Feel-Ideal Difference Index (FID scores resulted different between the subsample with foreign-born mother in comparison to the native one (significantly lower in daughters of immigrants (FID- F: 0.31 vs 0.57; M: 0.35 vs 0.32. There were significant differences in the choice of the ideal figure of the child between immigrant mothers and Italian mothers (FID- F: -0.05 vs 0.19; M: -0.35 vs −0.03: the ideal figure values were higher in the immigrant mothers of male children and lower in the Italian mothers of female children. Conclusion Our results suggest that cultural and behavioral factors linked to ethnicity play an important role in the

  10. Is immigrant status relevant in school violence research? An analysis with Latino students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A

    2008-07-01

    The role of race and ethnicity is consistently found to be linked to the likelihood of students experiencing school violence-related outcomes; however, the findings are not always consistent. The variation of likelihood, as well as the type, of student-related school violence outcome among the Latino student population may be attributed to immigrant status. Drawing from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002, this research investigates if the role of immigrant status and English proficiency are pertinent for 1457 nationally representative public school Latino students' experiences with school violence-related outcomes. Third-generation immigrant students were more likely than first- and second-generation students to be victimized while at school, as well as receive a formal disciplinary school sanction. On the other hand, first-generation immigrant children were less likely to be a victim of crime while at school and receive a formal disciplinary sanction in comparison to second- and third-generation immigrants. However, first-generation immigrant students were the most likely to feel unsafe at school. Additionally, nonnative English-speaking students were more likely to report being a victim of school violence in comparison to native English speakers. This study indicates that immigrant status-related variables should be included in school violence research. Furthering the investigation of school and local community characteristics of immigration and assimilation and their impact upon children's lives and their exposure to violence is essential for a growing immigrant population.

  11. The occupational status of immigrants in Western and non-Western societies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spörlein, Christoph; van Tubergen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This study examines existing hypotheses on cross-national differences in immigrants' labor market integration. Unlike previous research, which focused on Western countries, we study the occupational status of immigrants in both Western and non-Western countries. We use census data for 45 Western and

  12. Emotional problems among recent immigrants and parenting status: Findings from a national longitudinal study of immigrants in Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillon T Browne

    Full Text Available The present study examined predictors of emotional problems amongst a nationally representative cohort of recent immigrants in Canada. Specifically, the effects of parenting status were examined given the association between parenting stress and mental health. Data came from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (N = 7055. Participants were recruited 6-months post landing (2001-2002 and followed up at 2 and 4 years. Self-reported emotional problems over time were considered as a function of parenting status (Two Parent, Lone Parent, Divorced Non-Parent, Non-Divorced Non-Parent and sociodemographic characteristics. Odds of emotional problems were higher among Two Parent, OR = 1.12 (1.01, 1.24, Lone Parent, OR = 2.24 (1.75, 2.88, and Divorced Non-Parent, OR = 1.30 (1.01, 1.66 immigrants compared to Non-Divorced Non-Parents. Visible minority status, female gender, low income, and refugee status were associated with elevated risk. Findings reveal that immigrant parents are at risk for emotional health problems during the post-migration period. Such challenges may be compounded by other sociodemographic risk.

  13. Unhealthy assimilation: why do immigrants converge to American health status levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antecol, Heather; Bedard, Kelly

    2006-05-01

    It is well documented that immigrants are in better health upon arrival in the United States than their American counterparts but that this health advantage erodes over time. We study the potential determinants of this "healthy immigrant effect, " with a particular focus on the tendency of immigrants to converge to unhealthy American BMI levels. Using data from the National Health Interview Survey, we find that average female and male immigrants enter the United States with BMIs that are approximately two and five percentage points lower than native-born women and men, respectively. Consistent with the declining health status of immigrants the longer they remain in the United States, we also find that female immigrants almost completely converge to American BMIs within 10 years of arrival, and men close a third of the gap within 15 years.

  14. Oral health status and qualityof life in pregnant chilean and peruvian immigrants women

    OpenAIRE

    Misrachi, Clara; Área Ciencias del Comportamiento, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Chile. Santiago, Chile. Odontólogo. Magíster en Educación.; Ríos, Matías; Área Ciencias del Comportamiento, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Chile. Santiago, Chile. Psicólogo, Magíster (c) en Psicología Clínica.; Morales, Ivan; Área Ciencias del Comportamiento, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Chile. Santiago, Chile. Odontólogo.; Urzúa, Juan Pablo; Área Ciencias del Comportamiento, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Chile. Santiago, Chile. Odontólogo.; Barahona, Pilar; Área Ciencias del Comportamiento, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Chile. Santiago, Chile. Odontólogo.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Compare the Oral Health status and related quality of life in pregnant Chilean and Peruvian immigrant women, in a Chilean district of high Peruvian concentration. Material and methods. An analytical transversal study was carried out on a sample of 58 Chilean and 50 Peruvian immigrant women under pregnancy control. Their oral health status was measured applying the Caries (DMF), Oral Hygiene (OHI), and the Gingival (GI) indexes, and the Quality of Life using the Chilean validate...

  15. Evaluating the impact of immigration policies on health status among undocumented immigrants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Omar; Wu, Elwin; Sandfort, Theo; Dodge, Brian; Carballo-Dieguez, Alex; Pinto, Rogeiro; Rhodes, Scott D; Rhodes, Scott; Moya, Eva; Chavez-Baray, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    Over the past two decades, new anti-immigration policies and laws have emerged to address the migration of undocumented immigrants. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to assess and understand how these immigration policies and laws may affect both access to health services and health outcomes among undocumented immigrants. Eight databases were used to conduct this review, which returned 325 papers that were assessed for validity based on specified inclusion criteria. Forty critically appraised articles were selected for analysis; thirty articles related to access to health services, and ten related to health outcomes. The articles showed a direct relationship between anti-immigration policies and their effects on access to health services. In addition, as a result of these policies, undocumented immigrants were impacted by mental health outcomes, including depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Action items were presented, including the promotion of cultural diversity training and the development of innovative strategies to support safety-net health care facilities serving vulnerable populations.

  16. Subjective Social Status and Self-Reported Health Among US-born and Immigrant Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Jeremiah R; Glenn, Beth A; Mistry, Rashmita S; Ponce, Ninez A; Zimmerman, Frederick J

    2017-02-01

    Subjective social status is associated with a range of health outcomes. Few studies have tested the relevance of subjective social status among Latinos in the U.S.; those that have yielded mixed results. Data come from the Latino subsample of the 2003 National Latino and Asian American Study (N = 2554). Regression models adjusted for socioeconomic and demographic factors. Stratified analyses tested whether nativity status modifies the effect of subjective social status on health. Subjective social status was associated with better health. Income and education mattered more for health than subjective social status among U.S.-born Latinos. However, the picture was mixed among immigrant Latinos, with subjective social status more strongly predictive than income but less so than education. Subjective social status may tap into stressful immigrant experiences that affect one's perceived self-worth and capture psychosocial consequences and social disadvantage left out by conventional socioeconomic measures.

  17. The effectiveness of bilingual school programs for immigrant children

    OpenAIRE

    Arbeitsstelle Interkulturelle Konflikte und Gesellschaftliche Integration (AKI), Berlin (Ed.)

    2005-01-01

    "Bilingual education programs are a much debated way of integrating immigrant children into the host country's school system. One of the main arguments in favor of bilingual education is its assumed positive effect on the acquisition of the second language and on academic achievement in general. However, the actual scientific evidence on this question is not quite as clear. Evaluation studies in Europe - especially in Germany - are still rare, although some European countries have a long trad...

  18. [Perceived discrimination at work for being an immigrant: a study on self-perceived mental health status among immigrants in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Anteo; Gatta, Rosaria; Rossi, Alessandra; Perez, Monica; Costanzo, Gianfranco; Mirisola, Concetta; Petrelli, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    exposure to discrimination is widely understood as a social determinant of psychophysical health and a contributing factor to health inequities among social groups. Few studies exist, particularly in Italy, about the effects of discrimination among immigrants at workplace. to analyse the association between perceived discrimination at work for being an immigrant and mental health status among immigrants in Italy. a sub-sample of 12,408 immigrants residing in Italy was analysed. data came from the survey "Social conditions and integration of foreign citizens in Italy", carried out in 2011-2012 by the Italian National Institute of Statistics (Istat). Self-perceived mental health status was measured through mental component summary (MCS) of SF-12 questionnaire, assuming as worse health status MCS score distribution ≤1st quartile. In order to evaluate the probability of poor health status, a multivariate log-binomial model was performed assuming: discrimination at work for being an immigrant as determinant variable; age, gender, educational level, employment status, area of origin, residence in Italy, length of stay in Italy, self-perceived loneliness and satisfaction about life as potential confounding variables. among immigrants, 15.8% referred discrimination at his/her workplace in Italy for being an immigrant. Higher probability of poor mental health status was observed for immigrants who referred discrimination at workplace (Prevalence Rate Ratio - PRR: 1.16) who arrived in Italy since at least 5 years (PRR: 1.14), for not employed subjects (PRR: 1.31), and for people from the Americas (PRR: 1.14). Lower probability of poor mental health status was found in immigrants from Western- Central Asia (PRR: 0.83) and Eastern-Pacific Asia (PRR: 0.79). Compared to immigrants residing in North-Eastern Italy, higher probability of worse mental health status was observed in people who resided in Northern-Western (PRR: 1.30), Central (PRR: 1.26), and Southern (PRR: 1

  19. Parental immigration status is associated with children's health care utilization: findings from the 2003 new immigrant survey of US legal permanent residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Katherine; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Curry, Leslie A; Krumholz, Harlan M; Desai, Mayur M

    2013-12-01

    Our objective was to examine the association between parental immigration status and child health and health care utilization. Using data from a national sample of immigrant adults who had recently become legal permanent residents (LPR), children (n = 2,170) were categorized according to their parents' immigration status prior to LPR: legalized, mixed-status, refugee, temporary resident, or undocumented. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used to compare child health and health care utilization by parental immigration status over the prior 12 months. Nearly all children in the sample were reported to be in good to excellent health. Children whose parents had been undocumented were least likely to have had an illness that was reported to have required medical attention (5.4 %). Children whose parents had been either undocumented or temporary residents were most likely to have a delayed preventive annual exam (18.2 and 18.7 %, respectively). Delayed dental care was most common among children whose parents had come to the US as refugees (29.1 %). Differences in the preventive annual exam remained significant after adjusting for socioeconomic characteristics. Parental immigration status before LPR was not associated with large differences in reported child health status. Parental immigration status before LPR was associated with the use of preventive annual exams and dental services. However, no group of children was consistently disadvantaged with respect to all measures.

  20. Canada's non-status immigrants: negotiating access to health care and citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklavcic, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Illegal immigration in Canada is characterized mainly by non-status immigrants who legally enter Canada and stay after their legal status expires and by failed refugee claimants. For these persons, immigration status or its absence plays an important role in determining the degree of access to Canadian health care. This article situates the clinical setting as a site of contention and negotiation of citizenship and care in social networks as well as pragmatic and discursive strategies. Drawing on the case of a patient who faced imminent deportation and became suicidal, in this article I depict how psychiatrists and other health practitioners embrace "bearing witness" as an ethical practice, which intersects the medical and legal spheres.

  1. Inequalities by immigrant status in depressive symptoms in Europe: the role of integration policy regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmusi, Davide; Palència, Laia; Ikram, Umar Z; Kunst, Anton E; Borrell, Carme

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to study whether country integration policy models were related to inequalities by immigrant status in depressive symptoms in Europe. This is a cross-sectional study using data from 17 countries in the sixth wave of the European Social Survey (2012), comparing subjects born either in the country of residence (non-immigrants, N = 28,333) or in a country not classified as "advanced economy" by the IMF (immigrants, N = 2041). Depressive symptoms were assessed with the eight-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale. Countries were grouped into three integration policy regimes (inclusive, assimilationist, and exclusionist). Linear regressions were fitted adjusting first by age, sex, and education level, then sequentially by citizenship, perceived discrimination, and socio-economic variables. In all integration regimes, immigrants report significantly more depressive symptoms than non-immigrants. The gap is the largest in exclusionist countries (immigrants score 1.16, 95% CI 0.65-1.68, points higher than non-immigrants in the depression scale), followed by assimilationist countries (0.85 and 0.57-1.13) and inclusive countries (0.60 and 0.36-0.84). Financial strain explains all the associations in inclusive countries, most of it in assimilationist countries, but only a small part in exclusionist countries. Across most European countries, immigrants seem to experience more depressive symptoms than the population born in the country, mostly reflecting their poorer socio-economic situation. Inequalities are larger in countries with more restrictive policies. Despite some limitations, this study adds new evidence to suggest that immigrants' health is shaped by integration policies in their host country.

  2. Trends in Disparities in Low-Income Children's Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care by Family Immigration Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarlenski, Marian; Baller, Julia; Borrero, Sonya; Bennett, Wendy L

    2016-03-01

    To examine time trends in disparities in low-income children's health insurance coverage and access to care by family immigration status. We used data from the National Survey of Children's Health in 2003 to 2011-2012, including 83,612 children aged 0 to 17 years with family incomes immigration status categories: citizen children with nonimmigrant parents; citizen children with immigrant parents; and immigrant children. We used multivariable regression analyses to obtain adjusted trends in health insurance coverage and access to care. All low-income children experienced gains in health insurance coverage and access to care from 2003 to 2011-2012, regardless of family immigration status. Relative to citizen children with nonimmigrant parents, citizen children with immigrant parents had a 5 percentage point greater increase in health insurance coverage (P = .06), a 9 percentage point greater increase in having a personal doctor or nurse (P Immigrant children had significantly lower health insurance coverage than other groups. However, the group had a 14 percentage point greater increase in having a personal doctor or nurse (P immigration status have lessened over time among children in low-income families, although large disparities still exist. Policy efforts are needed to ensure that children of immigrant parents and immigrant children are able to access health insurance and health care. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Interior Immigration Enforcement and Political Participation of U.S. Citizens in Mixed-Status Households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina; Lopez, Mary J

    2017-12-01

    The 2000s have witnessed an expansion of interior immigration enforcement in the United States. At the same time, the country has experienced a major demographic transformation, with the number of U.S. citizens living in mixed-status households-that is, households where at least one family member is an unauthorized migrant-reaching 16 million. U.S. citizens living in mixed-status households are personally connected to the struggles experienced by their unauthorized family members. For them, immigration policy is likely to shape their current and future voting behavior. Using data from the 2002-2014 Current Population Survey Voting and Registration Supplements, we examine whether intensified immigration enforcement has affected the political engagement of U.S. citizens living in mixed-status households. We find that immigration enforcement has chilled their electoral participation by lowering their propensity to register by 5 %; however, it has not visibly affected their voting propensity among those registered. Importantly, their lower voting registration likelihood does not seem to reflect indifference for community and public matters, given that it has been accompanied by greater involvement in civic forms of political participation, such as volunteering. Understanding how immigration policy affects the political participation of a fast-growing segment of the electorate is imperative because they will inevitably constitute a rapidly rising political force in future elections.

  4. Health and Young Adulthood: Does Immigrant Generational Status Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Zambrano

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A substantial body of research in international migration focuses on the “immigrant health paradox” and the health benefits immigrants may experience because of it. Less examined are the health outcomes of immigrants’ children and later generations. Will the protective health benefit apply to child migrants and the children of immigrants? Will it endure as they transition to adulthood? Using two waves of data from the Na-tional Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, I examine the differences in health out-comes among young immigrants (1.5 generation, children of immigrants (2nd genera-tion, and native-born adolescents with native-born parents (3rd generation+. Self-reported health serves to measure health outcomes. I find that both Hispanic respon-dents and Hispanic second-generation respondents are more likely to report poor health.Un important organisme de recherche dans le domaine de l’immigration internationale s’intéresse au “paradoxe de la santé des immigrants” et aux avantages que les immigrants peuvent en tirer en termes de santé. L’état de santé des enfants des immigrants et des générations ultérieures est moins étudié. Cet avantage en termes de santé s’appliquera-t-il aux enfants migrants et aux enfants des immigrants ? Perdurera-t-il lorsque ceux-ci passeront à l’âge adulte ? A partir de deux vagues de données issues de l’Etude longitudinale nationale sur la santé des adolescents, j’ai comparé l’état de santé de jeunes immigrants (1,5 génération, d’enfants d’immigrants (2ème génération et d’adolescents nés dans le pays d’immigration issus de parents eux-mêmes nés dans le pays d’immigration (3ème génération et au-delà. L’auto-évaluation de la santé sert à mesurer l’état de santé. A l’issue de cette analyse, j’ai découvert que les personnes hispaniques interrogées et les personnes hispaniques de deuxième génération interrogées étaient plus

  5. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Education-Occupation Mismatch Status Among Immigrants in South Africa and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kevin J A

    2010-11-01

    In this study, a comparative-international approach is used to examine race-ethnic disparities in education-occupation mismatch status among immigrants. Using data from the USA and South Africa, this study finds that immigrants are most likely to be undereducated, or have less schooling for their jobs, when their racial characteristics are similar to those of the local racial majority. Black immigrants in South Africa and White immigrants in the USA are the most likely to be undereducated. Having racial characteristics similar to those of the local racial majority is associated with a lower likelihood of overeducation among immigrants.

  6. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Education–Occupation Mismatch Status Among Immigrants in South Africa and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a comparative–international approach is used to examine race–ethnic disparities in education–occupation mismatch status among immigrants. Using data from the USA and South Africa, this study finds that immigrants are most likely to be undereducated, or have less schooling for their jobs, when their racial characteristics are similar to those of the local racial majority. Black immigrants in South Africa and White immigrants in the USA are the most likely to be undereducated. Having racial characteristics similar to those of the local racial majority is associated with a lower likelihood of overeducation among immigrants. PMID:25018670

  7. "We Only Speak English Here": English Dominance in Language Diverse, Immigrant After-School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Melanie Jones; Okamoto, Dina G.; Feldman, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Past research suggests that community after-school programs (ASPs) are crucial sites for culturally relevant programming for minority and immigrant youth; yet, we know little about how ASPs address language in their programming. Using an ethnographic fieldwork approach, we examine the goals and practices of ASP workers serving immigrant youth with…

  8. The impact of immigration and visible minority status on psychosis symptom profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Akiah Ottesen; Andreassen, Ole A; Aminoff, Sofie Ragnhild; Romm, Kristin Lie; Hauff, Edvard; Melle, Ingrid

    2014-11-01

    Immigrants have heightened risks of psychotic disorders, and it is proposed that migration influences symptom profiles. The purpose of this study was to investigate if either migration experience and/or visible minority status affected symptom profiles, using a cross-culturally validated five-factor model of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), in patients with broadly defined psychotic disorders. PANSS was assessed in a large catchment area based sample of patients with psychotic disorders verified with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (n = 1,081). Symptom profiles based on Wallwork et al. five-factor model were compared for Norwegians (73 %), white immigrants (10.5 %), and visible minority groups (16.5 %). Visible minorities were significantly younger, had less education, more often a schizophrenia diagnosis and higher PANSS positive, negative and disorganized/concrete factor scores than Norwegians and white immigrants. After controlling for confounders only the items "Delusions" and "Difficulty in abstract thinking" differed between groups. Multivariate analyses indicated that these items were not associated with immigration per se, but rather belonging to a visible minority. We found mostly similarities in psychotic symptoms between immigrants and Norwegians when using a cross-culturally validated five-factor model of the PANSS. Immigration did not directly influence psychotic symptom profiles but visible minority groups had higher levels of "Delusions" and "Difficulty in abstract thinking", both symptoms that are partially context dependent.

  9. Inequalities by immigrant status in depressive symptoms in Europe: the role of integration policy regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malmusi, Davide; Palència, Laia; Ikram, Umar Z.; Kunst, Anton E.; Borrell, Carme

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to study whether country integration policy models were related to inequalities by immigrant status in depressive symptoms in Europe. This is a cross-sectional study using data from 17 countries in the sixth wave of the European Social Survey (2012), comparing subjects born either in the

  10. Immigrant Status, Gender, and School Burnout in Finnish Lower Secondary School Students: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Read, Sanna; Minkkinen, Jaana; Kinnunen, Jaana M.; Rimpelä, Arja

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study among 9223 students from grade 7 and grade 9 (age 13-14 and 15-16) was to assess whether immigrant status and gender are associated with the level and change (slope) in school burnout among lower secondary school students in the Helsinki metropolitan area. Ninety-seven percent of the variation in school burnout…

  11. Connecting Gender, Race, Class, and Immigration Status to Disease Management at the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S.; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chronic diseases are the leading causes of death in the United States. Chronic disease management occurs within all aspects of an individual's life, including the workplace. Though the social constructs of gender, race, class, and immigration status within the workplace have been considered, their connection to disease management among workers has been less explicitly explored. Using a sample of immigrant hotel housekeepers, we explored the connections between these four social constructs and hypertension management. Methods This qualitative research study was guided by critical ethnography methodology. Twenty-seven hotel room cleaners and four housemen were recruited (N = 31) and invited to discuss their experiences with hypertension and hypertension management within the context of their work environments. Results Being a woman worker within the hotel industry was perceived to negatively influence participants’ experience with hypertension and hypertension management. In contrast, being a woman played a protective role outside the workplace. Being an immigrant played both a positive and a negative role in hypertension and its management. Being black and from a low socioeconomic class had only adverse influences on participants’ experience with hypertension and its management. Conclusion Being a woman, black, lower class, and an immigrant simultaneously contribute to immigrant hotel housekeepers’ health and their ability to effectively manage their hypertension. The connection between these four constructs (gender, race, class, and immigration status) and disease management must be considered during care provision. Hotel employers and policy stakeholders need to consider those constructs and how they impact workers’ well-being. More studies are needed to identify what mitigates the associations between the intersectionality of these constructs and immigrant workers’ health and disease management within their work environment. PMID:27695659

  12. Connecting Gender, Race, Class, and Immigration Status to Disease Management at the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading causes of death in the United States. Chronic disease management occurs within all aspects of an individual's life, including the workplace. Though the social constructs of gender, race, class, and immigration status within the workplace have been considered, their connection to disease management among workers has been less explicitly explored. Using a sample of immigrant hotel housekeepers, we explored the connections between these four social constructs and hypertension management. This qualitative research study was guided by critical ethnography methodology. Twenty-seven hotel room cleaners and four housemen were recruited (N = 31) and invited to discuss their experiences with hypertension and hypertension management within the context of their work environments. Being a woman worker within the hotel industry was perceived to negatively influence participants' experience with hypertension and hypertension management. In contrast, being a woman played a protective role outside the workplace. Being an immigrant played both a positive and a negative role in hypertension and its management. Being black and from a low socioeconomic class had only adverse influences on participants' experience with hypertension and its management. Being a woman, black, lower class, and an immigrant simultaneously contribute to immigrant hotel housekeepers' health and their ability to effectively manage their hypertension. The connection between these four constructs (gender, race, class, and immigration status) and disease management must be considered during care provision. Hotel employers and policy stakeholders need to consider those constructs and how they impact workers' well-being. More studies are needed to identify what mitigates the associations between the intersectionality of these constructs and immigrant workers' health and disease management within their work environment.

  13. Mental Health Status, Health Care Utilisation, and Service Satisfaction among Immigrants in Montreal: An Epidemiological Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Rob; Wang, JiaWei; Fleury, Marie-Josee; Liu, Aihua; Caron, Jean

    2017-08-01

    To examine variations between immigrants and nonimmigrants in 1) prevalence of common mental disorders and other mental health variables; 2) health service utilisation for emotional problems, mental disorders, and addictions, and 3) health service satisfaction. This article is based on a longitudinal cohort study conducted from May 2007 to the present: the Epidemiological Catchment Area Study of Montreal South-West (ZEPSOM). Participants were followed up at 4 time points (T1, n = 2433; T4, n = 1095). Core exposure variables include immigrant status (immigrant vs. nonimmigrant), duration of residence, and region of origin. Key outcome variables included mental health status, health service utilisation, and health service satisfaction. Data were analysed both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Immigrants had been in Canada for 20 years on average. Immigrants had significantly lower rates of high psychological distress (32.6% vs. 39.1%, P = 0.016), alcohol dependence (1.4% vs. 3.9%, P =0.010), depression (5.2% vs. 9.2%, P = 0.008), and various other mental disorders. They had significantly higher scores of mental well-being (48.9 vs. 47.1 score, P = 0.014) and satisfaction with social (34.0 vs. 33.4 score, P = 0.021) and personal relationships (16.7 vs. 15.6 score, P mental disorders, and addictions and significantly higher rates of health service satisfaction at all time points. Asian and African immigrants had particularly low rates of utilisation and high rates of satisfaction. Immigrants had better overall mental health than nonimmigrants.

  14. Contextualizing nativity status, social ties, and ethnic enclaves: Implications for understanding immigrant and Latino health paradoxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viruell-Fuentes, Edna A.; Morenoff, Jeffrey D.; Williams, David R.; House, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Researchers have posited that one potential explanation for the better-than-expected health outcomes observed among some Latino immigrants, vis-à-vis their U.S.-born counterparts, may be the strength of their social ties and social support among immigrants. Methods We examined the association between nativity status and social ties using data from the Chicago Community Adult Health Study’s Latino subsample, which includes Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and other Latinos. First, we used Ordinary Least Squares [OLS] regression methods to model the effect of nativity status on five outcomes: informal social integration; social network diversity; network size; instrumental support; and informational support. Using multilevel mixed effects regression models, we estimated the association between Latino/immigrant neighborhood composition on our outcomes, and whether these relationships varied by nativity status. Lastly, we examined the relationship between social ties and immigrants’ length of time in the United States. Results After controlling for individual-level characteristics, immigrant Latinos had significantly lower levels of social ties than their U.S.-born counterparts for all our outcomes, except for informational support. Latino/immigrant neighborhood composition was positively associated with being socially integrated and having larger and more diverse social networks. The associations between two of our outcomes (informal social integration and network size) and living in a neighborhood with greater concentrations of Latinos and immigrants were stronger for U.S.-born Latinos than for immigrant Latinos. U.S.-born Latinos maintained a significant socialties advantage compared to immigrants—regardless of length of time in the United States—for informal social integration, network diversity, and network size. Conclusion At the individual level, our findings challenge the assumption that Latino immigrants would have larger networks and/or higher

  15. Examining Associations between Self-Rated Health and Proficiency in Literacy and Numeracy among Immigrants and U.S.-Born Adults: Evidence from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC)

    OpenAIRE

    Esther Prins; Shannon Monnat

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses data from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) to analyze the relationship between self-reported health (SRH) and literacy and numeracy proficiency for immigrants compared to U.S.-born respondents and for Hispanic versus Asian immigrants. The research questions were: (1) Are literacy and numeracy scores associated with adults' SRH? (2) Are associations between SRH and literacy and numeracy proficiency moderated by immigrant status? (3) Amo...

  16. [Differences between Eastern European immigrants of German origin and the rest of the German population in health status, health care use and health behaviour: a comparative study using data from the KORA-Survey 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Mary Luz; Döring, Angela; Mielck, Andreas; Holle, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    Differences between Eastern European immigrants of German origin and the rest of the German population in health status, health care use and health behaviour: a comparative study using data from the KORA-Survey 2000 To identify differences in health status, health care use and health behaviour between Eastern European immigrants of German origin and the rest of the German population in order to develop new concepts for preventive programs. Using data from the KORA-Survey 2000 (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg), immigrants of German origin were compared to the rest of the German population with multiple regression models controlling for sex, age, living with partner, years of education and occupation. Tests of trend were performed for the groups classified according to the year of immigration. Compared to other Germans, immigrants of German origin consider their health status more often as poor. They were more likely to be obese (OR = 1.95) and have hyperlipidemia (total-cholesterol/HDL-C > 4: OR = 1.71). They were less likely to use cancer screening (OR = 0.41) or to perform sport activities (OR = 0.47). All these differences decrease with the length of residence in Germany. Concerning their health status, Eastern European immigrants of German origin were identified as a high risk group. They should be considered for specific preventive programs and health care interventions, especially during the first years of immigration.

  17. The effect of immigration status on physics identity and physical science career intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Florin; Potvin, Geoff; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.

    2012-02-01

    Using data collected from a nationally-representative sample of first-year college students, we examine how students' identity development as physics persons and their likelihood to pursue a career in physical science is predicted by differing immigrant experiences. We consider broad factors having a social, economic, or cultural nature as covariates in a propensity score model that assesses differences due to immigrant generation. Our results show that, when controlling for such factors as race/ethnicity, socio-economic status, and gender, students' physics identities and the likelihood of choosing a career in physical science are significantly higher amongst first generation students than second generation (or later) students. We conclude that physical science as a career option can be influenced by the experiences of being an immigrant and through the relationship between origin and host culture.

  18. Gender differences in the occupational status of undocumented immigrants in the United States: experience before and after legalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, M G; Seltzer, W; Shi, J

    1998-01-01

    "This article examines the incorporation of a national sample of undocumented immigrants both before and after they applied to legalize their status under the provisions of the [U.S.] Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA). Data from the 1989 and 1992 Legalized Population Surveys (LPS-1 and LPS-2) are used. These surveys provide labor force and occupational data for three critical reference periods: as newly arrived undocumented immigrants, as experienced undocumented immigrants, and as documented immigrants.... The overall upward mobility of both men and women between first job and the occupation held at time of application for legalization continued after legalization. On average, men also continued to report higher status jobs than women, although women did somewhat better after their status was legalized." This is a revised version of a paper originally presented at the 1997 Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America. excerpt

  19. Immigrants from the Crimea in Russia: Employment and Legal Status »

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Belyakov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The author is attempting to summarize all available information on the Crimean immigrants in the Russian state of the 15th–17th centuries. The article examines immigration processes of the Chinggisids: both the Gerays as well as other branches’ representatives, tribal noblemen and the “ordinary” Tatars. The author offers the following periodization of migration: 1 the last quarter of the 15th century – the 1530s; 2 the 1580s – early 17th century; 3 period after the completion of the Time of Troubles. According to the conclusions of the author, compared with migrants from other areas immigrants from the Crimean Khanate more easily integrated into the serving class of the local population and successfully maintained and expanded their “privileges”. At the same time, taking into account the specific nature of available sources, our knowledge is limited almost exclusively on the upper strata of the Crimean immigrants. Surviving documents contain very fragmentary information on immigrants who had inferior status in the social hierarchy compared to the Chinggisids or representatives of the clan aristocracy.

  20. Immigration

    OpenAIRE

    Jupp, James

    2008-01-01

    Since its foundation Sydney has been the major port of arrival for immigrants to Australia. There have been times when this position was temporarily lost – the gold rush directed arrivals towards Melbourne in the 1850s and mass migration to Queensland took place in the 1880s. Fremantle was the first port of arrival for many ships, and tired passengers often stopped off there and remained in Western Australia. But the dominance of Sydney was finally consolidated from the 1960s when passengers ...

  1. Examining Associations between Self-Rated Health and Proficiency in Literacy and Numeracy among Immigrants and U.S.-Born Adults: Evidence from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Prins

    Full Text Available This paper uses data from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC to analyze the relationship between self-reported health (SRH and literacy and numeracy proficiency for immigrants compared to U.S.-born respondents and for Hispanic versus Asian immigrants. The research questions were: (1 Are literacy and numeracy scores associated with adults' SRH? (2 Are associations between SRH and literacy and numeracy proficiency moderated by immigrant status? (3 Among immigrants, are literacy and numeracy scores more strongly associated with SRH for Hispanics versus Asians? Immigrants had significantly lower literacy and numeracy scores, yet reported better health than U.S.-born respondents. Ordinal logistic regression analyses showed that literacy and numeracy were both positively related to SRH for immigrants and U.S.-born adults, and should therefore be viewed as part of the growing evidence that literacy is an independent and significant social determinant of health. Second, U.S.-born and immigrant adults accrued similarly positive health benefits from stronger literacy and numeracy skills. Third, although Hispanic immigrants were more disadvantaged than Asian immigrants on almost all socioeconomic characteristics and had significantly lower literacy and numeracy scores and worse SRH than Asian immigrants, both Hispanic and Asian immigrants experienced similar positive health returns from literacy and numeracy proficiency. These findings underscore the potential health benefits of providing adult basic education instruction, particularly for immigrants with the least formal schooling and fewest socioeconomic resources.

  2. Examining Associations between Self-Rated Health and Proficiency in Literacy and Numeracy among Immigrants and U.S.-Born Adults: Evidence from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Esther; Monnat, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses data from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) to analyze the relationship between self-reported health (SRH) and literacy and numeracy proficiency for immigrants compared to U.S.-born respondents and for Hispanic versus Asian immigrants. The research questions were: (1) Are literacy and numeracy scores associated with adults' SRH? (2) Are associations between SRH and literacy and numeracy proficiency moderated by immigrant status? (3) Among immigrants, are literacy and numeracy scores more strongly associated with SRH for Hispanics versus Asians? Immigrants had significantly lower literacy and numeracy scores, yet reported better health than U.S.-born respondents. Ordinal logistic regression analyses showed that literacy and numeracy were both positively related to SRH for immigrants and U.S.-born adults, and should therefore be viewed as part of the growing evidence that literacy is an independent and significant social determinant of health. Second, U.S.-born and immigrant adults accrued similarly positive health benefits from stronger literacy and numeracy skills. Third, although Hispanic immigrants were more disadvantaged than Asian immigrants on almost all socioeconomic characteristics and had significantly lower literacy and numeracy scores and worse SRH than Asian immigrants, both Hispanic and Asian immigrants experienced similar positive health returns from literacy and numeracy proficiency. These findings underscore the potential health benefits of providing adult basic education instruction, particularly for immigrants with the least formal schooling and fewest socioeconomic resources.

  3. [Differences in the nutritional and health status among illegal immigrant adolescents from Morocco and Algeria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliván Gonzalvo, Gonzalo

    2004-03-20

    We decided to determine if there were differences in the nutritional and health status among illegal immigrant adolescents from Morocco and Algeria. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study (1997-2003); 120 male adolescents (86 Moroccans and 34 Algerians) admitted to protection centers of Zaragoza City were assessed. The nutritional status was assessed using the anthropometric method. The health status was assessed according to a standardized medical and laboratory protocol. The mean age (SDU) of the Moroccans was 15.9 (1.2) years and the mean age of the Algerians was 15.6 (1.5) years. Significantly lower values of weight (p = 0.027), upper arm circumference (p = 0.0005) and subscapular skinfold thickness (p = 0.023) along with a significantly higher incidence of ferritin isolated deficiency (p = 0.027; odds ratio = 7.54; 95% CI, 0.96-59.32) were observed in the Moroccan adolescents. Illegal immigrant adolescents from Morocco had a significantly lower nutritional and iron reserves status than that observed in illegal immigrant adolesents from Algeria.

  4. The effects of familial acculturative stress and hopelessness on suicidal ideation by immigration status among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Robert; Miranda, Regina

    2017-09-18

    Based on acculturative family distancing theory, we examined whether familial acculturative stress interacted with hopelessness to predict suicidal ideation differentially among emerging adult immigrant versus nonimmigrant college students. We recruited 152 generationally and racially/ethnically diverse college students (42 immigrants) from 2012 to 2013. Participants completed measures of hopelessness, depressive symptoms, ethnic identity, familial acculturative stress, and suicidal ideation. Immigrant status interacted with hopelessness and familial acculturative stress. Hopelessness was associated with less suicidal ideation among immigrants than among nonimmigrants at a familial acculturative stress score below the 11th percentile, but greater suicidal ideation among immigrants than among nonimmigrants at a familial acculturative stress score above the 72nd percentile. Familial acculturative stress may exacerbate the effect of hopelessness on suicidal ideation among immigrant college students, and should be monitored during suicide risk assessment and treatment.

  5. ¿Y ahora qué? Anticipated immigration status barriers and Latina/o high school students' future expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Ellen Hawley; Ramos, Karina; Medina, Cynthia

    2013-07-01

    Latina/o high school students without documentation face a challenging situation when they graduate from high school, with pathways to work and postsecondary education stymied by their immigration status. We examined the effects of anticipated barriers associated with immigration status, age, and sex on the dependent variables of vocational outcome expectations, anticipated external and internal barriers, and postsecondary schooling plans in a sample of 475 Latina/o high school students. Findings include that students anticipating immigration status problems had lower vocational outcome expectations and anticipated more external barriers to pursuing their postsecondary plans. Latina girls and older high school students anticipating immigration status problems were more likely to plan to attend 2-year rather than 4-year colleges, and less likely to plan on postsecondary education, respectively. Implications for practice, policy, and research are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Foiled Aspirations: The Influence of Unauthorized Status on the Educational Expectations of Latino Immigrant Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreira, Krista; Spees, Lisa

    2015-10-01

    Latino immigrant adolescents have the highest high school dropout rates of any race-ethnic or nativity group in the United States. One potential reason for high dropout rates among Latino immigrant youth is that many are unauthorized entrants. These unauthorized Latino immigrant youth have few opportunities to attend college, and, as they become aware of barriers to their educational progress and employment, they may lower their educational expectations. Using data from the Latino Adolescent Migration, Health, and Adaptation Project (N=275), we examine the association of unauthorized entry into the U.S. with the educational expectations of Latino immigrant youth. We find that adolescents entering the U.S. without authorization have lower educational expectations than those who enter with authorization. These differences in their expectations persist after controlling for differences in their pre-migration, migration, and post-migration experiences. Policies and programs that reduce barriers to higher education and labor market opportunities can potentially help to foster higher educational expectations among unauthorized immigrant youth and may promote their high school completion.

  7. Contextualizing nativity status, Latino social ties, and ethnic enclaves: an examination of the 'immigrant social ties hypothesis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viruell-Fuentes, Edna A; Morenoff, Jeffrey D; Williams, David R; House, James S

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have posited that one potential explanation for the better-than-expected health outcomes observed among some Latino immigrants, vis-à-vis their US-born counterparts, may be the strength of social ties and social support among immigrants. We examined the association between nativity status and social ties using data from the Chicago Community Adult Health Study's Latino subsample, which includes Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and other Latinos. First, we used ordinary least squares (OLS) regression methods to model the effect of nativity status on five outcomes: informal social integration; social network diversity; network size; instrumental support; and informational support. Using multilevel mixed-effects regression models, we estimated the association between Latino/immigrant neighborhood composition and our outcomes, and whether these relationships varied by nativity status. Lastly, we examined the relationship between social ties and immigrants' length of time in the USA. After controlling for individual-level characteristics, immigrant Latinos had significantly lower levels of social ties than their US-born counterparts for all the outcomes, except informational support. Latino/immigrant neighborhood composition was positively associated with being socially integrated and having larger and more diverse social networks. The associations between two of our outcomes (informal social integration and network size) and living in a neighborhood with greater concentrations of Latinos and immigrants were stronger for US-born Latinos than for immigrant Latinos. US-born Latinos maintained a significant social ties advantage over immigrants - regardless of length of time in the USA - for informal social integration, network diversity, and network size. At the individual level, our findings challenge the assumption that Latino immigrants would have larger networks and/or higher levels of support and social integration than their US-born counterparts. Our study

  8. Postpartum mental health of immigrant mothers by region of origin, time since immigration, and refugee status: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigod, Simone N; Bagadia, Ashlesha J; Hussain-Shamsy, Neesha; Fung, Kinwah; Sultana, Anjum; Dennis, Cindy-Lee E

    2017-06-01

    Immigrant women are at high risk for postpartum mental disorders. The purpose of this study was to understand how rates of postpartum mental health contact differ among immigrant women by region of origin, time since immigration, and refugee status. We conducted a population-based cohort study of immigrant mothers in Ontario, Canada, with children born from 2008 to 2012 (N = 123,231). We compared risk for mental health contact (outpatient, emergency department, inpatient hospitalization) in the first postpartum year by region of origin, time since immigration, and refugee status, generating adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Immigrants from North Africa and the Middle East were more likely to have outpatient mental health contact than a referent group of immigrants from North America or Europe (aOR 1.07, 95% CI 1.01-1.14); those from East Asia and the Pacific, Southern Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa were less likely (0.64, 0.61-0.68; 0.78, 0.74-0.83; 0.88, 0.81-0.94). Refugees were more likely to have contact than non-refugees (1.10, 1.04-1.15); those in Canada Refugees were more likely to have an emergency department visit (1.81, 1.50-2.17) and a psychiatric hospitalization than non-refugees (1.78, 1.31-2.42). These findings have implications for targeted postpartum mental health service delivery targeting certain immigrant groups and particularly refugees.

  9. Converging identities: dimensions of acculturation and personal identity status among immigrant college students

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Seth; Su Yeong, Kim; Whitbourne, Susan K; Zamboanga, Byron L; Weisskirch, Robert S; Forthun, Larry F; Vazsonyi, Alexander T; Beyers, Wim; Luyckx, Koen

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to ascertain the extent to which dimensions of acculturation would differ across personal identity statuses in a sample of 2,411, first and second generation immigrant college‐attending emerging adults. Participants from 30 colleges and universities around the United States completed measures of personal identity processes as well as of heritage and American cultural practices, values, and identifications. Cluster‐analytic procedures were used to classify partic...

  10. Beyond Immigrant Status: Book-Sharing in Low-Income Mexican-American Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Maria; Pérez-Granados, Deanne R.; Feldman, Heidi M.; Huffman, Lynne C.

    2017-01-01

    Data from a sample (n = 145) of low-income Mexican-American mothers and their toddlers (9-26 months) were used to explore the prevalence of high-frequency book-sharing (?3 days/week) and its association with maternal immigrant status (Mexico-born vs US-born), as well as other demographic and psychosocial factors. Mexico-born mothers were more…

  11. A comparative examination of tuberculosis immigration medical screening programs from selected countries with high immigration and low tuberculosis incidence rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) in migrants is an ongoing challenge in several low TB incidence countries since a large proportion of TB in these countries occurs in migrants from high incidence countries. To meet these challenges, several countries utilize TB screening programs. The programs attempt to identify and treat those with active and/or infectious stages of the disease. In addition, screening is used to identify and manage those with latent or inactive disease after arrival. Between nations, considerable variation exists in the methods used in migration-associated TB screening. The present study aimed to compare the TB immigration medical examination requirements in selected countries of high immigration and low TB incidence rates. Methods Descriptive study of immigration TB screening programs Results 16 out of 18 eligible countries responded to the written standardized survey and phone interview. Comparisons in specific areas of TB immigration screening programs included authorities responsible for TB screening, the primary objectives of the TB screening program, the yield of detection of active TB disease, screening details and aspects of follow up for inactive pulmonary TB. No two countries had the same approach to TB screening among migrants. Important differences, common practices, common problems, evidence or lack of evidence for program specifics were noted. Conclusions In spite of common goals, there is great diversity in the processes and practices designed to mitigate the impact of migration-associated TB among nations that screen migrants for the disease. The long-term goal in decreasing migration-related introduction of TB from high to low incidence countries remains diminishing the prevalence of the disease in those high incidence locations. In the meantime, existing or planned migration screening programs for TB can be made more efficient and evidenced based. Cooperation among countries doing research in the areas outlined in this study should

  12. A comparative examination of tuberculosis immigration medical screening programs from selected countries with high immigration and low tuberculosis incidence rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagebiel Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB in migrants is an ongoing challenge in several low TB incidence countries since a large proportion of TB in these countries occurs in migrants from high incidence countries. To meet these challenges, several countries utilize TB screening programs. The programs attempt to identify and treat those with active and/or infectious stages of the disease. In addition, screening is used to identify and manage those with latent or inactive disease after arrival. Between nations, considerable variation exists in the methods used in migration-associated TB screening. The present study aimed to compare the TB immigration medical examination requirements in selected countries of high immigration and low TB incidence rates. Methods Descriptive study of immigration TB screening programs Results 16 out of 18 eligible countries responded to the written standardized survey and phone interview. Comparisons in specific areas of TB immigration screening programs included authorities responsible for TB screening, the primary objectives of the TB screening program, the yield of detection of active TB disease, screening details and aspects of follow up for inactive pulmonary TB. No two countries had the same approach to TB screening among migrants. Important differences, common practices, common problems, evidence or lack of evidence for program specifics were noted. Conclusions In spite of common goals, there is great diversity in the processes and practices designed to mitigate the impact of migration-associated TB among nations that screen migrants for the disease. The long-term goal in decreasing migration-related introduction of TB from high to low incidence countries remains diminishing the prevalence of the disease in those high incidence locations. In the meantime, existing or planned migration screening programs for TB can be made more efficient and evidenced based. Cooperation among countries doing research in the areas

  13. Identifying health insurance predictors and the main reported reasons for being uninsured among US immigrants by legal authorization status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Bustamante, Arturo; Chen, Jie; Fang, Hai; Rizzo, John A; Ortega, Alexander N

    2014-01-01

    This study identifies differences in health insurance predictors and investigates the main reported reasons for lacking health insurance coverage between short-stayed (≤ 10 years) and long-stayed (>10 years) US immigrant adults to parse the possible consequences of the Affordable Care Act among immigrants by length of stay and documentation status. Foreign-born adults (18-64 years of age) from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey are the study population. Health insurance coverage predictors and the main reasons for being uninsured are compared across cohorts and by documentation status. A logistic-regression two-part multivariate model is used to adjust for confounding factors. The analyses determine that legal status is a strong health insurance predictor, particularly among long-stayed undocumented immigrants. Immigration status is the main reported reason for lacking health insurance. Although long-stayed documented immigrants are likely to benefit from the Affordable Care Act implementation, undocumented immigrants and short-stayed documented immigrants may encounter difficulties getting health insurance coverage. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Vitamin D supplementation and vitamin D status in children of immigrant background in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madar, Ahmed A; Gundersen, Thomas E; Haug, Anne M; Meyer, Haakon E

    2017-11-01

    Sufficient vitamin D status during infancy is important for child health and development. Several initiatives for improving vitamin D status among immigrant children have been implemented in Norway. The present study aimed to evaluate the vitamin D status and its determinants in children of immigrant background in Oslo. Cross-sectional study. Child health clinics in Oslo. Healthy children with immigrant background (n 102) aged 9-16 months were recruited at the routine one-year check-up from two child health clinics with high proportions of immigrant clients. Blood samples were collected using the dried blood spot technique and analysed for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) concentration using LC-MS/MS. Mean s-25(OH)D was 52·3 (sd 16·7) nmol/l, with only three children below 25 nmol/l and none below 12·5 nmol/l. There was no significant gender, ethnic or seasonal variation in s-25(OH)D. However, compared with breast-fed children, s-25(OH)D concentration was significantly higher among children who were about 1 year of age and not breast-fed. About 38 % of the children were anaemic, but there was no significant correlation between s-25(OH)D and Hb (Pearson correlation, r=0·1, P=0·33). Few children in the study had vitamin D deficiency, but about 47 % of the children in the study population were under the recommended s-25(OH)D sufficiency level of ≥50 nmol/l.

  15. Sociocultural and Environmental Influences on Brazilian Immigrant Mothers' Beliefs and Practices Related to Child Feeding and Weight Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Ana Cristina; Wallington, Sherrie F; Greaney, Mary L; Hasselman, Maria H; Machado, Marcia M T; Mezzavilla, Raquel S; Detro, Barbara M

    2017-05-01

    Background Length of residence in the United States (US), changes in dietary and physical activity behaviors, and economic and social barriers contribute to high childhood obesity rates among children from immigrant families in the US. Brazilians comprise a fast-growing immigrant population group in the US, yet little research has focused on health issues affecting Brazilian children in immigrant families. Understanding sociocultural and environmental influences on parents' beliefs and practices related to child feeding and weight status is essential to altering obesity trends in this group. Methods Qualitative study consisting of five focus groups with a convenience sample of 29 Brazilian immigrant mothers. Results Analyses revealed that the sociocultural and environment transitions faced by Brazilian immigrant mothers' influence their beliefs and practices related to child feeding and weight status. Additionally, acculturation emerged as a factor affecting mothers' feeding practices and their children's eating habits, with mothers preferring Brazilian food environments and that their children preferring American food environments. Mothers viewed themselves as being responsible for promoting and maintaining their children's healthy eating and feeding behaviors, but changes in their social and cultural environments due to immigration and the pressures and demands of raising a family in a new country make this difficult. Conclusions Health promotion interventions to improve healthful eating and feeding practices of Brazilian children in immigrant families must account for social and cultural changes and daily life demands due to immigration as well as potential variation in the levels of acculturation between mothers and their children.

  16. Post-immigration Changes in Social Capital and Substance Use Among Recent Latino Immigrants in South Florida: Differences by Documentation Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrus, E; Trepka, M J; Kanamori, M; Gollub, E; Fennie, K; Li, T; Albatineh, A N; De La Rosa, M

    2015-12-01

    Changing social capital among recent Latino immigrants (RLIs) influences substance use post-immigration. This was a longitudinal study of 476 South/Central American RLIs examining social capital and substance use changes pre to post-immigration. Self-reported measures of social capital and substance use were compared between surveys administered within 1 year of immigration and 2 years post-immigration. Post-immigration, social capital, hazardous drinking and illicit drug use decreased. Women were less likely to engage in hazardous drinking [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) .32, p < .001], and less likely to use illicit drugs (AOR .67, p = .01). Documented individuals with higher levels of 'business' social capital had increased odds of illicit drug use (AOR 2.20, p < .05). Undocumented individuals with higher levels of 'friend and others' social capital had decreased risk for hazardous drinking and illicit drug use (AOR .55, p < .01; AOR .56, p < .05). Documentation status moderated the relationship between social capital and substance use. RLIs can be targeted for primary prevention of substance abuse.

  17. [Assessing the health and nutritional status of illegal immigrant adolescents from Maghreb].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliván Gonzalvo, G

    2000-07-01

    To assess the health and nutritional status of illegal immigrant adolescents from Maghreb at the time of entry into foster care in Zaragoza, Spain. Cross-sectional study over a 3-year period (1997-1999). Health status via clinical history and physical examination was assessed according to standard protocols and individualized complementary laboratory examinations were performed. Nutritional status was assessed using the anthropometric method. Weight, height, head and upper arm circumferences, tricipital and subscapular skinfold thickness, body-mass index and nutritional index were established and compared with national normal standards of reference (Z-score). Student s t-test was used to assess statistically significant differences. Forty male adolescents (22 Algerians and 18 Moroccans) were admitted during the study period. Mean age was 15 +/- 1.42 years (range: 13-17 years). Health status: anomaly in at least one body system (50%) and more than one anomaly (15%). Most frequent problems were odontologic (32. 5%), dermatological (17.5%), respiratory (12.5%), ophthalmological (7.5%), orthopedic (5%) and otic (2.5%). Tuberculous infection was detected in 5% and iron deficiency anemia in 2.5% of the patients. Nutritional status: except for head circumference (p immigration process. Chronic malnutrition was not observed.

  18. Migration status and perinatal parameters in a Greek public maternity hospital: an illustration of the "healthy immigrant effect".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdona, E; Papamichail, D; Ragkou, E; Kakalou, E; Briana, D D; Panagiotopoulos, T; Malamitsi-Puchner, A

    2017-09-04

    Although socioeconomic disparities adversely affect health, studies referring to the "healthy immigrant effect" imply more favorable health outcomes in immigrants than natives. We aimed to investigate the impact of immigration on several perinatal parameters. Birth records (01/01/2010 - 31/12/2014) from a public maternity hospital in Athens, Greece were reviewed for maternal (ethnicity, age, delivery mode) and neonatal (gender, birthweight, gestational age) variables. Immigrants were classified by country of origin, according to Human Development Index. Comparison of results between Greeks and immigrants were made. Stratification by maternal age (< and ≥35 years) was conducted to test for confounding and interaction. Almost one-third of 7506 deliveries applied to immigrants; 36.3% of Greeks and 19.2% of immigrants [risk ratio (RR) = 0.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.52-0.54] delivered at ≥35 years; 10.5% of Greek and 7.0% of immigrant neonates weighted <2500 g (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.61-0.74); 10.9% of Greeks and 8.1% of immigrants were born <37 wks (RR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.67-0.82); 55.7% of Greeks and 48.2% of immigrants delivered by caesarean section (RR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.85-0.88). We found that immigrant women deliver at a younger age, vaginally, more mature, and heavier neonates. Furthermore, we confirmed that the protective effect of immigrant status could not be explained by maternal age only.

