WorldWideScience

Sample records for program funding findings

  1. Finding Funding: A Guide to Federal Sources for Youth Programs. Finding Funding Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins-Harper, Dionne; Bhat, Soumya

    2007-01-01

    This publication is part of a series of tools and resources on financing and sustaining youth programming. These tools and resources are intended to help policymakers, program developers, and community leaders develop innovative strategies for implementing, financing, and sustaining effective programs and policies. This guide outlines strategies…

  2. Program development fund: FY 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-03-01

    It is the objective of the Fund to encourage innovative research to maintain the Laboratory's position at the forefront of science. Funds are used to explore new ideas and concepts that may potentially develop into new directions of research for the Laboratory and that are consistent with the major needs, overall goals, and mission of the Laboratory and the DOE. The types of projects eligible for support from PDF include: work in forefront areas of science and technology for the primary purpose of enriching Laboratory research and development capabilities; advanced study of new hypotheses, new experimental concepts, or innovative approaches to energy problems; experiments directed toward ''proof of principle'' or early determination of the utility of a new concept; and conception, design analyses, and development of experimental devices, instruments, or components. This report is a review of these research programs.

  3. Find Funds for Wellness Assessment Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Marilyn M.; Kirkpatrick, Beth

    1995-01-01

    Many physical education teachers have difficulty finding ways to purchase wellness assessment equipment. The article provides strategies to help them find the money for needed equipment, highlighting the physical education budget, the computer equipment budget, grants, local businesses, statewide organizations, universities, and national…

  4. 7 CFR 227.5 - Program funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS NUTRITION EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROGRAM General § 227.5 Program funding. (a... Education. (b) First fiscal year participation—(1) Assessment and planning grant. A portion of the total... administrative costs shall consist of an amount equal to 50 cents per child enrolled in schools and institutions...

  5. STEM Intervention Programs: Funding Practices and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Blanca E.; George-Jackson, Casey E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the funding practices and challenges of diversity initiatives found in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Interviews with 55 intervention program administrators, representing 48 unique STEM intervention programs, were conducted at nine large research-intensive universities. The interviews,…

  6. How Funding Instability Affects Army Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    important contributions to the conduct and reporting of this work. Lauri Zeman guided this work from the start. Fran Lussier worked to get the project...Table 1.1 reflect plans at Mile - stone B. The third column provides the date of Milestone B, which occurred after 1985 for 17 of the 18 programs. That...following the intensive Mile - stone B review conducted within the Army and OSD. Increased fund- ing was slightly more common than reductions in

  7. 25 CFR 47.3 - How does a Bureau-operated school find out how much funding it will receive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION UNIFORM DIRECT FUNDING AND SUPPORT FOR BUREAU-OPERATED SCHOOLS § 47.3 How does a Bureau-operated school find out how much funding it will receive? The Office of Indian Education Programs (OIEP) will... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a Bureau-operated school find out how much...

  8. 36 CFR 401.10 - Monument Trust Fund Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monument Trust Fund Program... MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS § 401.10 Monument Trust Fund Program. Pursuant to the provisions of 36 U.S.C. 2106(d), the Commission operates a Monument Trust Fund Program (MTFP) in countries where there is a Commission...

  9. Increased Science Instrumentation Funding Strengthens Mars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Lee D.; Graff, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    As the strategic knowledge gaps mature for the exploration of Mars, Mars sample return (MSR), and Phobos/Deimos missions, one approach that becomes more probable involves smaller science instrumentation and integrated science suites. Recent technological advances provide the foundation for a significant evolution of instrumentation; however, the funding support is currently too small to fully utilize these advances. We propose that an increase in funding for instrumentation development occur in the near-term so that these foundational technologies can be applied. These instruments would directly address the significant knowledge gaps for humans to Mars orbit, humans to the Martian surface, and humans to Phobos/ Deimos. They would also address the topics covered by the Decadal Survey and the Mars scientific goals, objectives, investigations and priorities as stated by the MEPAG. We argue that an increase of science instrumentation funding would be of great benefit to the Mars program as well as the potential for human exploration of the Mars system. If the total non-Earth-related planetary science instrumentation budget were increased 100% it would not add an appreciable amount to the overall NASA budget and would provide the real potential for future breakthroughs. If such an approach were implemented in the near-term, NASA would benefit greatly in terms of science knowledge of the Mars, Phobos/Deimos system, exploration risk mitigation, technology development, and public interest.

  10. 25 CFR 170.301 - Can a tribe use IRR Program funds to leverage other funds or pay back loans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a tribe use IRR Program funds to leverage other funds... Financing § 170.301 Can a tribe use IRR Program funds to leverage other funds or pay back loans? (a) A tribe can use IRR Program funds to leverage other funds. (b) A tribe can use IRR Program funds to pay back...

  11. 5 CFR 410.304 - Funding training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding training programs. 410.304... Establishing and Implementing Training Programs § 410.304 Funding training programs. Section 4112 of title 5, United States Code, provides for agencies paying the costs of their training programs and plans from...

  12. CPD Cross-Program Funding Matrix and Dashboard

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — These matrices and dashboards provide funding information for each city and state that receives CPD Program funds, in a place-based format. The reports detail the...

  13. 25 CFR 47.11 - Can these funds be used as matching funds for other Federal programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION UNIFORM DIRECT FUNDING AND SUPPORT FOR BUREAU-OPERATED SCHOOLS § 47.11 Can these funds be used as matching funds for other Federal programs? A Bureau-operated school may use funds that it receives under...

  14. 78 FR 63747 - Public Housing Capital Fund Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... Housing Development Program (which encompasses mixed-finance development), into the Capital Fund Program... that promote energy conservation and efficiency, including green construction and retrofits, which... Housing Development Program (which encompasses mixed-finance development). In 2008, the Housing and...

  15. Funding Opportunity Announcement: Pesticide Safety Education Funds Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is soliciting proposals from eligible applicants to establish and administer a national subaward program in support of pesticide applicator education and training for certified applicators of restricted use pesticides.

  16. 7 CFR 1780.18 - Allocation of program funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...” means any of the States of the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, any territory or... Administrator may retain additional amounts to fund authorized demonstration programs. (8) Pooling of funds. A... time of pooling those funds within a State's allocation for the fiscal year or portion of the fiscal...

  17. 75 FR 30007 - Race to the Top Fund Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Overview Information Race to the Top Fund Assessment Program Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Numbers: 84.395B (Comprehensive Assessment Systems grants) and 84.395C (High School Course Assessment... applications for new awards for FY 2010 (NIA) for the Race to the Top Fund Assessment Program. This notice...

  18. 76 FR 6653 - Public Housing Capital Fund Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... Development Program (which encompasses mixed-finance development), into the Capital Fund Program (CFP). This... that maximize energy conservation and efficiency, including green construction and retrofits, which.... One is where the funding for additional units is for a mixed- finance project (42 U.S.C. 1437g(g)(3)(C...

  19. The employment intervention demonstration program: major findings and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Judith A; Blyler, Crystal R; Leff, H Stephen; McFarlane, William R; Goldberg, Richard W; Gold, Paul B; Mueser, Kim T; Shafer, Michael S; Onken, Steven J; Donegan, Kate; Carey, Martha Ann; Kaufmann, Caroline; Razzano, Lisa A

    2008-01-01

    This article summarizes the published results of the Employment Intervention Demonstration Program (EIDP), a federally-funded, multi-site study examining the effectiveness of supported employment programs for 1273 unemployed individuals with psychiatric disabilities in the U.S. Findings confirm the effectiveness of supported employment across different models, program locations, and participant populations. The study's results are discussed in the context of public policies designed to encourage return to work for those with a severe mental illness.

  20. Interactions between Energy Efficiency Programs funded under the Recovery Act and Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Hoffman, Ian; Fuller, Merrian C.; Billingsley, Megan A.

    2011-02-25

    Since the spring of 2009, billions of federal dollars have been allocated to state and local governments as grants for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects and programs. The scale of this American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funding, focused on 'shovel-ready' projects to create and retain jobs, is unprecedented. Thousands of newly funded players - cities, counties, states, and tribes - and thousands of programs and projects are entering the existing landscape of energy efficiency programs for the first time or expanding their reach. The nation's experience base with energy efficiency is growing enormously, fed by federal dollars and driven by broader objectives than saving energy alone. State and local officials made countless choices in developing portfolios of ARRA-funded energy efficiency programs and deciding how their programs would relate to existing efficiency programs funded by utility customers. Those choices are worth examining as bellwethers of a future world where there may be multiple program administrators and funding sources in many states. What are the opportunities and challenges of this new environment? What short- and long-term impacts will this large, infusion of funds have on utility customer-funded programs; for example, on infrastructure for delivering energy efficiency services or on customer willingness to invest in energy efficiency? To what extent has the attribution of energy savings been a critical issue, especially where administrators of utility customer-funded energy efficiency programs have performance or shareholder incentives? Do the new ARRA-funded energy efficiency programs provide insights on roles or activities that are particularly well-suited to state and local program administrators vs. administrators or implementers of utility customer-funded programs? The answers could have important implications for the future of U.S. energy efficiency. This report focuses on a selected set of ARRA-funded

  1. Center Innovation Fund: JPL CIF Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Funds are distributed to each NASA Center to support emerging technologies and creative initiatives that leverage Center talent and capabilities. NASA scientists and...

  2. Center Innovation Fund: KSC CIF Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Each individual NASA Center has full discretion on the use of the funds and the Center Chief Technologists coordinates a competitive process at their Center for the...

  3. 76 FR 47296 - Transit Asset Management (TAM) Pilot Program Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... Federal Transit Administration Transit Asset Management (TAM) Pilot Program Funds AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION: Transit Asset Management Pilot Program Announcement of Project Selections... the Transit Asset Management (TAM) Pilot Program, which was announced in the TAM Program Notice of...

  4. Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund: Los Angeles Program Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Los Angeles, CA.

    The Coca-Cola Hispanic Education Fund was created in response to the high school dropout problem in Los Angeles. The Fund enables the Coca-Cola Bottling Company of Los Angeles to build upon the successful relationship it has developed in the Hispanic community and maximizes the effectiveness of existing student support programs by directing needy…

  5. Fund Allocation in Complex Rehabilitation Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Hegazy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Civil Infrastructure assets require continuous renewal actions to sustain their operability and safety. Allocating limited renewal funds amongst numerous building components, however, represents a large-scale optimization problem and earlier efforts utilized genetic algorithms (GAs to optimize medium size problems yet exhibit steep performance degradation as problem size increases. In this research, after experimenting with various approaches of segmenting a large problem into multiple smaller sub-problems, clustered segmentation proved to be the most promising. The paper discusses the underlying life cycle analysis model, the various segmentation methods, and the optimization results using the improved GAs + clustered segmentation, which proved to be able to optimize asset renewals for 50,000 components with no noticeable performance degradation. The proposed method is simple and logical, and can be used on variety of asset types to improve infrastructure fund allocation. Future extension of this research is then highlighted.

  6. Evaluation of an internal research funding program in a school of veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David G; Kearney, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    The present article describes a paradigm for evaluating the internal research funding program of a college or school of veterinary medicine, using as an example a similar exercise recently conducted at the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine (LSU SVM). The purpose of the exercise was to quantify and evaluate the effectiveness of the LSU SVM internal research funding mechanism known as the Competitive Organized Research Program (CORP). The evaluation resulted in several important observations that will allow us to further improve the effectiveness of our internal research funding program investment. Among the most important of these was the greater return on investment for CORP projects funded with smaller awards (approximately $10,000 US) compared to projects funded with larger awards (approximately $52,000 US). Other colleges and schools of veterinary medicine may find such an exercise similarly informative and beneficial.

  7. Funding, Survival and Growth of Postdoctoral General Dentistry Programs after Federal Funding Ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Frank

    1991-01-01

    A challenge now faced by dental school administrators is to maintain the feasibility of federally funded postdoctoral general dentistry residency programs when institutional, educational, and economic priorities stretch institutional limits. Some existing programs can offer ideas and insights through their diverse and nontraditional funding…

  8. Alternative Strategies for Funding a General Dentistry Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralewski, John E.; Wiggins, Carla

    1987-01-01

    Three alternative program funding approaches used in other professions are examined: (1) the reorientation of selected dental schools toward graduate education, (2) emphasizing and marketing the service aspects of the programs, and (3) developing education programs as in-house training for large organizations. (MSE)

  9. Impact of International Monetary Fund programs on child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Adel; Nosrati, Elias; Reinsberg, Bernhard; Kentikelenis, Alexander E; Stubbs, Thomas H; King, Lawrence P

    2017-06-20

    Parental education is located at the center of global efforts to improve child health. In a developing-country context, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) plays a crucial role in determining how governments allocate scarce resources to education and public health interventions. Under reforms mandated by IMF structural adjustment programs, it may become harder for parents to reap the benefits of their education due to wage contraction, welfare retrenchment, and generalized social insecurity. This study assesses how the protective effect of education changes under IMF programs, and thus how parents' ability to guard their children's health is affected by structural adjustment. We combine cross-sectional stratified data (countries, 67; children, 1,941,734) from the Demographic and Health Surveys and the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys. The sample represents ∼2.8 billion (about 50%) of the world's population in year 2000. Based on multilevel models, our findings reveal that programs reduce the protective effect of parental education on child health, especially in rural areas. For instance, in the absence of IMF programs, living in an household with educated parents reduces the odds of child malnourishment by 38% [odds ratio (OR), 0.62; 95% CI, 0.66-0.58]; in the presence of programs, this drops to 21% (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.86-0.74). In other words, the presence of IMF conditionality decreases the protective effect of parents' education on child malnourishment by no less than 17%. We observe similar adverse effects in sanitation, shelter, and health care access (including immunization), but a beneficial effect in countering water deprivation.

  10. Comparison of State-Funded Technology Maturation Programs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Elizabeth James Kistin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warren, Drake [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hess, Marguerite Evelyn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the structure and impact of state-funded technology maturation programs that leverage research institutions for economic development throughout the United States. The lessons learned and practices identified from previous experiences will inform Sandia National Laboratories' Government Relations and Technology Partnerships teams as they participate in near-term discussions about the proposed Technology Readiness Gross Receipts Tax Credit and Program, and continue to shape longer-term program and partnership opportunities. This Page Intentionally Left Blank

  11. Social Innovation Fund: Finding What Works, Making It Work for More People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corporation for National and Community Service, 2017

    2017-01-01

    The Social Innovation Fund (SIF), a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), supports the growth of effective programs, and the development of innovative approaches to solve the country's most intractable problems. The SIF directs resources towards efforts in the areas of youth development, economic opportunity, and…

  12. 75 FR 52054 - Bus and Bus Facilities Discretionary Program Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... 8, 2009. The Livability Bus program makes funds available to public transit providers to finance... 2-New York, Administrator, Region 7-Kansas One Bowling Green, Room 429, New City, MO, 901 Locust... Metropolitan Office, Region 2-New York, One Bowling Green, Room 428, New York, NY 10004-1415, Tel. 212-668-2202...

  13. 77 FR 50903 - Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations: Administrative Funding Allocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... food, including fresh produce, in FDPIR, and (4) making all Social Security recipients categorically... lifestyle changes. These funds are allocated separately from program administrative funds. D. Regulatory...

  14. [Applications and approved projectsof general program, young scientist fund and fund for less developedregion of national natural science funds in discipline of Chinese materia medica, NSFC in 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Qing; Han, Li-Wei; Wu, Xiu-Hong; Bi, Ming-Gang; Shang, Hong-Cai; Liu, Yun-Fang; He, Wei-Ming; Li, Dan-Dan; Dong, Yan; Wang, Chang-En

    2013-01-01

    The applications accepted and approved by general program, young scientist fund and fund for less developed region of national natural science funds in the discipline of Chinese materia medica, NSFC in 2012 have been introduced. The research contents of the funded projects in the popular research areas have been summarized and the problems in the applications have been analyzed to give a reference to the scientists in the field of Chinese materia medica.

  15. 45 CFR 2519.600 - How are funds for Higher Education programs distributed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are funds for Higher Education programs...) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE HIGHER EDUCATION INNOVATIVE PROGRAMS FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE Distribution of Funds § 2519.600 How are funds for Higher Education programs distributed? All funds under this...

  16. 45 CFR 287.45 - How can NEW Program funds be used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT WORKS (NEW) PROGRAM NEW Program Funding § 287.45 How can NEW Program funds be used? (a) NEW grants... be used for work activities as defined by the Tribal grantee. (c) Work activities may include... retaining employment. ...

  17. The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billingsley, Megan A.; Hoffman, Ian M.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Schiller, Steven R.; Goldman, Charles A.; LaCommare, Kristina

    2014-03-19

    End-use energy efficiency is increasingly being relied upon as a resource for meeting electricity and natural gas utility system needs within the United States. There is a direct connection between the maturation of energy efficiency as a resource and the need for consistent, high-quality data and reporting of efficiency program costs and impacts. To support this effort, LBNL initiated the Cost of Saved Energy Project (CSE Project) and created a Demand-Side Management (DSM) Program Impacts Database to provide a resource for policy makers, regulators, and the efficiency industry as a whole. This study is the first technical report of the LBNL CSE Project and provides an overview of the project scope, approach, and initial findings, including: • Providing a proof of concept that the program-level cost and savings data can be collected, organized, and analyzed in a systematic fashion; • Presenting initial program, sector, and portfolio level results for the program administrator CSE for a recent time period (2009-2011); and • Encouraging state and regional entities to establish common reporting definitions and formats that would make the collection and comparison of CSE data more reliable. The LBNL DSM Program Impacts Database includes the program results reported to state regulators by more than 100 program administrators in 31 states, primarily for the years 2009–2011. In total, we have compiled cost and energy savings data on more than 1,700 programs over one or more program-years for a total of more than 4,000 program-years’ worth of data, providing a rich dataset for analyses. We use the information to report costs-per-unit of electricity and natural gas savings for utility customer-funded, end-use energy efficiency programs. The program administrator CSE values are presented at national, state, and regional levels by market sector (e.g., commercial, industrial, residential) and by program type (e.g., residential whole home programs, commercial new

  18. Redesigning and aligning assessment and evaluation for a federally funded math and science teacher educational program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardré, Patricia L; Slater, Janis; Nanny, Mark

    2010-11-01

    This paper examines the redesign of evaluation components for a teacher professional development project funded by the National Science Foundation. It focuses on aligning evaluation instrumentation and strategies with program goals, research goals and program evaluation best practices. The study identifies weaknesses in the original (year 1) program evaluation design and implementation, develops strategies and tracks changes for year 2 implementation, and then reports enhancement of findings and recommendations for year 3. It includes lessons learned about assessment and evaluation over the project lifespan, with implications for research and evaluation of a range of related programs. This study functions as a classic illustration of how critical it is to observe first principles of assessment and evaluation for funded programs, the risks that arise when they are ignored, and the benefits that accrue when they are systematically observed. Copyright (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. 25 CFR 39.130 - Can ISEF funds be used for Language Development Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can ISEF funds be used for Language Development Programs... INDIAN SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Language Development Programs § 39.130 Can ISEF funds be used for Language Development Programs? Yes, schools can use ISEF funds to...

  20. Responding to Recession: IT Funding and Cost Management in Higher Education. Key Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the key findings from "Responding to Recession: IT Funding and Cost Management in Higher Education", the 2010 ECAR (EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research) study of how the economic recession is impacting information technology (IT) organizations and operations in higher education. The study was designed to address the…

  1. The employment of nurses in publicly funded substance abuse treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Abraham, Amanda J

    2012-10-01

    Little is known about the organizational and environmental factors associated with the employment of nurses in substance abuse treatment programs. Using data collected from the administrators of 250 publicly funded substance abuse treatment programs, this study examined the organizational and environmental correlates of nurse employment in these settings. Negative binomial regression models indicated that the number of nurses employed by treatment programs was positively associated with government ownership, location within a healthcare setting, and the availability of detoxification services. Outpatient-only programs employed fewer nurses than programs with inpatient/residential services. Two environmental factors were associated with nurse employment. Programs that more strongly endorsed a scale of financial barriers employed significantly fewer nurses, whereas programs indicating that funding from state contracts could be used to pay for healthcare providers employed significantly more nurses. These findings suggest that organizational decisions about employing nurses may reflect both the characteristics of the program and the funding environment. Future research should continue to examine the employment of nurses in substance abuse treatment settings, particularly given the shifting environment due to the implementation of healthcare reform.

  2. An Overview and Funding History of Select Department of Justice (DOJ) Grant Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    ...), and the Office of Violence Against Women, provide grant funds to state, local, and tribal governments for crime prevention and intervention programs as well as funding for criminal justice system improvement programs...

