WorldWideScience

Sample records for program iaq tribal

  1. Tribal Waste Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s Tribal Waste Management Program encourages environmentally sound waste management practices that promote resource conservation through recycling, recovery, reduction, clean up, and elimination of waste.

  2. 78 FR 24212 - Tribal Management Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    .... 450b(l). Tribal organizations must provide proof of non-profit status. Tribal organizations are... additional proof of applicant status documents required such as Tribal resolutions, proof of non-profit..., Program Analyst, Office of Tribal Self-Governance, Indian Health Service, Reyes Building, 801 Thompson...

  3. 75 FR 48329 - Tribal Drinking Water Operator Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... AGENCY Tribal Drinking Water Operator Certification Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Drinking Water Infrastructure Grant Tribal Set-Aside (DWIG TSA) program. The Federal drinking water regulations require some system operators to be ``qualified.'' Participation in EPA's Tribal Drinking Water...

  4. What is IAQ?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanger, Povl Ole

    2005-01-01

    ventilation standards are met show high percentages of dissatisfied persons and of those suffering from SBS symptoms. Recent studies show that improvement of IAQ by a factor of 2-7 compared to existing standards increases office productivity and school learning significantly, while decreasing the risk...... of allergic symptoms and asthma in homes. To make indoor air acceptable, even for the most sensitive persons, an improvement of 1-2 orders of magnitude is required. The paper will discuss the development of new methods that can provide such substantial improvements of IAQ while maintaining or even decreasing...

  5. What is IAQ?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanger, Povl Ole

    2006-01-01

    ventilation standards are met show high percentages of dissatisfied persons and of those suffering from sick building syndrome symptoms. Recent studies show that improvement of IAQ by a factor of 2-7 compared with existing standards increases office productivity and school learning significantly, while...... decreasing the risk of allergic symptoms and asthma in homes. To make indoor air acceptable, even for the most sensitive persons, an improvement of 1-2 orders of magnitude may be required. The paper will discuss the development of new methods that can provide such substantial improvements of IAQ while...

  6. Region 9 Tribal Clean Water Act Programs and Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Tribal Water Office in Region 9 manages all grants related to the Clean Water Act for over 100 federally recognized tribes and provides programmatic and technical assistance for water quality standards and CWA grant programs.

  7. Tribal Energy Program for California Indian Tribes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-10

    A strategic plan is needed to catalyze clean energy in the more than 100 California Indian tribal communities with varying needs and energy resources. We propose to conduct a scoping study to identify tribal lands with clean energy potential, as well as communities with lack of grid-tied energy and communications access. The research focus would evaluate the energy mixture and alternatives available to these tribal communities, and evaluate greenhouse gas emissions associated with accessing fossil fuel used for heat and power. Understanding the baseline of energy consumption and emissions of communities is needed to evaluate improvements and advances from technology. Based on this study, we will develop a strategic plan that assesses solutions to address high energy fuel costs due to lack of electricity access and inform actions to improve economic opportunities for tribes. This could include technical support for tribes to access clean energy technologies and supporting collaboration for on-site demonstrations.

  8. 76 FR 44394 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ... Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit... availability of $15,075,000 in funding provided by the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program... establishing the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program (Tribal Transit Program) (TTP). This...

  9. 77 FR 14465 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit... Surface and Air Transportation Programs Extension Act of 2011, Public Law No.112-30 continues the... establishing the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program (Tribal Transit Program or TTP). This...

  10. 78 FR 37821 - Tribal Self-Governance Program, Negotiation Cooperative Agreement, Announcement Type: New-Limited...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Tribal Self-Governance Program, Negotiation Cooperative Agreement... (IHS) Office of Tribal Self-Governance (OTSG) is accepting limited competition Negotiation Cooperative Agreement applications for the Tribal Self-Governance Program (TSGP). This program is authorized under Title...

  11. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Maria Perez, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Historically, American Indian Tribes have lacked sufficient numbers of trained, technical personnel from their communities to serve their communities; tribal expertise in the fields of science, business and engineering being extremely rare and programs to encourage these disciplines almost non-existent. Subsequently, Tribes have made crucial decisions about their land and other facets of Tribal existence based upon outside technical expertise, such as that provided by the United States government and/or private industries. These outside expert opinions rarely took into account the traditional and cultural values of the Tribes being advised. The purpose of this internship was twofold: Create and maintain a working relationship between CERT and Colorado State University (CSU) to plan for the Summit on Tribal human resource development; and Evaluate and engage in current efforts to strengthen the Tribal Resource Institute in Business, Engineering and Science (TRIBES) program. The intern lists the following as the project results: Positive interactions and productive meetings between CERT and CSU; Gathered information from Tribes; CERT database structure modification; Experience as facilitator in participating methods; Preliminary job descriptions for staff of future TRIBES programs; and Additions for the intern`s personal database of professional contacts and resources.

  12. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Karen Sandoval, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the project was to: create a working relationship between CERT and Colorado State University (CSU); involve and create relationships among individuals and departments at CSU; empower Native communities to run their own affairs; establish programs for the benefit of Tribes; and create Native American Program Development Office at CSU. The intern lists the following as the project results: revised a Native American Program Development document; confirmation from 45 departments across campus for Summit attendance [Tribal Human Resource Development Summit]; created initial invitee list from CSU departments and colleges; and informed CERT and CSU staff of results. Much of the response from the campus community has been positive and enthusiastic. They are ready to develop new Native American programs on campus, but need the awareness of what they can do to be respectful of Tribal needs.

  13. 76 FR 41297 - Grant Program To Build Tribal Energy Development Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Grant Program To Build Tribal Energy Development Capacity AGENCY: Bureau of... proposals from Federally-recognized Indian tribes for projects to build tribal capacity for energy resource... Indian tribes that wish to build capacity to develop conventional or renewable energy resources on tribal...

  14. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho)

    1996-06-01

    This summary gives the major points of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery by the Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and other interested parties. The Nez Perce once were one of the largest Plateau tribes in the Northwest and occupied a territory that included north central Idaho, southeastern Washington and northeastern Oregon. Salmon and other migratory fish species are an invaluable food resource and an integral part of the Nez Perce Tribe`s culture. Anadromous fish have always made up the bulk of the Nez Perce tribal diet and this dependence on salmon was recognized in the treaties made with the Tribe by the US. The historic economic, social, and religious significance of the fish to the Nez Perce Tribe continues to this day, which makes the decline of fish populations in the Columbia River Basin a substantial detrimental impact to the Nez Perce way of life. The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that would rear and release spring, summer, and fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), biologically similar to wild fish, to reproduce in the Clearwater River Subbasin. Program managers propose techniques that are compatible with existing aquatic and riparian ecosystems and would integrate hatchery-produced salmon into the stream and river environments needed to complete their life cycle.

  15. ASHRAE IAQ 2010: Airborne infection controlventilation, IAQ & energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekhar, Chandra; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2012-01-01

    . • Knowledge that proximity to an infected person affects infection rate, but the continued lack of certainty about whether that is due to large "ballistic" droplets or just a higher concentration of smaller airborne particles. Besides the papers from the IAQ 2010 conference mentioned above, this special issue...

  16. Evaluating IAQ effects on people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyon, David; Tham, K. W.; Sekhar, C.

    2003-01-01

    "conclusive". From them, a small number of conclusions were drawn, and some very large gaps in our knowledge of this important area of research were identified. Taking these as the starting point, this paper formulates a strategy for evaluating IAQ effects on people. It formulates some critical hypotheses...

  17. 75 FR 10496 - Tribal Self-Governance Program Planning Cooperative Agreement; Announcement Type: New Funding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Tribal Self-Governance Program Planning Cooperative Agreement... Self- Governance Program (TSGP), as authorized by Public Law 106-260, the Tribal Self-Governance... is designed to promote Self-Governance by enabling Tribes to assume control of Indian Health Service...

  18. 77 FR 43353 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self-Governance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self- Governance Program... for Tribal Self-Governance Program authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0143. This information...-Governance, 1951 Constitution Avenue NW., Mail Stop 355-G SIB, Washington, DC 20240; telephone: (202) 219...

  19. 78 FR 27284 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit... 5311(j) of MAP-21, Public Law 112-41 (July 6, 2012), authorizes the Public Transportation on Indian...) Fiscal Year 2013 Public Transportation on Indian Reservation Program: Request for comment, Announcement...

  20. 76 FR 22412 - Information Collection for Tribal Energy Development Capacity Program; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Information Collection for Tribal Energy Development Capacity Program; Comment... Economic Development (IEED) is submitting a proposed information collection related to funds provided under... Energy Development Capacity Program Grants. Brief Description of Collection: Indian tribes that would...

  1. 77 FR 47405 - Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation... (OTSG) is accepting limited competition Negotiation Cooperative Agreement applications for the Tribal... (Compacts and Funding Agreements) on behalf of the IHS Director. To begin the Self-Governance negotiations...

  2. 75 FR 27114 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... Federal Transit Administration Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit... availability of $15,074,963 million in funding provided by the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations.... Overview Section 3013 of SAFETEA-LU, amended 49 U.S.C. 5311(c) by establishing the Public Transportation on...

  3. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (Idaho).

    1996-06-01

    Bonneville Power Administration, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Nez Perce Tribe propose a supplementation program to restore chinook salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin in Idaho. The Clearwater River is a tributary to the Snake River, which empties into the Columbia River. The Nez Perce Tribe would build and operate two central incubation and rearing hatcheries and six satellite facilities. Spring, summer and fall chinook salmon would be reared and acclimated to different areas in the Subbasin and released at the hatchery and satellite sites or in other watercourses throughout the Subbasin. The supplementation program differs from other hatchery programs because the fish would be released at different sizes and would return to reproduce naturally in the areas where they are released. Several environmental issues were identified during scoping: the possibility that the project would fail if mainstem Columbia River juvenile and adult passage problems are not solved; genetic risks to fish listed as endangered or threatened; potential impacts to wild and resident fish stocks because of increase competition for food and space; and water quality. The Proposed Action would affect several important aspects of Nez Perce tribal life, primarily salmon harvest, employment, and fisheries management.

  4. DOE's Tribal Energy Program Offers Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas C. MacCourt, Chair, Indian Law Practice, Ater Wynne LLP

    2010-06-01

    This handbook is an accessible reference for those who are new to tribal energy project development or who seek a refresher on key development issues as they navigate the project development process. Building upon the wealth of feedback and experiences shared by tribal and other participants in tribal energy workshops conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, it is designed to provide tribal leaders, tribal economic and energy enterprises, and those supporting them with a general overview of the renewable energy project development process. It includes information on how to structure a renewable energy project transaction to protect tribal interests, with an emphasis on joint project development efforts undertaken with nontribal parties; a general overview of key energy development agreements, including power sale agreements, transmission and interconnection agreements, and land leases; and a detailed discussion of ways tribes can finance renewable energy projects, the sources of funding or financing that may be available, the types of investors that may be available, and federal tax incentives for renewable energy projects. The guide also includes a glossary of some of the most commonly used technical terms.

  5. Tribal CCDF Guide to "Financial Management, Grants Administration, and Program Accountability"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Care Bureau, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Tribal managers and staff working with Federal grants must be fully knowledgeable of all applicable Federal requirements and skilled in applying these requirements to the daily operation of their programs, whether starting a new program or striving to maintain a quality program which meets the intent of the enacting legislation. It is the…

  6. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Melinda Jacquez, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the intern project was to write a comprehensive booklet on all state legislation proposed in 1995 on Native American issues. A second purpose was to contact tribal governments and request an ordinance, law or resolution on hazardous and nuclear waste transportation. This intern report contains a summary of bills proposed in 37 state legislatures pertaining to Native American issues. Time ran out before the second project objective could be met.

  7. 77 FR 71016 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self-Governance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Tribal Self- Governance Program... Self-Governance Program. The information collection is currently authorized by OMB Control Number 1076... comments to Ken Reinfeld, Office of Self-Governance, 1951 Constitution Avenue NW., Mail Stop 355-G SIB...

  8. 28 CFR 90.51 - Program criteria for Indian tribal government discretionary grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... strengthening effective law enforcement and prosecution strategies to combat violent crimes against women, and to develop and strengthen victim services in cases involving violent crimes against women. (b... programs, including sexual assault and domestic violence victim services programs. Indian tribal government...

  9. 75 FR 17745 - Tribal Management Grant Program; Announcement Type: New and Competing Continuation Discretionary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... Assistance Number(s): 93.228. Key Dates: Program Requirements Session: April 21-22 and May 5-6, 2010. Grant..., 2010. Receipt Date for Final Tribal Resolution: October 1, 2010. Review Date: October 4-8, 2010...-638, as amended. This program is described at 93.228 in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance...

  10. 45 CFR 309.170 - What statistical and narrative reporting requirements apply to Tribal IV-D programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What statistical and narrative reporting... (IV-D) PROGRAM Statistical and Narrative Reporting Requirements § 309.170 What statistical and narrative reporting requirements apply to Tribal IV-D programs? (a) Tribes and Tribal organizations...

  11. Welfare Eligibility: Programs Treat Indian Tribal Trust Fund Payments Inconsistently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    renewa- ble and over t ime will be depleted. Timber as well its oil and gas market s have been depressed for the last few years, a Iia Official told us... self -support of the blind and disabled. In addition, tribal trust distributions are excluded. Benefits Eligible individuals receive monthly cash...8217 ’r’I .’)L orcdP6 the purcrhase Lcc the exr: -uded amrount- ray ix- c, c 000 dcp JL"’ri or the nrxber and amournt of -,-he pa~irerit . - ’I 4r deprec

  12. 75 FR 10492 - Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation Cooperative Agreement... Opportunity Description The purpose of the Negotiation Cooperative Agreement is to provide resources to Tribes...)). The Negotiation Cooperative Agreement provides a Tribe with funds to help cover the expenses involved...

  13. 40 CFR 745.325 - Lead-based paint activities: State and Tribal program requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lead-based paint activities: State and... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES State and Indian Tribal Programs § 745.325 Lead-based paint activities: State and...

  14. 75 FR 74078 - Information Collection for Tribal Energy Development Capacity Program; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... the Tribal Energy Development Capacity (TEDC) program. Indian tribes, including Alaska Native regional... collection to Ashley Stockdale, Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development... development on Indian land from Indian tribes, including Alaska Native regional and village corporations under...

  15. Tribal Energy Program, Assisting Tribes to Realize Their Energy Visions (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-06-01

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  16. Clean Diesel Tribal Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DERA Tribal Program awards clean diesel grants specifically for tribal nations. The Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) appropriates funds for these projects. Publication Numbers: EPA-420-B-13-025 and EPA-420-P-11-001.

  17. Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Program First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization – Human Capacity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiita, Joanne

    2013-07-30

    The Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Project expanded weatherization services for tribal members’ homes in southeast Alaska while providing weatherization training and on the job training (OJT) for tribal citizens that lead to jobs and most probably careers in weatherization-related occupations. The program resulted in; (a) 80 Alaska Native citizens provided with skills training in five weatherization training units that were delivered in cooperation with University of Alaska Southeast, in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy Core Competencies for Weatherization Training that prepared participants for employment in three weatherizationrelated occupations: Installer, Crew Chief, and Auditor; (b) 25 paid OJT training opportunities for trainees who successfully completed the training course; and (c) employed trained personnel that have begun to rehab on over 1,000 housing units for weatherization.

  18. Medicaid Home Care for Tribal Health Services: A Tool Kit for Developing New Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Steven P.; Satter, Delight E.; Zubiate, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    Planning and financing long-term care services for American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) elders is a challenge. Institutional care (i.e. nursing homes) is not desired by most elders and has high costs for both the elders and tribal governments. In contrast, less expensive home care can provide enough assistance to keep most disabled elders in their own or their relatives’ homes, where they prefer to be. State Medicaid programs are one source of funding for home and community based long-ter...

  19. Wabanaki Youth in Science (WaYS): A Tribal Mentoring and Educational Program Integrating Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Western Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    tish carr; Laura S. Kenefic; Darren J. Ranco

    2017-01-01

    The Wabanaki Youth in Science (WaYS) program provides mentoring and training opportunities in the life sciences for Native American youth in Maine. This program, which was motivated by a shortage of young natural resource professionals to manage tribal lands, uses a multifaceted approach (i.e., camps, community outreach, and internships with cultural resource and...

  20. Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) : Using Temporal Data and GIS to Visualize IAQ in Campus Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    N Li, Na

    2013-01-01

    There is no doubt that indoor air quality (IAQ) is essential for human health because of the long exposure time human has inside. But the legislation and relevant policy about indoor air are far behind outdoors. Recently indoor air quality has been paid attention, some relevant epidemiological studies were carried and WHO published indoor air quality guidelines ac-cordingly as the reference of policy-making. The demand and requirement of good indoor air quality is booming from legislation enf...

  1. Using UVC technology to enhance IAQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheir, R.; Fencl, F.B. [Steril-Aire USA, Inc., Cerritos, CA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    There are several categories of organisms that can grow and/or spread in modern air handling systems: pathogens--viruses, bacteria, and fungi that cause a range of infectious diseases; allergens--bacteria and mold that cause allergic rhinitis, asthma, humidifier fever, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis; toxins--endotoxins and mycotoxins that cause a variety of toxic effects, irritation, and odors. As HVAC systems move large amounts of outdoor and recirculated air through occupied buildings, they become the conduits by which these unhealthful organisms are spread throughout the spaces they serve. A new UVC technology overcomes previous limitations to enhance IAQ control, effectively and efficiently killing microorganisms that grow, disseminate, and circulate in air handling systems.

  2. 78 FR 57858 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... 57701. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert Bialas, Regional Program Manager, Region XI, Office of...) Tribal Consultations for leaders of Tribal Governments operating Head Start and Early Head Start programs... the issues and concerns raised in 2012 OHS Tribal Consultations. Tribal leaders and designated...

  3. Tribal Grant Program Area Polygons with Project Officer and Tribal Contact Information, US EPA Region 9, 2015, Regional Tribal Operations Committee

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains information pertaining to EPA Region 9 project officers and their areas of oversight, EPA Region 9 grant program recipients and grant types,...

  4. 78 FR 37828 - Tribal Self-Governance Program Planning Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... Thompson Avenue, TMP ] Suite 360, Rockville, MD 20852. Applicants submitting Tribal resolutions after or... additional proof of applicant status documents required such as Tribal resolutions, proof of non-profit... tracking number as proof of contact. The tracking number is helpful if there are technical issues that...

  5. What is IAQ? [Indoor Air Quality]; Wat is IAQ? [Indoor Air Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanger, P.O. [International Centre for Inoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2007-07-15

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) is often defined as the extent to which human requirements are met. The air should be fresh and pleasant, not have a negative impact on health, that it not effects productivity. Present ventilation standards and guidelines do not include productivity and only require that the indoor air must be 'acceptable'. With such a modest aim it is not surprising that comprehensive field studies in many countries in buildings in which ventilation standards are met show high percentages of dissatisfied persons and of those suffering from Sick Building Syndrome. Recent studies show that improvement of IAQ by a factor of 2-7 compared with existing standards increases office productivity and school learning significantly, while decreasing the risk of allergic symptoms and asthma in homes. To make indoor air acceptable, even for the most sensitive persons, an improvement of 1-2 orders of magnitude may be required. The paper will discuss the development of new methods that can provide such substantial improvements of IAQ while maintaining or even decreasing ventilation end energy usage. [Dutch] In ruimtes die bestemd zijn voor menselijke bezetting wordt de binnenluchtkwaliteit (indoor Air Quality - IAQ) vaak gedefinieerd als de mate waarin aan menselijke behoeften wordt voldaan. Maar welke behoeften hebben mensen van de binnenlucht? Het is wenselijk dat de lucht wordt ervaren als zuiver en aangenaam. Dit betekent dat de lucht geen negatieve invloed mag hebben op de gezondheid en dat de lucht het werken moet stimuleren. De binnenlucht zou de productiviteit van werknemers en de schoolprestaties van kinderen moeten verhogen. In de huidige normen en richtlijnen voor ventilatie worden deze laatste twee aspecten niet meegenomen, er wordt uitgegaan van de bescheiden eis dat de binnenluchtkwaliteit 'acceptabel' dient te zijn. Dit houdt in dat de meest gevoelige groep personen (doorgaans 20%) de lucht als onacceptabel zal beoordelen en dat de

  6. 76 FR 48865 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... Program Manager Region XI, e-mail [email protected] or phone (202) 401- 5964. Additional...) Tribal Consultations ] for leaders of Tribal Governments operating Head Start and Early Head Start... Natives convention. We are convening the OHS Tribal Consultations in conjunction with other Tribal Leader...

  7. 5311(c) Tribal Transit Funding : Assessing Impacts and Determining Future Program Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    The federal government has invested a significant amount of money in tribal transit in recent years. Since the enactment of the current highway bill (Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU)) i...

  8. 77 FR 19020 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Program Manager Region XI, email [email protected] or phone (202) 401- 5964. Additional information... Consultations with leaders of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start) programs for...) programs are located. We are convening the OHS Tribal Consultations in conjunction with other Tribal Leader...

  9. 78 FR 20658 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... CONTACT: Robert Bialas, Regional Program Manager, Region XI, Office of Head Start, email [email protected] leaders of Tribal Governments operating Head Start and Early Head Start programs. As much as possible, the... OHS Tribal Consultations. Tribal leaders and designated representatives interested in submitting...

  10. 78 FR 11891 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert Bialas, Regional Program Manager, Region XI, Office of Head Start, email Robert... leaders of Tribal Governments operating Head Start and Early Head Start programs. As much as possible, the... OHS Tribal Consultations. Tribal leaders and designated representatives interested in submitting...

  11. Infrastructure Task Force Tribal Solid Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    These documents describe 1) issues to consider when planning and designing community engagement approaches for tribal integrated waste management programs and 2) a proposed approach to improve tribal open dumps data and solid waste projects, and 3) an MOU.

  12. Welfare Eligibility: Programs Treat Indian Tribal Trust Fund Report to Congressional Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This report was sought by the Conference Committee on the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985, concerned that federal law allows payments from tribal trust funds to be excluded when determining eligibility for welfare benefits to American Indians. Applicable federal laws and eligibility policies were reviewed to determine the…

  13. Building Bridges: Perspectives on Partnership and Collaboration from the US Forest Service Tribal Relations Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael J. Dockry; Sophia A. Gutterman; Mae A. Davenport

    2017-01-01

    American Indian tribes have inherent rights to national forestland and resources codified in treaties, the US Constitution, statutes, Presidential Executive Orders, and case law. These rights require a government-togovernment relationship between each tribe and the US Forest Service (USFS), which recognizes federal trust responsibilities and tribal sovereignty. This is...

  14. 75 FR 51609 - Classified National Security Information Program for State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... security information shared by the Federal Government with State, local, tribal, and private sector (SLTPS... entity'' as defined in section 2 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 101(11)). (g) ``Private... President [[Page 51609

  15. 77 FR 16120 - Tribal Consultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Tribal Organizations to apply for grants for Veterans cemeteries on Trust Lands. Public Law 109-461, 120... the Veterans Cemetery Grant Program to Tribal Organizations in the same manner, and under the same... applying for these grants. Veterans Health Administration: The VA-IHS MOU was signed by Dr. Petzel and Dr...

  16. 45 CFR 309.130 - How will Tribal IV-D programs be funded and what forms are required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Secretary: (i) Funds have been committed to other budget items; (ii) A high rate of unemployment; (iii) A... is subject to review at any time during the funding period and may be revoked, if changing... change in Tribal IV-D budget estimate results from a change in the Tribal IV-D plan, the Tribe or Tribal...

  17. Evaluation of Mercury Exposure Reduction through a Fish Consumption Advisory Program for Anishinaabe Tribal Members in Northern Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Foran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission has an extensive program to inform Anishinaabe tribal members from northern Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota who harvest and consume walleye about the health risks of consuming these fish, and to encourage harvest and consumption practices that reduce exposure to MeHg. We report here the results of a probabilistic analysis of exposure to methyl mercury (MeHg among tribal members who consume walleye. The model predicts that the potential for greatest exposures to MeHg occur among women of child-bearing age and children who consume large walleye from lakes that contain heavily contaminated (MeHg concentration >0.5 mg/kg fish. The analysis allows GLIFWC to evaluate, focus, and fine-tune its initiatives to protect the health of tribal members in ways that result in exposure and risk reduction for tribal harvesters, women of child-bearing age, and children, while maintaining important tribal lifeways, which include the harvest and consumption of walleye.

  18. Assess So You Can Address Indoor Air Quality in Your School – Use EPA’s New IAQ School Assessment Mobile App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides overview of Assessing IAQ by downloading EPA's School Assessment Mobile App. “One-stop shop” for accessing guidance from EPA’s IAQ Tools for Schools Action Kit with proven strategies for specifically addressing important IAQ issues.

  19. Energy and IAQ Implications of Residential Ventilation Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the energy, humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of residential ventilation cooling in all U.S. IECC climate zones. A computer modeling approach was adopted, using an advanced residential building simulation tool with airflow, energy and humidity models. An economizer (large supply fan) was simulated to provide ventilation cooling while outdoor air temperatures were lower than indoor air temperatures (typically at night). The simulations were performed for a full year using one-minute time steps to allow for scheduling of ventilation systems and to account for interactions between ventilation and heating/cooling systems.

  20. 'Any questions?'--Clinicians' usage of invitations to ask questions (IAQs) in outpatient plastic surgery consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, Katherine; Patrick, Peter L

    2014-12-01

    To explore use of 'Invitations to Ask Questions' (IAQs) by plastic surgeons in outpatient consultations, and consider how type of IAQ impacts on patients' responses to, and recollection of, IAQs. Descriptive study: 63 patients were audio recorded in consultation with 5 plastic surgeons, and completed a brief questionnaire immediately after the consultation. Consultation transcripts were analyzed using inductive qualitative methods of Discourse Analysis and compared with questionnaire findings. A taxonomy of IAQs was developed, including three types of IAQ (Overt, Covert, and Borderline). Overt IAQs were rarely identified, and almost all IAQs occurred in the closing stages of the consultation. However, when an overt IAQ was used, patients always recollected being asked if they had any questions after the consultation. Patients are rarely explicitly offered the opportunity to ask questions. When this does occur, it is often in the closing stages of the consultation. Clinicians should openly encourage patients to ask questions frequently throughout the consultation, and be mindful that subtle differences in construction of these utterances may impact upon interpretation. Clear communication, of message and intention, is essential in clinical encounters to minimize misunderstanding, misinterpretation, or missed opportunities for patients to raise concerns. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Classifying Sources Influencing Indoor Air Quality (IAQ Using Artificial Neural Network (ANN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaharil Mad Saad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring indoor air quality (IAQ is deemed important nowadays. A sophisticated IAQ monitoring system which could classify the source influencing the IAQ is definitely going to be very helpful to the users. Therefore, in this paper, an IAQ monitoring system has been proposed with a newly added feature which enables the system to identify the sources influencing the level of IAQ. In order to achieve this, the data collected has been trained with artificial neural network or ANN—a proven method for pattern recognition. Basically, the proposed system consists of sensor module cloud (SMC, base station and service-oriented client. The SMC contain collections of sensor modules that measure the air quality data and transmit the captured data to base station through wireless network. The IAQ monitoring system is also equipped with IAQ Index and thermal comfort index which could tell the users about the room’s conditions. The results showed that the system is able to measure the level of air quality and successfully classify the sources influencing IAQ in various environments like ambient air, chemical presence, fragrance presence, foods and beverages and human activity.

  2. 45 CFR 309.150 - What start-up costs are allowable for Tribal IV-D programs carried out under § 309.65(b) of this...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... IV-D programs carried out under § 309.65(b) of this part? Federal funds are available for costs of... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What start-up costs are allowable for Tribal IV-D programs carried out under § 309.65(b) of this part? 309.150 Section 309.150 Public Welfare Regulations...

  3. 45 CFR 309.145 - What costs are allowable for Tribal IV-D programs carried out under § 309.65(a) of this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... programs carried out under § 309.65(a) of this part? Federal funds are available for costs of operating a... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What costs are allowable for Tribal IV-D programs carried out under § 309.65(a) of this part? 309.145 Section 309.145 Public Welfare Regulations Relating...

  4. 78 FR 77155 - Grant Program To Assess, Evaluate, and Promote Development of Tribal Energy and Mineral Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... on tribal energy and mineral resources, including digital land grids, geographic information system... by electronic funds transfer (through the Treasury Fedline Payment System (FEDLINE)). The recipient... and Mineral Development Funding D. Submission of Application in Digital Format E. Application...

  5. Webinar: A Proactive Approach to IAQ: Saving Money and Protecting Health With Preventive Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    A page to register to view the June 22, 2017, webinar in the IAQ Knowledge-to-Action Professional Training Webinar Series: Green Cleaning for Improved Health: The Return on Investment of Green Cleaning in Schools

  6. School Indoor Air Quality Assessments Go Mobile / EPA Launches School IAQ Assessment Mobile App

    Science.gov (United States)

    WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today launched a new mobile app to assist schools and school districts with performing comprehensive indoor air quality (IAQ) facility assessments to protect the health of children and sch

  7. Region 9 Tribal Environmental GAP Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Region 9 invites Indian Environmental General Assistance Program (GAP) grant proposals from federally recognized tribal governments and eligible intertribal consortia for FY2019 work plan program development activities.

  8. ‘I used to be ashamed’. The influence of an educational program on tribal and non-tribal children's knowledge and valuation of wild food plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz Garcia, G.S.; Howard, P.L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the influence of an extra-curricular educational program on children's knowledge and cultural valuation of wild food plants, which are an important component of their diets. This program aims to reinforce children's traditional knowledge and values around biological resources in

  9. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM LATEX PAINT-PART 2. TEST HOUSE STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY (IAQ) MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emission models developed using small chamber data were combined with an Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) model to analyze the impact of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from latex paint on indoor environments. Test house experiments were conducted to verify the IAQ model's pred...

  10. Short-term airing by natural ventilation - implication on IAQ and thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiselberg, P; Perino, M

    2010-04-01

    The need to improve the energy efficiency of buildings requires new and more efficient ventilation systems. It has been demonstrated that innovative operating concepts that make use of natural ventilation seem to be more appreciated by occupants. Among the available ventilation strategies that are currently available, buoyancy driven, single-sided natural ventilation has proved to be very effective and can provide high air change rates for temperature and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) control. However, to promote a wider distribution of these systems an improvement in the knowledge of their working principles is necessary. The present study analyses and presents the results of an experimental evaluation of airing performance in terms of ventilation characteristics, IAQ and thermal comfort. It includes investigations of the consequences of opening time, opening frequency, opening area and expected airflow rate, ventilation efficiency, thermal comfort and dynamic temperature conditions. A suitable laboratory test rig was developed to perform extensive experimental analyses of the phenomenon under controlled and repeatable conditions. The results showed that short-term window airing is very effective and can provide both acceptable IAQ and thermal comfort conditions in buildings. Practical Implications This study gives the necessary background and in-depth knowledge of the performance of window airing by single-sided natural ventilation necessary for the development of control strategies for window airing (length of opening period and opening frequency) for optimum IAQ and thermal comfort in naturally ventilated buildings.

  11. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be

  12. Report: Alleged Misuse of Tribal Clean Water Act Section 106 Funds in EPA Region 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #12-P-0453, May 4, 2012. On the first allegation, we found that Region 8 funded tribal Section 106 programs based on the region’s review of tribal work plans and did not inappropriately withhold funds.

  13. Access to Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) for Employees of Certain Indian Tribal Employers. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    This final rule makes Federal employee health insurance accessible to employees of certain Indian tribal entities. Section 409 of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (codified at 25 U.S.C. 1647b) authorizes Indian tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations that carry out certain programs to purchase coverage, rights, and benefits under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program for their employees. Tribal employers and tribal employees will be responsible for the full cost of benefits, plus an administrative fee.

  14. Resolving the ambiguities: An industrial hygiene Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammage, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    Resolving the Ambiguities: An Industrial Hygiene (IAQ) Symposium was a one-day event designed to inform practicing industrial hygienists about highlight presentations made at Indoor Air `93. A broad range of topics was presented by invited speakers. Topics included were attempts to deal with guidelines and standards, questionnaires, odors and sensory irritation, respiratory allergies, neuroses, sick building syndrome (SBS), and multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS).

  15. Saving energy and improving IAQ through application of advanced air cleaning technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, W.J; Destaillats, H.; Sidheswaran, M.A.

    2011-03-01

    In the future, we may be able use air cleaning systems and reduce rates of ventilation (i.e., reduce rates of outdoor air supply) to save energy, with indoor air quality (IAQ) remaining constant or even improved. The opportunity is greatest for commercial buildings because they usually have a narrower range of indoor pollutant sources than homes. This article describes the types of air cleaning systems that will be needed in commercial buildings.

  16. The tribal girl child in Rajasthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanti, R

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the status of the girl child among tribes in India. Tribes have son preference but do not discriminate against girls by female infanticide or sex determination tests. Girls do not inherit land, but they are not abused, hated, or subjected to rigid social norms. Girls are not veiled and are free to participate in dancing and other recreational programs. There is no dowry on marriage. The father of the bridegroom pays a brideprice to the father of the girl. Widowed or divorced women are free to marry again. Daughters care for young children, perform housework, and work in the field with their brothers. In the tribal village of Choti Underi girls were not discriminated against in health and nutrition, but there was a gender gap in education. Both girls and boys were equally exposed to infection and undernourishment. Tribals experience high rates of infant and child mortality due to poverty and its related malnutrition. Child labor among tribals is a way of life for meeting the basic needs of the total household. A recent report on tribals in Rajasthan reveals that 15-20% of child labor involved work in mines that were dangerous to children's health. Girl children had no security provisions or minimum wages. Tribal children were exploited by human service agencies. Child laborers were raped. Government programs in tribal areas should focus on improving living conditions for children in general. Special programs for girls are needed for providing security in the workplace and increasing female educational levels. More information is needed on the work burden of tribal girls that may include wage employment as well as housework.

  17. 40 CFR 745.327 - State or Indian Tribal lead-based paint compliance and enforcement programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION... lead-based paint compliance and enforcement programs. (a) Approval of compliance and enforcement programs. A State or Indian Tribe seeking authorization of a lead-based paint program can apply for and...

  18. 3 CFR - Tribal Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Departments and Agencies The United States has a unique legal and political relationship with Indian tribal... the OMB is hereby authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register. This...

  19. ACF Tribal Consultation Policy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The purpose of the ACF Tribal Consultation Policy is to build meaningful relationships with federally recognized tribes by engaging in open, continuous, and...

  20. gidakiimanaaniwigamig (Seek To Know)--A Native Youths Science Immersion Program Created Through a Partnership Between a Tribal College, a Research Laboratory and a Science Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Pellerin, H.; Steiner, M.