  19. Legalization Programs and the Integration of Unauthorized Immigrants: A Comparison of S. 744 and IRCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E. Enchautegui

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiences under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA may prove to be a poor guide for understanding how smoothly today’s unauthorized immigrants will integrate into the economy under reform proposals such as the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act (S. 744. While IRCA provided a relatively quick path to legal permanent resident status, S. 744 proposes a decade long process with much attendant uncertainty.  This and other provisions in S. 744 may adversely affect immigrants’ integration and economic mobility. 

  20. Subjective Social Status, Mental and Psychosocial Health, and Birth Weight Differences in Mexican-American and Mexican Immigrant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleuriet, K Jill; Sunil, T S

    2015-12-01

    Recent Mexican immigrant women on average have an unexpectedly low incidence of low birth weight (LBW). Birth weights decline and LBW incidence increases in post-immigrant generations. This pilot project tested the hypothesis that subjective social status (SSS) of pregnant women predicts variation in birth weight between Mexican immigrant and Mexican-American women. 300 low-income pregnant Mexican immigrant and Mexican-American women in South Texas were surveyed for SSS, depression, pregnancy-related anxiety, perceived social stress and self-esteem and subsequent birth weight. No significant difference in SSS levels between pregnant Mexican immigrant and Mexican-American women were found. However, SSS better predicted variation in birth weight across both groups than mental and psychosocial health variables. Results suggest distinct relationships among SSS, mental and psychosocial health that could impact birth weight. They underscore the relevance of a multilevel, biopsychosocial analytical framework to studying LBW.

  1. Building relationships and facilitating immigrant community integration: An evaluation of a Cultural Navigator Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rebecca L; Chiarelli-Helminiak, Christina M; Ferraj, Brunilda; Barrette, Kyle

    2016-04-01

    Despite the long history of immigration in the United States, communities around the country struggle to integrate newcomers into the economic, cultural, and political spheres of society. Utilizing results from the program evaluation of one public library's Cultural Navigator Program, the authors illustrate how communities and public institutions can promote integration and relationship-building between newly arrived immigrants and long-time residents. Existing social networks within receiving communities, conceptualized in this article as social capital, were leveraged to build capacity among newly arrived immigrants and foster inclusivity and integration at the community level. As a place of intervention, public libraries are suggested as a safe and shared space where community integration can be fostered. Insights derived from the evaluation inform a discussion on engaging approaches to immigrant integration. Lessons learned and recommendations for program evaluators and administrators are provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. SEMATECH EUVL mask program status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Henry; Goodwin, Frank; Huh, Sungmin; Orvek, Kevin; Cha, Brian; Rastegar, Abbas; Kearney, Patrick

    2009-04-01

    As we approach the 22nm half-pitch (hp) technology node, the industry is rapidly running out of patterning options. Of the several lithography techniques highlighted in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), the leading contender for the 22nm hp insertion is extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). Despite recent advances with EUV resist and improvements in source power, achieving defect free EUV mask blank and enabling the EUV mask infrastructure still remain critical issues. To meet the desired EUV high volume manufacturing (HVM) insertion target date of 2013, these obstacles must be resolved on a timely bases. Many of the EUV mask related challenges remain in the pre-competitive stage and a collaborative industry based consortia, such as SEMATECH can play an important role to enable the EUVL landscape. SEMATECH based in Albany, NY is an international consortium representing several of the largest manufacturers in the semiconductor market. Full members include Intel, Samsung, AMD, IBM, Panasonic, HP, TI, UMC, CNSE (College of Nanoscience and Engineering), and Fuller Road Management. Within the SEMATECH lithography division a major thrust is centered on enabling the EUVL ecosystem from mask development, EUV resist development and addressing EUV manufacturability concerns. An important area of focus for the SEMATECH mask program has been the Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC). At the MBDC key issues in EUV blank development such as defect reduction and inspection capabilities are actively pursued together with research partners, key suppliers and member companies. In addition the mask program continues a successful track record of working with the mask community to manage and fund critical mask tools programs. This paper will highlight recent status of mask projects and longer term strategic direction at the MBDC. It is important that mask technology be ready to support pilot line development HVM by 2013. In several areas progress has been

  3. Immigrant status and increased risk of heart failure: the role of hypertension and life-style risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borné Yan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies from Sweden have reported association between immigrant status and incidence of cardiovascular diseases. The nature of this relationship is unclear. We investigated the relationship between immigrant status and risk of heart failure (HF hospitalization in a population-based cohort, and to what extent this is mediated by hypertension and life-style risk factors. We also explored whether immigrant status was related to case-fatality after HF. Methods 26,559 subjects without history of myocardial infarction (MI, stroke or HF from the community-based Malmö Diet and Cancer (MDC cohort underwent a baseline examination during 1991-1996. Incidence of HF hospitalizations was monitored during a mean follow-up of 15 years. Results 3,129 (11.8% subjects were born outside Sweden. During follow-up, 764 subjects were hospitalized with HF as primary diagnosis, of whom 166 had an MI before or concurrent with the HF. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, the hazard ratios (HR for foreign-born were 1.37 (95% CI: 1.08-1.73, p = 0.009 compared to native Swedes, for HF without previous MI. The results were similar in a secondary analysis without censoring at incident MI. There was a significant interaction (p Conclusions Immigrant status was associated with long-term risk of HF hospitalization, independently of hypertension and several life-style risk factors. A significant interaction between WC and immigrant status on incident HF was observed.

  4. Feeding styles and child weight status among recent immigrant mother-child dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Alison; Hennessy, Erin; Pirie, Alex; Must, Aviva; Gute, David M; Hyatt, Raymond R; Kamins, Christina Luongo; Hughes, Sheryl O; Boulos, Rebecca; Sliwa, Sarah; Galvão, Heloisa; Economos, Christina D

    2012-05-29

    Research has shown that parental feeding styles may influence children's food consumption, energy intake, and ultimately, weight status. We examine this relationship, among recent immigrants to the US. Given that immigrant parents and children are at greater risk for becoming overweight/obese with increased time in the US, identification of risk factors for weight gain is critical. Baseline data was collected on 383 mother-child dyads enrolled in Live Well, a community-based, participatory, randomized controlled lifestyle intervention to prevent weight gain in recent immigrant mothers. Socio-demographic information together with heights and weights were collected for both mother and child. Acculturation, behavioral data, and responses to the Caregiver's Feeding Styles Questionnaire (CFSQ) were also obtained from the mother. The children's average age was 6.2 ± 2.7 years, 58% male. Mothers had been in the country for an average of 6.0 ± 3.3 years, and are Brazilian (36%), Haitian (34%) and Latino (30%). Seventy-two percent of the mothers were overweight/obese, while 43% of the children were overweight/obese. Fifteen percent of mothers reported their feeding style as being high demanding/high responsive; 32% as being high demanding/low responsive; 34% as being low demanding/high responsive and 18% as being low demanding/low responsive. In bivariate analyses, feeding styles significantly differed by child BMIz-score, ethnic group, and mother's perceived stress. In multiple linear regression, a low demanding/high responsive feeding style was found to be positively associated (ß = 0.56) with a higher child weight as compared to high demanding/high responsive, controlling for known covariates (p = 0.01). Most mothers report having a low demanding/high responsive feeding style, which is associated with higher child weight status in this diverse immigrant population. This finding adds to the growing literature that suggests this type of feeding style may be a risk

  5. Feeding styles and child weight status among recent immigrant mother-child dyads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tovar Alison

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has shown that parental feeding styles may influence children’s food consumption, energy intake, and ultimately, weight status. We examine this relationship, among recent immigrants to the US. Given that immigrant parents and children are at greater risk for becoming overweight/obese with increased time in the US, identification of risk factors for weight gain is critical. Methods Baseline data was collected on 383 mother-child dyads enrolled in Live Well, a community-based, participatory, randomized controlled lifestyle intervention to prevent weight gain in recent immigrant mothers. Socio-demographic information together with heights and weights were collected for both mother and child. Acculturation, behavioral data, and responses to the Caregiver’s Feeding Styles Questionnaire (CFSQ were also obtained from the mother. Results The children’s average age was 6.2 ± 2.7 years, 58% male. Mothers had been in the country for an average of 6.0 ± 3.3 years, and are Brazilian (36%, Haitian (34% and Latino (30%. Seventy-two percent of the mothers were overweight/obese, while 43% of the children were overweight/obese. Fifteen percent of mothers reported their feeding style as being high demanding/high responsive; 32% as being high demanding/low responsive; 34% as being low demanding/high responsive and 18% as being low demanding/low responsive. In bivariate analyses, feeding styles significantly differed by child BMIz-score, ethnic group, and mother’s perceived stress. In multiple linear regression, a low demanding/high responsive feeding style was found to be positively associated (ß = 0.56 with a higher child weight as compared to high demanding/high responsive, controlling for known covariates (p = 0.01. Conclusions Most mothers report having a low demanding/high responsive feeding style, which is associated with higher child weight status in this diverse immigrant population. This finding adds to the growing

  6. Utilisation of psychiatrists and psychologists in private practice among non-Western labour immigrants, immigrants from refugee-generating countries and ethnic Danes: the role of mental health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Signe Smith; Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Kreiner, Svend; Norredam, Marie; Krasnik, Allan

    2015-01-01

    The stressful migration process has been associated with higher vulnerability for mental health problems, implying a greater need for mental healthcare among immigrants compared with native-born. Our objective was to investigate whether potential differences in the use of psychiatrists and psychologists in labour immigrants, immigrants from refugee-generating countries (RGC), and ethnic Danes could be fully explained by mental health status. We conducted a nationwide survey in 2007 with 3,573 individuals aged 18-66 comprising ethnic Danes, labour immigrants (Pakistan and Turkey), and immigrants from RGC (Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, and Somalia). Survey data was linked to healthcare utilisation registries. Using Poisson regression, contacts with private practising psychiatrists and psychologists were estimated. Analyses were adjusted for socioeconomic factors and mental health status. Overall, 2.2 % among ethnic Danes, 1.4 % among labour immigrants and 6.5 % among immigrants from RGC consulted a psychiatrist or psychologist. In adjusted analyses, for psychiatrists, compared with ethnic Danes, labour-immigrant women (multiplicative effect = 1.78), and immigrant women from RGC (multiplicative effect = 2.49) had increased use, while labour-immigrant men had decreased use (multiplicative effect = 0.03). For psychologists, immigrant men from RGC had increased use (multiplicative effect = 2.96), while labour-immigrant women had decreased use (multiplicative effect = 0.27) compared with ethnic Danes. Mental health status had a somewhat explanatory effect on the use of psychiatrists and psychologists. These selected parts of the Danish mental healthcare system seem responsive to health needs across different population groups, particularly for immigrants from RGC. Yet more attention should be given to non-Western labour immigrants to meet their mental health needs.

  7. The Association Between Immigration Status and Office-based Medical Provider Visits for Cancer Patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wilson, Fernando A; Chen, Li-Wu

    2017-06-01

    We examined differences in cancer-related office-based provider visits associated with immigration status in the United States. Data from the 2007-2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and National Health Interview Survey included adult patients diagnosed with cancer. Univariate analyses described distributions of cancer-related office-based provider visits received, expenditures, visit characteristics, as well as demographic, socioeconomic, and health covariates, across immigration groups. We measured the relationships of immigrant status to number of visits and associated expenditure within the past 12 months, adjusting for age, sex, educational attainment, race/ethnicity, self-reported health status, time since cancer diagnosis, cancer remission status, marital status, poverty status, insurance status, and usual source of care. We finally performed sensitivity analyses for regression results by using the propensity score matching method to adjust for potential selection bias. Noncitizens had about 2 fewer visits in a 12-month period in comparison to US-born citizens (4.0 vs. 5.9). Total expenditure per patient was higher for US-born citizens than immigrants (not statistically significant). Noncitizens (88.3%) were more likely than US-born citizens (76.6%) to be seen by a medical doctor during a visit. Multivariate regression results showed that noncitizens had 42% lower number of visiting medical providers at office-based settings for cancer care than US-born citizens, after adjusting for all the other covariates. There were no significant differences in expenditures across immigration groups. The propensity score matching results were largely consistent with those in multivariate-adjusted regressions. Results suggest targeted interventions are needed to reduce disparities in utilization between immigrants and US-born citizen cancer patients.

  8. Erratum to: Evaluating the Impact of Immigration Policies on Health Status Among Undocumented Immigrants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Omar; Wu, Elwin; Sandfort, Theo; Dodge, Brian; Carballo-Dieguez, Alex; Pinto, Rogeiro; Rhodes, Scott D; Moya, Eva; Chavez-Baray, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Erratum to: J Immigrant Minority Health, DOI 10.1007/s10903-013-9968-4. One of the co-author's name was erroneously submitted and published without middle name, as Scott Rhodes, it should be Scott D. Rhodes.

  9. Practices and Approaches of Out-of-School Time Programs Serving Immigrant and Refugee Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Hall

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Opportunity to participate in an out-of-school time program may be a meaningful support mechanism towards school success and healthy development for immigrant and refugee children. This study extends existing research on best practices by examining the on-the-ground experiences of supporting immigrant and refugee youth in out-of-school time programs. Findings from semi-structured interviews with program directors in 17 Massachusetts and New Hampshire programs suggest a number of program strategies that were responsive to the needs of immigrant and refugee students, including support for the use of native language as well as English, knowing about and celebrating the heritage of the students’ homeland, including on staff or in leadership individuals with shared immigrant background, and giving consideration to the academic priorities of parents. The development of such intentional approaches to working with immigrant and refugee youth during the out-of-school time hours will encourage enrollment of, and enhance effectiveness with, this vulnerable population.

  10. Evaluation of immigration status, race and language barriers on chronic hepatitis C virus infection management and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Céline; Druyts, Eric F; Garber, Gary; Cooper, Curtis

    2009-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence in certain Canadian immigrant populations is higher than that of the overall population. Disparities in care related to immigration status as well as to race and language are well recognized. Identifying and understanding these disparities is vital to the provision of optimal and inclusive HCV care. HCV RNA-positive patients assessed at The Ottawa Hospital Viral Hepatitis Clinic between June 2000 and June 2007 were identified using a clinical database. As measures of access to care, liver biopsy rates, treatment initiation rates, supportive care provision (i.e. erythropoietin for treatment-related anemia) and sustained virological response (SVR) rates were assessed as a function of immigration status, race and spoken language. Nine hundred and ten patients were evaluated, of which 20% were immigrants. Biopsy rates (54 vs. 51%), HCV treatment initiation (37 vs. 38%), erythropoietin prescription (13 vs. 18%) and SVR rates (52 vs. 51%) did not differ between immigrants and Canadian-born individuals. Spoken language and race did not influence access to treatment. SVR was predicted by genotype, HIV status and race. In the context of a multidisciplinary, multilingual universal health care system, by studying the influence of barriers to HCV investigation and successful therapy can be abrogated.

  11. What are the consequences of an amnesty for undocumented immigrants?

    OpenAIRE

    Orrenius, Pia M.; ZAVODNY, MADELINE

    2004-01-01

    The United States has not created a major amnesty program that would allow undocumented immigrants to legalize their status since 1986. As the number of undocumented immigrants has surged in recent decades, momentum for a new amnesty program has gained ground. This paper discusses the current position of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. economy and the likely economic consequences of an amnesty program. The results of the 1986 amnesty indicate several lessons for designing an amnesty plan ...

  12. Social Support and Socioeconomic Status Predict Secondary Students' Grades and Educational Plans Indifferently across Immigrant Group and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulriksen, Robin; Sagatun, Åse; Zachrisson, Henrik Daae; Waaktaar, Trine; Lervåg, Arne Ola

    2015-01-01

    Social support and socioeconomic status (SES) have received considerable attention in explaining academic achievement and the achievement gap between students with ethic majority and immigrant background, and between boys and girls. Using a Structural Equation Modeling approach we examine (1) if there exist a gap in school achievements between…

  13. Twelve-year trends in health insurance coverage among Latinos, by subgroup and immigration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N Sarita; Carrasquillo, Olveen

    2006-01-01

    We examine twelve-year trends in the Latino uninsured population by ethnic subgroup and immigration status. From 1993 to 1999, most Latino subgroups, particularly Puerto Ricans, had large decreases in Medicaid coverage. For some subgroups these were offset by increases in employer coverage, but not for Mexicans, resulting in a four-percentage-point increase in their uninsured population. During 2000-2004, Medicaid/SCHIP expansions benefited most subgroups and mitigated smaller losses in employer coverage. However, during 1993-2004, the percentage of noncitizen Latinos lacking coverage increased by several percentage points. This was attributable to Medicaid losses during 1993-1999 and losses in employer coverage during 2000-2004.

  14. Descriptions of depression and depression treatment in older Hispanic immigrants in a geriatric collaborative care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, David; Estrada, Elena; Lagomasino, Isabel T; Aranda, Maria P; Green, Jennifer

    2017-05-29

    To explore experiences with depression and depression treatment among older Hispanic immigrants participating in a collaborative care program of psychotherapy and antidepressant medication. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 14 older Spanish-speaking Hispanic immigrants with major depression who participated in a collaborative care program within a public sector specialty geriatric clinic in Los Angeles, CA. Findings revealed that participants used various idioms to describe their experiences with depression, and that depression had a strong impact on functioning. Other findings indicated that depression was caused by various psychosocial problems, antidepressants were helpful in reducing depression, and that bilingual psychotherapists provided a welcoming and safe environment to express emotions and find solutions to problems. Results revealed participants' experiences with depression and the impact of participating in a collaborative care intervention for depression. Findings from this project should be used to inform future geriatric interventions for older Hispanic immigrants in the USA.

  15. Racial/ethnic disparities in short sleep duration by occupation: the contribution of immigrant status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Chandra L; Hu, Frank B; Redline, Susan; Williams, David R; Mattei, Josiemer; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2014-10-01

    Sleep duration, associated with increased morbidity/mortality, has been shown to vary by race and occupation. Few studies have examined the additional influence of immigrant status. Using a nationally-representative sample of 175,244 US adults from the National Health Interview Survey from 2004 to 2011, we estimated prevalence ratios (PRs) for short sleep duration (Short sleep prevalence was highest among US- and non-US born Blacks in all occupations, and the prevalence generally increased with increasing professional/management roles in Blacks and Latinos while it decreased among Whites. Adjusted short sleep was more prevalent in US-born Blacks compared to Whites in professional/management (PR = 1.52 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.42-1.63]), support services (PR = 1.31 [95% CI: 1.26-1.37]), and laborers (PR = 1.11 [95% CI: 1.06-1.16]). The Black-White comparison was even higher for non-US born Black laborers (PR = 1.50 [95% CI: 1.24-1.80]). Similar for non-US born Latinos, Latinos born in the US had a higher short sleep prevalence in professional/management (PR = 1.14 [95% CI: 1.04-1.24]) and support services (PR = 1.06 [95% CI: 1.01-1.11]), but a lower prevalence among laborers (PR = 0.77 [95% CI: 0.74-0.81]) compared to Whites. Short sleep varied within and between immigrant status for some ethnicities in particular occupations, further illuminating the need for tailored interventions to address sleep disparities among US workers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The prevalence of over-qualification and its association with health status among occupationally active new immigrants to Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cynthia; Smith, Peter; Mustard, Cameron

    2010-12-01

    Occupational over-qualification refers to a situation where an individual's occupational status is lower than would be expected by their training, skills, or experience. The objective of this study is to examine the prevalence of three dimensions of over-qualification among a cohort of new immigrants to Canada, and the associations between each dimension of over-qualification with changes in general and mental health status over a four-year period. This study utilized data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada. For the purpose of this study, we restricted our sample to those employed respondents who worked before coming to Canada, were planning on working after immigration, were in good health at baseline and were interviewed at 4 years post-arrival (N=2685). We defined three measures of over-qualification based on occupational attainment at 4 years relative to: level of education, previous work experience, and occupational expectation upon arrival in Canada. Regression models explored the associations between each dimension of over-qualification and change in self-reported general and mental health adjusting for a variety of immigrants' personal and immigration-related characteristics. Four years after arriving in Canada, 51.6% of immigrants were overqualified for their jobs based on their education levels, with a lesser extent overqualified based on experience (44.4%) or expectations (42.8%). Respondents experiencing any dimension of over-qualification were more likely to report a decline in mental, but not general, health. These relationships were only mildly attenuated after adjustment for other possible confounding variables. Inclusion of job satisfaction and perceptions of employment situation mediated these relationships to a large extent suggesting they are primary pathways through which over-qualification influences mental health. On average, occupationally active immigrants who were overqualified for their attained occupations in Canada had

  17. Socio-economic status and emotional distress of female Turkish immigrants and native German women living in Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichberger, M C; Bromand, Z; Heredia Montesinos, A; Temur-Erman, S; Mundt, A; Heinz, A; Rapp, M A; Schouler-Ocak, M

    2012-06-01

    Many immigrants face more economic strains and hardship than non-immigrants. Income inequality and an increasing social gap between immigrants and non-immigrants in Europe warrant further studies on the impact of socioeconomic factors on health in immigrant groups. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of socioeconomic status (SES) and emotional distress in women of Turkish descent and in women of German descent. A total of 405 women of German or Turkish descent residing in Berlin were interviewed. Emotional distress was assessed by the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), and SES was examined by level of education, employment status, and income. The associations of emotional distress and SES were estimated in multivariate linear regression analyses. Unemployment was associated with increased levels of emotional distress in all women, with the highest level of distress in the group of unemployed Turkish women. The overall SES level was related to a greater level of emotional distress in Turkish women, but not in German women (-3.2, 95%CI -5.9 - -.5; p=.020 vs. -.8, 95%CI -2.7 - 1.2; p=.431). Further stratified analyses by relationship status revealed that the association of SES and emotional distress only remained significant among single women. The impact of socioeconomic hardship appears to be complicated by social roles and expectations related to these. Further in-depth study of the complex nature of the interaction of social roles and socioeconomic position in female Turkish immigrants in Germany is needed to better understand differing risk patterns for emotional distress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Effects of an Individual Breast-feeding Promotion Program for Married Immigrant Women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi Kyoung; Moon, So Hyun

    2016-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of an individual breast-feeding promotion program to address breast-feeding knowledge, attitude, method and rate of practice for married immigrant women. A non-equivalent control group quasi-experimental design was used (experimental group=16, control group=17). The intervention consisted of 3 phases: (1) Within 2 hours of delivery - individual breast-feeding training through video/verbal/practical training education and demonstration (2) After 1~2 days - group training using video, model doll, and breast models (3) After 7 days - family visit, counseling, retraining and reinforcement training. The data were analyzed using non-parametric tests with the SPSS program. Married immigrant women who participated in the individual breast-feeding program scored high in knowledge, attitude, method and rate of practice compared to the control group. The results indicate that the individual breast-feeding program is very effective in increasing breast-feeding knowledge, attitude, method and rate of practicing breast feeding for married immigrant women. So, nurses are encouraged to aggressively utilize individual breast-feeding programs to help married immigrant women, who are exposed to vulnerability due to various situations.

  19. Evaluation of a Judo/Community Organization Program to Treat Predelinquent Hispanic Immigrant Early Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Stephen J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Ninety Latino immigrant children in grades 3-6, many of whom were referred due to aggressive or other problem behaviors, participated for 1 year in a twice-weekly community program that featured judo instruction, tutoring, and parent training. Children improved significantly in academic achievement and behavior. Parents improved significantly in…

  20. The Impact of Ethnic-Immigrant Status and Obesity-Related Risk Factors on Behavioral Problems among US Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal K. Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the prevalence and correlates of parent-reported behavioral problems among immigrants and US-born children aged 6–17 years. The 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health was used to develop an 11-item factor-based behavioral problems index (BPI and a dichotomous serious behavioral problems (SBP measure. Logistic and least-squares regression and disparity indices were used to analyze differentials. BPI scores varied from 92.3 for immigrant Asian children to ≥102.4 for native Hispanic and Black children. The prevalence of SBP ranged from 2.9% for immigrant Asian children to 17.0% for native Black children. Children in most ethnic-immigrant groups had higher adjusted levels of behavioral problems than immigrant Asian children. Native Hispanic children, native and immigrant White children, immigrant Black children, and native Asian children had ≥3.0 times higher adjusted odds of SBP than immigrant Asian children. Lower socioeconomic status, obesity, physical inactivity, lack of sports participation, increased television viewing, and sleep disruption were associated with greater behavioral problems. Sociodemographic and behavioral factors accounted for 37.0% and 48.5% of ethnic-immigrant disparities in BPI and SBP, respectively. Immigrant children had fewer behavioral problems than native-born children. Policies aimed at modifying obesity-related behaviors and social environment may lead to improved behavioral/emotional health in both immigrant and native children.

  1. [Immigrant women care in a health intercultural mediation program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz Quevedo, Manuela; Paredes-Carbonell, Joan J; Sancho Mestre, Carla; López-Sánchez, Pilar; García Moreno, J Luis; Vivas Consuelo, David

    2014-01-01

    Intercultural Mediation is a strategy for quality health care aimed at reducing inequalities in immigrant population. The aim is to analyse main reasons consultation with the mediation service, women care profile and characteristics of intervention. Cross-sectional study of 339 episodes of care by two intercultural mediators (MI) from February 2008 to October 2011 in Valencia. Variables were analysed individual records of the consultations of the MI: reasons for referral to MI and professionals who refer, motives and problems identified by MI, kind of intervention, kind of derivation of MI and socio-economic variables. To evaluate the differences between countries, X2 test was used for qualitative variables and one-way ANOVA test for quantitative variables. 123 women (36,3%), were referred to the MI by the Sexual and Reproductive Health Centre and 98 (28,9%) by the midwife. 272 women (80,24%) were referred for information and demand for contraception. The MI conducted health education and detected social problems in 67 women (19,7%) and gender violence in 38 (11,21%). The women attending were Latin American immigrants (those of Bolivia showed more vulnerability) and were referred for contraception. The MI provided information, education and facilitated access to reproductive health services. Bolivian women showed more vulnerability factors: irregular situation, precarious work and low residence time.

  2. Creating Positive Contexts of Reception: The Value of Immigrant Teachers in U.S. Early Childhood Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adai, Jennifer Keys

    2016-01-01

    Young children of immigrants are increasingly part of early childhood programs in the United States but teachers have mixed approaches and attitudes about the immigrant families that they work with. This article details an analysis of 50 preschool teachers in five US cities using data from the Children Crossing Borders video-cued ethnographic…

  3. PACOSS program overview and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, L. C.; Richards, K. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Many future civilian and military large space structures (LSS) will have as performance objectives stringent pointing accuracies, short settling times, relatively fast response requirements, or combinations thereof. Many of these structures will be large, light weight, and will exhibit high structural modal density at low frequency and within the control bandwidth. Although it is possible in principle to achieve structural vibration control through purely active means, experience with complex structures has shown that the realities of plant model inaccuracies and sensor/actuator dynamics frequently combine to produce substandard performance. A more desirable approach is to apply passive damping technology to reduce the active control burden. Development of the technology to apply this strategy is the objective of the PACOSS (Passive and Active Control OF Space Structures) program. A key element in the PACOSS program is the Representative System Article (RSA). The RSA is a generic paper system that serves as a testbed for damping and controls studies. It also serves as a basis for design of the smaller Dynamic Test Article (DTA), a hardware testbed for the laboratory validation of analysis and design practices developed under PACOSS.

  4. Working Together: Building Successful Policy and Program Partnerships for Immigrant Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els de Graauw

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Supporting and investing in the integration of immigrants and their children is critically important to US society. Successful integration contributes to the nation’s economic vitality, its civic and political health, and its cultural diversity. But although the United States has a good track record on immigrant integration, outcomes could be better. A national, coherent immigrant integration policy infrastructure is needed. This infrastructure can build on long-standing partnerships between civil society and US public institutions. Such partnerships, advanced under Republican- and Democratic-led administrations, were initially established to facilitate European immigrants’ integration in large American cities, and later extended to help refugees fleeing religious persecution and war. In the twenty-first century, we must expand this foundation by drawing on the growing activism by cities and states, new civil society initiatives, and public-private partnerships that span the country. A robust national integration policy infrastructure must be vertically integrated to include different levels of government and horizontally applied across public and private sector actors and different types of immigrant destinations. The resultant policy should leverage public-private partnerships, drawing on the energy, ideas, and work of community-based nonprofit organizations as well as the leadership and support of philanthropy, business, education, faith-based, and other institutions. A new coordinating office to facilitate interagency cooperation is needed in the executive branch; the mandate and programs of the Office of Refugee Resettlement need to be secured and where possible expanded; the outreach and coordinating role of the Office of Citizenship needs to be extended, including through a more robust grant program to community-based organizations; and Congress needs to develop legislation and appropriate funding for a comprehensive integration

  5. Subjective Well-Being in Older Chinese and Korean Immigrants in the United States: Effects of Self-Rated Health and Employment Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bum Jung; Jun, Hyeyoun; Lee, Jisun; Linton, Kristen; Kim, Meehye; Browne, Colette

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of association between self-rated health and employment status on subjective well-being among older Chinese and Korean immigrants in the United States. Data were collected from 171 Chinese and 205 Korean older adult immigrants living in Los Angeles County. The primary variables included demographic data, subjective index of well-being, self-rated health, and employment status. Data support the association between self-rated health and subjective well-being for both groups. Employment, education, and age were associated with the level of subjective well-being only for older Korean immigrants. Similarities and differences were noted in these two Asian American subgroups. Findings suggest the need to develop health promotion services for both populations and employment opportunities targeted more so for Korean older immigrants to further support their subjective well-being. Results may have implications for other for older immigrants.

  6. Informed Choice in the German Mammography Screening Program by Education and Migrant Status: Survey among First-Time Invitees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Maria Berens

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer among women and mammography screening programs are seen as a key strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality. In Germany, women are invited to the population-based mammography screening program between ages 50 to 69. It is still discussed whether the benefits of mammography screening outweigh its harms. Therefore, the concept of informed choice comprising knowledge, attitude and intention has gained importance. The objective of this observational study was to assess the proportion of informed choices among women invited to the German mammography screening program for the first time. A representative sample of 17,349 women aged 50 years from a sub-region of North Rhine Westphalia was invited to participate in a postal survey. Turkish immigrant women were oversampled. The effects of education level and migration status on informed choice and its components were assessed. 5,847 (33.7% women responded to the postal questionnaire of which 4,113 were used for analyses. 31.5% of the women had sufficient knowledge. The proportion of sufficient knowledge was lower among immigrants and among women with low education levels. The proportion of women making informed choices was low (27.1%, with similar associations with education level and migration status. Women of low (OR 2.75; 95% CI 2.18-3.46 and medium education level (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.27-1.75 were more likely to make an uninformed choice than women of high education level. Turkish immigrant women had the greatest odds for making an uninformed choice (OR 5.30, 95% CI 1.92-14.66 compared to non-immigrant women. Other immigrant women only had slightly greater odds for making an uninformed choice than non-immigrant women. As immigrant populations and women with low education level have been shown to have poor knowledge, they need special attention in measures to increase knowledge and thus informed choices.

  7. Informed Choice in the German Mammography Screening Program by Education and Migrant Status: Survey among First-Time Invitees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berens, Eva-Maria; Reder, Maren; Razum, Oliver; Kolip, Petra; Spallek, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer among women and mammography screening programs are seen as a key strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality. In Germany, women are invited to the population-based mammography screening program between ages 50 to 69. It is still discussed whether the benefits of mammography screening outweigh its harms. Therefore, the concept of informed choice comprising knowledge, attitude and intention has gained importance. The objective of this observational study was to assess the proportion of informed choices among women invited to the German mammography screening program for the first time. A representative sample of 17,349 women aged 50 years from a sub-region of North Rhine Westphalia was invited to participate in a postal survey. Turkish immigrant women were oversampled. The effects of education level and migration status on informed choice and its components were assessed. 5,847 (33.7%) women responded to the postal questionnaire of which 4,113 were used for analyses. 31.5% of the women had sufficient knowledge. The proportion of sufficient knowledge was lower among immigrants and among women with low education levels. The proportion of women making informed choices was low (27.1%), with similar associations with education level and migration status. Women of low (OR 2.75; 95% CI 2.18-3.46) and medium education level (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.27-1.75) were more likely to make an uninformed choice than women of high education level. Turkish immigrant women had the greatest odds for making an uninformed choice (OR 5.30, 95% CI 1.92-14.66) compared to non-immigrant women. Other immigrant women only had slightly greater odds for making an uninformed choice than non-immigrant women. As immigrant populations and women with low education level have been shown to have poor knowledge, they need special attention in measures to increase knowledge and thus informed choices.

  8. Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening After CARES: A Community Program for Immigrant and Marginalized Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Sheila F; Lofters, Aisha K; Ginsburg, Ophira M; Meaney, Christopher A; Ahmad, Farah; Moravac, M Catherine; Nguyen, Cam Tu Janet; Arisz, Angela M

    2017-05-01

    Marginalized populations such as immigrants and refugees are less likely to receive cancer screening. Cancer Awareness: Ready for Education and Screening (CARES), a multifaceted community-based program in Toronto, Canada, aimed to improve breast and cervical screening among marginalized women. This matched cohort study assessed the impact of CARES on cervical and mammography screening among under-screened/never screened (UNS) attendees. Provincial administrative data collected from 1998 to 2014 and provided in 2015 were used to match CARES participants who were age eligible for screening to three controls matched for age, geography, and pre-education screening status. Dates of post-education Pap and mammography screening up to June 30, 2014 were determined. Analysis in 2016 compared screening uptake and time to screening for UNS participants and controls. From May 15, 2012 to October 31, 2013, a total of 1,993 women attended 145 educational sessions provided in 20 languages. Thirty-five percent (118/331) and 48% (99/206) of CARES participants who were age eligible for Pap and mammography, respectively, were UNS on the education date. Subsequently, 26% and 36% had Pap and mammography, respectively, versus 9% and 14% of UNS controls. ORs for screening within 8 months of follow-up among UNS CARES participants versus their matched controls were 5.1 (95% CI=2.4, 10.9) for Pap and 4.2 (95%=CI 2.3, 7.8) for mammography. Hazard ratios for Pap and mammography were 3.6 (95% CI=2.1, 6.1) and 3.2 (95% CI=2.0, 5.3), respectively. CARES' multifaceted intervention was successful in increasing Pap and mammography screening in this multiethnic under-screened population. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gracious space: Library programming strategies towards immigrants as tools in the creation of social capital

    OpenAIRE

    Vårheim, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Recent research on the generation of social trust and social capital gives public institutions prominent roles as instruments for creating social capital, the trust and connections between community members that yield collective action. Less is known about specific institutions and the mechanisms involved in creating social capital. In this paper, public library programs directed towards immigrants are explored as one possible mechanism for generating social capital. The data are unstructured...

  10. NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems Program Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Hamley, John A.; McCallum, Peter W.; Sutliff, Thomas J.; Zakrajsek, June F.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program began formal implementation in December 2010. The RPS Program's goal is to make available RPS for the exploration of the solar system in environments where conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet mission needs. To meet this goal, the RPS Program manages investments in RPS system development and RPS technologies. The current keystone of the RPS Program is the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). This generator will be about four times more efficient than the more traditional thermoelectric generators, while providing a similar amount of power. This paper provides the status of the RPS Program and its related projects. Opportunities for RPS generator development and targeted research into RPS component performance enhancements, as well as constraints dealing with the supply of radioisotope fuel, are also discussed in the context of the next ten years of planetary science mission plans.

  11. Maternal Race–Ethnicity, Immigrant Status, Country of Birth, and the Odds of a Child With Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Fairthorne PhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of autism spectrum disorder varies by maternal race–ethnicity, immigration status, and birth region. In this retrospective cohort study, Western Australian state registries and a study population of 134 204 mothers enabled us to examine the odds of autism spectrum disorder with intellectual disability in children born from 1994 to 2005 by the aforementioned characteristics. We adjusted for maternal age, parity, socioeconomic status, and birth year. Indigenous women were 50% less likely to have a child with autism spectrum disorder with intellectual disability than Caucasian, nonimmigrant women. Overall, immigrant women were 40% less likely to have a child with autism spectrum disorder with intellectual disability than nonimmigrant women. However, Black women from East Africa had more than 3.5 times the odds of autism spectrum disorder with intellectual disability in their children than Caucasian nonimmigrant women. Research is implicated on risk and protective factors for autism spectrum disorder with intellectual disability in the children of immigrant women.

  12. Immigrants to the United States and Adult Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrotta, Clarena

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes documented and undocumented immigrant populations in the United States. It discusses salient factors influencing their status as immigrants as well as adult education services available to them through publicly funded programs, social units, and community centers, especially churches and libraries.

  13. The association between immigrant generational status, child maltreatment history and intimate partner violence (IPV): evidence from a nationally representative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimber, Melissa; Henriksen, Christine A; Davidov, Danielle M; Goldstein, Abby L; Pitre, Nicole Y; Tonmyr, Lil; Afifi, Tracie O

    2015-07-01

    The extent to which immigrant-specific factors influence the intergenerational transmission of family violence is unknown. The objectives of this paper are to examine the associations between immigrant generational status (IGS), child maltreatment (CM), intimate partner violence (IPV) and acculturation (i.e., the extent to which an individual adopts the values, language and attitudes of a new culture). The sample was drawn from wave two of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC; n = 34,653), a nationally representative survey of United States (US) residents aged 20 years and older. Logistic regression was used to estimate the associations between IGS, CM history, IPV, and acculturation. Compared to 3rd generation (or later) respondents, 1st generation immigrants were less likely to report a history of sexual (AOR = 0.74, CI0.95 = 0.62, 0.90) and emotional abuse (AOR = 0.69, CI0.95 = 0.55, 0.87), but were more likely to report physical neglect (AOR = 1.30, CI0.95 = 1.11, 1.52). After adjusting for covariates, IGS was not associated with IPV among respondents with or without a CM history. Among those without a CM history, highly acculturated 1st generation immigrants (AOR = 1.07, CI0.95 = 1.01, 1.13) were more likely to report perpetrating IPV, with highly acculturated 3rd generation respondents having lower odds of reporting IPV perpetration (AOR = 0.93, CI0.95 = 0.88-1.00). IGS and acculturation are important factors in CM and IPV. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the influence of IGS, recency of immigration, acculturation and acculturative stress on the experiences and relationship between CM and IPV.

  14. Benefit and adherence of the disease management program "diabetes 2": a comparison of Turkish immigrants and German natives with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Anna Christin; Kofahl, Christopher

    2014-09-17

    There is an ongoing debate about equity and equality in health care, and whether immigrants benefit equally from services as the non-immigrant population. The study focuses on benefits from and adherence to the diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2) disease management program (DMP) among Turkish immigrants in Germany. So far, it has not been researched whether this group benefits from enrollment in the DMP as well as diabetics from the non-immigrant population. Data on the non-immigrant sample (N = 702) stem from a survey among members of a German health insurance, the Turkish immigrant sample (N = 102) was recruited in the area of Hamburg. Identical questions in both surveys enable comparing major components. Regarding process quality, Turkish diabetics do not differ from the non-immigrant sample; moreover, they have significantly more often received documentation and diabetes training. In terms of outcome quality however, results display a greater benefit on behalf of the non-immigrant sample (e.g., blood parameters and body mass index), and they also met more of the DMP criteria. This underlines the need of diabetics with Turkish background for further education and information in order to become the empowered patient as is intended by the DMP as well as to prevent comorbidities.

  15. Self-reported health status in primary health care: the influence of immigration and other associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinero-Fort, Miguel Á; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; del Otero-Sanz, Laura; de Burgos-Lunar, Carmen; Chico-Moraleja, Rosa M; Martín-Madrazo, Carmen; Gómez-Campelo, Paloma

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study are to compare self-reported health status between Spanish-born and Latin American-born Spanish residents, adjusted by length of residence in the host country; and additionally, to analyse sociodemographic and psychosocial variables associated with a better health status. This is a cross-sectional population based study of Latin American-born (n = 691) and Spanish-born (n = 903) in 15 urban primary health care centres in Madrid (Spain), carried out between 2007 and 2009. The participants provided information, through an interview, about self-reported health status, socioeconomic characteristics, psychosocial factors and migration conditions. Descriptive and multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted. The Spanish-born participants reported a better health status than the Latin America-born participants (79.8% versus 69.3%, pimmigrants with a better health status is greater in those who have been in Spain for less than five years compared to those who have stayed longer. Better health status is significantly associated with being men, under 34 years old, being Spanish-born, having a monthly incomes of over 1000 euros, and having considerable social support and low stress. Better self-reported health status is associated with being Spanish-born, men, under 34 years old, having an uppermiddle-socioeconomic status, adequate social support, and low stress. Additionally, length of residence in the host country is seen as a related factor in the self-reported health status of immigrants.

  16. Radioisotope Power Systems Program Status and Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajsek, June F.; Hamley, John A.; Sutliff, Thomas J.; Mccallum, Peter W.; Sandifer, Carl E.

    2017-01-01

    The Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Programs goal is to make RPS available for the exploration of the solar system in environments where conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to use to meet mission needs. To meet this goal, the RPS Program manages investments in RPS system development and RPS technologies. The RPS Program exists to support NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD). The RPS Program provides strategic leadership for RPS, enables the availability of RPS for use by the planetary science community, successfully executes RPS flight projects and mission deployments, maintains a robust technology development portfolio, manages RPS related National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Nuclear Launch Safety (NLS) approval processes for SMD, maintains insight into the Department of Energy (DOE) implementation of NASA funded RPS production infrastructure operations, including implementation of the NASA funded Plutonium-238 production restart efforts. This paper will provide a status of recent RPS activities.

  17. The relationship between social support and self-reported health status in immigrants: an adjusted analysis in the Madrid Cross Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez-García Rodrigo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social support is an important factor in the adaptation process of immigrants, helping for their integration in a new environment. The lack of social support may influence on well-being and health status. The aim of this study is to describe the social support of immigrant and native population and study the possible association between immigration and lack social support after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, income, stress and self-reported health status. Methods Cross-sectional population based study of immigrants and national patients without mental disorders of 15 urban primary health centers in the north-eastern area of Madrid. Participants provided information on social support, stress level, perceived health status and socio-economic characteristics. Descriptive and multiple logistic regression were conducted. Results The proportion of the global perception of social support among immigrants and natives was 79.2% and 94.2%, respectively. The lack of global social support adjusted prevalence ratio (PR of immigrant was 2.72 (95% Confidence Interval = 1.81-4.09, showing a significant association with being male (PR = 2.26, having monthly income below 500 euros (PR = 3.81 and suffering stress (PR = 1.94. For the dimensions of lack of social support the higher association was being an immigrant and suffering stress. Conclusions We conclude that with regardless of the level of monthly income, stress level, self-reported health status, and gender, immigrant status is directly associated with lack social support. The variable most strongly associated with lack social support has been monthly income below 500 euros.

  18. Frequent attenders in general practice and immigrant status in Norway: a nationwide cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Esperanza; Gimeno-Feliu, Luis-Andrés; Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; Prados-Torres, Alexandra

    2014-12-01

    To compare the likelihood of being a frequent attender (FA) to general practice among native Norwegians and immigrants, and to study socioeconomic and morbidity factors associated with being a FA for natives and immigrants. Linked register data for all inhabitants in Norway with at least one visit to the general practitioner (GP) in 2008 (2 967 933 persons). Immigrants were grouped according to their country of origin into low- (LIC), middle- (MIC), and high-income countries (HIC). FAs were defined as patients whose attendance rate ranked in the top 10% (cut-off point > 7 visits). FAs were compared with other GP users by means of multivariate binary logistic analyses adjusting for socioeconomic and morbidity factors. Among GP users during the daytime, immigrants had a higher likelihood of being a FA compared with natives (OR (95% CI): 1.13 (1.09-1.17) and 1.15 (1.12-1.18) for HIC, 1.84 (1.78-1.89) and 1.66 (1.63-1.70) for MIC, and 1.77 (1.67-1.89) and 1.65 (1.57-1.74) for LIC for men and women respectively). Pregnancy, middle income earned in Norway, and having cardiologic and psychiatric problems were the main factors associated with being a FA. Among immigrants, labour immigrants and the elderly used GPs less often, while refugees were overrepresented among FAs. Psychiatric, gastroenterological, endocrine, and non-specific drug morbidity were relatively more prevalent among immigrant FA compared with natives. Although immigrants account for a small percentage of all FAs, GPs and policy-makers should be aware of differences in socioeconomic and morbidity profiles to provide equality of health care.

  19. Effects of a Program to Improve Mental Health Literacy for Married Immigrant Women in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Jung

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate a mental health improvement program for the acculturative stress and mental health literacy of married immigrant women using bilingual gatekeepers. Bilingual gatekeepers were recruited from multicultural centers and trained to provide 8-week structured mental health improvement services to the women in the experimental group using a mental health improvement guidebook developed by the authors in 8 different languages. The program was effective in improving mental health and mental health literacy scores as well as reducing the degree of acculturative stress. This study offers a model of effective mental healthcare for multicultural communities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Immigration generation status and its association with suicide attempts, substance use, and depressive symptoms among latino adolescents in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Juan B; Wyman, Peter A; Brown, C Hendricks; Matthieu, Monica M; Olivares, Telva E; Hartel, Diana; Zayas, Luis H

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated the relation between suicide attempts and immigrant generation status using the Latino subset of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a school-based, nationally representative sample. This study also examined whether generation status predicted risk factors associated with elevated suicide behaviors, namely illicit substance use, problematic alcohol use, and depressive symptoms. Finally, hypothesizing that elevated depressive symptoms and substance use mediate the relation between immigrant generation status and suicide attempts among Latino adolescents, a path model was tested. Our findings revealed immigrant generation status was a determinant for suicide attempts, problematic alcohol use, repeated marijuana use, and repeated other drug use for Latino adolescents. US-born Latinos with immigrant parents (i.e., second-generation youth) were 2.87 (95% CI, 1.34, 6.14) times more likely to attempt suicide, 2.27 (95% CI, 1.53, 3.35) times more likely to engage in problematic alcohol use, 2.56 (95% CI, 1.62, 4.05) times more likely to engage in repeated marijuana use, and 2.28 (95% CI, 1.25, 4.17) times more likely to engage in repeated other drug use than were foreign-born youth (i.e., first-generation youth). Later-generations of US-born Latino youth with US-born parents were 3.57 (95% CI, 1.53-8.34) times more likely to attempt suicide, 3.34 (95% CI, 2.18-5.11) times more likely to engage in problematic alcohol use, 3.90 (95% CI, 2.46, 6.20) times more likely to engage in repeated marijuana use, and 2.80 (95% CI, 1.46, 5.34) times more likely to engage in repeated other drug use than were first-generation youth. Results from the path analysis indicated that repeated other drug use may mediate the effect of generation status on suicide attempts.

  1. Peer tutoring pilot program for the improvement of oral health behavior in underprivileged and immigrant children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Claus H; Löpker, Nadine; Noack, Michael J; Klein, Klaus; Rosen, Evelyne

    2009-01-01

    Caries prevalence in underprivileged children is particularly high and, even though many efforts have been made, adherence to dental preventive programs is low. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a tutoring program can improve oral health behavior in underprivileged and/or immigrant children. Thirty fourth-grade children (mean age = 9.6), over 50 percent of immigrant background, participated in this longitudinal pilot study. The fourth graders were invited to develop on oral health program for their first-grade peers. For this purpose, the fourth graders learned oral health practices and developed the peer tutoring program. Prior to the intervention and after having instructed their first-grade peers, all fourth graders were interviewed about their oral health habits and their tooth-brushing was recorded on video. Toothbrushing time, performance of circular tooth-brushing movements, and systematic cleaning of all dental surfaces were analyzed before and after the intervention. After peer teaching, there was a significant increase concerning tooth-brushing time (P = .004), performance of circular tooth-brushing movements (P tutoring program yielded a significant improvement in relevant oral care behavior. This approach provided an environment which, in contrast to traditional approaches, facilitates empowerment.

  2. The Influence of Immigrant Parent Legal Status on U.S.-Born Children's Academic Abilities: The Moderating Effects of Social Service Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabeck, Kalina M.; Sibley, Erin; Taubin, Patricia; Murcia, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between immigrant parent legal status and academic performance among U.S.-born children, ages 7-10. Building on previous research and a social ecological framework, the study further explored how social service use moderates the relationship between parent legal status and academic performance.…

  3. Effects of Parent Immigration Status on Mental Health Service Use Among Latino Children Referred to Child Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Cardoso, Jodi Berger; Dettlaff, Alan J; Hurlburt, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    Latino families may be at risk of experiencing stressors resulting from the immigration process, such as those related to documentation status and acculturation, that may increase their need for mental health services. However, little research exists on the mental health needs and service use of Latino children. This study examined how parental nativity and legal status influence mental health needs and service utilization among children in Latino families investigated by child welfare. Data from the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, a nationally representative, prospective study of families investigated by child welfare agencies for maltreatment, were used to examine mental health need and service use in a subset of Latino children who remained in the home following a maltreatment investigation (N=390). Although children of immigrants did not differ from children of U.S.-born parents in levels of clinical need, they had lower rates of mental health service receipt. After the analyses accounted for other relevant variables, the odds of receiving services were significantly lower (odds ratio=.09) for children whose parents were undocumented compared with children whose parents were U.S. citizens. This study contributes to growing discourse on Latino family needs within the child welfare system. Analyses support earlier research regarding the effects of parent nativity on mental health service use and advance the literature by identifying parent legal status as a unique barrier to child service receipt.

  4. Intestinal parasite infections in immigrant children in the city of Rome, related risk factors and possible impact on nutritional status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manganelli Laura

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic diseases can represent a social and economic problem among disadvantaged people - even in developed countries. Due to the limited data available concerning Europe, the aims of the present study were to evaluate the presence of parasites in immigrant children and the risk factors favouring the spread of parasites. Subsequently, the possible correlation between nutritional status and parasitic infections was also investigated. Findings A convenience sample of two hundred and forty seven immigrant children (aged 0–15 attending the Poliambulatorio della Medicina Solidale in Rome was examined. Data were collected using structured questionnaires, and parasitological and anthropometric tests were applied. Chi-squared test and binary logistic multiple-regression models were used for statistical analysis. Thirty-seven children (15% tested positive to parasites of the following species: Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba coli, Giardia duodenalis, Enterobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides and Strongyloides stercoralis. A monospecific infection was detected in 30 (81% out of 37 parasitized children, while the others (19% presented a polyparasitism. The major risk factors were housing, i.e. living in shacks, and cohabitation with other families (p Conclusions This study shows that parasite infection in children is still quite common, even in a developed country and that children’s growth and parasitism may be related. Extensive improvements in the living, social and economic conditions of immigrants are urgently needed in order to overcome these problems.

  5. Classroom drama therapy program for immigrant and refugee adolescents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Cécile; Benoit, Maryse; Gauthier, Marie-France; Lacroix, Louise; Alain, Néomée; Rojas, Musuk Viger; Moran, Alejandro; Bourassa, Dominique

    2007-07-01

    This evaluative study assesses the effects of a school drama therapy program for immigrant and refugee adolescents designed to prevent emotional and behavioral problems and to enhance school performance. The 9-week program involved 136 newcomers, aged 12 to 18, attending integration classes in a multiethnic school. Pretest and posttest data were collected from the students and their teachers. The self-report and teacher's forms of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire were used to assess emotional and behavioral symptoms. At the end of the program, although there were no reported improvement in self-esteem or emotional and behavioral symptoms, the adolescents in the experimental group reported lower mean levels of impairment by symptoms than those in the control group, when baseline data were controlled for. Their performance in mathematics also increased significantly compared to that of their control peers. The findings suggest that the workshops may have an impact on social adjustment of recently arrived immigrants and refugees. This drama therapy program appears to be a promising way of working preventively and in a nonstigmatizing manner with adolescents who have been exposed to diverse forms of adversity, among which are war and violence.