  3. A Diversified Approach to Funding a Paleontology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, A., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Routine field collection of fossils and other geologic specimens and maintenance of the resulting collections do not typically receive frequent infusions of large amounts of grant money, in spite of the relatively low costs of these activities and the baseline of data they provide. This type of work is often carried out by chronically-underfunded museums that that must use innovative methods of fundraising to carry out their missions. The Virginia Museum of Natural History (VMNH) is an independent state agency that is not affiliated with a university or any other institution. The VMNH paleontology department carries out frequent excavations of vertebrate fossils at three different localities in Virginia and Wyoming, maintains a collection of several hundred thousand specimens, and conducts original research and participates in professional meetings. Yet the annual operations (non-salary) appropriation for the paleontology department is only $500/year. Since 2007, state appropriations have accounted for only 3% of the department's non-salary funding, while grants (excluding salary-specific funding) have accounted for 27% and cash donations provided 1%. The remaining 69% has come from a diverse suite of alternate fundraising methods. Ecotourism and educational programming fees (37%) include fees paid by students and members of the public to participate in VMNH excavations, as well as fee-based field trips and programs involving fossils or casts. Merchandise sales (15%) are based on casts of specimens held in either the VMNH collections or at smaller museums that have contracted with VMNH to provide paleontology services. Contract work (13%) has included paleo-themed exhibit design, specimen evaluation, and repair of fossil specimens for smaller museums and visitor centers that lack a paleontology staff. A crowdfunding campaign designed to support a specific fossil excavation was responsible for 4% of the department's funds. This diverse range of funding sources has

  4. 78 FR 28949 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (Rehabilitation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program, Department of Veterans Affairs, 10770 North 46th Street... AFFAIRS Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (Rehabilitation) AGENCY... grantee facilities originally funded under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (see funding...

  5. When self-interest and age sterotypes collide: elders opposing increased funds for programs benefiting themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Becca R; Schlesinger, Mark J

    2005-01-01

    Elders tend to be portrayed by the media as selfishly promoting programs that benefit the old. We predicted, however, that older individuals who choose positive stereotypes about the young over positive stereotypes about the old would oppose an increase in spending on these programs. By analyzing the responses of 1656 individuals, we found: (1) older participants were more likely than younger participants to oppose increased funding of Social Security, Meals on Wheels, and Medicare; and (2) this opposition to increased funding for Social Security and Meals on Wheels was predicted by a stereotype of aging based on a more favorable perception of the capabilities of the young than of the old. Our findings suggest that elders' evaluation of programs that benefit their age group may be more influenced by stereotypes internalized decades earlier than by their current group interests.

  6. 23 CFR 450.308 - Funding for transportation planning and unified planning work programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Funding for transportation planning and unified planning... TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH PLANNING ASSISTANCE AND STANDARDS Metropolitan Transportation Planning and Programming § 450.308 Funding for transportation planning and unified planning work programs. (a) Funds...

  7. Application of Program Life Cycle Concepts for Fund Raising Strategies in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, Firooz; Heischmidt, Kenneth A.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of program life-cycle management is applied to college fund raising. Program life-cycle stages (introduction, take-off, maturation, saturation, decline) and fund-raising steps (identification of objectives, targeting of markets, estimate potential for contribution, organization, strategy development, fund-raising performance…

  8. 7 CFR 1486.205 - What types of funding are available under the program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MARKETS PROGRAM Eligibility, Applications, and Funding § 1486.205 What types of funding are available... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What types of funding are available under the program? 1486.205 Section 1486.205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued...

  9. 25 CFR 170.451 - Can IRR Program funds be used for archeological and environmental compliance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... funds be used for archeological and environmental compliance? Yes. For approved IRR projects, IRR Program funds can be used for environmental and archeological work consistent with 25 CFR 900.125(c)(6... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can IRR Program funds be used for archeological and...

  10. 75 FR 19353 - Notice of Funding Availability: Rural Development Voucher Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... Rural Housing Service Notice of Funding Availability: Rural Development Voucher Program AGENCY: Rural Housing Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Rural Development Voucher Program Availability SUMMARY: This... a demonstration Rural Development Voucher Program, as authorized under Section 542 of the Housing...

  11. 77 FR 6172 - Discretionary Bus and Bus Facilities Program and National Research Program Funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... this notice. This commitment should be indicated by inclusion of preliminary proposed performance... plan and identify funds from other FTA grant programs, such as Sections 5310 (Elderly/Disabled), 5316... how veterans, especially disabled veterans, will be engaged in the development and operation of the...

  12. Making It Count: Understanding the Value of Energy Efficiency Financing Programs Funded by Utility Customers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fadrhonc, Emily Martin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Goldman, Charles [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schiller, Steve [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schwartz, Lisa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Utility customer-supported financing programs are receiving increased attention as a strategy for achieving energy saving goals. Rationales for using utility customer funds to support financing initiatives

  13. 76 FR 66318 - Announcement of Funding Awards; Limited English Proficiency Initiative Program (LEPI), Fiscal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards; Limited English Proficiency Initiative Program (LEPI... funding under the Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Limited English Proficiency Initiative... INFORMATION: Executive Order 13166 signed in August 2000 requires all federal agencies to improve access to...

  14. 78 FR 49249 - Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Program; Reopening of Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 98 Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Program; Reopening of Comment... comments on the proposed rule for the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), published in the Federal... proposed rule for the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) in the Federal Register on May 20, 2013 (78 FR...

  15. 78 FR 25291 - Announcement of Funding Awards; Section 3 Program Coordination and Implementation; Fiscal Year 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... funding decisions made by the Department for funding under the Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for... under the Section 3 Program is 14.412.) Dated: April 18, 2013. John D. Trasvi a, Assistant Secretary for... Kansas City, 301 Valentine Reid, 816-777-2390. 7 50,000.00 East Armour Boulevard, Jackson, MO 64112-1254...

  16. 78 FR 12349 - Proposed Information Collection; Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance... INFORMATION: I. Abstract The Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965 (LWCF Act) (16 U.S.C. 460l-4 et seq... discussed in detail in the Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program Federal Financial...

  17. Can an Infusion of Federal Funds Result in Sustainable Projects? An Evaluation of Suicide Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsler, Robert; Formica, Scott W; Stout, Ellyson; Carr, Colleen

    2017-12-01

    Our study evaluated the sustainability of programs in early cohorts of the Garrett Lee Smith (GLS) Memorial Act suicide prevention initiative, a major source of federal funding for youth suicide prevention among states, tribes, and institutions of higher education. We sought to: (1) determine whether suicide prevention activities initiated with federal support continued after funding ended, and (2) identify factors associated with sustainment. Thirty-three sites between 1 and 4 years beyond the end of their GLS grant participated in a retrospective online survey assessing their level of suicide prevention activity 1 year before, during (during-GLS), and 1 year after funding (after-GLS). We found that, on average, sites experienced a 6% decrease in their overall level of activity from during- to after-GLS. Twenty-two (67% of responding sites) exhibited either an increase in activity level or no more than a 10% decline from during- to after-GLS periods. After-GLS scores for the 11 remaining sites declined between 11 and 30% from their during-GLS levels. We conducted semi-structured follow-up interviews with 13 sites that successfully continued their activities to explore factors associated with sustainability. Our findings indicate that program actions in the during-GLS period associated with sustainability included: maintaining a sustainability mindset, developing and nurturing partnerships and relationships, embedding services in parent organizations, pursuing new and diversified funding, and implementing cost-reduction efficiencies. Actions in the after-GLS period associated with sustainability included: obtaining funding from other sources, reconfiguring, and maintaining continuous leadership.

  18. Evaluating the Impact of Egyptian Social Fund for Development Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Abou-Ali, Hala; El-Laithy, Heba; Haughton, Jonathan; Shahidur R. Khandker; El-Azony, Hesham

    2009-01-01

    The Egyptian Social Fund for Development was established in 1991 with a mandate to reduce poverty. Since its inception, it has disbursed about $2.5 billion, of which nearly two-fifths was devoted to supporting microcredit and financing community development and infrastructure. This paper investigates the size of the impact of the Fund s interventions, whether the benefits have been commens...

  19. 78 FR 18617 - Recreational Boating Safety Projects, Programs and Activities Funded Under Provisions of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... Program: Funding was allocated for this program, which provides full marketing, media, public information... initiatives and campaigns, some of which include: National Boating Under the Influence Campaign (BUI), ``Boat... initiatives. ($296,000). Web site Support: Funding for this initiative provides a full range of public media...

  20. Constructing a Self-Funded Program Takes More than Just Dollars and Cents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Scott

    2012-01-01

    With a little ingenuity and a lot of dedication, the author created a self-funded construction program that is weathering the ups and downs of school funding; it enjoys great support from the community, is accomplishing more with less, and collaborative efforts between teachers are paying off. Creating such a program takes time, vision,…

  1. 78 FR 25339 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Tribal Transportation Program Safety Funds; and Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... Process A. Contents of Applications B. Standard Form 424 C. Narrative D. Contact Information E. Protection... funds are to be allocated based on an identification and analysis of highway safety issues and... Standard Form 424 (SF 424) available from Grants.gov ; and (2) the narrative attachment to the SF 424 as...

  2. Finding Funding: A Guide to Federal Sources for Out-of-School TIme and Community School Initiatives. Revised and Updated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgette, Heather Clapp

    Noting the growing nation-wide demand for affordable, high-quality, out-of-school time and community school programs, this guide is intended to assist program developers, policy makers, and community leaders identify federal funding sources to support out-of-school time or broader-based community school services. The guide provides an overview of…

  3. Financial Conflicts of Interest: An Association between Funding and Findings in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joseph; Lopez, Sandra; Means, Jessica; Mohan, Raja; Soni, Ashwin; Milton, Jacqueline; Tufaro, Anthony P; May, James W; Dorafshar, Amir

    2015-11-01

    Despite a growing interest in examining the effects of industry funding on research in plastic surgery, no study to date has comprehensively examined the effects of financial conflicts of interest on publication outcomes. The authors investigated the association between financial conflicts of interest and reported study findings in plastic surgery research. The authors reviewed all entries in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Annals of Plastic Surgery, and Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2012. All clinical and basic science articles were analyzed. The following article characteristics were extracted: self-reported financial conflicts of interest, sample size, level of evidence, study design, and prospectiveness. The findings reported in each abstract were blindly graded as not applicable, negative, or positive. Of the 1650 abstracts that resulted from the authors' initial search, 568 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The majority of the included articles covered breast (20.8 percent), experimental (19.7 percent), and general reconstruction (31.69 percent). Financial conflicts of interest were disclosed in only 17.6 percent of the articles. Of the total studies that met inclusion criteria, 66.2 percent were reviewed as having positive outcomes, and 33.8 percent were reviewed as having negative or not applicable results. Studies that disclosed a financial conflict of interest were 7.12 times more likely (p plastic surgery studies with a positive conclusion compared with investigators with no conflicts of interest.

  4. Public Health Preparedness Funding: Key Programs and Trends From 2001 to 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Crystal R; Watson, Matthew; Sell, Tara Kirk

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate trends in funding over the past 16 years for key federal public health preparedness and response programs at the US Department of Health and Human Services, to improve understanding of federal funding history in this area, and to provide context for future resource allocation decisions for public health preparedness. In this 2017 analysis, we examined the funding history of key federal programs critical to public health preparedness by reviewing program budget data collected for our annual examination of federal funding for biodefense and health security programs since fiscal year (FY) 2001. State and local preparedness at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initially received $940 million in FY2002 and resulted in significant preparedness gains, but funding levels have since decreased by 31%. Similarly, the Hospital Preparedness Program within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response was funded at a high of $515 million in FY2003, but funding was reduced by 50%. Investments in medical countermeasure development and stockpiling remained relatively stable. The United States has made significant progress in preparing for disasters and advancing public health infrastructure. To enable continued advancement, federal funding commitments must be sustained.

  5. Funding Preschool Programs for Children with Special Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberg, Dolly F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes funding and communication strategies at six, nonprofit, nonsectarian, tuition-free preschools for mentally retarded and developmentally delayed children. Details marketing strategies; the role of multiple markets; the targeting of potential funders among local citizens, foundations, and corporations; and the creation of honorary…

  6. US Global Change Research Program Distributed Cost Budget Interagency Funds Transfer from DOE to NSF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhle, Maria [National Science Foundation (NSF), Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-22

    These funds were transferred from DOE to NSF as DOE's contribution to the U.S. Global Change Research Program in support of 4 internationalnactivities/programs as approved by the U.S. Global Change Research Program on 14 March 2014. The programs are the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, the DIVERSITAS programme, and the World Climate Research Program. All program awards ended as of 09-23-2015.

  7. 77 FR 47405 - Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation Cooperative Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Funding Opportunity: Tribal Self-Governance Program; Negotiation... (OTSG) is accepting limited competition Negotiation Cooperative Agreement applications for the Tribal... (Compacts and Funding Agreements) on behalf of the IHS Director. To begin the Self-Governance negotiations...

  8. 78 FR 36183 - State Allotment Percentages for the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ..., non-tribal water systems (each serving less than 3,301 people), the 2011 assessment extrapolated the... AGENCY State Allotment Percentages for the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Program AGENCY... Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing the revised Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) allotments that...

  9. 76 FR 21325 - Notice of Funds Availability: Inviting Applications for the Market Access Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... Commodity Credit Corporation Notice of Funds Availability: Inviting Applications for the Market Access... assistance for generic or brand promotion activities. For generic activities, funding priority is given to... government agencies can participate directly in the brand program. The MAP generally operates on a...

  10. 76 FR 29227 - Funding Down Slate; Indian Education Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Funding Down Slate; Indian Education Professional Development Program AGENCY: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of intent to fund down the fiscal year (FY...

  11. Dow Jones Fund Opens Journalism Programs to White Students after Lawsuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scmidt, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses a Lawsuit filed against Dow Jones Newspaper Fund and the legal settlement between the defendant and the plaintiff. The fund, a nonprofit organization affiliated with Dow Jones & Company had been operating more than 20 programs for minority high-school students to pursue careers in newspaper journalism. The organization…

  12. 76 FR 64882 - Inquiry Into Disbursement Process for the Universal Service Fund Low Income Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Inquiry Into Disbursement Process for the Universal Service Fund Low Income Program... Universal Service Fund low income support to eligible telecommunications carriers (ETCs) based upon claims... Universal Service Administrative Company (USAC) reimburses ETCs for low income support each month based on...

  13. Government-Funded Program Completions 2014. Preliminary. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2015

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides data on Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) programs completed from 2010 to 2014 in Australia's government-funded vocational education and training (VET) system (broadly defined as all activity delivered by government providers and government-funded activity delivered by community education and other registered…

  14. Green Pricing Program Marketing Expenditures: Finding the Right Balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, B.; Miller, M.

    2009-09-01

    In practice, it is difficult to determine the optimal amount to spend on marketing and administering a green pricing program. Budgets for marketing and administration of green pricing programs are a function of several factors: the region of the country; the size of the utility service area; the customer base and media markets encompassed within that service area; the point or stage in the lifespan of the program; and certainly, not least, the utility's commitment to and goals for the program. All of these factors vary significantly among programs. This report presents data on programs that have funded both marketing and program administration. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) gathers the data annually from utility green pricing program managers. Programs reporting data to NREL spent a median of 18.8% of program revenues on marketing their programs in 2008 and 16.6% in 2007. The smallest utilities (those with less than 25,000 in their eligible customer base) spent 49% of revenues on marketing, significantly more than the overall median. This report addresses the role of renewable energy credit (REC) marketers and start-up costs--and the role of marketing, generally, in achieving program objectives, including expansion of renewable energy.

  15. Trends and Predictors of National Institutes of Health Funding to Plastic Surgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Abbatematteo, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin; Serletti, Joseph M

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated low levels of National Institutes of Health funding for surgical research. The authors compared the funding in plastic surgery with the funding for other surgical specialties. A query of National Institutes of Health grants awarded to departments of surgical specialties was performed using the National Institutes of Health RePORTER database (2008 to 2016). Trends in funding were compared by specialty and adjusted for the number of active physicians in each specialty. Plastic surgery residency program characteristics were correlated with funding procurement. Eight hundred eighty-nine faculty at 94 plastic surgery residency programs were queried. Forty-eight investigators (5.4 percent) at 23 programs (24.4 percent) had National Institutes of Health funding. From 2008 to 2016, a total of $84,142,138 was awarded through 81 grants. Funding supported translational (44.6 percent), clinical (26.4 percent), basic science (27.2 percent), and educational (1.7 percent) research. In 2016, plastic surgery received the least amount of National Institutes of Health funding per active physician ($1,530) relative to orthopedic surgery ($3124), obstetrics and gynecology ($3885), urology ($5943), otolaryngology ($9999), general surgery ($11,649), ophthalmology ($11,933), and neurologic surgery ($20,874). Plastic surgery residency program characteristics associated with National Institutes of Health funding were high ranking and had more than 10 clinical faculty (p Plastic surgery receives the least National Institutes of Health funding among the surgical specialties. Departments and divisions of plastic surgery should support investigators applying for research grants to increase future National Institutes of Health funding.

  16. 77 FR 14364 - Comment Sought on Funding Pilot Program Participants Transitioning Out of the Rural Health Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... COMMISSION Comment Sought on Funding Pilot Program Participants Transitioning Out of the Rural Health Care... to fund Rural Health Care Pilot Program (Pilot Program) participants who will exhaust funding... year to provide time to establish a process to transition them into the permanent Rural Health Care...

  17. 75 FR 1755 - Public Telecommunications Facilities Program: Notice of Availability of Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration Public Telecommunications Facilities Program: Notice of Availability of Funds AGENCY: National Telecommunications and Information Administration, U.S.... SUMMARY: On December 2, 2009, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA...

  18. 75 FR 75693 - Tax Credit Assistance Program-Reallocation of Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... be found at the HUD Web site at http://portal.hud.gov/portal/page/portal/HUD/recovery/programs/tax... announces the availability on its Web site of the application information, submission deadlines, funding...

  19. 75 FR 26188 - Notice of Funds Availability: Inviting Applications for the Emerging Markets Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... ineligible expenditures include: branded product promotions (in-store, restaurant advertising, labeling, etc... not suitable for funding under other CCC marketing programs, e.g., the Foreign Market Development...

  20. International Monetary Fund programs and tuberculosis outcomes in post-communist countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stuckler

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have indicated that International Monetary Fund (IMF economic programs have influenced health-care infrastructure in recipient countries. The post-communist Eastern European and former Soviet Union countries experienced relatively similar political and economic changes over the past two decades, and participated in IMF programs of varying size and duration. We empirically examine how IMF programs related to changes in tuberculosis incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates among these countries. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed multivariate regression of two decades of tuberculosis incidence, prevalence, and mortality data against variables potentially influencing tuberculosis program outcomes in 21 post-communist countries for which comparative data are available. After correcting for confounding variables, as well as potential detection, selection, and ecological biases, we observed that participating in an IMF program was associated with increased tuberculosis incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates by 13.9%, 13.2%, and 16.6%, respectively. Each additional year of participation in an IMF program was associated with increased tuberculosis mortality rates by 4.1%, and each 1% increase in IMF lending was associated with increased tuberculosis mortality rates by 0.9%. On the other hand, we estimated a decrease in tuberculosis mortality rates of 30.7% (95% confidence interval, 18.3% to 49.5% associated with exiting the IMF programs. IMF lending did not appear to be a response to worsened health outcomes; rather, it appeared to be a precipitant of such outcomes (Granger- and Sims-causality tests, even after controlling for potential political, socioeconomic, demographic, and health-related confounders. In contrast, non-IMF lending programs were connected with decreased tuberculosis mortality rates (-7.6%, 95% confidence interval, -1.0% to -14.1%. The associations observed between tuberculosis mortality and IMF

  1. 34 CFR 403.180 - How must a State reserve funds for the basic programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...,000 for Sex Equity Programs. 7.0% ×20,000,000 = 1,400,000 for Programs for Single Parents, Displaced... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must a State reserve funds for the basic programs? 403.180 Section 403.180 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued...

  2. [Applications and spproved projects of general program, young scientist fund and fund for less developed region of national natural science funds in discipline of Chinese materia medica, NSFC in 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Liwei; Wang, Yueyun; He, Wenbin; Zhang, Junjie; Bi, Minggang; Shang, Hongcai; Shang, Deyang; Wang, Chang'en

    2012-03-01

    The applications accepted and approved by general program, young scientist fund and fund for less developed region of national natural science funds in the discipline of Chinese materia medica, NSFC in 2011 have been introduced. The character and problems in these applications have been analyzed to give a reference to the scientists in the field of Chinese material medica.

  3. Post Milestone B Funding Climate and Cost Growth in Major Defense Acquisition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Paper P-8091 March 2017 Post-Milestone B Funding Climate and Cost Growth in Major...Jun 2013]. Post-Milestone B Funding Climate and Cost Growth in Major Defense Acquisition Programs David L. McNicol I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F...entered a boom climate for procurement funding some time after passing Milestone (MS) B on average had higher unit cost growth than programs whose

  4. 34 CFR 611.41 - Under what circumstances may an individual receive a scholarship of program funds to attend a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... scholarship of program funds to attend a teacher training program? 611.41 Section 611.41 Education Regulations..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TEACHER QUALITY ENHANCEMENT GRANTS PROGRAM Scholarships § 611.41 Under what circumstances may an individual receive a scholarship of program funds to attend a teacher training program? (a...

  5. Funding Universities for Efficiency and Equity: Research Findings versus Petty Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psacharopoulos, George

    2008-01-01

    The present paper starts by discussing the principles of public funding of universities. The size of the social returns to investment in education gives an indication regarding the most efficient use of resources, while the difference between the private and the social rates relates to issues of equity. The available evidence is contrasted to…

  6. Seeing Past the Fences: Finding Funds of Knowledge for Ethical Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The urban school context is rife with descriptors that frame children's lives in deficit ways: "under-prepared," "below grade level," "limited English proficient." In this study, I reframe my perception of the life of one child in my second-grade class to better understand the funds of knowledge he brings to school each day. The data include…

  7. 75 FR 35460 - Funding Opportunity; Basic Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... support, guidance, and opportunities during adolescence, a time of rapid growth and change. With this... of government. (45 CFR 1351.1) Maternity Group Home (MGH)--The program provides long-term residential...