    2004-12-01

    The National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics, an NSF-sponsored Science and Technology Center, through a partnership between the University of Minnesota, the Science Museum of Minnesota, and the Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, has created gidakiimanaaniwigamig (Seek to Know), where students in middle and high school participate in hands-on research projects on topics in environmental science through a series of four yearly seasonal camps combined with field trips and after school programming. Through meetings with Native elders, community leaders and educators, we know that the major issues that must be addressed are student retention, gaps in programming that allow students who have been performing successfully in math and science to drift away from their interest in pursuing STEM careers, and concern about moving away from the community to pursue higher education. After-school and summer programs are an effective means of creating interest in STEM careers, but single-contact programs don't have the long-term impact that will create a bridge from grade school to college and beyond. Often children who have learned to love science in grade school gradually move away from this interest as they enter middle and high school. While a single intervention offered by a science camp or visit to a laboratory can be life-altering, once the student is back in their everyday life they may forget that excitement and get sidetracked from the educational goals they formed based on this single experience. We want to build on the epiphany (science is fun!) with continued interaction that allows the students to grow in their ability to understand and enjoy science. In order to foster STEM careers for underrepresented youths we need to create a sustained, long-term, program that takes youths through programs that stimulate that initial excitement and gradually become more intensive and research-oriented as the youths get older. NCED's approach to these challenges is to

  1. Natural Resources Education Embraces Tribal Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    The Northwest Center for Sustainable Resources, at Chemeketa Community College (Salem, Oregon), develops college curricula in natural resources management encompassing Native American understandings of relations between humans and their environment; organizes hands-on conservation programs for tribal youth; and sponsors conferences and seminars…

  2. Collaborations for Building Tribal Resiliency to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamzai, A.; Taylor, A.; Winton, K.

    2015-12-01

    Sixty-eight tribes are located in the U.S. Department of the Interior's South Central Climate Science Center (SCCSC) region. The SCCSC made it a priority to include the tribes as partners from its inception and both the Chickasaw Nation and the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma participate in the center's activities as consortium members. Under this arrangement, the SCCSC employs a full-time tribal liaison to facilitate relations with the tribes, develop partnerships for climate-relevant projects, build tribal stakeholder capacity, and organize tribal youth programs. In 2014, the SCCSC published its Tribal Engagement Strategy (USGS Circular 1396) to outline its approach for developing tribal relationships. The conceptual plan covers each step in the multi-year process from initial introductory meetings and outreach to demonstrate commitment and interest in working with tribal staff, building tribal capacity in climate related areas while also building researcher capacity in ethical research, and facilitating the co-production of climate-relevant research projects. As the tribes begin to develop their internal capacity and find novel ways to integrate their interests, the plan ultimately leads to tribes developing their own independent research projects and integrating climate science into their various vulnerability assessments and adaptation plans. This presentation will outline the multiple steps in the SCCSC's Tribal Engagement Strategy and provide examples of our ongoing work in support of each step.

  3. 45 CFR 309.75 - What administrative and management procedures must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What administrative and management procedures must a Tribe or Tribal organization include in a Tribal IV-D plan? 309.75 Section 309.75 Public Welfare... ENFORCEMENT (IV-D) PROGRAM Tribal IV-D Plan Requirements § 309.75 What administrative and management...

  4. Tribal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-09-01

    This 12-page brochure provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tribal Energy Program and describes the financial, technical, and educational assistance it provides to help tribes develop their renewable energy resources and reduce their energy consumption.

  5. Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hualapai Tribal Nation

    2008-05-25

    The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon

  6. Feasibility Analysis For Heating Tribal Buildings with Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Clairmont; Micky Bourdon; Tom Roche; Colene Frye

    2009-03-03

    This report provides a feasibility study for the heating of Tribal buildings using woody biomass. The study was conducted for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation in western Montana. S&K Holding Company and TP Roche Company completed the study and worked together to provide the final report. This project was funded by the DOE's Tribal Energy Program.

  7. Energy Keepers Incorporated, U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Award #DE-EE0005040 Final Report December 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillin, Charmel; Lipscomb, Brian

    2014-12-23

    This project aimed at supporting one key component of a major multi-step undertaking on the part of the CSKT: the acquisition of the Kerr Hydroelectric project and its subsequent operation as a wholesale power generation facility. This project provided support to kick-start the development of the organizational structure to acquire and operate the facility by acquiring critical expertise necessary for the acquisition by funding in part two key personnel for the first two years of the four-year organizational development process. These individuals provided the Tribes with expert knowledge in the highly specialized areas of resource balancing, power marketing, and hydro-engineering; essential prerequisites to the Tribes' ability to build an organization for the operation of the Kerr Project and to securing financial backing for the acquisition. Goals achieved:   • Establishing an efficient and economic conveyance process, and transition plans • Establishing an efficient and effective Tribal wholesale power generation corporation to manage the plant, balance the resources, and market the power from the Kerr Project. The success of this project, which is essential to the Tribes' acquisition of the Kerr Hydroelectric facility, helps to address poverty and unemployment among Tribal members by generating a number of highly skilled and specialized, high-paying Tribal member jobs and providing a stream of income from power sales that will be used for Tribal economic development. Objectives achieved: The project supported the position of Power Plant Operations and Maintenance engineer and power marketing coordinator positions. These are key, in part, to the Tribes' successful acquisition and operation of the facility because they will enable to the Tribes to gain the very specialized expertise required to operate a large wholesale power generation facility. Specific objectives include: Objective 1: Hire a power marketing coordinator to develop and

  8. Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization - Human Capacity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irenia Quitiquit

    2012-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to create jobs and to provide tribal homes and buildings with weatherization assistance for energy efficiency. The project will establish a Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program to provide training, outreach and education on energy assistance and conservation to low-income families. The Tribes' mission, under its Strategic Energy Plan of 2008, is to promote tribal efficiency, reduce energy costs, create jobs, economic opportunities, and incorporate energy planning in construction and economic development.

  9. 75 FR 39730 - Tribal Economic Development Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... Tribal Economic Development Bonds AGENCY: Department of the Treasury, Departmental Offices. ACTION... from Indian Tribal Governments regarding the Tribal Economic Development Bond provision in Section 7871... ``Tribal Economic Development Bonds,'' under Section 7871(f) of the Internal Revenue Code (``Code'') to...

  10. Grants Management Training Materials for Tribal Organizations Learner Manual Module 9: Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DBE Program is a requirement of every EPA assistance agreement. The program encourages federal dollars to flow down to disadvantaged businesses (such as Tribally-owned businesses) through a grant recipient’s purchases and procurements.

  11. 77 FR 76076 - Information Security Oversight Office; State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office; State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector... matters relating to the Classified National Security Information Program for State, Local, Tribal, and... number of individuals planning to attend must be submitted to the Information Security Oversight Office...

  12. Renewable Energy on Tribal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains presentations from the Brown to Green: Make the Connection to Renewable Energy workshop held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, during December 10-11, 2008 regarding Renewable Energy on Tribal Lands.

  13. EPA Region 1 Tribal Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a dataset of Tribal/Native American lands in the New England region. EPA notes that there are some disputes over the exact boundaries of the territories of...

  14. A review of tribal best practices in substance abuse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Allyson; Witzel, Morgan; Fatupaito, Bethany

    2017-11-16

    American Indian youth experience higher rates of substance use than non-American Indian youth. Researchers, clinicians, and treatment programs embrace evidence-based practices (EBPs) and practice based evidence (PBE) as a primary method for addressing substance abuse and advancing behavioral health. However, less is known about the use of tribal best practices (TBPs) and how they are implemented in American Indian substance use prevention contexts. The main objective of this systematic review was to determine how TBPs are implemented and shared in the context of tribal substance use prevention. The second objective was to document TBP examples from three tribal communities involved in a 5-year substance use prevention initiative. A systematic review of published and grey literature was conducted using funding agencies websites, EBSCO Host and national registries. Three tribal communities involved in the initiative documented current TBPs to highlight characteristics of TBPs, costs, and approval processes. TBPs are very limited in the literature. Despite tribal use for thousands of years, TBPs are underrepresented and misunderstood. This review found that the terminology used to describe TBPs is not consistent across agencies, publications, websites, or reports. There is also variation in how TBPs originate in substance use prevention contexts and there is not a primary resource or protocol for sharing TBPs. Continued efforts are needed to support the use and dissemination of TBPs in substance use prevention.

  15. 25 CFR 23.22 - Purpose of tribal government grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT.... Such child and family service programs may include, but need not be limited to: (1) A system for... tribal court in the disposition of domestic relations and child welfare matters, but not to establish...

  16. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Master Plan and Appendices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Mobrand, Lars Erik

    1992-03-01

    This report describes the findings that have resulted from the effort to create a proposed Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) in northern Idaho. This effort has been undertaken because of low population densities of salmon in the Clearwater and Salmon River Basins. The Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) has approved the NPTH concept. For the NPTH to proceed, the Council must approve a master plan and amend the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (CBFWP). Requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) also must be met. The goals of NPTH are to: (1) develop, increase, and reintroduce natural populations of spring, summer, and fall chinook in the Clearwater and Salmon River Basins; (2) sustain long-term preservation and genetic integrity of target fish populations; (3) keep the ecological and genetic impacts of nontarget fish populations within acceptable limits; and, (4) provide harvest opportunities for both tribal and non-tribal anglers.

  17. 77 FR 3210 - Indian Tribal Government Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ...-08] RIN 1545-BI19 Indian Tribal Government Plans AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury... hearing on proposed regulations, (REG-133223-08) relating to Indian tribal government plans. DATES: The...

  18. 50 CFR 223.204 - Tribal plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Threatened Marine and Anadromous Species § 223.204 Tribal plans. (a) Limits on the prohibitions. The... impact on the biological requirements of the species, and will assess the effect of the Tribal Plan on... or not implementation of a Tribal Plan will appreciably reduce the likelihood of survival and...

  19. 77 FR 67439 - Fiscal Year 2013 Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... Federal Transit Administration Fiscal Year 2013 Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program.... SUMMARY: This notice announces changes in the Public Transportation on Indian Reservations program (Tribal... Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program (Tribal Transit Program). The program authorized...

  20. Minnesota Tribal Coalition - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Triplett

    2006-12-19

    The project helped tribal leaders, staff and community members on the Grand Portage, Leech Lake, and White Earth Reservations better understand their community's energy usage, assess local resources that might be utilized to reduce energy consumption and begin to formulate appropriate development strategies. The principal guiding interest was to assess energy usage and the potential for wind resource development on each of the three reservations. Key tribal staff became familiar with wind energy technology and assessment methodologies that will be of continued use as each tribe moves forward with development projects. The findings were that wind resources are available at each reservation with varying degrees of potential for development. At White Earth moderate to excellent resources are present at White Earth village and along the U.S. 59 corridor sufficient to be tapped to serve several scattered tribal complexes. At Grand Portage a former community television repeater tower site provides a viable elevated location for a wind turbine to serve the tribal community settlement. At Leech Lake, while most constrained by tree cover, a site adjacent to a casino holds promise for the newer taller wind turbines now coming to market at ever-increasing taller rotor heights. The project developed considerable data of importance regarding the potential for wind development on and near each reservation.

  1. TRIBALISM-VAGUE BUT VALID

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1999-09-02

    Sep 2, 1999 ... One doubts if this malaise stems from tribal life. If anything, in other parts of the world a revival has taken placein recent years; in Australia .... focus of allegiance and social identity. For many for whom the state fails to evoke the necessary sentiments, in the understandable and justifiable striving for national ...

  2. 76 FR 12967 - Tribal Consultation Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ... Families, OHS leadership, and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early... the report without attribution, along with topics of concern and recommendations. Hotel and logistical...

  3. The Application of Advanced Geophysical Classification in Support of Munitions Response Program: An Outreach to Federal, State and Local Regulators and Tribal Governments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-18

    FUDS Program CTC (FY* & Beyond) $ B ill io ns M&S IRP MMRP $18.2 $17.9 $16.7 $14.1 $14.0 $13.0 $13.5 $12.2 $10.0 $9.5 $3.2 $2.8 $3.0...collection, moderate geology Spencer Range, TN Camp Beale, CA Most analysts correctly classify all seeds, eliminate ~70% of the clutter from the...complex geology Massachusetts Military Reservation, MA Even the most skilled analysts may not detect all TOI, eliminate ~50- 70% of the clutter from

  4. 45 CFR 310.15 - What are the safeguards and processes that comprehensive Tribal IV-D agencies must have in place...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... responsibilities with respect to such programs; (3) Maintenance and control of application software program data... IV-D System and Office Automation through methods such as audit trails and feedback mechanisms to... comprehensive Tribal IV-D agency must have procedures to ensure that all personnel, including Tribal IV-D staff...

  5. Tribal Geographic Area (RTOC) Polygons with Representative Information, US EPA Region 9, 2015, Regional Tribal Operations Committee

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Regional Tribal Operations Committee (RTOC) is a working committee of EPA and Tribal personnel co-chaired by an EPA representative and a Tribal representative....

  6. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2005 Annual Operation Plan, 2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, Harold R.; Lundberg, Jeffrey H.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-02-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  7. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2004 Annual Operation Plan, 2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, Harold R.; Penney, Aaron K.; Larson, Roy Edward (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

  8. ODDJP's Tribal Youth Initiatives: Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Kay

    The violent crime rate among American Indians is twice that of the United States as a whole. Tribal communities are also beset by high rates of domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, alcohol abuse, and gang involvement. Given such factors, it is not surprising that tribal youth are exposed to multiple risk factors for delinquency. Indeed,…

  9. 77 FR 5442 - Indian Tribal Government Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BI19 Indian Tribal Government Plans AGENCY: Internal...-08) relating to Indian tribal government plans. This notice supersedes the notice of public hearing...

  10. Healthy Tribal Colleges Create Healthy Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarest, Donna

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that tribal colleges play a pivotal role in both the cultural resilience and in addressing the health problems of a tribal community. Relates Oglala Lakota College (South Dakota) Department of Nursing's leadership role in the development of community resources and identification of private and federal sources of funding. (VWC)

  11. Types, outcome and risk factors of stroke in Tribal Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jittendra K; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumari, Archana; Dahale, Amol S; Jha, Rajendra; Das, Ranjan

    2013-12-01

    Studies suggest that ethnicity and racial factors has an important role in the variation in epidemiology of stroke. The present study was conducted to assess the subtypes, risk factors, and outcome of stroke in the tribal community of Jharkhand state and to compare it with that in the non-tribals from the same geographical location. We carried out a hospital-based prospective observational study at Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences-Ranchi. Patients of acute stroke, reporting to the medical outpatient department and emergency department from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2010 were studied. Computed tomography scan was done immediately and again after 24 h to confirm the diagnosis of stroke. To compare the findings between tribal and non-tribal patients, we used chi-square test/Fisher exact test as appropriate. Of the total 1156 patients included in the study, 536 were tribals, while 620 were non-tribals. Significant differences were found in tribal stroke patients as compared with non-tribals: mean age of tribal subjects was 53·8 years (60·8 years in non-tribals); stroke in young individual was present in 25% of tribal subjects (17% in non-tribals, P = 0·01); primary intracerebral hemorrhage variety was present in 31% of tribals (18% in non-tribals, P-value tribal subjects (35% among non-tribals, P = 0·02). Hypertension and alcohol abuse was found to be associated with intracerebral hemorrhage in tribal subjects, although no such association was found in non-tribals. Tribals have early onset, poor outcomes and higher proportion of ICH compared to non-tribals. [Correction added after online publication 7 Aug 2012: The sentence "Tribals have early with non-tribals." in the Conclusion section of the abstract was deleted.]. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  12. Monitoring and evaluation plan for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, C.R.

    1996-08-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe has proposed to build and operate the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) in the Clearwater River subbasin of Idaho for the purpose of restoring self-sustaining populations of spring, summer, and fall chinook salmon to their native habitats. The project comprises a combination of incubation and rearing facilities, satellite rearing facilities, juvenile and adult collection sites, and associated production and harvest management activities. As currently conceived, the NPTH program will produce approximately 768,000 spring chinook parr, 800,000 summer chinook fry, and 2,000,000 fall chinook fry on an annual basis. Hatchery fish would be spawned, reared, and released under conditions that promote wild-type characteristics, minimize genetic changes in both hatchery and wild chinook populations, and minimize undesirable ecological interactions. The primary objective is to enable hatchery-produced fish to return to reproduce naturally in the streams in which they are released. These and other characteristics of the project are described in further detail in the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Master Plan, the 1995 Supplement to the Master Plan, and the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program Environmental Impact Statement. The report in hand is referred to in project literature as the NPTH Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Plan. This report describes monitoring and evaluation activities that will help NPTH managers determine whether they were successful in restoring chinook salmon populations and avoiding adverse ecological impacts.

  13. Potential effects of permeable and hygroscopic lightweight structures on thermal comfort and perceived IAQ in a cold climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnitski, J; Kalamees, T; Palonen, J; Eskola, L; Seppänen, O

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we simulated and measured the effect of permeable and hygroscopic lightweight structures on indoor air quality (IAQ) and thermal comfort in a cold climate. The potential effect of hygroscopic mass was assessed with the simulation of extreme cases, where permeable and hygroscopic lightweight structures with unfinished surfaces were compared with impermeable and non-hygroscopic ones. Measurements were conducted in 78 rooms of 46 newly built detached timber-framed houses and analyzed according to hygroscopic surface materials and envelope permeability. From the simulations, it was shown that permeable and hygroscopic structures considerably improved perceived air quality in summer, when a ventilation rate of 6 l/s pers. in the non-hygroscopic case corresponded roughly to 4 l/s pers. in the hygroscopic case. However, window airing and furnishing will reduce this difference in practice. Both simulated and measured results showed that permeable and hygroscopic structures significantly reduced peak indoor relative humidity levels and daily changes in relative humidity, but had no long-term effects. Measured results also indicated that completely non-hygroscopic houses did not exist in reality. Limited knowledge is available about building envelope and ventilation system interactions with consequent effects on indoor climate. To take such effects adequately into account in design and construction of buildings, solid scientific data explaining the significance of the phenomena studied are needed. We have demonstrated that moisture exchange has evidently enough importance to be taken into account in future building simulation tools.

  14. Tribal Colleges Initiative project. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Tribal Colleges Initiative (TCI) grant is in the second year of funding from the US Department of Energy Environmental Management program. This quarterly report includes activities for the first three months (April 1--June 30, 1998) of the Year 2 funding period. The TCI program office requested each Tribal College to write a quarterly report of activities at their respective institutions. These reports are attached. These institutions are Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), Crownpoint Institute of Technology (CIT) and the Dine` College (DC, formerly Navajo Community College). The purpose of this program is to offer educational opportunities to Native Americans in the environmental field.

  15. Barriers and Strategies for Healthy Food Choices among American Indian Tribal College Students: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Jill F; Stastny, Sherri; Brunt, Ardith; Agnew, Wanda

    2017-10-20

    American Indian and Alaskan Native individuals experience disproportionate levels of chronic health conditions such as type 2 diabetes and overweight and obesity that are influenced by dietary patterns and food choices. Understanding factors that influence healthy food choices among tribal college students can enrich education and programs that target dietary intake. To build an understanding of factors that influence healthy food choices among tribal college students at increased risk for college attrition. A nonexperimental cohort design was used for qualitative descriptive analysis. Participants (N=20) were purposively sampled, newly enrolled, academically underprepared tribal college students enrolled in a culturally relevant life skills course at an upper Midwest tribal college between September 2013 and May 2015. Participant demographic characteristics included various tribal affiliations, ages, and number of dependents. Participant responses to qualitative research questions about dietary intake, food choices, self-efficacy for healthy food choices, psychosocial determinants, and barriers to healthy food choices during telephone interviews were used as measures. Qualitative analysis included prestudy identification of researcher bias/assumptions, audiorecording and transcription, initial analysis (coding), secondary analysis (sorting and identifying meaning), and verification (comparative pattern analysis). Qualitative analysis revealed a variety of themes and subthemes about healthy food choices. Main themes related to barriers included taste, food gathering and preparation, and difficulty clarifying healthy food choices. Main themes related to strategies included taste, cultural traditions and practices, and personal motivation factors. Qualitative analysis identified barrier and strategy themes that may assist nutrition and dietetics practitioners working with tribal/indigenous communities, tribal college educators and health specialists, and tribal

  16. Doctors for tribal areas: Issues and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep Mavalankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Health parameters of tribal population had always been a concern for India's march towards Millennium development Goals (MDG's. Tribal population contributes 8.6% of total population, in spite of efforts and commitment of Government of India towards MGD, India lagged far behind from achieving and optimal health of tribal population will be a concern for achieving Sustainable development Goals SDG's also. Some of the common health problems of the tribal population face are deficiency of essential components in diet like energy malnutrition, protein calorie malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Goiter, Gastrointestinal disorders, particularly dysentery and parasitic infections are very common. High prevalence of genetic disorders like sickle cell anemia and others are endemic in few tribes of India. Tribal Health is further compounded issues by social issues like excessive consumption of alcohol, poor access to contraceptive, substance abuse and gender based violence. Besides other reasons, like poor budget allocation, difficult to reach, poor access to health care facility, severe shortage of qualified health workers and workforce led to poor governance of health sector in tribal areas. Present view point reflects on the issues of inadequacy of doctors in tribal area and suggests possible solutions.

  17. Recruitment and Baseline Characteristics of American Indian Tribal College Students Participating in a Tribal College Tobacco and Behavioral Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won S; Nazir, Niaman; Pacheco, Christina M; Filippi, Melissa K; Pacheco, Joseph; White Bull, Julia; Nance, Christi; Faseru, Babalola; Greiner, K Allen; Daley, Christine Makosky

    2016-06-01

    quitting. Results from this study could lead to the development of a culturally-tailored smoking cessation and prevention program for American Indian tribal college students. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. CULTURAL TOURISM: BANGLADESH TRIBAL AREAS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad SHAMSUDDOHA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is the world's largest industry which is linked with thousands of associated business. Though Bangladesh is a small country in terms of its size it contains huge prospect in its tourism including culture. Bangladesh culture is very rich which initiated long ago with different dimensions. Chittagong hill tracts of Bangladesh are a place of tribal. Tribal are having their own rich culture which is very attractive and nice looking. This study focused on tribal culture and its tourists. This paper also seeks about problems of cultural tourism in Bangladesh.

  19. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  20. Emergency preparedness handbook for tribal governments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Many Native American tribal governments are lacking in emergency preparedness, a part of the : emergency management cycle where planning for disasters happens. These governments need : assistance planning for future disasters. Federal, and state gove...

  1. 77 FR 48159 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ..., Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start leadership and the leadership of Tribal... Session will be summarized in each report without attribution, along with topics of concern and...

  2. Pinoleville Pomo Nation Tribal Green Building Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pinoleville Pomo Nation (PPN) worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Development Center for Appropriate Technology (DCAT) to create this framework for tribal building codes.

  3. 77 FR 71833 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... traditional cultural values and beliefs of the people they are designed to serve, including youth and at-risk... workplace safety while working to alleviate the high unemployment found on tribal lands. The Department is...

  4. 77 FR 23283 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... are designed to serve, including youth and at-risk populations facing employment barriers. DINAP works... high unemployment found on tribal lands. The Department is committed to building on these efforts to...

  5. Partnership for Environmental Technology Education: Tribal Colleges Initiative in Science and Environmental Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    The Tribal Colleges Initiatives in Science and Environmental Education (TCI) was developed in collaboration with the Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (PETE). This program is focused on long-term, systematic change through assisting tribally-controlled colleges in improving science and technology infrastructure, faculty and curricula. The goals are to: develop new or enhance existing science and technology education programs within tribally-controlled colleges and affiliates with a focus on environmental education and technology; establish and maintain clearly defined and secure educational pathways for Native American students; produce more Native American environmental and advanced degree graduates who can contribute to meeting the environmental/natural resource management and economic development goals of Indian Nations; and enhance the general level of Native American scientific literacy through improved public access to information.

  6. ETHNOMARKETING AND TRIBAL MARKETING – GENERAL ISSUES

    OpenAIRE

    Angelica-Nicoleta NECULAESEI (ONEA)

    2017-01-01

    Ethnomarketing and tribal marketing can be regarded as subdivisions of intercultural management. This is the perspective intended to be analyzed in the proposed study, by valuing cultural specificity features that can support the effort of adaptation to a group that can be described by common features. The aim is to provide a general theoretical framework and proposals to adapt the marketing mix to a certain ethnic or "tribal" profile, in order to increase the company's performance.

  7. ETHNOMARKETING AND TRIBAL MARKETING – GENERAL ISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica-Nicoleta NECULAESEI (ONEA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethnomarketing and tribal marketing can be regarded as subdivisions of intercultural management. This is the perspective intended to be analyzed in the proposed study, by valuing cultural specificity features that can support the effort of adaptation to a group that can be described by common features. The aim is to provide a general theoretical framework and proposals to adapt the marketing mix to a certain ethnic or "tribal" profile, in order to increase the company's performance.

  8. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting harvestable fisheries for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). The Spokane Tribe, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Colville Confederated Tribes and Lake Roosevelt Development Association/Lake Roosevelt Volunteer Net Pen Project are cooperating in a comprehensive artificial production program to produce kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for annual releases into the project area. The program consists of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. The Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake Fisheries Evaluation Program monitor and evaluates release strategies and production methods for the aforementioned projects. Between 1985 and 2005 the projects have collectively produced up to 800,000 rainbow trout and 4 million kokanee salmon for release into Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry for Banks Lake annually. In 2005, the annual release goal included 3.3 million kokanee fry, 475,000 kokanee yearlings and 500,000 rainbow trout yearlings. Fish produced by this project in 2005 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 3,446,438 kokanee fingerlings, 347,730 rainbow trout fingerlings and 525,721 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Meadow Creek and Lake Whatcom kokanee, diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and

  9. 75 FR 26973 - Notice of Public Comment on Tribal Consultation Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... leadership and the leadership of Tribal Governments operating Head Start (including Early Head Start... (including Early Head Start) programs to participate in a formal Consultation Session with OHS leadership... be summarized in the report without attribution, along with topics of concern and recommendations...

  10. 25 CFR 20.208 - What if the tribal redesign plan leads to increased costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What if the tribal redesign plan leads to increased costs? 20.208 Section 20.208 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES... leads to increased costs? The tribe must meet any increase in cost to the General Assistance program...

  11. Hospital gets IAQ checkup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, K.E. (HDR, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Wozniak, A.L. (Pure Air Control Services, Inc., Clearwater, FL (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Findings and remediation efforts performed over the past year in a large hospital are presented. Recommended practice in new design and retrofit to reduce the potential for microbial growth in HVAC systems in discussed. The request for a building health check at a large, central Florida hospital was prompted by concern for the welfare of employees and patients. This facility consists of approximately 830,000 sq ft of building with 985 patient beds and was constructed over the past 40 years with a diversity of mechanical systems ranging from fan-coils to multizone air handlers to dual-duct built up air handlers serving over 100,000 sq ft. All air distribution systems are served by a chilled-water and hot-water four-pipe system from a central chiller/boiler plant. Air filtration systems range from 20 percent throwaway panel filters to 40 percent prefilters and 95 percent final air handler filters. Outside air quantities range from 25 cfm per person to 100 percent outside air once-through systems.

  12. EPA Tribal Areas (1 of 4): Lower 48 States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This layer represents locations of American Indian Tribal lands in the lower 48 states. The areas include all lands associated with Federally recognized tribal...

  13. Deconstructing the portrayals of HIV/AIDS among campaign planners targeting tribal populations in Koraput, India: a culture-centered interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Lalatendu; Dutta, Mohan Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    This article deconstructs the portrayal of HIV/AIDS in the tribal dominated district of Koraput, India, among program planners, service delivery personnel, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), etc. who plan, implement, and evaluate HIV/AIDS interventions targeting tribal communities in the region. Drawing upon postcolonial and subaltern studies approaches, we critically examine the ideological assumptions that circulate in the dominant discursive spaces among campaign planners and implementers who target HIV/AIDS among the tribal population in Koraput, India. Based on our critical examination, we suggest guidelines for engaging with program planners and implementers through health communication pedagogy informed by the culture-centered approach.

  14. Building Tribal Communities in the Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, Stuart; Mattsson, Jan

    2016-01-01

    the nature and development of a variety of collaborative consumption businesses; in particular, we explore how start-up entrepreneurs see the problems of creating a tribal community among customers and users. Interviews were carried out with founders and co-founders of collaborative consumption ventures...... during 2014–15. The results suggest that these organisations face many common issues. We develop and apply a framework to understand some of these. We find that collaborative consumption entrepreneurs strive to build a tribal community by matching, in an innovative way, supply and demand....... This is typically done by co-creating shared commonality, developing scalable electronic platforms, and building trust into platforms using social media to develop proxy social capital. Consequently, by using existing ecosystems of social media, tribal communities can be formed and scaled much more quickly than via...

  15. Toward a Tribal Critical Race Theory in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones Brayboy, Bryan McKinley

    2005-01-01

    In this article, I outline the central tenets of an emerging theory that I call Tribal Critical Race Theory (TribalCrit) to more completely address the issues of Indigenous Peoples in the United States. TribalCrit has it roots in Critical Race Theory, Anthropology, Political/Legal Theory, Political Science, American Indian Literatures, Education,…

  16. Universal Primary Education among Tribals in Jharkhand: A Situational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anant

    2008-01-01

    The paper is an attempt to understand and analyse the status of universal primary education among tribals in Jharkhand and its challenges. Considering the low literacy among tribals and high drop out rates at elementary and higher levels, there is need of special focus on tribal's education, inclusive of context-specific traditional and innovative…

  17. Working with Indian Tribal Nations. A guide for DOE employees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) employees and contractors frequently work with Indian tribes or nations as part of their jobs. The purpose of this guide is to help DOE employees and contractors initiate contact with tribes and build effective relationships. DOE maintains a unique government-to government relationship with tribal nations. This guide presents an overview of the history of the relationship between the tribes and the Federal government, as well as the laws and Executive Orders that define that relationship. The guide discusses the Federal government’s trust responsibility to the tribes, tribal treaty rights, and the Department of Energy’s American Indian policy. The guide also discusses important cultural differences that could lead to communication problems if not understood and provides examples of potential cultural misunderstandings. In particular the guide discusses tribal environmental beliefs that shape tribal responses to DOE actions. The guide also provides pointers on tribal etiquette during meetings and cultural ceremonies and when visiting tribal reservations. Appendix 1 gives examples of the tribal nations with whom DOE currently has Memoranda of Understanding. While this guide provides an introduction and overview of tribal relations for DOE staff and contractors, DOE has also designated Tribal Issues Points of Contacts at each of its facilities. A list of these Points of Contact for all DOE facilities is provided in Appendix 2. DOE staff and contractors should consult with the appropriate tribal representatives at their site before initiating contact with a tribal nation, because many tribes have rules and procedures that must be complied with before DOE staff or contractors may go on tribal lands or conduct interviews with tribal members. Appendix 3 is the complete DOE American Indian Policy. Appendices 4-6 are Executive Orders that govern the relationship of all federal agencies with tribal nations. DOE employees and staff are

  18. Final Technical Report. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Audits of Tribally-Owned Governmental Buildings and Residential Tribal Housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Jeffrey W. [Sault Sainte Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Marie, MI (United States)

    2015-03-27

    The Tribe is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings and low income housing sites. In 2009, the Tribe applied to the U. S. Department of Energy for funding to conduct energy audits of Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Findings from the energy audits would define the extent and types of energy efficiency improvements needed, establish a basis for energy priorities, strategies and action plans, and provide a benchmark for measuring improvements from energy efficiency implementations. In 2010, the DOE awarded a grant in the amount of $95,238 to the Tribe to fund the energy audits of nine governmental buildings and to pay for travel expenses associated with attendance and participation at the DOE annual program reviews. In 2011, the Tribe applied for and was awarded a DOE grant in the amount of $75,509 to conduct energy audits of the remaining 30 Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Repeating mobilization steps performed during the first DOE energy audits grant, the Tribe initiated the second round of governmental building energy audits by completing energy auditor procurement. The selected energy auditor successfully passed DOE debarment and Sault Tribe background clearances. The energy audits contract was awarded to U. P. Engineers and Architects, Inc. of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. The Tribe continued mobilizing for the energy audits by providing the energy auditor with one year of electric, gas and water utility invoice copies per building, as well as supplemental building information, such as operating hours. The Tribe also contacted building occupants to coordinate scheduling for the on-site energy audit inspections and arranged for facilities management personnel to guide the energy auditor through the buildings and answer questions regarding building systems.

  19. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for

  20. 78 FR 52827 - Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations: Income Deductions and Resource Eligibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... received 98 written comments from seven elected Tribal leaders, seven FDPIR program administrators, three... race, color, national origin, sex, age, political beliefs, religious creed, or disability. The... teleconferences, for collaborative conversations with Tribal leaders and their representatives concerning ways to...

  1. 78 FR 44459 - Tribal Self-Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Public Health Service 42 CFR Part 137 Tribal Self-Governance CFR Correction In Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1 to 399, revised as of October 1, 2012, on page 932, in...

  2. 76 FR 55678 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... President Obama's Executive Memorandum be moved to either the Background section or some sort of History... ACF. ACF will continue to utilize TFWGs that incorporate tribal leadership to inform ACF leadership... concepts of Executive Order 13175. ACF would like to refer the commenter to Section 7. Consultation Parties...

  3. Contemporary Tribal Codes and Gender Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bruce G.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the legal codes of eight Coast Salish tribes. Focuses on gender issues, including the legal statuses of males and females, inheritance, access to tribal jobs and job training, political enfranchisement, child welfare and parental responsibilities, parent rights, and public safety. The codes vary substantially in how they balance…

  4. 76 FR 50226 - Announcement of a Single Source Grant Award to the Tribal Law and Policy Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ... and Policy Institute, located in West Hollywood, CA, to support activities of the National Resource Center for Tribes under the Tribal Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. CFDA Number... program expansion supplement funds will be used to provide technical assistance and support for the...

  5. Tribal and Indigenous Geoscience and Earth System Science: Ensuring the Evolution and Practice of Underrepresented Scientists and Researchers in the 21ST Century and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J.

    2014-12-01

    The time is critical for Tribal, Indigenous and Underrepresented K-12/university students and communities to accept the duty to provide representation in Earth System Sciences/Geosciences fields of study and professions. Tribal nations in the U.S have a unique legal status rooted in a complex relationship between the U.S. federal government, individual state/local governments and Tribal authorities. Although geosciences are often at the center of these relationships, especially as they pertain to the development of natural resources, tribal economics, and environmental stewardship, Tribal/Indigenous people remain severely underrepresented in advanced geoscience education. Our students and communities have responded to the invitation. To represent and most important develop and lead research initiatives. Leadership is a central focus of the invitation to participate, as Tribal people have immense responsibility for significant landscapes across North American Continent, critical natural resources and millennia of unpretentious natural evolution with the localized native geologies, species and environmental systems. INRSEP and Pacific Northwest Tribal Nations found sustaining relationships with the Geoscience Alliance, MS PHD's, Woods Hole PEP, Native American Pacific Islander Research Experience (NAPIRE) and LSAMP programs, in addition to state/federal agencies, has advanced culturally-relevant STEM research. Research foundationally grounded on traditional ecological knowledge, individual and Tribal self-determination. A key component is student research experiences within their ancestral homelands and traversing to REU's in multiple national and international Tribal/Indigenous ancestral territories. The relationships also serve an immense capacity in tracking student achievement, promoting best practices in research development and assessing outcomes. The model has significantly improved the success of students completing STEM graduate programs. The presentation

  6. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support &apos

  7. The cumulative MeHg and PCBs exposure and risk of tribal ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies have shown that the U.S. population continues to be exposed to methyl mercury (MeHg) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) due to the long half-life of those environmental contaminants. Fish intake of Tribal populations is much higher than the U.S. general population due to dietary habits and unique cultural practices. Large fish tissue concentration data sets from the Environmental Protections Agency’s (EPA’s) Office of Water, USGS’s EMMMA program, and other data sources, were integrated, analyzed, and combined with recent tribal fish intake data for exposure analyses using the dietary module within EPA’s SHEDS-Multimedia model. SHEDS-Multimedia is a physically-based, probabilistic model, which can simulate cumulative (multiple chemicals) or aggregate (single chemical) exposures over time for a population via various pathways of exposure for a variety of multimedia, multipathway environmental chemicals. Our results show that MeHg and total PCBs exposure of tribal populations from fish are about 3 to 10 and 5 to 15 times higher than the US general population, respectively, and that the estimated exposures pose potential health risks. The cumulative exposures of MeHg and total PCBs will be assessed to generate the joint exposure profiles for Tribal and US general populations. Model sensitivity analyses will identify the important contributions of the cumulative exposures of MeHg and total PCBs such as fish types, locations, and size, and key expos

  8. Tribal and stakeholder involvement in systems analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, L. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swartz, G. [Swartz and Associates, Boulder City, NV (United States); Cooley, C. [Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Beginning in early 1995, U.S. Department of Energy began an experiment to link tribal and stakeholder representatives into technology assessment activities related to an Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. The INTS study moved outside the framework of after-the-fact public involvement by providing the opportunity for technical and non-technical stakeholders alike to work together in the early predecision stages of the criteria development and assessment of options for innovative mixed waste treatment. The stakeholders gained an appreciation of the intense level of effort required to complete such an analysis. The engineers and scientists conducting the systems analyses had the opportunity (some for the first time) to learn more about tribal and stakeholder issues and how they might apply to the technical tasks related to technology assessment and selection.