  6. Body image, body dissatisfaction and weight status in children from Emilia-Romagna (Italy): comparison between immigrant and native-born.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toselli, Stefania; Brasili, Patricia; Spiga, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Cross-sectional study among immigrant and native children from Emilia-Romagna (Italy). The purpose of the present study was to examine the relative contribution of weight status, ethnicity and sex on body dissatisfaction in a sample of children from Emilia-Romagna (Italy). Primary school children (226 immigrants and 1206 Italians) aged 6-11 years were measured: immigrant children were divided into Asians, Africans, Latin Americans and East Europeans. Height and weight were measured and Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated. Body image perception was assessed using Body Silhouette Charts. A body dissatisfaction score (BDS) was derived by subtracting the "ideal self" from the "self" score. Weight status disorders were higher in immigrants than in native-born males; Italian females had higher prevalence of underweight and overweight and lower prevalence of obesity than immigrants peers. BDS rose with the increase of weight status categories. Awareness of body image size and increasing body dissatisfaction with higher weight status is established in childhood, regardless of ethnicity and gender.

  7. Analysis of English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Program in Cultural Institutions : Educational Opportunity for Adult Immigrants in New York City

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Shoko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the educational services for immigrants through the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program in cultural institutions such as library and museum in New York City. Due to the rapid growth of immigrant population, the role of cultural institutions in providing learning environment for adult immigrants has expanded drastically. In this study, the following questions are considered. How does the ESOL program in cultural institutions r...

  8. Household food insecurity status and Hispanic immigrant children’s body mass index and adiposity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the high prevalence rates of food insecurity and obesity among children of Hispanic immigrants, there has been a dearth of research on the direct relationship between food insecurity and obesity among this population. Further, prior research examining the association between food insecurity ...

  9. Educational gradients in five Asian immigrant populations: Do country of origin, duration and generational status moderate the education-health relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Annie; Geronimus, Arline; Bound, John; Griffith, Derek; Gee, Gilbert

    2016-12-01

    Education usually shows a relationship with self-rated health such that those with highest education have the best health and those with lowest education have the worst health. We examine these educational gradients among Asian immigrants and whether they differ by country of origin, duration in the United States, and generational status. Migration theories suggest that recent immigrants from poorer countries should show a weaker relationship between education and health than US-born Whites. Acculturation theory further suggests that differences in gradients across country of origin should diminish for longer-term immigrants and the US-born and that these groups should display gradients similar to US-born Whites. We use the March Current Population Survey (2000 - 2010) to examine educational gradients in self-rated health among recent immigrants (≤ 15 years duration), longer-term immigrants (> 15 years duration), and second generation US-born Asians from China (n = 4473), India (n = 4,307), the Philippines (n = 5746), South Korea (n = 2760), and Japan (n = 1265). We find weak or non-significant educational gradients among recent Asian immigrants across the five countries of origin. There is no indication that longer-term immigrants display significant differences across educational status. Only second generation Chinese and Filipinos show significant differences by educational status. Overall, Asians show an attenuated relationship between education and self-rated health compared to US-Whites that persists over duration in the US and generational status. Our findings show shortcomings in migration and acculturation theories to explain these gradient patterns. Future research could use binational data or explore psychosocial factors to identify potential suppressors of educational gradients.

  10. Socioeconomic status, ethnicity, culture, and immigration: examining the potential mechanisms underlying Mexican-origin adolescents' organized activity participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Sandra D; Delgado, Melissa Y; Price, Chara D; Quach, Alex; Starbuck, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    The integrative model for child development and ecodevelopmental theory suggest that macro factors, such as socioeconomic status, ethnicity, culture, and immigration influence the settings in which adolescents engage. The goal of this investigation was to use a combination of deductive and inductive qualitative analysis to describe the mechanisms by which these macro factors might be related to Mexican-origin adolescents' participation in organized after-school activities. Qualitative data were collected through focus group interviews with 44 adolescents, 50 parents, and 18 activity leaders from 2 neighborhoods that varied in ethnic composition and average family income. Results indicated that family socioeconomic status might be related to adolescents' participation through financial resources and parents' work. Ethnicity was identified as a predictor of participation via experiences with ethnic discrimination, particularly in the neighborhood with a low percentage of Hispanic families. Cultural values and practices were related to participants' preferences for particular activities (e.g., bilingual, church-sponsored) and adolescents' participation in activities. Immigration seemed to be a factor in parents' familiarity with and beliefs about organized activities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Empower Educators to Teach Immigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Sara; Kugler, Eileen Gale; Tesh, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, U.S. immigration has changed significantly, yet the way we teach about immigration in schools has changed little. The American Immigration Council has developed a two-year program on Long Island, an area experiencing an increase of new arrivals and anti-immigrant sentiment. The program empowers teachers with the knowledge to…

  12. The social determinants of health of the child-adolescent immigration and its influence on the nutritional status: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh Moussa, Kamila; Sanz-Valero, Javier; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina

    2014-11-01

    to review the social determinants of health more characteristic of the child and adolescents of immigrants, by reviewing the literature and assess its effect on nutritional status. a systematic review was performed using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) in PubMed (Medline) and The Cochrane Library, in order to identify undetected studies; articles bibliographic lists were examined. The final election was done according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. No restrictions on sex and ethnicity of the participants. STROBE checkpoints were used for an information and methodological quality control. As Social Determinants of Health (SDH); social, demographic and economic conditions were considered for the study of their effect on the nutritional status. from 31 identified articles 18 are included in this study, 17 (94.4%) had a good or excellent quality. Hispanic and African were the most studied ethnicities; birth place and parent's residence period were used for generational classification. Alimentary culture and linguistic isolation of the first generation have a protective effect preventing from overweight and obesity risk while it decrease in second and third generation due to the experienced acculturation process equalizing their weight gain to natives; which prevalence is higher among Hispanics. No relation was found for nutritional status differences between sexes neither alimentary aids protective effect hypothesis was confirmed. the SDH with greater influence on child-adolescent immigrants were the socio-demographic conditions; among them: residence period distinguish the three identified generations while linguistic barrier and ethnic background are truly influential on the biological response to the experimented change caused by the acculturation process, establishing differences in the nutritional status. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. Coronary heart disease incidence among non-Western immigrants compared to Danish-born people: effect of country of birth, migrant status, and income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Anne; Zinckernagel, Line; Krasnik, Allan; Petersen, Jorgen H; Norredam, Marie

    2015-10-01

    Increasing global migration has made immigrants' health an important topic worldwide. We examined the effect of country of birth, migrant status (refugee/family-reunified) and income on coronary heart disease (CHD) incidence. This was a historical prospective register-based cohort study. The study cohort consisted of immigrants above 18 years from non-Western countries who had obtained a residence permit in Denmark as a refugee (n = 29,045) or as a family-reunified immigrant (n = 28,435) from 1 January 1993-31 December 1999 and a Danish-born reference population (n = 229,918). First-time CHD incidence was identified from 1 January 1993-31 December 2007. Incidence ratios for 11 immigrant groups were estimated using Cox regression analysis. Immigrants from Afghanistan, Iraq, Turkey, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, South Asia, the Former Yugoslavia, and the Middle East and North Africa had significantly higher incidences of CHD (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05-1.75 to HR = 2.86; 95% CI: 2.01-4.08) compared with Danish-born people. Immigrants from Somalia, South and Middle America, Sub-Saharan Africa and women from East Asia and the Pacific did not differ significantly from Danish-born people, whereas immigrant men from East Asia and the Pacific had a significantly lower incidence (HR = 0.32; 95% CI: 0.17-0.62). When also including migrant status, the higher incidences were reduced. Refugee men (HR = 1.35; 95% CI: 1.11-1.65) and women (HR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.08-1.65) had a significantly higher incidence of CHD than family-reunified immigrants. When migrant status and income were included simultaneously, the incidences decreased to an insignificant level for most immigrant groups. Most non-Western immigrant groups had a higher incidence of CHD than Danish-born people. The study revealed that migrant status and income are important underlying mechanisms of the effect of country of birth on CHD. © The European

  14. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 3 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q3 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army...Hearing Division General Medical: 500A September 2017 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Army Hearing Program Status Report... Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health Management System and provides a means for the installation Hearing Program Managers

  15. Self-reported discrimination and mental health status among African descendants, Mexican Americans, and other Latinos in the New Hampshire REACH 2010 Initiative: the added dimension of immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Gilbert C; Ryan, Andrew; Laflamme, David J; Holt, Jeanie

    2006-10-01

    We examined whether self-reported racial discrimination was associated with mental health status and whether this association varied with race/ethnicity or immigration status. We performed secondary analysis of a community intervention conducted in 2002 and 2003 for the New Hampshire Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health 2010 Initiative, surveying African descendants, Mexican Americans, and other Latinos. We assessed mental health status with the Mental Component Summary (MCS12) of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 12, and measured discrimination with questions related to respondents' ability to achieve goals, discomfort/anger at treatment by others, and access to quality health care. Self-reported discrimination was associated with a lower MCS12 score. Additionally, the strength of the association between self-reported health care discrimination and lower MCS12 score was strongest for African descendants, then Mexican Americans, then other Latinos. These patterns may be explained by differences in how long a respondent has lived in the United States. Furthermore, the association of health care discrimination with lower MCS12 was weaker for recent immigrants. Discrimination may be an important predictor of poor mental health status among Black and Latino immigrants. Previous findings of decreasing mental health status as immigrants acculturate might partly be related to experiences with racial discrimination.

  16. In Harm’s Way: Family Separation, Immigration Enforcement Programs and Security on the US-Mexico Border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Slack

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Consequence Delivery System (CDS is a suite of border and immigration enforcement programs designed to increase the penalties associated with unauthorized migration in order to convince people not to return (Rosenblum 2013. Despite its inauguration in 2011, many aspects of the CDS are not new. CDS does however, mark a shift from the deterrent strategy that, in the 1990s that relied heavily on the dangers of the natural terrain to dissuade unauthorized border crossers, to one that actively punishes, incarcerates, and criminalizes them. This article presents findings from the Migrant Border Crossing Study, a random sample survey of 1,100 recently deported migrants in six cities in Mexico conducted between 2009 and 2012. It examines the demographics and family ties of deportees, their experiences with immigration enforcement practices and programs under the CDS, and how these programs have reshaped contemporary migration and deportation along the US-Mexico border. The article covers programs such as criminal prosecutions of illegal entries under Operation Streamline, and the Alien Transfer and Exit Program (ATEP or lateral repatriation program which returns immigrants to different locations from where they illegally entered. In relationship to these programs, it considers issues of due process and treatment of deportees in US custody. It also examines interior enforcement under Secure Communities, which, during the study period, comprised part of the overarching border security plan, and screened virtually everybody arrested in the United States against immigration databases.The article concludes that these programs do not have a strong deterrent effect. Instead, immigration enforcement has led to a “caging effect” over the past two decades which has disrupted seasonal migration flows, increased familial and social ties to the United States, and decreased the probability of returning to Mexico once in the United States. The development of

  17. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 2 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q2 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army...Hearing Division General Medical: 500A July 2017 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Army Hearing Program Status Report, Q2FY17...56               INTRODUCTION The Army Hearing Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health

  18. 8 CFR 1245.8 - Adjustment of status as a special immigrant under section 101(a)(27)(K) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... under section 101(a)(27)(K) of the Act. 1245.8 Section 1245.8 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE... section 101(a)(27)(K) of the Act. (a) Application. Each person applying for adjustment of status as a special immigrant under section 101(a)(27)(K) of the Act must file a Form I-485, Application to Register...

  19. Improving Access to Mental Health Services for Racialized Immigrants, Refugees, and Non-Status People Living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y Y Brandon; Li, Alan Tai; Fung, Kenneth Po; Wong, Josephine Pui

    2015-05-01

    The demographic characteristics of people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs) in Canada are increasingly diverse. Despite literature suggesting a potentially heightened mental health burden borne by racialized immigrant, refugee, and non-status PHAs (IRN-PHAs), researchers have hitherto paid insufficient attention to whether existing services adequately address this need and how services might be improved. Employing community-based research methodology involving PHAs from five ethnoracial groups in Toronto, Ontario, this study explored IRN-PHAs' mental health service-seeking behaviors, service utilization experiences, and suggestions for service improvements. Results showed that while most IRN-PHAs were proactive in improving their mental health, their attempts to obtain support were commonly undermined by service provider mistreatment, unavailability of appropriate services, and multiple access barriers. A three-pronged approach involving IRN-PHA empowerment, anti-stigma and cultural competence promotion, and greater service integration is proposed for improving IRN-PHAs' mental health service experience.

  20. The Impact of Including Immigrants without Permanent Residence Status in the Public Health Insurance System in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tepperová Jana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Whether an individual can or cannot participate in the Czech public health insurance system depends on several characteristics, one of which is whether he/she has permanent residence status in the Czech Republic, and a second whether he/she is employed. This means that those without permanent residence status, including self-employed migrants from third countries, their dependent relatives, and the dependent relatives of third country employees in the Czech Republic, cannot participate in the public health insurance system. Some argue that such migrants should be included in the system, since commercial health insurance is disadvantageous and the contributions they would pay into the public health insurance system would increase the public health insurance agencies’ income. We estimate the value of the contributions to public health insurance that would be paid by third country self-employed and non-working immigrants, if they were insured based on data from 2011 to 2013, and compare this to the assumed costs of their medical care. To calculate the contributions for self-employed migrants we use data on the distribution of the tax base for self-employed persons from personal income tax returns. Our estimation results in an overall negative balance of 22 million CZK on the data for 2012 and 2013. In the current system this deficit would be covered by the state, which would pay contributions to the system for certain (state insured persons amounting to 97 million CZK; overall therefore the inclusion of these immigrants would result in a positive balance of 75 million CZK.

  1. The impact of language barriers and immigration status on the care experience for Spanish-speaking caregivers of patients with pediatric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Eduardo R; Kaul, Sapna; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Gwilliam, Vannina; Jimenez, Ornella A; Morreall, Deborah K; Montenegro, Roberto E; Kinney, Anita Y; Fluchel, Mark N

    2016-12-01

    An increasing proportion of pediatric cancer patients in the United States are Latino and many have Spanish-speaking immigrant parents with limited English proficiency (LEP). Little is known about how language or undocumented immigration status impacts their care experience. A cross-sectional survey was administered to English (N = 310) and Spanish-speaking LEP (N = 56) caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. To assess differences in healthcare experiences between the language groups, t-tests and chi-square statistics were used. Multivariable logistic regression evaluated associations between primary language and knowledge of clinical trial status. Spanish-speaking caregivers were more likely to report higher rates of quitting or changing jobs as a direct result of their child's cancer, and their children were more likely to experience a delay in education. Although Spanish-speaking caregivers reported higher satisfaction with care, 32% reported feeling that their child would have received better care if English was their primary language. Spanish-speaking caregivers were more likely to incorrectly identify whether their child was on a clinical trial compared with English-speaking caregivers. The majority of Spanish-speaking caregivers reported at least one undocumented caregiver in the household and 11% of them avoided or delayed medical care for their child due to concerns over their undocumented immigration status. Language barriers and undocumented immigration status may negatively impact the quality of informed decision-making and the care experience for Spanish-speaking LEP caregivers of pediatric cancer patients. These families may benefit from culturally appropriate Spanish language resources to improve communication and open a dialogue regarding undocumented immigration status. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Association of body fat and vitamin D status and the effect of body fat on the response to vitamin D supplementation in Pakistani immigrants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Ida Marie; Lundby, M.; Mølgaard, C.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and obesity are both prevalent conditions in the northern countries, especially among immigrants. The aims were to assess the possible relationship between body fat and vitamin D status, and to investigate the effect of body fat on the response to oral vitamin D supplementation...... and vitamin D status in a multiple linear regression model (Peffect of body fat was seen on the vitamin D status response following the intervention with vitamin D. In conclusion, there was no baseline association between body fat percentage and vitamin D status, and body fat percentage had...... no effect on the response to vitamin D supplementation....

  3. Geographical distribution of the Soviet-Jewish new immigrants in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efrat, E

    1991-01-01

    The influx since 1989 of Jewish immigrants from the Soviet Union to Israel and its impact on the country's spatial distribution are analyzed and compared with a similar mass immigration that took place in the 1950s. The effects of government financial assistance programs, migrants' educational status, and cultural background on migrants' choice of settlement location are assessed.

  4. 7 CFR 295.4 - Program evaluation status reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program evaluation status reports. 295.4 Section 295.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... projects concerning evaluation of FNS food assistance programs. A copy of the current status report on...

  5. A Peer Health Educator Program for Breast Cancer Screening Promotion: Arabic, Chinese, South Asian, and Vietnamese Immigrant Women's Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Joanne; Frisina, Angela; Hack, Tricia; Parascandalo, Faye

    2015-01-01

    This study explored Arabic, Chinese, South Asian, and Vietnamese immigrant women's experiences with a peer health educator program, a public health program that facilitated access to breast health information and mammography screening. Framed within critical social theory, this participatory action research project took place from July 2009 to January 2011. Ten focus groups and 14 individual interviews were conducted with 82 immigrant women 40 years of age and older. Qualitative methods were utilized. Thematic content analysis derived from grounded theory and other qualitative literature was employed to analyze data. Four dominant themes emerged: Breast Cancer Prevention focused on learning within the program, Social Support provided by the peer health educator and other women, Screening Services Access for Women centered on service provision, and Program Enhancements related to specific modifications required to meet the needs of immigrant women accessing the program. The findings provide insights into strategies used to promote breast health, mammography screening, and the improvement of public health programming. Perceived barriers that continue to persist are structural barriers, such as the provision of information on breast cancer and screening by family physicians. A future goal is to improve collaborations between public health and primary care to minimize this barrier.

  6. Pakistani Immigrant Children and Adults in Denmark Have Severely Low Vitamin D Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke; Mølgaard, C.; Skovgaard, L. T.

    2008-01-01

    , Copenhagen (55 degrees N), January- November. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25OHD), serum intact parathyroid hormone (S-iPTH), bone turnover markers and whole body and lumbar spine bone mineral density were measured. Sun, smoking and clothing habits, age, body mass index (BMI), and vitamin D and calcium from...... food and from supplements were recorded. Thirty-seven girls (median age, range: 12.2 years, 10.1 - 14.7), 115 women (36.2 years, 18.1 - 52.7) and 95 men (38.3 years, 17.9 - 63.5) of Pakistani origin (immigrants or descendants with Pakistani parents) took part in the study. Results: Median concentration...

  7. Developing Culturally Sensitive Parent Education Programs for Immigrant Families: The Helping Youth Succeed Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zha Blong Xiong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the process by which the Helping Youth Succeed (HYS curriculum was developed for Cambodian, Hmong, Lao, and Vietnamese immigrants in the United States to help address and minimize conflicts between immigrant parents and their adolescent children. A detailed explanation of this model is provided to encourage the development of additional culturally specific parent education curricula for other immigrant/refugee groups and/or diversepopulations.

  8. Status of HTGR development program in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanokawa, Konomo; Fujishiro, Toshio; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute JAERI, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Considering global warming due to emission of greenhouse gases it is essentially important to make efforts to obtain a more reliable and stable energy supply by extending use of nuclear energy which includes high temperature heat generated by nuclear power plants. Hence, efforts should be made continuously to establish and upgrade technologies of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR), which can supply high temperature heat with high thermal efficiency and high heat-utilizing rate. It is also expected that making basic research at high temperature using HTGR will contribute to innovative basic research in the future. The construction of the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which is an HTGR with the maximum helium gas coolant temperature of 9500C at the reactor outlet, was decided by the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan (JAEC) in 1987 and successfully completed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Functional tests of the HTTR have been carried out since May 1996. First criticality will be attained in the near future. The project is intended to establish and upgrade the technology basis necessary for HTGR developments. Heat utilization system is planned to be connected to the HTTR and demonstrated at the initial stage of the second core. Steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production is adopted as an HTTR heat utilization system. The JAERI also plans to conduct material and fuel irradiation tests as innovative basic research as well as safety demonstration tests after attaining coolant gas temperature of 950C. Preliminary tests on selected research subjects such as new semiconductors, superconductors and composite material development, have been carried out at high temperature and under irradiation. This paper describes major features of the HTTR, present status of its construction and prospects on test programs using the HTTR, and the other activity on HTGRs in Japan. 2 refs.

  9. Variations in Sense of Place Across Immigrant Status and Gender in Hamilton, Ontario; Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; and, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Melissa; Williams, Allison

    Past research in Hamilton, Ontario has found that age and longevity of residence are positively associated with evaluations of sense of place (SoP); further, evaluations of SoP between immigrants and Canadian-born individuals have shown no clear pattern (Williams et al. 2010; Williams and Kitchen 2012). This paper builds on this work by further examining evaluations of SoP among both immigrants and Canadian-born residents and across gender in Hamilton, while expanding the study to two other small-to-medium sized cities: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan and, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. This paper has two objectives: (1) to establish measures of SoP across immigrant status and gender in Hamilton, Saskatoon, and Charlottetown; and, (2) to determine how SoP varies according to immigrant status, length of residence in Canada, age, income, and neighbourhood length of residence across the three city sites. Telephone survey data (n = 1,132) was used to compare evaluations of SoP across various groups and to construct an ordered logistic regression model for SoP. Results suggest that immigrants tended to rate their SoP lower than their Canadian-born counterparts. Hamilton residents were found to rate their SoP lowest, followed by Saskatoon residents and, finally, Charlottetown residents. Younger individuals, those with lower income levels, and those with shorter neighbourhood residency in the cities concerned were more likely to have lower evaluations of SoP. This research suggests that greater attention is needed to nurture immigrants' connection with their new home.

  10. Significance of after-school programming for immigrant children during middle childhood: opportunities for school social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joy Pastan

    2014-07-01

    School social workers and other school personnel can find meeting the educational and social needs of immigrant children a challenge, particularly if these children are also experiencing poverty and other educational barriers, including limited English language proficiency. Quality after-school programming has been associated with a variety of positive effects such as increased educational attainment and positive social and emotional development and could, therefore, prove significant in the lives of immigrant children. Yet, immigrant children participate less. The purpose of this article is to discuss ways in which school social workers can increase enrollment in after-school programming among immigrant children, six to 12 years of age, by becoming both advocates for children and families and leaders in developing and maintaining these services. School social workers are poised to play a number of roles related to practice, administration, research, and policy. Because this particular age group of children begins to look beyond the family for guidance and support, middle childhood is an opportune time for school social workers to work toward involving children in positive after-school experiences.

  11. Socioeconomic Status, Occupational Characteristics, and Sleep Duration in African/Caribbean Immigrants and US White Health Care Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertel, Karen A.; Berkman, Lisa F.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: o advance our understanding of the interplay of socioeconomic factors, occupational exposures, and race/ethnicity as they relate to sleep duration. We hypothesize that non Hispanic African/Caribbean immigrant employees in long term health care have shorter sleep duration than non Hispanic white employees, and that low education, low income, and occupational exposures including night work and job strain account for some of the African/Caribbean immigrant–white difference in sleep duration. Design: Cross sectional Setting: Four extended care facilities in Massachusetts, United States Participants: 340 employees in extended care facilities Measurements and Results: Sleep duration was assessed with wrist actigraphy for a mean of 6.3 days. In multivariable regression modeling controlling for gender and age, African/Caribbean immigrants slept 64.4 fewer minutes (95% CI: −81.0, −47.9) per night than white participants; additional control for education and income reduced the racial gap to 50.9 minutes (−69.2, −32.5); additional control for the occupational factors of hours worked per week and working the night shift reduced the racial gap to 37.7 minutes (−57.8, −17.6). Conclusions: his study provides support for the hypothesis that socioeconomic and occupational characteristics explain some of the African/ Caribbean immigrant–white difference in sleep duration in the United States, especially among health care workers. Citation: Ertel KA; Berkman LF; Buxton OM. Socioeconomic status, occupational characteristics, and sleep duration in African/Caribbean immi grants and US white health care workers. SLEEP 2011; 34(4):509-518. PMID:21461330

  12. The evaluation of immigration policies

    OpenAIRE

    Rinne, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the literature on the evaluation of immigration policies. It brings together two strands of the literature dealing with the evaluation of labor market programs and with the economic integration of immigrants. Next to immigrant selection and settlement policies, there are four types of interventions that aim at improving the economic and social outcomes of immigrants: a) introduction programs, b) language training, c) labor market programs, and d) anti-discrimination po...

  13. K-12 educational outcomes of immigrant youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosnoe, Robert; Turley, Ruth N López

    2011-01-01

    The children from immigrant families in the United States make up a historically diverse population, and they are demonstrating just as much diversity in their experiences in the K-12 educational system. Robert Crosnoe and Ruth López Turley summarize these K-12 patterns, paying special attention to differences in academic functioning across segments of the immigrant population defined by generational status, race and ethnicity, and national origin. A good deal of evidence points to an immigrant advantage in multiple indicators of academic progress, meaning that many youths from immigrant families outperform their peers in school. This apparent advantage is often referred to as the immigrant paradox, in that it occurs despite higher-than-average rates of social and economic disadvantages in this population as a whole. The immigrant paradox, however, is more pronounced among the children of Asian and African immigrants than other groups, and it is stronger for boys than for girls. Furthermore, evidence for the paradox is far more consistent in secondary school than in elementary school. Indeed, school readiness appears to be one area of potential risk for children from immigrant families, especially those of Mexican origin. For many groups, including those from Latin America, any evidence of the immigrant paradox usually emerges after researchers control for family socioeconomic circumstances and youths' English language skills. For others, including those from Asian countries, it is at least partially explained by the tendency for more socioeconomically advantaged residents of those regions to leave their home country for the United States. Bilingualism and strong family ties help to explain immigrant advantages in schooling; school, community, and other contextual disadvantages may suppress these advantages or lead to immigrant risks. Crosnoe and Turley also discuss several policy efforts targeting young people from immigrant families, especially those of Latin

  14. K–12 Educational Outcomes of Immigrant Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosnoe, Robert; López Turley, Ruth N.

    2017-01-01

    Summary The children from immigrant families in the United States make up a historically diverse population, and they are demonstrating just as much diversity in their experiences in the K–12 educational system. Robert Crosnoe and Ruth López Turley summarize these K–12 patterns, paying special attention to differences in academic functioning across segments of the immigrant population defined by generational status, race and ethnicity, and national origin. A good deal of evidence points to an immigrant advantage in multiple indicators of academic progress, meaning that many youths from immigrant families outperform their peers in school. This apparent advantage is often referred to as the immigrant paradox, in that it occurs despite higher-than-average rates of social and economic disadvantages in this population as a whole. The immigrant paradox, however, is more pronounced among the children of Asian and African immigrants than other groups, and it is stronger for boys than for girls. Furthermore, evidence for the paradox is far more consistent in secondary school than in elementary school. Indeed, school readiness appears to be one area of potential risk for children from immigrant families, especially those of Mexican origin. For many groups, including those from Latin America, any evidence of the immigrant paradox usually emerges after researchers control for family socioeconomic circumstances and youths’ English language skills. For others, including those from Asian countries, it is at least partially explained by the tendency for more socioeconomically advantaged residents of those regions to leave their home country for the United States. Bilingualism and strong family ties help to explain immigrant advantages in schooling; school, community, and other contextual disadvantages may suppress these advantages or lead to immigrant risks. Crosnoe and Turley also discuss several policy efforts targeting young people from immigrant families, especially

  15. Looking Down or Looking Up: Status and Subjective Well-Being among Asian and Latino Immigrants in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelatt, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Foundational theories of international migration rest on the assumption that immigrants maintain reference groups in their country of origin even after settling in a new place, while the transnationalism perspective suggests that immigrants maintain a dual frame of reference. This paper uses the nationally-representative National Latino and Asian American Survey to test the location of immigrants' reference groups. I find that the relationship between various measures of subjective social standing and subjective well-being suggests that immigrants maintain simultaneous reference groups in both the United States and the country of origin, supporting transnational theories, and refuting earlier theories.

  16. Immigration and self-reported health status by social class and gender: the importance of material deprivation, work organisation and household labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, C; Muntaner, C; Solà, J; Artazcoz, L; Puigpinós, R; Benach, J; Noh, S

    2008-05-01

    Spain and Catalonia have experienced several immigration waves over the last century. The goal of this study was to examine the role of social class and its mediating pathways (ie, work organisation, material deprivation at home and household labour) in the association between migration status and health, as well as whether these associations were modified by social class or gender. Barcelona city, Spain. The study used the Barcelona Health Interview Survey, a cross-sectional survey of 10,000 residents of the city's non-institutionalised population in 2000. The present study was conducted on the working population, aged 16-64 years (2342 men and 1872 women). The dependent variable was self-reported health status. The main independent variable was migration status. Other variables were: social class (measured using Erik Olin Wright's indicators); age; psychosocial and physical working conditions; job insecurity; type of labour contract; number of hours worked per week; material deprivation at home and household labour. Two hierarchical logistic regression models were built by adding different independent variables. Among men, foreigners presented the poorest health status (fully adjusted odds ratios (OR) 2.16; 95% CI 1.14 to 4.10), whereas among women the poorest health status corresponded to those born in other regions of Spain. There was an interaction between migration and social class among women, with women owners, managers, supervisors or professionals born in other regions of Spain reporting a worse health status than the remaining groups (fully adjusted OR 3.60; 95% CI 1.83 to 7.07). This study has shown that the pattern of perceived health status among immigrant populations varies according to gender and social class. These results have to be taken into account when developing policies addressed at the immigrant population.

  17. Field Operations Program Activities Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. Francfort; D. V. O' Hara; L. A. Slezak

    1999-05-01

    The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program's goals are to evaluate electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments, support electric vehicle technology advancement, develop infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use, support increased use of electric vehicles in federal fleets, and increase overall awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from fiscal year 1997 through mid-fiscal year 1999. The Field Operations Program succeeded the Site Operator Program, which ended in September 1996. Electric vehicle testing conducted by the Program includes baseline performance testing (EV America testing), accelerated reliability (life-cycle) testing, and fleet testing. The baseline performance parameters include accelerations, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collects accelerated reliability and fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program's Qualified Vehicle Testing (QVT) partners. The Program's QVT partners have over 3 million miles of electric vehicle operating experience.

  18. Status of Iran's nuclear program and negotiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, David

    2014-05-01

    Iran's nuclear program poses immense challenges to international security. Its gas centrifuge program has grown dramatically in the last several years, bringing Iran close to a point where it could produce highly enriched uranium in secret or declared gas centrifuge plants before its breakout would be discovered and stopped. To reduce the risk posed by Iran's nuclear program, the P5+1 have negotiated with Iran short term limits on the most dangerous aspects of its nuclear programs and is negotiating long-term arrangements that can provide assurance that Iran will not build nuclear weapons. These long-term arrangements need to include a far more limited and transparent Iranian nuclear program. In advance of arriving at a long-term arrangement, the IAEA will need to resolve its concerns about the alleged past and possibly on-going military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program.

  19. Local Immigration Enforcement and Arrests of the Hispanic Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Coon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Section 287(g of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA, which was added to the INA by the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (IIRIRA, allows the federal government to enter into voluntary partnerships with state and local law enforcement agencies to enforce immigration law. Upon entering these agreements, law enforcement officers are trained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE and receive delegated authority to enquire about an individual’s immigration status and, if found to be removable, to detain the individual while ICE makes a determination of whether to initiate deportation proceedings. In some instances, this inquiry about immigration status takes place as part of the intake process when a criminal defendant is arrested and placed into a criminal jail. In other instances, task force officers are trained to inquire in the field about immigration status and enforce immigration law against people who have not committed any criminal offense.  The key difference between the two models is that task force agents can arrest for immigration violations undocumented individuals who have not committed any criminal offense, whereas in the jail model individuals must be arrested on some other criminal charge before immigration status can be determined. The 287(g program has raised several concerns regarding its implementation and results. First, the program could lead to racial and ethnic profiling. In particular, given that the majority of undocumented immigrants hail from Latin American countries, it is highly plausible that Hispanics, regardless of immigrant status, might be disproportionally affected by this program. That is, in a jurisdiction that participates in the jail model, an officer might arrest a Hispanic individual for a very minor offence in order to process them through the jail and determine their immigration status, when perhaps without the program they may have only issued a citation

  20. Research Experience in Psychiatry Residency Programs Across Canada: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugalingam, Arany; Ferreria, Sharon G; Norman, Ross M G; Vasudev, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current status of research experience in psychiatry residency programs across Canada. Method: Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) resident representatives from all 17 psychiatry residency programs in Canada were asked to complete a survey regarding research training requirements in their programs. Results: Among the 17 COPE representatives, 15 completed the survey, representing 88% of the Canadian medical schools that have a psychiatry residency program. Among the 15 programs, 11 (73%) require residents to conduct a scholarly activity to complete residency. Some of these programs incorporated such a requirement in the past 5 years. Ten respondents (67%) reported availability of official policy and (or) guidelines on resident research requirements. Among the 11 programs that have a research requirement, 10 (91%) require residents to complete 1 scholarly activity; 1 requires completion of 2 scholarly activities. Eight (53%) residency programs reported having a separate research track. All of the programs have a research coordinator and 14 (93%) programs provide protected time to residents for conducting research. The 3 most common types of scholarly activities that qualify for the mandatory research requirement are a full independent project (10 programs), a quality improvement project (8 programs), and assisting in a faculty project (8 programs). Six programs expect their residents to present their final work in a departmental forum. None of the residency programs require publication of residents’ final work. Conclusions: The current status of the research experience during psychiatry residency in Canada is encouraging but there is heterogeneity across the programs. PMID:25565474

  1. Interactive Influences of Family and School Ecologies on the Depression Status among Children in Marital Immigrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu-Gong; Tung, Ho-Jui; Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of transnational marriage has increased significantly in Taiwan in recent years. Children born in immigrant families are predisposed to acculturation and learning problems. We aimed to determine if the children of marital immigrants are more depressed than children from native families, and examine the individual and joint effects of…

  2. Integrated Data Base Program: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notz, K.J.; Klein, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program provides official Department of Energy (DOE) data on spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. The accomplishments of FY 1983 are summarized for three broad areas: (1) upgrading and issuing of the annual report on spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics, including ORIGEN2 applications and a quality assurance plan; (2) creation of a summary data file in user-friendly format for use on a personal computer and enhancing user access to program data; and (3) optimizing and documentation of the data handling methodology used by the IDB Program and providing direct support to other DOE programs and sites in data handling. Plans for future work in these three areas are outlined. 23 references, 11 figures.

  3. National Status and Trends: Mussel Watch Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mussel Watch is the longest running continuous chemical contaminant monitoring program in U.S. coastal and Great Lakes waters and was created in response to concerns...

  4. Lithium-Ion Battery Program Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, S.; Huang, C. K.; Smart, M.; Davies, E.; Perrone, D.; Distefano, S.; Halpert, G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this program is to develop rechargeable Li-ion cells for future NASA missions. Applications that would benefit from this project are: new millenium spacecraft; rovers; landers; astronaut equipment; and planetary orbiters. The approach of this program is: select electrode materials and electrolytes; identify failure modes and mechanisms and enhance cycle life; demonstrate Li-ion cell technology with liquid electrolyte; select candidate polymer electrolytes for Li-ion polymer cells; and develop Li-ion polymer cell technology.

  5. How Effective are Cash Transfer Programs at Improving Nutritional Status?

    OpenAIRE

    Gitter, Seth R.; James Manley; Vanya Slavchevska

    2011-01-01

    Cash transfer programs have not always affected children�s nutritional status. We reviewed 30,000 articles relating cash transfer programs and height for age, finding 21 papers on 17 programs. Applying meta-analysis we examine the overarching relationship, finding that the programs� average impact on height-for-age is positive, but small and not statistically significant. We evaluate many program, child and local characteristics� correlation with estimated outcome. Conditional programs ...

  6. Immigrants and foreigners -with and without proper legal status- in Spain: a comparative study by autonomous regions / Inmigrantes y extranjeros regulares e irregulares en España: una comparativa entre autonomías

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Ortega Ruiz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the classic proposals that differentiate between (i immigrants and citizens, and (ii foreigners with and without proper legal status, are being reconsidered and reviewed. In addition, the distinction between “legal immigrants” and “illegal immigrants” for the granting of social rights is an object of controversy. There can be no doubt that immigration (and all matters related to it is a controversial topic, as could be seen with the controversies that arose by the refusal of the town councils of Vic (Catalunya and Torrejón de Ardoz (Madrid to take a population census of illegal immigrants. Nevertheless, are we aware of how many people without proper legal status are living in Spain and each Autonomous Region? This paper offers a survey of the immigration population (with and without proper legal status in Spain by comparing each Autonomous Region.

  7. Health care access for refugees and immigrants with precarious status: public health and human right challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Cécile; ter Kuile, Sonia; Munoz, Marie; Nadeau, Lucie; Ouimet, Marie-Jo; Kirmayer, Laurence; Crépeau, François

    2008-01-01

    Migration flux is being transformed by globalization, and the number of people with either undocumented or with a precarious status is growing in Canada. There are no epidemiological data on the health and social consequences of this situation, but clinicians working in primary care with migrants and refugees are increasingly worried about the associated morbidity. This commentary summarizes findings from a pilot study with health professionals in the Montreal area and suggests that the uninsured population predicament is a national problem. Although ethical and legal issues associated with data collection by clinicians, institutions and governments need to be examined, estimating the public health consequences and long-term cost associated with problems in access to health care due to migratory status should be a priority. Current regulations and administrative policies appear to be at odds with the principles of equal rights set out by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Beyond the commitment of individual clinicians, Canadian medical associations should take an advocacy role and scrutinize the ethical and medical implications of the present system.

  8. NASA's Hypersonic Program: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueter, Uwe; Hutt, John; McClinton, Charles; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's has established long term goals for access-to-space. NASA's third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational in approximately 25 years. The goals for third generation launch systems are to reduce cost by a factor of 100 and improve safety by a factor of 10,000 over current conditions. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop third generation space transportation technologies. The Hypersonics Investment Area, part of ASTP, is developing third generation launch vehicle technologies in two main areas, propulsion and airframes. The current program's major investment is in hypersonic airbreathing propulsion since it offers the greatest potential for meeting the third generation launch vehicles goals thus enabling the opening of new space markets. The program will methodically improve the technologies in three key propulsion areas, scramjets, rocket-based combined cycle and turbine-based combination cycle. Ground and flight propulsion tests are planned. A airframe technologies will be matured through ground testing. The invited paper describes NASA's activities in hypersonic. Current programs, future plans and technologies that are being pursued by the Hypersonics Investment Area under the Advanced Space Transportation Program Office will be discussed.

  9. Weight status of Mexican immigrant women: a comparison with women in Mexico and with US-born Mexican American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guendelman, Sylvia D; Ritterman-Weintraub, Miranda L; Fernald, Lia C H; Kaufer-Horwitz, Martha

    2013-09-01

    We assessed the association between birthplace, residence, or years in the United States and actual weight (body mass index), perceived weight accuracy, or provider screens for overweight or obesity among Mexican immigrant women. We used linked data from Health and Nutrition Examination Survey waves 2001-2006 and 2006 National Mexican Health and Nutrition Survey to compare 513 immigrants with 9527 women in Mexico and 342 US-born Mexican American women. Immigrants were more likely than women in Mexico to be obese and to perceive themselves as overweight or obese after adjustment for confounders. Recent immigrants had similar weight-related outcomes as women in Mexico. Immigrants were less likely to be obese than were US-born Mexican Americans. Within the overweight or obese population, reported provider screens were higher among immigrants than among women in Mexico, but lower than among US-born Mexican Americans. US residency of at least 5 years but less than 20 years and reporting insufficient provider screens elevated obesity risk. Mexican-origin women in the United States and Mexico are at risk for overweight and obesity. We found no evidence of a "healthy immigrant" effect.

  10. Double risk: immigrant mothers, domestic violence and public child welfare services in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earner, Ilze

    2010-08-01

    This paper examines the experiences of Mexican immigrant mothers living in New York City who become involved with public child welfare services because of domestic violence and makes recommendations for evaluation of program services to immigrant mothers. A case study and the results of a focus group interview will be presented to illustrate the often conflicting cultural, social and political issues confronted by immigrant mothers as they negotiate the organization of services designed to address specific forms of domestic violence, i.e., the protection of children and the protection of women. Emergent themes point to the double risk faced by immigrant women-first at the hands of their partners and then by service providers who do not understand the cultural issues that surround domestic violence nor the implications that immigration status has for victims of abuse. After intervention, participants in this research study describe feeling both like 'bad mothers' who fail to protect their children and 'bad women' who turn family members over for deportation. Evaluation of services to immigrant mothers requires consideration not only of cultural and social issues that affect program outcomes but must also consider the larger implications that immigration status has on utilization of services by immigrant women. Immigrant women often face multiple risks when seeking help for family problems. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Change in self-reported health status among immigrants in the United States: associations with measures of acculturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunmin; O'Neill, Allison H; Ihara, Emily S; Chae, David H

    2013-01-01

    Although acculturation may have positive effects for immigrants, including better socioeconomic profiles and increased occupational opportunities, their health profiles deteriorate with longer duration in the U.S. Prior research indicates that increasing acculturation is associated with some poorer health outcomes among immigrants in the U.S. However, most of these studies have used length of stay or English language proficiency as proxies for acculturation, and have mainly examined self-reported "current" health outcomes. This study advances knowledge on associations between acculturation and health among immigrants by explicitly examining self-reported "change" in health since immigration, in relation to acculturation-related variables. We use data from the New Immigrant Survey (NIS; 2003-2004), a cross-sectional study of legal immigrants to the U.S. In addition to testing more conventionally examined proxies of acculturation (length of stay and English proficiency), we also examine English language use and self-reported change in diet. Multivariable logistic regression analyses on 5,982 participants generally supported previous literature indicating a deleterious impact of acculturation, with increasing duration of stay and greater self-reported change in diet being associated with a poorer change in health since moving to the U.S. Although English language proficiency and use were associated with greater odds of reporting a worse change in health when examined individually, they were non-significant in multivariable models including all acculturation measures. Findings from this study suggest that when taking into account multiple measures of acculturation, language may not necessarily indicate unhealthy assimilation and dietary change may be a pathway leading to declines in immigrant health. Increasing duration in the U.S. may also reflect the adoption of unhealthy behaviors, as well as greater exposure to harmful sources of psychosocial stress including

  12. Change in self-reported health status among immigrants in the United States: associations with measures of acculturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunmin Lee

    Full Text Available Although acculturation may have positive effects for immigrants, including better socioeconomic profiles and increased occupational opportunities, their health profiles deteriorate with longer duration in the U.S. Prior research indicates that increasing acculturation is associated with some poorer health outcomes among immigrants in the U.S. However, most of these studies have used length of stay or English language proficiency as proxies for acculturation, and have mainly examined self-reported "current" health outcomes. This study advances knowledge on associations between acculturation and health among immigrants by explicitly examining self-reported "change" in health since immigration, in relation to acculturation-related variables. We use data from the New Immigrant Survey (NIS; 2003-2004, a cross-sectional study of legal immigrants to the U.S. In addition to testing more conventionally examined proxies of acculturation (length of stay and English proficiency, we also examine English language use and self-reported change in diet. Multivariable logistic regression analyses on 5,982 participants generally supported previous literature indicating a deleterious impact of acculturation, with increasing duration of stay and greater self-reported change in diet being associated with a poorer change in health since moving to the U.S. Although English language proficiency and use were associated with greater odds of reporting a worse change in health when examined individually, they were non-significant in multivariable models including all acculturation measures. Findings from this study suggest that when taking into account multiple measures of acculturation, language may not necessarily indicate unhealthy assimilation and dietary change may be a pathway leading to declines in immigrant health. Increasing duration in the U.S. may also reflect the adoption of unhealthy behaviors, as well as greater exposure to harmful sources of psychosocial

  13. Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A.

    2001-02-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a mission-oriented program of research and analysis whose goal is to develop and demonstrate cropping systems for producing large quantities of low-cost, high-quality biomass feedstocks for use as liquid biofuels, biomass electric power, and/or bioproducts. The program specifically supports the missions and goals of DOE's Office of Fuels Development and DOE's Office of Power Technologies. ORNL has provided technical leadership and field management for the BFDP since DOE began energy crop research in 1978. The major components of the BFDP include energy crop selection and breeding; crop management research; environmental assessment and monitoring; crop production and supply logistics operational research; integrated resource analysis and assessment; and communications and outreach. Research into feedstock supply logistics has recently been added and will become an integral component of the program.

  14. Defense Acquisition Programs: Status of Selected Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    31)))Aqij inrgam Appendix III Air Force Programs ReqtIi re ments The Air Force established the requirement for such a weapon in the laIt 1970s. A 1978...h ard- ware deliveries and test schedules had slipped several times and were in danger of slipping again due to frequent test failures. The Air

  15. STATUS OF ITEP DECABORANE ION SOURCE PROGRAM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KULEVOY,T.V.; PETRENKO, S.V.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; KOZLOV, A.V.; STASEVICH, YU.B.; SITNIKOV, A.L.; SHAMAILOV, I.M.; PERSHIN, V.I.; HERSHCOVITCH, A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; OKS, E.M.; POOLE, H.J.; MASUNOV, E.S.; POLOZOV, S.M.

    2007-08-26

    The joint research and development program is continued to develop steady-state ion source of decaborane beam for ion implantation industry. Both Freeman and Bemas ion sources for decaborane ion beam generation were investigated. Decaborane negative ion beam as well as positive ion beam were generated and delivered to the output of mass separator. Experimental results obtained in ITEP are presented.

  16. "La Familia" HIV prevention program: a focus on disclosure and family acceptance for Latino immigrant MSM to the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Rita M; Zepeda, Jorge; Samaniego, Rafael; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Alaniz, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to pilot test and evaluate a HIV prevention program that used a Freirean approach to engage Latino immigrant MSM (men who have sex with men) on issues of sexual orientation, family acceptance, stigma as well as HIV prevention and sexual risk behaviors. Participants were evaluated using a survey before and after participation in the program and compared to a control group. Focus groups where participants discussed their experiences in the program as well as perceptions of the program were held and analyzed. Survey results indicate that after their participation in the program, participants increased their safer sex behaviors, comfort disclosing their sexual orientation and support from friends. HIV prevention needs to incorporate cultural, social and structural factors.

  17. Status of Pharmacy Practice Experience Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Dayl; Kwasnik, Abigail; Craddick, Karen; Heinz, Andrew K.; Harralson, Arthur F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess financial, personnel, and curricular characteristics of US pharmacy practice experiential education programs and follow-up on results of a similar survey conducted in 2001. Methods. Experiential education directors at 118 accredited US pharmacy colleges and schools were invited to participate in a blinded, Web-based survey in 2011. Aggregate responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and combined with data obtained from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy to assess program demographics, faculty and administrative organizational structure, and financial support. Results. The number of advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) sites had increased by 24% for medium, 50% for large, and 55% for very large colleges and schools. Introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) sites outnumbered APPEs twofold. The average experiential education team included an assistant/associate dean (0.4 full-time equivalent [FTE]), a director (1.0 FTE), assistant/associate director (0.5 FTE), coordinator (0.9 FTE), and multiple administrative assistants (1.3 FTE). Most faculty members (63%-75%) were nontenure track and most coordinators (66%) were staff members. Estimated costs to operate an experiential education program represented a small percentage of the overall expense budget of pharmacy colleges and schools. Conclusion. To match enrollment growth, pharmacy practice experiential education administrators have expanded their teams, reorganized responsibilities, and found methods to improve cost efficiency. These benchmarks will assist experiential education administrators to plan strategically for future changes. PMID:24850934

  18. NGNP Program 2013 Status and Path Forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Gougar

    2014-03-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology can play an important role in the energy future of the United States by extending the use of nuclear energy for non-electricity energy production missions, as well as continuing to provide a considerable base load electric power generation capability. Extending nuclear energy into the industrial and transportation sectors through the coproduction of process heat and electricity provides safe, reliable energy for these sectors in an environmentally responsible manner. The modular HTGR provides a substantial improvement in nuclear plant safety for the protection of the public and the environment, and supports collocation of the HTGRhigh temperature gas-cooled reactor with major industrial facilities. Under U.S. Department of Energy direction since 2006, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project at Idaho National Laboratory has been working toward commercializing the HTGR technology. However, a recent decision by the Secretary of Energy to reduce the scope of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to a research and development program, considerable realignment has taken place. This report: (1) summarizes the accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program from FY2011 through FY2013; (2) lays out the path forward necessary to achieve the ultimate objective of commercializing HTGR technology; and (3) discusses ongoing technical, licensing, and evaluation activities under the realigned Next Generation Nuclear Plant program considered important to preserve the significant investment made by the government to-date and to maintain some progress in meeting the objectives of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct2005).

  19. Prevalence of chronic diseases by immigrant status and disparities in chronic disease management in immigrants: a population-based cohort study, Valore Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buja, Alessandra; Gini, Rosa; Visca, Modesta; Damiani, Gianfranco; Federico, Bruno; Francesconi, Paolo; Donato, Daniele; Marini, Alessandro; Donatini, Andrea; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Baldo, Vincenzo; Bellentani, Mariadonata

    2013-05-24

    For chronic conditions, disparities can take effect cumulatively at various times as the disease progresses, even when care is provided. The aim of this study was to quantify the prevalence of diabetes, congestive heart failure (CHF) and coronary heart disease (CHD) in adults by citizenship, and to compare the performance of primary care services in managing these chronic conditions, again by citizenship. This is a population-based retrospective cohort study on 1,948,622 people aged 16 years or more residing in Italy. A multilevel regression model was applied to analyze adherence to care processes using explanatory variables at both patient and district level. The age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes was found higher among immigrants from high migratory pressure countries (HMPC) than among Italians, while the age-adjusted prevalence of CHD and CHF was higher for Italians than for HMPC immigrants or those from highly-developed countries (HDC). Our results indicate lower levels in all quality management indicators for citizens from HMPC than for Italians, for all the chronic conditions considered. Patients from HDC did not differ from Italian in their adherence to disease management schemes. This study revealed a different prevalence of chronic diseases by citizenship, implying a different burden of primary care by citizenship. Our findings show that more effort is needed to guarantee migrant-sensitive primary health care.

  20. Hospitalisation for depressive disorder following unemployment--differentials by gender and immigrant status: a population-based cohort study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Anna-Clara; Bruce, Daniel; Ekberg, Jan; Burström, Bo; Ekblad, Solvig

    2013-10-01

    The association between unemployment and poor mental health in general is explained by both causation and selection. The aim was to study whether experiencing unemployment was a risk factor for hospitalisation for depressive disorder specifically, and whether gender and immigrant status modified the hypothesised risk. A register-based prospective cohort study, 2000-2006, of persons aged 18-64 with a strong connection to the Swedish labour market. hospital admission for a depressive episode; F32 in International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision. employment status. Explanatory variables: gender and immigrant status. Confounders: age group, education and marital status. Cox regression models were used to estimate HRs with 95% CIs. The cohort comprised 3 284 896 adults, 47.5% women. An excess relative risk for hospitalisation was found among those who became unemployed (HR=1.94, 95% CI 1.85 to 2.03). Foreign-born women who experienced unemployment had the highest relative risk (HR=3.47 95% CI 3.02 to 3.98). Among persons with a strong connection to the labour market experiencing unemployment, is a risk factor for hospitalisation for depressive disorders. Unemployed foreign-born women had the highest relative risk compared with all Swedish born, all foreign-born men and to employed foreign-born women.