  8. 25 CFR 170.135 - Can a tribe use Federal funds for its recreation, tourism, and trails program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a tribe use Federal funds for its recreation, tourism... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.135 Can a tribe use Federal funds for its recreation, tourism... funds for recreation, tourism, and trails programs if the programs are included in the IRRTIP...

  9. 75 FR 62849 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program... Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP). This announcement... nonprofit organizations and consortia that have experience in providing self-help housing. Grant funds are...

  10. 76 FR 67759 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program... Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP). This announcement... organizations and consortia that have experience in providing self-help housing. Grant funds are used to...

  11. 76 FR 48876 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program... Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP). This announcement... nonprofit organizations and consortia that have experience in providing self-help housing. Grant funds are...

  12. 45 CFR 2517.600 - How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are funds for community-based service-learning... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Distribution of Funds § 2517.600 How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed? All...

  13. 77 FR 22061 - FTA Section 5307 Urbanized Area Formula Program: Allocation of Funding Caps for Treating Fuel and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... Federal Transit Administration FTA Section 5307 Urbanized Area Formula Program: Allocation of Funding Caps.... Based on the $100,000,000 cap on use of this provision, FTA has allocated funding caps to program... allocate the available resources, FTA has determined funding caps for all requesting UZAs and States (see...

  14. Providing culturally competent care: residents in HRSA Title VII funded residency programs feel better prepared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alexander R; Betancourt, Joseph R; Park, Elyse R; Greer, Joseph A; Donahue, Elizabeth J; Weissman, Joel S

    2008-11-01

    The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) funds primary care residency programs through its Title VII training grants, with a goal of ensuring a well-prepared, culturally competent physician workforce. The authors sought to determine whether primary care residents in Title VII-funded training programs feel better prepared than those in nonfunded programs to provide care to culturally diverse patients. The authors analyzed data from a national mailed survey of senior resident physicians conducted in 2003-2004. Of 1,467 randomly selected family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatrics residents, 866 responded--403 in Title VII-funded programs and 463 in nonfunded programs (response rate = 59%). The survey included 28 Likert-response questions about residents' preparedness and perceived skills to provide cross-cultural care, sociodemographics, and residency characteristics. Residents in Title VII-funded programs were more likely than others to report being prepared to provide cross-cultural care across all 8 measures (odds ratio [OR] = 1.54-2.61, P experience related to cross-cultural care (e.g., role models, cross-cultural training, and attitudes of attending physicians) accounted for many of the differences in self-reported preparedness and skills. Senior residents in HRSA Title VII-funded primary care residency training programs feel better prepared than others to provide culturally competent care. This may be partially explained by better cross-cultural training experiences in HRSA Title VII-funded programs.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs.

  15. From Compassionate Conservatism to Obamacare: Funding for the Ryan White Program During the Obama Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, William; Pund, Britten; Khatiashvili, Giorgi

    2016-11-01

    To examine President Obama's fiscal commitment to the Ryan White Program (formerly Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resource Emergency Act), which provides funding for economically disadvantaged people and families affected by HIV. We analyzed budgetary request and congressional appropriation data from 2009 to 2016. The data are available from the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Increased coverage for people living with HIV/AIDS provided by the Affordable Care Act most likely led the Obama administration to request small increases and at times decreases in funding for the Ryan White Program. Congress passed either small increases or decreases in appropriations for the Ryan White Program. Decreases or small increases in the Ryan White Program funding risk progress made in treating HIV among economically disadvantaged patients.

  16. Every Child's Right to Food: A Handbook on Federally-Funded Child Nutrition Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Rights Group, San Francisco, CA.

    In recognition of the fact that food is an important step in the educational process and in order to generate new child nutrition programs in communities across the nation (especially in rural communities with significant numbers of migrant farmworkers' children), basic information is presented about four federally funded child nutrition programs.…

  17. Redesigning and Aligning Assessment and Evaluation for a Federally Funded Math and Science Teacher Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardre, Patricia L.; Slater, Janis; Nanny, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the redesign of evaluation components for a teacher professional development project funded by the National Science Foundation. It focuses on aligning evaluation instrumentation and strategies with program goals, research goals and program evaluation best practices. The study identifies weaknesses in the original (year 1)…

  18. 75 FR 69454 - Emergency Homeowners' Loan Program: Notice of Allocation of Funding for Substantially Similar...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    .... Eligible state programs are those that already have experience, during this current housing crisis, in...' Loan program. VII. Other Information Environmental Review. This notice of funding availability does not... environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. (42 U.S.C. 4321) Dated: November 5...

  19. 77 FR 26245 - Household Water Well System Grant Program Announcement of Application Deadlines and Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... with low to moderate incomes finance the costs of household water wells that they own or will own. The... Rural Utilities Service Household Water Well System Grant Program Announcement of Application Deadlines... in grant funds to be competitively awarded for the Household Water Well System (HWWS) Grant Program...

  20. 76 FR 21318 - Notice of Funds Availability; Inviting Applications for the Quality Samples Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... funding assistance should contact the Program Operations Division, Office of Trade Programs, Foreign... preference for that end product; and Samples shall be in quantities less than a typical commercial sale and... resources, and establish realistic export goals. Applicants planning to use the Internet-based system must...

  1. 77 FR 3784 - Recreational Boating Safety Projects, Programs and Activities Funded Under Provisions of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... Associated Travel: Travel by members of the Boating Safety Division's strategic planning panel was undertaken... strategic plan. ($652). Boating Accident News Clipping Services: Funding was provided to continue to gather... program which provides full marketing, media, public information, and program strategy support to the...

  2. Assessment and Treatment of Co-occurring Eating Disorders in Privately Funded Addiction Treatment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Therese K.; Greenfield, Shelly F.; Bride, Brian E.; Cohen, Lisa; Gordon, Susan Merle; Roman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Privately-funded addiction treatment programs were surveyed to increase understanding of assessment and current treatment options for patients with co-occurring substance use and eating disorders. Data were collected from face-to-face interviews with program administrators of a nationally representative sample of 345 private addiction treatment programs. Although the majority of programs reported screening for eating disorders, programs varied in screening instruments used. Sixty-seven percent reported admitting cases of low severity. Twenty-one percent of programs attempt to treat eating disorders. These results highlight the need for education of addiction treatment professionals in assessment, referral and treatment of eating disorders. PMID:21477048

  3. Resource and cost adjustment in the design of allocation funding formulas in public health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, James W; Bernet, Patrick M; Ogden, Lydia L

    2012-01-01

    Multiple federal public health programs use funding formulas to allocate funds to states. To characterize the effects of adjusting formula-based allocations for differences among states in the cost of implementing programs, the potential for generating in-state resources, and income disparities, which might be associated with disease risk. Fifty US states and the District of Columbia. Formula-based funding allocations to states for 4 representative federal public health programs were adjusted using indicators of cost (average salaries), potential within-state revenues (per-capita income, the Federal Medical Assistance Percentage, per-capita aggregate home values), and income disparities (Theil index). Percentage of allocation shifted by adjustment, the number of states and the percentage of US population living in states with a more than 20% increase or decrease in funding, maximum percentage increase or decrease in funding. Each adjustor had a comparable impact on allocations across the 4 program allocations examined. Approximately 2% to 8% of total allocations were shifted, with adjustments for variations in income disparity and housing values having the least and greatest effects, respectively. The salary cost and per-capita income adjustors were inversely correlated and had offsetting effects on allocations. With the exception of the housing values adjustment, fewer than 10 states had more than 20% increases or decreases in allocations, and less than 10% of the US population lived in such states. Selection of adjustors for formula-based funding allocations should consider the impacts of different adjustments, correlations between adjustors and other data elements in funding formulas, and the relationship of formula inputs to program objectives.

  4. Outcomes of a federally funded program for alcohol and other drug prevention in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardone, John C

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the Nationwide Campuses Study that measure the impact of programs supported by the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) for collegiate alcohol and other drug (AOD) prevention efforts. Outcomes were measured by using standardized pre- and post-program items on the Core Alcohol and Drug Survey and adjusted prevalences of AOD use. Although student awareness of AOD prevention programs increased during the funding period, there also were increases in the desire for drugs at parties and in the frequencies of arrests for driving while intoxicated or under the influence and of poor academic performance. Adjusted prevalences of alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine use among students increased, while tobacco use decreased. Curriculum infusion, administrative response, and faculty and community activities most clearly were associated with favorable outcomes. Overall, however, FIPSE funding had limited short-term impact on AOD use and its consequences in higher education.

  5. The Employment of Nurses in Publicly Funded Substance Abuse Treatment Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, Hannah K.; Abraham, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the organizational and environmental factors associated with the employment of nurses in substance abuse treatment programs. Using data collected from the administrators of 250 publicly funded substance abuse treatment programs, this study examined the organizational and environmental correlates of nurse employment in these settings. Negative binomial regression models indicated that the number of nurses employed by treatment programs was positively associated with gover...

  6. Implications of DOD Funds Execution Policy for Acquisition Program Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    E only 5 3 7 1 Procurement and RDT&E 8 1 5 4 Platform Mod C3 UAS Support Equipment Other 9 3 4 3 2 4 Program by Type 19 to distinguish causes and...2010, full-rate production decision scheduled for September 2012  Increment 2 failed IOT &E (Initial Operational Test and Evaluation)  September 2012...ADM provided only additional Low-Rate Initial Production (LRIP) quantities, pending completion of follow-on IOT &E  September 2013 ADM again only

  7. Gene recognition by combination of several gene-finding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, K; Takagi, T

    1998-01-01

    A number of programs have been developed to predict the eukaryotic gene structures in DNA sequences. However, gene finding is still a challenging problem. We have explored the effectiveness when the results of several gene-finding programs were re-analyzed and combined. We studied several methods with four programs (FEXH, GeneParser3, GEN-SCAN and GRAIL2). By HIGHEST-policy combination method or BOUNDARY method, approximate correlation (AC) improved by 3-5% in comparison with the best single gene-finding program. From another viewpoint, OR-based combination of the four programs is the most reliable to know whether a candidate exon overlaps with the real exon or not, although it is less sensitive than GENSCAN for exon-intron boundaries. Our methods can easily be extended to combine other programs. We have developed a server program (Shirokane System) and a client program (GeneScope) to use the methods. GeneScope is available through a WWW site (http://gf.genome.ad.jp/). (katsu,takagi)@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

  8. "Cairo-Plus-Five" review is finding political will strong -- but funds lacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S A

    1999-04-01

    Last year, the UN Population Fund initiated a 5-year review of progress in attaining the goals of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD). The review included a series of meetings, including a forum in The Hague involving 2000 people, and will culminate in a special session of the UN General Assembly that will endorse the Secretary-General's progress report. The message that has emerged from these meetings is that countries have made a political commitment to implement the ICPD agenda but some of the largest donor countries, including the US, have failed to fulfill their pledges. The final report from the Hague Forum focuses on progress and constraints in: 1) creating an enabling environment for achieving sustainable development; 2) achieving gender equality, equity, and the empowerment of women; 3) promoting reproductive health and rights; 4) strengthening partnerships; and 5) mobilizing and monitoring resources. The Hague Forum was marked by a lack of controversy even though it recommended that: 20% of all donor allocations for reproductive health be earmarked for adolescent-oriented initiatives, postcoital contraception be promoted to reduce the incidence of unsafe abortion, and laws punishing women for undergoing illegal abortions be reviewed. The most significant obstacle to implementing the ICPD goals is the fact that total funding is only half of the $17 billion promised for the year 2000. To date, the US has provided only about a third of its pledged amount.

  9. Regional decision-making and competitive funding : metropolitan planning organizations and the transportation investments generating economic recovery program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Transportation benefits and economic stimulus were behind the creation of the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) program in 2009. New transportation funding programs exist in a landscape of other programs, and in addition ...

  10. 23 CFR 661.23 - How will a bridge project be programmed for funding once eligibility has been determined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.23 How will a bridge project be programmed for funding once eligibility has been determined? (a) All projects will be... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How will a bridge project be programmed for funding once...

  11. Lessons learned from preparticipation cardiovascular screening in a state funded program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeltser, Ilana; Cannon, Bryan; Silvana, Lawrence; Fenrich, Arnold; George, Jayni; Schleifer, Jessica; Garcia, Michelle; Barnes, Aliessa; Rivenes, Shannon; Patt, Hanoch; Rodgers, George; Scott, William

    2012-09-15

    In 2007, the Texas legislature appropriated money for a pilot study to evaluate cardiovascular screening of student athletes to identify those who might be at risk of sudden death using a questionnaire, physical examination, electrocardiography, and limited echocardiography. We sought to determine (1) the feasibility of a state-wide cardiovascular screening program, (2) the ability to reliably identify at-risk subjects, and (3) problems in implementing screening state wide. The data were analyzed using established pediatric electrocardiographic and echocardiographic criteria. Positive results were confirmed by a blinded reviewer. In 31 venues (2,506 students), the electrocardiographic findings met the criteria for cardiovascular disease in 57 (2.3%), with 33 changes suggestive of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 14 with long QT syndrome, 7 with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and 3 with potential ischemic findings related to a coronary anomaly. Of the 2,051 echocardiograms, 11 had findings concerning for disease (9 with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 1 with dilated cardiomyopathy). In patients with electrocardiographic findings consistent with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the limited echocardiograms were normal in 24 of 33. Of the 33 who remained at risk of sudden death on the electrocardiogram or echocardiogram, 25 (65.8%) pursued the recommended evaluation, which confirmed long QT syndrome in 4, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in 7, and dilated cardiomyopathy in 1. The interobserver agreement was 100% for electrocardiography and 79% for echocardiography. The questionnaire identified 895 (35% of the total) potentially at-risk students, with disease confirmed in 11 (1.23%). In conclusion, in this large state-funded project, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic screening identified 11 of 2,506 patients potentially at risk of cardiovascular disease. The questionnaire was of limited value and had a large number of false-positive results. Interobserver variation was

  12. 75 FR 57145 - Federal-State Unemployment Compensation Program; Funding Goals for Interest-Free Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... Labor Employment and Training Administration 20 CFR Part 606 Federal-State Unemployment Compensation... Administration 20 CFR Part 606 RIN 1205-AB53 Federal-State Unemployment Compensation Program; Funding Goals for... advances from the Federal Government for the payment of unemployment compensation (UC) upon the State...

  13. 77 FR 10543 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Capacity Building for Sustainable Communities Program for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... 2000, dba Envision 600,000 Utah, 254 South 600 East, Salt Lake City, UT Institute for Sustainable... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Capacity Building for Sustainable Communities Program for Fiscal Year 2011 AGENCY: Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities, HUD. ACTION...

  14. 76 FR 68499 - Draft WaterSMART Cooperative Watershed Management Program Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... and time. Water shortage and water-use conflicts have become more commonplace in many areas of the... Office of the Secretary Draft WaterSMART Cooperative Watershed Management Program Funding Opportunity Announcement AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Water and Science, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  15. 75 FR 26194 - Notice of Funds Availability: Inviting Applications for the Market Access Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... Commodity Credit Corporation Notice of Funds Availability: Inviting Applications for the Market Access... marketing and promotion activities. MAP participants may receive assistance for generic or brand promotion... brand program. The MAP generally operates on a reimbursement basis. III. Eligibility Information 1...

  16. 31 CFR 103.130 - Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anti-money laundering programs for mutual funds. 103.130 Section 103.130 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS Anti-Money Laundering...

  17. Evaluating Navy’s Funded Graduate Education Program. A Return-on-Investment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    unfunded graduate education to the bureau. Navy Program and Service Comparisons 25 et al., 2008). Each fiscal year, the Navy has about 390 funded... Politicas , Vol 28, No. 4, 1995. Roth, John P., FY 2009 Department of Defense (DoD) Military Personnel Composite Standard Pay and Reimbursement Rates

  18. 77 FR 41190 - Office of Clinical and Preventive Services Funding Opportunity: National HIV Program for Enhanced...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Office of Clinical and Preventive Services Funding Opportunity: National HIV Program for Enhanced HIV/AIDS Screening and Engagement in Care AGENCY: Indian Health Service...

  19. Federally Funded Education and Job Training Programs for Low-Income Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworsky, Amy

    2011-01-01

    With the growing demand for highly skilled workers and declining wages for those who are less skilled, low-income youth with limited education and no work experience have few opportunities for gainful employment. Since the Great Depression, the federal government has been funding programs that provide low-income, out-of-school, and unemployed…

  20. An Assessment of Operational Energy Capability Improvement Fund (OECIF) Programs 17-S-2544

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-19

    identifies one or more specific themes for each year to reflect Department priorities and focus the evaluation and management of S&T investments...thirteen programs were successful, both from a technical and transition perspective , and their transition partners have either already funded or will...persistently attack key operational energy problems . OECIF themes are summarized in Table 1, and Appendix A includes more detail on the programs within

  1. Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies Program Funding Opportunities | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI is very pleased to announce that the Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies (IMAT) program funding opportunity announcements have been posted for calendar year (CY) 2013. Please visit this website for more information on these announcements. For your convenience, a link to each solicitation is provided below with associated submission deadlines for new applications and resubmissions. Please contact the NCI IMAT program director, Dr.

  2. Understanding the performance and impact of public knowledge translation funding interventions: protocol for an evaluation of Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation funding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Robert K D; Graham, Ian D; Bosompra, Kwadwo; Choudhry, Yumna; Coen, Stephanie E; Macleod, Martha; Manuel, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan; Mota, Adrian; Peckham, David; Tetroe, Jacqueline M; Tucker, Joanne

    2012-06-22

    The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) has defined knowledge translation (KT) as a dynamic and iterative process that includes the synthesis, dissemination, exchange, and ethically-sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products, and strengthen the healthcare system. CIHR, the national health research funding agency in Canada, has undertaken to advance this concept through direct research funding opportunities in KT. Because CIHR is recognized within Canada and internationally for leading and funding the advancement of KT science and practice, it is essential and timely to evaluate this intervention, and specifically, these funding opportunities. The study will employ a novel method of participatory, utilization-focused evaluation inspired by the principles of integrated KT. It will use a mixed methods approach, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative data, and will elicit participation from CIHR funded researchers, knowledge users, KT experts, as well as other health research funding agencies. Lines of inquiry will include an international environmental scan, document/data reviews, in-depth interviews, targeted surveys, case studies, and an expert review panel. The study will investigate how efficiently and effectively the CIHR model of KT funding programs operates, what immediate outcomes these funding mechanisms have produced, and what impact these programs have had on the broader state of health research, health research uptake, and health improvement. The protocol and results of this evaluation will be of interest to those engaged in the theory, practice, and evaluation of KT. The dissemination of the study protocol and results to both practitioners and theorists will help to fill a gap in knowledge in three areas: the role of a public research funding agency in facilitating KT, the outcomes and impacts KT funding interventions, and how KT can best be evaluated.

  3. Understanding the performance and impact of public knowledge translation funding interventions: Protocol for an evaluation of Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation funding programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLean Robert K D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR has defined knowledge translation (KT as a dynamic and iterative process that includes the synthesis, dissemination, exchange, and ethically-sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products, and strengthen the healthcare system. CIHR, the national health research funding agency in Canada, has undertaken to advance this concept through direct research funding opportunities in KT. Because CIHR is recognized within Canada and internationally for leading and funding the advancement of KT science and practice, it is essential and timely to evaluate this intervention, and specifically, these funding opportunities. Design The study will employ a novel method of participatory, utilization-focused evaluation inspired by the principles of integrated KT. It will use a mixed methods approach, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative data, and will elicit participation from CIHR funded researchers, knowledge users, KT experts, as well as other health research funding agencies. Lines of inquiry will include an international environmental scan, document/data reviews, in-depth interviews, targeted surveys, case studies, and an expert review panel. The study will investigate how efficiently and effectively the CIHR model of KT funding programs operates, what immediate outcomes these funding mechanisms have produced, and what impact these programs have had on the broader state of health research, health research uptake, and health improvement. Discussion The protocol and results of this evaluation will be of interest to those engaged in the theory, practice, and evaluation of KT. The dissemination of the study protocol and results to both practitioners and theorists will help to fill a gap in knowledge in three areas: the role of a public research funding agency in facilitating KT, the outcomes and impacts KT funding

  4. Workforce development for comparative effectiveness research: training programs funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geonnotti, Kristin L; Rich, Eugene C; Esposito, Dominick

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a midstream assessment of the comparative effectiveness research (CER) training programs funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) by examining program characteristics, planned curriculum development activities and core competencies. We examined all 43 training projects funded by the US$46 million ARRA CER investment, collecting data from key informant discussions and a technical expert panel. The majority of projects leveraged institutional resources to provide an individualized combination of didactic and experiential learning supported by strong mentorship. Core competencies included skills in statistical modeling, evidence synthesis (systematic reviews and meta-analysis) and general research design skills. ARRA-supported CER training programs enhanced workforce capacity by developing curricula and preparing CER researchers to apply emerging methods and utilize new CER infrastructure.