  9. Tribal Colleges Initiative project. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Tribal Colleges Initiative (TCI) grant is in the second year of funding from the US Department of Energy Environmental Management Program. The project period has been determined to be 7.5 months, April 1 to November 14, 1998 in order to align with the federal fiscal year. This quarterly report includes activities for the first three months (April 1--June 30, 1998) of the Year 2 funding period. The TCI Program office requested each Tribal College to write a quarterly report of activities at their respective institutions. These reported are attached. These institutions are Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), Crownpoint Institute of Technology (CIT) and the Dine` College (DC, formerly Navajo Community College).

  10. 75 FR 41896 - Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood Products Division...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... Employment and Training Administration Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer Colville Tribal Enterprise..., applicable to workers of Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood... Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood Products Division. The Department has determined that...

  11. 78 FR 52900 - Request for Applications: The Community Forest and Open Space Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... including clean air, water, and wildlife habitat; benefits from forest-based educational programs; benefits... behalf of any Indian tribe, must not be Tribal allotment lands, must be offered for sale by a willing... applications to the State Forester. Tribal applicants must submit applications to the appropriate Tribal...

  12. Rates, indications, and outcomes of caesarean section deliveries: A comparison of tribal and non-tribal women in Gujarat, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Desai

    Full Text Available Even though the caesarean section is an essential component of comprehensive obstetric and newborn care for reducing maternal and neonatal mortality, there is a lack of data regarding caesarean section rates, its determinants and health outcomes among tribal communities in India.The aim of this study is to estimate and compare rates, determinants, indications and outcomes of caesarean section. The article provides an assessment on how the inequitable utilization can be addressed in a community-based hospital in tribal areas of Gujarat, India.Prospectively collected data of deliveries (N = 19923 from April 2010 to March 2016 in Kasturba Maternity Hospital was used. The odds ratio of caesarean section was estimated for tribal and non-tribal women. Decomposition analysis was done to decompose the differences in the caesarean section rates between tribal and non-tribal women.The caesarean section rate was significantly lower among tribal compared to the non-tribal women (9.4% vs 15.6%, p-value < 0.01 respectively. The 60% of the differences in the rates of caesarean section between tribal and non-tribal women were unexplained. Within the explained variation, the previous caesarean accounted for 96% (p-value < 0.01 of the variation. Age of the mother, parity, previous caesarean and distance from the hospital were some of the important determinants of caesarean section rates. The most common indications of caesarean section were foetal distress (31.2%, previous caesarean section (23.9%, breech (16% and prolonged labour (11.2%. There was no difference in case fatality rate (1.3% vs 1.4%, p-value = 0.90 and incidence of birth asphyxia (0.3% vs 0.6%, p-value = 0.26 comparing the tribal and non-tribal women.Similar to the prior evidences, we found higher caesarean rates among non-tribal compare to tribal women. However, the adverse outcomes were similar between tribal and non-tribal women for caesarean section deliveries.

  13. Rates, indications, and outcomes of caesarean section deliveries: A comparison of tribal and non-tribal women in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Gayatri; Anand, Ankit; Modi, Dhiren; Shah, Shobha; Shah, Kalpana; Shah, Ajay; Desai, Shrey; Shah, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    Even though the caesarean section is an essential component of comprehensive obstetric and newborn care for reducing maternal and neonatal mortality, there is a lack of data regarding caesarean section rates, its determinants and health outcomes among tribal communities in India. The aim of this study is to estimate and compare rates, determinants, indications and outcomes of caesarean section. The article provides an assessment on how the inequitable utilization can be addressed in a community-based hospital in tribal areas of Gujarat, India. Prospectively collected data of deliveries (N = 19923) from April 2010 to March 2016 in Kasturba Maternity Hospital was used. The odds ratio of caesarean section was estimated for tribal and non-tribal women. Decomposition analysis was done to decompose the differences in the caesarean section rates between tribal and non-tribal women. The caesarean section rate was significantly lower among tribal compared to the non-tribal women (9.4% vs 15.6%, p-value < 0.01) respectively. The 60% of the differences in the rates of caesarean section between tribal and non-tribal women were unexplained. Within the explained variation, the previous caesarean accounted for 96% (p-value < 0.01) of the variation. Age of the mother, parity, previous caesarean and distance from the hospital were some of the important determinants of caesarean section rates. The most common indications of caesarean section were foetal distress (31.2%), previous caesarean section (23.9%), breech (16%) and prolonged labour (11.2%). There was no difference in case fatality rate (1.3% vs 1.4%, p-value = 0.90) and incidence of birth asphyxia (0.3% vs 0.6%, p-value = 0.26) comparing the tribal and non-tribal women. Similar to the prior evidences, we found higher caesarean rates among non-tribal compare to tribal women. However, the adverse outcomes were similar between tribal and non-tribal women for caesarean section deliveries.

  14. 45 CFR 310.10 - What are the functional requirements for the Model Tribal IV-D System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the functional requirements for the Model Tribal IV-D System? 310.10 Section 310.10 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES...

  15. 78 FR 60861 - Native American Tribal Insignia Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... the tribe and the address for correspondence; (2) a copy of the tribal resolution adopting the... official insignia adopted by the tribal resolution. Requests from state-recognized tribes must also be in... Respondent Cost Burden: $228. The USPTO expects that the information in this collection will be prepared by...

  16. 44 CFR 201.7 - Tribal Mitigation Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE MITIGATION PLANNING § 201.7 Tribal Mitigation Plans. The... events. (ii) A description of the Indian tribal government's vulnerability to the hazards described in... its impact on the tribe. The plan should describe vulnerability in terms of: (A) The types and numbers...

  17. Geographic science for public and Tribal lands management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, Alicia; Hendley, James W. II

    2011-01-01

    There are more than 650 million acres of U.S. public and Tribal lands, most found west of the Mississippi River. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey's Western Geographic Science Center are working to increase the scientific information available for natural resource decision making, while continuing productive collaborations with Federal land managers, Tribal leaders, and local communities.

  18. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  19. 42 CFR 137.3 - Effect on existing Tribal rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect on existing Tribal rights. 137.3 Section 137.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE General Provisions § 137.3 Effect on existing...

  20. Tribal experiences and lessons learned in riparian ecosystem restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald K. Miller; James E. Enote; Cameron L. Martinez

    1996-01-01

    Riparian ecosystems have been part of the culture of land use of native peoples in the Southwest United States for thousands of years. The experiences of tribal riparian initiatives to incorporate modern elements of environment and development with cultural needs are relatively few. This paper describes tribal case examples and approaches in riparian management which...

  1. Tribal lands provide forest management laboratory for mainstream university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra J. Hoagland; Ronald Miller; Kristen M. Waring; Orlando Carroll

    2017-01-01

    Northern Arizona University (NAU) faculty and Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) foresters initiated a partnership to expose NAU School of Forestry (SoF) graduate students to tribal forest management practices by incorporating field trips to the 1.68-million acre Fort Apache Indian Reservation as part of their silviculture curriculum. Tribal field trips were contrasted and...

  2. 75 FR 65611 - Native American Tribal Insignia Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Native American Tribal Insignia Database ACTION: Proposed collection; comment... recommendations made in the report was that the USPTO create and maintain an accurate and comprehensive database... database. The USPTO database of official tribal insignias assists trademark attorneys in their examination...

  3. Indoor air quality (IAQ) assessment in a multistorey shopping mall by high-spatial-resolution monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodio, M; Dambruoso, P R; de Gennaro, Gianluigi; de Gennaro, L; Loiotile, A Demarinis; Marzocca, A; Stasi, F; Trizio, L; Tutino, M

    2014-12-01

    In order to assess indoor air quality (IAQ), two 1-week monitoring campaigns of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were performed in different areas of a multistorey shopping mall. High-spatial-resolution monitoring was conducted at 32 indoor sites located in two storehouses and in different departments of a supermarket. At the same time, VOC concentrations were monitored in the mall and parking lot area as well as outdoors. VOC were sampled at 48-h periods using diffusive samplers suitable for thermal desorption. The samples were then analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The data analysis and chromatic maps indicated that the two storehouses had the highest VOC concentrations consisting principally of terpenes. These higher TVOC concentrations could be a result of the low efficiency of the air exchange and intake systems, as well as the large quantity of articles stored in these small spaces. Instead, inside the supermarket, the food department was the most critical area for VOC concentrations. To identify potential emission sources in this department, a continuous VOC analyzer was used. The findings indicated that the highest total VOC concentrations were present during cleaning activities and that these activities were carried out frequently in the food department. The study highlights the importance of conducting both high-spatial-resolution monitoring and high-temporal-resolution monitoring. The former was able to identify critical issues in environments with a complex emission scenario while the latter was useful in interpreting the dynamics of each emission source.

  4. Reasons for Substance Use: A Comparative Study of Alcohol Use in Tribals and Non-tribals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeraj, V S; Prasad, Surjit; Khess, Christoday Raja Jayant; Uvais, N A

    2012-07-01

    Consumption of alcohol has been attributed to different reasons by consumers. Attitude and knowledge about the substance and addiction can be influenced by the cultural background of the individual. The tribal population, where alcohol intake is culturally accepted, can have different beliefs and attributes causing one to take alcohol. This study attempts to examine the reasons for alcohol intake and the belief about addiction and their effect on the severity of addiction in people with a different ethnic background. The study was conducted at a Psychiatric institute with a cross-sectional design. The study population included patients hailing from the Jharkhand state, twenty each, belonging to tribal and non-tribal communities. Patients fulfilling the ICD 10 diagnostic criteria of mental and behavioral disorders due to the alcohol dependence syndrome, with active dependence, were taken, excluding those having any comorbidity or complications. The subjects were assessed with specially designed Sociodemographic-Clinical Performa, modified version of Reasons for Substance Use scale, Addiction Belief scale, and the Alcohol Dependence scale. A significantly high number of tribals cited reasons associated with social enhancement and coping with distressing emotions rather than individual enhancement, as a reason for consuming alcohol. Addiction was severe in those consuming alcohol to cope with distressing emotions. Belief in the free-will model was noted to be stronger across the cultures, without any correlation with the reason for intake. This cross-sectional study design, which was based on patients, cannot be easily generalized to the community. [corrected] Societal acceptance and pressure as well as high emotional problems appears to be the major etiology leading to higher prevalce of substance depedence in tribals. Primary prevention should be planned to fit the needs of the ethnics.

  5. Feasibility Study to Identify Potential Reductions in Energy Use in Tribal Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Willie [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Pablo, MT (United States)

    2017-03-30

    Under this project, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) assessed the technical and economic feasibility of energy efficiency improvements to existing Tribally-owned buildings. The feasibility study followed a systematic approach in identifying, selecting, and ranking recommended measures, recognizing that the appropriateness of a measure would depend not only on technical issues but also on institutional and organizational issues, such as financing options and occupant requirements. The completed study provided the Tribes with the information needed to commit necessary resources to reduce the energy use and cost in approximately 40 Tribal buildings, including the changes that may be needed in each facility’s operation and maintenance and personnel requirements. It also presented an economic analysis of energy-efficiency capital improvements and an annotated list of financing options and possible funding sources for implementation and an overall strategy for implementation. This project was located in various Tribal communities located throughout the Flathead Indian Reservation in Western Montana. Notice: The following is a compilation of Annual Program Review Presentations, Award Modifications, and Quarterly Progress Reports submitted to the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes under agreement DE-EE0005171. This report covers project activities from September 30, 2011 through December 31, 2014 and has been uploaded to OSTI by DOE as a substitute for the required Final Technical Report which was not received by DOE from the project recipient.

  6. Gidakiimanaanawigamig’s Circle of Learning: A Model for Partnership between Tribal Community and Research University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M Dalbotten

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 2002, the National Center for Earth-Surface dynamics has collaborated with the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, the Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, the University of Minnesota, and other partner institutions to develop programs aimed at supporting Native American participation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM fields, and especially in the Earth and Environmental Sciences. These include the gidakiimanaaniwigamig math and science camps for students in kindergarten through 12th grade, the Research Experience for Undergraduates on Sustainable Land and Water Resources, which takes place on two native reservations, and support for new majors at tribal colleges. All of these programs have a common focus on collaboration with communities, place-based education, community-inspired research projects, a focus on traditional culture and language, and resource management on reservations. Strong partnerships between university, tribal college, and Native American reservation were a foundation for success, but took time and effort to develop. This paper explores steps towards effective partnerships that support student success in STEM via environmental education.

  7. Tribal Wind Assessment by the Eastern Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pete, Belvin; Perry, Jeremy W.; Stump, Raphaella Q.

    2009-08-28

    The Tribes, through its consultant and advisor, Distributed Generation Systems (Disgen) -Native American Program and Resources Division, of Lakewood CO, assessed and qualified, from a resource and economic perspective, a wind energy generation facility on tribal lands. The goal of this feasibility project is to provide wind monitoring and to engage in preproject planning activities designed to provide a preliminary evaluation of the technical, economic, social and environmental feasibility of developing a sustainable, integrated wind energy plan for the Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapahoe Tribes, who resides on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The specific deliverables of the feasibility study are: 1) Assessments of the wind resources on the Wind River Indian Reservation 2) Assessments of the potential environmental impacts of renewable development 3) Assessments of the transmission capacity and capability of a renewable energy project 4) Established an economic models for tribal considerations 5) Define economic, cultural and societal impacts on the Tribe

  8. 77 FR 65895 - Announcement of the Award of Four Single-Source Program Expansion Supplement Grants To Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... Program Expansion Supplement Grants To Support Activities Associated With the Tribal Early Learning... expansion supplement grants to Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) grantees to support their activities as participants in the Tribal Early Learning Initiative. SUMMARY: The...

  9. Water Resources Impacts on Tribal Irrigation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minihane, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Branch of Irrigation and Power provides oversight and technical support to select irrigation projects and systems on tribal lands. The BIA provides operations and maintenance support for 16 irrigation systems. To make the best use of limited resources, the BIA must incorporate climate change impacts on hydrology and water management for these irrigation systems in the coming decades. The 16 irrigation projects discussed here are divided into three climatological regions: the Pacific Northwest Region, the Greater Rocky Mountain Region, and the Western, Southwest, & Navajo Region. Significant climate projections that impact irrigation systems in one or more of these regions include increased temperatures and evaporative demand, earlier snowmelt and runoff, an increase in floods, an increase in heavy precipitation events, an increase in the frequency and intensity of droughts, and declining water supplies. Some irrigation projects are particularly vulnerable to these climate impacts because they are in already water-stressed areas or areas in which water resources are over-allocated. Other irrigation projects will have to adjust their storage and water management strategies to accommodate changes in the timing of streamflow. Overall, though, the BIA will be better able to assist tribal nations by incorporating expected climate impacts into their water resources management practices.

  10. 76 FR 367 - Office of State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... identified by TCAC members and other tribal leaders as priority public health issues. The Biannual Tribal... Consultation meeting is by special invitation to the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Tribal Leaders from... complementary venue wherein tribal representatives and CDC staff have the opportunity to exchange information...

  11. "They Prepared Me to Be a Teacher, but Not a Culturally Responsive Navajo Teacher for Navajo Kids": A Tribal Critical Race Theory Analysis of an Indigenous Teacher Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagno, Angelina E.

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that federally-funded Indigenous teacher preparation programs housed at mainstream, predominantly White universities can be colonial and thus require significant focused work in order to ensure that they are not. The article has three interrelated objectives: first, to discuss efforts to prepare Indigenous teachers for…

  12. Reasons for Substance Use: A Comparative Study of Alcohol Use in Tribals and Non-tribals

    OpenAIRE

    Sreeraj, V. S.; Prasad, Surjit; Khess, Christoday Raja Jayant; Uvais, N. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Consumption of alcohol has been attributed to different reasons by consumers. Attitude and knowledge about the substance and addiction can be influenced by the cultural background of the individual. The tribal population, where alcohol intake is culturally accepted, can have different beliefs and attributes causing one to take alcohol. This study attempts to examine the reasons for alcohol intake and the belief about addiction and their effect on the severity of addiction in peopl...

  13. Effect of specific soccer training on general soccer ability of high fit tribal soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.Gopal Chandra Saha; Dr. Hiralal Adhikari

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of specific soccer training on General Soccer ability (volleying Skill) by using Mcdonald Soccer Test of high fit tribal soccer players. ninety, high fit tribal Soccer players out of two hundred and seventy, 9th and 10th grade school level tribal Soccer players from Ergoda School parihati of paschim Medinipur, District of West Bengal were randomly selected as the tribal subjects for this study. To ascertain the high fit tribal Soccer play...

  14. AHP 25: Jahzong: Tibetan Tribal Leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzorge Guru མཛོད་དགེ་གུ་རུ།

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available "An electrifying, revelatory experience. In it, we learn much about the lives of Tibetan tribal groups that cannot be found in any academic treatise." Victor H. Mair, Professor, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia "A rare insight into an intriguing world of violence and compassion that has all but disappeared." Fernanda Pirie, Oxford University "A treasure. A window to the past and present of a dynamic Tibetan culture. A story full of life flowing with harsh reality and vivid imagination." Douglas Duckworth, Florida State University "Ethnographic and immediate, Guru's novel brings readers into a world of Eastern Tibetans generations ago. The spell-binding chain of events echoes the dynamics of traditional heroic epic and folktale." Mark Bender, The Ohio State University

  15. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory: Building partnerships and developing tools to support local Tribal community response to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. D.; Wee, B.; Kuslikis, A.

    2015-12-01

    Response of Tribal nations and Tribal communities to current and emerging climate change challenges requires active participation of stakeholders who have effective access to relevant data, information and analytical tools. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory (TLC), currently under development, is a joint effort between the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC), the Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri), and the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). The vision of the TLC is to create an integrative platform that enables coordination between multiple stakeholders (e.g. Tribal resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, farmers, ranchers, and other local community members) to collaborate on locally relevant climate change issues. The TLC is intended to facilitate the transformation of data into actionable information that can inform local climate response planning. The TLC will provide the technical mechanisms to access, collect and analyze data from both internal and external sources (e.g. NASA's Giovanni climate data portal, Ameriflux or USA National Phenology Network) while also providing the social scaffolds to enable collaboration across Tribal communities and with members of the national climate change research community. The prototype project focuses on phenology, a branch of science focused on relationships between climate and the seasonal timing of biological phenomena. Monitoring changes in the timing and duration of phenological stages in plant and animal co­­­­mmunities on Tribal lands can provide insight to the direct impacts of climate change on culturally and economically significant Tribal resources . The project will leverage existing phenological observation protocols created by the USA-National Phenology Network and NEON to direct data collection efforts and will be tailored to the specific needs and concerns of the community. Phenology observations will be captured and managed within the Collaboratory

  16. 45 CFR 284.30 - What information must the State include in its assessment of the impact of the TANF program(s) in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... program(s); (2) The total amount of State and Tribal spending on TANF cash assistance payments; (3) The... Food Stamp Program or other State supportive and assistance programs; (4) The proportion of students...

  17. Nutritional status of tribal children in Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangam Sukhdas, Sairam Challa, Prakash Bhatia, A.R. Rao, Koteswara Rao.P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tribes constitute separate socio-cultural groups, having distinct customs, traditions, marriage, kinship, and property inheritance systems. They live largely in agricultural and pre-agricultural level of technology. Their dependency on nature and impoverished economy bear effect on the nutritional status different compared to the general population. Aims: To study the prevalence of malnutrition in the under-five years age group tribal children in the three regions of Andhra Pradesh and compare the same with national statistics. Methods and Material: A cross sectional survey was carried out to assess the nutritional status of under-five age group children in three Integrated Tribal Development Agency (ITDA blocks of Andhra Pradesh. Results & Conclusions: Based on the WHO Child Growth Standards, the prevalence of malnutrition was lower in the AP tribal blocks than the national averages among tribal populations, but higher than the overall national and state averages.

  18. Comparing Tribal Research and Specimens Policies: Models, Practices, and Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Bardill

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews a range of tribal policies regarding the proper solicitation, collection, disposition, and return or disposal of biological samples, or biospecimens, which include not only the sample itself but also data, such as genetic information, derived from the sample. These policies are not always found within tribal regulation, and many that exist emerge from a discrete set of models, such as from the American Indian Law Center (AILC, the Canadian Institutes of Health (CIHR, and the Indigenous Peoples Council on Biocolonialism (IPCB. Some policies merge language from these national models and conceptual papers with tribally specific foci, including incorporating tribal language for specific principles to guide research with that community and their biospecimens. The article concludes with recommendations for principles that emerge as paramount in the review for directing research involving biospecimens.

  19. Education for tribal children: An engine for human development

    OpenAIRE

    Malyadri, Pacha

    2012-01-01

    The Indian Constitution assigns special status to the Scheduled Tribes (STs). Traditionally referred to as adivasis, vanbasis, tribes, or tribals; STs constitute about 8% of the Indian population. There are around 573 Scheduled Tribes living in different parts of the country, having their own languages different from the one mostly spoken in the State where they live. There are more than 270 such languages in India. Accordingly to the 2001 census, the tribal population in India is about 67.8 ...

  20. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairgrieve, William; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2004-04-01

    The Colville Tribal Hatchery produced 62,335 pounds of trout during the contract period, however, only 46,092 pounds were liberated to lakes and streams. The remaining production will be carried over to 2004 to be planted as larger fish into reservation waters for the lakes opener. New raceways were completed in November and brought on line in the spring. These raceways currently hold the redband rainbow brood stock and will be spawned in 2004. Efforts are continuing to capture redbands from other streams in coordination with the monitoring and evaluation program. Creel was expanded by hiring a second creel clerk to give better coverage of reservation waters by reducing travel time. Marking continues on all fish planted from CTH and refinements continue to be made. The first tag retention study has been completed and the second study is now underway to determine long term tag recognition. Lakes continue to be surveyed to complete the baseline analysis of all reservation lakes and will be completed in 2004.

  1. California Tribal Nations Technical Water Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben, C; Coty, J

    2005-08-15

    , it was necessary to confine the analysis to a smaller geographic area, yet still represent the diversity of tribes and context within which tribal water issues arise. The state of California provides this opportunity. California has 106 federally recognized tribes. California is diverse in its geography, environment, demographics, and economic bases; California tribes demonstrate similar diversity. Additionally, no central repository of national or state tribal water issues exists and information must be aggregated, in general, tribe by tribe. This presents research challenges and, for this report, these were overcome by developing a method to essentially ''sub-sample'' the 106 federally recognized tribes in the state, while making every effort to maintain a sub-sample that broadly represents all of the 106 tribes. n an effort to develop an equitable and appropriate method with which to identify this set of representative tribes, multiple entities were contacted for guidance. Consultation with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Indian Health Services (IHS), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) and Tribal Environmental Directors, provided key information and recommendations to guide the research process. It is hoped that an appropriate representation of the diversity of tribes across the state has been achieved; this includes an adequate representation of similarities and differences between Californian tribes on key water research issues (and the same between regions). This research occurred over a limited time period (i.e., three months) and given a general concern that this may not be sufficient, any information and conclusions in this report should be viewed with this in mind. Finally, it is hoped that this research allows for an (enhanced) informed capacity to better propose further dialog between tribes and LLNL to continue to exchange water research perspectives and define

  2. Monitoring and Evaluation Plan for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery, 1996 Technical Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, Cleveland R.

    1996-08-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe has proposed to build and operate the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) in the Clearwater River subbasin of Idaho for the purpose of restoring self-sustaining populations of spring, summer, and fall chinook salmon to their native habitats. The project comprises a combination of incubation and rearing facilities, satellite rearing facilities, juvenile and adult collection sites, and associated production and harvest management activities. As currently conceived, the NPTH program will produce approximately 768,000 spring chinook parr, 800,000 summer chinook fry, and 2,000,000 fall chinook fry on an annual basis. Hatchery fish would be spawned, reared, and released under conditions that promote wild-type characteristics, minimize genetic changes in both hatchery and wild chinook populations, and minimize undesirable ecological interactions. The primary objective is to enable hatchery-produced fish to return to reproduce naturally in the streams in which they are released. These and other characteristics of the project are described in further detail in the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Master Plan (Larson and Mobrand 1992), the 1995 Supplement to the Master Plan (Johnson et al. 1995), and the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program Environmental Impact Statement (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996). The report in hand is referred to in project literature as the NPTH Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Plan. This report describes monitoring and evaluation activities that will help NPTH managers determine. whether they were successful in restoring chinook salmon populations and avoiding adverse ecological impacts. Program success will be gauged primarily by changes in the abundance and distribution of supplemented chinook populations. The evaluation of project-related impacts will focus on the biological effects of constructing and operating NPTH hatchery facilities, introducing hatchery fish into the natural environment, and removing or displacing wild

  3. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2018 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program Requirements for Eligible Hospitals, Critical Access Hospitals, and Eligible Professionals; Provider-Based Status of Indian Health Service and Tribal Facilities and Organizations; Costs Reporting and Provider Requirements; Agreement Termination Notices. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2018. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, the 21st Century Cures Act, and other legislation. We also are making changes relating to the provider-based status of Indian Health Service (IHS) and Tribal facilities and organizations and to the low-volume hospital payment adjustment for hospitals operated by the IHS or a Tribe. In addition, we are providing the market basket update that will apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2018. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2018. In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities). We also are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs. We are updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition (HAC) Reduction Program. We also are making changes relating to transparency of accrediting organization survey

  4. Tribal Colleges and Universitie/American Indian Higher Education Consortium Advanced Manufacturing Technical Assistance Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atcitty, Stanley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) created a Minority Serving Institution Partnership Plan (MSIPP) to 1) align investments in a university capacity and workforce development with the NNSA mission to develop the needed skills and talent for NNSA’s enduring technical workforce at the laboratories and production plants and 2) to enhance research and education at under-represented colleges and universities. Out of this effort, MSIPP launched a new program in early FY17 focused on Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs). The following report summarizes the project focus and status update during this reporting period.

  5. Balancing Tribal Sovereignty and the Role of Interjurisdictional Partnerships in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Meenoo; Lupi, Monica Valdes; Carter, Sara Sally; Meeks, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Oklahoma has a history of strong partnerships with their tribal health leaders and tribal communities. In 2012, the Oklahoma State Department of Health (OSDH) established the Office of the Tribal Liaison, as Oklahoma has 39 tribal nations in the state, of which 38 are federally recognized. The Office of the Tribal Liaison is responsible for promoting relationships with Oklahoma Tribal Nations and implementing the OSDH Tribal Consultation policy. The strength of the partnership between the OSDH and the Tribal Nations enabled a new collaboration during an event hosted by a tribal casino event center that brought tattoo artists to provide tattoos to patrons over 3 days. Licensure issues that crossed the jurisdiction boundaries of the OSDH emerged before the event, which required the OSDH, Indian Health Service, and the Tribal Nation to work together to protect the public's health. The 3 jurisdictions drew upon their previously established partnership, OSDH's tribal consultation policy, and their open and trusting relationship to come together quickly to protect the public's health. This event and interjurisdictional partnership highlighted the importance of adopting the "Spectrum of Processes for Collaboration and Consensus-Building" model as outlined by Orenstein et al to help guide and support state, tribal, and federal collaborations. This case example highlights the opportunities for collaboration between different regulatory public health and tribal bodies to improve the communities' health.

  6. Fate and Effects of Leachate Contamination on Alaska's Tribal Drinking Water Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and Alaskan tribal communities identified and selected five representative Alaskan tribal landfills/dump sites and performed water quality sampling and analysis to identify chemical and microbial contaminants of concern (COCs) that could potentially impact the local drinking ...

  7. Tribal corridor management planning : model, case study, and guide for Caltrans District 1 [research brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    This guide was created to help the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 1 personnel and members of the North Coast Tribal Transportation Commission to develop interpretive tribal transportation corridors along stretches o...

  8. Tribal Science 2017 Webinar Series: Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs): Research, Collaborations, and Other Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tribal Science Webinar Series provides a forum for discussion of the complex environmental issues facing many tribal and indigenous communities, and features a wide variety of expert guest speakers from government,.....

  9. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: David Conrad, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The intern`s report contains a Master`s thesis entitled, ``An implementation analysis of the US Department of Energy`s American Indian policy as part of its environmental restoration and waste management mission.`` This thesis examines the implementation of a working relationship between the Nez Perce Tribe and the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management at the Hanford reservation. It examines the relationship using a qualitative methodology and three generations of policy analysis literature to gain a clear understanding of the potential for successful implementation.

  10. 25 CFR 163.36 - Tribal forestry program financial support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... timberland or having more than a one million board foot harvest of forest products annually. (2) Category 2... timberland and having less than a one million board foot harvest of forest products annually, or whose forest... services to carry out forest land management activities and shall be based on levels of funding assistance...

  11. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: Karen Sandoval, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This intern report consists of the workshop handbook for the Comprehensive Environmental and Natural Resource Management Planning workshop presented by the Council of Energy Resource Tribes. The workshop objectives were to foster and awareness of integrated resource management rationale; present the fundamental elements of an integrated approach; explain what distinguishes this approach from mainstream strategies; discuss how worldview and philosophy shape action and policy; present ways in which philosophical dexterity promotes effective management; and identify opportunities to engage and participate in integrated management. Resource articles presented at the meeting have been removed for separate processing for inclusion on the data base.

  12. Serum Zinc Levels Amongst Tribal Population in a District of Jharkhand State, India: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    KAPİL, UMESH; SİNGH, PREETİ; PATHAK, PRİYALİ

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Nutritional deficiency of zinc is widespreadin developing countries. India has the second largestconcentration of tribal population after that of Africancontinent. Limited data is available on the serum zinclevels amongst tribal population in India.The objective of this study is to assess the status ofserum zinc amongst tribal population in a district ofJharkhand State, India.Method: The study was conducted amongst tribals inthe age group of 18-75 years residing in districtSahibgan...

  13. Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

    2014-11-06

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

  14. Final Report for the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Planning Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Kim [EPA Specialist

    2013-09-17

    In 2011 the Tribe was awarded funds from the Department of Energy to formulate the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan. This will be a guiding document used throughout the planning of projects focused on energy reduction on the Reservation. The Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan's goal is to create a Five Year Energy Plan for the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians in San Jacinto, California. This plan will guide the decision making process towards consistent progress leading to the Tribal goal of a 25% reduction in energy consumption in the next five years. It will additionally outline energy usage/patterns and will edentify areas the Tribe can decrease energy use and increase efficiency. The report documents activities undertaken under the grant, as well as incldues the Tribe's strategif energy plan.

  15. Historical review: Does falciparum malaria destroy isolated tribal populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, G Dennis

    Many isolated populations of tribal peoples were nearly destroyed when they first contacted infectious diseases particularly respiratory pathogens such as measles and smallpox. Surviving groups have often been found to have declining populations in the face of multiple social and infectious threats. Malaria, especially Plasmodium falciparum, was thought to be a major cause of depopulation in some tribal peoples isolated in tropical jungles. The dynamics of such host parasite interactions is unclear especially since most such populations would have had long histories of exposure to malaria. Three groups are individually reviewed: Meruts of Borneo, Yanomami of Amazonia, Jarawas of the Andaman Islands. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of falciparum malaria in the depopulation of some isolated tribal groups in order to understand what measures, if any, would be likely to prevent such losses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Negotiating Three Worlds: Academia, Nursing Science, and Tribal Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkup, Patricia A.; Rodehorst, T. Kim; Wilhelm, Susan L.; Kuntz, Sandra W.; Weinert, Clarann; Stepans, Mary Beth Flanders; Salois, Emily Matt; Bull, Jacqueline Left Hand; Hill, Wade G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to use a cross-cultural model to guide the exploration of common issues and the dynamic interrelationships surrounding entrée to tribal communities as experienced by four nursing research teams. Method Members of four research teams discuss the primary lessons learned about successful strategies and challenges encountered during their projects' early stages. Results Understanding the cultural values of relationship and reciprocity is critical to the success of research projects conducted in Native American communities. Discussion Conducting cross-cultural research involves complex negotiations among members of three entities: academia, nursing science, and tribal communities. The lessons learned in these four research projects may be instructive to investigators who have the opportunity to conduct research with tribal communities. PMID:18948449

  17. School Adjustment And Academic Achievement Among Tribal Dolescents In Manipur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ch. Beda Devi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study is an attempt to examine school adjustment and academic achievement among tribal adolescent students in two districts of Manipur. The study also attempts to examine the high and low academic achievers of tribal students of the two areas. The sample comprised of 629 XI standard tribal adolescent students. Out of which 136 were from Imphal West and 493 were from Ukhrul district. A standardized school adjustment inventory for adolescent students developed by the investigator was used. For academic achievement the last public examination i.e. H.S.L.C. marks were used as the index of academic achievement. The findings revealed that a low positive correlation between school adjustment and academic achievement in both the districts. It was also reveals that high academic achievers had better adaptability in school than that of low academic achievers

  18. Microbial Fuel Cell Possibilities on American Indian Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, Kimberlynn [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief background of tribal reservations, the process of how Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) work, and the potential benefits of using MFCs on tribal reservations to convert waste water to energy as a means to sustainably generate electricity. There have been no known studies conducted on tribal lands that would be able to add to the estimated percentage of all renewable energy resources identified. Not only does MFC technology provide a compelling, innovative solution, it could also address better management of wastewater, using it as a form of energy generation. Using wastewater for clean energy generation could provide a viable addition to community infrastructure systems improvements.

  19. Work Participation in Cultural Operations of Rice Farming by Tribal and Non-Tribal Labourers in Wayanad district : A Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Narayanan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice is a traditional staple food crop of India, having high cultural and ecological significance in the present global scenario. Tribal labourers in Wayanad district of Kerala had been the traditional labourers in rice farming. The consequent migration of non-tribals to Wayanad district of Kerala had been changed the demographic and cultural entity of the district. The present study was conducted in Wayanad district to compare the work participation between tribal and non- tribal labourers. Twenty tribal and non-tribal labourers were selected from each selected panchayats and a total of one hundred and twenty respondents were included in the study. A well-structured interview schedule was used for collecting the data from the respondents. The data were tabulated and inferences were drawn after appropriate statistical analysis. The results show that majority of the tribal labourers had high work participation than non-tribals. While comparing based on gender, female labourers had high work participation than male labourers both in the case of tribal and non-tribal labourers.