  1. "For the dream of being here, one sacrifices...": voices of immigrant mothers in a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Ruth

    2008-04-01

    Fourteen Latina immigrants participating in an innovative home visiting program for mothers of infants and young children at risk of child maltreatment were interviewed about their experiences coming to the United States, conditions they were living in after arriving, and perceptions of the intervention. Findings from the qualitative analyses detail rich, descriptive information regarding the struggles and adaptations of the immigrant mothers and families. Poverty in home countries propelled these women to move to the United States, leaving close family and sometimes children behind. Harrowing journeys to a new country are chronicled as well as the women's isolation and depression, and the strengths they utilized in adapting to new lives. Findings provide insight into the role of the bilingual/bicultural home visitors who were overwhelmingly perceived as helpful in providing emotional support, case management/advocacy, translation, education, and friendship. Implications include the need for mental health and social service providers to (a) appreciate viscerally the histories of immigrant clients, (b) understand the role of the home visitor-client relationship in enhancing client engagement and retention, and (c) recognize the multi-dimensional contribution of paraprofessional home visitors. Copyright 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Migration experiences, employment status and psychological distress among Somali immigrants: a mixed-method international study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warfa Nasir

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discourse about mental health problems among migrants and refugees tends to focus on adverse pre-migration experiences; there is less investigation of the environmental conditions in which refugee migrants live, and the contrasts between these situations in different countries. This cross-national study of two samples of Somali refugees living in London (UK and Minneapolis, Minnesota, (USA helps to fill a gap in the literature, and is unusual in being able to compare information collected in the same way in two cities in different countries. Methods There were two parts to the study, focus groups to gather in-depth qualitative data and a survey of health status and quantifiable demographic and material factors. Three of the focus groups involved nineteen Somali professionals and five groups included twenty-eight lay Somalis who were living in London and Minneapolis. The quantitative survey was done with 189 Somali respondents, also living in London and Minneapolis. We used the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI to assess ICD-10 and DSM-IV mental disorders. Results The overall qualitative and quantitative results suggested that challenges to masculinity, thwarted aspirations, devalued refugee identity, unemployment, legal uncertainties and longer duration of stay in the host country account for poor psychological well-being and psychiatric disorders among this group. Conclusion The use of a mixed-methods approach in this international study was essential since the quantitative and qualitative data provide different layers and depth of meaning and complement each other to provide a fuller picture of complex and multi-faceted life situations of refugees and asylum seekers. The comparison between the UK and US suggests that greater flexibility of access to labour markets for this refugee group might help to promote opportunities for better integration and mental well-being.

  3. Migration experiences, employment status and psychological distress among Somali immigrants: a mixed-method international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfa, Nasir; Curtis, Sarah; Watters, Charles; Carswell, Ken; Ingleby, David; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2012-09-07

    The discourse about mental health problems among migrants and refugees tends to focus on adverse pre-migration experiences; there is less investigation of the environmental conditions in which refugee migrants live, and the contrasts between these situations in different countries. This cross-national study of two samples of Somali refugees living in London (UK) and Minneapolis, Minnesota, (USA) helps to fill a gap in the literature, and is unusual in being able to compare information collected in the same way in two cities in different countries. There were two parts to the study, focus groups to gather in-depth qualitative data and a survey of health status and quantifiable demographic and material factors. Three of the focus groups involved nineteen Somali professionals and five groups included twenty-eight lay Somalis who were living in London and Minneapolis. The quantitative survey was done with 189 Somali respondents, also living in London and Minneapolis. We used the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) to assess ICD-10 and DSM-IV mental disorders. The overall qualitative and quantitative results suggested that challenges to masculinity, thwarted aspirations, devalued refugee identity, unemployment, legal uncertainties and longer duration of stay in the host country account for poor psychological well-being and psychiatric disorders among this group. The use of a mixed-methods approach in this international study was essential since the quantitative and qualitative data provide different layers and depth of meaning and complement each other to provide a fuller picture of complex and multi-faceted life situations of refugees and asylum seekers. The comparison between the UK and US suggests that greater flexibility of access to labour markets for this refugee group might help to promote opportunities for better integration and mental well-being.

  4. SNO+: Physics program and status update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, L.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Joining the current generation of neutrinoless double beta decay experiments, SNO+ is a kilotonne-scale liquid scintillator neutrino detector housed 2 km underground in Vale Canada Ltd's Creighton Mine near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Through re-purposing existing hardware in place for the now decommissioned Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), and employing a rigourous materials purification and selection program, SNO+ will investigate neutrinoless double beta decay of 130Te. Owing to its size, SNO+ expects a sensitivity to the effective Majorana neutrino mass near 100 meV with a 0.3% loading of natural Te and several years of data collection. Designed as a general purpose detector, SNO+ also has a robust physics program that includes investigations of solar and supernova neutrinos, and reactor and geo anti-neutrinos. Construction of the detector is nearly complete, with the first water-fill commissioning phase set to begin at the end of this year and the neutrinoless double beta decay phase following in late 2014.

  5. SNO+: Physics program and status update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibley, L. [Department of Physics, 4-181 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton AB, T6G 2E1 (Canada); Collaboration: SNO+ Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    Joining the current generation of neutrinoless double beta decay experiments, SNO+ is a kilotonne-scale liquid scintillator neutrino detector housed 2 km underground in Vale Canada Ltd’s Creighton Mine near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Through re-purposing existing hardware in place for the now decommissioned Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), and employing a rigourous materials purification and selection program, SNO+ will investigate neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 130}Te. Owing to its size, SNO+ expects a sensitivity to the effective Majorana neutrino mass near 100 meV with a 0.3% loading of natural Te and several years of data collection. Designed as a general purpose detector, SNO+ also has a robust physics program that includes investigations of solar and supernova neutrinos, and reactor and geo anti-neutrinos. Construction of the detector is nearly complete, with the first water-fill commissioning phase set to begin at the end of this year and the neutrinoless double beta decay phase following in late 2014.

  6. French immigration policy since May 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deley, M

    1983-01-01

    Examining the immigration policy changes undertaken by Socialist President Francois Mitterand between May 1981 and September 1982, this discussion provides backgroung information for the study of immigration policy reform in France, discusses the institutional and historical contexts within which recent policy changes have occurred, and examines the initial measures taken, the new immigration legislation adopted in October 1981, the "Exceptional Regularization" carried out in 1981-82, and various other immigration measures announced during the period under study. The discussion also identifies some of the problems which arose and are likely to arise as a result of the new policies. The French government has historically taken great pains to track the movement of both foreigners and natives within its territory. All citizens are issued a national identity card, and all foreigners residing in the country for longer than 3 months must obtain a residence permit from their local prefecture of police. The entry of some 347 million people annually into France must contribute to the problem of exercising strict control at entry. French measures to enforce immigration laws within its borders have not prevented the development of clandestine immigration nor the employment of undocumented foreigners. French law requires that all employers and employees contribute to the system of the Securite Sociale and to a variety of other government programs providing social and economic assistance to workers and their families. The year 1932 marks the date of the first French laws limiting immigration. On July 5, 1974 the French government closed the country's borders to immigration and have not reopened them since. Following that date a more severe attitude towards clandestine immigration became evident. Despite the anti-immigration policies of the 1974-81 period the number of foreigners residing in France did not diminish. 3 basic goals guided the new government in the development of

  7. Status of alloyed dingot program, January 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, E.A.

    1963-01-11

    This report summarizes and highlights the more importan milestones, development programs, performance and characteristics, and properties of dingot uranium and its use in the Hanford reactors from 1955 to the present. For the benefit of those unfamiliar with the terms ingot and dingot uranium as used in this report, ingot uranium refers to the metal made at the Fernald Plant of the National Lead Company by remelting under vacuum a mixed charge of solid scrap, briquetted scrap, and derby metal (the product of the UF{sub 4} bomb reduction), while dingot metal refers to the metal made by Mallinckrodt Chemical Works by reduction of UF{sub 4} to metal which is used directly (after suitable forming into convenient size for rolling), without the intermediate vacuum remelting step.

  8. Current status of endoscopic simulation in gastroenterology fellowship training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Thompson, Christopher C

    2015-07-01

    Recent guidelines have encouraged gastroenterology and surgical training programs to integrate simulation into their core endoscopic curricula. However, the role that simulation currently has within training programs is unknown. This study aims to assess the current status of simulation among gastroenterology fellowship programs. This questionnaire study consisted of 38 fields divided into two sections. The first section queried program directors' experience on simulation and assessed the current status of simulation at their institution. The second portion surveyed their opinion on the potential role of simulation on the training curriculum. The study was conducted at the 2013 American Gastroenterological Association Training Directors' Workshop in Phoenix, Arizona. The participants were program directors from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited gastroenterology training programs, who attended the workshop. The questionnaire was returned by 69 of 97 program directors (response rate of 71%). 42% of programs had an endoscopic simulator. Computerized simulators (61.5%) were the most common, followed by mechanical (30.8%) and animal tissue (7.7%) simulators, respectively. Eleven programs (15%) required fellows to use simulation prior to clinical cases. Only one program has a minimum number of hours fellows have to participate in simulation training. Current simulators are deemed as easy to use (76%) and good educational tools (65%). Problems are cost (72%) and accessibility (69%). The majority of program directors believe that there is a need for endoscopic simulator training, with only 8% disagreeing. Additionally, a majority believe there is a role for simulation prior to initiation of clinical cases with 15% disagreeing. Gastroenterology fellowship program directors widely recognize the importance of simulation. Nevertheless, simulation is used by only 42% of programs and only 15% of programs require that trainees use simulation prior to

  9. Effect of vitamin D supplementation on bone and vitamin D status among Pakistani immigrants in Denmark: a randomised double-blinded placebo-controlled intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke; Mølgaard, Christian; Skovgaard, Lene T.

    2008-01-01

    Severe vitamin D deficiency is common among Muslim immigrants. The dose necessary to correct the deficiency and its consequence for bone health are not known for immigrants. The aim was to assess the effect of relatively low dosages of supplemental vitamin D on vitamin D and bone status...... D (S-25OHD), parathyroid hormone, bone turnover markers and bone mass. The study showed that supplementation with 10 and 20 mu g vitamin D-3 per d increased S-25OHD concentrations similarly in vitamin D-deficient Pakistani women (4-fold), and that 10 mu g increased S-25OHD concentrations 2-fold...... in Pakistani immigrants. This 1-year-long randomised double-blinded placebo-controlled intervention with vitamin D-3 (10 and 20 mu g/d) included girls (10.1 - 14.7 years), women (18.1 - 52.7 years) and men (17.9-63.5 years) of Pakistani origin living in Denmark. The main endpoints were serum 25-hydroxyvitamin...

  10. [Tuberculosis screening program for undocumented immigrant teenagers using the QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold In-Tube test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Carlos; Ballaz, Aitor; Díez, Rosa; Aguirre, Urko; Antón, Ane; Altube, Lander

    2015-07-06

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tuberculosis infection in undocumented immigrant teenagers using a tuberculin skin test (TST) for initial screening and QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) as a confirmatory test. From 2007 to 2012, under 19 year-old immigrant teenagers from 2 accommodation centers of the Basque Country (Spain) were included in the study. The TST was done in all of them and the QFT-GIT was done in selected patients with a TST≥5mm. Eight hundred and forty-five immigrants were included, most of them from Africa (99.5%). Fifty-one percent of immigrants with TST ≥ 5 mm has a positive QFT-GIT. We found 2 cases of active tuberculosis (2/845: 0.24%). The concordance between TST (≥ 10 mm) and QFT-GIT was 63%, with 57% of positive concordance cases and 96% of negative concordances. There were 246 cases with TST ≥ 10 mm (29%), with significant differences between Magrebis (21.5%) and Subsaharians (67%) (P<.001). Vaccination with Calmette-Guéin bacille was an independent predictor for having a TST ≥ 10 mm (OR: 2.11; P<.001) and for the discordance TST+/QFT-GIT-, both for a TST≥5 and a TST≥10mm (OR 2.16, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.46-3.20, and OR 1.91 95% CI 1.23-2.97, respectively). The positive value of QFT-GIT increased significantly as the TST increased, with a positive association in all the cut-off points analyzed: 10-14 mm (OR 7.95, 95% CI 1.79-35.33), 15-19 mm (OR 35, 95% CI 7.93-154.52) and ≥ 20 mm (OR 91.3, 95% CI 18.20-458.11). Due to the high prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection in Subsaharian immigrants, we recommend implementing screening programs in this population. Using QFT-GIT, the number of candidates for chemoprophylaxis was reduced to 43% compared with TST alone (≥ 10 mm). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. A cluster randomized-controlled trial of a classroom-based drama workshop program to improve mental health outcomes among immigrant and refugee youth in special classes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Rousseau

    Full Text Available The aim of this cluster randomized trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a school-based theatre intervention program for immigrant and refugee youth in special classes for improving mental health and academic outcomes. The primary hypothesis was that students in the theatre intervention group would report a greater reduction in impairment from symptoms compared to students in the control and tutoring groups.Special classrooms in five multiethnic high schools were randomly assigned to theater intervention (n = 10, tutoring (n = 10 or control status (n = 9, for a total of 477 participants. Students and teachers were non-blinded to group assignment. The primary outcome was impairment from emotional and behavioural symptoms assessed by the Impact Supplement of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ completed by the adolescents. The secondary outcomes were the SDQ global scores (teacher and youth reports, impairment assessed by teachers and school performance. The effect of the interventions was assessed through linear mixed effect models which incorporate the correlation between students in the same class, due to the nature of the randomization of the interventions by classroom.The theatre intervention was not associated with a greater reduction in self-reported impairment and symptoms in youth placed in special class because of learning, emotional and behavioural difficulties than a tutoring intervention or a non-active control group. The estimates of the different models show a non-significant decrease in both self-reported and impairment scores in the theatre intervention group for the overall group, but the impairment score decreased significantly for first generation adolescents while it increased for second generation adolescents.The difference between the population of immigrant and refugee youth newcomers studied previously and the sample of this trial may explain some of the differences in the observed impact of

  12. Current status of the AMS program at the TANDAR Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Niello, J.; Alvarez, D.E.; Liberman, R.G. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica] [and others

    1997-12-31

    The status of the AMS program at the TANDAR laboratory is briefly overviewed and recent improvements on the tandem accelerator are summarized. {sup 36} Cl measurements have been extensively performed and studies with nickel beams have been started. Their results are presented and evaluated in the context of future activities. (author) 4 refs., 4 figs.; marti at tandar.cnea.edu.ar

  13. Status of Career Programs on College and University Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, William Dale

    1982-01-01

    Studied the status of a sample of college and university career development programs (N=98) in relation to six elements: career counseling, career workshops and seminars, career classes, interest inventories, other services, and evaluation. Found most institutions utilized career counseling, interest inventories, and career workshops. (RC)

  14. Is elevated risk of child maltreatment in immigrant families associated with socio-economic status? Evidence from three sources.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alink, L.R.A.; Euser, S.; van IJzendoorn, M.H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we tested whether children from Dutch-immigrant families are at increased risk for maltreatment, and if so, what factors could explain this risk. Three data sources from the second Netherlands Prevalence Study of Maltreatment of Youth (NPM-2010) were used to answer these questions.

  15. The Effects of Familial Acculturative Stress and Hopelessness on Suicidal Ideation by Immigration Status among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Robert; Miranda, Regina

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Based on acculturative family distancing theory, we examined whether familial acculturative stress interacted with hopelessness to predict suicidal ideation differentially among emerging adult immigrant versus nonimmigrant college students. Participants: We recruited 152 generationally and racially/ethnically diverse college students…

  16. Program status 3. quarter -- FY 1994: Confinement systems programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-19

    Highlights of the DIII-D Research Operations are: began experimental research operations; successfully passed radiative divertor project review; presented papers at PSI, Diagnostics, and EPS meetings and prepared IAEA synopses; new computer speeds up data acquisition; completed installation of FWCD antennas with Faraday shields; and completed report of radiative divertor preliminary design with review committee. Summaries are given for progress in research programs; operations; mechanical engineering; electrical engineering; upgrade project; operations support; and collaborative efforts. Brief summaries are given for progress on the International Cooperation task which include JET, ASDEX, TEXTOR, TORE SUPRA, JAERI, TRINTI, T-10, and ARIES support. The work in support of the development plan for the TPX (Tokamak Physics Experiment) goals and milestones continued. Progress in improving on existing models and codes leading to improved understanding of experiments is given. Highlights from the User Service Center are: 18 gigabytes of disks were purchased for exclusive fusion use; a Hewlett-Packard 9000 Series 800 T500 computer was selected as the fusion complete server; the first VAX was removed from the USC cluster; security vulnerability on HP VUE software was corrected; and a cleanup script was developed for the NERSC Cray system. A list of personnel and their assignments is given for the ITER Design Engineering task.

  17. Health, chronic conditions, and behavioral risk disparities among U.S. immigrant children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gopal K; Yu, Stella M; Kogan, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    We examined differentials in the prevalence of 23 parent-reported health, chronic condition, and behavioral indicators among 91,532 children of immigrant and U.S.-born parents. We used the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health to estimate health differentials among 10 ethnic-nativity groups. Logistic regression yielded adjusted differentials. Immigrant children in each racial/ethnic group had a lower prevalence of depression and behavioral problems than native-born children. The prevalence of autism varied from 0.3% among immigrant Asian children to 1.3%-1.4% among native-born non-Hispanic white and Hispanic children. Immigrant children had a lower prevalence of asthma, attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; developmental delay; learning disability; speech, hearing, and sleep problems; school absence; and ≥ 1 chronic condition than native-born children, with health risks increasing markedly in relation to mother's duration of residence in the U.S. Immigrant children had a substantially lower exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, with the odds of exposure being 60%-95% lower among immigrant non-Hispanic black, Asian, and Hispanic children compared with native non-Hispanic white children. Obesity prevalence ranged from 7.7% for native-born Asian children to 24.9%-25.1% for immigrant Hispanic and native-born non-Hispanic black children. Immigrant children had higher physical inactivity levels than native-born children; however, inactivity rates declined with each successive generation of immigrants. Immigrant Hispanic children were at increased risk of obesity and sedentary behaviors. Ethnic-nativity differentials in health and behavioral indicators remained marked after covariate adjustment. Immigrant patterns in child health and health-risk behaviors vary substantially by ethnicity, generational status, and length of time since immigration. Public health programs must target at-risk children of both immigrant and U

  18. Status of the LHC inner triplet quadrupole program at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, N; Bauer, P; Bossert, R; Brandt, J; Carson, J; Caspi, S; Chichili, D R; Chiesa, L; Darve, C; Di Marco, J; Fehér, S; Ghosh, A; Glass, H; Huang, Y; Kerby, J S; Lamm, M J; Markarov, A A; McInturff, A D; Nicol, T H; Nobrega, A; Novitski, I; Ogitsu, T; Orris, D; Ozelis, J P; Page, T; Peterson, T; Rabehl, Roger Jon; Robotham, W; Sabbi, G L; Scanlan, R M; Schlabach, P; Sylvester, C D; Strait, J B; Tartaglia, M; Tompkins, J C; Velev, G V; Yadav, S; Zlobin, A V

    2001-01-01

    Fermilab, in collaboration with LBNL and BNL, is developing a quadrupole for installation in the interaction region inner triplets of the LHC. This magnet is required to have an operating gradient of 215 T/m across a 70 mm coil bore, and operates in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. A 2 m magnet program addressing mechanical, magnetic, quench protection, and thermal issues associated with the design was completed earlier this year, and production of the first full length, cryostatted prototype magnet is underway. This paper summarizes the conclusions of the 2 m program, and the design and status of the first full-length prototype magnet. (11 refs).

  19. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 1 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    hearing illness and injury. For Q1FY17, an average of 4 Civilian (CIV) and 17 military (MIL) recordable hearing losses were reported by the Defense...Army Hearing Program Status Report, Q1FY17 March 2017 5 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reportable hearing loss is...Civilian and military occupational illness/injuries. Based upon the determination of work-relatedness, not all individuals flagged by the DOEHRS- HC will

  20. The CoRoT Exoplanet program: status & results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moutou C.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The CoRoT satellite is the first instrument hunting for planets from space. We will review the status of the CoRoT/Exoplanet program. We will then present the CoRoT exoplanetary systems and how they widen the range of properties of the close-in population and contribute to our understanding of the properties of planets.

  1. Sweeping Changes in Immigration Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Dan P.

    1978-01-01

    Among the changes in Immigration Laws are the rectification of the long-standing inequity between the Eastern and Western Hemispheres by instituting identical preference systems, the provision for the adjustment from a non-immigrant visa status to that of a permanent resident, and amendments to the Labor Certification requirements. (NQ)

  2. Strategies Utilized by African Refugee and Immigrant Students in Order to Persist in Post-Secondary Career and Technical Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Pamela Ann

    2013-01-01

    This research study was a constructivist case study designed to elicit the strategies utilized by African refugees and immigrant students in order to persist in their post-secondary career and technical education programs. The eleven students interviewed were currently enrolled in or recently graduated from a technical college in a suburb of the…

  3. Results from a pilot promotora program to reduce depression and stress among immigrant Latinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Anh N; Ornelas, India J; Kim, Mimi; Perez, Georgina; Green, Melissa; Lyn, Michelle J; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2014-05-01

    The stressful experiences that Latino immigrants face throughout the migration process to the United States put them at increased risk for poor mental health. Latinas are at heightened risk due to stigma, limited access to mental health resources, domestic violence, and gender role expectations. In addition, for those who live in new immigrant settlement areas, such as the Southeast, these disparities are magnified by even fewer culturally appropriate services and limited social support. This study evaluates the impact of ALMA (Amigas Latinas Motivando el Alma/Latina Friends Motivating the Soul), a pilot promotora intervention offered in three North Carolina counties to improve mental health among Latinas by offering coping skills training. The intervention trained community-based promotoras to conduct outreach to Latina women in their social network (compañeras). Using a pre-post test design, we assessed the mental health outcomes of compañeras. Compañeras improved on the following outcomes: depressive symptoms, attitudes of depression treatment, perceived and acculturative stress, perceived social support, and positive coping responses. Our findings suggest that promotora interventions, such as ALMA, that focus on building self-care strategies can be valuable to reducing preclinical symptoms and addressing health care disparities that are exacerbated by unavailable or underused mental health services.

  4. Correlates and Predictors of Psychological Distress Among Older Asian Immigrants in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Miya; Moon, Ailee

    2016-01-01

    Psychological distress occurs frequently in older minority immigrants because many have limited social resources and undergo a difficult process related to immigration and acculturation. Despite a rapid increase in the number of Asian immigrants, relatively little research has focused on subgroup mental health comparisons. This study examines the prevalence of psychological distress, and relationship with socio-demographic factors, and health care utilization among older Asian immigrants. Weighted data from Asian immigrants 65 and older from 5 countries (n = 1,028) who participated in the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) were analyzed descriptively and in multiple linear regressions. The prevalence of psychological distress varied significantly across the 5 ethnic groups, from Filipinos (4.83%) to Chinese (1.64%). General health status, cognitive and physical impairment, and health care utilization are all associated (p culturally effective mental health services and outreach programs.

  5. The Challenges Encountered by Immigrant-Serving Agencies in Addressing the Health of Temporary Foreign Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salami, Bukola; Kirova, Anna; Hegadoren, Kathleen; Meherali, Salima; Chiu, Yvonne; Nsaliwa, Christina

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to examine the challenges encountered by immigrant-serving agencies in meeting the health needs of temporary foreign workers and their families in one Canadian province. The authors interviewed 11 representatives of immigrant-serving agencies and two policy makers. Some of the challenges that agencies face in delivering programs and services for temporary foreign workers and their families include the time required to build trust with this population, temporary foreign workers' reluctance to use services due to fear that it will affect their immigration status, and the emotional labor associated with working with temporary foreign workers.

  6. Containment atmosphere response (CAR) program. Second status report. [HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landoni, J.A.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains a summary of the work performed under the Containment Atmosphere Response (CAR) Program of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Safety Research Task since the publication of the previous status report (February 1978). The work concentrated on development of models describing containment phenomena during core heatup in support of probabilistic risk assessment studies. Models were completed for fission product iodine sorption on coated surfaces, diffusivity and retentivity of untreated concrete, iodine interaction with condensing steam on the containment atmosphere boundaries, and the cleanup filter system. These models were incorporated into a new computer program called CARCAS, a substantial extension of the CNTB computer program, and applied to Accident Initiation and Progression Analysis for Phase II core heatup sequences. Development was begun on models describing the postulated behavior of particulate fission products or aerosols within and leaking out of the containment.

  7. WSRC Reactor Tank Inspection Program (RTIP) status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loibl, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) recently completed the initial phase of nondestructive inspections of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) reactor tanks. This program required almost three years to be conceptualized, fabricated, and tested. An additional 20 months were required to complete the NDE inspection of the P, K and L reactor tanks. The overall cost of the program to date is approximately $25 MM. This status report will address: (1) A brief review of the RTIP program and the constraints which had to be overcome (2) A summary of the examination results of the P,K, and L Reactor tanks. (3) A projection of the future enhancements and capabilities presently in development.

  8. WSRC Reactor Tank Inspection Program (RTIP) status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loibl, M.W.

    1992-06-01

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) recently completed the initial phase of nondestructive inspections of the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) reactor tanks. This program required almost three years to be conceptualized, fabricated, and tested. An additional 20 months were required to complete the NDE inspection of the P, K and L reactor tanks. The overall cost of the program to date is approximately $25 MM. This status report will address: (1) A brief review of the RTIP program and the constraints which had to be overcome (2) A summary of the examination results of the P,K, and L Reactor tanks. (3) A projection of the future enhancements and capabilities presently in development.

  9. Risk of Hodgkin lymphoma according to immigration status and origin: a migrant cohort study of 2.3 million Jewish Israelis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Hagai; Leiba, Merav; Bar Zeev, Yael; Keinan-Boker, Lital; Derazne, Estela; Leiba, Adi; Kark, Jeremy D

    2017-04-01

    Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL), a common early adulthood malignancy, has a complex etiology. We conducted a migrant cohort study to assess immigration status and origin as predictors of HL in Israel, which has among the highest rates of HL worldwide. Nationwide data on 2,285,009 16-19-year-old Jewish adolescents, collected from 1967-2011, were linked to Israel's Cancer Registry to obtain the incidence of HL until 2012. Two thousand and ninety-three HL cases were detected during 47.0 million person-years of follow-up. Using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards modeling, risk was higher for Israeli-born compared to immigrants, similarly across origin groups (HR = 1.59; 95%CI 1.32-1.92 for the dominant nodular sclerosis subtype). Risk of HL was greater for more recent year of birth, higher BMI, taller stature, and apparently for women. These findings suggest that exposure to as yet unidentified elements of the Israeli environment increase the risk of nodular sclerosis HL, and should aid in directing research efforts.

  10. Implementation and evaluation of the chronic-disease self-management program among Chinese immigrant older adults in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, XiaoRong; Hardin, Heather K; Zhou, Lei; Fang, Lei; Shi, Pan; Robinson, Karen M

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and evaluation of the chronic-disease self-management (CDSM) program, developed by Stanford University, among Chinese older adults in a metro area of a large Southeastern City of the U.S. The method of Practical Participatory Evaluation through an academic-community partnership between university researchers and local Chinese communities was used to develop the program and assess its applicability in the population. Results suggested that language proficiency, communication, social network and culture of the population were the most influential factors for U.S. Chinese immigrants to attend the CDSM program. The program increased participants' knowledge, skills and confidence in CDSM, whereas its capability in addressing culture differences needed improvement. Knowledge learned in this project was instrumental in implementing similar projects among immigrants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Status of the DOE Battery and Electrochemical Technology Program V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R.

    1985-06-01

    The program consists of two activities, Technology Base Research (TBR) managed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Exploratory Technology Development and Testing (EDT) managed by the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The status of the Battery Energy Storage Test (BEST) Facility is presented, including the status of the batteries to be tested. ECS program contributions to the advancement of the lead-acid battery and specific examples of technology transfer from this program are given. The advances during the period December 1982 to June 1984 in the characterization and performance of the lead-acid, iron/nickel-oxide, iron/air, aluminum/air, zinc/bromide, zinc/ferricyanide, and sodium/sulfur batteries and in fuel cells for transport are summarized. Novel techniques and the application of established techniques to the study of electrode processes, especially the electrode/electrolyte interface, are described. Research with the potential of leading to improved ceramic electrolytes and positive electrode container and current-collectors for the sodium/sulfur battery is presented. Advances in the electrocatalysis of the oxygen (air) electrode and the relationship of these advances to the iron/air and aluminum/air batteries and to the fuel cell are noted. The quest for new battery couples and battery materials is reviewed. New developments in the modeling of electrochemical cell and electrode performance with the approaches to test these models are reported.

  12. Status of the DOE Battery and Electrochemical Technology Program 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R.

    1985-06-01

    The program consists of two activities, Technology Base Research (TBR) managed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Exploratory Technology Development and Testing (EDT) managed by the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The status of the Battery Energy Storage Test (BEST) Facility is presented, including the status of the batteries to be tested. ECS program contributions to the advancement of the lead-acid battery and specific examples of technology transfer from this program are given. The advances during the period December 1982 to June 1984 in the characterization and performance of the lead-acid, iron/nickel-oxide, iron/air, aluminum/air, zinc/bromide, zinc/ferricyanide, and sodium/sulfur batteries and in fuel cells for transport are summarized. Novel techniques and the application of established techniques to the study of electrode processes, especially the electrode/electrolyte interface, are described. Research with the potential of leading to improved ceramic electrolytes and positive electrode container and current-collectors for the sodium/sulfur battery is presented. Advances in the electrocatalysis of the oxygen (air) electrode and the relationship of these advances to the iron/air and aluminum/air batteries and to the fuel cell are noted. The quest for new battery couples and battery materials is reviewed. New developments in the modeling of electrochemical cell and electrode performance with the approaches to test these models are reported.

  13. A Peer Health Educator Program for Breast Cancer Screening Promotion: Arabic, Chinese, South Asian, and Vietnamese Immigrant Women’s Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Crawford

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored Arabic, Chinese, South Asian, and Vietnamese immigrant women’s experiences with a peer health educator program, a public health program that facilitated access to breast health information and mammography screening. Framed within critical social theory, this participatory action research project took place from July 2009 to January 2011. Ten focus groups and 14 individual interviews were conducted with 82 immigrant women 40 years of age and older. Qualitative methods were utilized. Thematic content analysis derived from grounded theory and other qualitative literature was employed to analyze data. Four dominant themes emerged: Breast Cancer Prevention focused on learning within the program, Social Support provided by the peer health educator and other women, Screening Services Access for Women centered on service provision, and Program Enhancements related to specific modifications required to meet the needs of immigrant women accessing the program. The findings provide insights into strategies used to promote breast health, mammography screening, and the improvement of public health programming. Perceived barriers that continue to persist are structural barriers, such as the provision of information on breast cancer and screening by family physicians. A future goal is to improve collaborations between public health and primary care to minimize this barrier.

  14. Undocumented Immigration: An Irritant or Significant Problem in U.S.-Mexico Relations? Rand Reprints: Labor & Population Program Reprint Series 94-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernez, Georges

    Both the current immigration debate and immigration itself have changed in recent years and require changes in thinking about immigration and the architecture of U.S. immigration laws. In California, which receives about a third of all immigrants, voters and state leaders have shifted from viewing immigration as a net benefit to focusing on the…

  15. Current Status of Postdoctoral and Graduate Programs in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assael, Leon

    2017-08-01

    Advanced dental education has evolved in the context of societal needs and economic trends to its current status. Graduate programs have positioned their role in the context of health systems and health science education trends in hospitals, interprofessional clinical care teams, and dental schools and oral health care systems. Graduate dental education has been a critical factor in developing teams in trauma care, craniofacial disorders, pediatric and adult medicine, and oncology. The misalignment of the mission of graduate dental programs and the demands of private practice has posed a challenge in the evolution of programs as educational programs have been directed towards tertiary and indigent care while the practice community focuses on largely healthy affluent patients for complex clinical interventions. Those seeking graduate dental education today are smaller in number and include more international dental graduates than in the past. Graduate dental education in general dentistry and in the nine recognized dental specialties now includes Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) recognition of training standards as part of its accreditation process and a CODA accreditation process for areas of clinical education not recognized as specialties by the American Dental Association. Current types of programs include fellowship training for students in recognized specialties. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century."

  16. Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder among Haitian immigrant students: implications for access to mental health services and educational programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Anna C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of Haitian immigrant and refugee youth have emphasized "externalizing" behaviors, such as substance use, high risk sexual behavior, and delinquency, with very little information available on "internalizing" symptoms, such as depression and anxiety. Analyzing stressors and "internalizing" symptoms offers a more balanced picture of the type of social and mental health services that may be needed for this population. The present study aims to: 1 estimate the prevalence of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD among Haitian immigrant students; and 2 examine factors associated with depression and PTSD to identify potential areas of intervention that may enhance psychosocial health outcomes among immigrant youth from Haiti in the U.S. Methods A stratified random sample of Haitian immigrant students enrolled in Boston public high schools was selected for participation; 84% agreed to be interviewed with a standardized questionnaire. Diagnosis of depression and PTSD was ascertained using the best estimate diagnosis method. Results The prevalence estimates of depression and PTSD were 14.0% and 11.6%; 7.9% suffered from comorbid PTSD and depression. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated factors most strongly associated with depression (history of father's death, self-report of schoolwork not going well, not spending time with friends and PTSD (concern for physical safety, having many arguments with parents, history of physical abuse, and lack of safety of neighborhood. Conclusions A significant level of depression and PTSD was observed. Stressors subsequent to immigration, such as living in an unsafe neighborhood and concern for physical safety, were associated with an increased risk of PTSD and should be considered when developing programs to assist this population. Reducing exposure to these stressors and enhancing access to social support and appropriate school-based and mental health services

  17. Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder among Haitian immigrant students: implications for access to mental health services and educational programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzi, Mary C Smith; Betancourt, Theresa S; Marcelin, Lilly; Klopner, Michelle; Munir, Kerim; Muriel, Anna C; Oswald, Catherine; Mukherjee, Joia S

    2009-12-22

    Previous studies of Haitian immigrant and refugee youth have emphasized "externalizing" behaviors, such as substance use, high risk sexual behavior, and delinquency, with very little information available on "internalizing" symptoms, such as depression and anxiety. Analyzing stressors and "internalizing" symptoms offers a more balanced picture of the type of social and mental health services that may be needed for this population. The present study aims to: 1) estimate the prevalence of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among Haitian immigrant students; and 2) examine factors associated with depression and PTSD to identify potential areas of intervention that may enhance psychosocial health outcomes among immigrant youth from Haiti in the U.S. A stratified random sample of Haitian immigrant students enrolled in Boston public high schools was selected for participation; 84% agreed to be interviewed with a standardized questionnaire. Diagnosis of depression and PTSD was ascertained using the best estimate diagnosis method. The prevalence estimates of depression and PTSD were 14.0% and 11.6%; 7.9% suffered from comorbid PTSD and depression. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated factors most strongly associated with depression (history of father's death, self-report of schoolwork not going well, not spending time with friends) and PTSD (concern for physical safety, having many arguments with parents, history of physical abuse, and lack of safety of neighborhood). A significant level of depression and PTSD was observed. Stressors subsequent to immigration, such as living in an unsafe neighborhood and concern for physical safety, were associated with an increased risk of PTSD and should be considered when developing programs to assist this population. Reducing exposure to these stressors and enhancing access to social support and appropriate school-based and mental health services may improve educational attainment and psychosocial health

  18. Status of physiology education in US Doctor of Pharmacy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed A; Khan, Seher A; Talukder, Rahmat M

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the current status of physiology education in US Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) programs. A survey instrument was developed and distributed through SurveyMonkey to American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Biological Sciences section members of 132 PharmD programs. Survey items focused on soliciting qualitative and quantitative information on the delivery of physiology curricular contents and faculty perceptions of physiology education. A total of 114 programs responded to the survey, resulting in a response rate of 86%. Out of 114 schools/colleges, 61 programs (54%) offered standalone physiology courses, and 53 programs (46%) offered physiology integrated with other courses. When integrated, the average contact hours for physiology contents were significantly reduced compared with standalone courses (30 vs. 84 h, P physiology contents. Eighty percent of the responding faculty (n = 204) agree/strongly agree that physiology is underemphasized in PharmD curriculum. Moreover, 67% of the respondents agree/strongly agree that physiology should be taught as a standalone foundational course. A wide variation in the depth and breadth of physiology course offerings in US PharmD programs remains. The reduction of physiology contents is evident when physiology is taught as a component of integrated courses. Given current trends that favor integrated curricula, these data suggest that additional collaboration among basic and clinical science faculty is required to ensure that physiology contents are balanced and not underemphasized in a PharmD curriculum. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Screening and Assessing Immigrant and Refugee Youth in School-Based Mental Health Programs. Issue Brief No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birman, Dina; Chan, Wing Yi

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of screening, identification, and assessment tools and processes that can be used by practitioners and researchers who care for immigrant and refugee youth. The authors focus particularly on those tools useful in school-based settings. First, the authors review mental health needs of immigrant and refugee youth and…

  20. The adaptation of non-western and Muslim immigrant adolescents in the Netherlands: An immigrant paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Geel, Mitch; Vedder, Paul

    2010-10-01

    This article addresses the possible existence of an immigrant paradox in a sample of immigrant adolescents attending vocational schools in the Netherlands. An immigrant paradox is the finding that first generation immigrants show a more positive pattern of adaptation than nationals despite poorer economic conditions. Second generation immigrants regress to the nationals in terms of adaptation. A sample of 152 first generation immigrant adolescents, 285 second generation immigrant adolescents and 406 national adolescents completed self-reports about socio-economic status, psychological problems, behavioral problems and self-esteem. The results supported the existence of an immigrant paradox in this sample. This indicates that further assimilation among immigrant adolescents does not necessarily lead to increased well being. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2010 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  1. 8 CFR 245.15 - Adjustment of status of certain Haitian nationals under the Haitian Refugee Immigrant Fairness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... other contact that the applicant knows to be contained or reflected in Service records. (3) Evidence....13(d) of this chapter. Nothing in this section shall preclude an applicant for adjustment of status... eligibility for adjustment of status under section 902 of HRIFA. During such proceedings, all parties are...

  2. Immigration Law & the American Dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrini, Michelle, Ed.; Parins, Claire, Ed.; Kittlaus, Jennifer, Ed.; Bliss, Pam, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This magazine is designed to help high school teachers of civics, government, history, law, and law-related education program developers educate students about legal issues. This issue focuses on immigration law and the American Dream. It includes 11 articles: (1) "U.S. Immigration Policy and Globalization" (P. Martin; S. Martin)…

  3. Translating current dietary guidelines into a culturally tailored nutrition education program for Korean American immigrants with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hee-Jung; Han, Hae-Ra; Lee, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jiyun; Kim, Kim B; Nguyen, Tam; Kim, Miyong T

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the process of translating evidence-based dietary guidelines into a tailored nutrition education program for Korean American immigrants (KAI) with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a research process involving researchers and communities to build a collaborative partnership. The study was conducted at a community-based organization. In a total of 79 KAI (intervention, n = 40; control, n = 39) with uncontrolled type 2 DM (A1C ≥ 7.5%), 44.3% were female and the mean age was 56. 5 ± 7.9 years. A culturally tailored nutrition education was developed by identifying community needs and evaluating research evidence. The efficacy and acceptability of the program was assessed. In translating dietary guidelines into a culturally relevant nutrition education, culturally tailored dietary recommendations and education instruments were used. While dietary guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) were used to frame nutrition recommendations, additional content was adopted from the Korean Diabetes Association (KDA) guidelines. Culturally relevant intervention materials, such as Korean food models and an individually tailored serving table, were utilized to solidify nutritional concepts as well as to facilitate meal planning. Evaluation of the education revealed significantly increased DM-specific nutrition knowledge in the intervention group. The participants' satisfaction with the education was 9.7 on a 0 to 10-point scale. The systematic translation approach was useful for producing a culturally tailored nutrition education program for KAI. The program was effective in improving the participants' DM-specific nutrition knowledge and yielded a high level of satisfaction. Future research is warranted to determine the effect of a culturally tailored nutrition education on other clinical outcomes.

  4. The Educational Experience of Afro-Caribbean Student Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmore, Keiana; Vazquez-Montilla, Elia; Greene, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    The following article summarizes a research study which involved an investigation of the educational experiences of Afro-Caribbean student immigrants who were academically successful in the United States (U.S.). Although immigrants of African descent experience barriers such as immigrant status and racial minority status which leads to a double…

  5. Characteristics Associated With Adding Cereal Into the Bottle Among Immigrant Mother-Infant Dyads of Low Socioeconomic Status and Hispanic Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Candice Taylor; Messito, Mary Jo; Gross, Rachel S; Tomopoulos, Suzy; Fierman, Arthur H; Cates, Carolyn Brockmeyer; Johnson, Samantha Berkule; Dreyer, Benard; Mendelsohn, Alan L

    2017-01-01

    Determine maternal and infant characteristics associated with adding cereal into the bottle. Secondary data analysis. Study participants were immigrant, low-income, urban mother-infant dyads (n = 216; 91% Hispanic, 19% US-born) enrolled in a randomized controlled trial entitled the Bellevue Project for Early Language, Literacy and Education Success. Maternal characteristics (age, marital status, ethnicity, primary language, country of origin, education, work status, income, depressive symptoms, and concern about infant's future weight) and infant characteristics (gender, first born, and difficult temperament). Fisher exact test, chi-square test, and simultaneous multiple logistic regression of significant (P bottle. After adjusting for confounding variables identified in bivariate analyses, mothers who were single (P = .02), had moderate to severe depressive symptoms (P = .01) and perceived their infant had a difficult temperament (P = .03) were more likely to add cereal into the bottle. Conversely, mothers who expressed concern about their infants becoming overweight were less likely to add cereal (P = .02). Health care providers should screen for adding cereal in infant bottles. Further research is needed to investigate the impact of adding cereal into the bottle on weight trajectories over time. Causal associations also need to be identified to effectively prevent this practice. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Immigrants and health care: sources of vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Escarce, José J; Lurie, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Immigrants have been identified as a vulnerable population, but there is heterogeneity in the degree to which they are vulnerable to inadequate health care. Here we examine the factors that affect immigrants' vulnerability, including socioeconomic background; immigration status; limited English proficiency; federal, state, and local policies on access to publicly funded health care; residential location; and stigma and marginalization. We find that, overall, immigrants have lower rates of health insurance, use less health care, and receive lower quality of care than U.S.-born populations; however, there are differences among subgroups. We conclude with policy options for addressing immigrants' vulnerabilities.

  7. Prevalence of non-food allergies among non-immigrants, long-time immigrants and recent immigrants in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiayun; Sbihi, Hind

    2016-12-27

    The prevalence of allergic conditions has been increasing worldwide, with the highest rates seen in Western countries like Canada. The development of allergies is known to be related to both genetic and environmental factors, but the causal pathways remain unclear. Studies on immigrants provide a unique opportunity to disentangle these two factors and provide a better understanding of the disease aetiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between immigration status and prevalence of non-food allergies in a population-based study of Canadians. Data of 116,232 respondents from the Canadian Community Health Survey (Cycle 3.1, 2005) were used in a multivariable logistic regression to assess the association between immigration status (non-immigrant, long-time immigrant [>10 years] and recent immigrant [≤10 years]) and self-reported doctor-diagnosed non-food allergies, adjusting for potential confounders. The highest prevalence of non-food allergies was found among non-immigrants (29.6%), followed by long-time immigrants (23.9%) and then recent immigrants (14.3%). The odds of non-food allergies were reduced by 60% (OR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.45) among recent immigrants and 25% (OR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.70, 0.80) among long-time immigrants, compared with non-immigrants, after adjusting for sex, age, socio-economic status and rurality. This study finds a distinctly lower prevalence of non-food allergies among immigrants compared with non-immigrants, with the difference diminishing with longer duration of residence in Canada. The findings highlight the potential of environmental determinants of allergy development that warrant further investigation, and demonstrate the need for multicultural strategies to manage the public health burden of allergic conditions.

  8. Health of International Marriage Immigrant Women in South Korea: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Tiffany; Roh, Eun Ha; Song, Ju-Eun

    2017-06-05

    International marriage migration is now one of the most prominent forms of migration in Asia, and the number of women migrating to South Korea for marriage has increased dramatically in the last two decades. In this article, we provide a systematic review regarding the health status and health-related issues of international marriage immigrant women. The literature search identified 620 articles, of which 53 studies are presented in the article. Three overarching categories including six subcategories were identified according to the research focus; 'Environmental factors of health' including social support and barriers, 'Health status' including physical, psychological and social health, and quality of life as 'Outcome of health'. Overall women immigrants by marriage showed relatively poor health outcomes. Social support was an important factor affecting the health status and quality of life in this population. We offer recommendations to develop and implement culturally and linguistically appropriate health promoting programs for international marriage immigrant women in South Korea.

  9. Immigrants and employer-sponsored health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmueller, Thomas C; Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Lurie, Ithai; Dolfin, Sarah

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the factors underlying the lower rate of employer-sponsored health insurance coverage for foreign-born workers. 2001 Survey of Income and Program Participation. We estimate probit regressions to determine the effect of immigrant status on employer-sponsored health insurance coverage, including the probabilities of working for a firm that offers coverage, being eligible for coverage, and taking up coverage. We identified native born citizens, naturalized citizens, and noncitizen residents between the ages of 18 and 65, in the year 2002. First, we find that the large difference in coverage rates for immigrants and native-born Americans is driven by the very low rates of coverage for noncitizen immigrants. Differences between native-born and naturalized citizens are quite small and for some outcomes are statistically insignificant when we control for observable characteristics. Second, our results indicate that the gap between natives and noncitizens is explained mainly by differences in the probability of working for a firm that offers insurance. Conditional on working for such a firm, noncitizens are only slightly less likely to be eligible for coverage and, when eligible, are only slightly less likely to take up coverage. Third, roughly two-thirds of the native/noncitizen gap in coverage overall and in the probability of working for an insurance-providing employer is explained by characteristics of the individual and differences in the types of jobs they hold. The substantially higher rate of uninsurance among immigrants is driven by the lower rate of health insurance offers by the employers of immigrants.

  10. 8 CFR 1245.15 - Adjustment of status of certain Haitian nationals under the Haitian Refugee Immigrant Fairness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... other contact that the applicant knows to be contained or reflected in Service records. (3) Evidence....13(d) of this chapter. Nothing in this section shall preclude an applicant for adjustment of status... proceedings, all parties are prohibited from raising or considering any unrelated issues, including, but not...

  11. Foreign female immigrants in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Fakiolas, Rossetos

    2000-01-01

    Strong push, pull and network formation factors account for the over 600,000 foreign immigrants, mostly economic and with irregular status, who have been since the early 1990s in Greece, a traditionally emigration country. Over a quarter of them are females who have come alone, marking the new trend in female migration. And like their male counterparts, they find jobs due to their wage and job flexibility. The recent Greek policy to regularise irregular or undocumented immigrants (UI), that i...

  12. Tuberculosis control among immigrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, C.

    2013-01-01

    The results in this thesis suggest a revision of the Dutch immigrant TB screening program. LTBI screening at entry rather than screening for TB only is expected to improve the cost-effectiveness. We provided evidence that the QFT-GIT could be a useful tool in this respect, but also the TST could

  13. Revisiting the immigrant paradox: Suicidal ideations and suicide attempts among immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazsonyi, Alexander T; Mikuška, Jakub; Gaššová, Zuzana

    2017-08-01

    The current study examined the immigrant paradox in suicidal ideations and attempts, whether rates and correlates varied across immigrant/non-immigrant youth in a nationally representative sample of 7,287 Swiss adolescents (10.2% 1st generation immigrants, 10.3% 2nd generation, and 16.1% mixed parentage; Mage = 17.45, SD = 1.85, 46.6% females). Known risk and protective factors for suicidal ideations and attempts (depressive symptoms, family and peer connectedness, and demographics) were used as correlates, and their effects were compared across groups. About 27% of youth thought about suicide in past 12 months, while 5.5% reported attempting suicide once in their lifetime. After controlling for known predictors and nationality, being an immigrant adolescent (1st, 2nd generation, or mixed parentage) lowered the risk for suicidal ideations as compared to native Swiss youth; immigrant status was unrelated to attempts. Findings provide mixed support for the immigrant paradox; both immigrant and native youth would benefit from effective intervention strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Brokering Identity and Learning Citizenship: Immigration Settlement Organizations and New Chinese Immigrants in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yidan

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines citizenship learning and identity construction of new Chinese immigrants in a Canadian immigration settlement organization (ISO). I address the gap between the concept of "settlement" and "citizenship" generated by government-funded ISOs and new immigrants' actual practices in these programs. I adopt Dorothy…

  15. Perceived Status and Direction of Agricultural Mechanization Training Programs by Instructors in Nigerian Schools of Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ede, Christian C.

    1987-01-01

    This survey of 24 instructors of agricultural power and machinery attempted to determine (1) the status of agricultural mechanics programs for agricultural assistants in Nigerian schools of agriculture and (2) the possible future orientation of agricultural mechanics programs. (CH)

  16. Longitudinal Changes in Access to Health Care by Immigrant Status among Older Adults: The Importance of Health Insurance as a Mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunha

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This longitudinal study examined the role of health insurance in access to health care among older immigrants. Design and Methods: Using data from the Second Longitudinal Study of Aging, the longitudinal trajectories of having a usual source of care were compared between 3 groups (all 70+ years): (a) late-life immigrants with less than 15…

  17. Immigrant Status and Secondary School Performance as Determinants of Post-Secondary Participation: A Comparison of Canada and Switzerland. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 77

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, Garnett

    2012-01-01

    This working paper seeks to explore the reasons why educational attainment in the immigrant population varies between North America and Europe. Specifically, the examples of Canada and Switzerland are used as Canada has an immigrant population with a typically higher rate of post-secondary education than that of the domestic population, while in…

  18. Mucho camino: the experiences of two undocumented Mexican mothers participating in their child's early intervention program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alvarado, M Irma

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the experiences of two mothers of Mexican origin who are immigrants living under undocumented status in the United States and who participated in their children's early intervention programs...

  19. WSTF Propulsion and Pyrotechnics Corrective Action Test Program Status-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulsberry, R.; Ramirez, J.; Julien, H. L.; Hart, M.; Smith, W.; Bement, L.; Meagher, N. E.

    2000-01-01

    Extensive propulsion and pyrotechnic testing has been in progress at the NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) since 1995. This started with the Mars Observer Propulsion and Pyrotechnics Corrective Action Test Program (MOCATP). The MOCATP has concluded, but extensive pyrovalve testing and research and development has continued at WSTF. The capability to accurately analyze and measure pyrovalve combustion product blow-by, evaluate propellant explosions initiated by blow-by, and characterize pyrovalve operation continues to be used and improved. This paper contains an overview of testing since MOCATP inception, but focuses on accomplishments since the status was last reported at the 35th Joint Propulsion Conference, June, 1999. This new activity includes evaluation of 3/8 inch Conax pyrovalves; development and testing of advanced pyrovalve technologies; investigation of nondestructive evaluation techniques to inspect pyrotechnically induced hydrazine explosions both through testing and modeling. Data from this collection of projects are now being formatted into a pyrovalve applications and testing handbook and consensus standard to benefit pyrovalve users and spacecraft designers. The handbook is briefly described here and in more detail in a separate paper. To increase project benefit, pyrovalve manufacturers are encouraged to provide additional valves for testing and consideration, and feedback is encouraged in all aspects of the pyrotechnic projects.