  5. 77 FR 40892 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program... Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP). This announcement... national and regional nonprofit organizations and consortia to undertake self-help homeownership housing...

  6. 77 FR 2744 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Rural Innovation Fund Program for Fiscal Year 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... Economic Development and Entrepreneurship grant in the amount of $798,888 to launch the Pikat Housing... Innovation Fund Indian Economic Development and Entrepreneurship grant in the amount of $567,908 that will be... receive a Rural Innovation Fund Indian Economic Development and Entrepreneurship grant in the amount of...

  7. Funds Needed for Implementing the Compulsory Education Program and the Methods of Raising Funds by Different Localities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese Education: A Journal of Translations, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Includes excerpts from a 1986 report on educational funding for different provincial and local school systems in China. Asserts that many local governments have been able to improve school buildings and teacher training. Concludes with five suggestions for increasing educational funding at the local level. (CFR)

  8. Are Americans finding affordable coverage in the health insurance marketplaces? Results from the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Petra W; Collins, Sara R; Doty, Michelle M; Beutel, Sophie

    2014-09-01

    By the end of the first open enrollment period for coverage offered through the Affordable Care Act's marketplaces, increasing numbers of people said they found it easy to find a plan they could afford, according to The Commonwealth Fund's Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, April-June 2014. Adults with low or moderate incomes were more likely to say it was easy to find an affordable plan than were adults with higher incomes. Adults with low or moderate incomes who purchased a plan through the marketplaces this year have similar premium costs and deductibles as adults in the same income ranges with employer-provided coverage. A majority of adults with marketplace coverage gave high ratings to their insurance and were confident in their ability to afford the care they need when sick.

  9. 34 CFR 403.161 - How must funds be used under the Comprehensive Career Guidance and Counseling Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Guidance and Counseling Programs? 403.161 Section 403.161 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... the Special Programs? Comprehensive Career Guidance and Counseling Programs § 403.161 How must funds be used under the Comprehensive Career Guidance and Counseling Programs? (a) A State shall use not...

  10. 77 FR 19306 - Announcement of Funding Awards: Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control Grant Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards: Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control Grant Programs for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 AGENCY: Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, HUD. ACTION... made by the Department in competitions for funding under the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard...

  11. Critical interactions between the Global Fund-supported HIV programs and the health system in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atun, Rifat; Pothapregada, Sai Kumar; Kwansah, Janet

    2011-01-01

    of the strengths and weaknesses of the relationship between Global Fund-supported activities and the health system and to identify positive synergies and unintended consequences of integration. Ghana has a well-functioning sector-wide approach to financing its health system, with a strong emphasis on integrated...... exponentially. Global Fund-supported activities have been well integrated into key health system functions to strengthen them, especially financing, planning, service delivery, and demand generation. Yet, with governance and monitoring and evaluation functions, parallel structures to national systems have......The support of global health initiatives in recipient countries has been vigorously debated. Critics are concerned that disease-specific programs may be creating vertical and parallel service delivery structures that to some extent undermine health systems. This case study of Ghana aimed to explore...

  12. 75 FR 6816 - Attorneys' Fees; Fee-Generating Cases; Use of Non-LSC Funds, Transfers of LSC Funds, Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-11

    ..., LSC notes that the lifting of the restriction indicates that Congress itself has had a change of heart... distinction to be artificial and not necessary to effectuate Congress' intention. LSC also believes that not... recorded in the same proportion that the amount of Corporation funds expended bears to the total amount...

  13. Report: New Hampshire Clean Water State Revolving Fund Program Financial Statements with Independent Auditor’s Report, June 30, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #2003-1-00086, March 26, 2003. The audit contains reports on the financial statements, internal controls, and compliance requirements applicable to the Clean Water State Revolving Fund program in New Hampshire for the year ended June 30, 2002.

  14. Ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs in a restructuredelectri city industry: Issues and options for regulators andlegislators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph; Goldman, Charles; Nadel, Stephen

    1998-05-01

    Electric industry restructuring requires state regulators and legislators to re-examine the purposes served by and the continuing need for ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency programs, as well as the mechanisms to collect funds for these programs and the institutions appropriate to administer them. This paper offers background to these issues and a series of recommendations based on analysis of recent state experiences. Our recommendations are summarized.

  15. 34 CFR 403.120 - How does a State reallocate funds under the Secondary School Vocational Education Program and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... School Vocational Education Program and the Postsecondary and Adult Vocational Education Programs? 403...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY..., Postsecondary, and Adult Vocational Education Programs § 403.120 How does a State reallocate funds under the...

  16. 45 CFR 303.109 - Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and... STANDARDS FOR PROGRAM OPERATIONS § 303.109 Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States for Access and Visitation Programs. (a) Monitoring. The State must...

  17. 75 FR 3970 - Fund Availability Under the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... accordance with their ranked order until funding is expended (approximately 900 beds). Methodology: VA will... respective funding category based on score and any ranking criteria set forth in that funding category only...

  18. Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-05-24

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program, a small-scale production initiative designed to increase numbers of a weak but potentially recoverable population of spring chinook salmon in the Tucannon River in the State of Washington. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-l326) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  19. International Monetary Fund programs and tuberculosis outcomes in post-communist countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckler, David; King, Lawrence P; Basu, Sanjay

    2008-07-22

    Previous studies have indicated that International Monetary Fund (IMF) economic programs have influenced health-care infrastructure in recipient countries. The post-communist Eastern European and former Soviet Union countries experienced relatively similar political and economic changes over the past two decades, and participated in IMF programs of varying size and duration. We empirically examine how IMF programs related to changes in tuberculosis incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates among these countries. We performed multivariate regression of two decades of tuberculosis incidence, prevalence, and mortality data against variables potentially influencing tuberculosis program outcomes in 21 post-communist countries for which comparative data are available. After correcting for confounding variables, as well as potential detection, selection, and ecological biases, we observed that participating in an IMF program was associated with increased tuberculosis incidence, prevalence, and mortality rates by 13.9%, 13.2%, and 16.6%, respectively. Each additional year of participation in an IMF program was associated with increased tuberculosis mortality rates by 4.1%, and each 1% increase in IMF lending was associated with increased tuberculosis mortality rates by 0.9%. On the other hand, we estimated a decrease in tuberculosis mortality rates of 30.7% (95% confidence interval, 18.3% to 49.5%) associated with exiting the IMF programs. IMF lending did not appear to be a response to worsened health outcomes; rather, it appeared to be a precipitant of such outcomes (Granger- and Sims-causality tests), even after controlling for potential political, socioeconomic, demographic, and health-related confounders. In contrast, non-IMF lending programs were connected with decreased tuberculosis mortality rates (-7.6%, 95% confidence interval, -1.0% to -14.1%). The associations observed between tuberculosis mortality and IMF programs were similar to those observed when

  20. Optimum allocation of conservation funds and choice of conservation programs for a set of African cattle breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulai Awudu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although funds for livestock conservation are limited there is little known about the optimal allocation of conservation funds. A new algorithm was used to allocate Mio US$ 1, 2, 3, 5 or unlimited funds, discounted over 50 years, on 23 African cattle breeds conserved with four different possible conservation programs. Additionally, Mio US$ 1 was preferably allocated to breeds with special traits. The conceptional in situ conservation programs strongly involve breeders and give them part of the responsibility for the conservation of the breed. Therefore, the pure in situ conservation was more efficient than cryoconservation or combined in situ and cryoconservation. The average annual discounted conservation cost for a breed can be as low as US$ 1000 to US$ 4400 depending on the design of the conservation program and the economic situation of the country of conservation. The choice of the breeds and the optimal conservation program and the amount of money allocated to each breed depend on many factors such as the amount of funds available, the conservation potential of each breed, the effects of the conservation program as well as its cost. With Mio US$ 1, 64% of the present diversity could be maintained over 50 years, which is 13% more than would be maintained if no conservation measures were implemented. Special traits could be conserved with a rather small amount of the total funds. Diversity can not be conserved completely, not even with unlimited funds. A maximum of 92% of the present diversity could be conserved with Mio US$ 10, leaving 8% of the diversity to unpredictable happenings. The suggested algorithm proved to be useful for optimal allocation of conservation funds. It allocated the funds optimally among breeds by identifying the most suited conservation program for each breed, also accounting for differences in currency exchange rates between the different countries.

  1. 76 FR 59074 - State Fiscal Stabilization Fund Program and Discretionary and Other Formula Grant Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ..., please contact the person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Purpose of Program: The SFSF... and limited English proficient students are included in State assessment systems; and whether the State makes information available regarding student academic performance in the State compared to the...

  2. The European Regional Development Fund and Island Regions: An Evaluation of the 2000-06 and 2007-13 Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey W. Armstrong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from a regional policy evaluation study conducted for the European Commission. The study examined the impact of the European Regional Development Fund and Cohesion Fund on EU regions with ‘specific geographical characteristics’, namely islands, mountain regions and sparsely populated areas. These types of regions have been attracting increasing EU regional policy attention and their economic development is considered important in helping the EU to attain its important ‘territorial cohesion’ objective. The focus of this paper is on the island regions. Evaluation of island regions in their own right has not been undertaken before by the EU. The study focuses on the 2000-06 and (still on-going 2007-13 EU regional policy programs. The paper presents the methodology adopted by the study before turning to the main findings concerning the types of policy initiatives adopted in the island regions, and the appropriateness of the policies used for the economic situation faced by the islands. The islands encompassed by the study are all normal sub-national regions of EU member states. Islands with an unusual degree of administrative autonomy (e.g. the Outermost Regions were excluded.

  3. The Source of Child Care Center Preschool Learning and Program Standards: Implications for Potential Early Learning Challenge Fund Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Debra J.; Sansanelli, Rachel A.

    2010-01-01

    The proposed federal Early Learning Challenge Fund (ELCF) aims to improve the quality of early care and education programs by promoting the integration of more stringent program and early learning standards than are typically found in child care centers. ELCF grantees also must outline their plans for professional development and technical…

  4. 13 CFR 119.12 - What criteria will SBA use to evaluate applications for funding under the PRIME program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... program growth, outcomes of training, types of services provided, delivery systems used, the number and... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What criteria will SBA use to evaluate applications for funding under the PRIME program? 119.12 Section 119.12 Business Credit and...

  5. 76 FR 55084 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly... Availability (NOFA) for the Section 202 Supportive Housing for the Elderly Program. This announcement contains... Elderly Program is authorized by section 202 of the Housing Act of 1959 (12 U.S.C. 1701q), as amended by...

  6. 25 CFR 170.607 - Can a tribe use its allocation of IRR Program funds for contract support costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... costs? Yes. Contract support costs are an eligible item out of a tribe's IRR Program allocation and need... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a tribe use its allocation of IRR Program funds for contract support costs? 170.607 Section 170.607 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  7. Do Experimental and Nonexperimental Evaluations Give Different Answers about the Effectiveness of Government-Funded Training Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David H.; Michalopoulos, Charles; Robin, Philip K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses meta-analysis to investigate whether random assignment (or experimental) evaluations of voluntary government-funded training programs for the disadvantaged have produced different conclusions than nonexperimental evaluations. Information includes several hundred estimates from 31 evaluations of 15 programs that operated between…

  8. 20 CFR 667.140 - Does a Local Board have the authority to transfer funds between programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does a Local Board have the authority to transfer funds between programs? 667.140 Section 667.140 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Board may transfer up to 20 percent of a program year allocation for adult employment and training...

  9. 34 CFR 403.113 - How does a State allocate funds under the Secondary School Vocational Education Program to area...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... School Vocational Education Program to area vocational education schools and intermediate educational... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED...? Secondary, Postsecondary, and Adult Vocational Education Programs § 403.113 How does a State allocate funds...

  10. Using Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants to Support Out-of-School Time Programs. Funding Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Shawn Stelow

    2010-01-01

    Out-of-school time programs give many youth the chance to engage in interesting and enriching opportunities in the arts. One source of funding for art and cultural activities in out-of-school time programs is The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). This federal agency is charged with creating strong libraries and museums that connect…

  11. 76 FR 59151 - Announcement of Funding Awards; HOPE VI Main Street Grant Program, Fiscal Year (FY) 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards; HOPE VI Main Street Grant Program, Fiscal Year (FY..., Office of Public and Indian Housing, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street, SW..., 2009). The purpose of the HOPE VI Main Street program is to provide grants to small communities to...

  12. Impact Evaluation of a Program of Public Funding of Private Innovation Activities. An Econometric Study of FONTAR in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés López; Ana María Reynoso; Martín Rossi

    2010-01-01

    This report contains an evaluation of the Argentinean Technological Fund (FONTAR), whose main objective is to fund projects presented by private firms which aim at improving their competitive performance through technological innovation activities. The main goal of this evaluation is to analyze the impact of FONTAR's programs on the innovation activities of granted firms. The authors also try to ascertain whether FONTAR contributed to improve supported firms' innovative outputs and productive...

  13. The effectiveness of a training program in increasing crowd funding awareness

    OpenAIRE

    El Talla, Suliman A; Al Shobaki, Mazen J.; Abu Naser, Samy S.; Abu Amuna, Youssef M.

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The current study tries to verify the effectiveness of a training program in increasing Crowdfunding awareness. The sample was (50) students in CIS, who were purposively selected and distributed equally into a treatment and control group. The researchers designed the study tools (a training program to increase Crowdfunding awareness). The study findings revealed the existence of statistically significant differences between the treatment and control groups in favor of ...

  14. The transition to medication adoption in publicly funded substance use disorder treatment programs: organizational structure, culture, and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Roman, Paul M

    2014-05-01

    Medications for the treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs) are not widely available in publicly funded SUD treatment programs. Few studies have drawn on longitudinal data to examine the organizational characteristics associated with programs transitioning from not delivering any pharmacotherapy to adopting at least one SUD medication. Using two waves of panel longitudinal data collected over a 5-year period, we measured the transition to medication adoption in a cohort of 190 publicly funded treatment organizations that offered no SUD medications at baseline. Independent variables included organizational characteristics, medical resources, funding, treatment culture, and detailing activities by pharmaceutical companies. Of 190 programs not offering SUD pharmacotherapy at baseline, 22.6% transitioned to offering at least one SUD medication at follow-up approximately 5 years later. Multivariate logistic regression results indicated that the employment of at least one physician at baseline, having a greater proportion of Medicaid clients, and pharmaceutical detailing were positively associated with medication adoption. Adoption of pharmacotherapy was more likely in programs that had greater medical resources, Medicaid funding, and contact with pharmaceutical companies. Given the potential expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, patients served by publicly funded programs may gain greater access to such treatments, but research is needed to document health reform's impact on this sector of the treatment system.

  15. Replacing Windows Reduces Childhood Lead Exposure: Results From a State-Funded Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, David E; Tobin, Matthew; Targos, Loreen; Clarkson, Dale; Dixon, Sherry L; Breysse, Jill; Pratap, Preethi; Cali, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence that window replacement reduces childhood lead exposure and improves energy conservation and market value, federal policies in childhood lead poisoning, home improvement, and weatherization programs all tend to discourage it. To evaluate a state bond-financed pilot program that replaced old lead-contaminated windows with new lead-free energy efficient ones. Pre-/post evaluation in 1 urban and 1 rural jurisdiction. Low-income households (n = 96). Dust wipe sampling, visual assessment, and physical and mental self-reported health at baseline and 1 year. Geometric mean lead dust (PbD) from baseline to 1 year for interior floors, interior sills, and exterior troughs declined by 44%, 88%, and 98%, respectively (P Local and state governments should fund and operate window replacement programs to eliminate a major source of childhood lead exposure, improve energy bills, increase home market value, and create local construction and industrial jobs. Federal agencies should encourage (not discourage) replacement of old windows contaminated with lead. In budget climates such as Illinois with reduced public expenditures, making wise investments such as lead-safe window replacement is more important than ever.

  16. 77 FR 5043 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Brownfields Economic Development Initiative (BEDI) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Brownfields Economic Development Initiative...) 2009 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Brownfield Economic Development Initiative (BEDI... by HUD. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Kaminsky, Office of Economic Development Grants...

  17. 77 FR 5044 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Brownfields Economic Development Initiative (BEDI) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Brownfields Economic Development Initiative... (FLY) 2010 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the Brownfield Economic Development Initiative... available by HUD. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Kaminsky, Office of Economic Development Grants...

  18. 75 FR 3968 - Fund Availability Under the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... accordance with their ranked order until funding is expended (approximately $19 million). Methodology: VA... then be ranked within their respective funding category based on score and any ranking criteria set...

  19. Indicators measuring the performance of malaria programs supported by the global fund in Asia, progress and the way forward.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkou Zhao

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In 2010, the Global Fund provided more than 75% of external international financing for malaria control. The Global Fund uses performance based funding in the grants it finances. This paper analyses the indicators used to measure the performance of Global Fund supported malaria grants in Asia. METHODS: Indicators used in the performance frameworks for all Global Fund supported malaria grants in Asia were retrieved from grant database and grouped into impact, outcome, output and input categories and categorized by service delivery areas. Indicators of each group were compared over rounds. Indicators used in performance frameworks were compared with internationally adopted indicators included in the Monitoring and Evaluation Toolkit developed by the Global Fund and international technical agencies. RESULTS: Between 2002 and 2010, 1,434 indicators were included in the performance frameworks of the 48 malaria grants awarded in Asia, including 229 impact and 227 outcome indicators, 437 output and 541 input indicators, with an average of 29.9 indicators per grant. The proportion of impact and outcome indicators increased over rounds, with that of input indicators declining from 44.1% in Round 1 to 22.7% in Round 9. CONCLUSIONS: Input indicators, which have predominated the performance frameworks of the Global Fund supported malaria programs in Asia have declined between Rounds 1 and 9. However, increased alignment with internationally adopted indicators included in the Monitoring and Evaluation Toolkit is needed to improve the validity of reported results.

  20. Return on investment: a fuller assessment of the benefits and cost savings of the US publicly funded family planning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jennifer J; Sonfield, Adam; Zolna, Mia R; Finer, Lawrence B

    2014-12-01

    Policy Points: The US publicly supported family planning effort serves millions of women and men each year, and this analysis provides new estimates of its positive impact on a wide range of health outcomes and its net savings to the government. The public investment in family planning programs and providers not only helps women and couples avoid unintended pregnancy and abortion, but also helps many thousands avoid cervical cancer, HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, infertility, and preterm and low birth weight births. This investment resulted in net government savings of $13.6 billion in 2010, or $7.09 for every public dollar spent. Each year the United States' publicly supported family planning program serves millions of low-income women. Although the health impact and public-sector savings associated with this program's services extend well beyond preventing unintended pregnancy, they never have been fully quantified. Drawing on an array of survey data and published parameters, we estimated the direct national-level and state-level health benefits that accrued from providing contraceptives, tests for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), Pap tests and tests for human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccinations at publicly supported family planning settings in 2010. We estimated the public cost savings attributable to these services and compared those with the cost of publicly funded family planning services in 2010 to find the net public-sector savings. We adjusted our estimates of the cost savings for unplanned births to exclude some mistimed births that would remain publicly funded if they had occurred later and to include the medical costs for births through age 5 of the child. In 2010, care provided during publicly supported family planning visits averted an estimated 2.2 million unintended pregnancies, including 287,500 closely spaced and 164,190 preterm or low birth weight (LBW) births, 99

  1. Cost Savings From the Provision of Specific Methods of Contraception in a Publicly Funded Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostovtseva, Daria P.; Brindis, Claire D.; Biggs, M. Antonia; Hulett, Denis; Darney, Philip D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the cost-effectiveness of contraceptive methods dispensed in 2003 to 955 000 women in Family PACT (Planning, Access, Care and Treatment), California's publicly funded family planning program. Methods. We estimated the number of pregnancies averted by each contraceptive method and compared the cost of providing each method with the savings from averted pregnancies. Results. More than half of the 178 000 averted pregnancies were attributable to oral contraceptives, one fifth to injectable methods, and one tenth each to the patch and barrier methods. The implant and intrauterine contraceptives were the most cost-effective, with cost savings of more than $7.00 for every $1.00 spent in services and supplies. Per $1.00 spent, injectable contraceptives yielded savings of $5.60; oral contraceptives, $4.07; the patch, $2.99; the vaginal ring, $2.55; barrier methods, $1.34; and emergency contraceptives, $1.43. Conclusions. All contraceptive methods were cost-effective—they saved more in public expenditures for unintended pregnancies than they cost to provide. Because no single method is clinically recommended to every woman, it is medically and fiscally advisable for public health programs to offer all contraceptive methods. PMID:18703437

  2. Integer goal programming approach for finding a compromise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology. Vol. 3, No. ... The use of goal programming allows considering multiple criteria to achieve the goals and satisfy the constraints and ... The selective maintenance operation is an optimal decision-making activity for systems consisting of several components under.

  3. Integer goal programming approach for finding a compromise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the first model, the reliability of subsystems are considered as different objectives. In second model the cost and time spent on repairing the components are considered as two different objectives. Selective maintenance operation is used to select the repairable components and a multi-objective goal programming ...

  4. LCPT: a program for finding linear canonical transformations. [In MACSYMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Char, B.W.; McNamara, B.

    1979-05-21

    This article describes a MACSYMA program to compute symbolically a canonical linear transformation between coordinate systems. The difficulties in implementation of this canonical small physics problem are also discussed, along with the implications that may be drawn from such difficulties about widespread MACSYMA usage by the community of computational/theoretical physicists.