  20. Southwest Exotic Mapping Program (SWEMP) Database, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Southwest Exotic Plant Mapping Program (SWEMP) is a collaborative effort between the United States Geological Survey and federal, tribal, state, county and...

  1. Child safety and booster seat use in five tribal communities, 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billie, Holly; Crump, Carolyn E; Letourneau, Robert J; West, Bethany A

    2016-12-01

    Motor-vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) including AI/AN children. Child safety seats prevent injury and death among children in a motor-vehicle crash, yet use is low among AI/AN children. To increase the use of child safety seats (CSS; car seats and booster seats), five tribal communities implemented evidence-based strategies from the Guide to Community Preventive Services during 2010-2014. Increased CSS use was evaluated through direct observational surveys and CSS event data. CSS events are used to check the installation, use, and safety of CSS and new CSS can be provided. CSS use increased in all five programs (ranging from 6% to 40%). Four out of five programs exceeded their goals for increased use. Among the five communities, a total of 91 CSS events occurred resulting in 1417 CSS checked or provided. Evidence-based child passenger safety interventions are both feasible in and transferable to tribal communities. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. 25 CFR 1000.14 - Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Selection of Additional Tribes for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.14 Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance? Two types of entities are...

  3. 42 CFR 137.15 - Who may participate in Tribal Self-Governance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who may participate in Tribal Self-Governance? 137... HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Selection of Indian Tribes for Participation in Self-Governance § 137.15 Who may participate in Tribal Self-Governance? Those...

  4. 25 CFR 1200.10 - Who is eligible to withdraw their tribal funds from trust?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is eligible to withdraw their tribal funds from trust... INTERIOR AMERICAN INDIAN TRUST FUND MANAGEMENT REFORM ACT Withdrawing Tribal Funds From Trust § 1200.10 Who is eligible to withdraw their tribal funds from trust? Any tribe for whom we manage funds in trust. ...

  5. 25 CFR 115.807 - Will OTFM consult with tribes about investments of tribal trust funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... trust funds? 115.807 Section 115.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.807 Will OTFM consult with tribes about investments of tribal trust funds? Upon...

  6. In the Service of Others: How Volunteering Is Integral to the Tribal College Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talahongva, Patty

    2016-01-01

    Today, the spirit of volunteering is very much alive at every tribal college and university (TCU). From fundraisers for food pantries to educational activities that help fellow students, TCUs help forge reciprocity among students and staff. Volunteerism is integral to the tribal college experience. Volunteerism at three tribal colleges--Cankdeska…

  7. 26 CFR 305.7871-1 - Indian tribal governments treated as States for certain purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER THE INDIAN TRIBAL GOVERNMENTAL TAX STATUS ACT OF 1982 § 305.7871-1 Indian tribal governments... foundations). (b) Special rule for excise tax provisions. An Indian tribal government shall be treated as a... tax imposed on a transaction under— (1) Chapter 31 of the Code (relating to tax on special fuels); (2...

  8. 78 FR 37541 - Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS); Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... leaders on activities and areas identified by TAC members and other tribal leaders as priority public... responsibility. It is an open and free exchange of information and opinion among parties that leads to mutual... be provided during the Consultation Session for tribal testimony. Tribal Leaders are encouraged to...

  9. Educating Students, Transforming Communities: Tribal Colleges Bridge Gap from Poverty to Prosperity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Sherrole

    2012-01-01

    Tribal colleges are often performing little miracles in their communities. Most tribal colleges operate without benefit of local and state taxes. Yet, they bring in new money from other sources that stimulate the local economy. Students gain knowledge and skills that can transform their communities and local economies. Tribal colleges not only…

  10. 75 FR 8508 - Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation AGENCY: Office of Child Support Enforcement...) that we had begun consideration with stakeholders of appropriate minimum Tribal systems automation... Federal/Tribal workgroup was convened and considered such automation issues as compatibility, scale...

  11. 76 FR 35474 - Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood Products Division...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... Employment and Training Administration Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise... Veneer, Colville Tribal Enterprise Corporation Wood Products Division, Omak, Washington. The Department's... employed on-site at the Omak, Washington location of Colville Indian Plywood and Veneer, Colville Tribal...

  12. 77 FR 39244 - Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS); Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments, CDC and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry... leadership and staff to conduct government-to-government consultation with elected tribal officials or their... wherein tribal representatives and CDC/ATSDR leadership and staff exchange information about public health...

  13. Goals, Family, and Community: What Drives Tribal College Transfer Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makomenaw, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This article examines success factors for American Indian tribal college students who transfer to 4-year predominantly White institutions. The study examined the experiences of 8 tribal college transfer students to Midwest universities. Using an indigenous methodology, 3 themes were found to help American Indian tribal college transfer students…

  14. Native Geosciences: Strengthening the Future Through Tribal Traditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J. R.; Quigley, I.; Douville, V.; Hollow Horn Bear, D.

    2008-12-01

    Native people have lived for millennia in distinct and unique ways in our natural sacred homelands and environments. Tribal cultures are the expression of deep understandings of geosciences shared through oral histories, language and ceremonies. Today, Native people as all people are living in a definite time of change. The developing awareness of "change" brings forth an immense opportunity to expand and elevate Native geosciences knowledge, specifically in the areas of earth, wind, fire and water. At the center of "change" is the need to balance the needs of the people with the needs of the environment. Native tradition and our inherent understanding of what is "sacred above is sacred below" is the foundation for an emerging multi-faceted approach to increasing the representation of Natives in geosciences. The approach is also a pathway to assist in Tribal language revitalization, connection of oral histories and ceremonies as well as building an intergenerational teaching/learning community. Humboldt State University, Sinte Gleska University and South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in partnership with Northern California (Hoopa, Yurok, & Karuk) and Great Plains (Lakota) Tribes have nurtured Native geosciences learning communities connected to Tribal Sacred Sites and natural resources. These sites include the Black Hills (Mato Paha, Mato Tiplia, Hinhan Kaga Paha, Mako Sica etc.), Klamath River (Ishkêesh), and Hoopa Valley (Natinixwe). Native geosciences learning is centered on the themes of earth, wind, fire and water and Native application of remote sensing technologies. Tribal Elders and Native geoscientists work collaboratively providing Native families in-field experiential intergenerational learning opportunities which invite participants to immerse themselves spiritually, intellectually, physically and emotionally in the experiences. Through this immersion and experience Native students and families strengthen the circle of our future Tribal

  15. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lamds of Viejas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrence Meyer (Black & Veatch); Mike Elenbaas (Black & Veatch)

    2005-09-30

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of Renewable Energy Development on the lands of the Viejas Band of the Kumeyaay Indian Nation. In addition, the study will investigate the feasibility of forming a renewable energy based tribal utility. Viejas contracted with Black & Veatch and Fredericks, Pelcyger & Hester, LLC to assist in the development of a feasibility study to ascertain the economics and operational factors of forming an electric and water utility. This report is the result of the investigation conducted by Black & Veatch, with input from Viejas Tribal Government.

  16. Delitto d’onore, ordine tribale e Stato - Honour crimes, tribal order and the State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Baghaï

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Globalization does not only mean that the Western world is pervading the non-Western world but also that the non-Western world, through migration processes, moves and settles in the Western world. The impressive number of honor crimes committed every year in the Western world suggests that a different social political order is acting on the Western stage. Honor crimes are committed in Muslim communities that have their roots in those parts of the Muslim world which have tribal societies on their territories, i.e. tribal institutions and laws which interact with or ignore State law. This is a political order which is stateless and based on blood ties – the author calls it an “ematocracy” – and it is perfectly able to survive within the different shapes taken by the State – when there is the State – but also without the State when it is considered as unreliable or when, for some reasons, it collapses. The author argues that political order based on blood ties is considered as reliable by the social actors since it is permanent and in expansion: blood ties reproduce themselves as long as there is life. And women – as protagonists of reproduction processes – are unfortunately at the heart of the conflict between State laws and customary law both in their home countries and in their new homes. Through an analysis of the intertwinement between State law and customary law, in some of the home countries of the migrants, and between shariya and customary law in the classical doctrine, the author shows how this process of ordering the world carries on its political projects in the post-global context.

  17. 45 CFR 287.45 - How can NEW Program funds be used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT WORKS (NEW) PROGRAM NEW Program Funding § 287.45 How can NEW Program funds be used? (a) NEW grants... be used for work activities as defined by the Tribal grantee. (c) Work activities may include... retaining employment. ...

  18. 25 CFR 115.815 - How does a tribe request trust funds from a tribal trust account?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a tribe request trust funds from a tribal trust... ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Withdrawing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.815 How does a tribe request trust funds from a tribal trust account? To request trust funds from a...

  19. 25 CFR 900.51 - What is an Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management system expected to do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Property Management System Standards § 900.51 What is an Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management system expected to do? An Indian tribe or tribal organization's property management...

  20. 25 CFR 900.41 - How long must an Indian tribe or tribal organization keep management system records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems General § 900.41 How long must an Indian tribe or tribal organization keep management system records? The... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long must an Indian tribe or tribal organization keep...

  1. From the other end: Tribals and democratic decentralisation in Kerala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, A.; Krishnan, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the contradictions of India s development trajectory by taking the case of the tribal population in the state of Kerala. The wide appreciation for the Kerala Model of development (characterised by significant achievements in social development, without corresponding economic

  2. 78 FR 21826 - Tribal Background Investigations and Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Part 558 RIN 3141-AA15 Tribal Background Investigations and Licensing AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission, Interior. ACTION: Technical amendment. SUMMARY: The...

  3. Chaparral Commerce Center Proposed Tribal Minor NSR Permit Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribal Minor New Source Review (NSR) Permit application for the two emergency diesel-fired generators (1,500 kW each) to be installed at the Chaparral Commerce Center in the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (SRPMIC) in Scottsdale, Arizona.

  4. Valuing Native American Tribal Elders and Stories for Sustainability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritter, Kristine; Scheurerman, Richard; Strong, Cindy; Schuster, Carrie Jim; Williams, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines a framework the authors have used to infuse sustainability study into humanities teaching at the middle school level. Native American tribal elders can act as co-teachers in such classrooms, and the place-based stories that shaped their views of the environment can serve as important classroom texts to investigate sustainable…

  5. Modeling tribal exposures to methyl mercury from fish consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure assessment and risk management considerations for tribal fish consumption are different than for the general U.S. population because of higher fish intake from subsistence fishing and/or from unique cultural practices. This research summarizes analyses of available data ...

  6. Tribalism as a Foiled Factor of Africa Nation-Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okogu, J. O.; Umudjere, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper tends to examine tribalism as a foiled factor on Africa nation-building and proffers useful tips to salvaging the Africa land from this deadly social problem. Africans in times past had suffered enormous attacks, injuries, losses, deaths, destruction of properties and human skills and ideas due to the presence of tribalistic views in…

  7. Tribal Watershed Management: Culture, Science, Capacity, and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Amanda; Ostergren, David M.

    2007-01-01

    This research focuses on two elements of contemporary American Indian natural resource management. First, the authors explore the capacity of tribes to manage natural resources, including the merging of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) with Western science. Second, they analyze tribal management in the context of local and regional…

  8. Tribally Controlled Community College Libraries: A Paradigm for Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Lotsee; Taylor, Rhonda Harris

    1996-01-01

    This study reports on the results of a mail survey administered to tribally controlled college libraries during 1993, just before the colleges were granted federal land-grant college status. Highlights include the historical development of the institutions operated by Native American Indian tribes; budgets; staff; services; computer utilization;…

  9. The impacts of climate change on tribal traditional foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathy Lynn; John Daigle; Jennie Hoffman; Frank Lake; Natalie Michelle; Darren Ranco; Carson Viles; Garrit Voggesser; Paul. Williams

    2013-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native tribes are uniquely affected by climate change. Indigenous peoples have depended on a wide variety of native fungi, plant and animal species for food, medicine, ceremonies, community and economic health for countless generations. Climate change stands to impact the species and ecosystems that constitute tribal traditional foods that...

  10. Mathematical Precision of Pitch Gaps in Tribal Tonal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    expressions in his mother tongue were quite without aesthetic parallel in any other language of mortals”.1. When I was a toddler one British Colonial Medical. Officer, Cicely Williams, described a children's dis- ease in Ghana and, using our tribal name Kwashiorkor, placed the condition in its socio-pathological context.2 3.

  11. Haptoglobin polymorphism among the tribal groups of southern Gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Priyanka; Aggarwal, Aastha; Huidrom, Suraj Singh; Kshatriya, Gautam K

    2011-09-01

    Gujarat is located at the western most point of the Indian subcontinent. Valsad and Surat districts are part of the 'tribal belt'of Gujarat and constitute 29.1% of total tribal population of Gujarat. These tribal populations are a rich source of gaining insights in the patterns of genetic diversity and genetico-environmental disorders against the back drop of their ecological, historical and ethnographic aspects. The objectives were to find out a) the genetic diversity among the tribes of Gujarat with reference to haptoglobin (Hp) locus b) the relationship between Hp polymorphism and sickle cell anemia/trait. 431 individuals belonging to eight tribal groups were studied for Hp polymorphism using polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Hb*S was screened by dithionate tube turbididy (DTT) test and confirmed using cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis (CAME). Allele frequency was calculated by direct gene counting method. Average heterozygosity and gene diversity were computed using software DISPAN. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) was estimated using software ARLEQUIN version 3.1. Pattern of allele frequency distribution showed preponderance of Hp(2) allele in all the eight tribal groups, which is in accordance with its frequency in different populations of Indian subcontinent. Total average heterozygosity (H(T)) was found to be low (0.160) but the level of genetic differentiation (G(ST)) was found to be moderately high (5.6%). AMOVA analysis indicated least among group variance between west and south Indian populations (-0.04%) indicating the affinities of the tribes of Gujarat with that of Dravidian speaking groups. Analysis of Hp phenotypes among sickle cell anemia/ trait individuals revealed a high frequency of Hp 0-0 phenotype (92.7%) among SS individuals as opposed to only 9.7% among AS individuals, reaffirming the selective advantage of HbAS state in relation to hemolytic disorders.

  12. Current and planned shared service arrangements in Wisconsin local and tribal health departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madamala, Kusuma; Young, Nancy; Young, Dustin; Giese, Lieske; Brandenberg, Terry; Zahner, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore current and future use of shared service arrangements as a management strategy to increase capacity to provide public health essential services in Wisconsin. An online cross-sectional survey of 99 local and tribal health departments in Wisconsin was conducted. Select variables from the 2010 Wisconsin Local Health Department Survey were merged. Other data sources included results from a Board of Health governance analysis and the Wisconsin Department of Health Services region data. Descriptive analysis was performed of current and future shared service arrangements and the characteristics of the types of arrangements and agreements in place. Ninety-one of 99 Wisconsin local and tribal health departments responded, yielding a 92% response rate. Seventy-one percent of respondents currently share services with 1 or more other health departments. More frequent arrangements were present in programmatic areas than in departmental operations. Most frequently reported motivators include making better use of resources, providing better services, and responding to program requirements. Extensive qualitative comments indicate arrangements accomplished what the local health department hoped it would with perceived gains in efficiency and effectiveness. There is widespread use of shared services among health departments in Wisconsin. Extensive qualitative comments suggest participant satisfaction with what the arrangements have accomplished. Motivating factors in developing the arrangements and limited mention of expiration dates suggest continued study of how these arrangements may evolve. Further examination of shared services as a potential mechanism to advance service effectiveness and efficiency is needed.

  13. Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Multiple

    2009-09-30

    The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining

  14. Utilization of the Native American Talking Circle to teach incident command system to tribal community health representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granillo, Brenda; Renger, Ralph; Wakelee, Jessica; Burgess, Jefferey L

    2010-12-01

    The public health workforce is diverse and encompasses a wide range of professions. For tribal communities, the Community Health Representative (CHR) is a public health paraprofessional whose role as a community health educator and health advocate has expanded to become an integral part of the health delivery system of most tribes. CHRs possess a unique set of skills and cultural awareness that make them an essential first responder on tribal land. As a result of their distinctive qualities they have the capability of effectively mobilizing communities during times of crisis and can have a significant impact on the communities' response to a local incident. Although public health emergency preparedness training is a priority of federal, state, local and tribal public health agencies, much of the training currently available is not tailored to meet the unique traits of CHRs. Much of the emergency preparedness training is standardized, such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Training Programs, and does not take into account the inherent cultural traditions of some of the intended target audience. This paper reports on the use of the Native American Talking Circle format as a culturally appropriate method to teach the Incident Command System (ICS). The results of the evaluation suggest the talking format circle is well received and can significantly improve the understanding of ICS roles. The limitations of the assessment instrument and the cultural adaptations at producing changes in the understanding of ICS history and concepts are discussed. Possible solutions to these limitations are provided.

  15. Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-06-10

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24

  16. Developing Tribal Integrated Waste Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    An IWMP outlines how the tribe will reduce, manage, and dispose of its waste. It identifies existing waste systems, assesses needs, and sets forth the ways to design, implement, and monitor a more effective and sustainable waste management program.

  17. 24 CFR 85.25 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program income. 85.25 Section 85.25... TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS Post-Award Requirements Financial Administration § 85.25 Program income. (a) General. Grantees are encouraged to earn income to defray program costs. Program income includes income from fees...

  18. The First Hydrology (Geoscience) Degree at a Tribal College or University: Salish Kootenai College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, G.; Berthelote, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    A new Hydrology Degree Program was developed at Salish and Kootenai College in western Montana. This program will begin to address the fact that our nation only awards 20 to 30 Geoscience degrees annually to Native American students. Previously absent from SKC and the other 36 Tribal Colleges or Universities (TCU) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) related programs are specific Geoscience disciplines, particularly those focusing on hydrological and water based sciences. Though 23 TCU’s offer some classes to supplement their environmental science or natural resource programs. This program is timely and essential for addressing the concerns that Native Americans have who maintain sovereignty over approximately 20% of our nation’s fresh water resources which are becoming more stressed each year. The overall objective of this new SKC Hydrology degree program is to produce students who are able to “give voice” to the perspectives of Native peoples on natural resources and particularly water-related issues, including water rights, agriculture, environmental health (related to water), beliefs and spirituality related to water, and sustainability of water resources. It will provide the opportunity for interdisciplinary study in physical, chemical, and biological water resources and their management. Students will gain theoretical, conceptual, computational, and practical knowledge/experiences in quantifying, monitoring, qualifying, and managing today’s water resource challenges with particular emphasis on Tribal lands. Completion of the Associate of Science Degree will provide the student with the necessary skills to work as a hydrology- water quality- or geo-technician within the Reservation area, the U. S. Forest Service, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Bureau of Reclamation, the United States Geological Society, and other earth science disciplines. The Bachelor’s Degree program provides students with a broad-based theoretical

  19. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, 1999 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, David B.; Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.

    2001-08-17

    This report consists of activities/events conducted in response to the Objectives and Tasks described in the 1999 contract Statement Of Work for the Planning and Planning and Design (P and D) and Maintenance (O and M) activities of the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH). The report follows the format of the contract for ease in finding accomplishments. Although specific emphasis will be placed on activities related directly to the NPTH, activities from other artificial production related projects might also be noted because of overlap in staff duties and production facilities. Additionally, the project leader's role has evolved as other Tribal fisheries projects have been developed and assigned to the Production Division, Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM), and Nez Perce Tribe (NPT). Thus, implementation of the project leader role for the NPTH actually entails specific duties of the Production Division Director and the Production Division Coordinator, as well as the Hatchery Division Coordinator.

  20. Accuracy of Weight Perception Among American Indian Tribal College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Heather D; Pacheco, Christina; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Daley, Christine; Greiner, K Allen; Choi, Won S

    2016-11-01

    National data indicate a higher prevalence of obesity among American Indian (AI) populations and greater disparity of morbidity and mortality among younger age groups compared with other ethnicities. Diet and physical activity are important obesity preventive behaviors, but no published data exist that describe these behaviors in relation to obesity in AI young adults at tribal colleges. Study purposes were to: (1) identify fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity practices of AI young adults from three U.S. tribal colleges according to BMI categories; (2) identify the accuracy of body weight perceptions; and (3) identify predictor variables for weight misperception. In this observational study during 2011-2014, a total of 1,256 participants were recruited from three participating U.S. tribal colleges to complete an online survey addressing issues related to diet, physical activity, and weight perception. Reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI categories, and differences between BMI categories were examined. Gender differences related to accuracy of weight perception by BMI categories were also examined. Analyses were conducted in 2016. Based on self-reported height and weight, 68% of the sample was overweight or obese (BMI ≥25) and mean BMI was 28.9 (SD=6.9). Most did not meet recommendations for fruit intake (78.7%), vegetable intake (96.6%), or physical activity (65.6%). More than half (53.7%%) who were overweight/obese underestimated their weight category. Men more often underestimated their weight category (54.2%) than women (35.1%). Interventions are needed to improve weight-related lifestyle behaviors of AI tribal college students. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An Overview and Funding History of Select Department of Justice (DOJ) Grant Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    ...), and the Office of Violence Against Women, provide grant funds to state, local, and tribal governments for crime prevention and intervention programs as well as funding for criminal justice system improvement programs...

  2. NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF PRESCHOOL TRIBAL CHILDREN IN NORTH KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu V

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Tribals are one of the most vulnerable groups in India. Under-nutrition and various morbidities go hand in hand, particularly in children. Nutritional status is a sensitive indicator of community health and nutrition. The present study is an attempt to assess the nutritional status of pre-school children of Kozhikode district in Kerala. The objectives of this study were 1. To study the prevalence of malnutrition among the preschool tribal children 2. To study the associated risk factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was a community-based, cross- sectional. Study was carried out in randomly selected 10 panchayaths in Kozhikode. Cluster sampling method was used. Anthropometric measurements were taken. Various indices of nutritional status were expressed in standard deviation units (z scores from the reference median. RESULTS More than half of the children say 57.6% (152/246 had deficits in at least one of the two anthropometric indicators. The prevalence of underweight and stunting was 47.3% and .38.6% respectively. The analysis showed significant associations between under-nutrition and educational status of mother, tribe to which the child belonged, large family size, high birth order and low preschool attendance. CONCLUSION The findings of the present study revealed the widespread prevalence of under-nutrition among pre-school tribal children and highlight a need for an integrated approach towards improving the child health as well as nutritional status in this area.

  3. Against Schooling: Viewpoints of Tribal Students of Kanavu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teena AUGUSTINE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Achieving what we believe to be the true purpose of education is a challenge in any society, particularly so in a society as diverse as contemporary India. Most attempts in this field are focussed on improving the access of children to education, but substantive questions such as: What is a school to a child? Does he/she enjoy learning? are seldom addressed prior to drafting any curriculum or policy. Even where they are, the exploration tends to be qualitatively poor and devoid of stake holders views. Alternative educational organisations might offer a perspective on the crisis education seems to be in today, with children lacking lifeskills, governments grappling with retention, disparities across gender and caste and declining standards of education. Kanavu is an educational organisation managed by tribal youth in Cheengode village of Wayanad, a hilly district in the southern state of Kerala, India. These are children who dropped out of mainstream schooling. In the light of efforts to mainstream tribal students into government schools and to control escalating dropout rates, this paper tries to understand the perspectives of the tribal students of Kanavu on schooling and their reasons for resisting mainstream schooling. This paper is a result of a 4 day visit and extensive correspondence the authors have had with this alternative learning organisation.

  4. Common state mechanisms regulating tribal tobacco taxation and sales, the USA, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Hillary; Chriqui, Jamie; Leider, Julien; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2016-10-01

    Native American tribes, as sovereign nations, are exempt from state tobacco excise taxation, and self-govern on-reservation activity in the USA. Under Federal law, state excise taxes are owed by non-members purchasing tobacco on tribal land, but states are limited in how they enforce or collect these taxes. This study highlights the various policy approaches that states have taken to regulate tobacco sales on tribal lands given jurisdictional challenges. State laws (statutes, regulations and case law), Attorney General opinions, and revenue notices and rulings effective as of 1 January 2015 for all 50 states and the District of Columbia were compiled using Boolean searches in Lexis-Nexis and Westlaw. Laws were limited to those addressing taxation compacts or tobacco sales involving tribal entities. Master Settlement Agreement laws and non-codified tribal codes/compacts were excluded. Twenty of the 34 states with tribal lands address tribal tobacco sales. Fourteen states address intergovernmental compacts: 11 are tobacco specific, and suggest or require specific provisions. Fifteen states address tribal tax stamps: 2 explicitly prohibit stamping tribally sold products, 9 stamp all products, and 4 stamp some. Prepayment of excise tax is required in 12 states: 6 on all products, 4 on products in excess of quota, and 2 on products sold by non-tribal retailers. 6 states use quotas to limit tax-free tobacco available to tribes. Many states with a tribal presence have no formal strategies for non-members purchasing tobacco on tribal lands. Formalising policies and harmonising tax rates may assist states in collecting tax revenue from non-tribal consumers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Tribal Militias: An Effective Tool to Counter Al-Qaida and Its Affiliates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    tribes,” which is reflected in the composition of the military, police, bu- reaucracy, and funding for specific tribal regions. Iraqi tribal society is...Sahwa. As part of a new carrot -and-stick policy, Al-Qaida continued to attack Sahwa commanders, while it re- duced its direct economic competition with...Cigar Editor for Production Dr. James G. Pierce Publications Assistant Ms. Rita A. Rummel ***** Composition Mrs. Jennifer E. Nevil TRIBAL MILITIAS: AN

  6. Native American Training Program in Petroleum Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Winifred M.; Kokesh, Judith H.

    1999-04-27

    This report outlines a comprehensive training program for members of Native American tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The program has two components: short courses and internships. Programs are proposed for: (1) adult tribes representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings, setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry; (2) graduate and undergraduate college students who are tribal members and are studying in the appropriate fields; and (3) high school and middle school teachers, science teachers. Materials and program models already have been developed for some components of the projects. The plan is a coordinated, comprehensive effort to use existing resources to accomplish its goals. Partnerships will be established with the tribes, the BIA, tribal organizations, other government agencies, and the private sector to implement the program.

  7. 40 CFR 147.751 - EPA-administered program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, and 148 and the additional... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Indiana § 147.751 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program for all classes of wells on Indian lands, and for Class I...

  8. Responding to Public Health Emergencies on Tribal Lands: Jurisdictional Challenges and Practical Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Justin B

    2015-01-01

    Response to public health emergencies on tribal lands poses a unique challenge for state and tribal public health officials. The complexity and intensely situation-specific nature of federal Indian jurisprudence leaves considerable question as to which government entity, state or tribal, has jurisdiction on tribal lands to undertake basic emergency measures such as closure of public spaces, quarantine, compulsory medical examination, and investigation. That jurisdictional uncertainty, coupled with cultural differences and an often troubled history of tribal-state relations, threatens to significantly impede response to infectious disease outbreaks or other public health emergencies on tribal lands. Given that tribal communities may be disproportionately impacted by public health emergencies, it is critical that tribal, state, and local governments engage with each other in coordinated planning for public health threats. This Article is offered as a catalyst for such planning efforts. The Article identifies some of the most pressing jurisdictional issues that may confront governments responding to a public health emergency on tribal lands, with the aim of highlighting the nature of the problem and the need for action. The Article goes on to examine the most promising means of addressing jurisdictional uncertainty: intergovernmental agreements. Already utilized in many areas of shared interest between tribe and state, intergovernmental agreements offer neighboring state, local, and tribal governments a vehicle for delineating roles and authorities in an emergency, and may lay the groundwork for sharing resources. The Article surveys various representative tribal public health intergovernmental agreements, and concludes with suggestions for tribes and state or local governments looking to craft their own agreements.

  9. Tribal Colleges and Universities/American Indian Research and Education Initiatives Advanced Manufacturing Technical Assistance Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atcitty, Stanley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The overall goal of this project is to establish a network of TCUs with essential advanced manufacturing (AM) facilities, associated training and education programs, and private sector and federal agency partnerships to both prepare an American Indian AM workforce and create economic and employment opportunities within Tribal communities through design, manufacturing, and marketing of high quality products. Some examples of high quality products involve next generation grid components such as mechanical energy storage, cabling for distribution of energy, and electrochemical energy storage enclosures. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is tasked to provide technical advising, planning, and academic program development support for the TCU/American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC) Advanced Manufacturing Project. The TCUs include Bay Mills Community College (BMCC), Cankdeska Cikana Community College (CCCC), Navajo Technical University (NTU), Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), and Salish Kooteani College. AIHEC and Sandia, with collaboration from SIPI, will be establishing an 8-week summer institute on the SIPI campus during the summer of 2017. Up to 20 students from TCUs are anticipated to take part in the summer program. The goal of the program is to bring AM science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) awareness and opportunities for the American Indian students. Prior to the summer institute, Sandia will be providing reviews on curriculum plans at the each of the TCUs to ensure the content is consistent with current AM design and engineering practice. In addition, Sandia will provide technical assistance to each of the TCUs in regards to their current AM activities.

  10. 75 FR 62839 - Award of a Single-Source Expansion Supplement to the Tribal Law and Policy Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... based strategies and resources that strengthen Tribal child and family services. The Fostering... between for Tribal leaders, child welfare and court staff in the licensing and maintaining of title I-VE...

  11. 77 FR 31592 - Applications for New Awards; State-Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) Pilot Grant Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... Applications for New Awards; State-Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) Pilot Grant Competition AGENCY: Office... State-Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) Pilot Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal... Application Package: You can obtain an application package via the Internet or from the Education Publications...

  12. Oaths of Office in Tribal Constitutions: Swearing Allegiance, but to Whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, David E.; Lightfoot, Sheryl

    2008-01-01

    No comprehensive analysis of tribal constitutions has ever been conducted, so this project aims to begin filling this significant gap in American, constitutional, and comparative politics research. In this study, the authors examine only one small but significant element of Native constitutions: oaths of office for incoming tribal government…

  13. Product recovery from tree grade 1 northern red oak on Menominee tribal lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    John P. Dwyer; Daniel C. Dey

    2007-01-01

    Since 1854 the Menominee Tribal people have practiced some level of forest management on their lands. In April of 2000, Menominee Tribal Enterprises (MTE) forestry staff along with federal, state, and university researchers began a comprehensive study of value in northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.). One of the objectives of this study was to relate...

  14. 77 FR 46106 - Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on Federal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-18891] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Listening Sessions...: Indian Affairs will conduct listening sessions with Indian tribes to obtain oral and written comments... tribal listening sessions. We will consider all comments received [[Page 46107

  15. Individual tenure rights, citizenship, and conflicts: Outcomes from tribal India's forest governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bose, P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how the new Scheduled Tribes and Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act 2006 shapes tribal households' claims to forest land rights in tribal India. It analyses the micro-dynamics of the Forest Rights Act using three dimensions: individual tenure

  16. UH conservation agriculture project working to help tribal communities in India and Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    University of Hawaii at Manoa; Water Resources Research Center

    2011-01-01

    This bulletin features a two-page summary of SANREM CRSP’s Sustainable Management of Agro-ecological Resources for Tribal Societies (SMARTS) project for India and Nepal. It includes a map of India and photos from their work in Kendujhar. It was distributed freely on UH Manoa campus and among project participants. LTRA-11 (CAPS among tribal societies in India and Nepal)

  17. Beyond Legitimation: A Tribal Response to Maori Education in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Huia Tomlins

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an intervention strategy, initiated under the New Zealand Government's tribal partnership scheme, which promotes a culture-based/place-based approach to education in mainstream schools and early childhood centres in one tribal region. Through place-based education children are immersed in local heritage, including language…

  18. Parents' Attitude toward Daughters' Education in Tribal Area of Dera Ghazi Khan (Pakistan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzdar, Muhammad Ayub; Ali, Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    The paper aimed to investigate the parents' attitudes toward their daughters' education in tribal areas of district Dera Ghazi Khan (Pakistan). To achieve the objectives four research questions were established. Focus of the questions was to examine the significance of girls' education for tribal parents. Existing and expected role of tribal…

  19. Broadening the Meaning of Citizenship Education: Native Americans and Tribal Nationhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes Writer, Jeanette

    2010-01-01

    The reality of tribal nationhood and the dual citizenship that Native Americans carry in their tribal nations and the United States significantly expands the definition and parameters of citizen education. Citizenship education means including and understanding the historical and political contexts of all U.S. citizens--especially, those…

  20. 78 FR 27341 - Restrictions on Legal Assistance With Respect to Criminal Proceedings in Tribal Courts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... sufficient legal training to preside over criminal proceedings; affording the defendant the right to... 45 CFR Part 1614 Restrictions on Legal Assistance With Respect to Criminal Proceedings in Tribal... represent eligible persons in any and all criminal proceedings in tribal courts. Previously, the LSC Act and...

  1. 77 FR 28616 - Tribal Consultation Sessions-Department of the Interior Information Technology Infrastructure...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... Office of the Secretary Tribal Consultation Sessions--Department of the Interior Information Technology... obtain tribal input on the 2012 Information Technology ] transformation realignment proposal as well as on how Information Technology transformation should be implemented in the coming years. DATES: See...

  2. 77 FR 43106 - Tribal Consultation Sessions-Department of the Interior Information Technology Infrastructure...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Office of the Secretary Tribal Consultation Sessions--Department of the Interior Information Technology... sessions. The purpose of the sessions is to obtain tribal input on the 2012 Information Technology transformation realignment proposal as well as on how Information Technology transformation should be implemented...

  3. Tribal College Transfer Student Success at Four-Year Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makomenaw, Matthew Van Alstine

    2010-01-01

    Tribal colleges, which are often community colleges, have been successful in helping American Indian students achieve academic success. The current study was designed to understand what happens to American Indian tribal college students when they transfer to four-year Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs). The research question that guides the…

  4. Adoption of Indigenous Dairy Management Practices among Tribal Farm Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chigasil M. Sangma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted among the tribal farm women of West Garo Hills District of Meghalaya, India with the objective to determine the extent of adoption of indigenous dairy management practices. Proportionate random sampling was used in selection of 120 respondents. Practices having rationality for adoption of indigenous dairy management practices were collected and the data were analyzed using percentage analysis. The findings revealed that majority of the respondents adopted care and management of dry and pregnant cows. This was followed by adoption of other practices viz.., selection of breed and feeding, care during and after calving and milking technique

  5. 25 CFR 900.96 - How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about BIA and IHS excess property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about... Property § 900.96 How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about BIA and IHS excess property? The Secretary shall not less than annually send to Indian tribes and tribal organizations a listing of...

  6. 25 CFR 900.103 - How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about property that has been designated as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can Indian tribes or tribal organizations learn about... or tribal organizations learn about property that has been designated as excess or surplus government property? The Secretary shall furnish, not less than annually, to Indian tribes or tribal organizations...

  7. 25 CFR 36.111 - Can a tribe, tribal governing body, or local school board waive the homeliving standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a tribe, tribal governing body, or local school board... tribe, tribal governing body, or local school board waive the homeliving standards? A tribal governing body or local school board may waive some or all of the standards established by this part if the body...

  8. 25 CFR 30.111 - When should the tribal governing body or school board request technical assistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When should the tribal governing body or school board... When should the tribal governing body or school board request technical assistance? In order to maximize the time the tribal governing body or school board has to develop an alternative definition of AYP...