  20. Evaluation of a school-based tuberculosis-screening program and associate investigation targeting recently immigrated children in a low-burden country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Paul; Steensma, Colin; Cadieux, Louise; Lands, Larry C

    2006-02-01

    In countries with a low incidence of tuberculosis (TB), screening programs targeting recent immigrants from TB-endemic countries have been shown to be effective in further reducing TB incidence; however, evaluative data on some aspects of these programs remain sparse. We sought to retrospectively evaluate a school-based screening program targeting children at high risk for TB infection in Montreal, Canada, as well as subsequently investigate family and household associates of the schoolchildren with latent TB infection (LTBI), based on adherence to LTBI therapy and cost-benefit analysis. Newly arrived immigrant children (aged 4-18 years) in selected schools were screened for LTBI by using the tuberculin skin test (TST). The TST was defined as positive at an induration of > or =10 mm. Each child who tested positive on the TST was referred for medical evaluation. Family and household associates of the TST-positive child also were screened for LTBI. Classroom attendance sheets and medical charts were reviewed for 16 elementary and secondary schools that comprised the school-screening program of the Montreal Children's Hospital from 1998 to 2003. Medical charts of the child associates (cost/benefit of the school-screening and associate-investigation programs, both respectively and as a combined program, compared with the cost of passive treatment of TB disease. Of 2524 immigrant children screened, 542 (21%) were TST-positive. Of 342 children started on therapy, 316 (92%) demonstrated adequate adherence. The only predictor of adherence among the schoolchildren was having > or =2 family members brought in for TB screening (adjusted odds ratio: 2.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.3-3.3). There were 599 associates investigated from the 484 TST-positive schoolchildren seen at the TB clinic. Of 555 associates with TST results, 211 (38%) were found to be TST-positive. Of 136 TST-positive child associates, 131 were seen at the Montreal Children's Hospital TB clinic and had their

  1. Protecting unauthorized immigrant mothers improves their children's mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainmueller, Jens; Lawrence, Duncan; Martén, Linna; Black, Bernard; Figueroa, Lucila; Hotard, Michael; Jiménez, Tomás R; Mendoza, Fernando; Rodriguez, Maria I; Swartz, Jonas J; Laitin, David D

    2017-09-08

    The United States is embroiled in a debate about whether to protect or deport its estimated 11 million unauthorized immigrants, but the fact that these immigrants are also parents to more than 4 million U.S.-born children is often overlooked. We provide causal evidence of the impact of parents' unauthorized immigration status on the health of their U.S. citizen children. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program granted temporary protection from deportation to more than 780,000 unauthorized immigrants. We used Medicaid claims data from Oregon and exploited the quasi-random assignment of DACA eligibility among mothers with birthdates close to the DACA age qualification cutoff. Mothers' DACA eligibility significantly decreased adjustment and anxiety disorder diagnoses among their children. Parents' unauthorized status is thus a substantial barrier to normal child development and perpetuates health inequalities through the intergenerational transmission of disadvantage. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  2. Vitamin D intake and status in immigrant and native Swedish women: a study at a primary health care centre located at 60°N in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åsa Andersson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immigration to Sweden from lower latitude countries has increased in recent years. Studies in the general population in other Nordic countries have demonstrated that these groups are at risk of developing vitamin D deficiency, but studies in primary health care patients are rare. Objectives: The aim of this study is to examine possible differences in plasma-25(OH-vitamin D levels and intake of vitamin D between Swedish and immigrant female patients in a primary health care centre located at 60°N, where half of the inhabitants have an immigrant background. Another objective was to estimate what foods contribute with most vitamin D. Design: Thirty-one female patients from the Middle East and Africa and 30 from Sweden were recruited. P-25(OHD was measured and intake of vitamin D was estimated with a modified food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. Results: Vitamin D deficiency (plasma-25(OHD <25 nmol/L was common among immigrant women (61%. One immigrant woman and half of the Swedish women had optimal levels (plasma-25(OHD >50 nmol/L. There was a positive correlation between the intake of vitamin D from food and plasma-25(OHD. Only three women, all Swedish, reached the recommended intake of vitamin D from food. The immigrant women had lower intake compared to Swedish women (median: 3.1 vs. 5.1 µg/day. The foods that contributed with most vitamin D were fatty fish, fortified milk and margarine. Immigrant women consumed less fortified milk and margarine but more meat. Irrespective of origin, patients with plasma-25(OHD <25 nmol/L consumed less margarine but more meat. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency was common in the immigrant patients and their intake of vitamin D was lower. This highlights the need to target information about vitamin D to immigrant women in order to decrease the risk for vitamin D deficiency. The FFQ was well adapted to its purpose to estimate intake of vitamin D.

  3. Emotional and behavioural problems and competencies among immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, L C; McKelvey, R S

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare levels of emotional and behavioural problems and competencies among immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents, and to determine factors that may contribute to any differences reported. Subjects were selected randomly from students aged 12-16 years attending a high school with a high proportion of immigrants in Perth, Western Australia. Parents completed the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL), and students completed the Youth Self-Report (YSR) and a Personal History Questionnaire. On univariate analyses, non-immigrant adolescents had significantly higher CBCL and YSR scores than immigrant adolescents. Multivariate analyses suggested that CBCL scores were predicted by a number of variables other than immigration, including family intactness, socioeconomic status (SES) and gender. Higher YSR scores were predicted by non-intact families, school setting and non-immigrant status, and higher competencies scores were predicted by higher SES and parents not being immigrants. In assessing the effects of immigration on adolescent mental health, it is important to control for factors associated with adolescent behavioural and emotional problems and to use multiple informants. Overall, immigrant adolescents report fewer total and externalizing problems and fewer competencies than native-born adolescents. This finding may reflect strict immigration policies or cultural differences in definitions of psychopathology and the social expectations for adolescents' behaviour.

  4. What the Hell Do We Do Now? A Policy Options Analysis of State, Local, and Tribal Law Enforcement Participation in Immigration Enforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    II offenses are lesser charges like fraud, drug abuse, other assaults, forgery, etc. - Federal Bureau of Investigation, Offense Definitions http...City of Chicago has ordinances regarding citizenship and immigration status. Similar to a San Francisco’s definition of itself as a “City of Refuge...inspections for children’s car seats, explaining the law and providing car seats to needy families. The program also enlists immigrant communities

  5. A pilot program to improve vaccination status for hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahud, Barbara; Clark, Shannon; Herigon, Joshua C; Sherman, Ashley; Lynch, Daryl A; Hoffman, Amber; Jackson, Mary Anne

    2015-01-01

    Screening of immunization status at each health care encounter is recommended to improve immunization coverage rates but is often limited to primary care practices. A pilot intervention study was performed to ascertain the immunization status of hospitalized children and determine if development of an immunization plan before discharge would improve the vaccination status for such children. On the basis of power calculations estimated to detect an increase in immunization status from 60% to 70% with 80% power, 356 randomly selected children were enrolled between March 6, 2012 and June 14, 2012. Immunization records were obtained, immunization status determined, and parent/guardian informed if catch-up dose(s) were needed. If parent requested vaccine dose(s), they were administered before discharge. Vaccination status was current per Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices guidelines in 73% of hospitalized children, and 27% children required catch-up dose(s) (200 doses for 95 children). Human papilloma virus vaccine (dose 1), varicella zoster vaccine (dose 2), and meningococcal conjugate vaccine were the most commonly identified dose(s) needed. Of those requiring catch-up dose(s), 25% were caught up, increasing vaccination status to 80% at 1-month post hospital discharge. This is the first study to determine the immunization status of hospitalized pediatric patients of all ages, including adolescents, providing new data on the immunization status of the inpatient pediatric population. A pilot intervention consisting of obtaining immunization records, determining immunization status, and discussing catch-up dose(s) before discharge resulted in improvement of immunization status, suggesting that the inpatient setting may be used along with many other national strategies to help address missed vaccination opportunities. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. An Elusive Concept: The Changing Definition of Illegal Immigrant in the Practice of Immigration Control in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Kristin; Santamaria, Ulysses

    1984-01-01

    Against a backdrop of administrative rather than criminal justice, examines the changing concepts in United Kingdom immigration practice, where immigration control at the port of entry has extended to internal control within the United Kingdom, the burden of proof of legality of status being increasingly upon the immigrant. (RDN)

  7. Immigrant Enhoming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogelman, Tatiana

    the difficulties that integration practitioners encounter in their attempts. I then highlight how the initial necessity of social spaces that are culturally and linguistically familiar to recent immigrants has, in conjunction with other factors, led to the establishment of at times solidified Russian......In Germany, as in many other countries, current conceptions of integration focus on increasing interactions of immigrants with old-time residents - as a means of achieving immigrants’ social integration into local milieus. This is especially true for adult migrants who linger in long...... fieldwork in socio-economically marginalized neighborhoods of eastern Berlin-Marzahn which are a home to a large number of Russian-speaking immigrants of German origin, I examine these projects’ attempts to construct communal social spaces shared by migrants and local residents. I start by noting...

  8. Acculturation and health-related quality of life among Vietnamese immigrant women in transnational marriages in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yung-Mei; Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2011-10-01

    To examine associations between demographic variables, acculturation, and health-related quality of life among Vietnamese immigrant women in transnational marriages in Taiwan. A cross-sectional survey of 203 participants in southern Taiwan. Instruments included a demographic inventory, the Suinn-Lew Asian Self-Identity Acculturation Scale, and the Short Form Health Survey-Version 2. Most participants had low acculturation levels. Length of residency, number of children, marital status, level of education, religion of spouse, and employment status of spouse significantly correlated with level of acculturation, as did mental health, bodily pain, vitality, and social functioning. Programs are needed to encourage social assimilation for Vietnamese immigrant women in Taiwan. Culturally sensitive medical evaluations will ensure early treatment of mental and physical health problems caused by the stress of acculturation. An increased understanding of variables affecting Southeast Asian immigrant women's acculturation process will improve health status.

  9. 7 CFR 37.11 - Publication of program assessment status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CONTAINER REGULATIONS PROGRAM TO ASSESS ORGANIC CERTIFYING AGENCIES § 37.11 Publication of program... assessment; effective date of assessment; and control number(s) of official certificate(s), as applicable. (b...

  10. 8 CFR 1246.4 - Immigration judge's authority; withdrawal and substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Immigration judge's authority; withdrawal and substitution. 1246.4 Section 1246.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS RESCISSION OF ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS § 1246.4 Immigration judge's...

  11. 8 CFR 246.4 - Immigration judge's authority; withdrawal and substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Immigration judge's authority; withdrawal... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS RESCISSION OF ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS § 246.4 Immigration judge's authority; withdrawal and substitution. In any proceeding conducted under this part, the immigration judge shall have...

  12. 8 CFR 1244.11 - Renewal of application; appeal to the Board of Immigration Appeals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of Immigration Appeals. 1244.11 Section 1244.11 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS TEMPORARY PROTECTED STATUS FOR NATIONALS OF DESIGNATED STATES § 1244.11 Renewal of application; appeal to the Board of Immigration Appeals. If a charging...

  13. Bridge Programs in Illinois: Results of the 2010 Illinois Bridge Status Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. L.; Harmon, T.

    2010-01-01

    This report provides a summary of major results of the Illinois Bridge Status Survey, administered online between April and June 2010. The purpose of the survey was to understand the extent to which bridge programs are being implemented in Illinois, as well as to build an online directory of bridge programs. Bridge programs are an emerging…

  14. 9 CFR 147.14 - Procedures to determine status and effectiveness of sanitation monitored program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... effectiveness of sanitation monitored program. 147.14 Section 147.14 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... status and effectiveness of sanitation monitored program. The following monitoring procedures 10 may be... sanitation program. (1) Culture the surface of cased eggs periodically for fecal contaminating organisms as...

  15. The Living Arrangements of Children of Immigrants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nancy S. Landale; Kevin J. A. Thomas; Jennifer Van Hook

    2011-01-01

    ... of marriage and family commitment. The authors examine differences by country of origin in the human capital, legal status, and social resources of immigrant families and describe their varied living arrangements, focusing on children...

  16. Human rights and immigrants' access to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmet, Wendy; Fischer, Simon

    2013-12-01

    Although the human right to health is well established under international law, many states limit non-citizens' participation in public insurance programs. In the United States, immigrants face especially high barriers due to the lack of recognition of a broad right to health as well as federal statutes restricting many immigrants' eligibility to federally-funded insurance. High rates of uninsurance among immigrants have a detrimental effect on their health, as well as on the health of citizens who live in their communities. Finch vs. Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector, a recent case decided by the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, recognized the rights of legal immigrants in Massachusetts to state-supported health care, and demonstrates the importance of insuring immigrants in broadly-based, rather than immigrant-specific, programs.

  17. Dynamics of immigration control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djajic, S

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines the dynamic implications of US border control policies and internal enforcement measures for the pattern of illegal immigration and the sectoral allocation of clandestine foreign workers. Efforts to counteract illegal immigration into the US have been increasing steadily following the passage of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. The purpose of the Act is to reduce illegal immigration with the aid of three instruments: 1) employer sanctions; 2) increased controls along the border; and 3) a legalization program designed to meet the existing demand for agricultural labor in geographic locations that are in proximity of Mexico, the principal source of clandestine foreign labor. The effect of tougher border control measures increases the cost of illegal entry, discouraging clandestine inflows. On the other hand, these measures induce migrants to increase their own anti-detection efforts, reducing the probability of detection and the deportation rate. If the latter effect should dominate, the steady-state stock of clandestine foreign labor will actually increase in response to more vigorous border control measures. Explicit consideration of the role of networks in the clandestine labor market suggests the need for a drastic policy change. This policy change should target illegal migration in areas with high concentrations of clandestine foreign workers. Complementary measures should accompany this policy change to prevent unbalanced enforcement measures.

  18. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Biscayne Bay, Florida (1995-1996) Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The toxicity of sediments in Biscayne Bay and many adjoining tributaries was determined as part of a bioeffects assessments program managed by NOAA's National Status...

  19. Status report on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory heavy ion fusion program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefe, D.; Faltens, A.; Hoyer, E.

    1978-11-01

    This status report is presented in three sections: (1) a design and cost procedure for heavy-ion induction LINACS, (2) theoretical activities, and (3) the experimental program on heavy ion fusion at LBL. (MOW)

  20. Status of Satellite Television Broadcast Programs Implementation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As the ICT domination in our day to day life is increasing, the Ethiopian Government convinced to utilize its opportunity for improving quality of education by introducing plasma television learning media in high schools of the country. The objective of this study was to determine implementation status of satellite plasma ...

  1. Intimate Partner Violence and Animal Abuse in an Immigrant-Rich Sample of Mother-Child Dyads Recruited From Domestic Violence Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Christie A; Hageman, Tina; Williams, James Herbert; Ascione, Frank R

    2015-11-25

    We examined rates of animal abuse in pet-owning families experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). We also examined whether higher levels of IPV (as measured by subscales from the Conflict Tactics Scales) predicted increased risk for partner-perpetrated animal abuse. Our sample included 291 mother-child dyads, where the mothers sought services from domestic violence agencies. Nearly half the sample is comprised of Mexican immigrants. Mothers reported that 11.7% of partners threatened to harm a pet and 26.1% actually harmed a pet, the latter of which represents a lower rate than in similar studies. When examining animal abuse by "Hispanic status," follow-up analyses revealed significant omnibus differences between groups, in that non-Hispanic U.S.-born partners (mostly White) displayed higher rates of harming pets (41%) than either U.S.-born or Mexican-born Hispanic groups (27% and 12.5%, respectively). Differences in rates for only threatening (but not harming) pets were not significant, possibly due to a small number of partners (n = 32) in this group. When examining whether partners' IPV predicted only threatening to harm pets, no IPV subscale variables (Physical Assault, Psychological Aggression, Injury, or Sexual Coercion) were significant after controlling for income, education, and Hispanic status. When examining actual harm to pets, more Psychological Aggression and less Physical Assault significantly predicted slightly higher risk of harm. However, Mexican-born partners had nearly 4 times lower risk of harming a pet. Overall, these results suggest that Hispanic men who are perpetrators of IPV are less likely to harm pets than non-Hispanic perpetrators of IPV, particularly if Mexican-born. Considering that the United States has a significant proportion of Mexican immigrants, it may be worthwhile to explore the topics of IPV and animal abuse within this group. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1994 quality program status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1996-03-01

    This status report is for calendar year 1994. It summarizes the annual activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP or Project) quality assurance program. By identifying the accomplishments of the quality program, a baseline is established that will assist in decision making, improve administrative controls and predictability, and allow us to annually identify adverse trends and to evaluate improvements. This is the fourth annual status report.

  3. The Status of Child Nutrition Programs in Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Daniel C.; Vigil, Herminia J.

    The health and learning potential of Colorado's children are enhanced by the nutritional benefits of several programs. The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is the oldest and largest. Unfortunately, 1980-81 budget cuts, price increases, and other factors caused a decrease in participation of over 40,000 children a day from the 1980 figure of…

  4. Domestic violence and immigration status among Latina mothers in the child welfare system: findings from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being II (NSCAW II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbonnaya, Ijeoma Nwabuzor; Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Kohl, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    Many children involved with the child welfare system witness parental domestic violence. The association between children's domestic violence exposure and child welfare involvement may be influenced by certain socio-cultural factors; however, minimal research has examined this relationship. The current study compares domestic violence experiences and case outcomes among Latinas who are legal immigrants (n=39), unauthorized immigrants (n=77), naturalized citizens (n=30), and US-born citizen mothers (n=383) reported for child maltreatment. This analysis used data from the second round of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being. Mothers were asked about whether they experienced domestic violence during the past year. In addition, data were collected to assess if (a) domestic violence was the primary abuse type reported and, if so, (b) the maltreatment allegation was substantiated. Results show that naturalized citizens, legal residents, and unauthorized immigrants did not differ from US-born citizens in self-reports of domestic violence; approximately 33% of mothers reported experiences of domestic violence within the past year. Yet, unauthorized immigrants were 3.76 times more likely than US-born citizens to have cases with allegations of domestic violence as the primary abuse type. Despite higher rates of alleged domestic violence, unauthorized citizens were not more likely than US-born citizens to have these cases substantiated for domestic violence (F(2.26, 153.99)=0.709, p=.510). Findings highlight that domestic violence is not accurately accounted for in families with unauthorized immigrant mothers. We recommend child welfare workers are trained to properly assess and fulfill the needs of immigrant families, particularly as it relates to domestic violence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Health Care Satisfaction: Effects of Immigration, Acculturation, Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutt, Russell K; Mejía, Camila

    2017-12-01

    Differences in health care satisfaction can alter patterns of health care utilization and so affect health outcomes, but little is known about variation in satisfaction in relation to immigration status. Health care satisfaction is analyzed with survey data from state public health program patients. Overall health care satisfaction is higher for first generation Hispanic immigrants and lower among those in the second generation compared to white Americans-consistent with the pattern termed the "healthy migrant effect." This pattern is more pronounced for Portuguese-speaking immigrants and is not explained by self-reported health, communication ability or acculturation. Satisfaction with specific aspects of health care follows different patterns that may be explained by differences in experiences and culture. As anticipated by segmented assimilation theory, we find variation in cross-generational patterns of health care satisfaction both within and between ethnic groups. This variation indicates the importance of distinguishing Portuguese-speakers from Spanish-speakers and of taking into account differences in the ways they are able to communicate with health care providers as well as differences in their orientations toward health care. Our disparate findings with other immigrant groups also reinforce limiting expectations of a "healthy migrant effect" to Latinos. Finally, the variable influences on different satisfaction measures indicate the importance of considering the relative influence of culturally-based orientations and health care experiences on the specific outcomes measured, with particular sensitivity to acceptance of individualized standards of care.

  6. FY 2001 year-end status report : Brucellosis program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The brucellosis program, created by the Wildlife Health, is a combination of technical assistance and research. The National Park Service (NPS), the U.S. Fish and...

  7. [Tuberculosis and immigration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Coronas, Joaquín; Rogado-González, M Cruz; Lozano-Serrano, Ana Belén; Cabezas-Fernández, M Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis worldwide is declining. However, in Western countries this decline is slower due to the impact of immigration. Tuberculosis in the immigrant population is related to health status in the country of origin and with overcrowding and poverty conditions in the host country. Immigrants with tuberculosis are younger, have a higher prevalence of extrapulmonary forms, greater proportion of drug resistance and higher treatment default rates than those of natives. New molecular techniques not only reduce diagnostic delay time but also allow the rapid identification of resistances and improve knowledge of transmission patterns. It is necessary to implement measures to improve treatment compliance in this population group like facilitating access to health card, the use of fixed-dose combination drugs, the participation of cultural mediators and community health workers and gratuity of drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Current status of the Gene-Tox Program.

    OpenAIRE

    Auletta, A E; Brown, M.; Wassom, J S; Cimino, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Gene-Tox Program is a multiphased effort to review and evaluate the existing literature in assay systems available in the field of genetic toxicology. The first phase of the Gene-Tox Program selected assay systems for evaluation, generated expert panel reviews of the data from the scientific literature, and recommended testing protocols for the systems. Phase II established and evaluated the database of chemical genetic toxicity data for its relevanc...

  9. Predictors of homeless veterans' irregular discharge status from a domiciliary care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, S L; Bakhtiar, L; Caskey, N H; Hardie, E; Redford, C; Sadler, N; Gelberg, L

    1995-01-01

    This study addresses the relationship of homeless veterans' discharge status from a domiciliary care program to biopsychosocial characteristics presented at admission into the program. Hypotheses were that younger age, less education, and substance abuse or psychiatric disorder would predict an irregular discharge. Research participants were 367 homeless male veterans who had been admitted to a domiciliary care program at the West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Medical Center for treatment of medical, psychiatric, or substance disorders. Status of veterans' program discharge (regular or irregular) served as the outcome measure. Logistic regression analysis revealed that irregular discharge from the program was more likely among veterans who were black, who had poor employment histories, or who had problems with alcohol. Results are discussed in light of the need to maintain homeless veterans in treatment programs so that they can achieve maximum benefit from available programs.

  10. Environmental and Occupational Exposures in Immigrant Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pracha P. Eamranond

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Immigrants comprise vulnerable populations that are frequently exposed to a multitude of environmental and occupational hazards. The historical context behind state and federal legislation has helped to foster an environment that is particularly hostile toward caring for immigrant health. Current hazards include toxic exposures, air and noise pollution, motor vehicle accidents, crowded living and work environments with inadequate ventilation, poor sanitation, mechanical injury, among many others. Immigrants lack the appropriate training, materials, health care access, and other resources to reduce their exposure to preventable environmental and occupational health risks. This dilemma is exacerbated by current anti-immigrant sentiments, miscommunication between native and immigrant populations, and legislation denying immigrants access to publicly funded medical care. Given that current health policy has failed to address immigrant health appropriately and political impetus is lacking, efforts should also focus on alternative solutions, including organized labor. Labor unions that serve to educate workers, survey work environments, and defend worker rights will greatly alleviate and prevent the burden of disease incurred by immigrants. The nation’s health will benefit from improved regulation of living and workplace environments to improve the health of immigrants, regardless of legal status.

  11. Immigration and suicidality in the young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursztein Lipsicas, Cendrine; Henrik Mäkinen, Ilkka

    2010-05-01

    Little research has focused on the relation of immigration and suicidal behaviour in youth. Nevertheless, the impact of migration on the mental health of youth is an issue of increasing societal importance. This review aimed to present studies on the prevalence of suicidal behaviour in immigrant youth in various countries and to provide possible explanations for suicidal behaviour in immigrant youth, especially regarding acculturation. The review included a literature search to locate articles on the subject of suicidal behaviour in immigrant youth in the context of acculturation. Studies on suicidal behaviour in culturally diverse youth are few and most of the existing research does not differentiate ethnic minorities from immigrants. Studies on epidemiology and on specific risk factors were found regarding various immigrant youth including Hispanics in the United States, Asians in North America and Europe, as well as comparative studies between different immigrant groups in specific countries. The relation between immigration status and suicidal behaviours in youth appears to vary by ethnicity and country of settlement. Time spent in the new country as well as intergenerational communication and conflicts with parents have, in many of the studies, been related to suicidality in immigrant youth. Summing up, there is a clear and urgent need to further pursue the work in this field, to develop targeted public health interventions as well as psychosocial treatment for preventing suicide in these youth.

  12. Effects of a food supplementation program on the nutritional status of pregnant women in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Mahmud; Ahmed, Shakil; Protik, Ali Ehsan; Dhar, Badal Chandra; Roy, S K

    2005-12-01

    The Government of Bangladesh implemented a comprehensive nutrition intervention in 1997 to reduce the rates of malnutrition among women and children. The pilot program, the Bangladesh Integrated Nutrition Program (BINP), adopted a multisectoral approach targeting women and children through food supplementation, home gardening, and health and nutrition education. This paper estimates the effectiveness of BINP's food supplementation and nutrition education on the nutritional status of pregnant women. Methods. Three effectiveness measures were considered: target efficiency, improvements in the nutritional status of beneficiaries, and the persistence of nutritional effects. To isolate the effects of the intervention, the nutritional status of participants and nonparticipants was compared after controlling for various demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Data were collected in 2000 from a random sample of 3262 households in a BINP intervention area. Thirty-nine percent of pregnant women were correctly targeted by the program's food supplementation activities. The nutrition program reduced the prevalence of thinness among participant pregnant women by about 3 percentage points per month of enrollment. The prevalence of thinness among program graduates was 62%, which was much higher than that of the matched (nonparticipant) group (35%). This finding is perplexing but it may simply imply that those who enrolled at the initial phase of the project were severely underweight and they fell back to their original status within a short period of time. The nutrition program was intended to improve the nutritional status of women in the longer run through the provision of nutrition education during the food supplementation phase. The prevalence of thinness or severe underweight in women who exited the program after completion of the enrollment period was found to be much higher than in women of similar age and socioeconomic status in the community. This apparent lack of

  13. Mental health concerns among African immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, Homer; Adekugbe, Olayinka; Massaquoi, Jacob; Nadeau, Cheryl; Saul, Jack; Gany, Francesca

    2011-08-01

    African immigrants represent a rapidly expanding group of immigrants in the United States. In New York City, Africans constitute the fastest growing segment of immigrants but the needs and practices of African immigrants in the U.S. remain poorly understood. A community based organization (CBO) serving African immigrants in Staten Island, NY began a health screening program in 2008 with the goal of promoting access to primary care. Over 18 months, 296 visits were recorded at African Refuge health screenings, representing a total of 87 people who averaged just over 3 visits per person. The screenings identified mental health among the top three medical problems of clients but referral to mental health services was rare. Dedicated services are required to better screen for mental health concerns and refer African immigrants to mental health care.

  14. Immigration, Adult Education and Multiculturalism in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Christopher; And Others

    The study described in this report reviews adult education relevant to immigration and multiculturalism in Australia. The report is presented in three parts. The first part examines the background and context of adult education programs intended for immigrants and for a multicultural society. The first of two chapters presents the historical and…

  15. 76 FR 63321 - U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ...-63322] [FR Doc No: 2011-26361] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services... Under Review: E-Verify Program. The Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration... and Immigration Services. (4) Affected public who will be asked or required to respond, as well as a...

  16. Individual, Social, and Family Factors Associated with High School Dropout among Low-SES Youth: Differential Effects as a Function of Immigrant Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, Isabelle; Janosz, Michel; Dupéré, Véronique; Brault, Marie-Christine; Andrew, Marie Mc

    2017-01-01

    Background: In most Western countries, the individual, social, and family characteristics associated with students' dropout in the general population are well documented. Yet, there is a lack of large-scale studies to establish whether these characteristics have the same influence for students with an immigrant background. Aims: The first aim of…

  17. Nuclear safeguards research and development program. Status report, January--April 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapir, J.L. (comp.)

    1977-06-01

    The status of the Nuclear Safeguards Research and Development program pursued by LASL Safeguards Groups Q-1, Q-2, Q-3, and Q-4 is presented . Topics covered include nondestructive assay technology development and applications, international safeguards, perimeter safeguards and surveillance, concepts and subsystems development (e.g., DYMAC program), integrated safeguards systems, training courses, and technology transfer.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1995 quality program status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1996-07-01

    This status report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project`s (YMP`s) quality assurance program for January 1 to September 30, 1995. The report includes major sections on program activities and trend analysis.

  19. Status of the 3D Elevation Program, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarbaker, Larry J.; Eldridge, Diane F.; Jason, Allyson L.; Lukas, Vicki; Saghy, David L.; Stoker, Jason M.; Thunen, Diana R.

    2017-01-18

    The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) is a cooperative activity to collect light detection and ranging (lidar) data for the conterminous United States, Hawaii, and U.S. territories; and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IfSAR) elevation data for Alaska during an 8-year period. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and partner organizations acquire high-quality three-dimensional elevation data for the United States and its territories that support requirements beyond what could be realized if agencies independently pursued lidar and IfSAR data collection activities. Data collection rates have been increasing as a growing number of State and Federal agencies participate in cooperative data acquisition projects. USGS and partner agencies expanded data collection, completed the initial product delivery systems and implemented changes to the program governance to include a restructuring of the 3DEP working group and formalizing the relationship to the Federal Geographic Data Committee during the final year (2015) of program preparation.

  20. The NASA Firefighter's Breathing System Program: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlan, Pat B.

    1973-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), through its Technology Utilization Program, has been making its advanced technology developments available to the public. This has coincided in recent years with a growing demand within the fire service for improved protective equipment. A better breathing system for firefighters was one of the more immediate needs identified by the firefighting organizations. The Johnson Space Center (JSC), based upon their experience in providing life support systems for space flight, was subsequently requested to determine the feasibility of providing an improved breathing system for firefighters. Such a system was determined to be well within the current state of the art, and the Center is well into a development program to provide design verification of this improved protective' equipment. This report - outlines the overall objectives of this program, progress to date, and future planned activities.

  1. Immigration Reform and Administrative Relief for 2014 and Beyond: A Report on Behalf of the Committee for Immigration Reform Implementation (CIRI, Human Resources Working Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Kamasaki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Successful implementation of any broad-scale immigrant legalization program requires an adequately funded infrastructure of immigrant-serving organizations. In 2014, President Obama announced an expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA program, as well as the Deferred Action for Parents of Citizens and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA program, which would make it possible for approximately five million people to attain lawful, albeit temporary, status and employment authorization. As the initial DACA program instituted in 2012 has already stretched the capacity of immigrant-serving organizations to their limits or even beyond them, the possibility of full implementation of DAPA and the expanded DACA programs presents a formidable challenge for these organizations.In this paper, the Human Resources Working Group of the Committee for Immigration Reform Implementation (CIRI draws on the lessons of the Immigrant Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA, DACA, and other initiatives to provide a roadmap for immigrant service delivery agencies and their partners in planning for implementation of the expanded DACA and the DAPA programs, with an eye (ultimately to broad legislative reform. In particular, this paper focuses on the funding and human resources that the immigrant service delivery field, writ large, would require to implement these programs.If expanded DACA and DAPA were implemented, the CIRI Working Group estimates that, of the total of five million that may be eligible, 1.08 million individuals will require extensive application assistance, generating the need for approximately three times more full-time staff than are currently in the field. Moreover, without additional funding and staff, agencies will likely not be able to shift a portion of staff time to accommodate any new program, even taking the typical fee-for-service model into account. Thus, the paper identifies a pressing need for “upfront” funding as early in the

  2. Bullying among immigrant and non-immigrant early adolescents: School- and student-level effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoroulis, Irene; Georgiades, Katholiki

    2017-12-01

    We examined the association between school immigrant concentration and bullying among immigrant and non-immigrant early adolescents, and identified potential explanatory factors. First generation immigrant students had reduced odds of victimization and perpetration in schools with high (20-60%), compared to low, levels of immigrant concentration. Second generation immigrant students had reduced odds of ethnic/racial victimization in moderately concentrated schools; while non-immigrants had increased odds in the same schools. Non-white students had increased odds of ethnic/racial victimization compared to White students. While students' sense of school belonging and perceived teacher cultural sensitivity were negatively associated with bullying, they did not account for the differential associations noted above. Results demonstrate the importance of immigrant density as a protective school characteristic for immigrant and ethnic minority youth. Additional social processes operating in schools that may explain bullying behaviors among immigrant and non-immigrant youth should be explored to inform programs for promoting inclusion in schools. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Status of the Short Dipole Model Program for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Artoos, K; Fessia, P; Perini, D; Sanfilippo, S; Siegel, N; Siemko, A; Tommasini, D; Vanenkov, I; Walckiers, L; Wyss, C

    2000-01-01

    The model program for the LHC main dipoles is dedicated to the study and validation of design variants and assembly parameters to achieve reproducible performance and optimise components and assembly costs. The topics investigated in the last year include the material of the coil end spacers, the use of polyimide films from different manufacturers, the definition of optimum azimuthal and longitudinal coil pre-stress values, shimming of coil ends, collaring around the "cold bore" and different layouts of the yoke ends. This paper presents the main characteristics of such recent models, the results obtained during cold tests and the plans for the final phase of the model program for the LHC dipoles.

  4. Early Academic Achievement Among American Low-Income Black Students from Immigrant and Non-Immigrant Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, Esther; Barajas-Gonzalez, R Gabriela; Dawson-McClure, Spring; Huang, Keng-Yen; Palamar, Joseph; Kamboukos, Dimitra; Brotman, Laurie Miller

    2015-11-01

    At least half of the well-documented achievement gap for low-income Black children is already present in kindergarten, due in part to limited opportunities for acquiring foundational skills necessary for school success. There is some evidence that low-income minority children from immigrant families have more positive outcomes than their non-immigrant counterparts, although little is known about how the immigrant paradox may manifest in young children. This study examines foundational school readiness skills (academic and social-emotional learning) at entry into pre-kindergarten (pre-k) and achievement in kindergarten and second grade among Black children from low-income immigrant and non-immigrant families (N = 299). Immigrant and non-immigrant children entered pre-k with comparable readiness scores; in both groups, reading scores decreased significantly from kindergarten to second grade and math scores decreased significantly for non-immigrant children and marginally for immigrant children. Regardless of immigrant status, pre-k school readiness and pre-k classroom quality were associated with elementary school achievement. However, declines in achievement scores were not as steep for immigrant children and several predictive associations were moderated by immigrant status, such that among those with lower pre-k school readiness or in lower quality classrooms, immigrant children had higher achievement test scores than children from non-immigrant families. Findings suggest that immigrant status provides young Black students with some protection against individual- and classroom-level risk factors for early underachievement in elementary school.

  5. 49 CFR 1515.5 - Appeal of Initial Determination of Threat Assessment based on criminal conviction, immigration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Assessment based on criminal conviction, immigration status, or mental capacity. 1515.5 Section 1515.5... criminal conviction, immigration status, or mental capacity. (a) Scope. This section applies to applicants... the immigration status requirements as described in 49 CFR 1572.105. (3) TSA has determined that an...

  6. Status of Satellite Television Broadcast Programs Implementation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (classroom interaction) is conducive for effective implementation of the satellite plasma television program? • What are the possible advantages and limitations of the plasma instruction? .... classroom teachers' use of lesson introduction. Accordingly, only 65.3% of .... 4 It decreases teachers creativity. 53. 47. 428. 5 It reduces ...

  7. Incorporating Cultural Perspectives into Diabetes Self-Management Programs for East Asian Immigrants: A Mixed-Study Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chorong; Nam, Soohyun; Whittemore, Robin

    2016-04-01

    It is important to understand East Asian immigrants (EAIs)' unique perspectives in managing diabetes in order to provide culturally-competent care. However, it is not known whether EAIs' perspectives are addressed in diabetes self-management interventions developed for EAIs. Therefore, a mixed-study review was conducted to identify EAIs' perspective from qualitative research (n = 9 studies) and to evaluate the components of EAI diabetes self-management interventions (n = 7). Themes from the qualitative synthesis demonstrated that EAIs have unique cultural values and traditional health beliefs while struggling with multi-contextual barriers due to immigration. The evaluation of EAI diabetes self-management interventions revealed that there was a lack of consensus on cultural strategies for EAIs' across the interventions. Addressing language barriers was the only factor consistently integrated in the cultural components of intervention by employing bilingual interventionists. EAIs' perspectives and experiences need to be incorporated in the future diabetes self-management interventions to better provide culturally-competent care.

  8. Demands of immigration among Chinese immigrant nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Amy X; Griffin, Mary T Quinn; Capitulo, Katie L; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the demands of immigration among Chinese nurses that have immigrated to the USA. The relationship between the demands of immigration and length of stay in the USA was investigated also. A descriptive correlational study design was used. A convenience sample of 128 nurses was recruited. A self-administered survey was conducted using the demands of immigration scale developed by Aroian, along with a demographic questionnaire. The results showed Chinese immigrant nurses have high demands of immigration. There were significant negative relationships between the demands of immigration and length of stay in the USA. Immigration demands decreased as length of stay increased but remained high even for those who had been in the USA for > 5 years. This information is vital to health-care agencies designing and implementing adaptation programmes targeting these demands to facilitate Chinese nurses' adaptation process. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Immigrants and immigration policy in ageing Finland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Łobodzińska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    .... The necessity of attracting a new workforce as well as the growing number of immigrants in the ethnically homogeneous Finnish society create a need for more detailed and creative immigration policy...

  10. How culture impacts the dissemination and implementation of innovation: a case study of the Families and Schools Together program (FAST) for preventing violence with immigrant Latino youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Nancy G; Knox, Lyndee

    2008-06-01

    We consider how culture impacts the translation of research into practice, focusing on the culture of the client and the culture of the agency implementing selected programs. We build on lessons learned from a pilot study of an evidence-based family-school partnership, Families and Schools Together (FAST), to prevent youth violence with low-income, immigrant Latino families in Southern California. We examine the impact of cultural characteristics on the translation of this innovation into practice at the community level, relying on an interactive systems framework developed recently by Wandersman and colleagues (2008, American Journal of Community Psychology, 41(3-4), in press) discussed in this issue. As we point out, the culture of the client and the culture of the agency can facilitate or impede connections within and across these interactive systems.

  11. FERMILAB ACCELERATOR R&D PROGRAM TOWARDS INTENSITY FRONTIER ACCELERATORS : STATUS AND PROGRESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2016-11-15

    The 2014 P5 report indicated the accelerator-based neutrino and rare decay physics research as a centrepiece of the US domestic HEP program at Fermilab. Operation, upgrade and development of the accelerators for the near- term and longer-term particle physics program at the Intensity Frontier face formidable challenges. Here we discuss key elements of the accelerator physics and technology R&D program toward future multi-MW proton accelerators and present its status and progress. INTENSITY FRONTIER ACCELERATORS

  12. Nickel hydrogen low Earth orbit test program update and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badcock, C. C.; Donley, S. W.; Felts, A. B.; Haag, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) testing ongong at NWSC, Crane In, and The Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, Ca are described. The objective of this testing is to develop a database for NiH2 battery use in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and support applications in Medium Altitude Orbit (MAO). Individual pressure vessel-type cells are being tested. A minimum of 200 cells (3.5 in diameter and 4.5 in diameter) are included in the test, from four U.S. vendors. As of this date (Nov. 18, 1986) approximately 60 cells have completed preliminary testing (acceptance, characterization, and environmental testing) and have gone into life cycling.

  13. Occupational trajectories and immigrant worker health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crollard, Allison; de Castro, A B; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun

    2012-11-01

    During their initial years in the receiving country, many immigrants experience occupational downgrading. Downgrading is a loss of occupational status between one's last job in the home country and first job in the receiving country, often resulting in overeducation or overqualification. Although the extent and determinants of such occupational trajectories have been characterized, the connection to immigrant worker health has not been widely examined. However, an emerging body of knowledge indicates that negative health outcomes are associated with overeducation and overqualification in general worker populations, suggesting similar experiences by immigrant workers. This article provides an overview of the magnitude and conceptualization of occupational downgrading, overeducation, and overqualification and discusses implications for immigrant worker health. Occupational health professionals should spearhead research efforts on occupational downgrading, raise public awareness about the issue, and serve as advocates for immigrant workers' rights.

  14. Neighborhood context and immigrant young children's development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Tama; Shuey, Elizabeth A

    2014-06-01

    This study explored how neighborhood social processes and resources, relevant to immigrant families and immigrant neighborhoods, contribute to young children's behavioral functioning and achievement across diverse racial/ethnic groups. Data were drawn from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, a neighborhood-based, longitudinal study with cohorts of children first seen at birth, 3 years, and 6 years of age and followed over 6 years (N = 3,209; 37% Mexican American, 33% Black, 15% White, 9% Puerto Rican, 4% other Latino, and 2% other races/ethnicities; 44% immigrant). Results of multilevel models suggest that the immigrant status of children's families was a more consistent moderator of associations between neighborhood processes and children's development than the immigrant concentration of their neighborhoods, but the nature of these associations depended on the outcome and racial/ethnic group considered. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Patterns of Family Visitation During Immigration Detention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Patler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The population detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement more than doubled between 2001 and 2013, swelling to over 477,000 individuals. Despite this growth, few studies analyze the experiences of detained immigrants. We draw from one of the first studies of detention in the United States, analyzing survey data from 565 noncitizens detained for six months or longer in California. Criminal incarceration literature finds that family visitation helps maintain social ties but is not evenly distributed. We analyze the predictors of contact and visitation with children during immigration detention. Results indicate that demographic background, the type of detention facility, and children’s legal status substantially affect contact and visitation experiences. Findings suggest that immigration detention replicates experiences of criminal incarceration and is perpetuating inequality in immigrant communities.

  16. Status of the intercontinental ballistic missile modernization program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    The Department of Defense is taking three major actions to modernize the intercontinental ballistic missile component of the U.S. strategic forces. Specifically, DOD is: (1) developing a small ICBM and its hard mobile launcher, (2) researching other basing technology, and (3) deploying Peacekeeper (MX) missiles in Minuteman silos. Potential major issues of the small ICBM can now be identified. For instance, for a 500 missile force on hard mobile launchers: (1) life cycle cost would be about $44 billion in 1982 dollars, (2) personnel requirements would be about 20,000 people, and (3) up to 28,000 square miles of land would be required for wartime operations. The Peacekeeper program is in production while development testing continues. Results to date have been positive. Current congressional action to limit the number of missiles deployed will affect program cost and schedule.

  17. Status of Efforts to Initiate an Amphibious Combat Vehicle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-10

    perceived need for new and better capabilities, the Marine Corps began development of the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle ( EFV ) in 2000. We reported on...the EFV program in 2006 and 2010.4 3GAO, Defense Acquisitions: Many Analyses of Alternatives Have Not...Provided a Robust Assessment of Weapon System Options, GAO-09-665 (Washington, D.C.: Sept. 24, 2009). According to plans, the EFV would travel at

  18. Current status of Westinghouse tubular solid oxide fuel cell program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W.G. [Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    In the last ten years the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) development program at Westinghouse has evolved from a focus on basic material science to the engineering of fully integrated electric power systems. Our endurance for this cell is 5 to 10 years. To date we have successfully operated at power for over six years. For power plants it is our goal to have operated before the end of this decade a MW class power plant. Progress toward these goals is described.

  19. A Status Report on the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fienberg, Richard Tresch; Fraknoi, Andrew; Gurton, Suzanne; Hurst, Anna; Schatz, Dennis L.

    2014-06-01

    The American Astronomical Society, in partnership with the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP), has launched a series of professional-development workshops and a community of practice designed to improve early-career astronomers’ ability to communicate effectively with students and the public. Called AAS Astronomy Ambassadors, the program provides training and mentoring for young astronomers, from advanced undergraduates to beginning faculty; it also provides them access to resources and a network of contacts within the astronomy education and public outreach (EPO) community. Ambassadors are provided with a library of outreach activities and resource materials suitable for a range of venues and audiences. For much of this library we are using resources developed by organizations such as the ASP, the Pacific Science Center, and the Center for Astronomy Education for other outreach programs, though some resources have been created by one of us (AF) specifically for this program. After a period of evaluation and revision, the program’s “Menu of Outreach Opportunities for Science Education” (MOOSE) is now posted on the AAS website at http://aas.org/outreach/moose-menu-outreach-opportunities-science-education.The first two Astronomy Ambassadors workshops were held at AAS meetings in January 2013 and January 2014; each served 30 young astronomers chosen from about twice that many applicants. Web-based follow-up activities are being provided through a website at the ASP designed to keep cohorts of educators trained in their programs in touch with one another. The AAS is exploring ways to fund additional workshops at future winter meetings; suggestions are most welcome. Meanwhile, the Astronomy Ambassadors trained to date have logged more than 150 outreach events, reaching many thousands of children and adults across the U.S. and Canada.

  20. Hospitalisation among immigrants in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraci Salvatore

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immigration is increasing in Italy. In 2003, 2.6 million foreign citizens lived in the country; 52% were men and the majority were young adults who migrated for work. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in hospitalisation between immigrants and the resident population during the year 2000 in the Lazio region. Methods Hospital admissions of immigrants from Less Developed Countries were compared to those of residents. We measured differences in hospitalisation rates and proportions admitted. Results Adult immigrants have lower hospitalisation rates than residents (134.6 vs. 160.5 per thousand population for acute care; 26.4 vs. 38.3 for day care. However, hospitalisation rates for some specific causes (injuries, particularly for men, infectious diseases, deliveries and induced abortions, ill-defined conditions were higher for immigrants than for residents. Immigrants under 18 years seem to be generally healthy; causes of admission in this group are similar to those of residents of the same age (respiratory diseases, injuries and poisoning. The only important differences are for infectious and parasitic diseases, with a higher proportion among immigrant youths. Conclusion The low hospitalisation rates for foreigners may suggest that they are a population with good health status. However, critical areas, related to poor living and working conditions and to social vulnerability, have been identified. Under-utilisation of services and low day care rates may be partially due to administrative, linguistic, and cultural barriers. As the presence of foreigners becomes an established phenomenon, it is important to evaluate their epidemiological profile, develop instruments to monitor and fulfil their specific health needs and plan health services for a multi-ethnic population.

  1. National Federal Fleet Loaner Program, Interim Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, James Edward

    2000-10-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Loaner Program is to increase the awareness, deployment, and use of electric vehicles (EVs) in Federal fleets. The Loaner Program accomplishes this by providing free EVs to Federal fleets on a loaner basis, generally for 1 or 2 months. The Program partners DOE with six electric utilities, with DOE providing financial support and some leads on Federal fleets interested in obtaining EVs. The utilities obtain the vehicles, identify candidate loaner fleets, loan the vehicles, provide temporary charging infrastructure, provide overall support to participating Federal fleets, and support fleets with their leasing decisions. While the utilities have not had the success initially envisioned by themselves, DOE, the Edison Electric Institute, and the Electric Vehicle Association of the Americas, the utilities can not be faulted for their efforts, as they are not the entity that makes the ultimate lease or no-lease decision. Some external groups have suggested to DOE that they direct other federal agencies to change their processes to make loaning vehicles easier; this is simply not within the power of DOE. By law, a certain percentage of all new vehicle acquisitions are supposed to be alternative fuel vehicles (AFV); however, with no enforcement, the federal agencies are not compelled to lease AFVs such as electric vehicles.

  2. Current status of the Gene-Tox Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auletta, A E; Brown, M; Wassom, J S; Cimino, M C

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Gene-Tox Program is a multiphased effort to review and evaluate the existing literature in assay systems available in the field of genetic toxicology. The first phase of the Gene-Tox Program selected assay systems for evaluation, generated expert panel reviews of the data from the scientific literature, and recommended testing protocols for the systems. Phase II established and evaluated the database of chemical genetic toxicity data for its relevance to identifying human health hazards. The ongoing phase III continues reviewing and updating chemical data in selected assay systems. Currently, data exist on over 4000 chemicals in 27 assay systems; two additional assay systems will be included in phase III. The review data are published in the scientific literature and are also publicly available through the National Library of Medicine TOXNET system. The review and analysis components of Gene-Tox comprise 45 published papers, and several others are in preparation. Differences that have been observed between Gene-Tox and National Toxicology Program databases relative to the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictivity of genetic toxicity data compared to carcinogenesis data are ascribable to differences between the two databases in chemical selection criteria, testing protocols, and chemical class distributions. PMID:1820273

  3. Current status of the Gene-Tox Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auletta, A.E.; Cimino, M.C. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)); Brown, M.; Wassom, J.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Gene-Tox Program is a multiphased effort to review and evaluate the existing literature in many systems available in the field of genetic toxicology. The first phase of the Gene-Tox Program selected assay systems for evaluation, generated expert panel reviews of the data from the scientific literature, and recommended testing protocols for the systems. Phase II established and evaluated the database of chemical genetic toxicity data for its relevance to identifying human health hazards. The ongoing phase III continues reviewing and updating chemical data in selected assay systems. Currently, data exist on over 4000 chemicals in 27 assay systems; two additional assay systems will be included in phase III. The review data are published in the scientific literature and are also publicly available through the National Library of Medicine TOXNET system. The review and analysis components of Gene-Tox comprise 45 published papers, and several others are in preparation. Differences that have been observed between Gene-Tox and National Toxicology Program databases relative to the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictivity of genetic toxicity data compared to carcinogenesis data are ascribable to differences between the two databases in chemical selection criteria, testing protocols, and chemical class distributions. 6 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. The Australian Geodetic Observing Program. Current Status and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, G.; Dawson, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, the Australian government has through programs like AuScope, the Asia Pacific Reference Frame (APREF), and the Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM) Project made a significant contribution to the Global Geodetic Observing Program. In addition to supporting the national research priorities, this contribution is justified by Australia's growing economic dependence on precise positioning to underpin efficient transportation, geospatial data management, and industrial automation (e.g., robotic mining and precision agriculture) and the consequent need for the government to guarantee provision of precise positioning products to the Australian community. It is also well recognised within Australia that there is an opportunity to exploit our near unique position as being one of the few regions in the world to see all new and emerging satellite navigation systems including Galileo (Europe), GPS III (USA), GLONASS (Russia), Beidou (China), QZSS (Japan) and IRNSS (India). It is in this context that the Australian geodetic program will build on earlier efforts and further develop its key geodetic capabilities. This will include the creation of an independent GNSS analysis capability that will enable Australia to contribute to the International GNSS Service (IGS) and an upgrade of key geodetic infrastructure including the national VLBI and GNSS arrays. This presentation will overview the significant geodetic activities undertaken by the Australian government and highlight its future plans.

  5. Medical education for "Dreamers": Barriers and opportunities for undocumented immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczewski, Mark G; Brubaker, Linda

    2014-12-01

    Medical schools should amend their admissions policies to welcome applications from qualified undocumented immigrants, often called "Dreamers." The recent creation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service removes the key obstacles to securing a license and residency eligibility for such medical school graduates. As a result, to deny application to Dreamers of DACA status represents a kind of unjustified discrimination and violates the basic ethical principle of the equality of human beings. In addition, the medical profession's duty of beneficence to patients compels medical schools to develop the talents of any and all qualified applicants so as to produce the most competent, diverse physician workforce that best represents contemporary U.S. society. Furthermore, social justice calls for medical schools to produce physicians inclined to serve populations that have traditionally been underserved, including some minority and immigrant populations. An examination of the characteristics of those granted DACA status suggests that they are a potential source of future physicians likely to be helpful in addressing these needs. The authors of this Perspective discuss the remaining challenges facing Dreamers who want to attend medical school in the United States and possible means of overcoming these hurdles. The authors' views are based on principles of social justice, their recognition of the duty to treat Dreamer applicants fairly and justly, and their belief that physicians have an obligation primarily to the patients they serve that entails developing the best health care workforce possible.

  6. Status of GEA review of DOE geothermal research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    The Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) will be conducting a series of workshops related to the DOE Research and Development (R&D) program, the first of which will take place tomorrow and the next day. This workshop will be focussing on drilling research and development. The objective of these workshops is to provide information and recommendations to DOE on the R&D needs and priorities of the geothermal industry. As a GEA officer, I will be conducting these workshops and it is something you might guess I am interested in. I have been interested in geothermal R&D for 20 years now.