  5. Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... topic Print Magazine Subscribe & Order a Free Copy Classroom Poster Order a Free Poster Findings showcases diverse ... Genetics, Evolution, Stem Cells, Model Organisms, Diseases, Sleep Research Pharmacology Biochemical Actions of Drugs in the Body, Pharmacogenomics, Drug Design, ...

  6. Cash In! Funding and Promoting the Arts. A Compendium of Imaginative Concepts, Tested Ideas, and Case Histories of Programs and Promotions that Make Money and Win Audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Alvin H.

    This combination handbook, guidebook, and how-to-do-it manual presents useful marketing and fund-raising strategies for those involved in promoting and funding the arts. Case histories of funding programs and promotions are presented along with advice and guidance on: tapping the corporate treasury; unusual direct-mail techniques; and the use of…

  7. Report: South Carolina Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Program Financial Statements with Independent Auditor’s Report, June 30, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #2003-1-00138, September 17, 2003. We have audited the balance sheet of the SCDWSRF Program as of June 30, 2002, the related statement of revenues, expenses, and changes in fund equity, and the statement of cash flows for the year then ended.

  8. 34 CFR 426.5 - What activities does the Secretary fund under the Program for Model Consumer and Homemaking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... parenting skills, especially among teenage parents; (f) Preventing teenage pregnancy; (g) Assisting aged... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities does the Secretary fund under the Program for Model Consumer and Homemaking Education Projects? 426.5 Section 426.5 Education Regulations of...

  9. 34 CFR 403.70 - How must funds be used under the State Programs and State Leadership Activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must funds be used under the State Programs and State Leadership Activities? 403.70 Section 403.70 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION...

  10. California Institute of Technology: Caltech Energy Conservation Investment Program. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The Caltech Energy Conservation Investment Program (CECIP) was initiated in 2009. It manages $8 million within an existing fund in the school's endowment, which had been created to finance capital projects. Any member of the Caltech community may submit a project proposal, and projects are considered for approval as long as they have at least a 15…

  11. The Trust Fund for the Administration of the Forest Development Program, and the Inventory and Monitoring of Jalisco's Natural Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis Artemio T. Alonso

    2006-01-01

    In 1966 the State Government of Jalisco conducted a review of the state’s forest sector. A new forest agenda resulted from this review, which led to a set of ground breaking actions creating a long term forest development program known as FIPRODEFO (Trust Fund for the Administration of the Forest Development Program of Jalisco). Among the relevant issues, the survey...

  12. Genefer: Programs for Finding Large Probable Generalized Fermat Primes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Arthur Bethune

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Genefer is a suite of programs for performing Probable Primality (PRP tests of Generalised Fermat numbers 'b'2'n'+1 (GFNs using a Fermat test. Optimised implementations are available for modern CPUs using single instruction, multiple data (SIMD instructions, as well as for GPUs using CUDA or OpenCL. Genefer has been extensively used by PrimeGrid – a volunteer computing project searching for large prime numbers of various kinds, including GFNs. Genefer’s architecture separates the high level logic such as checkpointing and user interface from the architecture-specific performance-critical parts of the implementation, which are suitable for re-use. Genefer is released under the MIT license. Source and binaries are available from www.assembla.com/spaces/genefer.

  13. 77 FR 24169 - Notice of Funds Availability: Inviting Applications for the Market Access Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Commodity Credit Corporation Notice of Funds Availability: Inviting Applications for the Market Access... Notice of Funds Availability. DATES: All applications must be received by 5 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time... overseas marketing and promotion activities. MAP participants may receive assistance for generic or brand...

  14. 78 FR 23893 - Notice of Funds Availability: Inviting Applications for the Market Access Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... Commodity Credit Corporation Notice of Funds Availability: Inviting Applications for the Market Access... publish a notice in the Federal Register rescinding this Notice of Funds Availability. DATES: All... marketing and promotion activities. MAP Participants may receive assistance for generic or brand promotion...

  15. Do European Banks with a Covered Bond Program still issue Asset-Backed Securities for funding?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesel, Nils; Kool, C.J.M.; Lugo, S.

    The decline in the issuance of Asset-Backed Securities (ABS) since the financial crisis and the comparative advantage of Covered Bonds (CBs) as a funding alternative to ABS raise the question whether banks still issue ABS as a mean to receive funding. Employing double-hurdle regression models on a

  16. Steps to a HealthierUS Cooperative Agreement Program: foundational elements for program evaluation planning, implementation, and use of findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Goldie; Garcia, Danyael; Zaza, Stephanie; Schooley, Michael; Compton, Don; Bryant, Terry; Bagnol, Lulu; Edgerly, Cathy; Haverkate, Rick

    2006-01-01

    The Steps to a HealthierUS Cooperative Agreement Program (Steps Program) enables funded communities to implement chronic disease prevention and health promotion efforts to reduce the burden of diabetes, obesity, asthma, and related risk factors. At both the national and community levels, investment in surveillance and program evaluation is substantial. Public health practitioners engaged in program evaluation planning often identify desired outcomes, related indicators, and data collection methods but may pay only limited attention to an overarching vision for program evaluation among participating sites. We developed a set of foundational elements to provide a vision of program evaluation that informs the technical decisions made throughout the evaluation process. Given the diversity of activities across the Steps Program and the need for coordination between national- and community-level evaluation efforts, our recommendations to guide program evaluation practice are explicit yet leave room for site-specific context and needs. Staff across the Steps Program must consider these foundational elements to prepare a formal plan for program evaluation. Attention to each element moves the Steps Program closer to well-designed and complementary plans for program evaluation at the national, state, and community levels.

  17. Saving Energy in Industrial Companies: Case Studies of Energy Efficiency Programs in Large U.S. Industrial Corporations and the Role of Ratepayer-Funded Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-03-08

    This paper is designed for companies looking to cut costs through energy savings, ratepayer-funded program administrators interested in increasing large industrial company participation in energy efficiency program offerings, and state utility commissions.

  18. Child Care and Development Fund: Undercover Tests Show Five State Programs Are Vulnerable to Fraud and Abuse. Report to Congressional Addressees. GAO-10-1062

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Through the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) subsidizes child care for low-income families whose parents work or attend education or training programs. In fiscal year 2009, the CCDF budget was $7 billion. States are responsible for determining program priorities and overseeing funds.…

  19. 75 FR 23319 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... as, business assessment, management training, counseling, technical assistance, marketing and..., improvement, or revitalization of any of the nation's modes of transportation. Funding Opportunity Number... contracts and subcontracts develop support mechanisms, including management and technical services, that...

  20. 75 FR 42181 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ..., such as, business assessment, management training, counseling, technical assistance, marketing and... revitalization of any of the nation's modes of transportation. Funding Opportunity Number: USDOT-OST-OSDBU... subcontracts; develop support mechanisms, including management and technical services, that will enable small...

  1. [The "Wunsch- und Wahlrecht" from §9 SGB IX in case of the application for the medical rehabilitation: findings of a regional survey among insurees of a federal pension fund and a compulsory health insurance fund].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohontsch, N; Welti, F; Raspe, H; Meyer, T

    2013-07-01

    the "Wunsch- und Wahlrecht" has been translated to reality of rehabilitation services provided by a federal pension fund and a compulsory health insurance fund. The findings show that many respondents know about their "Wunsch- und Wahlrecht" and make use of it to a certain degree. At the moment wishes still relate mainly to the place or region of rehabilitation. This shows the necessity of informing applicants about their "Wunsch- und Wahlrecht" on a regular basis. At the same time they must be enlightened about potentially important criteria for choosing a rehabilitation clinic. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. 76 FR 32355 - Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) Inviting Applications for the Biorefinery Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... provides guaranteed loans for the development and construction of commercial- scale biorefineries or for... obtained from: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, Energy Branch, Attention: BioRefinery...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Business-Cooperative Service Rural Utilities Service Notice of Funds...

  3. 75 FR 74134 - State of Good Repair Bus and Bus Facilities Discretionary Program Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ..., infrastructure, and equipment in a state of good repair. Grantees selected for competitive discretionary funding..., Cambridge, MA Worth, 819 Taylor Street, Room 02142-1093, Tel. 617-494-2055. 8A36, Ft. Worth, TX 76102, Tel... Mokhtee Ahmad, Regional Administrator, Region 2--New York, One Administrator, Region 7-- Bowling Green...

  4. 76 FR 21320 - Notice of Funds Availability: Inviting Applications for the Emerging Markets Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... emerging market, lack of awareness by foreign officials of U.S. technology and business practices... and products by funding activities that improve emerging markets' food and rural business systems... emerging market's food and rural business systems previously identified by an EMP project that are to be...

  5. Welfare Eligibility: Programs Treat Indian Tribal Trust Fund Report to Congressional Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This report was sought by the Conference Committee on the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985, concerned that federal law allows payments from tribal trust funds to be excluded when determining eligibility for welfare benefits to American Indians. Applicable federal laws and eligibility policies were reviewed to determine the…

  6. 75 FR 78725 - Recreational Boating Safety Projects, Programs and Activities Funded Under Provisions of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century; Accounting of ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In 1999... development of new regulations and to conduct boating safety- related research and analysis ($669,338..., during classroom instruction, and during Vessel Safety Checks. ($101,420). Reimbursable Salaries: Funding...

  7. How the Affordable Care Act Has Improved Americans’ Ability to Buy Health Insurance on Their Own: Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sara R; Gunja, Munira Z; Doty, Michelle M; Beutel, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Issue: Since 2001, long before the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey has examined health coverage and consumers’ experiences buying insurance and using health care. Goals: To examine long-term trends and to make comparisons before and after passage of health reform. Methods: Analysis of the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, 2016. Findings and Conclusions: There have been dramatic improvements in people’s ability to buy health plans on their own following the passage of the ACA. For adults with family incomes less than $48,500, uninsured rates dropped about 17 percentage points below their 2010 peak. Lower-income whites, blacks, and Latinos have experienced drops this large, though Latinos are uninsured at higher rates. Among working-age adults who had shopped for plans in the individual market and ACA marketplaces over the prior three years, the percentage who reported it was very difficult to find affordable plans fell by nearly half from 2010, prior to the ACA reforms, to 2016. Coverage gains are helping working-age Americans get the care they need: the number of adults who reported problems getting needed health care and filling prescriptions because of costs fell from a high of 80 million in 2012 to an estimated 63 million in 2016.

  8. Americans' Experiences with Marketplace and Medicaid Coverage. Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March-May 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sara R; Rasmussen, Petra W; Doty, Michelle M; Beutel, Sophie

    2015-06-01

    The latest Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey finds the share of uninsured working-age adults was 13 percent in March–May 2015, compared with 20 percent just before the major coverage expansions went into effect. More than half of adults who currently have coverage either through the Affordable Care Act's (ACA's) marketplace plans or Medicaid expansion were uninsured prior to gaining coverage. Of those, more than 60 percent lacked coverage for one year or longer. More than six of 10 adults who used their new plans to obtain care reported they could not have afforded or accessed it previously. Majorities of people with ACA coverage who have used their plans express satisfaction with the doctors covered in their networks and are able to find physicians with relative ease. Wait times to get appointments with physicians in marketplace plans and Medicaid are comparable to those reported by other working-age adults.

  9. Effectiveness of a grant program's efforts to promote synergy within its funded initiatives: perceptions of participants of the Southern Rural Access Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiner Bryan J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foundations and public agencies commonly fund focused initiatives for individual grantees. These discrete, stand-alone initiatives can risk failure by being carried out in isolation. Fostering synergy among grantees' initiatives is one strategy proposed for promoting the success and impact of grant programs. We evaluate an explicit strategy to build synergy within the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Southern Rural Access Program (SRAP, which awarded grants to collaboratives within eight southeastern U.S. states to strengthen basic health care services in targeted rural counties. Methods We interviewed 39 key participants of the SRAP, including the program director within each state and the principal subcontractors heading the program's funded initiatives that supported heath professionals' recruitment, retention and training, made loans to health care providers, and built networks among providers. Interews were recorded and transcribed. Two investigators independently coded the transcripts and a third investigator distilled the main points. Results Participants generally perceived that the SRAP yielded more synergies than other grant programs in which they had participated and that these synergies added to the program's impact. The synergies most often noted were achieved through relationship building among grantees and with outside agencies, sharing information and know-how, sharing resources, combining efforts to yield greater capacity, joining voices to advocate for common goals, and spotting gaps in services offered and then filling these gaps. The SRAP's strategies that participants felt fostered synergy included targeting funding to culturally and geographically similar states, supporting complementary types of initiatives, promoting opportunities to network through semi-annual meetings and regular conference calls, and the advocacy efforts of the program's leadership. Participants noted that synergies were sometimes

  10. The Future of Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs in the United States: Projected Spending and Savings to 2025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbose, Galen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Goldman, Charles [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hoffman, Ian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Billingsley, Megan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-09-11

    We develop projections of future spending on, and savings from, energy efficiency programs funded by electric and gas utility customers in the United States, under three scenarios through 2025. Our analysis, which updates a previous LBNL study, relies on detailed bottom-up modeling of current state energy efficiency policies, regulatory decisions, and demand-side management and utility resource plans. The three scenarios are intended to represent a range of potential outcomes under the current policy environment (i.e., without considering possible major new policy developments). By 2025, spending on electric and gas efficiency programs (excluding load management programs) is projected to double from 2010 levels to $9.5 billion in the medium case, compared to $15.6 billion in the high case and $6.5 billion in the low case. Compliance with statewide legislative or regulatory savings or spending targets is the primary driver for the increase in electric program spending through 2025, though a significant share of the increase is also driven by utility DSM planning activity and integrated resource planning. Our analysis suggests that electric efficiency program spending may approach a more even geographic distribution over time in terms of absolute dollars spent, with the Northeastern and Western states declining from over 70% of total U.S. spending in 2010 to slightly more than 50% in 2025, with the South and Midwest splitting the remainder roughly evenly. Under our medium case scenario, annual incremental savings from customer-funded electric energy efficiency programs increase from 18.4 TWh in 2010 in the U.S. (which is about 0.5% of electric utility retail sales) to 28.8 TWh in 2025 (0.8% of retail sales). These savings would offset the majority of load growth in the Energy Information Administration’s most recent reference case forecast, given specific assumptions about the extent to which future energy efficiency program savings are captured in that forecast

  11. Inequities in access to medical care in five countries: findings from the 2001 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Cathy; Doty, Michelle M

    2004-03-01

    To examine across five countries inequities in access to health care and quality of care experiences associated with income, and to determine whether these inequities persist after controlling for the effect of insurance coverage, minority and immigration status, health and other important co-factors. Multivariate analysis of a cross-sectional 2001 random survey of 1400 adults in five countries: Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and United States. Access difficulties and waiting times, cost-related access problems, and ratings of physicians and quality of care. The study finds wide and significant disparities in access and care experience between US adults with above and below-average incomes that persist after controlling for insurance coverage, race/ethnicity, immigration status, and other important factors. In contrast, differences in UK by income were rare. There were also few significant access differences by income in Australia; yet, compared to UK, Australians were more likely to report out of pocket costs. New Zealand and Canada results fell in the mid-range of the five nations, with income gaps most pronounced on services less well covered by national systems. In the four countries with universal coverage, adults with above-average income were more likely to have private supplemental insurance. Having private insurance in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand protects adults from cost-related access problems. In contrast, in UK having supplemental coverage makes little significant difference for access measures. Being uninsured in US has significant negative consequences for access and quality ratings. For policy leaders, the five-nation survey demonstrates that some health systems are better able to minimize among low income adults financial barriers to access and quality care. However, the reliance on private coverage to supplement public coverage in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand can result in access inequities even within health systems

  12. Evaluation of the School Breakfast Program Pilot Project: Findings from the First Year of Implementation. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Joan E.; Bernstein, Lawrence S.; Crepinsek, May Kay; Daft, Lynn M.; Murphy, J. Michael

    In 1998, Congress authorized implementation of a 3-year pilot breakfast program involving 4,300 students in elementary schools in 6 school districts representing a range of economic and demographic characteristics. The program began in the 2000-01 school year. This lengthy report presents the findings from the pilot's first year. The study had two…

  13. An explanatory model of women’s entrepreneur intention within a government funded entrepreneurship program

    OpenAIRE

    Margarita Araya Jofré

    2017-01-01

    This study consists in an explanatory model of the entrepreneur intention (EI) of a group of women participating in the Learning to Undertake Project (LTU) financed by PRODEMU (Women’s Promotion and Development Fund) in 2014. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TBP) variables, as well as socio personal variables were studied to determine the impact upon the subject’s entrepreneur conduct. Since the study found that there is a positive correlation between EI and age; and a negative correlation bet...

  14. A Comparison of Science and Technology Funding for DoD's Space and Nonspace Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goldberg, Matthew; Rehmus, Paul

    2008-01-01

    ...) unclassified space programs have experienced growth in their costs and delays in their schedules compared with what DoD envisioned when the programs entered the development and demonstration phase...

  15. Contribution of Global Polio Eradication Initiative-Funded Personnel to the Strengthening of Routine Immunization Programs in the 10 Focus Countries of the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ent, Maya M V X; Swift, Rachel D; Anaokar, Sameer; Hegg, Lea Anne; Eggers, Rudolf; Cochi, Stephen L

    2017-07-01

    The Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan (PEESP) established a target that at least 50% of the time of personnel receiving funding from the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) for polio eradication activities (hereafter, "GPEI-funded personnel") should be dedicated to the strengthening of immunization systems. This article describes the self-reported profile of how GPEI-funded personnel allocate their time toward immunization goals and activities beyond those associated with polio, the training they have received to conduct tasks to strengthen routine immunization systems, and the type of tasks they have conducted. A survey of approximately 1000 field managers of frontline GPEI-funded personnel was conducted by Boston Consulting Group in the 10 focus countries of the PEESP during 2 phases, in 2013 and 2014, to determine time allocation among frontline staff. Country-specific reports on the training of GPEI-funded personnel were reviewed, and an analysis of the types of tasks that were reported was conducted. A total of 467 managers responded to the survey. Forty-seven percent of the time (range, 23%-61%) of GPEI-funded personnel was dedicated to tasks related to strengthening immunization programs, other than polio eradication. Less time was spent on polio-associated activities in countries that had already interrupted wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission, compared with findings for WPV-endemic countries. All countries conducted periodic trainings of the GPEI-funded personnel. The types of non-polio-related tasks performed by GPEI-funded personnel varied among countries and included surveillance, microplanning, newborn registration and defaulter tracing, monitoring of routine immunization activities, and support of district immunization task teams, as well as promotion of health behaviors, such as clean-water use and good hygiene and sanitation practices. In all countries, GPEI-funded personnel perform critical tasks in the strengthening of routine

  16. The Tax-Credit Scholarship Audit: Do Publicly Funded Private School Choice Programs Save Money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    This report follows up on previous work that examined the fiscal effects of private school voucher programs. It estimates the total fiscal effects of tax-credit scholarship programs--another type of private school choice program--on state governments, state and local taxpayers, and school districts combined. Based on a range of assumptions, these…

  17. How to Help Unemployed Find Jobs Quickly : Experimental Evidence from a Mandatory Activation Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graversen, B.K.; van Ours, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates how a mandatory activation program in Denmark affects the job finding rate of unemployed workers.The activation program was introduced in an experimental setting where about half of the workers who became unemployed in the period from November 2005 to March 2006 were randomly

  18. Research-Doctorate Programs in the Biomedical Sciences: Selected Findings from the NRC Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorden, Joan F., Ed.; Kuh, Charlotte V., Ed.; Voytuk, James A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Research Doctorate Programs in the Biomedical Sciences: Selected Findings from the NRC Assessment" examines data on the biomedical sciences programs to gather additional insight about the talent, training environment, outcomes, diversity, and international participation in the biomedical sciences workforce. This report supports an…

  19. Findings from the Evaluation of OJJDP's Gang Reduction Program. Juvenile Justice Bulletin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Meagan; Hayeslip, David

    2010-01-01

    This bulletin draws on findings from an independent evaluation, conducted by the Urban Institute, of the Gang Reduction Program's (GRP) Impact in Los Angeles, California; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; North Miami Beach, Florida; and Richmond, Virginia, to examine how effectively these sites implemented the program. Following are some of the authors' key…

  20. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  1. How Medicaid Enrollees Fare Compared with Privately Insured and Uninsured Adults: Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunja, Munira Z; Collins, Sara R; Blumenthal, David; Doty, Michelle M; Beutel, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    ISSUE: The number of Americans insured by Medicaid has climbed to more than 70 million, with an estimated 12 million gaining coverage under the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion. Still, some policymakers have questioned whether Medicaid coverage actually improves access to care, quality of care, or financial protection. GOALS: To compare the experiences of working-age adults who were either: covered all year by private employer or individual insurance; covered by Medicaid for the full year; or uninsured for some time during the year. METHOD: Analysis of the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, 2016. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: The level of access to health care that Medicaid coverage provides is comparable to that afforded by private insurance. Adults with Medicaid coverage reported better care experiences than those who had been uninsured during the year. Medicaid enrollees have fewer problems paying medical bills than either the privately insured or the uninsured.