  9. 25 CFR 30.106 - How does a tribal governing body or school board propose an alternative definition of AYP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a tribal governing body or school board propose... Definition of Ayp § 30.106 How does a tribal governing body or school board propose an alternative definition of AYP? If a tribal governing body or school board decides that the definition of AYP in § 30.104 is...

  10. 25 CFR 30.105 - May a tribal governing body or school board use another definition of AYP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a tribal governing body or school board use another... May a tribal governing body or school board use another definition of AYP? Yes. A tribal governing body or school board may waive all or part of the Secretary's definition of academic content and...

  11. 25 CFR 166.504 - Are there any other administrative or tribal fees, taxes, or assessments that must be paid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER GRAZING PERMITS Administrative and Tribal Fees § 166.504 Are there any other administrative or tribal fees, taxes, or assessments that must be paid? Yes. The permittee... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are there any other administrative or tribal fees, taxes...

  12. 25 CFR 900.43 - What are the general financial management system standards that apply to a tribal organization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management Systems Standards for Financial... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the general financial management system standards that apply to a tribal organization carrying out a self-determination contract? 900.43 Section 900...

  13. 25 CFR 900.40 - When are Indian tribe or tribal organization management standards and management systems evaluated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When are Indian tribe or tribal organization management... Organization Management Systems General § 900.40 When are Indian tribe or tribal organization management... Indian tribe or tribal organization submits an initial contract proposal. (b) Management systems are...

  14. Tribal linkage and race data quality for American Indians in a state cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer C; Soliman, Amr S; Tadgerson, Dan; Copeland, Glenn E; Seefeld, David A; Pingatore, Noel L; Haverkate, Rick; Banerjee, Mousumi; Roubidoux, Marilyn A

    2009-06-01

    Racial misclassification of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) individuals as non-AI/AN in cancer registries presents problems for cancer surveillance, research, and public health practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of tribal linkages in enhancing the quality of racial information in state cancer registries. Registry Plus Link Plus 2.0 probabilistic record linkage software was used to link the Michigan state cancer registry data (1985-2004; 1,031,168 cancer cases) to the tribal membership roster (40,340 individuals) in July of 2007. A data set was created containing AI/AN cancer cases identified by the state registry, Indian Health Service (IHS) linkages, and tribal linkage. The differences between these three groups of individuals were compared by distribution of demographic, diagnostic, and county-level characteristics using multilevel analysis (conducted in 2007-2008). From 1995 to 2004, the tribal enrollment file showed linkages to 670 cancer cases (583 individuals) and the tribal linkage led to the identification of 190 AI/AN cancer cases (168 individuals) that were classified as non-AI/AN in the registry. More than 80% of tribal members were reported as non-AI/AN to the registry. Individuals identified by IHS or tribal linkages were different from those reported to be AI/AN in terms of stage at diagnosis, tumor confirmation, and characteristics of the county of diagnosis, including contract health services availability, tribal health services availability, and proportion of AI/AN residents. The data linkage between tribal and state cancer registry data sets improved racial classification validity of AI/AN Michigan cancer cases. Assessing tribal linkages is a simple, noninvasive way to improve the accuracy of state cancer data for AI/AN populations and to generate tribe-specific cancer information.

  15. Cosmetic ethnobotany practiced by tribal women of Kashmir Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamayun Shaheen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Himalayan mountain populations have been dependent upon indigenous plant resources for their health care for many years. Tribal women are interested in use of local herbs for cosmetic purposes. The present work is based on the results of research conducted on cosmetic uses of some important plants by the tribal women in District Poonch, Azad Kashmir Pakistan. Materials and Methods: An ethno botanical survey was carried out during summer 2012. The data were collected from 310 female informants from 16 villages using questionnaire method and semi structured interviews. Results: A total of 39 plants species belonging to 20 families, being used for various cosmetic purposes were recorded. Indigenous species are traditionally used by the locals for problems including acne (16%, hair growth (11%, bad breath (12%, facial spots (9%, allergy, (9%, fairness (8%, wrinkles (8%, eye and lip care (9%. Seventy different recipes were recorded to be practiced by locals using herbal parts. The major plant parts utilized in herbal recipes included fruit (32.8%, Leaves (25.2%, seeds (13.4% and roots (8.9%. Women of older (>30 years age group showed greater (67% response regarding knowledge and practice of cosmetic herbs. Conclusion: This study was the 1st ever project focusing on cosmetic perspectives of ethno-botany in the area. Our study contributes to an improved understanding of ignored aspect of cosmetic ethnobotany among the local women. Further detailed investigations are recommended to record and preserve precious ethno-botanical knowledge of the area.

  16. 25 CFR 87.9 - Programming aspects of plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Programming aspects of plans. 87.9 Section 87.9 Indians... JUDGMENT FUNDS § 87.9 Programming aspects of plans. In assessing any tribal programming proposal the... such reservation residents; the nature of recent programming affecting the subject tribe or group and...

  17. 40 CFR 147.101 - EPA-administered program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Alaska § 147.101 EPA-administered program. (a) Contents. The UIC program in the State of Alaska for Class I, III, IV, and V wells...

  18. The Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy Initiative: Findings From a Collaborative, Participatory Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sheryl; D'Silva, Joanne; Hernandez, Carol; Villaluz, Nicole Toves; Martinez, Jaime; Matter, Chris

    2017-07-01

    While the reduction in the overall U.S. smoking prevalence has been declared one of the top 10 public health achievements of the past century, the growing disparity in smoking between American Indians and the general population is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. Minnesota in particular has very high smoking rates among American Indians (59%). Tribal Nations in Minnesota share a past of attempted cultural genocide and a present of restoring the strength of their cultural teachings, including the prominence of traditional tobacco as a sacred "first medicine." The Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy initiative works to address this complex and challenging context. This article describes results of a participatory evaluation from 2010 to 2013 in four Minnesota Tribal Nations-three Ojibwe and one Dakota. Tribal Tobacco Education and Policy coordinators used their cultural knowledge to develop community-level strategies, identifying appropriate strategies from best practices on tobacco advocacy, while drawing on the strengths of their own sovereignty and sacred tobacco traditions. Tribal coordinators generated support for policy change by conducting culturally relevant education, engaging tribal members, and nurturing relationships. This approach resulted in norm changes, practices toward restoring traditional tobacco, informal policies, and tribal resolutions to advance smoke-free policies.

  19. Excise tax differences at Oklahoma smoke shops: an opportunity for inter-tribal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Fritz L; Chaloupka, Frank J; Beebe, Laura A

    2015-01-01

    Oklahoma's tribal tobacco shops are distributed throughout the state, including in urban areas. During the time frame of this study, state excise tax rates for cigarettes varied by tribe and region, and took five distinct levels, ranging from 5.75 cents to $1.03 per pack. To describe the pricing behavior of these smoke shops in a way that could support potential increases in the tribal taxation of cigarettes within the state. Two waves (2010 and 2011) of site visits were conducted, covering nearly all tribal smoke shops in the northeastern quarter of the state, an area containing the city of Tulsa and 60% of all tribal outlets. Researchers recorded representative prices and verified the tax rate paid (via tax stamp) for each shop. Data were analyzed in 2013. Lower-taxed tribal cigarettes tended to be priced at discounts that were even greater than the differential in tax rates. For example, across waves, the average pack of Marlboros from a shop with a 5.75-cent tax stamp sold for 52 cents less than the same pack from a 25.75-cent shop and 60 cents less than from a 51.5-cent shop. The minimal inter-tribal price response to the discontinuation of large quantities of contraband cigarette sales suggests that inter-tribal price competition in the Tulsa area is not as intense as expected. Ample scope exists for either unilateral or coordinated cross-tribal tax and price increases that will increase tribal cigarette tax revenue collections and improve public health. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Storymakers: Hopa Mountain's Early Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Hopa Mountain's StoryMakers program is an innovative, research-based program for donating high quality young children's books to parents. Hopa Mountain is a nonprofit organization based in Bozeman, Montana. Hopa Mountain works with groups of rural and tribal citizen leaders who form StoryMakers Community Teams to talk one-on-one with local parents…

  1. Native American Indian child welfare system change: implementation of a culturally appropriate practice model across three tribal child welfare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannapieco, Maria; Iannone, Mary A

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there are 565 federally recognized tribes in the United States who are independent sovereign nations. These tribes have varying capacities to manage and administer child welfare programs. Most provide some type of child welfare service to the children and families within their tribal land. However, there are no national resources to document the number of children in foster care or the extent of abuse and neglect in the families served by tribal child welfare agencies. Information is only known about those Native American/Alaska Native families and children who are reported to state child protection agencies. Native American children represented 0.9% of all children in the United States in the late 1990s, but they comprised 3.1% of the substitute care population in state-run child welfare systems (Morrison, et al., 2010). Incident rates of child welfare referrals, substantiated referrals, and foster care placement among Native American children and families are relatively high compared to other ethnic groups (Earle & Cross, 2001) but precise interpretation of Native American status is difficult due to variations in child welfare reporting systems (Magruder & Shaw, 2008).

  2. Building Healthy Tribal Nations in Montana and Wyoming Through Collaborative Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Steve R.; Belcourt, Gordon M.; Langwell, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a collaborative approach to reducing health disparities affecting Montana and Wyoming tribal nations while promoting health-protective practices and interventions among these populations. Under the auspices of the Montana-Wyoming Tribal Leaders Council, a consortium has undertaken activities to (1) establish the research infrastructure necessary for conducting ongoing health disparities research, (2) develop a target research agenda that addresses tribally identified priority health issues and tests the feasibility of interventions, (3) develop increased research skills and cultural competency through mentoring activities, and (4) develop effective collaborative relationships. All research projects are user-defined and -authorized, and participation is voluntary. PMID:15855453

  3. Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1999 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluff, Stanley

    2000-12-01

    In October of 1997, The construction of the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was complete. No spawning activity was recorded for the spring of 1998. On June 14, 1999 the first spawn at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was successful. A total of seven nests were fertilized that produced approximately 144,000 fry. The second spawn occurred on July 13, 1999 and a total of six nests were fertilized producing approximately 98,0000 fry. The total amount of largemouth bass fry produced at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was 242,000.

  4. 76 FR 35221 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and..., concerning competitive cooperative agreement applications to establish Tribal Epidemiology Centers serving...

  5. EPA Tribal Science Webinar Series Kick-off: Research, Traditional Knowledge and Community Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    The webinar series will develop a forum for discussion of the complex environmental issues facing many tribal and indigenous communities, by featuring a wide variety of expert guest speakers, from government, academic institutions and other organizations

  6. Scientific Framework for a Comprehensive Assessment of Tribal Water Resources in Western Washington

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Konrad, Christopher P

    2005-01-01

    Judicious management of water resources and protection of Tribal water rights requires information about the quantity and quality of water available in western Washington, the quantity of water needed...

  7. OPP Guidance for Submission of State and Tribal Water Quality Monitoring Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guidance describes the process to submit state and tribal surface and groundwater monitoring data for consideration in exposure characterizations for ecological and and human health risk assessments and in risk management decisions for pesticides.

  8. Tribal corridor management planning : model, case study, and guide for Caltrans District 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    In Northern California, tribal governments and personnel of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 1, have applied innovative context-sensitive solutions to meet a variety of transportation challenges along state highways tha...

  9. Tribal corridor management planning : model, case study, and guide for Caltrans District I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    In Northern California, tribal governments and personnel of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 1, have applied innovative context-sensitive solutions to meet a variety of transportation challenges along state highways tha...

  10. Report: EPA Needs an Agency-Wide Plan to Provide Tribal Solid Waste Management Capacity Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #11-P-0171, March 21, 2011. EPA cannot determine whether its efforts are assisting tribal governments in developing the capacity to manage solid waste or reduce the risks of open dumps in Indian country.

  11. Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Shiprock Wastewater Treatment Facility; Draft NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is proposing to issue a NPDES permit (No. NN0020621) to Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA) for the Shiprock wastewater treatment facility in San Juan County, New Mexico, within the northeastern portion of the Navajo Nation.

  12. 77 FR 45815 - Indian Child Welfare Act; Designated Tribal Agents for Service of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ...) 543-7400; Fax: (907) 543-5759; Email: [email protected] Allakaket Village, Emily Bergman, Tribal...-2233; Email: Emily.bergman@tananachiefs.org Legal Department, Tanana Chiefs Conference, 122 First...

  13. 78 FR 35961 - Pilot Project for Tribal Jurisdiction Over Crimes of Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... held accountable for their criminal behavior.\\3\\ \\1\\ Public Law 113-4, 127 Stat. 54 (2013); see Remarks... with applicable Executive Orders and Presidential Memoranda on tribal consultation. Third, generally...

  14. Polythetic democracy: Tribal elections, bogus votes, and political imagination in the Naga uplands of Northeast India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wouters, Jelle J. P

    2015-01-01

      This article presents an ethnography of modern democracy by examining the particularistic substance and conceptions of "politics" and "the political" in the small, hilly, and tribal state of Nagaland...

  15. 78 FR 71645 - Pilot Project for Tribal Jurisdiction over Crimes of Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... tribal provisions of VAWA 2013 are gender-neutral; but in the interests of brevity, this final notice..., notwithstanding the issuance of any patent, and, including rights-of-way running through the reservation, (b) all...

  16. 77 FR 41204 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office, National Archives...

  17. 78 FR 75376 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTP-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... Policy Advisory Committee (SLTP-PAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). ACTION..., Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTP-PAC). The meeting will be held to...

  18. 76 FR 80971 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration, Information...

  19. 76 FR 41826 - State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office State, Local, Tribal, and Private Sector Policy Advisory Committee (SLTPS-PAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION...

  20. Geothermal access to federal and tribal lands: A progress report (Preprint)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhar, Barbara C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2002-09-01

    This paper traces the progress to date in resolving key barriers to geothermal energy use. It focuses primarily on two areas: improving geothermal access to federal lands and increasing understanding of the tribal aspects of geothermal energy use.

  1. No Security Without Us: Tribes and Tribalism in Al Anbar Province, Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    tribal organization is disappearing in the urban setting, modern tribes maintain elements of tribal culture and retain the ability to mobilize...Faleh Jabar, “Shaykhs and Ideologues: Destruction and Reconstruction of Tribes under Patrimonial Totalitarianism in Iraq, 1968-1998,” in Tribes and...and the Albu Issa Tribe” (2006). Published electronically Jun. 2006. www.comw.org/warreport/fulltext/0709todd.pdf. 14 Philip Carl Salzman, Culture

  2. Comparative Economic and Gender, Labor Analysis of Conservation Agriculture Practices in Tribal Villages in India

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Cynthia; Chan, Catherine; Halbrendt, Jacqueline; Shariq, Linsey; Roul, Pravat; Idol, Travis; Ray, Chittanrajan; Evensen, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Marginal land use and subsequent natural resource degradation is a common issue among tribal villages in the Kendujhar district of India. In this study, Conservation Agriculture (CA) technologies at an experimental site, specifically the practices of intercropping and minimum tillage, were compared to conventional tillage practices of three tribal villages (145 households total) in this district. The impacts of CA implementation on gender, labor, and economic (yield and profitability) factors...

  3. The management of potable water supply : the case of Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority / Magwaza, D.W.

    OpenAIRE

    Magwaza, Duduzile Witness

    2011-01-01

    This mini–dissertation addresses the management of the potable water supply in the Mkhwanazi Tribal Authority's area of jurisdiction. The main objectives of the study were to determine the organisational structures and public policies governing the potable water supply in the uMhlathuze Local Municipality with a view to establishing the factors that hinder the provision of potable water to some parts of the Mkhwanazi Tribal Area and also determine how the present potable water situation is pe...

  4. Governmentality and Social Capital in Tribal/Federal Relations Regarding Heritage Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-08

    discourse, in spite of overlapping goals. Using practice and agency theories and the concept of social capital (i.e., valued relations with others), we...overlapping goals. Using practice and agency theories and the concept of social capital (i.e., valued relations with others), we will develop a model...for improved tribal/federal heritage consultation; this will be accomplished by working collaboratively with tribal heritage specialists toward

  5. Penobscot Indian Nation's Strategic Energy Planning Efficiency on tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sockalexis, Mike; Fields, Brenda

    2006-11-30

    The energy grant provided the resources to evaluate the wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal and solar resource potential on all Penobscot Indian Naiton's Tribal lands. The two objectives address potential renewable energy resources available on tribal lands and energy efficiency measures to be taken after comprehensive energy audits of commercial facilities. Also, a Long Term Strategic Energy Plan was developed along with a plan to reduce high energy costs.

  6. 40 CFR 147.901 - EPA-administered program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... lands, is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Kentucky § 147.901 EPA...

  7. 40 CFR 147.601 - EPA-administered program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Hawaii § 147.601 EPA...

  8. 40 CFR 147.801 - EPA-administered program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Iowa § 147.801 EPA...

  9. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Tulsa, Oklahoma, Roundtable Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-04-14

    TULSA EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Tulsa, Oklahoma DOE Tribal Roundtable convened on April 14th, at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Policy and Programs and facilitated by Debra Drecksel, Senior Program Manager, Senior Facilitator, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute) and Brian Manwaring, Program Manager, U.S. Institute. They were assisted by Lindsey Sexton, Program Associate, U.S. Institute.  Tribal leaders and representatives from multiple tribal communities attended the roundtable. David Conrad, Director of Tribal and Intergovernmental Affairs, DOE Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs represented DOE at the meeting.  

  10. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF TRIBAL BEAN (Canavalia virosa) AND ITS ALTERNATIVE TOFU AND TEMPEH FOOD PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Titiek F. Djaafar; Nurdeana Cahyaningrum; Heni Purwaningsih

    2013-01-01

    Increasing price of soybean becomes a serious problem for producers of traditional foods such as tempeh and tofu. These traditional foods are important protein sources for many Indonesian people. Tribal bean (Canavalia virosa) could be used as a substitution of soybean for tempeh and tofu processing. This study aimed to determine physico-chemical characteristics of tribal bean and its products such as tofu and tempeh. Tribal bean old pods were peeled manually in the Postharvest and Agricultur...

  11. Physico-chemical Characteristics of Tribal Bean (Canavalia Virosa) and Its Alternative Tofu and Tempeh Food Products

    OpenAIRE

    Djaafar, Titiek F; Cahyaningrum, Nurdeana; Purwaningsih, Heni

    2010-01-01

    Increasing price of soybean becomes a serious problem for producers of traditional foods such as tempeh and tofu. These traditional foods are important protein sources for many Indonesian people. Tribal bean (Canavalia virosa) could be used as a substitution of soybean for tempeh and tofu processing. This study aimed to determine physico-chemical characteristics of tribal bean and its products such as tofu and tempeh. Tribal bean old pods were peeled manually in the Postharvest and Agricultur...

  12. Impediments Involved in the Integration of Federally Administrated Tribal Areas (FATA) in the National Mainstream of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-11

    and its integration issues with the national mainstream of Pakistan to the forefront. 12World Lingo , “Federally Administered Tribal Areas -1947-79...automatically in the FATA.23 21World Lingo , “Federally Administered Tribal Areas -1947-79,” http://www.worldlingo.com/ma/enwiki/en...accessed 29 July 2009). World Lingo . “Federally Administered Tribal Areas -1947-79.” http://www.worldlingo.com/ma/enwiki/en

  13. Neonatal morbidity and mortality in tribal and rural communities in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhimanyu Niswade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Little is known about the natural history of neonates born in the rural and tribal areas in India. The Neonatal Disease Surveillance Study (NDSS measures the incidence of high-priority neonatal diseases, neonatal health events and associated risk factors to plan appropriate and effective actions. Materials and Methods: The NDSS is being conducted in Ramtek Revenue Block, Nagpur district, Maharashtra state, given its considerably high level of neonatal mortality. All households from five selected primary health centers were screened. Both active and passive surveillance systems were used for systematic collection of mother′s health during pregnancy and of baby′s health from birth to 4 months after birth. First-year results from November 2006 to October 2007 are presented. Results: Pregnancy outcomes were available for 1,136 women, with an overall neonatal mortality of 73 per 1,000 live births. The pregnancy outcomes varied by gestational age of the baby; miscarriages and abortions were higher in tribal than in non-tribal women, and tribal women had higher rates of low-birth weight (LBW neonates than non-tribal women. The main cause of neonatal mortality was LBW, followed by sepsis and respiratory illness. The mortality of non-tribal babies was most strongly associated with pre term. For tribal babies, mortality was also associated with maternal morbidity and delay in the initiation of breastfeeding. Interpretation and Conclusions: The NDSS provides valuable information on the potentially modifiable factors associated with increased likelihood of neonatal mortality and morbidity. The Neonatal Health Research Initiative is now developing community-based interventions to reduce the high rate of neonatal mortality and morbidity in the rural areas of India.

  14. 25 CFR 36.99 - Are immunizations required for residential program students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are immunizations required for residential program... SITUATIONS Homeliving Programs Program Requirements § 36.99 Are immunizations required for residential program students? Each student must have all immunizations required by State, local, or tribal governments...

  15. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E - IRR Program Functions That Are Not Otherwise Contractible

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... State/tribal/Federal permits are obtained; 3. Performing quality assurance activities; 4. Conducting...-project-related management activities. I. BIADOT program management: 1. Developing budget on needs for the... Assistance Program, Recreational Travel and Tourism, Transit Program, ERFO Program, Presidential initiatives...

  16. Inclusion of AIDS educational messages in rites of passage ceremonies: reaching young people in tribal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, Nora; Mawar, Nita; Macnamara, Marina

    2006-01-01

    The impact of HIV on tribal populations has received little attention. Often living in remote areas, further isolated by language, tradition and endogamous marriage patters, members of such communities have been assumed to be at lower risk for HIV. However, there is growing awareness that tribal peoples are sometimes at considerable risk for HIV, as well as other sexually transmitted infections. Young people in such communities may be particularly vulnerable. Traditional practices may forbid discussion of sex at the same time as increasing exposure to outside influences bring new attitudes and expectations about sex and sexuality. Concerned about the implications of the HIV epidemic on tribal populations, a review was conducted of available data on the HIV epidemic within tribal groups. Based on findings from this review, we propose a largely unexplored avenue for reaching tribal populations: namely, the incorporation of the HIV and AIDS related messages into traditional coming of age ceremonies. Such an intervention however can be one component of a comprehensive approach to reaching these often hard-to-reach populations but it may be an especially effective way to reach young people within these communities.

  17. Analysis of the barriers to renewable energy development on tribal lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas Elisha

    Native American lands have significant renewable energy resource potential that could serve to ensure energy security and a low carbon energy future for the benefit of tribes as well as the United States. Economic and energy development needs in Native American communities match the energy potential. A disproportionate amount of Native American households have no access to electricity, which is correlated with high poverty and unemployment rates. Despite the vast resources and need for energy, the potential for renewable energy development has not fully materialized. This research explores this subject through three separate articles: 1) a case study of the Navajo Nation that suggests economic viability is not the only significant factor for low adoption of renewable energy on Navajo lands; 2) an expert elicitation of tribal renewable energy experts of what they view as barriers to renewable energy development on tribal lands; and 3) a reevaluation of Native Nation Building Theory to include external forces and the role that inter-tribal collaboration plays with renewable energy development by Native nations. Major findings from this research suggests that 1) many Native nations lack the technical and legal capacity to develop renewable energy; 2) inter-tribal collaboration can provide opportunities for sharing resources and building technical, legal, and political capacity; and 3) financing and funding remains a considerable barrier to renewable energy development on tribal lands.

  18. Tribal Science 2017 Webinar Series: Arctic Research, One Health and the Local Environmental Observer (LEO) Network: Ongoing Activities and Expansion to Lower 48

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA Sustainable and Healthy Communities Seminar Series presents the Tribal Science Webinar Series that will look to develop a forum for discussion of the complex environmental issues facing many tribal and indigenous communities.

  19. Entre foi et compromis tribal : 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dridi Moez

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available On comprend mieux l’adhésion d’Oman à l’islam, entre 628 et 633 si on l’étudie dans son contexte historique et  en relation avec les enjeux politiques et économiques de l’époque. Depuis le ive siècle de l’ère chrétienne, la côte orientale de la péninsule arabique se trouvait dans l’aire d’influence de l’empire sassanide, et la région d’Oman, Mâzun, était administrée par un gouverneur perse, marzubân, contrôlant un « roi » arabe local. Centré sur les ports de Dabâ et Suhar (Suhâr, cette entité politique bénéficiait des revenus du commerce international avec l’Asie occidentale. Les premiers contacts épistolaires du Prophète Muhammad avec les chefs de tribus et rois locaux furent suivis par une série d’accords de reconnaissance de sa tutelle spirituelle nominale, sans que l’on puisse encore parler d’ « islamisation ». C’est seulement à la mort du Prophète, que la révolte de la ridda (« apostasie » provoqua, avec une intervention militaire directe de l’État mecquois, le départ des Perses et l’entrée véritable d’Oman dans l’islam.Between Faith and Tribal Compromise: How the Region of Oman entered IslamThe adhesion of Oman to Islam between 628 and 633 is better understood when it is studied in its historical context along with its relation to the major political and economic events of the period. Starting from the 4th c. of the Christian era, the Eastern coast of the Arabic peninsula was under the influence of the Sassanid Empire, the region of Oman, Mâzun, being administrated by the Persian government, marzubân, which controlled a local Arab « king ». This political entity, centered on the ports of Dabâ and Suhar, was deriving benefit from the revenue from international trade with West Asia. The first epistolary contacts of the prophet Muhammad with the local tribal leaders and kings were followed by a series of agreements recognizing his nominal spiritual

  20. Ten questions concerning green buildings and indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinemann, Anne; Wargocki, Pawel; Rismanchi, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    as opportunities to improve IAQ within green buildings and their programs. Our focus is on IAQ, while recognizing that many factors influence human health and the healthfulness of a building. We begin with an overview of green buildings, IAQ, and whether and how green building certifications address IAQ. Next, we...... of organizations, and efforts to improve IAQ can improve health, well-being, productivity, and profitability....

  1. The Blue Pony Lacrosse Program: Embracing the Spirit of Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    An offshoot of a Denver, Colorado, alcohol and drug abuse prevention program, Blue Pony reclaims lacrosse as a Native American sport, and uses it to bridge tribal differences and promote cultural awareness, self-empowerment, and healthy lifestyles among urban Native American children. Discusses the game's history, a literacy program utilizing…

  2. 40 CFR 147.151 - EPA-administered program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Navajo Indian lands consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators, and... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Arizona § 147.151 EPA...

  3. A Special Issue of the Journal of Forestry—Tribal Forest Management: Innovations for Sustainable Forest Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael J. Dockry; Serra J. Hoagland

    2017-01-01

    Native American forests and tribal forest management practices have sustained indigenous communities, economies, and resources for millennia. These systems provide a wealth of knowledge and successful applications of long-term environmental stewardship and integrated, sustainable forest management. Tribal forestry has received an increasing amount of attention from...

  4. 25 CFR 44.110 - What Indian Self-Determination Act provisions apply to grants under the Tribally Controlled...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What Indian Self-Determination Act provisions apply to grants under the Tribally Controlled Schools Act? 44.110 Section 44.110 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... Self-Determination Act provisions apply to grants under the Tribally Controlled Schools Act? (a) The...

  5. 25 CFR 900.45 - What specific minimum requirements shall an Indian tribe or tribal organization's financial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Management Systems § 900.45 What specific minimum requirements shall an Indian tribe or tribal organization's... tribe or tribal organization. The system shall contain sufficient information to identify contract...-determination contract. (d) Budget controls. The financial management system shall permit the comparison of...

  6. 42 CFR 137.401 - What role does Tribal consultation play in the IHS annual budget request process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What role does Tribal consultation play in the IHS annual budget request process? 137.401 Section 137.401 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...-GOVERNANCE Secretarial Responsibilities Budget Request § 137.401 What role does Tribal consultation play in...

  7. 26 CFR 31.3402(r)-1 - Withholding on distributions of Indian gaming profits to tribal members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... profits to tribal members. 31.3402(r)-1 Section 31.3402(r)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(r)-1 Withholding on distributions of Indian gaming profits to tribal members. (a) (1) General rule. Section 3402(r...

  8. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... IV-D Systems and office automation? 310.5 Section 310.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... AUTOMATION Requirements for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.5 What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation? (a) Allowable computerized support...

  9. 77 FR 70461 - Jackson Rancheria-Tribal Council Ordinance No. 2012-01-Sale, Consumption & Possession of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... Tribe's economy, providing income to the Tribe and training and employment to its members. 6. The Tribal..., including all of its Tribal Business Enterprises. Severability, Amendment, and Sovereign Immunity 1. If any... sovereign immunity from unconsented suit or action. Effective Date This ordinance shall become effective...

  10. Malaria epidemiology in an area of stable transmission in tribal population of Jharkhand, India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Manoj K; Prajapati, Brijesh K; Tiendrebeogo, Régis W

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malaria remains an important health problem in India with approximately 1 million cases in 2014. Of these, 7% occurred in the Jharkhand state mainly in the tribal population. METHODS: This study was conducted in Dumargarhi, a tribal village about 42 km east of Ranchi city, Jharkhand...... or complete out of phase pattern of the vector density peaks together with a high prevalence of parasite positive individuals in the study population explains the year-round malaria transmission in the study region. CONCLUSIONS: The collection of clinical data from a well-characterized tribal cohort from...... Jharkhand, India, has provided evidence for naturally acquired immunity against malaria in this hyperendemic region. The study also suggests that enforcement of existing control programmes can reduce the malaria burden further....

  11. Understanding Malnutrition of Tribal Children in India: The Role of Women's Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Avijit; Bhattacharjee, Nairita

    2016-01-01

    Child malnutrition is considered to be the key risk factor for illness during adolescence and is responsible for about one-third of child deaths globally. Historically tribal communities have lagged behind the general population in terms of most socioeconomic aspects, and one such aspect is the nutritional status of children. The present study analyzes regional variations in child malnutrition and its association with women's empowerment in the tribal communities of India. The investigation is based on secondary data compiled from India's third National Family Health Survey (NFHS). Both bivariate and multivariate techniques were used to analyze data. We found a conditional inverse association between child malnutrition and women's empowerment in tribal communities. It is conditional in the sense that women's empowerment is effective when other factors supposed to influence nutritional status are proactive. Policy prescriptions are discussed.

  12. Pattern of Decision Making of Irula Tribal Farm Women in Nilgiris District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeetha Natarajan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to find out the pattern of decision making of the Irula  tribal farm women of Nilgiris district in farm and home. The study revealed that Irula tribal farm women took self decision in the case of irrigating fields (85.00 followed by using plant protection measures (83.33 in case of farm management and took self decision in cases like selection and preparation of food (100.00, decorating the house (70.00 They had least participation in decisions like construction of new house (63.33 followed by borrowing and giving loans (38.33.

  13. The Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey Program (CAPS): scientific support to optimize a national program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa D. Jackson; Daniel A. Fieselmann

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS) program is to provide a survey profile of exotic plant pests in the United States deemed to be of regulatory significance to USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ), State Departments of Agriculture, tribal governments, and cooperators by confirming the...

  14. The Penobscot River and environmental contaminants: Assessment of tribal exposure through sustenance lifeways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Valerie; Kusnierz, Daniel; Hillger, Robert; Ferrario, Joseph; Hughes, Thomas; Diliberto, Janet; Orazio, Carl E.; Dudley, Robert W.; Byrne, Christian; Sugatt, Richard; Warren, Sarah; DeMarini, David; Elskus, Adria; Stodola, Steve; Mierzykowski, Steve; Pugh, Katie; Culbertson, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    EPA in collaboration with the Penobscot Indian Nation, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USF&WS) collectively embarked on a four year research study to evaluate the environmental health of the riverine system by targeting specific cultural practices and using traditional science to conduct a preliminary contaminant screening of the flora and fauna of the Penobscot River ecosystem. This study was designed as a preliminary screening to determine if contaminant concentrations in fish, eel, snapping turtle, wood ducks, and plants in Regions of the Penobscot River relevant to where PIN tribal members hunt, fish and gather plants were high enough to be a health concern. This study was not designed to be a statistically validated assessment of contaminant differences among study sites or among species. The traditional methodology for health risk assessment used by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is based on the use of exposure assumptions (e.g. exposure duration, food ingestion rate, body weight, etc.) that represent the entire American population, either as a central tendency exposure (e.g. average, median) or as a reasonable maximum exposure (e.g. 95% upper confidence limit). Unfortunately, EPA lacked exposure information for assessing health risks for New England regional tribes sustaining a tribal subsistence way of life. As a riverine tribe, the Penobscot culture and traditions are inextricably tied to the Penobscot River watershed. It is through hunting, fishing, trapping, gathering and making baskets, pottery, moccasins, birch-bark canoes and other traditional practices that the Penobscot culture and people are sustained. The Penobscot River receives a variety of pollutant discharges leaving the Penobscot Indian Nation (PIN) questioning the ecological health and water quality of the river and how this may affect the practices that sustain their way of life

  15. Intake of nutrients and food sources of nutrients among the Khasi tribal women of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrahar-Murugkar, D; Pal, P P

    2004-03-01

    Dietary intake patterns and socioeconomic variables are well-known indicators for assessing the nutrition status of a society. The Khasi society is matrilineal, and women play an important role in the tribal community, especially with respect to family nutrition. We investigated the existing food habits, beliefs, and trends contributing to the nutrition and health of these women. Nutrient intakes and food sources were studied in 650 Khasi tribal women older than 18 y. Personal interviews using the questionnaire method, 24-h dietary recall method, and food-frequency method were used to elicit information. Respondents were allocated to a low-income group (LIG) or high-income group (HIG). Within these groups, subjects were further classified as non-pregnant and non-lactating (NPNL), pregnant (P), or lactating (L). The dietary pattern was based on rice and cereals (392.48 +/- 13.81 g/d), flesh foods (21.51 +/- 8.63 g/d), green leafy vegetables (110.37 +/- 3.32 g/d), fruits (20.3 +/- 2.10 g/d), and roots and tubers (54.43 +/- 2.92 g/d). Consumption of energy, protein, iron, and vitamin C were adequate except in L women in whom energy levels were significantly lower than the recommended daily allowance in the LIG (2187 +/- 111.12 g/d), protein levels in the LIG (60.85 +/- 4.48 g/d) and the HIG (66.96 +/- 2.99 g/d), iron levels in the LIG (13.64 +/- 1.63), and vitamin C levels in the LIG (66.55 +/- 6.55). Iron intake also was significantly lower in P women in the LIG (17.41 +/- 2.59 mg/d) and the HIG (23.23 +/- 7.47 mg/d). Consumption of pulses (18.49 +/- 7.41 g/d), dairy products (11.89 +/- 0.48 g/d), other vegetables (4.81 +/- 1.74 g/d), and fats and oils (10.52 +/- 4.71) were significantly below the recommended daily allowance, leading to low consumption of fat, calcium, and carotene in all physiologic states and income groups: calcium in all groups except HIG NPNL women (397.74 +/- 53.62 mg/d); carotene in LIG NPNL (1484.05 +/- 179.01 mg/d) and HIG NPNL (1641

  16. 40 CFR 147.951 - EPA-administered program-Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators, and EPA shall comply with these requirements... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Louisiana...

  17. 40 CFR 147.1053 - EPA-administered program-Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators, and EPA shall comply with these requirements... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Maryland...

  18. 40 CFR 147.553 - EPA-administered program-Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators, and EPA shall comply with these requirements... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Georgia...

  19. 40 CFR 147.1101 - EPA-administered program-Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators, and EPA shall comply with... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS...