  7. Breast cancer screening disparities among immigrant women by world region of origin: a population-based study in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Mandana; Lofters, Aisha; Kumar, Matthew; Glazier, Richard H

    2016-07-01

    Rates of mammography screening for breast cancer are disproportionately low in certain subgroups including low-income and immigrant women. The purpose of the study was to examine differences in rates of appropriate breast cancer screening (i.e., screening mammography every 2 years) among Ontario immigrant women by world region of origin and explore the association between appropriate breast cancer screening among these women groups and individual and structural factors. A cohort of 183,332 screening-eligible immigrant women living in Ontario between 2010 and 2012 was created from linked databases and classified into eight world regions of origin. Appropriate screening rates were calculated for each region by age group and selected sociodemographic, immigration, and healthcare-related characteristics. The association between appropriate screening across the eight regions of origin and selected sociodemographic, immigration, and health-related characteristics was explored using multivariate Poisson regression. Screening varied by region of origin, with South Asian women (48.5%) having the lowest and Caribbean and Latin American women (63.7%) the highest cancer screening rates. Factors significantly associated with lower screening across the world regions of origin included living in the lowest income neighborhoods, having a refugee status, being a new immigrant, not having a regular physical examination, not being enrolled in a primary care patient enrollment model, having a male physician, and having an internationally trained physician. Multiple interventions entailing cross-sector collaboration, promotion of patient enrollment models, community engagement, comprehensive and intensive outreach to women, and knowledge translation and transfer to physicians should be considered to address screening disparities among immigrant population. Consideration should be given to design and delivery of culturally appropriate and easily accessible cancer screening programs

  8. Status of nuclear power programs in South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    Analysis of nuclear power plants construction in four South American countries - Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Uruguay - is made based on programs set up by government specialized agencies. In Argentina, in a time-span up to 2023, the nuclear power program considers a five-fold increase of the current installed capacity reaching some 5,000 M We. The Brazilian reference scenario will install additional 4,000 M We, up to 2030, to reach a total installed capacity of about 6,000 M We. Other scenarios could bring this total to some 8,000 - 10,000 M We. Chile and Uruguay have started strategic studies to place the nuclear power option in the future energy matrix of the country. The government of Chile set up, in 2007, a Task Group to determine whether nuclear power could be considered a viable option. This Group concluded that nuclear power is a mature, safe competitive, and low carbon emitter technology that could be considered a viable option. A Nuclear Advisory Group was created who made studies to install a nuclear power plant in the 2016-2021 time-span. In December 2008, the Uruguayan Government created a high level Working Group to establish the feasibility conditions for Nuclear Power Generation in the country. (Author)

  9. Status of reduced enrichment programs for research reactors in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, Keiji; Nishihara, Hedeaki [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan); Shirai, Eiji; Oyamada, Rokuro; Sanokawa, Konomo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    The reduced enrichment programs for the JRR-2, JRR-3, JRR-4 and JMTR of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), and the KUR of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) have been partially completed and are mostly still in progress under the Joint Study Programs with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The JMTR and JRR-2 have been already converted to use MEU aluminide fuels in 1986 and 1987, respectively. The operation of the upgraded JRR-3(JRR-3M) has started in March 1990 with the LEU aluminide fuels. Since May 1992, the two elements have been inserted in the KUR. The safety review application for the full core conversion to use LEU silicide in the JMTR was approved in February 1992 and the conversion has been done in January 1994. The Japanese Government approved a cancellation of the KUHFR Project in February 1991, and in April 1994 the U.S. Government gave an approval to utilize HEU in the KUR instead of the KUHFR. Therefore, the KUR will be operated with HEU fuel until 2001. Since March 1994, Kyoto University is continuing negotiation with UKAEA Dounreay on spent fuel reprocessing and blending down of recovered uranium, in addition to that with USDOE.

  10. LANL Environmental ALARA Program Status Report for CY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ensures that radiation exposures to members of the public and the environment from LANL operations, past and present, are below regulatory thresholds and are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) through compliance with DOE Order 458.1 Radiation Protection for the Public and the Environment, and LANL Policy 412 Environmental Radiation Protection (LANL2016a). In 2007, a finding (RL.2-F-1) and observation (RL.2-0-1) in the NNSA/ LASO report, September 2007, Release of Property (Land) Containing Residual Radioactive Material Self-Assessment Report, indicated that LANL had no policy or documented process in place for the release of property containing residual radioactive material. In response, LANL developed PD410, Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental ALARA Program. The most recent version of this document became effective in 2014 (LANL 2014a). The document provides program authorities, responsibilities, descriptions, processes, and thresholds for conducting qualitative and quantitative ALARA analyses for prospective and actual radiation exposures to the public and t o the environment resulting from DOE activities conducted on the LANL site.

  11. LANL Environmental ALARA Program Status Report for CY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gillis, Jessica Mcdonnel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ensures that radiation exposures to members of the public and the environment from LANL operations, past and present, are below regulatory thresholds and are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) through compliance with DOE Order 458.1 Radiation Protection for the Public and the Environment, and LANL Policy 412 Environmental Radiation Protection. In 2007, a finding (RL.2-F-1) and observation (RL.2-0-1) in the NNSA/ LASO report, September 2007, Release of Property (Land) Containing Residual Radioactive Material Self-Assessment Report, indicated that LANL had no policy or documented process in place for the release of property containing residual radioactive material. In response, LANL developed PD410, Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental ALARA Program. The most recent version of this document became effective on September 28, 2011. The document provides program authorities, responsibilities, descriptions, processes, and thresholds for conducting qualitative and quantitative ALARA analyses for prospective and actual radiation exposures to the public and t o the environment resulting from DOE activities conducted on the LANL site.

  12. Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

  13. Status of reusable surface insulation thermal protection system technology programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenshields, D. H.; Meyer, A. J.; Tillian, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    The development of three low-density rigidized insulation materials for the shuttle TPS application is reported. These materials consist of one high purity silica system and two systems based on mullite, an aluminum silicate. Both systems consist of fibers joined together with appropriate binders to obtain a rigidized insulation composite. Both material systems require the application of a glassy coating to provide a wear resistant, high emittance surface and to prevent the absorption of water by the fiber matrix. The technology program has addressed the development of water impervious coatings, methods of assembling the materials in design concepts while minimizing the thermal stress in the insulation, achieving compatibility between the RSI material and the structural system, and test evaluations to demonstrate the feasibility of the surface insulation concept.

  14. On Programmed Cell Death in Plasmodium falciparum: Status Quo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewaldt Engelbrecht

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Conflicting arguments and results exist regarding the occurrence and phenotype of programmed cell death (PCD in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Inconsistencies relate mainly to the number and type of PCD markers assessed and the different methodologies used in the studies. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of knowledge and empirical evidence for PCD in the intraerythrocytic stages of P. falciparum. We consider possible reasons for discrepancies in the data and offer suggestions towards more standardised investigation methods in this field. Furthermore, we present genomic evidence for PCD machinery in P. falciparum. We discuss the potential adaptive or nonadaptive role of PCD in the parasite life cycle and its possible exploitation in the development of novel drug targets. Lastly, we pose pertinent unanswered questions concerning the PCD phenomenon in P. falciparum to provide future direction.

  15. On Programmed Cell Death in Plasmodium falciparum: Status Quo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Dewaldt; Durand, Pierre Marcel; Coetzer, Thérèsa Louise

    2012-01-01

    Conflicting arguments and results exist regarding the occurrence and phenotype of programmed cell death (PCD) in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Inconsistencies relate mainly to the number and type of PCD markers assessed and the different methodologies used in the studies. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of knowledge and empirical evidence for PCD in the intraerythrocytic stages of P. falciparum. We consider possible reasons for discrepancies in the data and offer suggestions towards more standardised investigation methods in this field. Furthermore, we present genomic evidence for PCD machinery in P. falciparum. We discuss the potential adaptive or nonadaptive role of PCD in the parasite life cycle and its possible exploitation in the development of novel drug targets. Lastly, we pose pertinent unanswered questions concerning the PCD phenomenon in P. falciparum to provide future direction. PMID:22287973

  16. 77 FR 47383 - Annual Assessment of the Status of Competition in the Market for the Delivery of Video Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... COMMISSION Annual Assessment of the Status of Competition in the Market for the Delivery of Video Programming... annually to Congress on the status of competition in markets for the delivery of video programming. This... delivery of video programming for the Commission's Fifteenth Report (15th Report). The 15th Report will...

  17. Occupational Trajectories and Immigrant Worker Health

    OpenAIRE

    Crollard, Allison; de Castro, A. B.; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun

    2012-01-01

    During their initial years in the receiving country, many immigrants experience occupational downgrading. Downgrading is a loss of occupational status between one’s last job in the home country and first job in the receiving country, often resulting in overeducation or overqualification. Although the extent and determinants of such occupational trajectories have been characterized, the connection to immigrant worker health has not been widely examined. However, an emerging body of knowledge i...

  18. Cultural Identities of Adolescent Immigrants: A Three-Year Longitudinal Study Including the Pre-Migration Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the cultural identities of adolescent immigrants in the pre-migration period and during the first 3 years after immigration. The target population consists of high-school Jewish adolescents from Russia and Ukraine participating in an Israeli immigration program. In this program, Jewish adolescents immigrate to Israel…

  19. Digital Immigrants in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Márquez, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The constant growth of methods of education that incorporate the Internet into teaching-learning processes has opened up a wide range of opportunities for students across the world to gain entry to undergraduate or graduate degree programs. However, if the enrolling student is a digital immigrant, the chances of success may be limited by the…

  20. Hybrid propulsion for launch vehicle boosters: A program status update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, R. L.; Boardman, T. A.; Claflin, S. E.; Harwell, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Results obtained in studying the origin and suppression of large-amplitude pressure oscillations in a 24 in. diameter hybrid motor using a liquid oxygen/hydroxylterminated polybutadiene/polycyclopentadiene propellant system are discussed. Tests conducted with liquid oxygen flow rates varying from 10 to 40 lbm/sec were designed to gauge the effectiveness of various vaporization chamber flow fields, injector designs, and levels of heat addition in suppressing high-frequency longitudinal mode oscillations. Longitudinal acoustic modes did not arise in any tests. However, initial testing revealed the presence of high-amplitude, sinusoidal, nonacoustic oscillations persisting throughout the burn durations. Analysis showed this to be analogous to chug mode instability in liquid rocket engines brought about by a coupling of motor combustion processes and the liquid oxygen feed system. Analytical models were developed and verified by test data to predict the amplitude and frequency of feed-system-coupled combustion pressure oscillations. Subsequent testing showed that increasing the feed system impedance eliminated the bulk mode instability. This paper documents the work completed to date in performance of the Hybrid Propulsion Technology for Launch Vehicle Boosters Program (NAS8-39942) sponsored by NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center.

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Annual status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The purpose, scope, history, requirements, and management organization of the UMTRA Program are summarized in the Introduction. The remainder of the report describes progress made during the past year (F 1980) and discusses future plants and activities. Early emphasis has been on the four highest-priority sites because of their proximity to population centers. These sites are: (1) Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; (2) Salt Lake City, Utah; (3) Durango, Colorado; and (4) Shiprock, New Mexico (Navajo Reservation). To date, twenty-five vicinity properties near the Canonsburg site and two such properties near the Salt Lake City site have been designated for remedial action. A research effort was undertaken at a major vicinity property, the Mountain States Supply Company in Salt Lake City, to study the effects of heating-and-ventilating-system modification on indoor radon-daughter concentrations. A cooperative agreement was executed between DOE and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. A similar agreement with the State of Utah is expected to be executed in early FY 1981. Further, it is expected that additional cooperative agreements will be negotiated during FY 1981 with the States of Colorado and Wyoming and the Navajo Nation. It is expected that the processing site at Canonsburg, PA (the Canonsburg Industrial Park) will be acquired during FY 1981. Draft Environmental Impact Statements for the four highest-priority sites will be completed during FY 1981.

  2. Immigration to Spain: implications for a unified European Union immigration policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntoon, L

    1998-01-01

    A unified immigration policy is one of the prerequisites for establishing the free movement of people within the European Union (EU). This paper considers the difficulties in establishing a joint policy on the free movement of people within the EU by focusing upon changing immigration policies in Spain. By comparing Spain, a country of only recent, small-scale immigration, to Germany, a country with a longer history of non-European immigration, obstacles to developing and effectively implementing coordinated immigration policies among EU members can be elucidated. The administrative control of entry, estimates of legal and illegal immigrants in the country, and the status of bilateral relations with Morocco are examined in order to highlight the political difficulties encountered in a unified immigration policy both within Spanish society and for the EU. Spain is both a threshold to the EU and a destination. Border control may be the easiest part of implementing a joint immigration policy in the EU. It is more difficult to control settlement. In addition, high rates of unemployment may result among the native host country populations as immigrants more readily accept low-skilled, low-paying jobs.

  3. The association of immigration and acculturation attributes with oral health among immigrants in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Gustavo D; Chen, Yu; Salazar, Christian R; Le Geros, Racquel Z

    2009-10-01

    We examined associations between immigration and acculturation attributes and oral disease among immigrants. We conducted a large cross-sectional study of 1318 immigrants in New York City. We performed comprehensive interviews and oral examinations of the participants and used linear regression models to assess differences in oral disease levels among immigrant subgroups. We also constructed proportional odds models to evaluate the association of oral disease level with length of stay in the United States, age at immigration, and language preference. After we controlled for most known risk factors, country of birth and age at immigration were associated with variations in oral disease prevalence and need for oral health care. Length of stay was inversely associated with need for treatment of dental caries but not with any other indicator of oral disease. Language preference was not associated with any indicator of oral disease. Immigrants' country of birth, length of stay in the United States, and age at immigration played important roles in their oral disease prevalence, independently of most known risk factors for oral diseases. Our findings emphasize the need for more studies to elucidate the complex relationships of ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and culturally influenced factors that impact immigrants' oral health.

  4. Genomic tools in cowpea breeding programs: status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ousmane eBoukar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea is one of the most important grain legumes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. It provides strong support to the livelihood of small-scale farmers through its contributions to their nutritional security, income generation and soil fertility enhancement. Worldwide about 6.5 million metric tons of cowpea are produced annually on about 14.5 million hectares. The low productivity of cowpea is attributable to numerous abiotic and biotic constraints. The abiotic stress factors comprise drought, low soil fertility, and heat while biotic constraints include insects, diseases, parasitic weeds and nematodes. Cowpea farmers also have limited access to quality seeds of improved varieties for planting. Some progress has been made through conventional breeding at international and national research institutions in the last three decades. Cowpea improvement could also benefit from modern breeding methods based on molecular genetic tools. A number of advances in cowpea genetic linkage maps, and quantitative trait loci associated with some desirable traits such as resistance to Striga, Macrophomina, Fusarium wilt, bacterial blight, root-knot nematodes, aphids and foliar thrips have been reported. An improved consensus genetic linkage map has been developed and used to identify QTLs of additional traits. In order to take advantage of these developments single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping is being streamlined to establish an efficient workflow supported by genotyping support service (GSS-client interactions. About 1100 SNPs mapped on the cowpea genome were converted by LGC Genomics to KASP assays. Several cowpea breeding programs have been exploiting these resources to implement molecular breeding, especially for MARS and MABC, to accelerate cowpea variety improvement. The combination of conventional breeding and molecular breeding strategies, with workflow managed through the CGIAR breeding management system (BMS, promises an increase in the number of

  5. Civilian Power Program. Part 1, Summary, Current status of reactor concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Author, Not Given

    1959-09-01

    This study group covered the following: delineation of the specific objectives of the overall US AEC civilian power reactor program, technical objectives of each reactor concept, preparation of a chronological development program for each reactor concept, evaluation of the economic potential of each reactor type, a program to encourage the the development, and yardsticks for measuring the development. Results were used for policy review by AEC, program direction, authorization and appropriation requests, etc. This evaluation encompassed civilian power reactors rated at 25 MW(e) or larger and related experimental facilities and R&D. This Part I summarizes the significant results of the comprehensive effort to determine the current technical and economic status for each reactor concept; it is based on the 8 individual technical status reports (Part III).

  6. Do First Generation Immigrant Adolescents Face Higher Rates of Bullying, Violence and Suicidal Behaviours Than Do Third Generation and Native Born?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottie, Kevin; Dahal, Govinda; Georgiades, Katholiki; Premji, Kamila; Hassan, Ghayda

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a systematic review to examine first generation immigrant adolescents' likelihood of experiencing bullying, violence, and suicidal behaviours compared to their later-generation and native born counterparts, and to identify factors that may underlie these risks. Eighteen studies met full inclusion criteria. First generation immigrant adolescents experience higher rate of bullying and peer aggression compared to third generation and native counterparts. Refugee status and advanced parental age were associated with increased parent to child aggression among South East Asians. Family cohesion was associated with lower rates of violence. Suicidal ideation was lower across most immigrant adolescents' ethnicities, with the exception of Turkish and South Asian Surinamese female adolescents in the Netherlands. Bullying and peer aggression of immigrant children and adolescents and potential mitigating factors such as family cohesion warrant research and program attention by policymakers, teachers and parents.

  7. The revised Stress Measurement of Female Marriage Immigrants in Korea: Evaluation of the psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Hee; Yang, Sook Ja; Chee, Yeon Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The twenty-one item Stress Measurement of Female Marriage Immigrants (SMFMI) was developed to assess stress of female marriage immigrants in Korea. This study reports the psychometric properties of a revised SMFMI (SMFMI-R) for application with female marriage immigrants to Korea who were raising children. Participants were 190 female marriage immigrants from China, Vietnam, the Philippines, and other Asian countries, who were recruited using convenience sampling between November 2013 and December 2013. Survey questionnaires were translated into study participants' native languages (Chinese, Vietnamese, and English). Principal component analysis yielded nineteen items in four factors (family, parenting, cultural, and economic stress), explaining 63.5% of the variance, which was slightly better than the original scale. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated adequate fit for the four-factor model. Based on classic test theory and item response theory, strong support was provided for item discrimination, item difficulty, and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.923). SMFMI-R scores were negatively associated with Korean proficiency and subjective economic status. The SMFMI-R is a valid, reliable, and comprehensive measure of stress for female marriage immigrants and can provide useful information to develop intervention programs for those who may be at risk for emotional stress.

  8. AMOR II: an effort to eradicate psychosocial barriers induced by immigration phenomenon in children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacif-Gomera, María Loris; Lorenzo-González, Rosalía; Hernández, Mercedes; Pérez-Martínez, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    Immigration in the childhood cancer population constitutes a stressor factor because of high biopsychosocial vulnerability. In recent years the incidence of immigrant children in our unit has increased. Since 2005 we have developed a psychosocial program to overcome this challenge. Our objective is to assess its impact on the immigrant pediatric population. We have compared new cases (n=114) from 2005 to 2010 with historical cases (n=95) from 1995 to 2004. We administered a long-term follow-up questionnaire allowing for the assessment of symptoms associated with biopsychosocial variables. Most of our immigrant patients came from Latin America and we observed a significant increase of cases coming from Morocco and Romania. The most common diagnosis was hematological malignancies. From 2005 to 2010 the disease status was mainly initial, whereas in the period 1995 to 2004 most of the patients arrived with advanced disease. Socioeconomic variables amongst these patients tended towards low incomes, high unemployment, and economic difficulties. The implementation of the biopsychosocial protocol AMOR II improved adaptation (P=0.012), the amount and understanding of information received (P=0.002), and family emotional support (P=0.004). In brief, our biopsychosocial protocol had significantly increased some psychosocial variables. However, immigration in Spain is still associated with economic difficulties, "aculturism" and failure to adapt.

  9. Continued advancement of the programming language HAL to an operational status

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    The continued advancement of the programming language HAL to operational status is reported. It is demonstrated that the compiler itself can be written in HAL. A HAL-in-HAL experiment proves conclusively that HAL can be used successfully as a compiler implementation tool.

  10. 48 CFR 52.219-25 - Small Disadvantaged Business Participation Program-Disadvantaged Status and Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... accomplished through using the Electronic Subcontracting Reporting System's Small Disadvantaged Business... Business Participation Program-Disadvantaged Status and Reporting. 52.219-25 Section 52.219-25 Federal... PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.219-25 Small Disadvantaged Business...

  11. Status of the Tau-Charm Facility and highlights of its physics program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1990-02-01

    In this paper I will first discuss the history and current status of the Tau-Charm Facility. I will then focus on the unique aspects of the heavy meson and tau physics program of such a facility, which motivates its construction and operation in the mid-1090's.

  12. On the welfare impacts of an immigration amnesty

    OpenAIRE

    Joël MACHADO

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to assess the effects of an immigration amnesty on agents' welfare by using a simple two-period overlapping generations model. Given that illegal immigrants play a role in the economy even before being regularized, an amnesty differs from new immigration. In the presence of labor market discrimination, capital holders are harmed as the acquisition of legal status increases the wage bill that they pay. The net fiscal effect strongly depends on the discrimination that illegal wo...

  13. Circulation of immigrants to Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Sándor Illés

    2015-01-01

    We measure the demographic patterns associated with international circular migration. Firstly, we define the circulation within the conceptual framework of transnationalism. Secondly, we create macro-scale data bank on long-term international circular migrants based on an original statistical method. Thirdly, we seek to gain further insight into the composition of international circular immigrants by gender, age, and family status. Conclusions indicate the need for future research.

  14. Development of the Stress of Immigration Survey (SOIS): a Field Test among Mexican Immigrant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Rosa Maria; Nápoles, Anna Maria; Gregorich, Steven; Paul, Steven; Lee, Kathryn A.; Stewart, Anita L.

    2016-01-01

    The Stress of Immigration Survey (SOIS) is a screening tool used to assess immigration-related stress. The mixed methods approach included concept development, pretesting, field-testing, and psychometric evaluation in a sample of 131 low-income women of Mexican descent. The 21-item SOIS screens for stress related to language; immigrant status; work issues; yearning for family and home country; and cultural dissonance. Mean scores ranged from 3.6 to 4.4 (1-5 scale, higher is more stress). Cronbach's alphas >.80 for all sub-scales. The SOIS may be a useful screening tool for detecting high levels of immigration-related stress in low-income Mexican immigrant women. PMID:26605954

  15. Development of the Stress of Immigration Survey: A Field Test Among Mexican Immigrant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Rosa Maria; Nápoles, Anna Maria; Gregorich, Steven; Paul, Steven; Lee, Kathryn A; Stewart, Anita L

    2016-01-01

    The Stress of Immigration Survey (SOIS) is a screening tool used to assess immigration-related stress. The mixed methods approach included concept development, pretesting, field testing, and psychometric evaluation in a sample of 131 low-income women of Mexican descent. The 21-item SOIS screens for stress related to language, immigrant status, work issues, yearning for family and home country, and cultural dissonance. Mean scores ranged from 3.6 to 4.4 (a scale of 1-5, higher is more stress). Cronbach α values were more than 0.80 for all subscales. The SOIS may be a useful screening tool for detecting high levels of immigration-related stress in low-income Mexican immigrant women.

  16. Cardiovascular diseases and risk factors among Chinese immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhizhong; Zhao, Dong

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and major CVD risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and smoking among Chinese immigrants by a systematic review of studies from various countries. PubMed and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched for studies of the prevalence of major CVDs and risk factors, and of CVD mortality among Chinese immigrants. The search identified 386 papers, 16 of which met the inclusion criteria for this review. In mainland China, there is a pattern of high stroke prevalence but low coronary heart disease (CHD) prevalence. Among Chinese immigrants, there is a much lower prevalence and mortality of stroke, but a higher prevalence and mortality of CHD, even though these are lower than the rates in immigrants of other ethnicities in the host country. The prevalence of CVD risk factors is also markedly different in immigrants. Compared with mainland Chinese, Chinese immigrants have a higher prevalence of diabetes and hypertension, higher serum cholesterol, poorer dietary patterns, and higher prevalence of obesity and smoking. Thus, the epidemiological pattern of CVD among Chinese immigrants changes compared with resident mainland Chinese. The less healthy environmental factor after immigration may be a major trigger in the adverse CVD status of Chinese immigrants. It is important for policy-makers to pay more attention to specific minority immigrant groups, and to implement more effective preventive measures to improve the health of immigrant populations.

  17. Liquefied gaseous fuels safety and environmental control assessment program: third status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    This Status Report contains contributions from all contractors currently participating in the DOE Liquefied Gaseous Fuels (LG) Safety and Environmental Control Assessment Program and is presented in two principal sections. Section I is an Executive Summary of work done by all program participants. Section II is a presentation of fourteen individual reports (A through N) on specific LGF Program activities. The emphasis of Section II is on research conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Reports A through M). Report N, an annotated bibliography of literature related to LNG safety and environmental control, was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of its LGF Safety Studies Project. Other organizations who contributed to this Status Report are Aerojet Energy Conversion Company; Applied Technology Corporation; Arthur D. Little, Incorporated; C/sub v/ International, Incorporated; Institute of Gas Technology; and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for Reports A through N for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  18. HEALTH AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF CHILDREN UNDER FIVE YEARS IN POSYANDU NUTRITION PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadang Sukandar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The objectives of this research were to analyze health, nutritional status of children under five years and its influential factors. This research was carried out in two sub-districts of Bogor: Sub-District of Ciomas and Sub-District of Darmaga. As many as 16 posyandu nutrition program were obtained. A total number of 240 mothers had been divided into control and intervention groups. Baseline data were collected during the pre-study, while endline data were collected after conducting intervention (experiment. The experiment had been conducted for five months in the form of providing nutrition education once in two weeks and implementing home gardening. The data analysis included estimation of mean, standard deviation, minimum value, maximum value and proportion. Based on the General Linear Model (GLM analysis, it was found that intervention had significant impact on the nutritional status (WAZ of children under five years. Intervention did not have significant effects on the nutritional status according to HAZ and WHZ. Key words: Health status, nutritional status, nutrition program, children under five years.

  19. Latino Immigrants' Biological Parents' Histories of Substance Use Problems in Their Country of Origin Predict Their Pre- and Post-Immigration Alcohol Use Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackson, Timothy C; De La Rosa, Mario; Sanchez, Mariana; Li, Tan

    2015-01-01

    No studies to date have assessed whether recent young adult (aged 18-34) Latino immigrants' biological parents' histories of substance use problems (BPHSUP) in their country of origin predict their alcohol use problems at pre- and post-immigration to the United States (US). BPHSUP in their country of origin were assessed via interviews conducted by bilingual Latino researchers with recent Latino immigrants primarily from Cuba and Central and South America recruited through respondent-driven sampling at the time of their immigration to southeastern US. Three waves of data were collected to document Latino immigrants' severity of alcohol use problems at pre-immigration and 2 annual post-immigration follow-up assessments. BPHSUP+/- status was used as a predictor of Latinos' (N = 452; 45.8% female, 54.2% male) Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores at pre- and post-immigration with age, education, and income as covariates as wells as odds ratios for AUDIT classifications of hazardous use, harmful use, and dependence. BPHSUP+ status predicted Latino immigrants' higher AUDIT scores pre- and post-immigration by gender (P immigrants of BPHSUP- status, controlling for age, education, and income. BPHSUP+ status predicted odds ratios of 3.45 and 2.91 for AUDIT alcohol dependence classification for men and women, respectively. This study documents that BPHSUP+/- status in their country of origin predict their young adult Latino offspring's severity of alcohol use problems pre- and post-immigration. These results may inform (1) community-based health care providers to screen recent young adult Latino immigrants for their BPHSUP+/- status and severity of alcohol use problems to redirect trajectories away from alcohol use disorders toward more normative post-immigration outcomes through culturally relevant prevention services and (2) future research advantages of differential susceptibility theory. Implications for future research and the need for replication

  20. Differences in diabetes prevalence and inequalities in disease management and glycaemic control by immigrant status: a population-based study (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballotari, Paola; Caroli, Stefania; Ferrari, Francesca; Romani, Gabriele; Marina, Greci; Chiarenza, Antonio; Manicardi, Valeria; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo

    2015-02-06

    The diabetes prevalence increases at an alarming rate around the world and understanding disparities in occurrence, care management, and health outcomes may be a starting point towards achieving more effective strategies to prevent and manage it. The aims of this study are to compare immigrants and Italians in terms of the differences in diabetes prevalence and to evaluate inequalities in disease management and glycaemic control by using information included in Reggio Emilia diabetes register. We retrieved from the diabetes register subjects aged 20-74 on December 31(st), 2009. Using citizenship, we created three main groups: Italy, High Developed Countries (HDC), and High Migration Pressure Countries (HMPC). These were split into sub-regions of origin. We calculated age-adjusted prevalence by gender and sub-region. Using logistic regression model, we analyzed the association between area of origin and following indicators: 1) not being in care of diabetes clinics; 2) not having glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) test in 2010; 3) among those tested, having a HbA1c value > = 9% (75 mmol/mol). We found 15,889 Italian and 1,295 HMPC citizens with diabetes. HMPC citizens had higher age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes than Italians (females 5.0% vs 3.6%; males 6.5% vs 5.5%). The excess was mostly due to a strong excess in immigrants from Southern Asia (females 9.7%, males 10.2%) and Northern Africa (females 9.3%, males 5.9%). HMPC citizens were cared for by diabetes clinics in a similar proportion than Italians (OR: 1.08; 95% CI: 0.93-1.25), but had a greater odds of not being tested for HbA1c (OR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.34-1.71), as well as of having HbA1c values equal to or over 9% (OR: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.80-3.14). The outcomes were poorer in HMPC females for the first two outcomes, while there was no difference for the HbA1c values (Wald test for heterogeneity p = 0.0850; p = 0.0156; p = 0.6635, respectively). Our findings highlight the need for gender-oriented actions for

  1. 8 CFR 244.11 - Renewal of application; appeal to the Board of Immigration Appeals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of Immigration Appeals. 244.11 Section 244.11 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS TEMPORARY PROTECTED STATUS FOR NATIONALS OF DESIGNATED STATES § 244.11 Renewal of application; appeal to the Board of Immigration Appeals. If a charging document is served on the alien with a...

  2. Hugging, Drinking Tea, and Listening: Mental Health Needs of Turkish Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohtorik, Yasemin; McWilliams, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Twelve Turkish immigrants were interviewed in a hypothesis-generating, qualitative investigation of their immigration experiences and mental health needs. Findings suggest high levels of psychological distress associated with homesickness, lack of English proficiency, problematic immigration status, difficulty adjusting to a new culture, and…

  3. Immigrants in Community Colleges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert T. Teranishi; Carola Suárez-Orozco; Marcelo Suárez-Orozco

    2011-01-01

    Immigrant youth and children of immigrants make up a large and increasing share of the nation s population, and over the next few decades they will constitute a significant portion of the U. S. workforce...

  4. Immigration in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Horst

    1986-01-01

    Presents sample learning objectives, tasks for students, and reading materials for studying about immigration to the United States. Raises the ethical question of restricting immigration to the United States and addresses the guest worker problem in Western Europe. (JDH)

  5. Obstetric and perinatal outcomes among immigrant and non-immigrant women in Berlin, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Matthias; Borde, Theda; Brenne, Silke; Ramsauer, Babett; Henrich, Wolfgang; Breckenkamp, Jürgen; Razum, Oliver

    2017-10-01

    In Germany, regular immigrants and their descendants have legal and financial access to health care equal to the general citizenry. Nonetheless, some of their health outcomes are comparatively unfavorable, and that is only partially explained by their lower socioeconomic status (SES). The aim of this study was to assess whether this disparity exists also for obstetric and perinatal outcomes. We compared obstetric and perinatal outcomes between immigrant women (first or second generation) and non-immigrant women, delivering at three maternity hospitals in Berlin, Germany, 2011-2012. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to assess immigrant status and other possible risk factors for the baby being delivered preterm, small for gestational age (SGA), or transferred to neonatal care. The final database retained 6702 women, of whom 53.1% were first- or second-generation immigrants. First-generation Turkish immigrant women had significantly lower odds of preterm birth (OR 0.37, P outcomes. This study provides strong evidence that health disparities for obstetric and perinatal health outcomes do not exist in immigrants relative to native Germans, but exist instead in women without post-secondary-level education compared to women with such education, regardless of ethnicity or migration history.

  6. Epidemiological Paradox or Immigrant Vulnerability? Obesity Among Young Children of Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Elizabeth H.; Rendall, Michael S.; Weden, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    According to the “immigrant epidemiological paradox,” immigrants and their children enjoy health advantages over their U.S.-born peers—advantages that diminish with greater acculturation. We investigated child obesity as a potentially significant deviation from this paradox for second-generation immigrant children. We evaluated two alternate measures of mother's acculturation: age at arrival in the United States and English language proficiency. To obtain sufficient numbers of second-generation immigrant children, we pooled samples across two related, nationally representative surveys. Each included measured (not parent-reported) height and weight of kindergartners. We also estimated models that alternately included and excluded mother's pre-pregnancy weight status as a predictor. Our findings are opposite to those predicted by the immigrant epidemiological paradox: children of U.S.-born mothers were less likely to be obese than otherwise similar children of foreign-born mothers; and the children of the least-acculturated immigrant mothers, as measured by low English language proficiency, were the most likely to be obese. Foreign-born mothers had lower (healthier) pre-pregnancy weight than U.S.-born mothers, and this was protective against their second-generation children's obesity. This protection, however, was not sufficiently strong to outweigh factors associated or correlated with the mothers' linguistic isolation and marginal status as immigrants. PMID:26111970

  7. Does acculturation narrow the health literacy gap between immigrants and non-immigrants-An explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantwill, Sarah; Schulz, Peter J

    2017-04-01

    To compare functional health literacy (HL) levels in three immigrant groups to those of the German- and Italian-speaking non-immigrant population in Switzerland. Moreover, to investigate whether language-independent, respectively language-dependent, functional HL and variables of acculturation were associated with self-reported health status among immigrants. Language-independent HL was assessed with the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy (S-TOFHLA) in the respective native languages. Language-dependent HL was measured using Brief Health Literacy Screeners (BHLS) asking about participants' confidence in understanding medical information in the language of the host country. Measures of acculturation included length of stay and age when taking residency in Switzerland. In particular Albanian- and Portuguese-speaking immigrants had lower levels of functional HL. In unadjusted analysis "age when taking residency in Switzerland" was associated with the BHLS. Adjusted analysis showed that the BHLS were significantly associated with self-reported health among all immigrant groups (p≤0.01). Functional HL that is dependent on understanding of medical information in the language of the new host country is a better predictor for self-reported health status among immigrants than language-independent HL. In the clinical setting limited functional HL might be a significant obstacle to successful disease treatment and prevention in immigrants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transition to Motherhood as an Immigrant: Risks and Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruveyde Aydin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The process of transition to motherhood that brings along a number of vital changes may be full of risks and difficulties for immigrant mothers. Poverty, being unfamiliar with the language of the country that the mother migrated, inability of healthcare policies in covering healthcare expenses of immigrants, insufficiency of social assistance and loneliness may negatively affect health of mother and infant. Postpartum immigrant mothers are seen depression, anxiety, stress and social isolation because of these obstacles. Therefore, health care professionals, who provide care to immigrant mothers, should clarify immigrant mothers' religious, cultural beliefs and attitudes. Procurement of peer support is important by developing care programs special to immigrant mothers and ensuring immigrant women to come together. Increase in the number of translators in hospitals and prepara-tion of education materials in native language of mothers will improve the level of benefiting from healthcare services. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2017; 9(3.000: 250-262

  9. 78 FR 15730 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... immigration status information contained within the DHS/USCIS Verification Information System (VIS). The... and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security. ] ACTION: Notice. Overview Information.... Citizenship and Immigration Services and the New York Department of Labor. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The...

  10. 78 FR 15731 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... status information contained within the DHS-USCIS Verification Information System (VIS). The immigration... Homeland Security/U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information: Privacy.... Citizenship and Immigration Services and the Texas Workforce Commission. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The...

  11. A Market for Immigration

    OpenAIRE

    Israelsen, Karl E.; Israelsen, L. Dwight; Israelsen, William J.

    2006-01-01

    Illegal immigration imposes large economic costs on U.s. taxpayers. The costs are disproportionately concentrated on citizens of southern border states and of other states in which illegal immigrants concentrate. The illegal immigrants themselves also suffer significant costs of migration, such as monetary payments for transportation to or across the border and physical costs, including death. These costs, as well as the benefits to the economy of the illegal immigrant labor force, have been ...

  12. Attitudes towards immigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Munch, Jakob Roland; Skaksen, Jan Rose

    2008-01-01

    Using the European Social Survey 2002/3, we develop a new test of whether economic self-interest influences people's attitudes towards immigration, exploiting that people have widely different perceptions of the consequences of immigration......Using the European Social Survey 2002/3, we develop a new test of whether economic self-interest influences people's attitudes towards immigration, exploiting that people have widely different perceptions of the consequences of immigration...

  13. Taxpayer effects of immigration

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Taxpayer effects are a central part of the total economic costs and benefits of immigration, but they have not received much study. These effects are the additional or lower taxes paid by native-born households due to the difference between tax revenues paid and benefits received by immigrant households. The effects vary considerably by immigrant attributes and level of government involvement, with costs usually diminishing greatly over the long term as immigrants integrate fully into society.

  14. Health Inequalities, Deprivation, Immigration and Aboriginality in Canada: A Geographic Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert Pampalon; Denis Hamel; Philippe Gamache

    2010-01-01

    .... It is hypothesized that differences in the magnitude of survival inequalities according to deprivation across Canada are attenuated when immigration and Aboriginal status are accounted for. Methods...

  15. Mediation of short and longer term effects of an intervention program to enhance resilience in immigrants from Mainland China to Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Xiaonan eYu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Few clinical trials report on the active intervention components that result in outcome changes, although this is relevant to further improving efficacy and adapting effective programs to other populations. This paper presents follow-up analyses of a randomized controlled trial to enhance adaptation by increasing knowledge and personal resilience in two separate brief interventions with immigrants from Mainland China to Hong Kong (Yu et al., 2014b. The present paper extends our previous one by reporting on the longer term effect of the interventions on personal resilience, and examining whether the Resilience intervention worked as designed to enhance personal resilience. The four-session intervention targeted at self-efficacy, positive thinking, altruism, and goal setting. In this randomized controlled trial, 220 immigrants were randomly allocated to three arms: Resilience, Information (an active control arm, and Control arms. Participants completed measures of the four active components (self-efficacy, positive thinking, altruism, and goal setting at baseline and immediately after the intervention. Personal resilience was assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and three- and six-month follow-ups. The results showed that the Resilience arm had greater increases in the four active components post-intervention. Changes in each of the four active components at the post-intervention assessment mediated enhanced personal resilience at the three-month follow-up in the Resilience arm. Changes in self-efficacy and goal setting showed the largest effect size, and altruism showed the smallest. The arm effects of the Resilience intervention on enhanced personal resilience at the six-month follow-up were mediated by increases of personal resilience post-intervention (Resilience versus Control and at the three-month follow-up (Resilience versus Information. These findings showed that these four active components were all mediators in this Resilience

  16. Immigrant Health in Rural Maryland: A Qualitative Study of Major Barriers to Health Care Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangaramoorthy, Thurka; Guevara, Emilia M

    2017-08-01

    Immigration to rural areas in new receiving communities like Maryland's Eastern Shore is growing. Despite a rapid rise in immigration and diminishing health system resources, little attention has been focused on barriers to health care access in this region for immigrants. A total of 33 in-depth key informant interviews with providers and immigrants were conducted. Qualitative analysis employing a constant comparison approach was used to explore emergent themes related to barriers to health care access for a growing immigrant population. Participants perceived limited health care resources, lack of health insurance coverage, high health expenditures, language barriers, and non-citizenship status as barriers to immigrants' access of health care. Findings imply that immigrants living and working on the rural Eastern Shore face serious barriers to health care access. Additional work on immigrant health in rural areas and the impacts of immigration to rural health systems are needed.

  17. Undocumented Immigrants and Access to Health Care: Making a Case for Policy Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, Jean

    2014-02-01

    The growth in undocumented immigration in the United States has garnered increasing interest in the arenas of immigration and health care policy reform. Undocumented immigrants are restricted from accessing public health and social service as a result of their immigration status. The Patient Protection and Affordability Care Act restricts undocumented immigrants from participating in state exchange insurance market places, further limiting them from accessing equitable health care services. This commentary calls for comprehensive policy reform that expands access to health care for undocumented immigrants based on an analysis of immigrant health policies and their impact on health care expenditures, public health, and the role of health care providers. The intersectional nature of immigration and health care policy emphasizes the need for nurse policymakers to advocate for comprehensive policy reform aimed at improving the health and well-being of immigrants and the nation as a whole. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions:]br]sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. [Access to health care for undocumented immigrants. Rights and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anne Rytter; Krasnik, Allan; Høg, Erling

    2006-09-04

    The purpose of this article is to illuminate undocumented immigrants' right to access to health care and their access in practice. Undocumented immigrants have a right to equal access to health care. Access to more than emergency health care in Denmark is dependent on immigration status. Medical doctors' duty to treat does not apply to non-emergency health needs, and the options existing in this situation remain ambiguous. In practice, undocumented immigrants in Denmark are able to receive more than emergency health care through unofficial networks of health care providers.

  19. Access to health care for undocumented immigrants: rights and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anne Rytter; Krasnik, Allan; Høg, Erling

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyse undocumented immigrants' right to access to health care and their access in practice. Undocumented immigrants have a right to equal access to health care. Access to more than emergency health care in Denmark is dependent on immigration status. Medical doctors' duty to treat does not apply to non-emergency health needs, and the options existing in this situation remain ambiguous. However, in practice, undocumented immigrants in Denmark are able to receive more than emergency health care through unofficial networks of health care providers.

  20. Teaching America's Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorr, Pamela Wheaton

    2006-01-01

    Whether through movies, stories of immigration, or a myriad of other out-of-the-box ideas, teachers are finding ways to help immigrant students create new futures in a new country. This article looks at schools around the country to find truly creative strategies for teaching immigrant students that work for ESL specialists and regular classroom…

  1. 77 FR 47415 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ..., 110 Stat. 2105 (1996); Title IV, Subtitle A, of Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant... Immigration Services (USCIS)--004--Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE) Program System of..., ``Department of Homeland Security/United States Citizenship and Immigration Services--004-- Systematic Alien...

  2. Chronic disease self-management program: 2-year health status and health care utilization outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorig, K R; Ritter, P; Stewart, A L; Sobel, D S; Brown, B W; Bandura, A; Gonzalez, V M; Laurent, D D; Holman, H R

    2001-11-01

    To assess the 1- and 2-year health status, health care utilization and self-efficacy outcomes for the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP). The major hypothesis is that during the 2-year period CDSMP participants will experience improvements or less deterioration than expected in health status and reductions in health care utilization. Longitudinal design as follow-up to a randomized trial. Community. Eight hundred thirty-one participants 40 years and older with heart disease, lung disease, stroke, or arthritis participated in the CDSMP. At 1- and 2-year intervals respectively 82% and 76% of eligible participants completed data. Health status (self-rated health, disability, social/role activities limitations, energy/fatigue, and health distress), health care utilization (ER/outpatient visits, times hospitalized, and days in hospital), and perceived self-efficacy were measured. Compared with baseline for each of the 2 years, ER/outpatient visits and health distress were reduced (P <0.05). Self-efficacy improved (P <0.05). The rate of increase is that which is expected in 1 year. There were no other significant changes. A low-cost program for promoting health self-management can improve elements of health status while reducing health care costs in populations with diverse chronic diseases.

  3. Undocumented immigrants and their use of medical services in Orange County, California

    OpenAIRE

    Chavez, LR

    2012-01-01

    Does an undocumented immigration status predict the use of medical services? To explore this question, this paper examines medical care utilization of undocumented Latino immigrants compared to Latino legal immigrants and citizens, and non-Latino whites in Orange County, California. Data were collected through a random sample telephone survey of 805 Latinos and 396 non-Hispanic whites between January 4 and January 30, 2006. Findings show that undocumented immigrants had relatively low incomes...

  4. Higher risk of gastric cancer among immigrants to Ontario: a population-based matched cohort study with over 2 million individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Rinku; Asidianya, Nnenna; Lee, Faith; Coburn, Natalie; Rabeneck, Linda; Paszat, Lawrence

    2017-12-28

    The risk of gastric carcinoma (GC) varies around the world and between females and males. We aimed to compare the risk of GC among immigrants to Ontario, Canada, to the risk of GC in its general population. This was a retrospective population-based matched cohort study from 1991 to 2014. We identified immigrants who were first eligible for the Ontario Health Insurance Plan at age 40 years or older, and matched 5 controls by year of birth and sex. We calculated crude rates and relative rates of GC stratified by sex. We modeled GC hazard using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression, where a time-varying coefficient was incorporated to examine changes in the association of immigrant status with GC hazard over time. Among females, 415 GC cases were identified among 209,843 immigrants and 1872 among 1,049,215 controls. Among males, 596 GC cases were identified among 191,792 immigrants and 2998 among 958,960 controls. Comparing immigrants from East Asia and Pacific with the controls, the crude relative rate of GC was 1.54 for females and 1.32 for males. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for GC among female immigrants was 1.29 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12, 1.48] within 10 years and 1.19 (1.01, 1.40) beyond 10 years; for males, the HR was 1.17 (1.04, 1.31) within 10 years and 1.00 (0.87, 1.15) beyond 10 years. The risk of GC among immigrants is elevated. Although high-risk immigrant populations in Ontario have been identified, further knowledge is required before a program of GC prevention that is targeted to them can be planned.

  5. Upgrade programs. Status and prospective; Programme de renovation. Etat et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loyer, F. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourdes (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    Arguments for launching a renovation program for GANIL system, taking into account aging and wear, are analyzed. A statistics of failures related to vacuum systems, power supplies, electronics, cooling systems, beam dumps and other equipment is given. The renovation program is targeted to: replacement of obsolete components, introduction of advanced systems of failure diagnosis, augmentation of performances of the new regulating and control system and improvement in the performance characteristics of certain fundamental equipment. The first results and to date status of the program development is reported. Mentioned are the works related to control of HF cavities and the associated amplifiers, electronics, the system of cavity synchronization, power supply, RMN, system commutation grid, pumping equipment, etc. Also, improvements concerning the machine data acquisition and online processing are referred to as well as program cost estimations 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Annual Report of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program: Fiscal Year 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terraqua, Inc. (Wauconda, WA)

    2009-07-20

    This document was created as an annual report detailing the accomplishments of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) in the Upper Columbia Basin in fiscal year 2008. The report consists of sub-chapters that reflect the various components of the program. Chapter 1 presents a report on programmatic coordination and accomplishments, and Chapters 2 through 4 provide a review of how ISEMP has progressed during the 2008 fiscal year in each of the pilot project subbasins: the John Day (Chapter 2), Wenatchee/Entiat (Chapter 3) and Salmon River (Chapter 4). Chapter 5 presents a report on the data management accomplishments in 2008.

  7. Higher education and children in immigrant families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Sandy; Flores, Stella M

    2011-01-01

    The increasing role that immigrants and their children, especially those from Latin America, are playing in American society, Sandy Baum and Stella Flores argue, makes it essential that as many young newcomers as possible enroll and succeed in postsecondary education. Immigrant youths from some countries find the doors to the nation's colleges wide open. But other groups, such as those from Latin America, Laos, and Cambodia, often fail to get a postsecondary education. Immigration status itself is not a hindrance. The characteristics of the immigrants, such as their country of origin, race, and parental socioeconomic status, in addition to the communities, schools, and legal barriers that greet them in the United States, explain most of that variation. Postsecondary attainment rates of young people who come from low-income households and, regardless of income or immigration status, whose parents have no college experience are low across the board. Exacerbating the financial constraints is the reality that low-income students and those whose parents have little education are frequently ill prepared academically to succeed in college. The sharp rise in demand for skilled labor over the past few decades has made it more urgent than ever to provide access to postsecondary education for all. And policy solutions, say the authors, require researchers to better understand the differences among immigrant groups. Removing barriers to education and to employment opportunities for undocumented students poses political, not conceptual, problems. Providing adequate funding for postsecondary education through low tuition and grant aid is also straightforward, if not easy to accomplish. Assuring that Mexican immigrants and others who grow up in low-income communities have the opportunity to prepare themselves academically for college is more challenging. Policies to improve the elementary and secondary school experiences of all children are key to improving the postsecondary

  8. Nuclear safeguards research and development. Program status report, October 1980-January 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, C.N. (comp.)

    1981-11-01

    This report presents the status of the Nuclear Safeguards Research and Development Program pursued by the Energy, Chemistry-Materials Science, and Operational Security/Safeguards Divisions of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics include nondestructive assay technology development and applications, international safeguards systems. Also discussed are training courses, technology transfer, analytical chemistry methods for fissionable materials safeguards, the Department of Energy Computer Security Technical Center, and operational security.

  9. Effects of a family-based childhood obesity treatment program on parental weight status

    OpenAIRE

    Trier, Cæcilie; Dahl, Maria; Stjernholm, Theresa; Nielsen, Tenna R. H.; Bøjsøe, Christine; Fonvig, Cilius E.; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of overweight/obesity among parents of children entering childhood obesity treatment and to evaluate changes in the parents' weight statuses during their child's treatment. Methods: The study included parents of 1,125 children and adolescents aged 3-22 years, who were enrolled in a multidisciplinary childhood obesity treatment program. At baseline, weight and height of the parents were obtained by self-reported information and...

  10. Extramural Programs of the National Library of Medicine: Program Objectives and Present Status *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marjorie P.; Douglass, Carl D.; Kefauver, David F.

    1966-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine Extramural Program, utilizing the authorities of the Medical Library Assistance Act of 1965 and the Public Health Service Act, includes support for library construction, improving and expanding basic library resources, research and development, man-power development, publications, and support for the operation of regional health sciences libraries. The program objectives relating to these various activities have been outlined. A $4,000,000 supplement has been appropriated by the Congress for fiscal year 1966 to implement the authorities of the Act. With the construction provision available in fiscal year 1967, over $13,000,000 has been requested for the second year of the program. The Medical Library Assistance Act is intended to catalyze and stimulate expanded support of medical libraries by their host institutions. Bold and imaginative plans by the medical library community are essential to the full success of the endeavor. PMID:5921469

  11. Overcoming Language and Literacy Barriers: Using Student Response System Technology to Collect Quality Program Evaluation Data from Immigrant Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Susan K.; Mao, Dung

    2016-01-01

    Student response system technology was employed for parenting education program evaluation data collection with Karen adults. The technology, with translation and use of an interpreter, provided an efficient and secure method that respected oral language and collective learning preferences and accommodated literacy needs. The method was popular…

  12. Utilisation of psychiatrists and psychologists in private practice among non-Western labour immigrants, immigrants from refugee-generating countries and ethnic Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Smith; Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Kreiner, Svend

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The stressful migration process has been associated with higher vulnerability for mental health problems, implying a greater need for mental healthcare among immigrants compared with native-born. Our objective was to investigate whether potential differences in the use of psychiatrists...... and psychologists in labour immigrants, immigrants from refugee-generating countries (RGC), and ethnic Danes could be fully explained by mental health status. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide survey in 2007 with 3,573 individuals aged 18-66 comprising ethnic Danes, labour immigrants (Pakistan and Turkey......: Overall, 2.2 % among ethnic Danes, 1.4 % among labour immigrants and 6.5 % among immigrants from RGC consulted a psychiatrist or psychologist. In adjusted analyses, for psychiatrists, compared with ethnic Danes, labour-immigrant women (multiplicative effect = 1.78), and immigrant women from RGC...

  13. Immigration and income inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deding, Mette; Hussain, Azhar; Jakobsen, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    During the last two decades most Western countries have experienced increased net immigration as well as increased income inequality. This article analyzes the effects on income inequality of an increased number of immigrants in Denmark and Germany for the 20- year period 1984-2003 and how...... the impact of the increased number of immigrants differs between the two countries. We find higher inequality for immigrants than natives in Denmark but vice versa for Germany. Over the period 1984-2003, this particular inequality gap has narrowed in both countries. At the same time, the contribution...... of immigrants to overall inequality has increased, primarily caused by increased between-group inequality. The share of immigrants in the population is more important for the change in overall inequality in Denmark than in Germany, while the opposite is the case for inequality among immigrants....

  14. Immigration and Prosecutorial Discretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonio, Dorie; Lochner, Todd; Heddens, Myriah

    Immigration has become an increasingly salient national issue in the US, and the Department of Justice recently increased federal efforts to prosecute immigration offenses. This shift, however, relies on the cooperation of US attorneys and their assistants. Traditionally federal prosecutors have enjoyed enormous discretion and have been responsive to local concerns. To consider how the centralized goal of immigration enforcement may have influenced federal prosecutors in regional offices, we review their prosecution of immigration offenses in California using over a decade's worth of data. Our findings suggest that although centralizing forces influence immigration prosecutions, individual US attorneys' offices retain distinct characteristics. Local factors influence federal prosecutors' behavior in different ways depending on the office. Contrary to expectations, unemployment rates did not affect prosecutors' willingness to pursue immigration offenses, nor did local popular opinion about illegal immigration.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan. Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Ellingson, Robert G.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Klein, Steve A.; McFarquhar, Gregory M.; Lamb, Peter J.; Long, Charles M.; Verlinde, Johannes

    2004-10-30

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years; Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square; Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds; Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations; Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites; Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale; and, Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote

  16. Economic and Cultural Drivers of Immigrant Support Worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentino, Nicholas A.; Soroka, Stuart N.; Iyengar, Shanto

    2017-01-01

    Employing a comparative experimental design drawing on over 18,000 interviews across eleven countries on four continents, this article revisits the discussion about the economic and cultural drivers of attitudes towards immigrants in advanced democracies. Experiments manipulate the occupational...... status, skin tone and national origin of immigrants in short vignettes. The results are most consistent with a Sociotropic Economic Threat thesis: In all countries, higher-skilled immigrants are preferred to their lower-skilled counterparts at all levels of native socio-economic status (SES......). There is little support for the Labor Market Competition hypothesis, since respondents are not more opposed to immigrants in their own SES stratum. While skin tone itself has little effect in any country, immigrants from Muslim-majority countries do elicit significantly lower levels of support, and racial animus...