  2. The rise in health care coverage and affordability since health reform took effect: findings from the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sara R; Rasmussen, Petra W; Doty, Michelle M; Beutel, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    New results from the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, 2014, indicate that the Affordable Care Act's subsidized insurance options and consumer protections reduced the number of uninsured working-age adults from an estimated 37 million people, or 20 percent of the population, in 2010 to 29 million, or 16 percent, by the second half of 2014. Conducted from July to December 2014, for the first time since it began in 2001, the survey finds declines in the number of people who report cost-related access problems and medical-related financial difficulties. The number of adults who did not get needed health care because of cost declined from 80 million people, or 43 percent, in 2012 to 66 million, or 36 percent, in 2014. The number of adults who reported problems paying their medical bills declined from an estimated 75 million people in 2012 to 64 million people in 2014.

  3. An explanatory model of women’s entrepreneur intention within a government funded entrepreneurship program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Araya Jofré

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study consists in an explanatory model of the entrepreneur intention (EI of a group of women participating in the Learning to Undertake Project (LTU financed by PRODEMU (Women’s Promotion and Development Fund in 2014. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TBP variables, as well as socio personal variables were studied to determine the impact upon the subject’s entrepreneur conduct. Since the study found that there is a positive correlation between EI and age; and a negative correlation between barriers to entrepreneurship, public policies to enhance socially vulnerable women entrepreneurship should consider these specific variables.

  4. Evaluating bacterial gene-finding HMM structures as probabilistic logic programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Søren; Holmes, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Probabilistic logic programming offers a powerful way to describe and evaluate structured statistical models. To investigate the practicality of probabilistic logic programming for structure learning in bioinformatics, we undertook a simplified bacterial gene-finding benchmark in PRISM...... modeling and three-state versions of the five model structures. The models are all represented as probabilistic logic programs and evaluated using the PRISM machine learning system in terms of statistical information criteria and gene-finding prediction accuracy, in two bacterial genomes. Neither of our...

  5. 78 FR 50026 - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program Finding of No Significant Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Rural Utilities Service Energy Efficiency and Conservation Loan Program Finding of No Significant Impact... (RUS) has made a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for implementing its new Energy Efficiency... 12 to authorize energy audits and energy efficiency measures and devices to reduce demand on electric...

  6. 78 FR 26684 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with DOT... authorities for the SBTRC's headquarters state must have representation on the planning committee. This...

  7. 78 FR 70617 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ... (STLP) Information, Bonding Education Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature... representation on the planning committee. This committee shall be established no later than 60 days after the...

  8. 78 FR 13143 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... Education Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with... for the SBTRC's headquarters state must have representation on the planning committee. This committee...

  9. 77 FR 4276 - Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) for the Biorefinery Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual's....) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille...

  10. 76 FR 41756 - Notice of Funds Availability Under the Rural Business Enterprise Grant Program To Provide...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal... for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's...

  11. 34 CFR 403.91 - How must funds be used under the Sex Equity Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for— (a) Programs, services, comprehensive career guidance and counseling, and activities to eliminate... 25, designed to enable the participants to support themselves and their families; and (c) Support...

  12. Tailoring health programming to clergy: findings from a study of United Methodist clergy in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proeschold-Bell, Rae Jean; LeGrand, Sara; Wallace, Amanda; James, John; Moore, H Edgar; Swift, Robin; Toole, David

    2012-01-01

    Research indicating high rates of chronic disease among some clergy groups highlights the need for health programming for clergy. Like any group united by similar beliefs and norms, clergy may find culturally tailored health programming more accessible and effective. There is an absence of research on what aspects clergy find important for clergy health programs. We conducted 11 focus groups with United Methodist Church pastors and district superintendents. Participants answered open-ended questions about clergy health program desires and ranked program priorities from a list of 13 possible programs. Pastors prioritized health club memberships, retreats, personal trainers, mental health counseling, and spiritual direction. District superintendents prioritized for pastors: physical exams, peer support groups, health coaching, retreats, health club memberships, and mental health counseling. District superintendents prioritized for themselves: physical exams, personal trainers, health coaching, retreats, and nutritionists. Additionally, through qualitative analysis, nine themes emerged concerning health and health programs: (a) clergy defined health holistically, and they expressed a desire for (b) schedule flexibility, (c) accessibility in rural areas, (d) low cost programs, (e) institutional support, (f) education on physical health, and (g) the opportunity to work on their health in connection with others. They also expressed concern about (h) mental health stigma and spoke about (i) the tension between prioritizing healthy behaviors and fulfilling vocational responsibilities. The design of future clergy health programming should consider these themes and the priorities clergy identified for health programming.

  13. 75 FR 10496 - Tribal Self-Governance Program Planning Cooperative Agreement; Announcement Type: New Funding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Tribal Self-Governance Program Planning Cooperative Agreement... Self- Governance Program (TSGP), as authorized by Public Law 106-260, the Tribal Self-Governance... is designed to promote Self-Governance by enabling Tribes to assume control of Indian Health Service...

  14. 77 FR 67386 - Announcement of Funding Awards; Indian Community Development Block Grant Program; Fiscal Year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ..., 523 Infrastructure. Ashmun Street, Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783, (906) 635-6050. Seminole Nation... Native American Programs (ONAP) serving your area or Glenda Green, Director, Office of Native Programs, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410, telephone number 202-402-6329. Hearing or speech-impaired...

  15. 77 FR 65448 - Funding Availability Under Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... housing. Only families with children under the age of 18 may receive such assistance; individuals are not... homeless persons. The Housing First approach is based on the concept that a homeless individual or...'s program concept must be generally consistent with the program concept of the grantee's current...

  16. Oregonians Debate Whether to Use Tax Funds to Bolster the State Universities' Flagging Sports Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Douglas

    1988-01-01

    Rising program deficits and lack of state aid for college sports programs in Oregon have caused the suspension of sports teams as a cost-cutting measure. Some trace the financial problems to equalization of women's sports and the 1982 downturn in the lumber industry. Financing options appear limited. (MSE)

  17. 75 FR 54530 - Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations: Administrative Funding Allocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... conducting data collection and analysis for several months, the work group completed a preliminary proposal... warehousing and transporting USDA foods to both the independent programs and those programs that they... FNS, the work group recommended that Montana's and North Dakota's warehousing and transportation costs...

  18. FOCUS: Essential Elements of Quality for State-Funded Preschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico Public Education Department, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The "FOCUS: Essential Elements of Quality, New Mexico's Tiered Quality Rating and Improvement System (TQRIS)," provides early childhood program personnel with the criteria, tools, and resources they need to improve the quality of their program. These quality improvements focus on children's growth, development, and learning--so that each…

  19. Selectivity of physiotherapist programs in the United States does not differ by institutional funding source or research activity level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P. Riley

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to compare selectivity characteristics among institution characteristics to determine differences by institutional funding source (public vs. private or research activity level (research vs. non-research. Methods: This study included information provided by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE and the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy. Data were extracted from all students who graduated in 2011 from accredited physical therapy programs in the United States. The public and private designations of the institutions were extracted directly from the classifications from the ‘CAPTE annual accreditation report,’ and high and low research activity was determined based on Carnegie classifications. The institutions were classified into four groups: public/research intensive, public/non-research intensive, private/research intensive, and private/non-research intensive. Descriptive and comparison analyses with post hoc testing were performed to determine whether there were statistically significant differences among the four groups. Results: Although there were statistically significant baseline grade point average differences among the four categorized groups, there were no significant differences in licensure pass rates or for any of the selectivity variables of interest. Conclusion: Selectivity characteristics did not differ by institutional funding source (public vs. private or research activity level (research vs. non-research. This suggests that the concerns about reduced selectivity among physiotherapy programs, specifically the types that are experiencing the largest proliferation, appear less warranted.

  20. Training Future Entrepreneurs Using European Funds. A Descriptive Research on Start-Up Romania Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Nicolau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the mutual relationship among the concepts of entrepreneurship, trainingpersonnel and business start-up and development. From our point of view, Romania shallencourage as much as possible entrepreneurship so as to create SMEs, the most flexible andnumerous in number in the Romanian total number of companies. Hence, the main objective of thispaper is to highlight the importance of accessing European funds in increasing the number ofRomanians properly trained so as to become successful entrepreneurs and to manage successfulbusinesses. At the same time, another main objective is to present the need of entrepreneurshiptraining and support in business start-up and development by using the descriptive method ofresearch.

  1. 78 FR 79477 - Announcement of Funding Awards, Choice Neighborhoods Grant Program, Fiscal Year 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... program aims to transform neighborhoods of poverty into viable mixed-income neighborhoods with access to... Park--Broadway. Sacramento, 801 12th Street, Sacramento, CA 95814-2947. County of St. Louis, 41 South...

  2. 78 FR 41817 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-11

    ... Education Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with... representation on the planning committee. This committee shall be established no later than 60 days after the...

  3. 77 FR 36034 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... (STLP) Information, Bonding Education Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with DOT booklets, Women and Girls Entrepreneurial Training and Technical... authorities for the SBTRC's headquarters state must have representation on the planning committee. This...

  4. 77 FR 42790 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... (STLP) Information, Bonding Education Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with DOT booklets, Women and Girls Entrepreneurial Training and Technical... must have representation on the planning committee. This committee shall be established no later than...

  5. 78 FR 4973 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... Program (BEP) information, SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with DOT booklets, Women and Girls in Transportation Initiative (WITI) information, and any other materials or... for the SBTRC's headquarters state must have representation on the planning committee. This committee...

  6. 78 FR 59338 - Notice of Funds Availability Under the Rural Microentrepreneur Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... for employment on the bases of race, color, national origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity... deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities and you wish to file either an EEO or program...

  7. A guide to federal-aid programs, projects, and other uses of highway funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    For the past 20 years, federal-aid highway programs have been directed primarily toward the construction, reconstruction, and improvement of highways on the federal-aid interstate, primary, secondary,and urban systems. As the result of legislation co...

  8. 75 FR 3517 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... assistance, business training programs, such as, business assessment, management training, counseling..., rehabilitation, restructuring, improvement, or revitalization of any of the nation's modes of transportation...; develop support mechanisms, including management and technical services, that will enable small...

  9. How the Affordable Care Act Has Helped Women Gain Insurance and Improved Their Ability to Get Health Care: Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunja, Munira Z; Collins, Sara R; Doty, Michelle M; Beautel, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    ISSUE: Prior to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), one-third of women who tried to buy a health plan on their own were either turned down, charged a higher premium because of their health, or had specific health problems excluded from their plans. Beginning in 2010, ACA consumer protections, particularly coverage for preventive care screenings with no cost-sharing and a ban on plan benefit limits, improved the quality of health insurance for women. In 2014, the law’s major insurance reforms helped millions of women who did not have employer insurance to gain coverage through the ACA’s marketplaces or through Medicaid. GOALS: To examine the effects of ACA health reforms on women’s coverage and access to care. METHOD: Analysis of the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Surveys, 2001–2016. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: Women ages 19 to 64 who shopped for new coverage on their own found it significantly easier to find affordable plans in 2016 compared to 2010. The percentage of women who reported delaying or skipping needed care because of costs fell to an all-time low. Insured women were more likely than uninsured women to receive preventive screenings, including Pap tests and mammograms.

  10. 77 FR 41190 - Office of Urban Indian Health Programs Funding Opportunity: Title V HIV/AIDS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... CONTACT: Ms. Phyllis Wolfe, Director, Office of Urban Health Programs, Indian Health Service, 801 Thompson... Dates: Proof of Non-Profit Status: Due date July 16, 2012.'' should read ``July 20, 2012.'' On page...

  11. Transition from grant funding to a self-supporting burn telemedicine program in the western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Katie W; Saffle, Jeffrey R; Theurer, Louanna; Cochran, Amalia L

    2015-12-01

    Many Americans have limited access to specialty burn care, and telemedicine has been proposed as a means to address this disparity. However, many telemedicine programs have been founded on grant support and then fail once the grant support expires. Our objective was to demonstrate that a burn telemedicine program can be financially viable. This retrospective review from 2005 to 2014 evaluated burn telemedicine visits and financial reimbursement during and after a Technology Opportunities Program grant to a regional burn center. In 2005, we had 12 telemedicine visits, which increased to 458 in 2014. In terms of how this compares to in-person clinic visits, we saw a consistent increase in telemedicine visits as a percentage of total clinic visits from .26% in 2005 to 14% in 2014. Median telemedicine reimbursement has been equivalent to in-person visits. Specialty telemedicine programs can successfully transition from grant-funded enterprises to self-sustaining. The availability of telemedicine services allows access to specialty expertise in a large and sparsely populated region without imposing an undue financial burden. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Federally Funded Programs Related to Building Energy Use: Overlaps, Challenges, and Opportunities for Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Butner, Ryan S.; Hostick, Donna J.

    2010-10-01

    As energy efficiency in buildings continues to move from discreet technology development to an integrated systems approach, the need to understand and integrate complementary goals and targets becomes more pronounced. Whether within Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP), across the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), or throughout DOE and the Federal government, mutual gains and collaboration synergies exist that are not easily achieved because of organizational and time constraints. There also cases where federal agencies may be addressing similar issues, but with different (and sometimes conflicting) outcomes in mind. This report conducts a comprehensive inventory across all EERE and other relevant Federal agencies of potential activities with synergistic benefits. A taxonomy of activities with potential interdependencies is presented. The report identifies a number of federal program objectives, products, and plans related to building energy efficiency and characterizes the current structure and interactions related to these plans and programs. Areas where overlap occurs are identified as are the challenges of addressing issues related to overlapping goals and programs. Based on the input gathered from various sources, including 20 separate interviews with federal agency staff and contractor staff supporting buildings programs, this study identifies a number of synergistic opportunities and makes recommends a number of areas where further collaboration could be beneficial.

  13. Picking Funds with Confidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Niels Strange; Lunde, Asger; Timmermann, Allan

    identified ex-ante as being superior earn substantially higher risk-adjusted returns than top funds identified by conventional alpha ranking methods. Importantly, we find strong evidence of variation in the breadth of the set of funds identified as superior, as well as fluctuations in the style and industry...... exposures of such funds over time and across different volatility states....

  14. The effect of two publicly funded insurance programs on use of dental services for young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickhouse, Tegwyn H; Rozier, R Gary; Slade, Gary D

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the use of dental services for preschool aged children enrolled in North Carolina Medicaid, a traditional program based on a fee-for-service schedule, and North Carolina Health Choice (NCHC), an State Children's Health Insurance Program (S-CHIP) dental insurance program structured similarly to private insurance. All children (165,858) 1-5 years of age enrolled in Medicaid and S-CHIP (NCHC) at some time during one study year (October 1, 1999-September 30, 2000). DATA SOURCES/EXTRACTION METHODS: Medicaid and NCHC enrollment and dental claims files were obtained for individual children. An observational study with a retrospective cohort design. Use of dental services for each child was measured as having at least one dental claim during the outcome period (October 1, 1999-September 30, 2000). Multivariable logistic regression models were developed to compare the effect of two differently administered insurance programs on the use of dental services, controlling for demographic, enrollment, and county characteristics. Children enrolled solely in S-CHIP (NCHC) were 1.6 times more likely (95 percent confidence intervals (CI)=1.50-1.79) to have a dental visit than those enrolled solely in Medicaid. Prediction models for children enrolled for 12 months indicated that those enrolled in S-CHIP (NCHC) had a significantly higher probability of having a dental visit (50 percent) than those enrolled in both plans (44 percent) or Medicaid only (39 percent), a trend found in all age groups. The S-CHIP (NCHC) program appears to provide children with increased access to dental care compared to children in the Medicaid program.

  15. What Campuses Assess When They Assess Their Learning Community Programs: Selected Findings from a National Survey of Learning Community Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardner, Emily

    2014-01-01

    In spring 2013, the Washington Center administered a national survey to find what campuses assessed when they assessed their learning community programs, how they assessed those outcomes, and what they did with the results. Sixty-six campuses responded to the survey. Most campuses assess at least one measure of student success (pass rates, course…

  16. The adverse effects of International Monetary Fund programs on the health and education workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marphatia, Akanksha A

    2010-01-01

    Decades of underinvestment in public sectors and in teachers and health workers have adversely affected the health and educational outcomes of women. This is partly explained by a general lack of resources. However, the amount a country can spend on social sectors, including teachers and health workers, is also determined by its macroeconomic framework, which is set in agreement with the International Monetary Fund. There is now ample evidence of how IMF-imposed wage ceilings have constrained the ability of governments to hire adequate numbers of trained professionals and increase investment in social sectors. Though the IMF has recently removed wage ceilings from its basket of conditions, little change has taken place to ensure that women are better supported by macroeconomic policies or, at the least, are less adversely affected. Thus far, the IMF's neoliberal policies have either ignored gender concerns or instrumentalized equity, health, and education to support economic development. Unless macroeconomic policies are more flexible and deliberately take into account the different needs of women and men, social outcomes will continue to be poor and inequitable. Governments must pursue alternative, feminist policies that put the goals of social equity at the center of macroeconomic policy. These policies can facilitate increased investment in education and health care, which are vital measures for achieving gender equality and providing both women and men with the skills and training needed to soften the impact of the current economic crisis.

  17. 76 FR 48204 - Fund Availability Under VA's Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... programs addressing emotional, social, spiritual, and generative needs. Terminally Ill (1) Help... reintegration such as life-skills education, recreational activities, and follow up case management; (3) Ensure... education. Through this NOFA, VA seeks to renew the FY 2009 previous grant and per diem Special Need...

  18. Stanford University: The Building Energy Retrofit Programs. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Stanford University's Energy Retrofit Program was created in 1993 to target resource reduction and conservation focused projects on campus. Fahmida Ahmed, Associate Director of the Department of Sustainability and Energy Management, says that Stanford has been investing in sustainability and energy-efficiency since the late 1970s, longer than many…

  19. 78 FR 21395 - Announcement of Funding Awards, Choice Neighborhoods Grant Program, Fiscal Year 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... community development centered on housing transformation. The program aims to transform neighborhoods of... (project is located in San Francisco, CA). City of Roanoke Redevelopment and 200,000 Lansdown Park and...; Croton Heights/Cottage Place Gardens of Yonkers, 1511 Central Park Avenue, neighborhood. Yonkers, NY...

  20. 78 FR 34323 - Funding Opportunity Title: Risk Management Education in Targeted States (Targeted States Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... Educational Materials to the Ag Risk and Farm Management Library Library C. Reporting Requirements Section VII... skills, leadership, and experience in delivering services or programs that assist agricultural producers... Risk and Farm Management Library RMA requires that awardees upload digital copies of all risk...

  1. 76 FR 41260 - Supplemental Funding for the Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... cooperative agreement through the competitive awards process to provide technical assistance, training, and... Center develops the tools, materials, website, expertise, resources and training activities to assist SMP... of the expanded SMP program. III. Agency Contact Direct inquiries regarding programmatic issues to U...

  2. Analysis of the Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education Program Fund Allocations for Indirect Medical Education Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Barbara O.; Kawata, Jennifer

    This study analyzed issues related to estimating indirect medical education costs specific to pediatric discharges. The Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education (CHGNE) program was established to support graduate medical education in children's hospitals. This provision authorizes payments for both direct and indirect medical education…

  3. 76 FR 30990 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ..., SBTRC brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with DOT booklets, and any other... representation on the planning committee. This committee shall be established no later than 60 days after the..., facilities and equipment to perform the services described in this announcement. (H) Women & Girls Program 1...

  4. 78 FR 13148 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Small Business Transportation Resource Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... Program (BEP) information, SBTRC ] brochures and literature, Procurement Forecasts; Contracting with DOT booklets, Women and Girls in Transportation Initiative (WITI) information, and any other materials or... headquarters state must have representation on the planning committee. This committee shall be established no...

  5. Blind Babies Program Not Effectively Implemented: Continued Funding by State Cannot Be Justified. OPPAGA Special Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Legislature, Tallahassee. Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability.

    This report presents an evaluation of Florida's Blind Babies Program, which provides community-based, early intervention education to visually impaired or blind children from birth through age 5 and to their parents, families, and caregivers. The evaluation found that: (1) the Division of Blind Services had not developed an adequate accountability…

  6. 75 FR 79087 - Fund Availability Under the Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... delivery-related problems. For a Copy of the Application Package: Download directly from the SSVF Program... prisons, mental health institutions, hospitals); c. Residency in housing that has been condemned by... standards for the housing unit size); o. Past institutional care (prison, treatment facility, hospital); p...

  7. 78 FR 21610 - Expansion Funds for the Support of the Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... to the incumbent Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) grantees under limited competition. SUMMARY: The... to Competition It is necessary to limit competition for this program to the current SMP grantees to... 29, 2015. III. Eligible Applicants Incumbent Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) grantees. IV. Evaluation...

  8. 75 FR 14661 - Bank Enterprise Award (BEA) Program; Notice of Funds Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... Investment Area as defined by the CDFI Program or a Low-Income Community as defined by the New Markets Tax... and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number. In addition, each Application must... the Applicant to Low- and Moderate-Income Residents. An Applicant may determine the number of Low- and...

  9. 78 FR 34978 - Amendment to Notice of Funding Availability for the Rural Energy for America Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... for these same types of applications for Fiscal Year 2012 applicants who wish to be considered for... USDA prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national...) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write to: USDA, Assistant Secretary...