  20. 40 CFR 147.703 - EPA-administered program-Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators, and EPA shall comply with these requirements... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Illinois...

  1. 40 CFR 147.860 - EPA-administered program-Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators, and EPA shall comply with these requirements... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Kansas...

  2. 42 CFR 137.274 - Does this subpart cover construction programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Program; (b) Construction program functions; and, (c) Planning services and construction management... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Does this subpart cover construction programs? 137... INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction...

  3. Developing Clean Energy Projects on Tribal Lands: Data and Resources for Tribes (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-12-01

    This is a outreach brochure (booklet) for the DOE Office of Indian Energy summarizing the renewable energy technology potential on tribal lands. The booklet features tech potential maps for various technologies, information about the activities of DOE-IE, and resources for Tribes.

  4. 77 FR 43818 - Applications for New Awards; State-Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) Pilot Grant Competition...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; State-Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) Pilot Grant Competition; Reopening the Fiscal Year 2012 Competition AGENCY: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department of...

  5. 76 FR 43701 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Tribal State Gaming Compact Process...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Tribal State Gaming Compact Process; Request for Comments AGENCIES: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... Indian Affairs (BIA) is seeking comments on renewal of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval for...

  6. Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nominelli, Gregg R.

    2012-12-17

    The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands. The Tribe's Comprehensive Strategic Plan seeks to diversify the Tribal Economy through the creation of alternative energy businesses, such as wind, solar and bio-mass facilities while protecting the waters of Lake Superior, tribal inland lakes and streams. In addition, the Community desired to utilize clean/green energy resources to promote the self-sufficiency of the Tribal Nation. The objective of the study is to preserve our environment and maintain our cultural goals of using the resources of the land wisely. To reduce our consumption of fossil fuels, mercury and carbon dioxide emissions, which harm our water and land; we have decided to evaluate the opportunities of utilizing wind power. Preliminary projections show that we may eliminate pollution from our land in a cost effective manner. This study will evaluate wind capacity and our current energy consumption while projecting the feasibility of converting to wind power for operations at our major facilities. This project will study the feasibility of wind power at two locations for the purpose of reducing the Tribe's reliance upon fossil fuels and creating business opportunities, jobs and revenue for the community.

  7. 77 FR 55860 - Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on Federal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Tribal Listening Sessions on Sacred Sites on Federal Lands AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Indian Affairs will conduct a listening session with... session in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is the sixth in a series of listening sessions held since the beginning of...

  8. 78 FR 75923 - Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... within the CDC Office of the Director (OD), other CDC Center, Institute, and Office (CIO) leadership... following public health issue topics identified by tribal leaders: Native specimens, behavioral risk factors... director and roundtable discussions with CDC senior leadership, and tribes will have an opportunity to...

  9. Conducting research with tribal communities: sovereignty, ethics, and data-sharing issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Anna; Harper, Barbara; Stone, Dave; O'Neill, Catherine; Berger, Patricia; Harris, Stuart; Donatuto, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    When conducting research with American Indian tribes, informed consent beyond conventional institutional review board (IRB) review is needed because of the potential for adverse consequences at a community or governmental level that are unrecognized by academic researchers. In this article, we review sovereignty, research ethics, and data-sharing considerations when doing community-based participatory health-related or natural-resource-related research with American Indian nations and present a model material and data-sharing agreement that meets tribal and university requirements. Only tribal nations themselves can identify potential adverse outcomes, and they can do this only if they understand the assumptions and methods of the proposed research. Tribes must be truly equal partners in study design, data collection, interpretation, and publication. Advances in protection of intellectual property rights (IPR) are also applicable to IRB reviews, as are principles of sovereignty and indigenous rights, all of which affect data ownership and control. Academic researchers engaged in tribal projects should become familiar with all three areas: sovereignty, ethics and informed consent, and IPR. We recommend developing an agreement with tribal partners that reflects both health-related IRB and natural-resource-related IPR considerations.

  10. It's Time to Talk: Tribal Colleges Tackle Culture of Silence about Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Compared to the general population, American Indians are experiencing an alarmingly increased rate of suicide, which some estimate at 50% higher than other ethnic groups. On the campuses of some tribal colleges, things look equally bleak, with 15% of students reporting that they seriously considered suicide over the past 12 months. While the…

  11. Tribal Formulations for Treatment of Pain: A Study of the Bede ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Bedes form one of the largest tribal or indigenous communities in Bangladesh and are popularly known as the boat people or water gypsies because of their preference for living in boats. They travel almost throughout the whole year by boats on the numerous waterways of Bangladesh and earn their livelihood by ...

  12. The Future is Green: Tribal College Saving Water, Electricity--and Money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Gelvin

    2005-01-01

    Tribal colleges and universities around the country are harnessing natural sources of energy on their campuses. Renewable energy and sustainable building design have many advantages--they save money and provide healthier learning and working environments while allowing people to live in greater harmony with the earth. This article discusses…

  13. Self-Determination in Health Research: An Alaska Native Example of Tribal Ownership and Research Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Y. Hiratsuka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Alaska Native (AN and American Indian (AI people are underrepresented in health research, yet many decline to participate in studies due to past researcher misconduct. Southcentral Foundation (SCF, an Alaska Native-owned and operated health care organization, is transforming the relationship between researchers and the tribal community by making trust and accountability required features of health research in AN/AI communities. In 1998, SCF assumed ownership from the federal government of health services for AN/AI people in south central Alaska and transformed the health system into a relationship-based model of care. This change reimagines how researchers interact with tribal communities and established community oversight of all health research conducted with AN/AI people in the region. We describe the SCF research review process, which requires tribal approval of the research concept, full proposal, and dissemination products, as well as local institutional review board approval, and a researcher-signed contract. This review evaluates research through the lens of tribal principles, practices, and priorities. The SCF example provides a framework for other tribes and organizations seeking to reshape the future of health research in AN/AI communities.

  14. 25 CFR 1200.3 - What is the Department's policy on tribal management of trust funds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... trust funds? 1200.3 Section 1200.3 Indians OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL TRUSTEE FOR AMERICAN INDIANS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AMERICAN INDIAN TRUST FUND MANAGEMENT REFORM ACT General Provisions § 1200.3 What is the Department's policy on tribal management of trust funds? (a) We will give tribes as much...

  15. Perception of the Effect of Leadership Styles on Organizational Commitment at Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathern, Amber M.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if a relationship exists between the perceived leadership style of supervisors and the organizational commitment level of the subordinate employees within Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs). Additionally, the study examined whether a difference exists in the organizational commitment levels of TCU…

  16. 249 The Effect of Inter-tribal Post Election Violence Conflict Trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    result of inter-ethnic conflicts on academic performance among secondary school students in Mt Elgon District, ... Are students who were affected by the inter-tribal conflict likely to seek assistance in counseling? ... traumatic events (PTEs) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) which indicated that female participants ...

  17. 77 FR 45370 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Gaming; Tribal Revenue Allocation Plans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Gaming; Tribal Revenue Allocation Plans; Gaming on Trust Lands AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of request...

  18. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance Annual Report, 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenema, David

    2003-03-01

    The Kalispel Tribal hatchery successfully spawned largemouth bass broodfish in spring 2002. Approximately 150,000 eggs were produced and hatched. These fry were started on brine shrimp for a period of ten days. At this time, the fry needed more abundance food supply. Cannibalism started and the hatchery staff transferred the remaining fry to the river in hopes that some fish would survive.

  19. Grants Management Training Materials for Tribal Organizations Learner Manual Module 2: Assistance Agreement Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    A large part of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s mission is to partner with American Indians and Native Alaskans to protect the environment and public health.The goals of this mission are accomplished by awarding federal funds to Tribal Nations.

  20. Taxation and Indian Sovereignty: A Look at the Matter of Taxation in a State Tribal Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Dolores, Ed.; Cordero, Andreita, Ed.

    Responding to a need expressed by New Mexico American Indian tribal leaders, this document defines and clarifies the status of reservations vis a vis the state's legal authority to impose tax. Divided into two major sections dealing with a current orientation to tax laws and the legal background upon which they are founded, this document also…

  1. Seeds of Mistrust: Tribal and Colonial Perspectives on Education in Chhotanagpur, 1834-circa 1850

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the project of tribal education in the British colonial state in the mid-nineteenth century and the shape into which it developed in Chhotanagpur, an obscure area of east India under the Presidency of Bengal. Known as the "Ruhr of India", it is now the southern part of the State of Jharkhand. Up to the 1840s there…

  2. Nursery manual for native plants: A guide for tribal nurseries - Volume 1: Nursery management

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Tara Luna; Thomas D. Landis

    2009-01-01

    In 2001, the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), through its Virtual Center for Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetics Resources (RNGR), invited Native Americans from across the United States to attend the Western Forest and Conservation Nursery Association annual meeting. About 25 tribal members, representing 20 tribes, attended the meeting at Fort...

  3. 45 CFR 286.75 - What must be included in the Tribal Family Assistance Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... eligibility criteria the Tribe has established, which includes a definition of “needy family,” including income and resource limits and the Tribe's definition of “Tribal member family” or “Indian family.” (2) A...

  4. Self-Determination in Health Research: An Alaska Native Example of Tribal Ownership and Research Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y; Beans, Julie A; Robinson, Renee F; Shaw, Jennifer L; Sylvester, Ileen; Dillard, Denise A

    2017-10-31

    Alaska Native (AN) and American Indian (AI) people are underrepresented in health research, yet many decline to participate in studies due to past researcher misconduct. Southcentral Foundation (SCF), an Alaska Native-owned and operated health care organization, is transforming the relationship between researchers and the tribal community by making trust and accountability required features of health research in AN/AI communities. In 1998, SCF assumed ownership from the federal government of health services for AN/AI people in south central Alaska and transformed the health system into a relationship-based model of care. This change reimagines how researchers interact with tribal communities and established community oversight of all health research conducted with AN/AI people in the region. We describe the SCF research review process, which requires tribal approval of the research concept, full proposal, and dissemination products, as well as local institutional review board approval, and a researcher-signed contract. This review evaluates research through the lens of tribal principles, practices, and priorities. The SCF example provides a framework for other tribes and organizations seeking to reshape the future of health research in AN/AI communities.

  5. 77 FR 39731 - Swinomish Indian Tribal Community-Title 15, Chapter 4: Liquor Legalization, Regulation and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... possession, sale and consumption of liquor within the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community's Indian country. This Code allows for the possession and sale of alcoholic beverages within the jurisdiction of the...-277, 67 Stat. 586, 18 U.S.C. 1161, as interpreted by the Supreme Court in Rice v. Rehner, 463 U.S. 713...

  6. Tribal formation on the Ethiopian fringe : toward a history of the 'Tishana'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, J.

    1990-01-01

    This article has two purposes: 1) to provide a first historical outline of the Tishana or Me'en, a small 'tribal' group living in southwestern Ethiopia, and 2) to illustrate the importance of a political economy approach for the explanation of such a process. Inspiration has been derived from the

  7. Creating a Learning Organization for State, Local, and Tribal Law Enforcement to Combat Violent Extremism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    1 B. PROBLEM STATEMENT .............................................................................5 C. RESEARCH...well as my mother, who has been my greatest lifelong proponent—both have provided me with my protective proclivities for every member of our great...part of entry-level or continuing education for state, local, or tribal (SLT) law enforcement personnel; however, currently, state and local law

  8. A Legacy of Sacrifice and Honor: Celebrating Tribal Resilience and Military Service at Haskell Nations University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Jacinta

    2017-01-01

    Haskell Indian Nations University opened 133 years ago, on September 17, 1884, as the U.S. Training and Industrial School--one of three original tribal boarding schools funded by the United States Congress. Three years later the school changed its name to Haskell Institute in honor of Chase Dudley Haskell, a U.S. representative from the Second…

  9. Nutritional and health status of adult women of the Lodha tribal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional and health status of adult women of the Lodha tribal population of Paschim Midnapore, West Bengal, India: Compared with nontribal women. ... The prevalence of anaemia among the Lodha women was very high (91.67%) and approximately five times higher than the women of general communities. Lodha ...

  10. 75 FR 34752 - Proposed Office of State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Proposed Office of State, Tribal, Local and... them. Consultation is an enhanced form of communication that emphasizes trust, respect, and shared... understanding and comprehension. CDC believes that consultation is integral to a deliberative process that...

  11. Prescription Pattern in the Department of Surgery in A Tribal District ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescription Pattern in the Department of Surgery in A Tribal District Hospital of Andhra Pradesh, India. A Khade, MSM Bashir, A Sheethal. Abstract. Background: Usually, surgical management cannot be completed without the use of antimicrobial and analgesic drugs. Irrational prescription may lead to severe postoperative ...

  12. Fighting Eviction : Tribal Land Rights and Research-in-Action | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Fighting Eviction : Tribal Land Rights and Research-in-Action. Couverture du livre Fighting Eviction. Auteur(s) : Daniel Buckles et Rajeev Khedkar. Directeur(s) : Bansi Ghevde et Dnyaneshwar Patil. Maison(s) d'édition : Cambridge University Press India. 3 octobre 2012. ISBN : 9789382264538. 258 pages. L'Inde compte ...

  13. Fighting Eviction: Tribal Land Rights and Research-in-Action | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    3 oct. 2012 ... It conveys the results of five years of IDRC-funded research on two compelling issues: the land and housing rights of tribal populations, and methods for engaging marginalized people in action research. “It illustrates what it means to do research with people rather than on people,” says co-author Daniel ...

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency among tribal populations of India - Country scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Malay B; Colah, Roshan B; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-05-01

    It is believed that the tribal people, who constitute 8.6 per cent of the total population (2011 census of India), are the original inhabitants of India. Glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked genetic defect, affecting around 400 million people worldwide and is characterized by considerable biochemical and molecular heterogeneity. Deficiency of this enzyme is highly polymorphic in those areas where malaria is/has been endemic. G6PD deficiency was reported from India more than 50 years ago. t0 he prevalence varies from 2.3 to 27.0 per cent with an overall prevalence of 7.7 per cent in different tribal groups. Since the tribal populations live in remote areas where malaria is/has been endemic, irrational use of antimalarial drugs could result in an increased number of cases with drug induced haemolysis. Therefore, before giving antimalarial therapy, routine screening for G6PD deficiency should be undertaken in those tribal communities where its prevalence is high.

  15. Working Together: Wellness and Academic Achievement at Tribal Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Bonnie; Magarati, Maya; Parker, Myra; Egashira, Leo; Kipp, Billie Jo

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the activities of the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute (IWRI) at the University of Washington, Washington State, in collaborating with tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) to examine alcohol, drug, and mental health issues among Native students. The authors provide first steps for the development of culturally…

  16. Negotiating Ojibwe Treaty Rights: Toward a Critical Geopolitics of State-Tribal Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvern, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    In this article the author provides a case study of how differing geographical imaginations are at the center of state-tribal relations in the United States. Specifically, he focuses on the political conflict between the state of Wisconsin and the Wisconsin Ojibwe over the continuing existence and exercise of Ojibwe off-reservation hunting,…

  17. 50 CFR 660.385 - Washington coastal tribal fisheries management measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Washington coastal tribal fisheries management measures. 660.385 Section 660.385 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST...

  18. Enhancing Tribal Energy Security and Clean Energy (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-07-01

    This fact provides information on the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE-IE) initiative to provide technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects in Indian Country.

  19. Prevalence of diabetes and hypertension among a tribal population in Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Radhakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes and hypertension is affecting at an alarming rate in both rural and urban populations in India and very few studies had been carried out among the tribal population. Objective: To determine the prevalence rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension and its associated risk factors among the tribal population in Salem District in Tamil Nadu. Materials and Methods: A total of about 525 tribal population above 40 years of age from various tribal places in Yercaud. All of them were screened for diabetes, by checking the random blood glucose levels and blood pressure, body mass index, dietary patterns, and physical activity levels were also recorded. Their knowledge about diabetes was also assessed by a set of 10 questions. Results: Among the study population, people who had RBS ΃ 200 was 28 (male = 11 and female = 17 and between 140 and 200 were 39 (male = 18 and female = 21 and people whose were in the prehypertensive stage was 185 (males 92 and female 93 and people in the stage 1 hypertension was 102 (male = 47 and female = 54 and in stage 2 hypertension was 64 (male = 33 and female = 29. The co-morbidity (diabetes and hypertension was present in among 45 (male = 25 and female = 20. Among the study population only 1 was obese and 39 were overweight. Among the various risk factors smoking, alcohol and positive family history were found to have a statistical significant association for males whereas among females only the family history was found to have a statistically significant association for both diabetes and hypertension. The knowledge of diabetes among the study population was very poor. None of them were aware about the normal levels of blood sugar and the risk factors. Conclusion: The study documented that the prevalence of diabetes and hypertension is increasingly high in the tribal areas and their awareness levels were very poor.

  20. Prevalence of anemia among tribal women of reproductive age in Udupi Taluk, Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra Kamath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Anaemia is a major public health problem in India. Many studies have emphasized on prevalence of anaemia among general population. This study has focussed to address the prevalence of anaemia among the tribal population in Udupi taluk. Anaemia among women in the reproductive age group is one of the causes for maternal morbidity and mortality in India. Aim: To estimate the prevalence of anemia among tribal women (aged 15 to 49 years. Settings and Design: A Community based cross sectional study was conducted among tribal women aged 14-49 years in Udupi taluk, Udupi district, Karnataka. Methods and Material: A cross sectional study during July 2012 to August 2012 was conducted. A sample size of 170 was calculated taking into consideration a relative error of 15% and the prevalence of anemia in Karnataka as 51% (as per the NFHS-3. Statistical analysis used: Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to analyse the data using SPSS 15. Results: The study sample had a mean hemoglobin value of 11.3 g/dL with 95% CI of (11 - 11.6, with a standard deviation of 2g/dL. The study reveals that in the sample of tribal women in the age group of 15-49 years, the prevalence of anemia was 55.9%. Among the subjects, 6 (3.5% were severely anemic, 33 (19.4% were moderately anemic and 56 (32.9% were mildly anemic. Conclusions: This study calls for an appropriate action and intervention in this tribal population to treat and prevent anaemia.

  1. Emergence of dengue in tribal villages of Mandla district, Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, P V; Shukla, M K; Kori, B K; Chand, G; Jain, L; Varun, B M; Dutta, D; Baruah, K; Singh, Neeru

    2015-05-01

    Dengue (DEN) is a rapidly spreading arboviral disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Although it is endemic in India, dengue virus (DENV) infection has not been reported from tribal areas of Madhya Pradesh. Investigations were conducted to establish the aetiology of sudden upsurge of cases with febrile illness in June 2013 from tribal villages of Mandla district of Madhya Pradesh, India. The rapid response team of the National Institute for Research in Tribal Health, Jabalpur, conducted clinical investigations and field surveys to collect the samples from suspected cases. Samples were tested using molecular and serological tools. Collected mosquitoes were identified and tested for the presence of virus using semi nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (nRT-PCR). The sequences were analysed to identify serotype and genotype of the virus. Of the 648 samples collected from 18 villages of Mandla, 321 (49.53%) were found to be positive for dengue. The nRT-PCR and sequencing confirmed the aetiology as dengue virus type 2. Eighteen per cent of patients needed hospitalization and five deaths were attributed to dengue. The virus was also detected from Aedes aegypti mosquito, which was incriminated as a vector. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the dengue virus 2 detected belonged to cosmopolitan genotype of the virus. Dengue virus serotype 2 was detected as the aetiological agent in the outbreak in tribal villages of Mandla district of Madhya Pradesh. Conducive man-made environment favouring mosquitogenic conditions and seeding of virus could be the probable reasons for this outbreak. Urgent attention is needed to control this new threat to tribal population, which is already overburdened with other vector borne diseases.

  2. Tribal Grants under Section 106 of the Clean Water Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA provides technical assistance and funding under the Clean Water Act Section 106 program to assist tribes and intertribal consortia to understand, assess, and preserve water resources on their lands.

  3. Feasibility Study for Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Hendrix, Project Director; Charles Weir, Project Manager; Dr. John Plodinec, Technology Advisor; Dr. Steve Murray, Economic Advisor

    2005-07-21

    Project Objective: The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) conducted a study of the feasibility of siting a renewable energy biomass-based installation on tribal lands. The purpose of the study was to determine whether such an installation can be economically sustainable, as well as consistent with the cultural, social, and economic goals of the Tribe. Scope: To achieve the goal of the feasibility study, the following tasks were carried out: (1) Resource availability assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the availability of both poultry litter and wood residues for use in the proposed facility. (2) Power utilization assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the potential market size for power produced, the existing infrastructure for delivering power to that market, and the costs and economic returns for doing so. (3) Technology review--The objective of this review was to identify one, or more, technical options for detailed economic and technical assessment. The study considered a range of feedstock and product mixtures of poultry litter; wood residues as feedstock; and electrical power and other ancillary products as outputs. Distributed power sources was also examined. Technologies ranging from gasification to systems that produce both power and value-added chemicals were considered. Technologies selected for detailed review were those that can be sized to process the amount of available feed (poultry litter, or poultry litter and wood residues), and that also appear to make economic sense in terms of the value of their inputs. The technology review leaned heavily on the experience from similar prior DOE projects, particularly those conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). NREL was involved in a consultative role, so that the project team could leverage their experience. (4) Systems Design(s)--Based on the technology review, a pre-conceptual design for an installation was developed. This

  4. Grants Management Training Materials for Tribal Organizations: Introduction to Tribal Administrative and Financial Guidance for Assistance Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA training can help grant recipients manage assistance agreement awards. Learn about grant requirements and EPA expectations. Learn how to manage an entire program, manage a specific piece of the project, or refresh understanding of specific tasks.

  5. Inter organization water conflicts and their resolution in Som Kadgar tribal dominated irrigation project of Rajasthan - India

    OpenAIRE

    Solanki, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    Irrigation being a crucial factor for enhancing agricultural productivity, it must be treated carefully when the irrigation project suffered socio economic constraints. In Indian context, the irrigation officials are facing a several host socio-economic problems. The problems can be well managed by irrigation management transfer. A similar case study was undertaken in tribal dominated irrigation project where 77.14 per cent farmers were fall into the category of the tribals. The farmers of th...

  6. Gender disparity in Socio-Demographic variables among the Tribals of Eastern India: a case study of the Santals

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Amrita; Murry, Benrithung

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives a glimpse of the possible gender disparities that can be intimidated through various socio-demographic variables that exist among the tribals of eastern India by gaining insights from the Santals of Jharkhand, India. Data was collected from 1000 ever married women of the Santals, the largest tribal group of eastern India. The data analysis was based on data collected directly from the field using interview schedule and conclusions are based on qualitative analysis. Gender dis...

  7. 40 CFR 147.451 - EPA-administered program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators, and EPA shall comply with these requirements. (b... (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS District of Columbia...

  8. American Indian Adoption Program: An Ethnic Approach to Child Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodluck, Charlotte Tsoi; Eckstein, Florence

    1978-01-01

    Sponsored by the Jewish Family and Children's Service of Phoenix, Arizona, the program places American Indian adoptees with their natural extended families or with families of the same tribe. Personal contacts, publicity, and national child welfare organizations help locate homes. Ensuring the child's tribal inheritance rights is yet to be…

  9. Tribal Proclivity and its Effects on the Cooperate Existence of Nigeria in the Centenary Era: An Islamic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    USMAN JIMOH MUHAMMAD

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper consists of seven sub-sections namely, the introduction, a flash on the prevalence of tribal proclivity in Nigeria, causes of tribal proclivity among Nigerians and its effects. Other aspect of the paper includes the Islamic perspective on tribal proclivity in Nigeria, recommendations and conclusion. The introduction briefly appraises the historical composition of Nigeria in the early nineteen century and its amalgamation in the year 1914. Reference is being made in the paper to cases of tribal proclivity in Nigeria while the causes of tribal penchant include unemployment, selfishness of some politicians, lack of patience and endurance by citizens in their relationship among themselves. Tribal proclivity the paper affirms results into insecurity of lives and properties, portrays evidence of lack of unity and bad governance. The paper examines some relevant verses and prophetic traditions in a bid to redress the situation and recommends that the government and the well to problem of unemployment in the nation. In addition, religious do people in the society should join hands together towards addressing the scholars and other orientation bodies must reorient people towards peaceful coexistence among themselves.

  10. 7 CFR 281.4 - Determining Indian tribal organization capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... regulations of this chapter, including provisions governing quality control procedures, fraud determinations... Food Stamp Program under § 281.2(b). (ii) Fiscal capabilities. The ITO shall provide FNS documentation of its bookeeping and accounting procedures, including procedures in use for fiscal accountability...

  11. Prevalence and molecular heterogeneity of alfa+ thalassemia in two tribal populations from Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodde, R; Losekoot, M; van den Broek, M H; Oldenburg, M; Rashida, N; Schreuder, A; Wijnen, J T; Giordano, P C; Nayudu, N V; Khan, P M

    1988-10-01

    We describe here the screening of a small group of apparently healthy individuals belonging to the tribal communities of Koya Dora and Konda Reddi. A remarkably high incidence of deletion and nondeletion alpha + thalassemia mutants has been found with allele frequencies and distributions characteristic to each tribe. We have confirmed the strict relationship between Hb S levels and the number of alpha globin genes in double heterozygotes for the S gene and alpha thalassemia. In this population sample we did not find either heterozygous carriers of alpha 0 thalassemia (deletion of both alpha genes in "cis") or individuals showing hemolytic anemia due to inactivation of three alpha-globin genes (Hb H disease). Selection by malaria is most probably responsible for the prevalence of the various alpha + thalassemia haplotypes among the two tribal populations of Andhra Pradesh.

  12. Indigenous and tribal peoples' health (The Lancet-Lowitja Institute Global Collaboration)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Ian; Robson, Bridget; Connolly, Michele

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: International studies of the health of Indigenous and tribal peoples provide important public health insights. Reliable data are required for the development of policy and health services. Previous studies document poorer outcomes for Indigenous peoples compared with benchmark...... populations, but have been restricted in their coverage of countries or the range of health indicators. Our objective is to describe the health and social status of Indigenous and tribal peoples relative to benchmark populations from a sample of countries. METHODS: Collaborators with expertise in Indigenous......-governmental organisations such as UNICEF, and other research. Absolute and relative differences were calculated. FINDINGS: Our data (23 countries, 28 populations) provide evidence of poorer health and social outcomes for Indigenous peoples than for non-Indigenous populations. However, this is not uniformly the case...

  13. Development of a cognitive screening instrument for tribal elderly population of Himalayan region in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Raina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cognitive impairment, characteristic of dementia, is measured objectively by standard neuropsychological (cognitive tests. Given the diversity of culture and language in India, it is difficult to use a single modified version of MMSE uniformly to Indian population. In this article, we report methods on the development of a cognitive screening instrument suitable for the tribal (Bharmour elderly (60 years and above population of Himachal Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: We used a systematic, item-by-item, process for development of a modified version of MMSE suitable for elderly tribal population. Results: The modifications made in the English version of MMSE and the pretesting and pilot testing thereof resulted in the development of Bharmouri version of cognitive scale. Discussion: The study shows that effective modifications can be made to existing tests that require reading and writing; and that culturally sensitive modifications can be made to render the test meaningful and relevant, while still tapping the appropriate cognitive domains.

  14. Adult tribal malnutrition in India: an anthropometric and socio-demographic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Subal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional status and socio-demographic profile of tribal people is an important issue in India due to their marginalization from main stream population with respect to varied facilities. However, data on their nutritional status and socio-demographic profile are limited. This review aims to give an overview of the prevalence of chronic energy deficiency (CED using Body mass index (BMI and various demographic profile of Indian tribes based on studies published hitherto. In total 76 studies were reviewed for mean BMI based on the World Health Organization (WHO classification of the public health problem of low BMI, based on adult populations worldwide. The overall sex specific prevalence of CED showed that both the tribal females (52.0% and males (49.3% were passing through the critical situation with respect to nutritional status with females being more underprivileged.

  15. 76 FR 60855 - Regional Tribal Consultation on Implementation of Indian Land Consolidation Program Under Cobell...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Mexico; and Thursday, September 29, 2011, in Phoenix, Arizona. These meetings were announced in previous... October 26, 2011 8 a.m.-4 p.m..... Best Western Ramkota Hotel and Conference Center, Rushmore Room, 2111 N...

  16. Tribal Set-Aside Program of the Drinking Water Infrastructure Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Safe Drinking Water Act (SWDA), as amended in 1996, established the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) to make funds available to drinking water systems to finance infrastructure improvements.

  17. CERT tribal internship program. Final intern report: D`Lisa Penney, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this intern`s project was to: education the Nez Perce people of the Hanford situation; begin researching into past and present health effects from the Hanford site; and inform and educate the Nez Perce people of the Hanford site and past exposures. The specific objectives were to begin researching the history of Nez Perce people and Hanford; create an understanding for the importance of this research; define the radiation and risks and how they occur; inform the Nez Perce people of the issue; and write the paper so it is easy to understand. This intern report contains a copy of the final paper written for the Nez Perce people. Because the dose reconstruction for Hanford is not complete, the health effects section is informative, but not definitive.

  18. 78 FR 25339 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Tribal Transportation Program Safety Funds; and Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... Process A. Contents of Applications B. Standard Form 424 C. Narrative D. Contact Information E. Protection... funds are to be allocated based on an identification and analysis of highway safety issues and... Standard Form 424 (SF 424) available from Grants.gov ; and (2) the narrative attachment to the SF 424 as...

  19. 75 FR 60781 - Announcement of Funding Awards for Fiscal Year 2010 Tribal Colleges and Universities Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... College, 124 South First Street, Mahnomen, MN 56557. Grant: $800,000. Region VIII 2. Fort Peck Community College, Craig Smith, Fort Peck Community College, 605 Indian Avenue, Poplar, MT 59201. Grant: $800,000. 3...) of the Department of Housing and Urban Development Reform Act of 1989 (103 Stat. 1987, 42 U.S.C. 3545...

  20. 78 FR 77161 - Grant Program To Build Tribal Energy Development Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... made by the U.S. Government by electronic funds transfer (through the Treasury Fedline Payment System.... General Requirements for TEDC Grant Proposals 1. TEDC grant proposals must be submitted to IEED in digital...; Payment of fees or procurement of any services associated with energy assessment or exploration or...

  1. 77 FR 47399 - Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Planning Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... September 6. Official signed resolutions can be mailed to the DGM, Attn: John Hoffman, 801 Thompson Avenue... Thompson Avenue, TMP Suite 360, Rockville, MD 20852. Applicants must reference the following information in... (except on Federal holidays). Upon contacting Grants.gov , obtain a tracking number as proof of contact...

  2. 78 FR 47480 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Tribal Transportation Program Safety Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... the project compliments a comprehensive approach to safety and addresses elements of the 4Es. Examples... compliments a comprehensive approach to safety and addresses elements of the 4Es. Examples of eligible... compliments a comprehensive approach to safety and addresses elements of the 4Es. Examples of eligible...

  3. Creating a learning organization for state, local, and tribal law enforcement to combat violent extremism

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, John Eric

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This is a proof-of-concept project for an online law enforcement learning organization dedicated to combating violent extremism (CVE), specifically, counter-radicalization techniques to be implemented by state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies. Although there are many different forms of violent extremism, examples in this paper reflect those threats from Islamic violent extremism. Even so, this proposed law enforcement learni...

  4. Obesogenic environments in tribally-affiliated childcare centers and corresponding obesity rates in preschool children

    OpenAIRE

    Sisson, Susan B.; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie A.; Lora, Karina R.; Campbell, Janis E.; Arnold, Sandra H.; DeGrace, Beth; Horm, Diane; Stephens, Lancer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Determine the relationship between obesogenic characteristics of childcare and child adiposity in tribally-affiliated centers in Oklahoma. Methods: The two-day Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation (EPAO) included a total environment (TE), nutrition (N), and physical activity (PA) score and took place in 11 centers across Oklahoma. Eighty-two preschool children (3-5 years) participated. Child height and weight were measured and overweight status (??85th percentile for ...

  5. Implementation of public health practices in tribal populations of India: challenges and remedies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Rambiharilal Shrivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large inequities in health exist between indigenous and non-indigenous populations worldwide. This health divide has also been demonstrated in India, where indigenous groups are officially classified as scheduled tribes (STs. India has one of the largest tribal populations in the world. Tribal communities in general and primitive tribal groups in particular are highly disease prone and their misery is compounded by poverty, illiteracy, ignorance of causes of diseases, hostile environment, poor sanitation, lack of safe drinking water, blind beliefs, etc. As per the estimates of National Family Health Survey-3 (NFHS-3, the likelihood of having received care from a doctor is lowest for ST mothers (only 32.8% compared to India of 50.2%. While many strategies have been attempted over the years to discuss some of the economic, social, and physical factors preventing tribal population to get access to healthcare services, the ultimate outcome has remained far less than the expectations. Considering that these ST groups are culturally and economically heterogeneous, the methods to tackle their health problems should not only be integrated and multi-fold, but also specific to the individual groups as feasibly as possible. Measures like strengthening of the existing human resources, bringing health services within the reach of remote populations, promotion of health awareness, facilitation of community participation using innovative strategies, bringing about a change in the behavior of health care providers, implementation of measures for the empowerment of ethnic groups by carrying out administrative reforms and finally by ensuring the sustainability of all above recommended measures. 

  6. TOBACCO CONSUMPTION AMONG TRIBAL ADOLESCENTS OF CENTRAL INDIA: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Neelam Anupama Toppo; Vishnu Gupta; Deepak Saklecha

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Tobacco is the most common substance used across the world. DALY’s lost due to tobacco consumption is 4.1. Substance use like tobacco and alcohol among adolescents can lead to a variety of detrimental consequences. Recent studies by WHO have found that tobacco use is increasing among school children in India and a sizeable proportion of them experiment with drugs quite early in life. OBJECTIVES 1. To study the prevalence of tobacco consumption among tribal adol...

  7. Knowledge Attitude and Practice Regarding Micronutrient in Secondary School Student of Tribal Area in Gujarat

    OpenAIRE

    Modi Bhavesh, Patel Prakash, Sutariya Shailesh, Dave Paresh

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Iodine, vitamin A and iron are most important micronutrients in global public health terms; their lack represents a major threat to the health and development of populations the world over, particularly children in low-income countries. To combat the deficiency of micronutrients, awareness of their importance and their source plays vital role. Objective: to assess knowledge regarding important micronutrients in tribal students. Methodology: It is a cross sectional study conducte...

  8. The role of underutilized fruits in nutritional and economic security of tribals: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandal, Urvashi; Bhardwaj, Raju Lal

    2014-01-01

    The tribal people of Rajasthan are severely malnourished along with multiple nutrient-deficiency disorders due to ignorance about importance of fruits and vegetables in their diets. The tribal areas are full of biodiversity having natural vegetation which is not harnessed fully. Due to which a wide gap is formed between health and optimal use of natural sources of nutrients, i.e., underutilized crops. The crops, which are neither grown commercially on large scale nor traded widely, may be termed as underutilized horticultural crops. These crops are cultivated, traded, and consumed locally. These crops have many advantages like easier to grow and hardy in nature, producing a crop even under adverse soil and climatic conditions. So, exploitation of underutilized horticultural crops can become a solution to the social problem of health and nutrition insecurity, poverty, and unemployment. The consumption of underutilized fruit crops can provide nutrition to the poor and needy tribals by meeting the nutrient requirements of vulnerable groups. As underutilized fruits, nuts, and vegetables are a rich of source of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, energy, vitamins-A, B1, B2, B3, B6, B9, B12, C, folic acid, and minerals-Ca, P, Fe, and dietary fiber. Thus, they have the nutritional capacity to prevent and cure various diseases like kwashiorkor, marasmus, night blindness, anemia, diabetes, cancer, hypertension, and hidden hunger. It is also established fact that seasonal, locally available, and cheap fruits and vegetables can also keep the population healthy and nutritionally secure rather than costly off-season ones. Also, the underutilized crops have the potential to give economic security to tribals by giving employment and by fetching good returns from their sale in raw form as well as value-added products.