  17. TUBERCULOSIS IN TROPICAL AREAS AND IMMIGRANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Zammarchi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available About 95% of cases and 98% of deaths due to tuberculosis (TB occurs in tropical countries while in temperate low incidence countries, a disproportionate portion of TB cases is diagnosed in immigrants. Urbanization, poverty, poor housing conditions and ventilation, poor nutritional status, low education level, the HIV co-epidemic, the growing impact of chronic conditions such as diabetes are the main determinants of the current TB epidemiology in tropical areas. TB care in these contests is complicated by several barriers such as geographical accessibility, educational, cultural, socio-psychological and gender issues. High quality microbiological and radiological facilities are not widely available and erratic supply of anti-TB drugs may affects tropical areas from time to time. Nevertheless in recent years, TB control programs reached major achievements in tropical countries as demonstrated by several indicators. Migrants have an high risk of acquire TB before migration. Moreover, after migration, they are exposed to additional risk factors for acquiring new infection or reactivate it such as poverty, stressful living conditions, social inequalities, overcrowded housing, malnutrition, substance abuse, and limited access to health care. TB mass screening programs for migrants have been implemented in low endemic countries, but present several limitations. Screening programs should not represent a stand-alone intervention, but a component of a wider approach integrated with other healthcare activities to ensure the health of migrants.

  18. Risk perception about zoonoses in immigrants and Italian workers in Northwestern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Cediel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: To assess factors associated with a low risk perception of zoonoses and to identify the gaps in knowledge about transmission and prevention of zoonoses in immigrant and Italian workers. MÉTODOS: A cross-sectional study with 175 workers in the agro-livestock and agro-food industry in Piemonte, Italy, was carried out. Data were collected with a semi-structured questionnaire based on knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP survey. We calculated proportions and used chi-square tests and odds ratios to assess associations. Eight individual interviews with key informants on immigration and public health in Piemonte were carried out. RESULTADOS: Participants were 82 (47% Italians and 93 (53% immigrants. Immigrants were from Romania, Morocco, Albania, India, China, Argentina, Peru, Macedonia, Ivory Coast, Ukraine and Colombia. The study revealed significant differences in risk perception at work (p = 0.001. We found associations between "not having correct knowledge about zoonoses" and the following variables: i. "being immigrant" OR = 4.1 (95%CI 1.7;9.8 p ≤ 0.01; ii. "working in the livestock industry" OR = 2.9 (95%CI 1.2;15.4 p = 0.01; and iii. "being an unqualified worker" OR = 4.4 (95%CI 2.9;15.4 p ≤ 0.01. Another strong association was found between being immigrant and having a low job qualification OR = 6.7 (IC95% 2.9 - 15.4 p ≤ 0.01. Asian immigrants were the group with the highest frequency of risky behaviours and the lowest level of knowledge about zoonoses. CONCLUSÕES: Our results indicate that there were differences in risk perception of zoonoses between the groups participating in our study. These results suggest that immigrant status can be considered a risk factor for having lower risk perception and lower level of knowledge of zoonoses at work. There is a relationship between this specific knowledge of zoonoses and lack of training and instruction among migrant populations. Our results stress the need for developing

  19. Immigration and Labor Government in Australia: 1983-95

    OpenAIRE

    Jock Collins

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the track record of the Labor Government (1983-9S) on matters related to immigration and ethnic diversity. The article first reviews the changes in the size and composition of immigration intakes since 1983 and looks at the controversies surrounding the refugee and business migration programs. It then reviews the Labor record on multiculturalism and settlement issues, including the issues of citizenship and racism. The major immigration reports commissione...

  20. Immigrant Sexual Citizenship: Intersectional Templates among Mexican Gay Immigrants to the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Steven; Carrillo, Héctor

    2014-01-01

    Existing literature on sexual citizenship has emphasized the sexuality-related claims of de jure citizens of nation-states, generally ignoring immigrants. Conversely, the literature on immigration rarely attends to the salience of sexual issues in understanding the social incorporation of migrants. This article seeks to fill the gap by theorizing and analyzing immigrant sexual citizenship. While some scholars of sexual citizenship have focused on the rights and recognition granted formally by the nation-state and others have stressed more diffuse, cultural perceptions of community and local belonging, we argue that the lived experiences of immigrant sexual citizenship call for multiscalar scrutiny of templates and practices of citizenship that bridge national policies with local connections. Analysis of ethnographic data from a study of 76 Mexican gay and bisexual male immigrants to San Diego, California reveals the specific citizenship templates that these men encounter as they negotiate their intersecting social statuses as gay/bisexual and as immigrants (legal or undocumented); these include an "asylum" template, a "rights" template, and a "local attachments" template. However, the complications of their intersecting identities constrain their capacity to claim immigrant sexual citizenship. The study underscores the importance of both intersectional and multiscalar approaches in research on citizenship as social practice.

  1. Immigrants in Slovenia: Integration Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janja Žitnik

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the latest statistics, the author estimates the present share of first- and second-generation immigrants in Slovenia’s population. After examining the quantity and intensity of those public efforts in Slovenia that have been focused on unresolved problems of the immigrants’ social and cultural integration, she continues to question the equality of immigrant minorities in Slovenia, and the sufficiency of the existing programs aimed at facilitating their integration with Slovenian society at large. She explains her doubts about the general assumption that a very clear distinction should be made between the rights of the autochthonous minorities and those of the immigrant ones as far as their special protection is concerned. In the third section of this article, the author discusses the social-ethnic stratification of Slovenian society and tries to look into the psychological background of the nationality/ethnicity statistics. She presents some aspects of the immigrants’ daily experience in Slovenian social, cultural, educational and working milieu, and points to the authorities’ attitude toward them. She comments on the burning issue of the “deleted residents”, and illustrates it with the experience of one of the persons involved. The fourth section, in which the most regular symptoms of Slovenian xenophobia are presented, consists of first-hand observations and focuses on the daily human attitude of the national majority towards the immigrant minorities. Finally the author compares the nature of the specific needs of Slovenians as a “European national minority” with the needs of the immigrant minorities in Slovenia.

  2. Educational gradients in five Asian immigrant populations: Do country of origin, duration and generational status moderate the education-health relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Ro

    2016-12-01

    Overall, Asians show an attenuated relationship between education and self-rated health compared to US-Whites that persists over duration in the US and generational status. Our findings show shortcomings in migration and acculturation theories to explain these gradient patterns. Future research could use binational data or explore psychosocial factors to identify potential suppressors of educational gradients.

  3. Depression and nutritional status of elderly participants of the Hiperdia Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millena Mirelle Pereira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: evaluate the relationship between depression and nutritional status of elderly enrolled in the Hiperdia Program.Methods: cross-sectional study in 91 elderly submitted to nutritional assessment and a structured questionnaire forscreening depression, the Geriatric Depression Scale. Results: there was prevalence of women, 60-65 years old. There wasminimal or moderate depression in 61.5% and severe depression in 2.2%. Proportionally high values of waist circumferencewere identified (91.8% and overweight (67.6% in elderly patients with minimal or moderate depression. Conclusion:there is an increasing imbalance in the nutritional status among women with a risk of developing cardiovascular disease,as well as overweight. Elderly are under health risk related to depression. This suggests that despite being inserted in aprogram for control of chronic diseases, they must be accompanied by the health team to improve their quality of life.

  4. Depression and anxiety symptoms, acculturation, depression stigma and psychological help-seeking among Russian-speaking skilled immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Demutska, Alla

    2017-01-01

    Immigrants constitute 24 percent of the Australian population, with skilled immigration becoming the fastest growing migration stream in Australia. Nonetheless, epidemiological data and systematic research of this population is lacking. Most recent Russian-speaking immigrants coming from the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have arrived to Australia on the skilled immigrant program, and there is also a lack of research on this particular cultural group. Skilled immigrants are expected to adapt bette...

  5. After abduction: exploring access to reintegration programs and mental health status among young female abductees in Northern Uganda

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muldoon, Katherine A; Muzaaya, Godfrey; Betancourt, Theresa S; Ajok, Mirriam; Akello, Monica; Petruf, Zaira; Nguyen, Paul; Baines, Erin K; Shannon, Kate

    2014-01-01

    .... Among a group of young female abductees in northern Uganda, this study examined access to post-abduction reintegration programming and tested for between group differences in mental health status...

  6. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Biological Effects of Toxic Contaminants in Sediments from Long Island Sound and Environs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of sediment toxicity was carried out by NOAA's National Status and Trends Program in the coastal bays that surround Long Island Sound in New York and...

  7. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Magnitude and Extent of Sediment Toxicity in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of the toxicity of sediments was performed by NOAA's National Status and Trends (NSandT) Program throughout the Hudson-Raritan Estuary. The objectives of...

  8. Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) Program: Selected Methods for Monitoring Chemical Contaminants and their Effects in Aquatic Ecosystems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmitt, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the suite of biological methods of the U.S. Geological Survey Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends program for monitoring chemical contaminants and their effects on fish...

  9. Who is afraid of immigrants? Social predictors of fear of immigrants in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Năstuţă

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the assumption that „fear” or „the threat feeling” felt on immigrants as a group is a strong predictor of negative reaction and actions against these out-groups we are trying to identify in this paper the social predictors of these feelings. If most studies on anti-immigrant attitudes are oriented mainly to economic effects, city or municipality effects we included in our analysis not only the clasical variable like education, income, age, gender, professional status, citizenship as in previous studies, but also the religious affiliation and immigration descendence. Starting from EVS 2008 data we obtained results that confirms other studies and also we identified the positive strong effect of religious denomination on immigration threat feelings.

  10. Emigrant Politics, Immigrant Engagement: Homeland Ties and Immigrant Political Identity in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Waldinger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Immigrants are also emigrants, possessing social ties that link them to people and places left behind. Although this duality is inherent to the migration process, researchers typically separate the study of emigration from that of immigration. Using new survey data on Latino immigrant social and political engagement in the sending and receiving society, we assess how political attitudes and national allegiance are shaped by social and political ties acquired at home and abroad. We find that immigrants’ home country social ties yield modest political consequences, whereas the more important influences sustaining connections to homeland polities stem from premigration political experiences. Both cross-border social ties and premigration political experiences reinforce homeland national identities. Furthermore, the acquisition of U.S. citizenship tends to corrode homeland attachments and Latino immigrants are more likely to shift political allegiance from home to host state once legal status is obtained.

  11. Implementation of a nutrition education program in a handball team; consequences on nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-López, Jorge; Molina, José Manuel; Chirosa, Luis Javier; Florea, Daniela; Sáez, Laura; Jiménez, Jorge; Planells, Paloma; Pérez de la Cruz, Antonio; Planells, Elena

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate nutritional status and dietary habits after implementation of a nutritional education program in professional handball players. Longitudinal study of 14 handball players evaluated with 72-h recall, a questionnaire on food consumption and anthropometric measures during 4 months. The intervention consisted of a nutrition education program. Energy intake was consistently below the recommended allowances. Macronutrient intakes as a percentage of total energy intake were below the recommended allowances for carbohydrates, and above recommended allowances for fats. Nutritional education was followed by a significant increase (p Nutritional education with continuous follow-up to monitor athletes' dietary habits may lead them to adopt appropriate nutritional habits to optimize dietary intakes. The lack of specific recommendations for micronutrient intakes in athletes leads to confusion regarding appropriate intakes; biochemical tests that yield normal values (albeit approaching cut-off values for deficiency) may disguise deficient status for some nutrients when strenuous exercise is involved. In-depth studies with nutrition education programs that include long-term follow-up are advisable to avoid deficiencies that can lead to irreversible damage in competitive athletes. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Unauthorized Immigrants Prolong the Life of Medicare's Trust Fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallman, Leah; Wilson, Fernando A; Stimpson, James P; Bearse, Adriana; Arsenault, Lisa; Dube, Blessing; Himmelstein, David; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2016-01-01

    Unauthorized immigrants seldom have access to public health insurance programs such as Medicare Part A, which pays hospitals and other health facilities and is funded through the Medicare Trust Fund. We tabulated annual and total Trust Fund contributions and withdrawals by unauthorized immigrants (i.e., outlays on their behalf) from 2000 to 2011 using the Current Population Survey and Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys. We estimated when the Trust Fund would be depleted if unauthorized immigrants had neither contributed to it nor withdrawn from it. We estimated Trust Fund surpluses by unauthorized immigrants if 10 % were to become authorized annually over the subsequent 7 years. From 2000 to 2011, unauthorized immigrants contributed $2.2 to $3.8 billion more than they withdrew annually (a total surplus of $35.1 billion). Had unauthorized immigrants neither contributed to nor withdrawn from the Trust Fund during those 11 years, it would become insolvent in 2029-1 year earlier than currently predicted. If 10 % of unauthorized immigrants became authorized annually for the subsequent 7 years, Trust Fund surpluses contributed by unauthorized immigrants would total $45.7 billion. Unauthorized immigrants have prolonged the life of the Medicare Trust Fund. Policies that curtail the influx of unauthorized immigrants may accelerate the Trust Fund's depletion.

  13. Knowledge of Occupational Chemical Exposure and Smoking Behavior in Korean Immigrant Drycleaners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Dal Lae; Duffy, Sonia A; Hong, OiSaeng

    2016-02-01

    To examine the association between knowledge of chemical exposure at work and cigarette smoking among Korean immigrant drycleaners. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a total of 151 Korean immigrant drycleaners (mean age = 49 years, 64 % male) from 96 drycleaning shops in a Midwestern state. The data were collected on demographic and work-related characteristics, knowledge of occupational chemical exposure, health concerns associated with chemical exposure, and smoking status. Approximately 25 % of participants were current smokers. The multivariate regression showed that greater knowledge of occupational chemical exposures was significantly associated with a lower likelihood of current smoking [odds ratio (OR) .63; 95 % confidence interval (CI) .41-.95]. Furthermore, male gender (OR 6.32; 95 % CI 1.66-24.00), shorter-term residence in the US (OR .93; 95 % CI .88-.98), and having multiple duties (OR 2.76; 95 % CI 1.01-7.51) were important covariates associated with current smoking among Korean immigrant drycleaners. Knowledge on occupational chemical exposure was significantly associated with smoking among Korean immigrant drycleaners. Smoking cessation programs for this population should consider integrated approaches that incorporate work environment factors into individual and sociocultural components.

  14. A Status Report of the X-50LR Program: A Laser Propulsion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Frank B., Jr.; Larson, C. W.; Kalliomaa, Wayne M.

    2001-10-01

    In 1996, the Air Force Research Lab's Propulsion Division at Edwards AFB initiated a program that had as its main objective to launch a laser-propelled vehicle into a suborbital trajectory within a period of 5 years in order to demonstrate the concept and its attractive features. The concept was to be a nanosatellite in which the laser propulsion engine and satellite hardware were intimately shared. This concept was based upon a 1989 design developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute under a Space Defense Initiative Office laser propulsion program. The forebody aeroshell had been designed to act as an external compression surface (i.e. the airbreathing engine inlet). The afterbody served a dual function as a primary receptive optic (parabolic mirror) for the laser beam and as an external expansion surface (plug nozzle). The primary thrust structure was the centrally located annular shroud. The shroud provided air through inlets and acts as a energy absorption chamber for plasma formation. In the rocket mode, the air inlets were closed, and the afterbody and shroud combined to form the rocket thrust chamber and plug ('aerospike-type') nozzle. The fully-scale vehicle was 1.4 meters in diameter with a dry mass of 120 kg. Fully fueled, this vehicle would have an initial mass of about 240 kg (i.e., a mass fraction of 0.5), and would be launched into orbit with a 100 megawatt-class infrared ground-based laser (GBL). This laser propelled vehicle would be a single-stage-to-orbit (i.e., airbreathing only to M=5 and 30 km; a laser thermal rocket, using liquid propellants, at higher altitudes and in space) using a combined-cycle pulsed detonation engine. Once in space, the Lightcraft was to use its one meter diameter optical system to provide, for example, Earth surveys from low Earth orbit with 8-15 cm resolution in the visible light frequencies. Such a device was simple, reliable, safe, environmentally clean, and could have a very high all azimuth on demand launch rate.

  15. Sabbatical programs and the status of academic emergency medicine: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, E; James, T; Bernstein, J

    1999-09-01

    The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) commissioned a survey in 1998 to describe sabbatical programs, academic rank, and tenure, and to shed light on factors affecting the continuum of faculty development, as a context for evaluating the potential importance of emergency medicine (EM) sabbatical programs. The chairs of 120 EM residency programs were surveyed. The response rate was 90%. Of 108 responses, 44 were academic EM departments (AEMDs); ten were their affiliates. The setting was urban for 82%; 37% were publicly funded and 58% privately. AEMDs were more likely to have a tenure track and eligibility for a sabbatical program, but not more likely to use a sabbatical program. Among 2,042 ranked EM faculty, there were 121 professors and 346 associate professors. Mean sabbatical length was six months, provided at full pay requiring a mean of 5.7 years of employment. Among 39 programs reporting eligibility for an EM sabbatical, requirements included: tenure (43%), academic rank of associate professor (78%), an application with multiple approval levels (92%), and a formal report (75%). Thirteen EM programs used sabbaticals; only 40 faculty members altogether (9% of senior faculty) have taken sabbaticals. The mean value of sabbaticals (rated by users on a scale of 1 to 10) was 6.8. Reduced funding, lack of departmental status, difficulty retaining faculty, Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) regulations, graduate medical education (GME) cutbacks, and no release time were identified as challenges for emergency physicians (EPs) wishing to participate in sabbaticals. Strategies proposed to overcome these obstacles include quality customer service, streamlined operations, outside contracts, computerization, hiring individuals with PhDs, collaboration, political activity, and faculty development. A sabbatical can be beneficial for individuals and their institutions, but presently EPs have not been able to maximize use of available opportunities. Some

  16. Welfare reform and older immigrants' health insurance coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Yunju

    2008-11-01

    I examined changes in older immigrants' health insurance coverage after welfare reform in the United States to determine whether the reform measures achieved their goal of saving money by reducing Medicaid participation without increasing the number of uninsured people. Data were obtained from older adults who participated in the Current Population Survey's Annual Social and Economic Supplement from 1994 to 1996 and 2001 to 2005. I used logistic regression to estimate changes in the sample's Medicaid and health insurance coverage after welfare reform, paying special attention to noncitizens and recent immigrants. Older immigrants' health insurance status was associated with their citizenship status and length of stay in the United States. Medicaid participation significantly decreased among noncitizens and recent immigrants but increased among naturalized citizens. Private health insurance and employer-sponsored insurance coverage significantly increased among recent immigrants but decreased among established immigrants and naturalized citizens. The probability of being uninsured did not significantly change among any group of immigrants. Given increases in postreform Medicaid participation among some immigrant groups, my findings suggest that the long-term cost-saving effectiveness of the current restrictive Medicaid eligibility policy is doubtful.

  17. Violence in relation to (immigrating women in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Van Der Troost

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This text characterizes the situation of (immigrating women in the European Union. In Europe, in 2006, there was a contingent of 18.5 million (immigrants coming from Developing Countries, 54% of which were women. (ImMigrating women suffer vulnerabilities linked to work, to lower political and social participation, higher exposition to violence and sexism. The authors present the current legislation concerned to (immigration in the 2000-2007 period, showing some integration programs and policies and highlighting the respect to basic human rights. 

  18. Undocumented immigrants and their use of medical services in Orange County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Leo R

    2012-03-01

    Does an undocumented immigration status predict the use of medical services? To explore this question, this paper examines medical care utilization of undocumented Latino immigrants compared to Latino legal immigrants and citizens, and non-Latino whites in Orange County, California. Data were collected through a random sample telephone survey of 805 Latinos and 396 non-Hispanic whites between January 4 and January 30, 2006. Findings show that undocumented immigrants had relatively low incomes and were less likely to have medical insurance; experience a number of stresses in their lives; and underutilize medical services when compared to legal immigrants and citizens. Predictors of use of medical services are found to include undocumented immigration status, medical insurance, education, and gender. Undocumented Latinos were found to use medical services less than legal immigrants and citizens, and to rely more on clinic-based care when they do seek medical services. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Exploring the mutual constitution of racializing and medicalizing discourses of immigrant tuberculosis in the Canadian press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitmanova, Sylvia; Gustafson, Diana L

    2012-07-01

    Drawing on critical discourse analysis of Canadian press coverage of the immigrant tuberculosis problem, we expose the complex relationship between press-constructed discourses of immigrant health and current tuberculosis control policies in Canada. The focus of these policies is on screening and surveillance of immigrants rather than addressing social inequalities underlying the problem of immigrant tuberculosis. The biomedical focus and racializing character of current policies were reinforced in the Canadian press by depicting tuberculosis as a biomedical (rather than a social) disease imported to Canada by immigrants. The status of the immigrant body as health threat was produced by and through preexisting and mutually constitutive racializing and medicalizing discourses materialized in press coverage and tuberculosis control policies. Deracialization and demedicalization of health information disseminated in the press are potentially important factors to be considered when revising health policies that would address the socioeconomic and political factors that determine the health status of Canadian immigrants.

  20. Language Barriers and Immigrant Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Andrew; Isphording, Ingo E

    2017-06-01

    We study the impact of language deficiency on the health status of childhood migrants to Australia. Our identification strategy relies on a quasi-experiment comparing immigrants arriving at different ages and from different linguistic origins. In the presence of considerable non-classical measurement error in self-reported language proficiency, our results provide lower and upper bounds for a strong negative effect of English deficiency on health of between one half and a full standard deviation in the health score. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yoon I.

    1992-01-01

    In the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system -- reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. The ALMR reactor plant design is being developed by an industrial team headed by General Electric and is presented in a companion paper. Detailed discussions on the present status of the IFR technology development activities in the areas of fuels, pyroprocessing, safety, core design, and fuel cycle demonstration are presented in the other two companion papers that follows this.

  2. Progress and status of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yoon I.

    1992-04-01

    In the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system -- reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. The ALMR reactor plant design is being developed by an industrial team headed by General Electric and is presented in a companion paper. Detailed discussions on the present status of the IFR technology development activities in the areas of fuels, pyroprocessing, safety, core design, and fuel cycle demonstration are presented in the other two companion papers that follows this.

  3. Status of The General Atomics Low Speed Urban Maglev Technology Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurol, S; Baldi, R; Bever, D; Post, R

    2004-06-16

    This paper presents the status of General Atomics Urban Maglev Program. The development provides an innovative approach for low speed transportation suitable for very challenging urban environments. Permanent magnets arranged in a 'Halbach' array configuration produce a relatively stiff magnetic suspension operating with an air gap of 25 mm. The project has progressed from design and prototype hardware testing, to the construction of a 120-meter full-scale test track, located in San Diego, California. Dynamic testing of the levitation, propulsion and guidance systems is being performed.

  4. Development status and potential program for development of proliferation-resistant molten-salt reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, J.R.; Bauman, H.F.; Dearing, J.F.; Grimes, W.R.; McCoy, H.E. Jr.

    1979-03-01

    Preliminary studies of existing and conceptual molten-salt reactor (MSR) designs have led to the identification of conceptual systems that are technologically attractive when operated with denatured uranium as the principal fissile fuel. These denatured MSRs would also have favorable resource-utilization characteristics and substantial resistance to proliferation of weapons-usable nuclear materials. The report presents a summary of the current status of technology and a discussion of the major technical areas of a possible base program to develop commercial denatured MSRs. The general areas treated are (1) reactor design and development, (2) safety and safety related technology, (3) fuel-coolant behavior and fuel processing, and (4) reactor materials. A substantial development effort could lead to authorization for construction of a molten-salt test reactor about 5 years after the start of the program and operation of the unit about 10 years later. A prototype commercial denatured MSR could be expected to begin operating 25 years from the start of the program. The postulated base program would extend over 32 years and would cost about $700 million (1978 dollars, unescalated). Additional costs to construct the MSTR, $600 million, and the prototype commercial plant, $1470 million, would bring the total program cost to about $2.8 billion. Additional allowances probably should be made to cover contingencies and incidental technology areas not explicitly treated in this preliminary review.

  5. "Ganando Confianza": Research Focus Groups with Immigrant Mexican Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; Zayas, Luis H.; Runes, Sandra; Abenis-Cintron, Anna; Calzada, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Immigrant families with children with developmental disabilities must be served using culturally sensitive approaches to service and research to maximize treatment benefits. In an effort to better understand cultural issues relevant to the provision of parenting programs for immigrant Mexican mothers of children with developmental disabilities, we…

  6. The Language of Instruction of Immigrant Children: An Australian Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rado, Marta

    1978-01-01

    Australian education was strictly monolingual until 1970 when the implementation of the Commonwealth Child Migrant Education Program provided special English instruction for immigrant students. Immigrants' languages are now offered as school subjects, but the growing awareness of multiculturalism has not affected English as the language of school…

  7. The integration of immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Bauböck, Rainer

    1995-01-01

    from the Table of Contents: Migration and integration - Basic concepts and definitions; Immigration and Integration policies; The legal framework for integration; Dimension of social integration; Cultural integration; Conclusions;

  8. Capitalism, Immigration, Language and Literacy: Mapping a Politicized Reading of a Policy Assemblage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masny, Diana; Waterhouse, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Immigration for Australia and Canada is critical to sustain economic growth. Each country's immigration policy stems from its vision of a nation that includes the role of language and literacy and a program of economic outcomes. While the authors acknowledge that economic integration through employment dominates immigration policies in Canada and…

  9. Strategies for health education in North American immigrant populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, P; Parry, M

    2012-12-01

    This article is intended to stimulate critical thinking about barriers and strategies related to health education for immigrant populations. Its rationale is to promote an understanding and appreciation for the individuality and diversity of immigrant beliefs, values and culture, and how these contribute to health education through nursing practice, research and theory. Since 2005, over 1,250,000 immigrants annually have obtained legal permanent residence in North America [over 1 million annually in the United States of America (USA) and over 250,000 annually in Canada]. While a broad immigration policy leads to population growth, cultural change and ethnic diversity, migration impacts immigrants' health status. In North America, the 'healthy immigrant effect', whereby immigrants generally tend to be healthier than individuals born in host countries, steadily declines after immigration. Immigration statistics and reports on literacy and learning were sourced from official websites in Canada and the USA. These were reviewed and discussed in the context of scholarly published literature on health literacy, health education and health promotion. Promoting health in immigrant populations is difficult due to cultural, linguistic, health literacy and socio-economic barriers. Cultural sensitivity, careful inquiry and comprehensive knowledge of immigrants' social circumstances are essential to every health education programme. Strategies for immigrant health education must be technologically diverse, involve partnerships with multidisciplinary professionals, elicit active community participation, and facilitate language transfer and interpretation. Future research must continue to explore these barriers and strategies, using both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. © 2012 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2012 International Council of Nurses.

  10. Status summary of chemical processing development in plutonium-238 supply program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Emory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Benker, Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wham, Robert M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); DePaoli, David W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delmau, Laetitia Helene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sherman, Steven R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This document summarizes the status of development of chemical processing in the Plutonium-238 Supply Program (PSP) near the end of Demonstration 1. The objective of the PSP is “to develop, demonstrate, and document a production process that meets program objectives and to prepare for its operation” (Frazier et al. 2016). Success in the effort includes establishing capability using the current infrastructure to produce Np targets for irradiation in Department of Energy research reactors, chemically processing the irradiated targets to separate and purify the produced Pu and transferring the PuO2 product to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at an average rate of 1.5 kg/y.

  11. Status and plans of the ion program of NA61 at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Grebieszkow, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE at the CERN SPS is a new experiment to study hadron production in h+h, h+A and A+A interactions. The main goal of the NA61 ion program is to explore the phase diagram (T - mu_B) of strongly interacting matter. In particular, we plan to study the properties of the onset of deconfinement and to search for the signatures of the critical point. A two-dimensional scan of the phase diagram will be performed by varying the energy (13A-158A GeV) and system size (p+p, Be+Be, Ar+Ca, Xe+La) of collisions. This paper summarizes the status and plans of the NA61/SHINE ion program. In particular the detector upgrades, data taking schedule and the first results on spectra and correlations are discussed.

  12. Accreditation status of U.S. military graduate medical education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2008-07-01

    Military graduate medical education (GME) comprises a substantial fraction of U.S. physician training capacity. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have placed substantial stress on military medicine, and lay and professional press accounts have raised awareness of the effects on military GME. To date, however, objective data on military GME quality remains sparse. Determine the accreditation status of U.S. military GME programs. Additionally, military GME program data will be compared to national (U.S.) accreditation lengths. Retrospective review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) data. All military-sponsored core programs in specialties with at least three residencies were included. Military-affiliated but civilian-sponsored programs were excluded. The current and past cycle data were used for the study. For each specialty, the current mean accreditation length and the net change in cycle was calculated. National mean accreditation lengths by specialty for 2005 to 2006 were obtained from the ACGME. Comparison between the overall mean national and military accreditation lengths was performed with a z test. All other comparisons employed descriptive statistics. Ninety-nine military programs in 15 specialties were included in the analysis. During the study period, 1 program was newly accredited, and 6 programs had accreditation withdrawn or were closed. The mean accreditation length of the military programs was 4.0 years. The overall national mean for the same specialties is 3.5 years (p programs had accreditation of 4 years or longer, compared to 70% in the current cycle, while 13% had accreditation of 2 years or less in the previous cycle compared to 14% in the current cycle. Ten (68%) of the military specialties had mean accreditation lengths greater than the national average, while 5 (33%) were below it. Ten (68%) specialties had stable or improving cycle lengths when compared to previous cycles. Military GME accreditation cycle lengths

  13. Migrant health in French Guiana: Are undocumented immigrants more vulnerable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolivet Anne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few data exist on the health status of the immigrant population in French Guiana. The main objective of this article was to identify differences in its health status in relation to that of the native-born population. Methods A representative, population-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009 among 1027 adults living in Cayenne and St-Laurent du Maroni. Health status was assessed in terms of self-perceived health, chronic diseases and functional limitations. The migration variables were immigration status, the duration of residence in French Guiana and the country of birth. Logistic regression models were conducted. Results Immigrants account for 40.5% and 57.8% of the adult population of Cayenne and St-Laurent du Maroni, respectively. Most of them (60.7% and 77.5%, respectively had been living in French Guiana for more than 10 years. A large proportion were still undocumented or had a precarious legal status. The undocumented immigrants reported the worst health status (OR = 3.18 [1.21-7.84] for self-perceived health, OR = 2.79 [1.22-6.34] for a chronic disease, and OR = 2.17 [1.00-4.70] for a functional limitation. These differences are partially explained by socioeconomic status and psychosocial factors. The country of birth and the duration of residence also had an impact on health indicators. Conclusion Data on immigrant health are scarce in France, and more generally, immigrant health problems have been largely ignored in public health policies. Immigrant health status is of crucial interest to health policy planners, and it is especially relevant in French Guiana, considering the size of the foreign-born population in that region.

  14. Migrant health in French Guiana: are undocumented immigrants more vulnerable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivet, Anne; Cadot, Emmanuelle; Florence, Sophie; Lesieur, Sophie; Lebas, Jacques; Chauvin, Pierre

    2012-01-19

    Few data exist on the health status of the immigrant population in French Guiana. The main objective of this article was to identify differences in its health status in relation to that of the native-born population. A representative, population-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009 among 1027 adults living in Cayenne and St-Laurent du Maroni. Health status was assessed in terms of self-perceived health, chronic diseases and functional limitations. The migration variables were immigration status, the duration of residence in French Guiana and the country of birth. Logistic regression models were conducted. Immigrants account for 40.5% and 57.8% of the adult population of Cayenne and St-Laurent du Maroni, respectively. Most of them (60.7% and 77.5%, respectively) had been living in French Guiana for more than 10 years. A large proportion were still undocumented or had a precarious legal status. The undocumented immigrants reported the worst health status (OR = 3.18 [1.21-7.84] for self-perceived health, OR = 2.79 [1.22-6.34] for a chronic disease, and OR = 2.17 [1.00-4.70] for a functional limitation). These differences are partially explained by socioeconomic status and psychosocial factors. The country of birth and the duration of residence also had an impact on health indicators. Data on immigrant health are scarce in France, and more generally, immigrant health problems have been largely ignored in public health policies. Immigrant health status is of crucial interest to health policy planners, and it is especially relevant in French Guiana, considering the size of the foreign-born population in that region.

  15. Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Snorkel Surveys and Rotary Screw Trap, 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelle, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office conducted snorkel surveys at 24 sites during the summer and fall periods of 2006 survey periods as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. A total of 37,938 fish from 15 species/genera and an unknown category were enumerated. Chinook salmon were the overall most common fish observed and comprised 15% of fish enumerated followed by rainbow trout (10%) and mountain whitefish (7%). Day surveys were conducted during the summer period 2007 (August), while night surveys were conducted during the fall 2007 (October) surveys. The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office (MCFRO) operated two rotary screw traps on the Entiat River as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) program from August through November of 2007. Along with the smolt traps, juvenile emigrants were also captured at remote locations throughout the Entiat watershed and its major tributary, the Mad River. A total of 999 wild Oncorhynchus mykiss and 5,107 wild run O. tshawytscha were PIT tagged during the study period. Rotary screw trap efficiencies averaged 22.3% for juvenile O. tshawytscha and 9.0% for juvenile O. mykiss. Rotary screw traps operated 7 days a week and remote capture operations were conducted when flow and temperature regimes permitted. This is third annual progress report to Bonneville Power Administration for the snorkel surveys conducted in the Entiat River as related to long-term effectiveness monitoring of restoration programs in this watershed. The objective of this study is to monitor the fish habitat utilization of planned in-stream restoration efforts in the Entiat River by conducting pre- and post-construction snorkel surveys at selected treatment and control sites.

  16. When the Divide Isn't Just Digital: How Technology-Enriched Afterschool Programs Help Immigrant Youth Find a Voice, a Place, and a Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Rebecca A.; Pastor, Manuel, Jr.; Rosner, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    The so-called "digital divide"--unequal access to information technology--is one of many social inequalities faced by individuals who are low-income, ethnic minorities, or immigrants. Surprisingly, the digital divide is even larger for young people than it is for adults, with African-American and Latino young people, as well as…

  17. The "Pesticides and Farmworker Health Toolkit" : An Innovative Model for Developing an Evidence-Informed Program for a Low-Literacy, Latino Immigrant Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePrevost, Catherine E.; Storm, Julia F.; Asuaje, Cesar R.; Cope, W. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Migrant and seasonal farmworkers are typically Spanish-speaking, Latino immigrants with limited formal education and low literacy skills and, as such, are a vulnerable population. We describe the development of the "Pesticides and Farmworker Health Toolkit", a pesticide safety and health curriculum designed to communicate to farmworkers…

  18. Tackling the Remaining Attainment Gap between Students with and without Immigrant Background: An Investigation into the Equivalence of SES Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkeit, Jenny; Caro, Daniel H.; Strand, Steve

    2015-01-01

    In England, students with immigrant background exhibit lower educational attainment than those without immigrant background. Family socioeconomic status (SES) helps explain differences in educational attainment, but a gap remains that differs in size for students with different immigrant backgrounds. While the explanatory repertoire for the…

  19. Responding to Immigrant Children's Mental Health Needs in the Schools: Project Mi Tierra/ My Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Ramos, Gladys; Sanchez-Nester, Milagros

    2001-01-01

    Describes a multifaceted program established in response to the complex psychological and social needs of immigrant children. The program is based in an elementary public school in a joint partnership with a graduate school of social work. Program focuses on Latino immigrant children, although the principles of the program are sufficiently generic…

  20. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs. Status 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE`s nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ``Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers`` and PNL-6577 ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.`` The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility.

  1. Here or There: Recent U.S. Immigrants' Medical and Dental Tourism and Associated Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sou Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Applying Andersen's health care utilization model, this paper shows the prevalence of immigrants' medical and dental tourism and associated factors. An analysis of the 2003 New Immigrant Survey data shows that about 17% of immigrants received medical care in a foreign country, whereas about one-third obtained dental care outside the United States. Latino immigrants have a higher prevalence of both types of tourism than their Asian counterparts. Race, level of education, and health insured status are commonly associated with medical and dental tourism. The findings contribute to the scarce literature on immigrants' health care utilization and medical and dental tourism.

  2. Depression among Korean immigrant elders living in Canada and the United States: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wooksoo; Kang, Suk-Young; Kim, Isok

    2015-01-01

    Korean immigrant elders in North America experience a high level of depression. This study explored the correlates of depression among a sample of 245 Korean immigrant elders living in metropolitan cities in Canada (n = 128) and a southwestern state in the United States (n = 117), using a stress-coping framework. Results revealed discrepancies between the 2 subgroups. Years since immigration and number of health concerns were positively associated, and English proficiency was negatively associated with depressive symptoms among Korean immigrant elders in the United States; only health status was significant among Korean immigrant elders in Canada. Implications of the study are presented.

  3. Status of the DOE (STOR)-sponsored national program on hydrogen production from water via thermochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The program structure is presented. The activities of the thermochemical cycles program are grouped according to the following categories: (1) specific cycle development, (2) support research and technology, (3) cycle evaluation. Specific objectives and status of on-going activities are discussed. Chemical reaction series for the production of hydrogen are presented. Efficiency and economic evaluations are also discussed.

  4. Transnationalism and Hypertension Self-Management Among Haitian Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanon, Marie-Anne; Spigner, Clarence; McCullagh, Marjorie C

    2016-03-01

    Transnationalism--maintenance of transborder activities--has important implications for the health status of contemporary immigrants. Yet little is known about how such interconnectivity interacts with health. In this critical ethnography study, 31 Haitian immigrants discussed the influences of transnationalism on their hypertension management. Transcripts of the semistructured individual interviews were analyzed and coded with the assistance of the Atlas.ti 6 software. Two major themes emerged: social support and financial obligation, both framed within the obligation to send monetary remittances. A duality emerged where social support facilitated hypertension self-management but consequently represented a financial burden. The study evidenced that transnationalism, although positively influencing immigrants' psychosocial well-being can negatively affect their experience with disease management. Health providers are urged to account for this transnationalism-disease management interaction when caring for this immigrant group. Future studies are needed to explore this phenomenon among other immigrant populations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Immigration policy and birth weight: Positive externalities in Italian law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmasi, Luca; Pieroni, Luca

    2015-09-01

    A decade ago, the political party of the Italian center-right voted a law restricting immigration. The law became effective in early 2005, when the Italian parliament approved the decree for its application, but one of its articles, granting amnesty for illegal immigrant workers, became immediately effective in July 2002. As a result, 650,000 immigrants were granted the status of foreign nationals in Italy. In this paper, we examine whether the increase in the prevalence of "regular immigrants" has led to an improvement in health outcomes of babies born to migrant women, measured in terms of birth weight. Two hitherto unexploited birth sample surveys published by Italian Institute of Statistics were used for this study. Our estimates show that regularized immigration reduced the probability of low birth weight. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Deporting the American Dream: Immigration Enforcement and Latino Foreclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob S. Rugh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, Latinos have been buffeted by two major forces: a record number of immigrant deportations and the housing foreclosure crisis. Yet, prior work has not assessed the link between the two. We hypothesize that deportations exacerbate rates of foreclosure among Latinos by removing income earners from owner-occupied households. We employ a quasi-experimental approach that leverages variation in county applications for 287(g immigration enforcement agreements with Immigration and Customs Enforcement and data on foreclosure filings from 2005–2012. These models uncover a substantial association of enforcement with Hispanic foreclosure rates. The association is stronger in counties with more immigrant detentions and a larger share of undocumented persons in owner-occupied homes. The results imply that local immigration enforcement plays an important role in understanding why Latinos experienced foreclosures most often. The reduced home ownership and wealth that result illustrate how legal status and deportation perpetuate the racial stratification of Latinos.

  7. Immigration and income inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deding, Mette; Hussain, Azhar; Jakobsen, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    During the last two decades most Western countries have experienced increased net immigration as well as increased income inequality. This article analyzes the effects on income inequality of an increased number of immigrants in Denmark and Germany for the 20- year period 1984-2003 and how...

  8. Immigration: Coming to America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    To say that immigration is currently a controversial issue would be an understatement. The media is rife with misinformation and does a very poor job of making the critical distinction between legal and illegal immigration. Because of this, it is vitally important that libraries provide students with clear and unbiased material on the topic. In…

  9. Educators for Immigrant Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Luis Genaro

    2015-01-01

    Educators for Immigrant Rights is a visual representation of the Los Angeles community organization, Educators for Immigrant Rights (EIR).  EIR is a collective of education advocates ranging from students, professors, district administrators, policy makers and activists from a number of Southern California counties.

  10. Workplace Concentration of Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Fredrik; García-Pérez, Mónica; Haltiwanger, John; McCue, Kristin; Sanders, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Casual observation suggests that in most U.S. urban labor markets, immigrants have more immigrant coworkers than native-born workers do. While seeming obvious, this excess tendency to work together has not been precisely measured, nor have its sources been quantified. Using matched employer–employee data from the U.S. Census Bureau Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) database on a set of metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) with substantial immigrant populations, we find that, on average, 37% of an immigrant’s coworkers are themselves immigrants; in contrast, only 14% of a native-born worker’s coworkers are immigrants. We decompose this difference into the probability of working with compatriots versus with immigrants from other source countries. Using human capital, employer, and location characteristics, we narrow the mechanisms that might explain immigrant concentration. We find that industry, language, and residential segregation collectively explain almost all the excess tendency to work with immigrants from other source countries, but they have limited power to explain work with compatriots. This large unexplained compatriot component suggests an important role for unmeasured country-specific factors, such as social networks. PMID:25425452

  11. Age at Immigration and Educational Attainment of Young Immigrants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.; Veenman, J.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    For immigrants who arrive in a country at a young age it is easier to assimilate than for teenagers.This paper investigates up to what immigration age the educational attainment of young immigrants in the Netherlands is similar to the educational attainment of secondgeneration immigrants, who were

  12. Holdninger til immigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Munch, Jakob Roland; Schroll, Sanne

    Denne artikel belyser holdninger til immigration blandt borgere i Danmark og de øvrige EU-15 lande - herunder holdningerne til immigration, der følger af den seneste EU-udvidelse. Det analyseres, hvilke faktorer der ligger til frund for disse holdninger, samt i hvilken udstrækning danskere afviger...... fra EU-gennemsnittet. Den typiske dansker er lidt mere skeptisk overfor immigration end andre europæere. Danskerne afskiller sig desuden ved, at forholdsvis få forbinder øget immigration med negative konsekvenser for arbejdsmarkedet, men forholdsvis mange forbinder det med højere omkostninger...... for velfærdsstaten. Når der tages hensyn til opfattelserne af de økonomiske konsekvenser af immigration, kommer Danmark til at fremstå som et væsentligt mere immigrationsskeptisk land, end hvad der kommer til udtryk i de ukorrigerede holdninger...

  13. Holdninger til Immigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Roland Munch, Jakob; Schroll, Sanne

    2006-01-01

    Denne artikel belyser holdninger til immigration blandt borgere i Danmark og de øvrige EU-15 lande - herunder holdningerne til immigration, der følger af den seneste EU-udvidelse. Det analyseres, hvilke faktorer der ligger til frund for disse holdninger, samt i hvilken udstrækning danskere afviger...... fra EU-gennemsnittet. Den typiske dansker er lidt mere skeptisk overfor immigration end andre europæere. Danskerne afskiller sig desuden ved, at forholdsvis få forbinder øget immigration med negative konsekvenser for arbejdsmarkedet, men forholdsvis mange forbinder det med højere omkostninger...... for velfærdsstaten. Når der tages hensyn til opfattelserne af de økonomiske konsekvenser af immigration, kommer Danmark til at fremstå som et væsentligt mere immigrationsskeptisk land, end hvad der kommer til udtryk i de ukorrigerede holdninger....

  14. Attitudes towards Immigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Klemmensen, Robert; Nørgaard, Asbjørn Sonne

    2016-01-01

    This article examines if deep-seated psychological differences add to the explanation of attitudes toward immigration. We explore whether the Big Five personality traits matter for immigration attitudes beyond the traditional situational factors of economic and cultural threat and analyze how...... individuals with different personalities react when confronted with the same situational triggers. Using a Danish survey experiment, we show that different personality traits have different effects on opposition toward immigration. We find that Openness has an unconditional effect on attitudes toward...... immigration: scoring higher on this trait implies a greater willingness to admit immigrants. Moreover, individuals react differently to economic threat depending on their score on the traits Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. Specifically, individuals scoring low on Agreeableness and individuals scoring...

  15. Family, School and Immigration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Terrén

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The family is the main social arena where the relationship between the first and the second generation of immigrants takes place, and education is a corner stone in such a dialectic. Immigrant families undergo profound transformations that are often complicated by extended periods of separation –not only from extended family members, but also from the nuclear family. Though many families are involved in transnational separation and reunion processes of this kind, there has been little research on the impact of these forms of family transformations on the vision of education held by immigrants. However, the perspective developed in this paper relies on the idea that an accurate knowledge of the schooling experience of the children of immigrants has to be related to the set of projects and expectations which are constantly being redefined in the life of an immigrant family

  16. Research on immigrant earnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duleep, Harriet Orcutt; Dowhan, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    As the first in a trio of pieces devoted to incorporating immigration into policy models, this review of research on immigrant earnings trajectories brings to light several findings. Controlling for demographic and human capital characteristics, immigrants often start their U.S. lives at substantially lower earnings, but experience faster earnings growth than natives with comparable years of education and experience. The extent to which the earnings trajectories of immigrants and natives differ varies by country of origin, with the source-country's level of economic development being a key determinant of the size of the U.S.-born/ foreign-born difference. The earnings profiles of immigrants from economically developed countries such as Japan, Canada, or Western Europe resemble those of U.S. natives who are of the same age and education level. In contrast, the earnings of immigrants from developing nations tend to start well below those of U.S. natives with comparable education levels and experience, but rise more rapidly than their U.S. counterparts. Comparing the earnings profiles of immigrants of similar age, sex, and years of schooling, over time and across groups, a strong inverse relationship emerges between their initial earnings and their subsequent U.S. earnings growth. In other words, the lower (higher) the initial earnings are, the higher (lower) the earnings growth. These and other research results have important implications for the projection of immigrant earnings and emigration in microsimulation models, as discussed in the two articles following this one: (1) "Adding Immigrants to Microsimulation Models" and (2) "Incorporating Immigrant Flows into Microsimulation Models".

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project 1992 quality program status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, S.L.; Burningham, A.; Chavez, P. [and others

    1994-03-01

    This status report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Los Alamos Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project`s quality assurance program for calendar year 1992. The report includes major sections on Program Activities and Trend Analysis. Program Activities are discussed periodically at quality meetings. The most significant issue addressed in 1992 has been the timely revision of quality administrative procedures. The procedure revision process was streamlined from 55 steps to 7. The number of forms in procedures was reduced by 38%, and the text reduced by 29%. This allowed revision in 1992 of almost half of all implementing procedures. The time necessary to complete the revision process (for a procedure) was reduced from 11 months to 3 months. Other accomplishments include the relaxation of unnecessarily strict training requirements, requiring quality assurance reviews only from affected organizations, and in general simplifying work processes. All members of the YMP received training to the new Orientation class Eleven other training classed were held. Investigators submitted 971 records to the Project and only 37 were rejected. The software program has 115 programs approved for quality-affecting work. The Project Office conducted 3 audits and 1 survey of Los Alamos activities. We conducted 14 audits and 4 surveys. Eight corrective action reports were closed, leaving only one open. Internally, 22 deficiencies were recognized. This is a decrease from 65 in 1991. Since each deficiency requires about 2 man weeks to resolve, the savings are significant. Problems with writing acceptable deficiency reports have essentially disappeared. Trend reports for 1992 were examined and are summarized herein. Three adverse trends have been closed; one remaining adverse trend will be closed when the affected procedures are revised. The number of deficiencies issued to Los Alamos compared to other participants is minimal.

  18. Transgender Health in Endocrinology: Current Status of Endocrinology Fellowship Programs and Practicing Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge-Pitts, Caroline; Nippoldt, Todd B; Danoff, Ann; Radziejewski, Lauren; Natt, Neena

    2017-04-01

    The transgender population continues to face challenges in accessing appropriate health care. Adequate training of endocrinologists in this area is a priority. Assess the status of transgender health care education in US endocrinology fellowship training programs and assess knowledge and practice of transgender health among practicing US endocrinologists. Mayo Clinic and the Endocrine Society developed and administered a Web-based anonymous survey to 104 endocrinology fellowship program directors (PDs; members of the Association of Program Directors in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism) and 6992 US medical doctor members of Endocrine Society. There were 54 total responses from 104 PDs (51.9%). Thirty-five of these 54 programs (72.2%) provide teaching on transgender health topics; however, 93.8% respondents indicated that fellowship training in this area is important. Barriers to provision of education included lack of faculty interest or experience. The most desired strategies to increase transgender-specific content included online training modules for trainees and faculty. Of 411 practicing clinician responders, almost 80% have treated a transgender patient, but 80.6% have never received training on care of transgender patients. Clinicians were very or somewhat confident in terms of definitions (77.1%), taking a history (63.3%), and prescribing hormones (64.8%); however, low confidence was reported outside of the hormonal realm. The most requested methods of education included online training modules and presentation of transgender topics at meetings. Confidence and competence in transgender health needs to increase among endocrinologists. Strategies include the development of online training modules, expansion of formal transgender curricula in fellowship programs, and presentations at national and international meetings.

  19. Pediatric tuberculosis immigration screening in high-immigration, low-incidence countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, G G; Clark, M; Altpeter, E; Douglas, P; Jones, J; Paty, M-C; Posey, D L; Chemtob, D

    2010-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) screening in migrant children, including immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers, is an ongoing challenge in low TB incidence countries. Many children from high TB incidence countries harbor latent TB infection (LTBI), and some have active TB disease at the point of immigration into host nations. Young children who harbor LTBI have a high risk of progression to TB disease and are at a higher risk than adults of developing disseminated severe forms of TB with significant morbidity and mortality. Many countries have developed immigration TB screening programs to suit the needs of adults, but have not focused much attention on migrant children. To compare the TB immigration medical examination requirements in children in selected countries with high immigration and low TB incidence rates. Descriptive study of TB immigration screening programs for systematically selected countries. Of 18 eligible countries, 16 responded to the written survey and telephone interview. No two countries had the same approach to TB screening among migrant children. The optimal evidenced-based manner in which to screen migrant children requires further research.

  20. Effects of anticoccidial and antibiotic growth promoter programs on broiler performance and immune status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Woo; Ho Hong, Yeong; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Jang, Seung I; Park, Myeong-Seon; Bautista, Daniel A; Ritter, G Donald; Jeong, Wooseog; Jeoung, Hye-Young; An, Dong-Jun; Lillehoj, Erik P; Lillehoj, Hyun S

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of various coccidiosis control programs in combination with antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) on growth performance and host immune responses in broiler chickens. The coccidiosis programs that were investigated included in ovo coccidiosis vaccination (CVAC) with Inovocox or in-feed medication with diclazuril as Clinacox (CLIN) or salinomycin (SAL). The AGPs were virginiamycin or bacitracin methylene disalicylate plus roxarsone. As a negative control, chickens were non-vaccinated and fed with non-supplemented diets (NONE). All animals were exposed to used litter from a commercial broiler farm with confirmed contamination by Eimeria parasites to simulate in-field exposure to avian coccidiosis. Broiler body weights in the CVAC group were greater at 14 and 32 days of age, but not at day 42, compared with the NONE, CLIN, and SAL groups. At day 14, the SAL group showed decreased body weight and reduced ConA-stimulated spleen cell proliferation compared with the CLIN and SAL groups. In contrast, at days 34 and 43, splenocyte proliferation was greater in the CVAC and CLIN groups compared with the NONE and SAL groups. Lymphocyte subpopulations and cytokine mRNA expression levels in the intestine and spleen were also altered by the denoted treatments. Collectively, these results suggest that in ovo coccidiosis vaccination or coccidiostat drug medication programs in combination with AGPs influences chicken growth and immune status in an Eimeria-contaminated environment. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd.