  10. 78 FR 53423 - Notice of Funds Availability Under the Intermediary Relending Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    .... Nondiscrimination Statement The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination against its customers..., gender identity, religion, reprisal, and where applicable, political beliefs, marital status, familial or... activities.) If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA...

  11. 77 FR 44655 - FY 2012 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for Rural Capacity Building Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... Indian tribes. HUD requires information in order to ensure the eligibility of Rural Capacity Building.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colette Pollard., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of... requires information in order to ensure the eligibility of Rural Capacity Building program applicants and...

  12. 78 FR 19183 - Notice of Funding Availability for the Rural Energy for America Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... the five stores and wind turbines for the other two stores, the owner can only submit an application for either the solar panels or for the wind turbines in the same fiscal year. V. Program Provisions... energy efficiency improvement projects; and grants for conducting renewable energy system feasibility...

  13. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program. Inventory of federally funded CFCC R&D projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richlen, S. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Industrial Technologies; Caton, G.M.; Karnitz, M.A.; Cox, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hong, W. [Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) are a new class of materials that are lighter, stronger, more corrosion resistant, and capable of performing at elevated temperatures. This new type of material offers the potential to meet the demands of a variety of industrial, military, and aerospace applications. The Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) has a new program on CFCCs for industrial applications and this program has requested an inventory of all federal projects on CFCCs that relate to their new program. The purpose of this project is to identify all other ongoing CFCC research to avoid redundancy in the OIT Program. The inventory will be used as a basis for coordinating with the other ongoing ceramic composite projects. The inventory is divided into two main parts. The first part is concerned with CFCC supporting technologies projects and is organized by the categories listed below. (1) Composite Design; (2) Materials Characterization; (3) Test Methods; (4) Non-Destructive Evaluation; (5) Environmental Effects; (6) Mechanical Properties; (7) Database Life Prediction; (8) Fracture/Damage; and (9) Joining. The second part has information on component development, fabrication, and fiber-related projects.

  14. Case study findings of PHOTON problem-based learning (PBL) with high school photonics outreach programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard-Clark, Joyce; Gilchrist, Pamela; Allgood, Sherri

    2009-08-01

    Using the Photonics Leaders program model, recruitment and retention, photonics content, parental engagement, internship, and PHOTON PBL challenges, the session's goal is to inform educators of strategies that can be used to motivate and develop cognitive skills in the discipline of Physics. The program caters to ethnically diverse students who traditionally lack experiences in the discipline. This paper discusses the initial findings of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program through which high school students and teachers were given the opportunity to participate in shared lessons, and coordinate projects through cooperative learning at The Science House at North Carolina State University.

  15. Scaling up towards international targets for AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria: contribution of global fund-supported programs in 2011-2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itamar Katz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The paper projects the contribution to 2011-2015 international targets of three major pandemics by programs in 140 countries funded by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the largest external financier of tuberculosis and malaria programs and a major external funder of HIV programs in low and middle income countries. DESIGN: Estimates, using past trends, for the period 2011-2015 of the number of persons receiving antiretroviral (ARV treatment, tuberculosis case detection using the internationally approved DOTS strategy, and insecticide-treated nets (ITNs to be delivered by programs in low and middle income countries supported by the Global Fund compared to international targets established by UNAIDS, Stop TB Partnership, Roll Back Malaria Partnership and the World Health Organisation. RESULTS: Global Fund-supported programs are projected to provide ARV treatment to 5.5-5.8 million people, providing 30%-31% of the 2015 international target. Investments in tuberculosis and malaria control will enable reaching in 2015 60%-63% of the international target for tuberculosis case detection and 30%-35% of the ITN distribution target in sub-Saharan Africa. CONCLUSION: Global Fund investments will substantially contribute to the achievement by 2015 of international targets for HIV, TB and malaria. However, additional large scale international and domestic financing is needed if these targets are to be reached by 2015.

  16. Transitioning a Large Scale HIV/AIDS Prevention Program to Local Stakeholders: Findings from the Avahan Transition Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bennett

    Full Text Available Between 2009-2013 the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation transitioned its HIV/AIDS prevention initiative in India from being a stand-alone program outside of government, to being fully government funded and implemented. We present an independent prospective evaluation of the transition.The evaluation drew upon (1 a structured survey of transition readiness in a sample of 80 targeted HIV prevention programs prior to transition; (2 a structured survey assessing institutionalization of program features in a sample of 70 targeted intervention (TI programs, one year post-transition; and (3 case studies of 15 TI programs.Transition was conducted in 3 rounds. While the 2009 transition round was problematic, subsequent rounds were implemented more smoothly. In the 2011 and 2012 transition rounds, Avahan programs were well prepared for transition with the large majority of TI program staff trained for transition, high alignment with government clinical, financial and managerial norms, and strong government commitment to the program. One year post transition there were significant program changes, but these were largely perceived positively. Notable negative changes were: limited flexibility in program management, delays in funding, commodity stock outs, and community member perceptions of a narrowing in program focus. Service coverage outcomes were sustained at least six months post-transition.The study suggests that significant investments in transition preparation contributed to a smooth transition and sustained service coverage. Notwithstanding, there were substantive program changes post-transition. Five key lessons for transition design and implementation are identified.

  17. Global health diplomacy investments in Afghanistan: adaptations and outcomes of global fund malaria programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevany, Sebastian; Sahak, Omar; Workneh, Nibretie Gobezie; Saeedzai, Sayed Ataullah

    2014-01-01

    Global health programmes require extensive adaptation for implementation in conflict and post-conflict settings. Without such adaptations, both implementation success and diplomatic, international relations and other indirect outcomes may be threatened. Conversely, diplomatic successes may be made through flexible and responsive programmes. We examine adaptations and associated outcomes for malaria treatment and prevention programmes in Afghanistan. In conjunction with the completion of monitoring and evaluation activities for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, we reviewed adaptations to the structure, design, selection, content and delivery of malaria-related interventions in Afghanistan. Interviews were conducted with programme implementers, service delivery providers, government representatives and local stakeholders, and site visits to service delivery points were completed. Programmes for malaria treatment and prevention require a range of adaptations for successful implementation in Afghanistan. These include (1) amendment of educational materials for rural populations, (2) religious awareness in gender groupings for health educational interventions, (3) recruitment of local staff, educated in languages and customs, for both quality assurance and service delivery, (4) alignment with diplomatic principles and, thereby, avoidance of confusion with broader strategic and military initiatives and (5) amendments to programme 'branding' procedures. The absence of provision for these adaptations made service delivery excessively challenging and increased the risk of tension between narrow programmatic and broader diplomatic goals. Conversely, adapted global health programmes displayed a unique capacity to access potentially extremist populations and groups in remote regions otherwise isolated from international activities. A range of diplomatic considerations when delivering global health programmes in conflict and post-conflict settings are

  18. A Population-Based Evaluation of a Publicly Funded, School-Based HPV Vaccine Program in British Columbia, Canada: Parental Factors Associated with HPV Vaccine Receipt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Gina; Anderson, Maureen; Marra, Fawziah; McNeil, Shelly; Pielak, Karen; Dawar, Meena; McIvor, Marilyn; Ehlen, Thomas; Dobson, Simon; Money, Deborah; Patrick, David M.; Naus, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Background Information on factors that influence parental decisions for actual human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine receipt in publicly funded, school-based HPV vaccine programs for girls is limited. We report on the level of uptake of the first dose of the HPV vaccine, and determine parental factors associated with receipt of the HPV vaccine, in a publicly funded school-based HPV vaccine program in British Columbia, Canada. Methods and Findings All parents of girls enrolled in grade 6 during the academic year of September 2008–June 2009 in the province of British Columbia were eligible to participate. Eligible households identified through the provincial public health information system were randomly selected and those who consented completed a validated survey exploring factors associated with HPV vaccine uptake. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to calculate adjusted odds ratios to identify the factors that were associated with parents' decision to vaccinate their daughter(s) against HPV. 2,025 parents agreed to complete the survey, and 65.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 63.1–67.1) of parents in the survey reported that their daughters received the first dose of the HPV vaccine. In the same school-based vaccine program, 88.4% (95% CI 87.1–89.7) consented to the hepatitis B vaccine, and 86.5% (95% CI 85.1–87.9) consented to the meningococcal C vaccine. The main reasons for having a daughter receive the HPV vaccine were the effectiveness of the vaccine (47.9%), advice from a physician (8.7%), and concerns about daughter's health (8.4%). The main reasons for not having a daughter receive the HPV vaccine were concerns about HPV vaccine safety (29.2%), preference to wait until the daughter is older (15.6%), and not enough information to make an informed decision (12.6%). In multivariate analysis, overall attitudes to vaccines, the impact of the HPV vaccine on sexual practices, and childhood vaccine history were predictive of parents having a

  19. A population-based evaluation of a publicly funded, school-based HPV vaccine program in British Columbia, Canada: parental factors associated with HPV vaccine receipt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ogilvie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Information on factors that influence parental decisions for actual human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine receipt in publicly funded, school-based HPV vaccine programs for girls is limited. We report on the level of uptake of the first dose of the HPV vaccine, and determine parental factors associated with receipt of the HPV vaccine, in a publicly funded school-based HPV vaccine program in British Columbia, Canada. METHODS AND FINDINGS: All parents of girls enrolled in grade 6 during the academic year of September 2008-June 2009 in the province of British Columbia were eligible to participate. Eligible households identified through the provincial public health information system were randomly selected and those who consented completed a validated survey exploring factors associated with HPV vaccine uptake. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to calculate adjusted odds ratios to identify the factors that were associated with parents' decision to vaccinate their daughter(s against HPV. 2,025 parents agreed to complete the survey, and 65.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 63.1-67.1 of parents in the survey reported that their daughters received the first dose of the HPV vaccine. In the same school-based vaccine program, 88.4% (95% CI 87.1-89.7 consented to the hepatitis B vaccine, and 86.5% (95% CI 85.1-87.9 consented to the meningococcal C vaccine. The main reasons for having a daughter receive the HPV vaccine were the effectiveness of the vaccine (47.9%, advice from a physician (8.7%, and concerns about daughter's health (8.4%. The main reasons for not having a daughter receive the HPV vaccine were concerns about HPV vaccine safety (29.2%, preference to wait until the daughter is older (15.6%, and not enough information to make an informed decision (12.6%. In multivariate analysis, overall attitudes to vaccines, the impact of the HPV vaccine on sexual practices, and childhood vaccine history were predictive of parents having

  20. The Adolescent Family Life Program: A Multisite Evaluation of Federally Funded Projects Serving Pregnant and Parenting Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Olivia Silber; LeTourneau, Kathryn L.; Williams, Julia Cassie; Jones, Sarah B.; Hampton, Joel; Scott, Alicia Richmond

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effectiveness of care demonstration projects supported by the Title XX Adolescent Family Life (AFL) program, which serves pregnant and parenting adolescents in an effort to mitigate the risks associated with adolescent childbearing. Methods. This cross-site evaluation involved 12 projects and 1038 adolescents who received either enhanced services funded by the AFL program or usual care. We examined the effects of enhanced services on health, educational, and child care outcomes approximately 6 months to 2 years after intake and explored moderation of program effects by time since intake and project characteristics associated with outcomes. Results. The odds of using long-acting reversible contraception (odds ratio [OR] = 1.58) and receiving regular child care (OR = 1.50) in the past month were higher in the intervention group than in the comparison group. Odds of a repeat pregnancy were lower (OR = 0.39) among intervention group adolescents than among comparison group adolescents within 12 months of intake. Several project characteristics were associated with adolescent health outcomes. Conclusions. These projects show promise in improving effective contraceptive use, increasing routine child care, and yielding short-term decreases in repeat pregnancy. PMID:22897549

  1. The National Association of State Scholarship and Grant Programs, 23rd Annual Survey Report, 1991-1992 Academic Year. State Funded Scholarship/Grant Programs for Students To Attend Postsecondary Educational Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jerry S.; Heberle, Deborah

    This report describes the results of a survey of publicly funded grant programs for undergraduates and graduate/professional school students operated by the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. It focuses on the grant program characteristics for 1991-92 and provides analysis of the trends of these programs. The analysis indicates…

  2. Mentoring Strategies and Outcomes of Two Federally Funded Cancer Research Training Programs for Underrepresented Students in the Biomedical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Marvella E; Abraham, Latecia M; Harrison, Anita L; Jefferson, Melanie S; Hazelton, Tonya R; Varner, Heidi; Cannady, Kimberly; Frichtel, Carla S; Bagasra, Omar; Davis, Leroy; Rivers, David E; Slaughter, Sabra C; Salley, Judith D

    2016-06-01

    The US is experiencing a severe shortage of underrepresented biomedical researchers. The purpose of this paper is to present two case examples of cancer research mentoring programs for underrepresented biomedical sciences students. The first case example is a National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute (NIH/NCI) P20 grant titled "South Carolina Cancer Disparities Research Center (SC CaDRe)" Training Program, contributing to an increase in the number of underrepresented students applying to graduate school by employing a triple-level mentoring strategy. Since 2011, three undergraduate and four graduate students have participated in the P20 SC CaDRe program. One graduate student published a peer-reviewed scientific paper. Two graduate students (50 %) have completed their master's degrees, and the other two graduate students will receive their degrees in spring 2015. Two undergraduate students (67 %) are enrolled in graduate or professional school (grad./prof. school), and the other graduate student is completing her final year of college. The second case example is a prostate cancer-focused Department of Defense grant titled "The SC Collaborative Undergraduate HBCU Student Summer Training Program," providing 24 students training since 2009. Additionally, 47 students made scientific presentations, and two students have published peer-reviewed scientific papers. All 24 students took a GRE test preparation course; 15 (63 %) have applied to graduate school, and 11 of them (73 %) are enrolled in grad./prof. school. Thirteen remaining students (54 %) are applying to grad./prof. school. Leveraged funding provided research-training opportunities to an additional 201 National Conference on Health Disparities Student Forum participants and to 937 Ernest E. Just Research Symposium participants at the Medical University of South Carolina.

  3. Energy systems programs funded by the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health: FY 1993--FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttram, A.W. [ed.

    1994-12-31

    This document presents an overview of work at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) during FY 1993--FY 1994 that was funded by the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ASEH). To illustrate the programmatic breadth of Energy Systems and to establish the context within which this work was accomplished, this document also includes representative descriptions of ASEH-related work at Energy Systems done for other sponsors. Activities for ASEH cover a wide variety of subjects that are geared towards the environmental, safety, and health aspects of DOE operations. Subjects include the following: environmental compliance, environmental guidance, environmental audits, NEPA oversight, epidemiology and health surveillance, transportation and packaging safety, safety and quality assurance; technical standards, performance indicators, occurrence reporting, health physics instrumentation, risk management, security evaluations, and medical programs. The technical support section describes work in progress for ASEH, including specific program accomplishments. The work for others section describes work for non-ASEH sponsors that reinforces and supplements the ASEH work. Appendix A includes a list of FY 1993--FY 1994 publications related to the ASEH work.

  4. Woman-to-woman approach wins plaudits in USAID-funded program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA) is a private voluntary organization (PVO) that has started a project using a woman to woman approach, along with the help of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), to deliver family planning services in developing nations. The project is called Access to Family Planning through Women Managers and has had its budget doubled to US $15 million through a 5 year cooperative agreement. The project takes women leaders from 10 different countries and trains them in effective ways to implement family planning services. The women bring with them the knowledge of local traditions and cultural knowledge that is essential for these types of programs to work. They also have the respect of the communities from which they came as well as access to networks of women that can be used to help further the cause. A very successful example of this project is in the Indian city of Ahmedabad. In 3 years the project has increased the number of female contraceptive users by 9000 with a 92.5% continuation rate. This figure is only 2% of the total population of 2 million; however, the project is still having a significant effect and has a very high success rate. The contraceptive prevalence rate in the slums has been raised from 12% to 61%.

  5. Early Successes in an Open Access, Provincially Funded Hepatitis C Treatment Program in Prince Edward Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Daniel; Francheville, Jordan W; Rankin, Robin; Beck, Jeremy; Hoare, Connie; Materniak, Stefanie; German, Greg; Barrett, Lisa; Bunimov-Wall, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    The availability of curative hepatitis C therapies has created an opportunity to improve delivery and access. Local providers, government, industry, and community groups in Prince Edward Island developed an innovative province-wide care model. Our goal was to describe the first year of program implementation. Using a community based prospective observational study design, all chronic hepatitis C referrals received from April 2015 to April 2016 were recorded in a database. Primary analysis assessed the time from referral to assessment/treatment, as well as the number of referrals, assessments, and treatment initiations. Secondary objectives included: 1) Treatment effectiveness using intention-to-treat analysis; and 2) Patient treatment experience assessed using demographics, adverse events, and medication adherence. During the study period 242 referrals were received, 123 patients were seen for intake assessments, and 93 initiated direct-acting antiviral therapy based on medical need. This is compared to 4 treatment initiations in the previous 2 years. The median time from assessment to treatment initiation was 3 weeks. Eighty-two of 84 (97.6%, 95% CI 91.7 - 99.7%) patients for whom outcome data were available achieved sustained virologic response at 12 weeks post-treatment; 1 was lost to follow-up and 1 died from an unrelated event. In the voluntary registry, 39.7% of patients reported missed treatment doses. In conclusion, results from the first 12 months of this multi-phase hepatitis C elimination strategy demonstrate improved access to treatment, and high rates of safe engagement and cure for patients living with chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 infections.

  6. 25 CFR 1000.336 - Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does the Tribe/Consortium have to return funds used in the operation of a retroceded program? 1000.336 Section 1000.336 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT...-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.336 Does the...

  7. 34 CFR 76.792 - How does an SEA allocate funds to eligible charter school LEAs under a covered program in which...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... charter school LEA receives at least a pro rata portion of the proportionate amount of funds for which the charter school LEA is eligible under each covered program. The pro rata amount must be based on the number... SEA may implement procedures to provide the charter school LEA with a pro rata portion of the...

  8. Schools and Libraries Program: Update on State-Level Funding by Category of Service. Report to the Honorable John D. Rockefeller IV, U.S. Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Stanley J.

    This report provides state-level data on the amount of funds committed to the following three categories of eligible services for each of the first three years of the Federal Communications Commission's e-rate program for schools and libraries: (1) telecommunications service, such as local, long-distance, and international telephone service, as…

  9. 34 CFR 403.71 - In what additional ways may funds be used under the State Programs and State Leadership Activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In what additional ways may funds be used under the State Programs and State Leadership Activities? 403.71 Section 403.71 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED...

  10. The Relationship between Perceived Career Barriers and Career Decision Self-Efficacy on the Certainty of Initial Career Choice among Educational Opportunity Fund Program Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Nicole Pacheco

    2014-01-01

    This study was an investigation of the predictive value of perceived career barriers and career decision self-efficacy on the certainty of initial career choice among Educational Opportunity Fund Program (EOF) pre-freshman college students, an under-studied college population with respect to career development (Winograd & Shick Tryon, 2009).…

  11. 78 FR 26638 - Non-Competitive One-Year Extension With Funds for Black Lung/Coal Miner Clinics Program (H37...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Non-Competitive One-Year Extension With Funds for Black Lung/Coal Miner Clinics Program (H37) Current Grantee AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Correction. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration...

  12. Report of the State Auditor. State Colleges in Colorado. Financial, State-Funded Student Financial Assistance Programs, and NCAA Audits. Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, J. David

    The results of a Colorado State audit of the consolidated financial statements are reported, along with the statements of appropriations, expenditures, transfers and reversions for state-funded Student Financial Assistance Programs for the four State Colleges in Colorado for the year ended June 30, 1995. Specific recommendations are given for each…

  13. Value for Money in Donor HIV Funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemayr, Sebastian; Ryan, Gery W; Liu, Jenny; Palar, Kartika

    2012-01-01

    Countries with the highest burden of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease are heavily reliant on donor funding from such sources as the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria for their HIV programs. In recent years, commitments from these organizations have flattened while demand for HIV/AIDS care continues to rise. To meet the continued need for more HIV services in developing countries, existing resources need to be better leveraged, i.e., to provide improved value for the money. This article examines options for improving value for money in HIV funding by using a case study that focuses on the two largest funders, PEPFAR and the Global Fund, with funding for antiretroviral therapy (ART) as its leading example. The authors' assessment of available input and output data suggests that current spending allocations across direct and indirect services are not based on increasing value for money. The authors recommend that expenditure data for PEPFAR be made available to the public in a transparent fashion on an annual basis in a usable format and that the Global Fund make its data accessible for each program funded. They find that program output indicators to track indirect services are incomplete and need to be further developed. The trade-off between providing current services and providing future ones needs to be stated clearly, and funding decisions made accordingly. Finally, given projections that funding for HIV will likely not increase, particularly for low-income countries facing the highest HIV burden, an explicit emphasis on improving value for money by finding ways to better leverage existing monies is imperative.

  14. Basic health program: state administration of basic health programs; eligibility and enrollment in standard health plans; essential health benefits in standard health plans; performance standards for basic health programs; premium and cost sharing for basic health programs; federal funding process; trust fund and financial integrity. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-12

    This final rule establishes the Basic Health Program (BHP), as required by section 1331 of the Affordable Care Act. The BHP provides states the flexibility to establish a health benefits coverage program for low-income individuals who would otherwise be eligible to purchase coverage through the Affordable Insurance Exchange (Exchange, also called Health Insurance Marketplace). The BHP complements and coordinates with enrollment in a QHP through the Exchange, as well as with enrollment in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). This final rule also sets forth a framework for BHP eligibility and enrollment, benefits, delivery of health care services, transfer of funds to participating states, and federal oversight. Additionally, this final rule amends another rule issued by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (Secretary) in order to clarify the applicability of that rule to the BHP.