  9. Socio-Economic Profiling of Tribal Dairy Farmers in Northern Hills Zone of Chhattisgarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mooventhan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chhattisgarh is traditionally known as the Rice Bowl of Central India. Chhattisgarh state has one of highest shares of Scheduled Tribe (ST population within a state, accounting for about 10 per cent of the STs in India. Scheduled Castes and STs together constitute more than 50 per cent of the state’s population. Agriculture is counted as the chief economic occupation of the state. About 80% of the population of the state is rural and the main livelihood of the villagers is agriculture and agriculture-based small industry. This exploratory study was conducted in the tribal populated districts of Chhattisgarh state. In this paper, socio-economic profile of tribal farmers are discussed in detail. About 65.33 percent of the tribal farmers were between 36 and 50 years of age group, more than one fourth (34.67% of the farmers were educated up to primary school level, less than half  (39.00% of the respondents had subsistence dairy farming + Minor forest products collection + labour as their sole occupations, nearly half (43.67% of the respondents were marginal farmers, more than half (62.00 % of the farmers were found with medium level of farming experience, about half (49.00 % of the respondents were at the income range of Rs. 25,001 to Rs. 75,000, about half (44.67 % of the respondents falling under the category of medium herd size followed by 35.67 percent in small and 19.66 percent in large herd size, more than half (56.33% of the tribal dairy farmers falling under the category of subsistence level of dairy production system.

  10. ETHNOVETERINARY PRACTICES FOR MEDICINAL PROBLEMS FOLLOWED BY TRIBALS OF SABARKANTHA DISTRICT OF GUJARAT

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. SHEIKH AND D. V. PARMAR

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The people of far-flung rural areas still depend to a large extent upon plants and household remedies for curing veterinary ailments. The folk knowledge of ethno-veterinary medicine and its significance has been identified by the traditional communities through a process of experience over hundreds of years. The present paper documented ethno-veterinary practices of tribals related to different medicinal problems in their livestock. The study was conducted in purposively selecte...

  11. 40 CFR 147.353 - EPA-administered program-Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators, and EPA shall comply with these requirements. (b... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Connecticut...

  12. 40 CFR 147.651 - EPA-administered program-Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators, and EPA shall comply with these requirements. (b... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Idaho § 147...

  13. 40 CFR 147.205 - EPA-administered program-Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148 and any additional requirements set forth in this subpart. Injection well owners and operators, and EPA shall comply with these requirements. (b) Effective date. The... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Arkansas...

  14. 40 CFR 147.2404 - EPA-administered program-Colville Reservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 124, 144 and 146 and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS... Indian Reservation consists of a prohibition of all Class I, II, III and IV injection wells and of a...

  15. 40 CFR 147.403 - EPA-administered program-Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators and EPA shall comply with these requirements. (b... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Delaware...

  16. 40 CFR 147.1001 - EPA-administered program-Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators and EPA shall comply with these requirements. (b... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Maine § 147...

  17. 40 CFR 147.60 - EPA-administered program-Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148 and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this subpart. Injection well owners and operators, and EPA shall comply with these requirements. (b... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Alabama...

  18. Surviving colonization and the quest for healing: narrative and resilience among California Indian tribal leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud Ramirez, Lucio; Hammack, Phillip L

    2014-02-01

    American Indians must negotiate the cultural and psychological legacy of colonialism as they construct coherent, purposive individual and communal narratives. Analysis of the life stories of highly generative members of these groups who have emerged as leaders offers important insights for psychological adaptation in the context of the historical legacy of colonialism. Based on an interpretive analysis of the life stories of two California Indian tribal leaders, we posit a resilient-strength-based approach to narrative identity development to complement and counter the historical trauma discourse. Native American identity emerged as the major source of psychological resilience in the life stories analyzed. This identity manifested and was supported through a commitment to the wellness of tribal community, spiritual practices, and beliefs. For these men, their relationship to their grandmothers was central in molding their identities and serving as a source of resilience throughout their lives. As leaders of a federally unrecognized tribal group, they have adopted a narrative of survivance (Vizenor, 2008), which appears to buffer psychosocial stress and provide a resilient narrative identity. Based on these findings, we theorize an indigenous California Native psychology of resilience.

  19. Operación Génesis: Reflections on Indigenous and Tribal Collective Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián López Escarcena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the judgment on Comunidades afrodescendientes desplazadas de la cuenca del río Cacarica (Operación Génesis as background, this article aims at reasking some of the questions that have been left unanswered in the case-law on collective property of indigenous and tribal communities of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. Like in other of its judicial decisions, in Operación Génesis the international tribunal reiterated some of the constitutive elements of this right of communal property that it has been developing jurisprudentially. However, it did not pronounce itself on other elements of equivalent importance, like the criteria that it uses to identify indigenous or tribal peoples and their lands and territories, or the deprivation or limitation of their right to collective property. Even though Operación Génesis does not answer these questions, it allows for a necessary critical rereading of its case-law on indigenous and tribal communal property, destined to challenge not only the comparative and international doctrine, but also for the Court itself.

  20. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF TRIBAL BEAN (Canavalia virosa AND ITS ALTERNATIVE TOFU AND TEMPEH FOOD PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titiek F. Djaafar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasing price of soybean becomes a serious problem for producers of traditional foods such as tempeh and tofu. These traditional foods are important protein sources for many Indonesian people. Tribal bean (Canavalia virosa could be used as a substitution of soybean for tempeh and tofu processing. This study aimed to determine physico-chemical characteristics of tribal bean and its products such as tofu and tempeh. Tribal bean old pods were peeled manually in the Postharvest and Agricultural Machinery Laboratory of the Yogyakarta AIAT. The peeled seeds were dried until 10% water content and their epidermis were removed mechanically by using an abrasive peeler to produce yellowish clean peeled beans. The beans were analyzed physically and chemically using the standard prosedure. Since the tribal bean seeds contained high HCN, to minimize HCN content the beans were presoaked for 48 hours in water. The beans were then mixed with soybean at a ratio of 50:50 or 25:75 and processed for making tempeh and tofu using traditional method. Physicochemical and organoleptic characteristics of the tribal bean tempe and tofu were analysed, involving organoleptic test with hedonic method, texture, as well as water, ash, protein and crude fiber contents. The results showed that tribal bean contained protein (37.30%, essential amino acids, minerals and fiber (3.1%, and a toxic substance HCN. Presoaking the beans in water for 48 hours significantly reduced HCN content by 98.51%, from 1334 ppm. Tofu made of a mixture of tribal bean and soybean at a ratio of 25:75 plus 2% rice vinegar as a coagulant has a white color and normal flavor appearances, and was accepted by panelists. The tribal bean tempeh contained 78.1% water, 1.21% ash, 8.14% protein, 3.1% crude fiber, and 44 ppm HCN. Tempeh made of a mixture of tribal bean and soybean at ratios of 50:50 and 25:75 showed good characters (flavor, taste, color, and texture and panelist acceptance, as well as nutrition

  1. Performance and treatment outcome of tuberculosis among patients on Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme in Urban and Tribal areas of a district in Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivshakti Dattatray Pawar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP was introduced in the country as a pilot project since 1993 in a phased manner and expanded throughout the country by the year 2005. Although studies have shown the success of RNTCP, data pertaining to the indicators of programme performance in urban and tribal set up are rare. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess and compare the RNTCP in urban and tribal areas of Maharashtra through the indicators of performance and outcome of the patients. Patients and Methods: A retrospective comparative record-based study was conducted in selected urban and tribal areas' tuberculosis (TB units. Records of patients enrolled newly for TB treatment and those already undergoing treatment under RNTCP from April 2015 to September 2015 (6 months were considered for analysis. Chi-square test and Z-test (test of significance are applied where required by using Epi Info 7 and Microsoft Excel 2010.Results: Sputum smear collection was significantly higher in urban areas (P = 0.001. In urban areas, new TB case detection was 35%, while in tribal areas, it was 42% as per the RNTCP norms. Sputum positivity was marginally more in tribal (5.87% than urban (3.28% areas. Cure rate was more in urban areas than tribal (P = 0.001 areas. There were statistically significantly high default cases in tribal areas. Conclusions: Sputum collection and sputum positivity rate were low in urban and tribal areas, but TB screening, especially in tribal areas, was significantly low. Sputum positivity was significantly higher in tribal areas. Significantly low cure rate and high default rate in tribal area warrant the need for strengthening of RNTCP activities in tribal areas.

  2. Progressive disability in elderly population among tribals of Telangana: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katta, Ajitha; Krishna, Anil Kumar Indira; M, Bagavandas; Anegawa, Tomofumi; Munuswamy, Suresh

    2017-06-19

    The tribal population of Telangana, India, lives in remote and difficult conditions. This study was carried out to find out estimate, the prevalence and progression of disability in elderly population among tribals of Khammam District, Telangana state, India. A population based cross sectional survey was conducted in villages of Tribal Sub Plan area. Elderly people who are 60 years or older were chosen with a two stage sampling procedure: (1) probability proportion to size was used to select clusters and (2) in each selected cluster households were selected by systematic random sampling. The participants were interviewed with the 36 item Telugu version of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS 2.0) questionnaire. Socio- demographic information, behavioral measurements, health and social benefit indicators were also assessed. Descriptive analytical methods were used for prevalence estimation and logistic regression was used to examine the associations of progressive age over disability among elderly. A total of 506 elderly people from 1349 households in 20 villages across 31mandals of Khammam were interviewed. Majority of elderly population among tribals were illiterate (men 88.94%; women 99.33%), used tobacco (men 81.25%; women 57.72%), consumed alcohol (men 80.77%; women 47.32%) and were hypertensive (men 53.85%; women 63.42%). The prevalence of disability was higher in women. Maximum disability in the interviewed elderly population was seen in domains of performing house hold activities, and mobility. In comparison with men, women expressed more disability for majority of domains. As age progressed, the disability for self-care domain increased to a maximum of 2.6 times in men and 6.6 times in women and for mobility domain increased to a maximum of 9.7 times in men and 7.2 times in women. Although present disability modifying mobility Assistive Devices (AD) can help elderly in overcoming disability, these are primarily designed for

  3. Sustainable Design of EPA's Campus in Research Triangle Park, NC—Environmental Performance Specifications in Construction Contracts—Section 01450 Sequence of Finishes Installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn more about the special construction scheduling/sequencing requirements and procedures necessary to assure achievement of designed Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) levels for the completed project required by the EPA IAQ Program.

  4. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2006-03-01

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see

  5. Duck Valley Resident Fish Stocking Program, 2000 Final Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodson, Guy; Pero, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    The Shoshone-Paiute Tribes fish-stocking program was begun in 1988 and is intended to provide a subsistence fishery for the tribal members. The program stocks catchable and fingerling size trout in Mt. View and Sheep Creek Reservoirs. Rainbow trout are purchased from only certified disease-free facilities to be stocked in our reservoirs. This project will help restore a fishery for tribal members that historically depended on wild salmon and steelhead in the Owyhee and Bruneau Rivers and their tributaries for their culture as well as for subsistence. This project is partial substitution for loss of anadromous fish production due to construction and operation of hydroelectric dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. Until anadromous fish can be returned to the Owyhee and Bruneau Rivers this project will continue indefinitely. As part of this project the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes will also receive income in the form of fees from non-tribal members who come to fish these reservoirs. Regular monitoring and evaluation of the fishery will include sampling for length/weight/condition and for signs of disease. A detailed Monitoring and evaluation plan has been put in place for this project. However due to budget limitations on this project only the fishery surveys and limited water quality work can be completed. A creel survey was initiated in 1998 and we are following the monitoring and evaluation schedule for this program (as budget allows) as well as managing the budget and personnel. This program has been very successful in the past decade and has provided enjoyment and sustenance for both tribal and non-tribal members. All biological data and stocking rates will be including in the Annual reports to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  6. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Pala, California, Roundtable Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-03-23

    The Pala, California, DOE Tribal Roundtable convened at 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 23, at the Pala Resort. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy). Tracey LeBeau, Director of the DOE Office of Indian Energy and Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director-Policy of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, attended. Tribal leaders and representatives from five tribal communities also attended. There were thirteen participants. The meeting was facilitated by Debra Drecksel, Senior Program Manager, Senior Facilitator, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). She was assisted by Lindsey Sexton, Program Associate, U.S. Institute.   

  7. Undernutrition among the tribal children in India: tribes of Coastal, Himalayan and Desert ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshatriya, Gautam Kumar; Ghosh, Arnab

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of the present cross-sectional investigation was to assess the nutritional condition in children of three tribal communities namely Dhodia, Kinnaura and Bhil, which belong to Coastal, Himalayan and Desert ecology, respectively, in India. A total of 989 tribal children in the age group 0-1 years through 5+ years (below 6 years) was examined. There were 306 Dhodia children (164 boys and 142 girls), 327 Kinnaura children (177 boys and 150 girls) and 356 Bhil children (168 boys and 188 girls) out of 989 subjects. Crown-heel length was measured using infantometer with the child lying supine, height with Martin's anthropometer and body weight using standard weighing machine. Body mass index (BMI) was subsequently computed. 'Z' score was undertaken to obtain comprehensive pictures of undernutrition in terms of wasting, stunting and underweight in these communities. The chi2-test test was also undertaken to compare nutritional indicators by the sexes. It was observed that maximum wasting (85.3%), stunting (86.6%) and underweight (93.3%) was recorded in Kinnaura girls, who belong to Himalayan ecology. The results revealed also that so far as wasting and stunting was concerned, the situation was worst for desert dwelling Bhil, where only 7.3% wasted and 5.6% stunted pre-school children fall in between -1 SD to 0.05). The findings of the present study revealed the widespread prevalence of undernutrition among the children of Dhodia, Kinnaura and Bhil tribal communities and highlight a need for an integrated approach towards improving the child health as well as the nutritional status in these areas.

  8. Rural epidemiology of HIV positive tribal patients from Chhattisgarh in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Harminder

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The primary objective was to study the epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive tribal patients, and the secondary objective was to study the associated comorbidities in a tertiary care hospital in the tribal (Bastar region of Chhattisgarh, India, between December 2006 and November 2008, and their relation to CD4 counts. Materials and Methods : In this study 90 tribal HIV positive subjects were enrolled. Information on demographics, that is, weight, height, age, educational status, sex, clinical finding, and laboratory parameters (CD4 counts were noted. Results: Among 90 HIV patients, 54 (60% were males and 36 (40% were females. Among these, most patients, 37 (41.1%, were in the age group of 30 to 39 years. Among these patients, 79.56% belonged to the lower socioeconomic status, whereas, only 1.45% were from a high socioeconomic status. The largest group was made up of drivers (32.2%, with the second largest group being housewives (27.7% and laborers (17.7%, respectively. A majority of the patients had a low education, 35.5% were educated only up to the fifth standard and 31.8% up to high school, while 18.8% were illiterate. The predominant mode of transmission was heterosexual contact (78.8%, only one patient (1.1% was infected through transfusion of infected blood, five (5.5% patients acquired infection via vertical (mother to child transmission, and in 13 patients the transmission history was not clear. Conclusion: There was a high frequency of behavioral risk factors, together with unawareness, and very little health infrastructure, thus creating an impending risk for the rapid spread of HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

  9. Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume I of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Paul

    2003-01-01

    provides a chronological account of previous ISRP reviews, official Coeur d'Alene fisheries program responses to a series of ISRP reviews, master planning documentation, and annual reports dating back to 1990. Collectively, the materials provided by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe in this Step-1 submission package comprehensively assesses key research, habitat improvement activities, and hatchery production issues to best protect and enhance native cutthroat trout populations and the historically and culturally important tribal fisheries they support.

  10. 25 CFR 115.813 - Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will disburse from a tribal trust account?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will... OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.813 Is there a limit to the amount of trust funds OTFM will...

  11. ‘Needs’ Based Development to ‘Desired’ Development: Locating the Freudian Idea in Social and Economic Development of Tribals after the New Economic Reforms in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhabani Shankar Nayak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to study tribal development in India where the tribals are not only marginalized but also dispossessed in the process of economic reforms in India. A massive transformation is taking place in the tribal societies in India where a need based self-sufficient society is being transformed into a desired based consumer society. The process is accelerated by the neoliberal public policies in India that promotes the idea of ‘desired development’. In a way, this article is trying to document the nature of change in the tribal society which has traveled from ‘need’ based development to ‘desired’ development in the planning for tribal development. In this process of transition, we are trying to locate the Freudian idea in tribal development planning in India that is putting tribals under durable poverty, underdevelopment and marginalization. Hence, this paper seeks to contextualise the transformation in the ‘logic’ of public and corporate socio-economic development programmes implemented amongst tribal groups in India within the broader changes that have characterised the gradual and sometimes fraught transitions in capitalist social relations.

  12. 25 CFR 900.130 - What role does the Indian tribe or tribal organization play during the performance of a self...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Construction § 900.130 What role does the Indian tribe or tribal organization play during the performance of a... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What role does the Indian tribe or tribal organization play during the performance of a self-determination construction contract? 900.130 Section 900.130...

  13. 25 CFR 900.124 - May the Indian tribe or tribal organization elect to use a grant in lieu of a contract?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May the Indian tribe or tribal organization elect to use a grant in lieu of a contract? 900.124 Section 900.124 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT... or tribal organization elect to use a grant in lieu of a contract? Yes. A grant agreement or a...

  14. Solar Energy Technologies and the Utilization on Native American Tribal Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Kathryn [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2017-08-31

    As an undergraduate researcher, I worked on a new technology called nanofluid-based direct absorption solar collectors (DASC) which is a type of solar water heater that has the potential to be more efficient than traditional solar water heaters. Because of my experience with this type of technology, I decided to look into other types of solar energy technologies which could be used on Native American tribal lands. Some types of solar energy technologies that I wanted to focus on are photovoltaic solar energy systems, passive solar design, and solar water heaters.

  15. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project : Combined-Planning & Design and Operations & Maintenance Reports, 2000 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.

    2002-12-31

    Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2000 Combined Maintenance and Operations (O&M) and Planning and Design (P&D) contract is hereby completed based on this annual report patterned after the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration. Primary project activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 process that: (1) Accepted final design, (2) Authorized a capital construction amount of $16,050,000, and (3) Authorized contractor selection, and (4) Provided construction site dedication, and (5) Implemented construction activities over an anticipated 2-year period of July 2000 through October 2002.

  16. PREVALENCE OF HEPATITIS B AND C VIRAL MARKERS AMONG THE TRIBAL POPULATION OF NILGIRIS, TAMIL NADU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnasamy Narayanasamy, Senthilkumar Ramalingam, Sathishkumar Elumalai, Jaya Lakshmi, Ramachandar S, Rameshkumar Manickam

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus and C viruses (HBV and HCV, respectively infects the liver which results in a wide range of disease outcomes. Worldwide, over 7% (350 million and 3% (170 million people are chronically infected with HBV and HCV, respectively.[1] HBV is transmitted through exposure to infective blood, semen, and other body fluids or through infected mothers to infants at the time of birth. Transmission may also occur through transfusions of HBV-contaminated blood and blood products, contaminated injections during medical procedures, and through transfusions of HCV-contaminated blood and blood products, contaminated injections during medical procedures, and through injection drug use. Sexual transmission is also possible.[2] Individuals with chronic hepatitis B and/or C virus infection remain infectious to others and are at risk of serious liver disease such as liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular cancer (HCC. [3,4] Study reports revealed that HBV and/or HCV infections are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in HIV positive population related to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.[5,6] Though studies on the prevalence of HBV (rarely on HCV among tribal population in India were available[7,8], there is no recent reports from southern part of India. Hence, the present study was conducted to assess the prevalence of HBV and HCV among tribal population in Kotagiri, Nilgiris. After obtaining the informed consent, blood samples (5 ml each from a total of 196 participants (103 males and 93 females were collected and sera were separated on site. Samples which showed positive for HBsAg and anti-HCV by rapid test were confirmed by ELISA technique using commercial kits Reliable Pro-detect Biomedical Ltd, India and Erba Lisa, Germany, respectively. Of the 196 individuals screened, none of them was positive for the viral markers. Several studies from India reported varying range of HBsAg and anti-HCV positivity among general and tribal

  17. Diet, nutrition and cardiac risk factor profile of tribal migrant population in an urban slum in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagajeevan Babu Geddam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Migration of tribal population to urban areas may increase the risk of non-communicable chronic diseases. In this study an attempt was made to explore the risk factors influencing cardio vascular disease, hypertension and Type 2 diabetes among the tribal migrants living in urban areas. A population based cross sectional study was carried out on tribal migrants (n=138 men, n=137 women aged ≥30 years of low economic status, living in an urban slum (Kondapur of Hyderabad, Telangana, India.  Blood lipids, glucose, homocysteine, glycated Haemoglobin, blood pressure and nutritional biochemical markers such as serum albumin, serum protein, Vitamin-D and haemoglobin were examined in a subsample of tribal migrants. The prevalence of overweight in men and women was 35.3% and 32.4% while general obesity was 14.3% and 24.3% respectively. In addition, high concentration of total cholesterol, low density lipo proteins (LDL, triglycerides, homocysteine and glycosylated haemoglobin in the study population was also observed.  Duration of stay had no significant association with overweight and obesity. Majority of tribal migrants did not meet at least 50% of RDI of micro-nutrients such as iron (80-84%, vitamin A (81-83% and riboflavin (67-84%. Similar finding was observed with food groups such as leafy vegetables (84-91%, milk and milk products. However, the consumption of fat and protein was found to be ≥70% of RDA indicating transition in diet pattern. The present study shows urban life style and diets may predispose to higher incidence of diabetes, hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease among tribal migrants living in urban areas.

  18. Southwest Exotic Mapping Program (SWEMP) Database, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kathryn A.; Guertin, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The Southwest Exotic Plant Mapping Program (SWEMP) is a collaborative effort between the United States Geological Survey and federal, tribal, state, county and non-governmental organization (NGO) partners in the southwest. This project is an ongoing effort to compile and distribute regional data on the occurrence of non-native invasive plants in the southwestern United States. The database represents the known sites (represented by a point location, i.e. site) of non-native invasive plant infestations within Arizona and New Mexico, and adjacent portions of California, Colorado, Nevada and Utah. These data, collected from 1911 to 2006, represent the field observations of various state, federal, tribal and county agencies, along with some specimen data from Herbaria. The SWEMP database comprises a compilation of data submitted through 2006.

  19. Is Mold the New Asbestos?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Craig

    2003-01-01

    Mold and indoor air quality (IAQ) are matters of major concern to architects and their educational clients. The Environmental Protection Agency's Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools program offers help to districts seeking to tackle IAQ issues. Strengthening community relations is one way to be ready in case of a bad environmental or IAQ report.…

  20. Tribal engagement strategy of the South Central Climate Science Center, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, William J.; Taylor, April; Winton, Kimberly T.

    2014-01-01

    The South Central Climate Science Center was established by the U.S. Department of the Interior in 2012 to increase understanding of climate change and coordinate an effective response to climate-change effects on Native American tribes and natural and cultural resources that the Department manages. The eight regional Climate Science Centers of the U.S. Department of the Interior work closely with natural-resource management agencies, university researchers, and others such as tribes and private landowners on climate-change issues. The relatively large number of Native Americans in the south central United States and their special knowledge of changing ecosystems make working with tribes and tribal members on climate-change issues particularly important in this part of the Nation. This circular describes priorities of the South Central Climate Science Center and provides information about resources available from Climate Science Centers and partner agencies regarding climate change. The circular also describes how this Climate Science Center, tribes and tribal members, and others can collaborate to minimize potential harmful effects of climate change on human society and our surrounding ecosystems.

  1. Treatment with aquatic plants by a Bagdi tribal healer of Rajbari District, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukti, Mohsina; Rahmatullah, Mohammed

    2013-07-01

    Tribal healers mainly use land plants in their medicinal formulations; use of aquatic plants has been scarcely reported. The aim of the present study was to conduct an ethnomedicinal survey working with a Bagdi tribal healer of Rajbari District, Bangladesh. The survey was carried out working with a Bagdi healer, who lived alone in the wetlands of Rajbari District and used primarily aquatic plants for treatment. Interview of the healer was carried out with the help of a semi-structured questionnaire and the guided field-walk method. The Bagdi healer was observed to use seven different aquatic plant species coming from five plant families for treatment of ailments such as hemorrhoids, tonsillitis, heart disorders, burning sensations and pain in hands or legs, blurred vision, debility, sexual weakness in males, chronic dysentery, infertility in women, constipation, chronic leucorrhea, blackness and foul odor of menstrual blood, hair loss, graying of hair and to keep the head cool. One plant was used to treat what the healer mentioned as "evil eye", this refers to their belief in black-magic. This is the first reported instance of a Bagdi healer who primarily uses aquatic plants for treatment. Ethnomedicinal uses of a number of the plants used by the Bagdi healer have been reported for other places in India and Pakistan. Taken together, the various uses of the different plant species opens up scientific possibilities of new drug discoveries from the plants.

  2. The Tribal Perspective of Old Growth in Frequent-fire Forests - Its History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Yazzie

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Anyone who has not lived in "Indian country" cannot understand just how extensively the United States government and its laws affect Native Americans and their natural resource management. These effects are sobering, and touch upon sensitive issues that all Native Americans hold within us. In this article, I outline the historic cycle of tribal entities, and characterize today's tribal self-determination in forest management. I provide an historical account from the "colonial" period and its use of the Doctrine of Discovery to the relations between the United States government and Native Americans from the 18th through the 20th centuries, during which time Native Americans struggled to establish their legal status as tribes, and solidify their land base to sustain and conserve culturally important lands, including areas of old-growth forests, to the current self-determination and self-governance potential of Indian tribes. More importantly, I discuss the cultural connectivity that Native Americans have to the land, and address the unique inherent right of tribes to integrate this cultural view into current forest management, including the protection of old-growth forests, on their reservations.

  3. WETLANDS ECOLOGICAL-ECONOMIC MAPPING AT COMMUNITY-TRIBAL LANDS IN THE RUSSIAN EUROPEAN ARCTIC COAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Evseev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An economic-ecological map for Nenets community tribal lands at the Russian Arctic coast wetlands was compiled. Wetlands supply a large variety of ecosystem services beneficial to ecological stability and biological resources for indigenous population support. Ecosystem services assessed in this project were mainly regulating: carbon deposition by different ecosystems (climate regulation function due to CO2 consumption, water purification and “warming” effect of bogs. This list was limited by data and assessment methods availability. We used traditional methods for ecological services assessment, based on their existing and possible (virtual market prices. Mapping approaches were based on Target 2 Action 5 Mapping and Assessment of Ecosystems and their Services (MAES of the EU Biodiversity Strategy to 2020. Proportional value regulating services of peat bogs appeared to be nearly the same as maximal existing lands value. Our assessment results enabled us to present spatial dimensions of ecosystem services of community-tribal lands, whose value appeared to be higher than compensatory sums for “lost profit” in case they are replaced by oil extraction infrastructure. Traditional nature management lands may be regarded as an alternative to further primarily industrial land use type and attribute ecological buffers role to them as well as indigenous population material and spiritual support functions.

  4. Using the HDI camera with Tohono O’odham Tribal Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmany, Catharine D.

    2017-01-01

    Tohono O’odham Community College is a small two-year tribal college, located at the foot of I'oligam Du'ag, also known as Kitt Peak. In recognition and appreciation of Kitt Peak National Observatory’s location on the Tohono O’odham reservation, NOAO has worked with the college to offer an introduction astronomy class when requested. The class has been taught by NOAO scientific staff and post docs, and the lab component of this 4-credit class has been carried out at Kitt Peak. With support from the WIYN0.9-m Consortium, students have been able to observe on the 0.9m telescope. Most recently they have used the HDI camera for an evening, which has been a highlight of the class that students always note in their final evaluation. I will describe challenges and rewards in developing and maintaining this class, including identifying post docs and graduate students who are able to teach it. However, we feel the challenges are worth it: this may be the only formal astronomy class offered at a tribal college.

  5. Disease concepts and treatment by tribal healers of an Amazonian forest culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plotkin Mark J

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extensive medicinal plant knowledge of Amazonian tribal peoples is widely recognized in the scientific literature and celebrated in popular lore. Despite this broad interest, the ethnomedical systems and knowledge of disease which guide indigenous utilization of botanical diversity for healing remain poorly characterized and understood. No study, to our knowledge, has attempted to directly examine patterns of actual disease recognition and treatment by healers of an Amazonian indigenous culture. Methods The establishment of traditional medicine clinics, operated and directed by elder tribal shamans in two remote Trio villages of the Suriname rainforest, presented a unique investigational opportunity. Quantitative analysis of clinic records from both villages permitted examination of diseases treated over a continuous period of four years. Cross-cultural comparative translations were articulated of recorded disease conditions through ethnographic interviews of elder Trio shamans and a comprehensive atlas of indigenous anatomical nomenclature was developed. Results 20,337 patient visits within the period 2000 to 2004 were analyzed. 75 disease conditions and 127 anatomical terms are presented. Trio concepts of disease and medical practices are broadly examined within the present and historical state of their culture. Conclusion The findings of this investigation support the presence of a comprehensive and highly formalized ethnomedical institution within Trio culture with attendant health policy and conservation implications.

  6. Tribal love: the neural correlates of passionate engagement in football fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Isabel C.; Afonso, Sónia; Jorge, Helena; Cayolla, Ricardo; Ferreira, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The tribal character of the affective link between football fans and their teams is a well-recognized phenomenon. Other forms of love such as romantic or maternal attachment have previously been studied from a neuroimaging point of view. Here we aimed to investigate the neural basis of this tribal form of love, which implies both the feeling of belongingness and rivalry against opposing teams. A pool of 56 participants was submitted to an fMRI experimental design involving the presentation of winning and losing football moments of their loved, rival or neutral teams. We found recruitment of amygdala and reward regions, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN), as well as other limbic regions involved in emotional cognition, for ‘positive vs neutral’ and ‘positive vs negative’ conditions. The latter contrast was correlated with neuropsychological scores of fanaticism in the amygdala and regions within the reward system, as the VTA and SN. The observation of increased response patterns in critical components of the reward system, in particular for positive content related to the loved team, suggests that this kind of non-romantic love reflects a specific arousal and motivational state, which is biased for emotional learning of positive outcomes. PMID:28338882

  7. Tribal love: the neural correlates of passionate engagement in football fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Isabel C; Afonso, Sónia; Jorge, Helena; Cayolla, Ricardo; Ferreira, Carlos; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    The tribal character of the affective link between football fans and their teams is a well-recognized phenomenon. Other forms of love such as romantic or maternal attachment have previously been studied from a neuroimaging point of view. Here we aimed to investigate the neural basis of this tribal form of love, which implies both the feeling of belongingness and rivalry against opposing teams. A pool of 56 participants was submitted to an fMRI experimental design involving the presentation of winning and losing football moments of their loved, rival or neutral teams. We found recruitment of amygdala and reward regions, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN), as well as other limbic regions involved in emotional cognition, for 'positive vs neutral' and 'positive vs negative' conditions. The latter contrast was correlated with neuropsychological scores of fanaticism in the amygdala and regions within the reward system, as the VTA and SN. The observation of increased response patterns in critical components of the reward system, in particular for positive content related to the loved team, suggests that this kind of non-romantic love reflects a specific arousal and motivational state, which is biased for emotional learning of positive outcomes. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Community perspectives on alcohol use among a tribal population in rural southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Anuradha; Minz, Shantidani; Manohari, G P; -, Thavamani; George, Kuryan; Arun, R; Vinodh, Amala

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use is common in many cultures. Excessive use of alcohol adversely impacts individuals, families and communities. Medicine, which uses biomedical models and perspectives, views alcohol dependence as a disease. Alcohol use and dependence are complex societal problems, which need to be viewed through multidisciplinary approaches and corrected by adopting intersectoral efforts involving local communities. We used qualitative methods such as focus group discussions and in-depth interviews to document perspectives on alcohol use among a tribal community in southern India. We recorded traditional norms, changing patterns of use of alcohol and its consequences for individuals, families and the community. Eight focus group discussions and eleven in-depth interviews were conducted. Though consumption of alcohol is part of the local culture, changes in occupation and availability of alcohol has made its consumption a problem. The introduction and easy availability of Indian-made foreign liquor, which is stronger than the locally brewed variety, in government-run outlets has changed the culture of drinking at festivals to drinking more often. This leads to public fights, domestic violence and increasing mortality and morbidity due to road traffic incidents and ill health. The age of initiation into drinking has decreased. The introduction of non-traditional and commercial alcohol use has put a heavy price on tribal and rural people. Community-based interventions targeting young children and adolescents may pay more dividends than pursuing purely medical treatments for problem drinkers. Copyright 2015, NMJI.

  9. Hydrologic assessment of the shallow groundwater flow system beneath the Shinnecock Nation tribal lands, Suffolk County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Michael L.; Rivera, Simonette L.; Busciolano, Ronald J.

    2016-12-02

    Defining the distribution and flow of shallow groundwater beneath the Shinnecock Nation tribal lands in Suffolk County, New York, is a crucial first step in identifying sources of potential contamination to the surficial aquifer and coastal ecosystems. The surficial or water table aquifer beneath the tribal lands is the primary source of potable water supply for at least 6 percent of the households on the tribal lands. Oyster fisheries and other marine ecosystems are critical to the livelihood of many residents living on the tribal lands, but are susceptible to contamination from groundwater entering the embayment from the surficial aquifer. Contamination of the surficial aquifer from flooding during intense coastal storms, nutrient loading from fertilizers, and septic effluent have been identified as potential sources of human and ecological health concerns on tribal lands.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) facilitated the installation of 17 water table wells on and adjacent to the tribal lands during March 2014. These wells were combined with other existing wells to create a 32-well water table monitoring network that was used to assess local hydrologic conditions. Survey-grade, global-navigation-satellite systems provided centimeter-level accuracy for positioning wellhead surveys. Water levels were measured by the USGS during May (spring) and November (fall) 2014 to evaluate seasonal effects on the water table. Water level measurements were made at high and low tide during May 2014 to identify potential effects on the water table caused by changes in tidal stage (tidal flux) in Shinnecock Bay. Water level contour maps indicate that the surficial aquifer is recharged by precipitation and upgradient groundwater flow that moves from the recharge zone located generally beneath Sunrise Highway, to the discharge zone beneath the tribal lands, and eventually discharges into the embayment, tidal creeks, and estuaries that bound the tribal lands to the east, south, and

  10. 75 FR 30842 - Statutorily Mandated Single Source Award Program Name: National Indian Health Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in Indian County not to exceed $450,000. (2) Data Analysis, Consultation... health care advocacy to IHS and HHS based on Tribal input through a broad based consumer network. The NIHB offers a national network of professional services to provide policy analysis and development...