  1. [Bolsa Família Program and child nutritional status: strategic challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Fabiana de Cássia Carvalho; Cotta, Rosângela Minardi Mitre; Sant'Ana, Luciana Ferreira da Rocha; Priore, Silvia Eloíza; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro

    2011-07-01

    The main nutritional deficiencies during childhood, namely anemia and malnutrition, are predominantly related to socio-economic factors. Thus, as the Bolsa Família Program (BFP) is the main policy to combat poverty, it is expected that it will have an impact on child nutrition. The aim was to analyze the differences in the nutritional situation of children registered with the BFP of a municipality located in Zona da Mata of Minas Gerais state. 446 children aged between 6 and 84 months were evaluated, of which 262 were non-beneficiaries and 184 were beneficiaries. Nutritional evaluation included analysis of weight and height parameters through weight/age, weight/height, height/age and Body Mass Index/age indexes and hemoglobin levels, using the Hemocue. The prevalence of anemia, short stature and obesity were 22.6, 6.3 and 5.2%, respectively, and there were no statistical differences between beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries. The beneficiary group initially had worse socio-economic conditions, but with the BFP it managed to financially match the non-beneficiary group. It is possible that the similarity between the two groups, also in the nutritional status, can be attributed to the program benefits, due to the financial funding as well as to the nutritional monitoring required as a condition of the program.

  2. Voting over Selective Immigration Policies with Immigration Aversion

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Russo

    2008-01-01

    The claim that "skilled immigration is welcome" is often associated to the increasing adoption of selective immigration policies. I study the voting over differentiated immigration policies in a two-country, three-factor general equilibrium model where there exist skilled and unskilled workers, migration decisions are endogenous, enforcing immigration restriction is costly, and natives dislike unskilled immigration. According to my findings, decisions over border closure are made to protect t...

  3. The Human Face of Immigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    In the past, nativists opposed immigration, period. The sharp distinction between "legal" and "illegal" immigrants emerged fairly recently, according to immigration historian David Reimers, a professor of history at New York University. "Basically, by the mid-90s 'legal' immigration was no longer an issue," he says.…

  4. Latino Immigration, Education, and Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Rosa M.

    2012-01-01

    Immigration is often framed as a problem, yet it is also a time of remarkable opportunity. While immigrants come to the United States from all over the world, the author focuses on the unique and urgent issues related to Latino immigration. Immigrant Latinos have changed the face of America and U.S. schools. Approximately one in five K-12 students…

  5. [Immigration and health: Social inequalities between native and immigrant populations in the Basque Country (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Álvarez, Elena; González-Rábago, Yolanda; Bacigalupe, Amaia; Martín, Unai; Lanborena Elordui, Nerea

    2014-01-01

    To analyze health inequalities between native and immigrant populations in the Basque Country (Spain) and the role of several mediating determinants in explaining these differences. A cross-sectional study was performed in the population aged 18 to 64 years in the Basque Country. We used data from the Basque Health Survey 2007 (n=4,270) and the Basque Health Survey for Immigrants 2009 (n=745). We calculated differences in health inequalities in poor perceived health between the native population and immigrant populations from distinct regions (China, Latin America, the Maghreb and Senegal). To measure the association between poor perceived health and place of origin, and to adjust this association by several mediating variables, odds ratios (OR) were calculated through logistic regression models. Immigrants had poorer perceived health than natives in the Basque Country, regardless of age. These differences could be explained by the lower educational level, worse employment status, lower social support, and perceived discrimination among immigrants, both in men and women. After adjustment was performed for all the variables, health status was better among men from China (OR: 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI95%]: 0.04-0.91) and Maghreb (OR: 0.26; 95% CI: 0.08-0.91) and among Latin American women (OR: 0.36; 95% CI: 0.14-0.92) than in the native population. These results show the need to continue to monitor social and health inequalities between the native and immigrant populations, as well as to support the policies that improve the socioeconomic conditions of immigrants. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. A comparison of health access between permanent residents, undocumented immigrants and refugee claimants in Toronto, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ruth M; Klei, A G; Hodges, Brian D; Fisman, David; Kitto, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the immigrant experience accessing healthcare is essential to improving their health. This qualitative study reports on experiences seeking healthcare for three groups of immigrants in Toronto, Canada: permanent residents, refugee claimants and undocumented immigrants. Undocumented immigrants who are on the Canadian Border Services Agency deportation list are understudied in Canada due to their precarious status. This study will examine the vulnerabilities of this particular subcategory of immigrant and contrast their experiences seeking healthcare with refugee claimants and permanent residents. Twenty-one semi-structured, one-on-one qualitative interviews were conducted with immigrants to identify barriers and facilitators to accessing healthcare. The open structure of the interviews enabled the participants to share their experiences seeking healthcare and other factors that were an integral part of their health. This study utilized a community-based participatory research framework. The study identifies seven sections of results. Among them, immigration status was the single most important factor affecting both an individual's ability to seek out healthcare and her experiences when trying to access healthcare. The healthcare seeking behaviour of undocumented immigrants was radically distinct from refugee claimants or immigrants with permanent resident status, with undocumented immigrants being at a greater disadvantage than permanent residents and refugee claimants. Language barriers are also noted as an impediment to healthcare access. An individual's immigration status further complicates their ability to establish relationships with family doctors, access prescriptions and medications and seek out emergency room care. Fear of authorities and the complications caused by the above factors can lead to the most disadvantaged to seek out informal or black market sources of healthcare. This study reaffirmed previous findings that fear of deportation

  7. A Scoping Review of Immigrant Experience of Health Care Access Barriers in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalich, Angela; Heinemann, Lyn; Ghahari, Setareh

    2016-06-01

    Canadian population-based surveys report comparable access to health care services between immigrant and non-immigrant populations, yet other research reports immigrant-specific access barriers. A scoping review was conducted to explore research regarding Canadian immigrants' unique experiences in accessing health care, and was guided by the research question: "What is currently known about the barriers that adult immigrants face when accessing Canadian health care services?" The findings of this study suggest that there are unmet health care access needs specific to immigrants to Canada. In reviewing research of immigrants' health care experiences, the most common access barriers were found to be language barriers, barriers to information, and cultural differences. These findings, in addition to low cultural competency reported by interviewed health care workers in the reviewed articles, indicate inequities in access to Canadian health care services for immigrant populations. Suggestions for future research and programming are discussed.

  8. Factors Associated with Korean Immigrants' Medical Tourism to the Homeland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sou Hyun

    2017-07-01

    This study examined factors associated with first-generation Korean immigrants' medical tours to the homeland, which has emerged as a field of study in immigrant medical transnationalism and immigrant healthcare behaviors. This paper reports survey data from 507 Korean immigrants and indepth interviews with 120 Korean immigrants in the New York-New Jersey area. About one-fourth of survey respondents have visited their home country for medical care since their migration to the US. Of those with relatives in Korea, 29% have experienced at least one medical tour, compared to only 9.2% of those without relatives in Korea. Having frequent contacts with relatives in the home country was positively associated with the number of medical tour visits. Except for social transnational ties, other types of transnational ties with the home country were marginally related to Korean immigrants' medical tourism. Surprisingly, their health insurance status itself, which is assumed to be important, was not statistically associated with medical tourism. Although this study has the limitation of analyzing a convenience sample, it contributes to the literature on immigrant transnationalism and immigrant healthcare behaviors by using a mixed-methods approach to focus on one ethnic group's medical transnationalism.

  9. Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder among Haitian immigrant students: implications for access to mental health services and educational programming

    OpenAIRE

    Muriel Anna C; Munir Kerim; Marcelin Lilly; Klopner Michelle; Betancourt Theresa S; Fawzi Mary; Oswald Catherine; Mukherjee Joia S

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous studies of Haitian immigrant and refugee youth have emphasized "externalizing" behaviors, such as substance use, high risk sexual behavior, and delinquency, with very little information available on "internalizing" symptoms, such as depression and anxiety. Analyzing stressors and "internalizing" symptoms offers a more balanced picture of the type of social and mental health services that may be needed for this population. The present study aims to: 1) estimate the...

  10. Status and research programs of the multinuclide accelerator mass spectrometry system at the University of Tsukuba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasa, Kimikazu, E-mail: ksasa@tac.tsukuba.ac.j [AMS Group, Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Takahashi, Tsutomu; Tosaki, Yuki [AMS Group, Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Matsushi, Yuki [AMS Group, Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem Accelerator, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Sueki, Keisuke; Tamari, Michiko; Amano, Takahiro; Oki, Toshiyuki; Mihara, Shozo; Yamato, Yoshihiro; Nagashima, Yasuo [AMS Group, Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Bessho, Kotaro; Kinoshita, Norikazu; Matsumura, Hiroshi [Radiation Science Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    We present the current status and research programs of a multinuclide accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system on the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator at the University of Tsukuba (Tsukuba AMS system), Japan. A maximum terminal voltage of 12 MV is available for the AMS system. The Tsukuba AMS system can measure environmental levels of long-lived radioisotopes of {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 129}I by employing a molecular pilot beam. Recently, enhancements in AMS techniques and equipment, including sample preparation, the ion source and the data acquisition system, have improved the performance of {sup 36}Cl-AMS. The standard deviation of fluctuations is typically +-2%, and the machine background level for the {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratio is lower than 1 x 10{sup -15} with a halite sample. We have measured over 500 samples in 1 year, including samples for earth and environmental sciences and nuclear safety research.

  11. Safeguards and security research and development: Program status report, February-July 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, C.N.; Walton, R.B. (comps.)

    1982-04-01

    This report, one of a series of biannual progress reports, describes the status of research and development in the Safeguards and Security Program at Los Alamos from February-July 1981. Most work covered here is sponsored by the Office of Safeguards and Security of the Department of Energy; however, project activities that are technically closely related to nuclear safeguards and security also are included where appropriate for conveying information useful to the nuclear community. The report comprises four major subject areas: Security Development and Support; Nuclear Materials Measurement and Engineering; Nuclear Facility Safeguards Support; and International Safeguards, Technology Transfer, and Training. Some technical topics included in the subject areas are computer and informational security, chemical and nondestructive analysis of nuclear materials, process modeling and analysis, nuclear materials accounting systems, evaluation of prototype measurement instrumentation and procedures in nuclear facilities, design and consultation for facilities, technical exchange, training courses, and international safeguards.

  12. [Vitamin A and D status among child participants in a food supplementation program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihayashi, Aline Yukari; Augusto, Rosangela Aparecida; Escaldelai, Fernanda Martins Dias; Martini, Lígia Araújo

    2015-03-01

    Vitamin A and D serum concentrations and risk factors for their deficiencies were investigated in children participating in a government-sponsored fortified milk program. The study used multivariate linear regression analysis with hierarchical selection of independent variables: socio-demographic conditions, children's health, food consumption, breastfeeding, fortified milk, exposure to sunlight, anthropometric measurements, and serum concentration of retinol and 25(OH)D. Vitamin A and vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency values were defined as Vitamin A and D intake was inadequate. Prevalence rates for vitamin A and vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency were 19%, 6%, 82%, and 58%, respectively. Factors associated with low serum vitamin A were exclusive breastfeeding for less than 120 days, low maternal schooling, maternal unemployment, more consumers of fortified milk in the family, and low serum vitamin D. Factors associated with vitamin D deficiency were low exposure to sunlight and low serum vitamin A. Nutritional education is needed to improve children's nutritional status.

  13. HEALTH CARE ACCESS AMONG HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS: ¿ALGUIEN ESTÁ ESCUCHANDO? [IS ANYBODY LISTENING?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Garcia, Jonathan; Song, David

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review identified 77 studies to examine patterns and determinants of health care access among Hispanic immigrants (HI) living in the U.S. In spite of major mental and physical care needs, HI and their families are at very high risk of not having access to health care compared with non-immigrant Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites. Noncitizenship status is a major barrier for accessing health care due to program ineligibility and fear of stigma and deportation. Low English proficiency is also an important barrier to health care. Culturally appropriate community outreach programs relying heavily on community health workers, also known as promotoras, have improved health care access and quality. Mexico shares the health care cost for HIs living in bordering states, calling for a binational dialogue. Mixed-methods research is needed to better understand: a) the net influence of acculturation on migrant health; b) the role of informal (e.g., family) vs. formal (e.g. promotoras) social support at facilitating health care access; c) issues related to ‘single’ male migrant farm workers; d) the “Hispanic mortality paradox”; e) traditional healing and medicine among HI. Comprehensive health and immigration reforms are needed to respect the human right that HIs have to gain access to health care. PMID:21116464

  14. Unauthorized Immigrants Prolong the Life of Medicare's Trust Fund

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zallman, Leah; Wilson, Fernando A; Stimpson, James P; Bearse, Adriana; Arsenault, Lisa; Dube, Blessing; Himmelstein, David; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2016-01-01

    Unauthorized immigrants seldom have access to public health insurance programs such as Medicare Part A, which pays hospitals and other health facilities and is funded through the Medicare Trust Fund...

  15. U.S. Immigration Policy on Haitian Migrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    do not 5 Manuel Roig -Franzia, “20 Haitian Migrants Die at Sea; 58 Missing,” The...12 Subsequently, an adjustment of status provision was included in the Immigration Reform and Control Act ( IRCA ) of 1986 that enabled Cuban...was included in the Immigration Reform and Control Act ( IRCA ) of 1986 (P.L. 99-603) that enabled the Cuban- Haitian Entrants who had arrived during

  16. Hostility toward immigration in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez i Coma, Ferran; Duval-Hernández, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides new evidence regarding public opinion on immigration by studying the Spanish case, and by analyzing not only respondents' preferences regarding immigration levels, but also regarding admittance policies and the rights and benefits to grant to foreigners. In general, Spaniards support less immigration, and more selectivity based on skills and qualifications, but not reduced rights and benefits for immigrants. Skilled natives have more positive attitudes about immigration, i...

  17. Immigration and the Dutch economy

    OpenAIRE

    Hans Roodenburg; Rob Euwals; Harry ter Rele

    2003-01-01

    For some time now, immigration has been high on the national and international agenda. In addition to the legal, humanitarian and social aspects, the economic impact of immigration is receiving increasing attention. Read also the accompanying press release . What costs and benefits of immigration accrue to the host country? How can immigration and integration policies be modified so as to improve the balance? Is immigration an effective instrument in alleviating the burden of ageing? What can...

  18. The Physical and Psychological Well-Being of Immigrant Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreira, Krista M.; Ornelas, India J.

    2011-01-01

    Poor childhood health contributes to lower socioeconomic status in adulthood. Subsequently, low socioeconomic status among parents contributes to poor childhood health outcomes in the next generation. This cycle can be particularly pernicious for vulnerable and low-income minority populations, including many children of immigrants. And because of…

  19. Impediments to the successful reconstruction of African immigrant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data were analysed using grounded theory and content analysis methods. Findings of the study revealed that immigration status, employment status, attitudes of indigenous learners and holding on to former culture or way of knowing due to lack of induction or mentoring, were impediments to the successful reconstruction of ...

  20. Mexican Immigrant Families Under Siege: The Impact of Anti-Immigrant Policies, Discrimination, and the Economic Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Ayón

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Latino immigrants have historically faced many challenges living in the United States (U.S.. The economic crisis combined with new anti-immigration policies and harsh enforcement strategies may exacerbate the stress and anxiety Latino immigrant families already endure as a result of discrimination and financial hardships. The purpose of this study was to understand the current challenges Latino immigrant families encounter within an anti-immigrant social-political environment. Fifty-two first generation immigrants participated in focus group sessions, which lasted between 90 and 120 minutes. The findings reveal that the economic crisis, anti-immigration policies, and enforcement strategies have deleterious effects on Latino immigrant families’ well-being. Participants stated that their limited English proficiency status and racial profiling were the basis for discriminatory practices they endured. Discrimination is experienced through instances of micro-aggression, as well as horizontal discrimination and institutional discrimination. Implications for social policy, social work practice, and research are discussed.

  1. Toward immigration reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Mark

    2005-01-01

    For the most part, immigrants in the United States do not have access to the very safety-net benefits supported by their taxes, nor to essential due-process rights, simply because they are not citizens or legal residents. Contemporary demographics of immigration and post-9/11 security concerns have colored our traditional hospitality as a nation of immigrants and made life more difficult for immigrants. The Catholic Church has a rich history of scriptural and social teaching that addresses the question of immigration. Stories of forced migration in the Pentateuch led to commandments regarding strangers and the responsibility to be welcoming. In the New Testament, we see that the Holy Family themselves were refugees. The Gospel of St. Matthew tells us that we will be judged by the way we respond to migrants and others in need. In Exsul Familia, Pope Pius XII reaffirms the commitment of the church to care for pilgrims, aliens, exiles, and migrants. In Ecclesia in America, Pope John Paul II states that the ultimate solution to illegal immigration is the elimination of global underdevelopment and that, in the meantime, the human rights of all migrants must be respected. In 2003, the bishops of Mexico and the United States jointly issued the pastoral letter Strangers No Longer: Together on the Journey of Hope. In this letter, the bishops say that U.S. immigration policy should protect the human rights and dignity of immigrants and asylum seekers. The bishops also offer a number of proposed public policy responses toward that end. To advance the principles contained in Strangers No Longer, the bishops have decided to mount a national campaign designed to unite and mobilize a growing network of Catholic organizations and individuals, as well as others of good faith. In addition, the campaign will seek to dispel myths and misperceptions about immigrants.

  2. Immigrant Youth Organizing as Civic Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Rand; Nguyen, Chi

    2017-01-01

    Adequately preparing youth to enter the civic spheres of adulthood has emerged as an issue of concern in recent years due to widening civic empowerment gaps that track along race and class lines. Drawing on an ethnographic study of Homeward Bound (pseudonym), a program for Vietnamese youth in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, we show how immigrant youth…

  3. Attitudes Towards Immigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Munch, Jakob Roland; Schroll, Sanne

    In this paper, we re-examine the role of economic self-interest in shaping people’s attitudes towards immigration, using data from the European Social Survey 2002/2003. Compared to the existing literature, there are two main contributions of the present paper. First, we develop a more powerful test...... of the hypothesis that a positive relationship between education and attitudes towards immigration reflects economic self-interest in the labour market. Second, we develop an alternative and more direct test of whether economic self-interest matters for people’s attitudes towards immigration. We find that while...

  4. Attitudes Towards Immigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Roland Munch, Jakob; Schroll, Sanne

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we re-examine the role of economic self-interest in shaping people's attitudes towards immigration, using data from the European Social Survey 2002/2003. Compared to the existing literature, there are two main contributions of the present paper. First, we develop a more powerful test...... of the hypothesis that a positive relationship between education and attitudes towards immigration reflects economic self-interest in the labour market. Second, we develop an alternativeand more direct test of whether economic self-interest mattersfor people's attitudes towards immigration. We find that whilethe...

  5. Immigration and income inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deding, Mette; Jakobsen, Vibeke; Azhar, Hussain

    Four income inequality measures (Gini-coefficient, 90/10-decile ratio, and two generalized entropy indices) are applied to analyse immigrants’ income position relative to natives in a comparative perspective. Administrative data is used for Denmark, while survey data is used for Germany. We find...... higher inequality among immigrants than natives in Denmark, but vice versa for Germany. Over the period 1984-2003, this inequality gap has narrowed in both countries. At the same time, the contribution of immigrants to overall inequality has increased systematically, primarily caused by the increased...... share of immigrants in the population....

  6. [Immigration: the American experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, N; Oudghiri, R

    1997-04-01

    This article, which is in two parts, examines aspects of current U.S. concerns about immigration. The first part, by Nicole Morgan, summarizes some of the recent work by David M. Kennedy and Georges J. Borjas on the benefits and costs of immigration. The second part, by Remy Oudghiri, examines the growing concern among some whites in California who fear the consequences of becoming the minority rather than the majority population in the state. The importance of taking economic and social factors into account in the resolution of problems associated with immigration is stressed.

  7. Obesity and Regional Immigrant Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Scott D; Carbert, Nicole S

    2017-11-24

    Canada has an increasingly large immigrant population. Areas of higher immigrant density, may relate to immigrants' health through reduced acculturation to Western foods, greater access to cultural foods, and/or promotion of salubrious values/practices. It is unclear, however, whether an association exists between Canada-wide regional immigrant density and obesity among immigrants. Thus, we examined whether regional immigrant density was related to obesity, among immigrants. Adult immigrant respondents (n = 15,595) to a national population-level health survey were merged with region-level immigrant density data. Multi-level logistic regression was used to model the odds of obesity associated with increased immigrant density. The prevalence of obesity among the analytic sample was 16%. Increasing regional immigrant density was associated with lower odds of obesity among minority immigrants and long-term white immigrants. Immigrant density at the region-level in Canada may be an important contextual factor to consider when examining obesity among immigrants.

  8. Durational and generational differences in Mexican immigrant obesity: is acculturation the explanation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Mathew J; Goldman, Noreen; Pebley, Anne R; Chung, Chang Y

    2012-07-01

    Using the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A.FANS-2; n = 1610), we explore the link between Mexican immigrant acculturation, diet, exercise and obesity. We distinguish Mexican immigrants and 2nd generation Mexicans from 3rd+ generation whites, blacks and Mexicans. First, we examine variation in social and linguistic measures by race/ethnicity, duration of residence and immigrant generation. Second, we consider the association between acculturation, diet and exercise. Third, we evaluate the degree to which acculturation, diet, exercise, and socioeconomic status explain the association between race/ethnicity, immigrant exposure to the US (duration since immigration/generation), and adult obesity. Among immigrants, we find a clear relationship between acculturation measures, exposure to the US, and obesity-related behaviors (diet and exercise). However, the acculturation measures do not clearly account for the link between adult obesity, immigrant duration and generation, and race/ethnicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effects of Immigration and Media Influence on Body Image Among Pakistani Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghir, Sheeba; Hyland, Lynda

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the role of media influence and immigration on body image among Pakistani men. Attitudes toward the body were compared between those living in Pakistan ( n = 56) and those who had immigrated to the United Arab Emirates ( n = 58). Results of a factorial analysis of variance demonstrated a significant main effect of immigrant status. Pakistani men living in the United Arab Emirates displayed poorer body image than those in the Pakistan sample. Results also indicated a second main effect of media influence.Those highly influenced by the media displayed poorer body image. No interaction effect was observed between immigrant status and media influence on body image. These findings suggest that media influence and immigration are among important risk factors for the development of negative body image among non-Western men. Interventions designed to address the negative effects of the media and immigration may be effective at reducing body image disorders and other related health problems in this population.

  10. Shadow Labor: Work and Wages among Immigrant Hispanic Women in Durham, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippen, Chenoa A

    2016-07-01

    Drawing on data collected in Durham, NC, this paper examines the forces shaping the labor supply and wages of immigrant Hispanic women in new destinations. The analysis evaluates the role of human capital and immigration characteristics (including legal status), family structure, and immigrant-specific labor market conditions, such as subcontracting, in shaping labor market outcomes. Findings indicate that the main determinants of labor supply among immigrant Hispanic women in Durham relate to family structure, with human capital playing a relatively minor role. Important variation is observed, however, in the degree of work-family conflict across occupations. For wages, human capital and immigration characteristics (including documentation) are more determinant than family structure. Results highlight the extremely precarious position of immigrant Hispanic women in Durham's low wage labor market, and multiple, overlapping sources of disadvantage, particularly relating to legal status and family structure.

  11. Status report for the 3D Elevation Program, 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Vicki; Eldridge, Diane F.; Jason, Allyson L.; Saghy, David L.; Steigerwald, Pamela R.; Stoker, Jason M.; Sugarbaker, Larry J.; Thunen, Diana R.

    2015-09-25

    The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) goal is to acquire, manage, and distribute enhanced three-dimensional elevation data for the Nation and U.S. territories by 2023. This status report covers implementation activities during 2013–2014 to include meeting funding objectives, developing a management structure, modernizing systems, and collecting and producing initial 3DEP data and products. The Nation will not have complete coverage of 3DEP quality data until 2023 assuming that sufficient funding is available. In spite of the overall condition of government budgets, the 3DEP initiative has gained widespread support and had incremental budget success to include supplemental funding resulting from natural disasters. The 3DEP Executive Forum and a wide range of professional organizations are actively working to maintain support for the program. The systems that have been developed to support increasing acquisition and processing levels are largely in place. The first 3DEP quality datasets were released to the public in late 2014. In addition, light detection and ranging (lidar), interferometric synthetic aperture radar (ifsar), and digital elevation models (DEMs) acquired before 2014 are all supported within the new infrastructure and available for download. Research is ongoing to expand the suite of products and services, and to increase overall throughput and data management efficiency. Emerging technologies may result in lower acquisition costs in the future. Elevation data acquired by 3DEP partnerships will be available through The National Map representing one of the largest and most comprehensive databases publicly available for the United States. 

  12. Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Snorkel Surveys, 2006-2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelle, R.D.

    2007-10-01

    The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office conducted snorkel surveys at 11 sites during the summer 2006 survey period and at 15 sites during fall 2006 and winter 2007 survey periods as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. A total of 39,898 fish from 14 species/genera and an unknown category were enumerated. Chinook salmon were the overall most common fish observed and comprised 19% of fish enumerated followed by mountain whitefish (18%) and rainbow trout (14%). Day and night surveys were conducted during the summer 2006 period (August), while night surveys were conducted during the fall 2006 (October) and winter 2007 (February/March) surveys. This is second annual progress report to Bonneville Power Administration for the snorkel surveys conducted in the Entiat River as related to long-term effectiveness monitoring of restoration programs in this watershed. The objective of this study is to monitor the fish habitat utilization of planned in-stream restoration efforts in the Entiat River by conducting pre- and post-construction snorkel surveys at selected treatment and control sites.

  13. Disposition of excess weapon grade plutonium: Status of the Russian program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diyakov, Anatoly [Center for Arms Control, Energy and Environmental Studies, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    During the Cold War, the Soviet Union and United States produced huge quantities of plutonium for weapons. Substantial cuts in their nuclear arsenals released of huge amounts of weapon grade nuclear materials. This put into the agenda the problem what to do with the excess weapon materials. In 2000 Russia and the United States concluded a Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement (PMDA), committing each to eliminate 34 tons of excess weapon plutonium. It was expected that the implementation of the PMDA Agreement will start in the second half of the year 2009 and the disposition programs finalized in 2025. But from the very beginning the practical implementation of the PMDA agreement met with substantial difficulties. After the consultations held in 2006-2007 the PMDA Agreement was modified. In compliance with the modified Agreement each side pledged to start the disposition of 34 tons of excess plutonium (25 tons in the form of metal and 9 tons in dioxide) in 2018 and to finalize the process in 15 years. Both sides were supposed to use the same disposition method through use in the MOX fuel and its subsequent irradiation in civil nuclear reactors: in light reactors for the USA and in fast neutron reactors for Russia. The presentation is going to provide the current status of the disposition program.

  14. Current Status of the Indigenous Languages Education Program from the Ministry of Public Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Ramos Rivas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available All of the Costa Rican indigenous languages are in danger of being lost because their spheres of use continue to shrink over time and the intergenerational transmission is diminishing. For this reason, the Costa Rican government has initiated a program to teach indigenous languages as a way to prevent their disappearance. As an effort to obtain a panoramic overview of the current status of indigenous languages education, this article presents a bibliographical review of what has been said about this program, its origins, obstacles and educational achievements. It is concluded that indigenous languages education has not been approached from a second language teaching perspective, there is shortage of educational material and a need for more training and follow-up for teachers, and finally, the non-indigenous population needs to be involved to create a better environment for language revitalization. Aside from providing a formal educational space, little has been done to incorporate indigenous languages in the social life of communities. These languages continue to be anchored in the past and language teachers have been left with a responsibility that should have been shared with the families.

  15. Diurnal cool thermal energy storage: Research programs, technological developments, and commercial status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, M A

    1992-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the major federal and private research and development efforts in diurnal cool thermal energy storage for electric load management in buildings. Included are brief technical descriptions and research histories of the technologies and applications of cool thermal storage. The goals, accomplishments, and funding levels of major thermal storage research programs also are summarized. The report concludes with the results of recent field performance evaluations of cool thermal storage installations and a discussion of the current commercial status of thermal storage equipment, including utility participation programs. This report was sponsored by the Technology and Consumer Products (TCP) Division within the Office of Conservation of the US Department of Energy. This report is part of TCP's ongoing effort to examine and evaluate technology developments and research efforts in the areas of lighting, space heating and cooling, water heating, refrigeration, and other building energy conversion equipment. Information obtained through this effort is used as an input in developing the US research agenda in these areas.

  16. Immigration and welfare state cash benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peder J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to summarize existing evidence on welfare dependence among immigrants in Denmark and to produce new evidence with focus on the most recent years. Design/methodology/approach – The paper combines a broad descriptive/analytical approach with multivariate...... estimation on the impact on welfare dependence from individual background factors. Findings – The main finding is the importance of aggregate low unemployment for immigrants to assimilate out of welfare dependence. Fairly small effects are reported from policy changes intending to influence the economic...... is the finding, at a disaggregate level, of how changes in immigration policy and cyclical changes interact, influencing the assimilation into or out of dependence on cash benefit programs....

  17. Immigrant Child Poverty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galloway, Taryn Ann; Gustafsson, Björn; Pedersen, Peder J.

    2015-01-01

    Immigrant and native child poverty in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden 1993–2001 is studied using large sets of panel data. While native children face yearly poverty risks of less than 10 percent in all three countries and for all years studied the increasing proportion of immigrant children...... with an origin in middle- and low-income countries have poverty risks that vary from 38 up to as much as 58 percent. At the end of the observation period, one third of the poor children in Norway and as high as about a half in Denmark and in Sweden are of immigrant origin. The strong overrepresentation...... of immigrant children from low- and middle-income countries when measured in yearly data is also found when applying a longer accounting period for poverty measurement. We find that child poverty rates are generally high shortly after arrival to the new country and typically decrease with years since...

  18. Liberal nationalism on immigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2009-01-01

    Liberal nationalists such as David Miller and Will Kymlicka have claimed that liberal principles have implausible implications with regard to the issue of immigration. They hold that nationality should play a normative role in this regard, and that this is necessary in order to justify restrictions...... on immigration. The present chapter discusses the envisaged role for considerations of nationality with regard to admission and residence, and examines the actual implications of arguments advanced by liberal nationalists as to why nationality should play this role. It is argued that the connection between...... nationality and immigration on liberal nationalist premises is not as straightforward as one might expect, and that the addition of considerations of nationality to liberal principles makes no practical difference with regard to reasons for restricting immigration or criteria of selection among applicants...

  19. Experiences with treating immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, Sima; Bjerre, Neele V; Dauvrin, Marie

    2012-01-01

    of human trafficking. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: The interviews highlighted specific challenges to treating immigrants in mental health services across all 16 countries including complications with diagnosis, difficulty in developing trust and increased risk...

  20. "A Day Without Immigrants"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Benita

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This article considers the debates surrounding the "Day Without Immigrants" protests organized in major U.S. cities on 1 May 2006, prompted by H.R. 4437, the Border Protection, Anti-Terrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act of 2005, from the multiple perspectives of scholars, pundits......, policy makers, and participants. Although much of these debates ostensibly centered around illegal Latino/a immigration to the United States, underneath the discussion ran a curious ideological thread, one that invoked groups' right to be in the United States in the first place. The article argues...... that the rhetoric used in these discourses pitted various class-based ethnoracial groups against each other not so much to tackle the proposed immigration bill but, rather, to comment on the ramifications of an increasingly multiracial United States. Udgivelsesdato: 01 December 2009...

  1. Immigrants and Native Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Mette; Peri, Giovanni

    Using a database that includes the universe of individuals and establishments in Denmark over the period 1991-2008 we analyze the effect of a large inflow of non-European (EU) immigrants on Danish workers. We first identify a sharp and sustained supply-driven increase in the inflow of non......-EU immigrants in Denmark, beginning in 1995 and driven by a sequence of international events such as the Bosnian, Somalian and Iraqi crises. We then look at the response of occupational complexity, job upgrading and downgrading, wage and employment of natives in the short and long run. We find...... that the increased supply of non-EU low skilled immigrants pushed native workers to pursue more complex occupations. This reallocation happened mainly through movement across firms. Immigration increased mobility of natives across firms and across municipalities but it did not increase their probability...

  2. Immigrant to Canada, newcomer to childhood cancer: a qualitative study of challenges faced by immigrant parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Anne F; Gulati, Sonia; Watt, Lisa; Banerjee, Ananya T; Sung, Lillian; Klaassen, Robert J; Dix, David; Poureslami, Iraj M; Shaw, Nicola

    2012-05-01

    Given the increasing numbers of immigrant families in Canada, it is imperative that healthcare providers (HCPs) understand the caregiving experiences of immigrant family caregivers. Our study aimed to explore any special challenges faced by immigrant parents of children with cancer and to identify supportive factors. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used. Participants included 50 first generation Chinese and South Asian parents of children with cancer who were at least six months post-diagnosis. Recruitment took place at six Canadian pediatric oncology centres. Interviews were conducted in English, Cantonese, Mandarin, Urdu, Punjabi or Hindi. Analysis involved coding and the use of the constant comparison method. Interviewing continued until no new themes emerged. While immigrant parents described many challenges faced by any parent of a child with cancer, the context of being an immigrant made certain experiences particularly challenging. Parents described challenges in the following areas: managing caregiving demand and financial strain, accessing support from others, and interfacing with the healthcare system. Parents described receiving a range of practical, emotional, social and informational support from extended family, their workplace, other cancer families, community organizations and HCPs. Our study addresses an important gap in the research literature by providing practical insight into the experiences of immigrant family caregivers. Our findings may help to inform the development of pediatric oncology policies and programs in ways that respond to the unique needs and challenges of culturally and linguistically diverse families. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Status of Propulsion Technology Development Under the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David; Kamhawi, Hani; Patterson, Mike; Pencil, Eric; Pinero, Luis; Falck, Robert; Dankanich, John

    2014-01-01

    Since 2001, the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program has been developing and delivering in-space propulsion technologies for NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD). These in-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling for future NASA Discovery, New Frontiers, Flagship and sample return missions currently under consideration. The ISPT program is currently developing technology in three areas that include Propulsion System Technologies, Entry Vehicle Technologies, and Systems/Mission Analysis. ISPT's propulsion technologies include: 1) the 0.6-7 kW NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) gridded ion propulsion system; 2) a 0.3-3.9kW Halleffect electric propulsion (HEP) system for low cost and sample return missions; 3) the Xenon Flow Control Module (XFCM); 4) ultra-lightweight propellant tank technologies (ULTT); and 5) propulsion technologies for a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). The NEXT Long Duration Test (LDT) recently exceeded 50,000 hours of operation and 900 kg throughput, corresponding to 34.8 MN-s of total impulse delivered. The HEP system is composed of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HIVHAC) thruster, a power processing unit (PPU), and the XFCM. NEXT and the HIVHAC are throttle-able electric propulsion systems for planetary science missions. The XFCM and ULTT are two component technologies which being developed with nearer-term flight infusion in mind. Several of the ISPT technologies are related to sample return missions needs: MAV propulsion and electric propulsion. And finally, one focus of the Systems/Mission Analysis area is developing tools that aid the application or operation of these technologies on wide variety of mission concepts. This paper provides a brief overview of the ISPT program, describing the development status and technology infusion readiness.

  4. The Status of Spacecraft Bus and Platform Technology Development Under the NASA ISPT Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David; Munk, Michelle M.; Pencil, Eric; Dankanich, John; Glaab, Louis; Peterson, Todd

    2014-01-01

    a brief overview of the ISPT program, describing the development status and technology infusion readiness.

  5. U.S. immigration policy: the guestworker option revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papademetriou, D G; Martin, P L; Miller, M J

    1983-01-01

    In guestworker programs foreign nationals are admitted into another country on a nonmigrant status with severely curtailed social and limited labor market rights. The duration of stay is always finite and compliance with the terms of the contract are entered through a network of legal arrangements which allow officials in the receiving country a substantial amount of administrative discretion. Pro-guestworker arguments say that the borders cannot be closed, that guestworkers can be substituted for illegal aliens, that guestworkers are better than illegal aliens, and that additional labor benefits the US economy. Those against guestworker programs stress longterm socioeconomic issues rather than short-term economic advantages, saying that guestworker programs are no quick answer for illegal immigration, for domestic labor shortages, or for the US poor population. Guestworker programs, its opponents say, provide short-run economic benefits to a few employers and individuals at the expense of more widespread and longterm socioeconomic costs. They oppose: 1) the concept of admitting foreign workers with restricted rights, 2) the concentration of any negative labor market impacts on already disadvantaged domestic groups, 3) the proliferation of "jobs which Americans won't take," 4) many temporary guests ending up permanent residents, and 5) that exporting workers is as likely to impede as accelerate job-creating economic development in immigration countries. Most economists believe that diminishing marginal productivity produces downward-sloping short-run demand for labor schedules. The European experience with these programs has been different than those in the US since foreign workers in Europe were initially recruited in response to actual labor shortages and have always had legal status, but both Europe and the US have experienced large contingents of workers who remain in the countries and are at a pronounced power disadvantage regarding the society's institutions

  6. Encounters with immigrant customers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Anna; Espersen, Sacha; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the challenges that Danish community pharmacy staff encounter when serving non-Western immigrant customers. Special attention was paid to similarities and differences between the perceptions of pharmacists and pharmacy assistants. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed...... companies. CONCLUSIONS: Community pharmacy staff report poorer quality in their encounters with immigrant customers, including sub-optimal counselling and frequent use of under-aged children as interpreters. Our study also reveals certain differences across personnel groups, which may be explained...

  7. 75 FR 28034 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) Biometric Data Collection at the Ports of Entry AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 30-Day notice and.... Chapter 35). NPPD is soliciting comments concerning this biometric data collection at the ports of entry...

  8. Malaria in illegal Chinese immigrants, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteelli, A; Volonterio, A; Gulletta, M; Galimberti, L; Maroccolo, S; Gaiera, G; Giani, G; Rossi, M; Dorigoni, N; Bellina, L; Orlando, G; Bisoffi, Z; Castelli, F

    2001-01-01

    A cluster of 22 imported malaria cases, 21 caused by Plasmodium falciparum, was observed among illegal Chinese immigrants in northern Italy in the summer of 2000. The rate of severe disease was high because the patients were not immune and they sought health-care services late in their illness because of their clandestine status. Recognition of the outbreak was delayed because no regional alert system among infectious diseases hospitals was in place.

  9. Incidence of Schizophrenia Among Second-Generation Immigrants in the Jerusalem Perinatal Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Cheryl; Perrin, Mary; Harlap, Susan; Deutsch, Lisa; Fennig, Shmuel; Manor, Orly; Nahon, Daniella; Kimhy, David; Malaspina, Dolores; Susser, Ezra

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Increased incidence of schizophrenia is observed among some immigrant groups in Europe, with the offspring of immigrants, ie “second-generation” immigrants particularly vulnerable. Few contemporary studies have evaluated the risk of schizophrenia among second-generation immigrants in other parts of the world. Methods: We studied the incidence of schizophrenia in relation to parental immigrant status in a population-based cohort of 88 829 offspring born in Jerusalem in 1964–1976. Parental countries of birth were obtained from birth certificates and grouped together as (1) Israel, (2) Other West Asia, (3) North Africa, and (4) Europe and industrialized countries. Cox proportional hazards methods were used in adjusting for sex, parents’ ages, maternal education, social class, and birth order. Results: Linkage with Israel's Psychiatric Registry identified 637 people admitted to psychiatric care facilities with schizophrenia-related diagnoses, before 1998. Incidence of schizophrenia was not increased among second-generation immigrants in this birth cohort, neither overall nor by specific group. Conclusions: The difference in risk of schizophrenia among second-generation immigrants in Europe and in this Israeli birth cohort suggests that the nature of the immigration experience may be relevant to risk, including reasons for migration, the nature of entry, and subsequent position in the host country for immigrants and their offspring. Minority status may be of importance as, in later studies, immigrants to Israel from Ethiopia had increased risk of schizophrenia. PMID:18648022

  10. Mood, anxiety, and personality disorders among first and second-generation immigrants to the United States

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    Salas-Wright, Christopher P.; Kagotho, Njeri; Vaughn, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    A careful examination of the multigenerational relationship between immigrant status and mental disorders can provide important information about the robustness and nature of the immigrant-mental health link. We examine immigrant status as a protective factor against mental illness, assess intergenerational effects, examine differences across race/ethnicity, and report the prevalence of mood, anxiety, and personality disorders of immigrants across major world regions. We employ data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) and compare first (n = 5,363) and second-generation (n = 4826) immigrants from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America to native-born Americans (n = 24,461) with respect to mental disorders. First-generation immigrants are significantly less likely than native-born Americans to be diagnosed with a mood, anxiety, or personality disorder, though the prevalence of mental health diagnoses increases among second generation immigrants. Similar results were observed for immigrants from major world regions as the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was lower among immigrants from Africa, Latin America, Europe, and Asia compared to native-born Americans. Findings provide evidence in support of the notion that the immigrant paradox may be extended to include mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in the United States. PMID:25223256

  11. Puberty Health Status among Adolescent Girls: A Model- based Educational Program

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    Fatemeh Kheirollahi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Adolescence is the period of transition from childhood to adulthood and is one of the fastest stages of human development which is simultaneous to start of puberty. This study aimed to investigate the puberty health status among adolescent girls through a model- based educational program. Materials and Methods The current study was an interventional quasi-experimental research. It was conducted on 152 girls aged 13 to 15 years old on the city of Qom- Iran. To select the subjects, first an education zone was randomly selected. In that zone, two schools were randomly selected as the intervention and control groups (76 for interventional group and 76 for control group.After confirming the reliability and validity of a researcher-made questionnaire, it was used to collect the required data via self-reports. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 software. Results The mean age and menarche of the students were 13.59 ± 0.87 and 12.38 ± 0.99 years, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the mean scores of knowledge and behavior in intervention and control groups after educational intervention, so that the mean scores of knowledge and behavior about puberty health in the intervention group were higher than the control group (P 0.05. Conclusion As the results showed, before the intervention the status of knowledge, attitude toward puberty health, and behavior about puberty health of the studied students was not favorable. Therefore, it is necessary to highlight the need for educational interventions and the role of health professionals in this field.

  12. Improving Nutritional Status of Older Persons with Dementia Using a National Preventive Care Program.

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    Johansson, L; Wijk, H; Christensson, L

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the outcome of change in body weight associated with use of a structured preventive care process among persons with dementia assessed as at risk of malnutrition or malnourished. The preventive care process is a pedagogical model used in the Senior Alert (SA) quality register, where nutrition is one of the prioritized areas and includes four steps: assessment, analysis of underlying causes, actions performed and outcome. An analysis of data from SA with a pre-post design was performed. The participants were living in ordinary housing or special housing in Sweden. 1912 persons, 65 years and older, registered in both SA and the dementia quality register Svedem were included. A national preventive care program including individualized actions. The Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form was used to assess nutritional status at baseline. Body weight was measured during baseline and follow-up (7-106 days after baseline). 74.3% persons were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. Those at risk of malnutrition or malnourished who were registered in all four steps of the preventive care process, increased in body weight from baseline (Md 60.0 kg) to follow-up (Md 62.0 kg) (p=0.013). In those with incomplete registration no increase in body weight was found. Using all steps in the structured preventive care process seems to improve nutritional status of persons with dementia assessed as at risk of malnutrition or malnourished. This study contributes to the development of evidence-based practice regarding malnutrition and persons with dementia.

  13. A large-scale national study of gambling severity among immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents: The role of the family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Natale; Vieno, Alessio; Griffiths, Mark D; Borraccino, Alberto; Lazzeri, Giacomo; Charrier, Lorena; Lemma, Patrizia; Dalmasso, Paola; Santinello, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to examine the association between immigrant generation, family sociodemographic characteristics, and problem gambling severity in a large-scale nationally representative sample of Italian youth. Data from the 2013-2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) Survey were used for cross-sectional analyses of adolescent problem gambling. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by a representative sample of 20,791 15-year-old students. Respondents' problem gambling severity, immigrant status, family characteristics (family structure, family affluence, perceived family support) and socio-demographic characteristics were individually assessed. Rates of adolescent at-risk/problem gambling were twice as high among first generation immigrants than non-immigrant students; the odds of being at-risk/problem gamblers were higher among first-generation immigrants than adolescents of other immigrant generations or non-immigrant. Not living with two biological or adoptive parents appears to be a factor that increases the risk of becoming a problem gambler in first generation immigrants. Immigrant status and family characteristics may play a key role in contributing to adolescent problem gambling. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Immigrant dreams: legal pathologies and structural vulnerabilities along the immigration continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This article contextualizes the results from a mixed methods study of the living and working conditions of Latino agricultural workers in northern Montana. The results of both the health needs assessment survey and the retrospective life-histories of these migrant farmworkers paint a picture of a population that is barely surviving in the United States, even after decades of living and working here. This article interrogates Singer's notions of "harmful social conditions and injurious social connections" that characterize syndemics of ill health through a detailed description of how different immigration statuses create particular local biologies embedded in the structural violence of powerlessness and lost life potentials. For Mexican immigrants to the United States, the immigration system itself is a powerful pathogen.

  15. Enforcement, Integration, and the Future of Immigration Federalism

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    Cristina Rodriguez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The federal government has a monopoly over the terms of immigration law, and it superintends the nation’s singular immigration enforcement bureaucracy. But our federalism nonetheless provides a vital playing field for sharp debates over the status of immigrants in American life. The forms of state and local involvement in immigration policy are varied, but they fall into two basic categories of mutually dependent and re-enforcing policies: enforcement federalism and integration federalism. Whereas enforcement federalism concerns the extent to which localities should assist or resist federal removal policies, integration federalism encompasses measures designed to assist immigrants, regardless of status, to plant roots and acculturate to life in the United States. Both forms of immigration federalism take shape through a wide variety of intergovernmental relations, not only between the federal government on the one hand and states and localities on the other, but also between states and the cities within them — an increasingly important dimension of immigration federalism today. These relations have important legal characteristics, and constitutional and statutory law bring them into being and mediate them. But the nature of any given intergovernmental dynamic will be shaped just as much by a combination of ideology and institutional imperatives. These elements can either unite the center and the periphery in common cause or produce the sort of conflict that has made immigration federalism a high-profile issue for decades. Given the density of the intergovernmental dynamics that shape the country’s immigration policy, developing a comprehensive strategy for immigration federalism requires more than a predilection toward or away from centralization of government authority. It requires a clear view on the appropriate metes and bounds of immigration enforcement, as well as a set of beliefs about the proper place in the social order of

  16. Labor Market Discrimination: Vietnamese Immigrants

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    Linus Yamane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vietnamese and East European immigrants face similar obstacles in the U.S. labor market. This provides for an interesting test of racial discrimination in the labor market. Does it make any difference if an immigrant is Asian or White? When Vietnamese immigrants are compared to East European immigrants, Vietnamese men earn 7-9% less than comparable East European men, with more discrimination among the less educated, and in the larger Vietnamese population centers like California. Vietnamese women earn as much as comparable East European women. Vietnamese immigrants, male and female, are much less likely to hold managerial and supervisory positions than comparable East European immigrants.

  17. Healthy Migrant Effect on Smoking Behavior Among Asian Immigrants in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerban, Aliya

    2016-02-01

    Healthy migrant effect (HME) of immigrants has been evidenced in various heath aspects. However, few studies have explored the applicability of HME on Asian immigrants' health risk behavior-smoking. This study used three waves of Current Population Survey-Tobacco Use Supplement data, 1998-1999, 2005-2006, and 2010-2011, to compare the rates of being a current smoker among Asian immigrants and United States born citizens. Further, the odds ratios of gender, age, marital status, socioeconomic status, years of migration, and citizenship status on the likelihood of being a current smoker were examined. Across the three waves, Asian immigrants smoked at a much lower rate than their native-born counterparts. The gender gap of being a current smoker was much wider among Asian immigrants. The longer the Asian immigrants stayed in the United States, the more likely they were to become current smokers. These data confirmed the association of HME and Asian immigrants' smoking behavior, and also provided strong evidence of the importance of smoking prevention among Asian immigrants. This study also implied the possibility of a decline in the effectiveness of HME on Asian immigrants as the time they spent in the United States increased.

  18. Mental Health of Aging Immigrants and Native-Born Men Across 11 European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Though working-age immigrants exhibit lower mortality compared with those domestic-born immigrants, consequences of immigration for mental health remain unclear. We examine whether older immigrants exhibit a mental advantage and whether factors believed to underlie immigrant vulnerability explain disparities. Method. The sample includes 12,247 noninstitutionalized men more than 50 years in 11 European countries. Multivariate logistic regression models estimated the impact of physical health, health behaviors, availability of social support, social participation, citizenship, time since immigration, socioeconomic status (SES), and employment on the mental health of immigrants. Results. Immigrants face 1.60 increased odds of depression despite a physical health advantage, evidenced by 0.74 lower odds of chronic illness. SES and availability of social support were predictive, though acculturation measures were not. Decomposition analysis revealed that only approximately 20% of the variation in depression rates between immigrants and native-born peers were explained by commonly cited risk factors. Conclusions. Despite physical health advantages, older immigrants suffer substantially higher depression rates. Time since immigration does not appear to mitigate depressive symptoms. PMID:23325505

  19. Nationalism, Immigration and the Dynamics of Language Evolution

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    Rocha, André Barreira da Silva

    2016-01-01

    I study the interplay between language competition and ideology struggle in a country where there is a native high-status language and a low-status language spoken by immigrants. Language transition is governed by a three-state model similar to the Minett-Wang (2008) and the Heinsalu et al. (2014) models. I introduce the novelty that, among natives, an ideological struggle exists between a group of nationalists and a group of pro-immigrants, thus a two-state model as in Abrams-Strogatz (2003). When bilingualism emerges as an equilibrium, there might be a completely segregated society with monolingual immigrants and monolingual nationalistic natives, thus an undesired outcome contrasting with the widespread literature. Removing ideology struggle, bilingualism is never stable, thus results in Heinsalu et al. (2014) are solely due to the way conversion rate constants are defined in their model. If language status is explicitly defined in the model, bilingualism becomes doomed in the long run.

  20. Parental awareness of health and community resources among immigrant families.

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    Yu, Stella M; Huang, Zhihuan J; Schwalberg, Renee H; Kogan, Michael D

    2005-03-01

    To examine the association between parental immigrant status and awareness of health and community resources to help address common family problems. Using the 1999 National Survey of America's Families, a survey of the health, economic, and social characteristics of children and adults, bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted on 35,938 children to examine the relationship between parents' immigrant status (U.S.-born citizens, naturalized citizens, and noncitizens) and their responses to questions about their awareness of specific health and community resources. Compared to U.S.-born citizens, noncitizens were at the highest risk of not being aware of health and community resources for most outcomes, followed by naturalized citizens. The services of which noncitizens were most likely to be unaware were places to get help for family discord, child care issues, and family violence. Multivariate analyses indicate that parental race/ethnicity, education level, employment status, and child age were other significant independent risk factors. Immigrant parents are at particularly high risk of alienation from systems of health care and support services that are available to low-income and other vulnerable populations in the United States. These findings clearly document disparate awareness among parents of different immigrant status. Community and health resources should reach out to immigrant populations, in linguistically and culturally appropriate ways, to alert them to the availability of their services.