  11. 78 FR 36183 - State Allotment Percentages for the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ..., non-tribal water systems (each serving less than 3,301 people), the 2011 assessment extrapolated the... AGENCY State Allotment Percentages for the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Program AGENCY... Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing the revised Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) allotments that...

  12. 40 CFR 147.501 - EPA-administered program-Class II wells and Indian lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146, 148, and any additional requirements set forth in the remainder of this... wells and Indian lands. 147.501 Section 147.501 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION...

  13. Inter-Tribal Student Services (I.S.S.): Collaborative Action Education in Building and Guiding the Future Under-represented Geosciences Workforce Through Tribal Foundations, Mentorship and Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J.

    2015-12-01

    Inter-Tribal Student Services (I.S.S.) was created as an Indian Self-Determination Organization to meet the every growing Tribal and under-represented minorities (URM) geosciences workforce needs. I.S.S. is one of only a few Indian Self-Determined Organizations in the U.S. with a distinct focused on buidling the Tribal and URM geosciences and natural resources workforces. In past three years, I.S.S has worked in partnership with U.S. colleges/universities, state/federal agencies (Bureau of Indian Affairs), private and International organizations and most importantly U.S. Tribal Nations to ensure emerging high school students, undergraduates, graduate students and post doctorates have the opportunities for training in supportive and unique environments, navigational mentoring, and broad professional development to build and practice the skills required for blue-collar, scientific, and managerial positions. I.S.S. has been highly successful in filling workforce opportunities within the broad range of geosciences positions. I.S.S. students are proficient in understanding and maneuvering the complex landscapes of interdisciplinary research, multidisciplinary multi-partner projects, traditional/western philosophies as well as being highly proficient in all areas of problem solving and communications. Research and on-site projects have heightened the educational experiences of all participants, in addition to addressing a perplexing geosciences challenge grounded in a Tribal environment. A number of the I.S.S. participants and students have found geosciences positions in Tribes, state/federal agencies, enterprize as well as International organizations. I.S.S. practices and has infused all research and projects with intergenerational teaching/learning, participation solution-focused initiatives, and holistic/multicultural mentoring. The presentation will highlight the vision, design, implementation, outcomes and future directions of I.S.S and participants.

  14. 76 FR 71600 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Tribal-State Gaming Compact Process...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Tribal- State Gaming Compact Process; Request for Comments AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... Affairs (BIA) is submitting to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request for renewal for the...

  15. 25 CFR 900.9 - May the Secretary require an Indian tribe or tribal organization to submit any other information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... organization to submit any other information beyond that identified in § 900.8? 900.9 Section 900.9 Indians... Proposal Contents § 900.9 May the Secretary require an Indian tribe or tribal organization to submit any other information beyond that identified in § 900.8? No. ...

  16. e-Agriculture Prototype for Knowledge Facilitation among Tribal Farmers of North-East India: Innovations, Impact and Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Saravanan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This case study deals with the implementation methodology, innovations and lessons of the ICT initiative in providing agricultural extension services to the rural tribal farming community of North-East India. Methodology: This study documents the ICT project implementation challenges, impact among farmers and briefly indicates lessons of…

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain E24377A, Obtained from a Tribal Drinking Water Source in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamhankar, Ashok J; Nerkar, Sandeep S; Khadake, Prashant P; Akolkar, Dadasaheb B; Apurwa, Sachin R; Deshpande, Uday; Khedkar, Smita U; Stålsby-Lundborg, Cecilia

    2015-04-02

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Its dissemination can occur through water sources contaminated by it. Here, we report for the first time the draft genome sequence of ETEC strain E24377A, obtained from a tribal drinking water source in India. Copyright © 2015 Tamhankar et al.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain E24377A, Obtained from a Tribal Drinking Water Source in India

    OpenAIRE

    Tamhankar, Ashok J.; Nerkar, Sandeep S.; Khadake, Prashant P.; Akolkar, Dadasaheb B.; Apurwa, Sachin R.; Deshpande, Uday; Khedkar, Smita U.; St?lsby-Lundborg, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Its dissemination can occur through water sources contaminated by it. Here, we report for the first time the draft genome sequence of ETEC strain E24377A, obtained from a tribal drinking water source in India.

  19. The cumulative MeHg and PCBs exposure and risk of tribal and US general population with SHEDS-multimedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies have shown that the U.S. population continues to be exposed to methyl mercury (MeHg) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) due to the long half-life of those environmental contaminants. Fish intake of Tribal populations is much higher than the U.S. general population due t...

  20. 75 FR 30430 - Notice Terminating the Exclusion of Indian Tribal Leases in the Uintah and Ouray Reservation From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: John Barder, Manager, Team B, Western Audit and Compliance, Minerals Revenue Management... Minerals Management Service Notice Terminating the Exclusion of Indian Tribal Leases in the Uintah and Ouray Reservation From Valuation Under 30 CFR 206.172 AGENCY: Minerals Management Service, Interior...

  1. 25 CFR 542.4 - How do these regulations affect minimum internal control standards established in a Tribal-State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do these regulations affect minimum internal control... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM INTERNAL CONTROL STANDARDS § 542.4 How do these regulations affect minimum internal control standards established in a Tribal-State compact? (a) If there is a...

  2. 45 CFR 286.110 - What safeguards are there to ensure that participants in Tribal TANF work activities do not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... part in a work activity outlined in § 286.100 cannot fill a vacant employment position if: (1) Any... terminated the employment of any regular employee or otherwise caused an involuntary reduction in its work... participants in Tribal TANF work activities do not displace other workers? 286.110 Section 286.110 Public...

  3. 25 CFR 900.234 - What types of personal conflicts of interest involving tribal officers, employees or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... tribal officers, employees or subcontractors would have to be regulated by an Indian tribe? 900.234 Section 900.234 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CONTRACTS UNDER THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION...

  4. Welcome to a New World: Experiences of American Indian Tribal College and University Transfer Students at Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makomenaw, Matthew Van Alstine

    2012-01-01

    This study utilizes an Indigenous methodology and phenomenological methods to better understand the experiences of eight American Indian tribal college and university (TCU) students who transferred to four-year Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs). The participants attended TCUs and PWIs located in the Midwest, a geographic area that is…

  5. Guidelines for Teaching Concepts of Fairness, Justice and Democracy in BIA and Tribal-Contract Schools. A curriculum Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Albuquerque, NM.

    Purpose of this bulletin is to inform teachers and other school staff about new requirements, effective in 1974-75, for all Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and tribal-contract schools to develop curriculum units relating to citizenship training and/or student rights and responsibilities in all grades K through post-secondary. Intended primarily for…

  6. 42 CFR 137.110 - May a Self-Governance Tribe retain and expend any program income earned pursuant to a compact and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May a Self-Governance Tribe retain and expend any... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Funding Program Income § 137.110 May a Self-Governance... Medicare, Medicaid, or other program income earned by a Self-Governance Tribe shall be treated as...

  7. The basis of clinical tribalism, hierarchy and stereotyping: a laboratory-controlled teamwork experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Clay-Williams, Robyn; Vecellio, Elia; Marks, Danielle; Hooper, Tamara; Westbrook, Mary; Westbrook, Johanna; Blakely, Brette; Ludlow, Kristiana

    2016-07-29

    To examine the basis of multidisciplinary teamwork. In real-world healthcare settings, clinicians often cluster in profession-based tribal silos, form hierarchies and exhibit stereotypical behaviours. It is not clear whether these social structures are more a product of inherent characteristics of the individuals or groups comprising the professions, or attributable to a greater extent to workplace factors. Controlled laboratory environment with well-appointed, quiet rooms and video and audio equipment. Clinical professionals (n=133) divided into 35 groups of doctors, nurses and allied health professions, or mixed professions. Participants engaged in one of three team tasks, and their performance was video-recorded and assessed. Primary: teamwork performance. Secondary, pre-experimental: a bank of personality questionnaires designed to assess participants' individual differences. Postexperimental: the 16-item Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS) to measure teamwork skills; this was self-assessed by participants and also by external raters. In addition, external, arm's length blinded observations of the videotapes were conducted. At baseline, there were few significant differences between the professions in collective orientation, most of the personality factors, Machiavellianism and conservatism. Teams generally functioned well, with effective relationships, and exhibited little by way of discernible tribal or hierarchical behaviours, and no obvious differences between groups (F (3, 31)=0.94, p=0.43). Once clinicians are taken out of the workplace and put in controlled settings, tribalism, hierarchical and stereotype behaviours largely dissolve. It is unwise therefore to attribute these factors to fundamental sociological or psychological differences between individuals in the professions, or aggregated group differences. Workplace cultures are more likely to be influential in shaping such behaviours. The results underscore the importance of culture and

  8. Cardiovascular health among healthy population of Northeast region of India: a cross-sectional study comparing urban-tribal difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Soma; Gupta, Kinnari; Kumar, Soumitra

    2013-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of adult mortality in India but data on the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors are scarce, especially from North-east region of India. This study aims to assess the prevalence and the urban/tribal gradient of cardiovascular disease risk factors among healthy population of Tripura. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 238 healthy individuals (140 urban and 98 tribal) in one urban and five tribal areas of Tripura. Data was collected on sociodemographic profile, medical history, anthropometry, dietary patterns and addiction. Fasting blood samples were collected for biochemical analysis. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors and short-term cardiovascular disease risk score was calculated. The association of independent variables with 10-year cardiovascular disease risk score were examined by using multiple regression model. Prevalence of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia, metabolic syndrome and short-term cardiovascular disease risk score were higher in urban group. Urban people had higher salt, calories and fat intake. No difference was found in the addiction patterns of tobacco and alcohol but frequency and quantity being higher in tribal area. Dyslipidaemia and alcohol consumption showed significant positive association with 10-year cardiovascular disease risk score in both groups. While the non-sedentary lifestyle and dietary habits (low salt, low fat, carbohydrate predominant) of tribal population need to be promoted as a whole across the nation, they need to be protected from the adverse effects of rampant prevalence of tobacco and alcohol addiction among them. Urban population need to be extricated from adverse effects of sedentary lifestyle, modern food habits (high salt, high fat) and tobacco-alcohol addiction.

  9. HANDBOOK FOR CONDUCTING ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEWS RELATED TO TRIBAL AND INDIAN PARTICIPATION IN THE CONSTRUCTION, OPERATION AND CLEANUP OF THE NUCLEAR WEAPONS COMPLEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristann Gibson; Mervyn L. Tano; Albert Wing

    1999-08-31

    There were three major projects undertaken at the outset of the DOE/EM 22 Cooperative Agreement back in September 1995. There was a project relating to Tribal oral histories. Another project of the Cooperative Agreement related to technology and Tribal values and needs. This project by analogy could apply to issues of technology, environmental cleanup and other indigenous peoples internationally. How can Indian Tribes participate in defining the need for technology development rather than merely learning to adapt themselves and their situations and values to technology developed by others with differing needs, values and economic resources? And the third project was the placement of a Tribal intern in EM-22.

  10. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  11. The interpretation of Huntington's thesis of clash of civilizations as a tribal conflict of global proportions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljković Zoran D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The author of this paper attempted the interpretation of Huntington's thought that the clash of civilizations is tribal conflict of global proportions. In the first interpretation of the conflict, we think of civilization as a tribe in conflict with the other tribes, they mutually perceive each other as barbarians, denouncing each other's civilizational identity. In the second interpretation, the clash of civilizations is perceived as a clash of postmodern immigrant groups (tribes with the dominant culture of the local population within a state. In the age of the universal conflict, we see Huntington's pessimistic view of the social world and the temporary man, whom we characterize as a synthesis of immigrants, migrants and foreigners, as a kind of personification of the spirit of the times of postmodern twenty-first century.

  12. Assessment of hand pump waters in three tribal dominated districts of southern Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, B K; Sharma, L L; Durve, V S

    2008-04-01

    Udaipur, Banswara and Dungarpur districts of southern Rajasthan (India) have dominance of tribal population. In these districts besides other water resources, hand pumps are catering the need for drinking water. The present study was undertaken to assess the level of chemical and bacteriological status for comparing the water quality with the prevailing standards. 18 hand pumps were studied for selected water quality parameters such as, pH, hardness, chloride, fluoride, NO3 -N, EC, orthophosphate, TDS, TSS, BOD, total coliforms and faecal coliforms, following the standard methods. The data on chemical parameters revealed that in all 18 hand pumps the water quality was within the permissible level of WHO. However, in eight hand pumps the faecal coliforms were higher (2-6 MPN/100 mL) than the permissible limit which confirm organic contamination in these drinking water resources. On the basis of this study, suitable remedial measures for protection of water quality have been suggested.

  13. Tribal Archives, Traditional Knowledge, and Local Contexts: Why the “s” Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Christen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article I examine the landscape of tribal or Indigenous archival management as it relates to digital assets and, more specifically, how these might help us reimagine the intellectual property needs of local, traditional, and indigenous communities, libraries, archives, and museums as they seek to manage, preserve, and reuse their digital cultural heritage. The colonial collecting project was a destructive mechanism by which Native materials were unhinged from their local places and knowledge and at the same time used as markers of Native erasure. As part of a practical solution to contemporary intellectual property dilemmas faced by Indigenous peoples globally due in large part to the residue of the colonial landscape, I will introduce the Local Contexts project and the Traditional Knowledge License and Label platform (www.localcontexts.org as one intervention into the sometimes-confusing arena of Indigenous intellectual property rights and the digital commons.

  14. Theory of feminism and tribal women: an empirical study of koraput.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Anil Kumar

    2009-01-01

    In the mainstream culture to identify oneself as a "feminist" has been a fashion. Feminism covers all issues degrading and depriving women of their due in society vis-à-vis male members and it has started a crusade against atrocities on women across the globe. It is therefore regarded as synonymous with a movement and revolution to defend and promote issues involving women. However, the concerns that feminism raises do seem alien to tribal inhabitants in the Koraput district of Orissa, because, unknowingly, they are its champions. Its principles are ingrained in their very culture. They practice and follow feminism as a matter of habit that has come to them down the ages. They do not follow it out of fear, compassion, enlightenment, education or compulsion; it is a necessity that comes quite naturally to them. It has been spontaneous and indigenous.

  15. Integrating Earth System Science Data Into Tribal College and University Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, P. J.; Perkey, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Universities Space Research Association and Sinte Gleska University (SGU) have teamed with eight Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs) to participate in a NASA Earth Science funded project, TRibal Earth Science and Technology Education (TRESTE) project which focuses on TCU faculty teaching undergraduate Earth science courses to non-science and science students, with particular attention to TCU faculty teaching K-12 pre- and in- service teachers. The eight partner TCUs are: Blackfeet Community College (BCC), Browning, MT, Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, Cloquet, MN, Fort Berthold Community College, New Town, ND, Little Priest Tribal College, Winnebago, NE, Oglala Lakota College, Pine Ridge, SD, Sitting Bull College, Fort Yates, ND, Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt, ND, United Tribes Technical College (UTTC), Bismarck, ND. The goal of this 3-year project is to promote the use of NASA Earth science data and products in the classroom thereby enabling faculty to inspire undergraduate students to careers in Earth system science, the physical sciences, and related fields of science and engineering. To accomplish this goal we are targeting three areas: (1) course content - enhance the utilization of Earth system science and physical science concepts, (2) teaching methodology - develop problem-based learning (PBL) methods, and (3) tools and technology - increase the utilization of GIS and remote sensing in the classroom. We also have enlisted ESRI, NativeView and the USGS as collaborators. To date we have held an introductory "needs" workshop at the USGS EROS Data Center and two annual workshops, one at UTTC and the second at BCC. During these annual workshops we have divided our time among the three areas. We have modeled the workshops using the PBL or Case Study approach by starting with a story or current event. Topics for the annual workshops have been Drought and Forest and Grassland Fires. These topics led us into the solar radiation budget

  16. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project; Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-12-01

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2002 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $3,036,014. Bonneville Power Administration identifies them as follows; (1) Part I--Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and $2,682,635 which includes--Equipment costs of $1,807,105. (2) Part II--Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-35-04, Contract No. 4035, $352,379 for Clearwater Coho Restoration Master Plan development Based on NPPC authorization for construction and operation of NPTH, the annual contracts were negotiated for the amounts shown above under (1) and (2). Construction contracts were handled by BPA until all facilities are completed and accepted.

  17. Cognitive impairment, psychiatric disorders, and problematic behaviors in a tribal nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, Lori L; Manson, Spero M

    2007-04-01

    Residents' cognitive, psychiatric, and behavioral statuses were examined as part of a larger study of care in a nursing home (NH) owned and operated by a Northern Plains American Indian tribe. Reviews of 45 medical records and semistructured interviews with 36 staff were completed. Creekside residents had considerable psychiatric and behavioral morbidity. High prevalences of non-Alzheimer's disease dementia, cognitive impairment, anxious symptomatology, and resistance to care were met with psychopharmacotherapy, reorientation, and informal techniques for behavior management. Significant depressive, anxious, psychotic, and behavioral symptoms remained. Staff interpretations of resident problems consisted of an ethnopsychological schema emphasizing resident loneliness, grumpiness, and propensity to "fight" rather than formal psychiatric nosology. Tribal NH residents were likely underdiagnosed for dementia and anxiety. Residual behavioral and psychiatric symptomatology suggest room for improvement in the NH's behavioral management regimen. Need for greater attention to conceptual, diagnostic, clinical, and documentation processes in the NH setting is noted.

  18. Theory of Feminism and Tribal Women: An Empirical Study of Koraput

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Anil Kumar

    2009-01-01

    In the mainstream culture to identify oneself as a “feminist” has been a fashion. Feminism covers all issues degrading and depriving women of their due in society vis-à-vis male members and it has started a crusade against atrocities on women across the globe. It is therefore regarded as synonymous with a movement and revolution to defend and promote issues involving women. However, the concerns that feminism raises do seem alien to tribal inhabitants in the Koraput district of Orissa, because, unknowingly, they are its champions. Its principles are ingrained in their very culture. They practice and follow feminism as a matter of habit that has come to them down the ages. They do not follow it out of fear, compassion, enlightenment, education or compulsion; it is a necessity that comes quite naturally to them. It has been spontaneous and indigenous. PMID:21836781

  19. Obesogenic environments in tribally-affiliated childcare centers and corresponding obesity rates in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, Susan B; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie A; Lora, Karina R; Campbell, Janis E; Arnold, Sandra H; DeGrace, Beth; Horm, Diane; Stephens, Lancer

    2016-06-01

    Determine the relationship between obesogenic characteristics of childcare and child adiposity in tribally-affiliated centers in Oklahoma. The two-day Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation (EPAO) included a total environment (TE), nutrition (N), and physical activity (PA) score and took place in 11 centers across Oklahoma. Eighty-two preschool children (3-5 years) participated. Child height and weight were measured and overweight status (≥ 85th percentile for age and sex) was determined. Regression models, fit using Generalized Estimating Equations methodology to account for clustering by center were used and adjusted for center characteristics. Participants were 3.8 (0.8) years old, 55% male, 67% American Indian (AI) and 38% overweight. A healthier TE and PA was associated with a reduced odds of overweight, which remained significant after adjusting for some center characteristics, but not all. A healthier TE, N, and PA was associated with lower BMI percentile, which remained significant after some center-level adjustments, but not all. Lower sedentary opportunity and sedentary time were no longer associated with reduced odds of overweight following adjustment. Lower opportunity for high sugar and high fat foods and minutes of active play were associated with reduced odds of overweight in some adjusted models. Collectively unadjusted and adjusted models demonstrate that some aspects of a healthier childcare center environment are associated with reduced odds of overweight and lower BMI percentile in preschool children attending tribally-affiliated childcare in Oklahoma. Future research should examine the association of childcare and health behaviors and further explore the role of potential confounders.

  20. Faecal microbiota of healthy adults in south India: Comparison of a tribal & a rural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadass, Balamurugan; Rani, B Sandya; Pugazhendhi, Srinivasan; John, K R; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S

    2017-02-01

    The relevance of the gut microbiota to human health is increasingly appreciated. The objective of this study was to compare the gut microbiota of a group of adult tribals with that of healthy adult villagers in Tamil Nadu, India. Faeces were collected from 10 healthy tribal adults (TAs) in the Jawadhi hills and from 10 healthy villagers [rural adults (RAs)] in Vellore district, Tamil Nadu. DNA was extracted, and 456 bp segments comprising hypervariable regions 3 and 4 of the 16S rRNA gene were amplified, barcoded and 454 sequenced. Totally 227,710 good-quality reads were analyzed. TAs consumed a millets-based diet, ate pork every day, and did not consume milk or milk products. RAs consumed a rice-based diet with meat intake once a week. In both groups, Firmicutes was the most abundant phylum, followed by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. The median Firmicutes-to-Bacteroidetes ratio was 34.0 in TA and 92.9 in RA groups. Actinobacteria were significantly low in TA, possibly due to non-consumption of milk. Clostridium constituted the most abundant genus in both groups, but was significantly more abundant in TAs than RAs, while Streptococcus was significantly more abundant in RA (P<0.05). Analyses of genetic distance revealed that the microbiota were distinctly different between TA and RA, and principal component analysis using 550 distinct taxonomically identifiable sequences revealed a clear separation of microbiota composition in the two groups. Phylogenetic analysis of major microbiota indicated clustering of microbial groups at different major branch points for TAs and RAs. Phylum Firmicutes and genus Clostridium constituted the bulk of the faecal microbiota, while significant differences in composition between the groups were probably due to differences in diet and lifestyle.

  1. Rats: if you can't beat them eat them! (Tricks of the trade observed among the Adi and other North-East Indian tribals)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meyer-Rochow, Victor Benno; Megu, Karsing; Chakravorty, Jharna

    2015-01-01

    Since outside the tribal areas of North-East India it is not widely known, neither in the world nor in India itself, that rats are considered a delicious food item, this was one of several reasons why...

  2. Presentation from 2016 STAR Tribal Research Meeting: Water, Our Voice to the Future: Climate Change Adaptation and Waterborne Disease Prevention on the Crow Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, Water, Our Voice to the Future: Climate Change Adaptation and Waterborne Disease Prevention on the Crow Reservation, was given at the 2016 STAR Tribal Research Meeting held on Sept. 20-21, 2016.

  3. Postmodernizm ve Klan Pazarlaması: Dinsel Topluluklara Yönelik Bir Uygulama = Postmodernism and Tribal Marketing: an Application For Religious Communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murat AKYILDIZ; Emel ADAMIŞ

    2013-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study is to define the religious communities in Turkey in terms of modern tribe behaviors and to determine to what extent tribal marketing is applicable to the concerning communities...

  4. UST System Compatibility with Petroleum-Biofuel Blends: A Brief Guide to the 2015 Federal UST Regulations for Owners and Operators of USTs Located on Tribal Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Review information for UST owners and operators on tribal lands with compatibility requirements in the 2015 federal UST regulation when storing gasoline blends containing greater than 10 percent ethanol or diesel blends containing greater than 20 percent.

  5. Framework Agreement: her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada as represented by the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council, ...

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) Agreement number FWA2005-1451 is a Framework Agreement between Canada and the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council for and on behalf of the First Nations which it represents...

  6. Transformative learning, tribal membership and cultural restoration: A case study of an embedded Native American service-learning project at a research university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent E Sykes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the case of a service-learning project embedded within a CBPR-based Native American tribal nation and research university collaboration in the US. Transformative learning (TL served as the theoretical framework by which we, the multidisciplinary research team, came to appreciate the significance of the tribal nation’s lived history and deep sense of cultural loss, as well as the social impact of the service-learning project. To date, the majority of research on transformative learning has focused on the individual. This research builds on the work of a growing cadre of TL theorists who consider the role of the collective in transformation. This is especially salient for community-focused research efforts that incorporate service-learning. In this case, we treat consciousness raising, observed through documents, direct observation and participant observation, as evidence of collective transformation. Results indicate that the service-learning project served as a catalyst for tribal nation higher education students and tribal leaders to collectively engage in critical reflection. In doing so, both groups came to develop new, emergent views of tribal membership. Students, in particular, emerged with transformed world views and deepened cultural connections, while tribal leaders came to appreciate service-learning relative to tribal needs. We thus assert that service-learning can be a culturally appropriate, sustainable educational mechanism that has application across a wide range of Indigenous communities, thereby highlighting the instrumentality of this case. The research also indicates how higher education institutions and fellow researchers oriented to CBPR may render more successful their future collaboration practices with historically marginalised communities. We advocate that service-learning be directed by the tribal nation or community in question. As such, the community’s lived experience and world view becomes

  7. 42 CFR 137.275 - May Self-Governance Tribes include IHS construction programs in a construction project agreement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May Self-Governance Tribes include IHS construction... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Purpose and Scope § 137.275 May Self-Governance Tribes include IHS construction programs in a construction project agreement or in a funding...

  8. 40 CFR 147.2200 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV, and V wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., and 281. (ii) Vernon's Texas Codes Annotated, Water Code, Chapters 5, 7, 26, and 32, Health and Safety... the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission a predecessor to the Texas Commission on... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION...

  9. Impact of nutritious meals on the nutritional status of the tribal students: A comparison between centralized kitchens (Annapurna) and regular kitchens in government tribal residential schools from two Districts of Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devara, Rajagopal; Deshmukh, Devika

    2017-01-01

    Tackling undernutrition is a global priority. It is the single largest risk factor influencing the burden of disease estimates at the global level. The Annapurna Project was undertaken by Government of Maharashtra to provide nutritious meals to Ashram/residential tribal school students through a centralized kitchen for achieving optimal growth and development and to prevent morbidity. The primary objective of our work was to ascertain whether the provision of nutritious meals through centralized kitchens improves the proportion of underweight and stunted children. We used a cluster trial with parallel intervention and control arms. The allocation ratio was 1:1 for participants in the intervention and control areas. The pilot was undertaken between 2015 and 2017. Tribal dominant Nashik and Palghar districts in Maharashtra were selected by the state government to implement the centralized kitchen plan. At the baseline, the percentage of underweight children in the intervention group was 36.9% and 31.9% in the control groups. The percentage of stunting in the intervention group was 30.0% and 38.2% in the control group. At the endline, 21.9% and 26.3% of the children were underweight. Both groups showed an improvement as compared to the baseline. However, the difference in reduction between the intervention and the control group was insignificant. Similarly, stunting also reduced to 12.9% and 14.6% in the intervention and control groups, respectively. The provision of regular nutritious meals, through centralized and local kitchen in government tribal residential schools of Maharashtra is effective and important in tackling undernutrition in Tribal children.

  10. Medicinal Formulations of a Kanda Tribal Healer — A Tribe on the Verge of Disappearance in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmatullah, Mohammed; Ayman, Umma; Akter, Fatema; Sarker, Mridul; Sifa, Rolee; Sarker, Bijoy; Chyti, Humayra Naj; Jahan, Farhana Israt; Chowdhury, Majeedul H; Chowdhury, Soheli A

    2012-01-01

    The Kanda tribe is one of the lesser known small tribes of Bangladesh with an estimated population of about 1700 people (according to them), and on the verge of extinction as a separate entity. To some extent, they have assimilated with the surrounding mainstream Bengali-speaking population, but they still maintain their cultural practices including traditional medicinal practices, for which they have their own tribal healers. Nothing at all has been documented thus far about their traditiona...

  11. Post-truth and „Fake news”. From Tribalizing to Filters – Interview with Constantin Vică

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Iancu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The interview addresses the concept of „post-truth“ and tries to get its meaning and its limits. The reference point is that of social networks which impose filters of reality and tribalize the Internet users. Post-truth is seen as a virus of democracy and as a challenge to Political science, and the „fake news“ phenomenon is analyzed in the light of its stake: to generate reluctance to believe anything.

  12. Effective state, local, and tribal police intelligence the New York City Police Department's intelligence enterprise - a smart practice

    OpenAIRE

    Comiskey, John Grattan

    2010-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited State, local, and tribal law enforcement (SLTLE) agencies play a significant role in homeland security. Their intelligence function supports their hometown and the nation's homeland security. The New York City Police Department (NYPD) recognized that the same intelligence that secures the homeland is required to secure New York City. NYPD restructured its organizational structure and external business practices to acquire the requ...

  13. STANDARDIZATION OF JANAMAGHUTTI: A FOLK-LORIC HERBAL FORMULATION OF TRIBALS OF CHITRAKOOT REGION, DISTRICT SATNA, MADHYA PRADESH, INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Indra P Tripathi; Neelesh Dwivedi

    2013-01-01

    Janamghutti is used in folklore prcatices as preventive health care need of tribals and rural population of the country since antiquity. This knowledge of medicament transmitted oraly through ancesters. The present study was aimed to validate the traditional medicinal knowledge through pharmacognostical standardization. Physico chemical parameters such as extractive values, ash values, loss on drying and pH were performed as per the WHO guidelines. The microscopic examination of the drug was ...

  14. Prevalence of autism spectrum disorder among rural, urban, and tribal children (1–10 Years of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Raina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies on autism spectrum disorders (ASDs have largely focused on children in specific settings. The current scenario of research in ASDs is limited largely to clinic-based case reports, case series, and retrospective chart reviews. The present study is the first population-based prevalence study conducted across rural, urban, and tribal populations in India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional two-phase study was conducted covering children in the age group of 1–10 years of age across geographical regions representing rural, urban, and tribal populations. The first phase (screening phase involved administration of the Hindi version of the Indian Scale for Assessment of Autism. Those identified as suspected of ASD and 10% of all classified as nonsuspects for autism were also evaluated by the clinical team in second phase (evaluation phase. Results: Forty-three children out of a total of 28,070 children in rural, urban, and tribal area in the age group of 1–10 years were diagnosed as cases of ASD yielding a prevalence of 0.15% (95% confidence interval [CI] =0.15–0.25. Logistic regression analysis showed a two times significantly higher risk of diagnosing ASD in rural area as compared to tribal (odds ratio [OR]; 95% CI = 2.17 [1.04–4.52], P = 0.04. Male sex and upper socioeconomic group of head of family/father had a higher risk of getting diagnosed as autism as compared to lower socioeconomic group (OR; 95% CI - 3.23; 0.24–44.28, P = 0.38. Conclusions: Estimation of true prevalence of ASD in India is going to improve policies on developmental disabilities.

  15. Post-truth and „Fake news”. From Tribalizing to Filters – Interview with Constantin Vică

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan Iancu

    2017-01-01

    The interview addresses the concept of „post-truth“ and tries to get its meaning and its limits. The reference point is that of social networks which impose filters of reality and tribalize the Internet users. Post-truth is seen as a virus of democracy and as a challenge to Political science, and the „fake news“ phenomenon is analyzed in the light of its stake: to generate reluctance to believe anything.

  16. The net benefits of human-ignited wildfire forecasting: the case of tribal land units in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeff Prestemon; David T. Butry; Douglas S. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that some categories of human-ignited wildfires may be forecastable, owing to their temporal clustering, with the possibility that resources could be predeployed to help reduce the incidence of such wildfires. We estimated several kinds of incendiary and other human-ignited wildfire forecast models at the weekly time step for tribal land units in the...

  17. Linking Tribal Medicinal Plant Co-operatives and Ayurvedic Manufacturing Firms for Better Rural Livelihood and Sustainable Use of Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Madhavan, Harilal

    2008-01-01

    The analysis brings forth the major issues in medicinal plant sector, taking Kerala as a case. The analysis, basically use the supply chain framework, focuses on the Southern Western Ghats part of Kerala, gives the picture of the lopsided sharing of income and hence the side-streamed tribal collectors in the medicinal plant chain. In the existing two types of chains, first one dominated by largely unequal distribution of income because of the existence of a large number of mediators while t...

  18. La Politique coloniale française et les Ahl Shaykh Ma al-cAynin. Jihad et resistances tribales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Bonte

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available El destino de Ahl Shaykh Mâ al-cAynîn está conectado a la resistencia contra la colonización europea en el Sahara y Marruecos. La literatura colonial francesa ha concebido la lucha del Sheij como consecuencia de un panislamismo activista. El contexto tribal regional lleva al Sheij a oponerse a la colonización francesa en Mauritania y Marruecos cuestionándose la legitimidad dinástica alawi. El desarrollo de la yihad concluyó con el nombramiento del sultán de Marruecos. Se subraya las contradicciones de un proyecto político basado en el guerrero tlamid del Sheij y las movilizaciones tribales contra el orden colonial. The fate of the Ahl Shaykh Mâ al-cAynîn is connected to the resistance against the European colonization in Sahara and Morocco. The french colonial literature has conceived the Shaykh’s fight as a consequence of an activistic panislamism. As a matter of fact it is located in a tribal regional context leading the Shaykh to be opposed to the French colonization in Mauritania and Morocco and to question finally the calawi dynastic legitimacy. The development of the jihad concluded in the name of the Moroccan Sultan underlines the contradictions of a political project depending on the warrior tlamid of the Shaykh and tribal mobilizations against the colonial order. The check of the jihad reduces the family’s part in the organization of the resistance; after 1920 this part becomes a secondary one.

  19. Association of religion and cultural tradition with alcohol use among some tribal communities of Arunachal Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Himanshu K; Bajpai, Ram C; Tiwari, Preeti

    2017-08-18

    Arunachal Pradesh, a land of high mountains and dense forest, is home to many tribal communities, which comprise two thirds of the state's population. Alcohol is one of the common addictive substances used traditionally among them despite much awareness about its harmful effect on health. The present study is focused on finding the association of religion, ethnicity, and demographic characteristics with alcohol use among some tribal communities in Changlang district of Arunachal Pradesh. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted on substance use in Changlang district of Arunachal Pradesh, India. A sample of 3,421 tribal respondents (1,795 males and 1,626 females) aged 15 years and older was extracted and analyzed. Sociodemographic differences in the prevalence of alcohol use among the tribes were analyzed and compared using the chi-square and t test. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to identify the predictor variables of alcohol use. Data analysis indicates high prevalence of alcohol use (39.1%) among the tribes; and it was higher among males (49.3%) than among females (27.9%). Alcohol use was higher among Indigenous (65%) and Hindu (55.1%) religions compared with Buddhist (24.7%) and Christian (10%). It was also recorded high among Tangsa (42.0%) and Tutsa (76%) tribes compared with Singpho (13.6%) and Khamti (11.4%). High association of alcohol use among the tribal community with age, occupation, ethnicity, and religion was also recorded. Association of alcohol use with demographic characteristics, religion, and ethnic group shows the traditional and cultural belief in alcohol use persists among the tribes.

  20. IAQ control in nursing homes using integrated desiccant technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B.M. [Engelhard ICC, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Miyauchi, Hikoo [Nichimen Engine Sales, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-07-01

    The demographics of the Japanese population indicate a need to provide a greater degree of elderly care, largely due to the long life expectancy of the Japanese people. It is explained that in response to this need Japan has embarked upon a dramatic programme to construct 5000 facilities by the year 2001. Air conditioning requirements of the elderly are somewhat different than those for other facilities and present an opportunity for the use of specialized equipment that will satisfy those requirements. A new facility care unit for the elderly has been built in Nagano, Japan and will start operation at the end of 1996. A new desiccant air conditioning unit designed for this facility is described. It combines humidity control of a desiccant sub-system and the thermal control of a conventional chiller in a single air-handling system. Regeneration of the desiccant is realized by a propane boiler at 88C, which also supplies heat in winter. It is emphasized that this new and exciting approach to air conditioning will change the expectations of society about indoor air quality and comfort control, which have been governed by the use of conventional equipment only, together with its inherent limitations. Other potential applications of desiccant technology are in supermarkets, industrial spaces, Pachinko halls, etc.