  15. Capacity and principles of participation of the provincial fund of environmental protection and water management in Cracow in Cracow program of elimination of low emission sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolek, K.; Sarzynski, H. [Provincial Fund of Environmental Protection and Water Management in Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    In general, the principles of environmental protection was determined by Law issued January 31, 1980. Certain detailed solutions have been included in several amendments in subsequent years and the uniformed text of the Law on Environmental Protection and Creation was published in 1994. The Provincial Fund of Environmental Protection and Water Management was established in 1989 but until 1993 the Fund has no legal status. The main purpose of the creation of such fund was to assign certain financial means to the defined tasks related to environmental protection. This way the fund accumulates financial means from the fees paid for the usage of the natural environmental for business purposes and from penalties becoming due in the case of non-observance of the environmental protection standards. On the other hand, the Fund spends money for tasks in the field of environmental protection requiring urgent implementation. It should be added that - after few amendments brought into force - the Provincial Funds are able to assign a greater amount of money to the implementation of these tasks. The basic purposes of Provincial Fund activity, defined by Law, determine the policy and criteria of the selection of undertaking. This is also a base for making programs of activity and for creation of the list of priorities. The environmental protection problems in the individual provinces are different. Therefore, the scope of works partly financed by the Fund is very differentiated both in essence and in the method of financing. The former system of subsidies is now being replaced with a wide range of partial financing of undertakings in the field of environmental protection. The system of selection of these undertakings has been changed essentially. The selection of tasks and methods of their financing is based on economic criteria.

  16. Evaluation of the awareness and effectiveness of IT security programs in a large publicly funded health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Shelanne L; Tarraf, Rima C; Birney, Arden; Arain, Mubashir Aslam

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health records are becoming increasingly common in the health care industry. Although information technology (IT) poses many benefits to improving health care and ease of access to information, there are also security and privacy risks. Educating health care providers is necessary to ensure proper use of health information systems and IT and reduce undesirable outcomes. This study evaluated employees' awareness and perceptions of the effectiveness of two IT educational training modules within a large publicly funded health care system in Canada. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups included a variety of professional roles within the organisation. Participants also completed a brief demographic data sheet. With the consent of participants, all interviews and focus groups were audio recorded. Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the IT security training modules. Five main themes emerged: (i) awareness of the IT training modules, (ii) the content of modules, (iii) staff perceptions about differences between IT security and privacy issues, (iv) common breaches of IT security and privacy, and (v) challenges and barriers to completing the training program. Overall, nonclinical staff were more likely to be aware of the training modules than were clinical staff. We found e-learning was a feasible way to educate a large number of employees. However, health care providers required a module on IT security and privacy that was relatable and applicable to their specific roles. Strategies to improve staff education and mitigate against IT security and privacy risks are discussed. Future research should focus on integrating health IT competencies into the educational programs for health care professionals.

  17. Center Innovation Fund Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To stimulate and encourage creativity and innovation within the NASA Centers. The activities are envisioned to fall within the scope of NASA Space Technology or...

  18. 45 CFR 309.130 - How will Tribal IV-D programs be funded and what forms are required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Secretary: (i) Funds have been committed to other budget items; (ii) A high rate of unemployment; (iii) A... is subject to review at any time during the funding period and may be revoked, if changing... change in Tribal IV-D budget estimate results from a change in the Tribal IV-D plan, the Tribe or Tribal...

  19. 77 FR 9955 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Community Challenge Planning Grant Program for Fiscal Year...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Fiscal Year 2011 AGENCY: Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities, HUD. ACTION: Announcement of... Department in a competition for funding under the Fiscal Year 2011 (FY 2011) Notice of Funding Availability... Hampshire Housing Finance Authority, 32 Constitution 1,000,000 Drive, Bedford, NH: New Hampshire 03110-6000...

  20. Summary of inspection findings of licensee inservice testing programs at United States commercial nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlop, A.; Colaccino, J.

    1996-12-01

    Periodic inspections of pump and valve inservice testing (IST) programs in United States commercial nuclear power plants are performed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regional Inspectors to verify licensee regulatory compliance and licensee commitments. IST inspections are conducted using NRC Inspection Procedure 73756, {open_quotes}Inservice Testing of Pumps and Valves{close_quotes} (IP 73756), which was updated on July 27, 1995. A large number of IST inspections have also been conducted using Temporary Instruction 2515/114, {open_quotes}Inspection Requirements for Generic Letter 89-04, Acceptable Inservice Testing Programs{close_quotes} (TI-2515/114), which was issued January 15, 1992. A majority of U.S. commercial nuclear power plants have had an IST inspection to either IP 73756 or TI 2515/114. This paper is intended to summarize the significant and recurring findings from a number of these inspections since January of 1990.

  1. An algorithm and program for finding sequence specific oligo-nucleotide probes for species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tautz Diethard

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of species or species groups with specific oligo-nucleotides as molecular signatures is becoming increasingly popular for bacterial samples. However, it shows also great promise for other small organisms that are taxonomically difficult to tract. Results We have devised here an algorithm that aims to find the optimal probes for any given set of sequences. The program requires only a crude alignment of these sequences as input and is optimized for performance to deal also with very large datasets. The algorithm is designed such that the position of mismatches in the probes influences the selection and makes provision of single nucleotide outloops. Program implementations are available for Linux and Windows.

  2. Offshore Investment Funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Jin Wei

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Offshore investment funds are alleged to have engaged in trading behavior that is different from their onshore counterparts because they may be subject to less supervision and regulation. In particular, they may trade more intensely. They could also pursue more aggressively certain trading strategies such as positive feedback trading or herding that could contribute to a greater volatility in the market. Using a unique data set, this chapter compares the trading behavior in the Korean stock market between offshore investment funds with their onshore counterparts registered in the US and UK. There are a number of interesting findings. First, there is indeed evidence suggesting that the offshore funds trade more intensely than their onshore counterparts. Second, however, there is no evidence that the offshore funds engage in positive feedback trading. In contrast, there is strong evidence that the funds from the U.S. and U.K. do. Third, while offshore funds do herd, they do so far less than onshore funds in the U.S. or UK. Fourth, offshore funds hold less glamour stocks (e.g. stocks with high P/E in their portfolio than funds in the U.S. or U.K. do. Moreover, flight to glamour stocks during the in-crisis period is less evident in the case of offshore funds. In sum, offshore funds are no especially worrisome monsters.

  3. A natural language processing program effectively extracts key pathologic findings from radical prostatectomy reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Brian J; Merchant, Madhur; Zheng, Chengyi; Thomas, Anil A; Contreras, Richard; Jacobsen, Steven J; Chien, Gary W

    2014-12-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) software programs have been widely developed to transform complex free text into simplified organized data. Potential applications in the field of medicine include automated report summaries, physician alerts, patient repositories, electronic medical record (EMR) billing, and quality metric reports. Despite these prospects and the recent widespread adoption of EMR, NLP has been relatively underutilized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of an internally developed NLP program in extracting select pathologic findings from radical prostatectomy specimen reports in the EMR. An NLP program was generated by a software engineer to extract key variables from prostatectomy reports in the EMR within our healthcare system, which included the TNM stage, Gleason grade, presence of a tertiary Gleason pattern, histologic subtype, size of dominant tumor nodule, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), perineural invasion (PNI), angiolymphatic invasion (ALI), extracapsular extension (ECE), and surgical margin status (SMS). The program was validated by comparing NLP results to a gold standard compiled by two blinded manual reviewers for 100 random pathology reports. NLP demonstrated 100% accuracy for identifying the Gleason grade, presence of a tertiary Gleason pattern, SVI, ALI, and ECE. It also demonstrated near-perfect accuracy for extracting histologic subtype (99.0%), PNI (98.9%), TNM stage (98.0%), SMS (97.0%), and dominant tumor size (95.7%). The overall accuracy of NLP was 98.7%. NLP generated a result in report. This novel program demonstrated high accuracy and efficiency identifying key pathologic details from the prostatectomy report within an EMR system. NLP has the potential to assist urologists by summarizing and highlighting relevant information from verbose pathology reports. It may also facilitate future urologic research through the rapid and automated creation of large databases.

  4. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Aeronautics and Mission Directorate (ARMD) programs. Other Government and commercial program managers can also find this information useful.

  5. Initial integration of chiropractic services into a provincially funded inner city community health centre: a program description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Steven R.; Toth, Audrey; Kanovsky, Joel; Olin, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Background: The burden of fees for chiropractic services rendered often falls on the patient and must be provided out-of-pocket regardless of their socioeconomic status and clinical need. Universal healthcare coverage reduces the financial barrier to healthcare utilization, thereby increasing the opportunity for the financially disadvantaged to have access to care. In 2011 the Canadian Province of Manitoba initiated a pilot program providing access to chiropractic care within the Mount Carmel Clinic (MCC), a non-secular, non-profit, inner city community health centre. Objective: To describe the initial integration of chiropractic services into a publically funded healthcare facility including patient demographics, referral patterns, treatment practices and clinical outcomes. Method: A retrospective database review of chiropractic consultations in 2011 (N=177) was performed. Results: The typical patient referred for chiropractic care was a non-working (86%), 47.3(SD=16.8) year old, who self-identified as Caucasian (52.2%), or Aboriginal (35.8%) and female (68.3%) with a body mass index considered obese at 30.4(SD=7.0). New patient consultations were primarily referrals from other health providers internal to the MCC (71.2%), frequently primary care physicians (76%). Baseline to discharge comparisons of numeric rating scale scores for the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, sacroiliac and extremity regions all exceeded the minimally clinically important difference for reduction in musculoskeletal pain. Improvements occurred over an average of 12.7 (SD=14.3) treatments, and pain reductions were also statistically significant at pChiropractic services are being utilized by patients, and referring providers. Clinical outcomes indicate that services rendered decrease musculoskeletal pain in an inner city population. PMID:26816049

  6. NSR&D Program Fiscal Year 2015 Funded Research Stochastic Modeling of Radioactive Material Releases Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrus, Jason P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pope, Chad [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Toston, Mary [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maas, Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    easy to use supplemental tool to help improve risk understanding and support better informed decisions. The SODA development project was funded through a grant from the DOE Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program.

  7. Key Program Findings and Insights From the Baby-Friendly Hawaii Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahin, Sahra A; McGurk, Meghan; Hansen-Smith, Heidi; West, Margaret; Li, Ruowei; Melcher, Carolyn Lopez

    2017-05-01

    Breastfeeding is the optimal method for infant feeding. In the United States, 81.1% of mothers initiate breastfeeding; however, only 44.4% and 22.3% of mothers are exclusively breastfeeding at 3 and 6 months, respectively. Research aim: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides guidance and funding to state health departments to support strategies to improve breastfeeding policies and practices in the hospital, community, and worksite settings. In 2010, the Hawaii State Department of Health received support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to launch the Baby-Friendly Hawaii Project (BFHP) to increase the number of Hawaii hospitals that provide maternity care consistent with the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding and increase the rate of women who remain exclusively breastfeeding throughout their hospital stay. For this article, we examined the BFHP's final evaluation report and Hawaii breastfeeding and maternity care data to identify the role of the BFHP in facilitating improvements in maternity care practices and breastfeeding rates. Since 2010, 52 hospital site visits, 58 trainings, and ongoing technical assistance were administered, and more than 750 staff and health professionals from BFHP hospitals were trained. Hawaii's overall quality composite Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care score increased from 65 (out of 100) in 2009 to 76 in 2011 and 80 in 2013, and Newborn Screening Data showed an increase in statewide exclusive breastfeeding from 59.7% in 2009 to 77.0% in 2014. Implementation and findings from the BFHP can inform future planning at the state and federal levels on maternity care practices that can improve breastfeeding.

  8. Reflecting on Vancouver’s Current Youth Media Funding Trends in the Context of Neoliberalism

    OpenAIRE

    Daviau Dempsey, Sophie Rose

    2016-01-01

    Youth media organizations and programs in Vancouver provide diverse opportunities for youth. However, my thesis argues that neoliberalism and discourses about the information society and creative industries have shaped youth media funding since the 1990s. Through interviewing youth media representatives in Vancouver, my findings indicate that these funding trends create a number of challenges for youth media organizations and programs. Organizations face precarious funding, have to rely on un...

  9. School-Based Performance Award Programs, Teacher Motivation, and School Performance: Findings from a Study of Three Programs. CPRE Research Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Carolyn; Heneman, Herbert, III; Milanowski, Anthony

    This report provides an overview of the findings of 3 studies conducted between 1995 and 1998 on school-based performance award (SBPA) programs. Such programs provide teachers, and often other school staff, with pay bonuses when their school as a whole achieves specific educational objectives. The studies focused on programs in the state of…

  10. Lives saved by Global Fund-supported HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria programs: estimation approach and results between 2003 and end-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyerla Rob

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 2003, the Global Fund has supported the scale-up of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria control in low- and middle-income countries. This paper presents and discusses a methodology for estimating the lives saved through selected service deliveries reported to the Global Fund. Methods Global Fund-supported programs reported, by end-2007, 1.4 million HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral treatment (ARV, 3.3 million new smear-positive tuberculosis cases detected in DOTS (directly observed TB treatment, short course programs, and 46 million insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs delivered. We estimated the corresponding lives saved using adaptations of existing epidemiological estimation models. Results By end-2007, an estimated 681,000 lives (95% uncertainty range 619,000-774,000 were saved and 1,097,000 (993,000-1,249,000 life-years gained by ARV. DOTS treatment would have saved 1.63 million lives (1.09 - 2.17 million when compared against no treatment, or 408,000 lives (265,000-551,000 when compared against non-DOTS treatment. ITN distributions in countries with stable endemic falciparum malaria were estimated to have achieved protection from malaria for 26 million of child-years at risk cumulatively, resulting in 130,000 (27,000-232,000 under-5 deaths prevented. Conclusions These results illustrate the scale of mortality effects that supported programs may have achieved in recent years, despite margins of uncertainty and covering only selected intervention components. Evidence-based evaluation of disease impact of the programs supported by the Global Fund with international and in-country partners must be strengthened using population-level data on intervention coverage and demographic outcomes, information on quality of services, and trends in disease burdens recorded in national health information systems.

  11. Snapshots of Indiana's Full-Day Kindergarten Programs before and after the State's Funding Increase for the Program. REL Technical Brief. REL 2009-No. 013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Rachel; Kochanek, Julie; Mathers, Carrie; Burke, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The Indiana General Assembly increased the state grant funds for full-day kindergarten from $8.5 million for 2006/07 to $33.5 million for 2007/08. Following the increase in funding, the Indiana Department of Education and the Indiana State Board of Education requested assistance from Regional Educational Laboratory Midwest to analyze Indiana…

  12. 40 CFR 35.517 - Unused funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Post-Award Requirements § 35.517 Unused funds. If funds... has already received funds) for the same environmental program or for a Performance Partnership Grant... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unused funds. 35.517 Section 35.517...

  13. The New York State Program for the Conservation and Preservation of Library Research Materials. Selected Press Clippings about Projects Funded by the Discretionary Grant Program, 1988/89 and 1989/90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Library, Albany. Div. of Library Development.

    This document is composed of clippings from news publications and press releases about projects funded by the New York State Discretionary Grant Program for Conservation and Preservation of Library Research Materials, which annually awards $500,000 to libraries, archives, historical societies, and similar agencies in New York State through…

  14. 75 FR 16493 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Public and Indian Housing Family Self-Sufficiency Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-Sufficiency Program Under the Resident Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) Program for Fiscal Year 2009...-Sufficiency Program under the Resident Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) Program for Fiscal Year 2009...: For questions concerning the FY 2009 Public and Indian Housing Family Self-Sufficiency Program under...

  15. Accounting for graduate medical education funding in family practice training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frederick M; Phillips, Robert L; Schneeweiss, Ronald; Andrilla, C Holly A; Hart, L Gary; Fryer, George E; Casey, Susan; Rosenblatt, Roger A

    2002-10-01

    Medicare provides the majority of funding to support graduate medical education (GME). Following the flow of these funds from hospitals to training programs is an important step in accounting for GME funding. Using a national survey of 453 family practice residency programs and Medicare hospital cost reports, we assessed residency programs' knowledge of their federal GME funding and compared their responses with the actual amounts paid to the sponsoring hospitals by Medicare. A total of 328 (72%) programs responded; 168 programs (51%) reported that they did not know how much federal GME funding they received. Programs that were the only residency in the hospital (61% versus 36%) and those that were community hospital-based programs (53% versus 22%) were more likely to know their GME allocation. Programs in hospitals with other residencies received less of their designated direct medical education payment than programs that were the only residency in the sponsoring hospital (-45% versus +19%). More than half of family practice training programs do not know how much GME they receive. These findings call for improved accountability in the use of Medicare payments that are designated for medical education.

  16. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Science Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  17. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into NASA Programs Associated With the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  18. The Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act Evaluation Findings on Children's Health Insurance Coverage in an Evolving Health Care Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA) reauthorized CHIP through federal fiscal year 2019 and, together with provisions in the Affordable Care Act, federal funding for the program was extended through federal fiscal year 2015. Congressional action is required or federal funding for the program will end in September 2015. This supplement to Academic Pediatrics is intended to inform discussions about CHIP's future. Most of the new research presented comes from a large evaluation of CHIP mandated by Congress in the CHIPRA. Since CHIP started in 1997, millions of lower-income children have secured health insurance coverage and needed care, reducing the financial burdens and stress on their families. States made substantial progress in simplifying enrollment and retention. When implemented optimally, Express Lane Eligibility has the potential to help cover more of the millions of eligible children who remain uninsured. Children move frequently between Medicaid and CHIP, and many experienced a gap in coverage with this transition. CHIP enrollees had good access to care. For nearly every health care access, use, care, and cost measure examined, CHIP enrollees fared better than uninsured children. Access in CHIP was similar to private coverage for most measures, but financial burdens were substantially lower and access to weekend and nighttime care was not as good. The Affordable Care Act coverage options have the potential to reduce uninsured rates among children, but complex transition issues must first be resolved to ensure families have access to affordable coverage, leading many stakeholders to recommend funding for CHIP be continued. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  19. Japan Special Fund and Japanese Trust Fund for Consultancy Services Annual Report 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Inter-American Development Bank

    2007-01-01

    This Annual Report details the activities of the Japanese Trusts Funds for 2006. The Japanese Trust Funds support five distinct programs: the Japan Special Fund (JSF); the Japanese Trust Fund for Consultancy Services (JCF); the Japan Poverty Reduction Program (JPO); the IDB/Japan Program; and the Japan-IDB Scholarship Program. The year 2006 was an outstanding period for the Japanese Trust Funds (JTF) to meet the high volume of various development needs in the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC)...

  20. The Impact of Increased Funding for the Mississippi Adequate Education Program (MAEP) on State Assigned School Accreditation Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Ed; Box, Jennifer A. L.

    2010-01-01

    State funding mechanisms are subject to intense political and economic scrutiny. The question asked most often tends to be, is the public getting sufficient return on their investment? Accountability standards arising from the No Child left Behind Act (NCLB) have sharpened the focus of this question to whether the students and schools are meeting…

  1. Assets and Barriers to Finding Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolte, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this intact-groups, quasi-experimental study, 115 unemployed job seekers who utilized federally funded labour market interventions were compared on program usage (long- or short-term), personality, personal meaning, employability skills, job search length, and pain and suffering. Results did not find significant differences in program usage or…

  2. Social assistance and labor market programs in Latin America : methodology and key findings from the social protection database

    OpenAIRE

    Kostenbaum, Silvana; Grosh, Margaret; Oliveri, Maria Laura; Rodriguez-Alas, Claudia; Cerutti, Paula; Strokova, Victoria; Fruttero, Anna

    2014-01-01

    How much do countries spend on social protection? Do social protection programs cover all poor people? And, how well are they targeted? It is notoriously hard to find comprehensive cross-country data on social protection programs which can help answer such questions and allow to benchmark social protection systems. The World Bank s Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) Social Protection Datab...

  3. The Novel Attempt for Finding Minimum Solution in Fuzzy Neutrosophic Relational Geometric Programming (FNRGP with (max,min Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda E. Khalid

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article sheds light on the possibility of finding the minimum solution set of neutrosophic relational geometric programming with (max, min composition. This work examines the privacy enjoyed by both neutrosophic logic and geometric programming, and how it affects the minimum solutions.

  4. Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    In line with the decisions concerning the new governance of the Pension Fund taken by the Council in June and September 2007, amendments to Section 2 "Structure and Functions" of the Rules of the Fund (Article I 2.08 – Composition of the Investment Committee and Article I 2.08b – Chairman of the Investment Committee) entered into force on 1st January 2009. These articles replace the provisions of the existing Regulations of the Investment Committee of the Pension Fund relating to the composition and chairman of the Investment Committee. Amendment No. 27 (PDF document) may be downloaded directly from the Pension Fund website: http://pensions.web.cern.ch/Pensions/statuts___rules.htm or obtained from the Administration of the Fund (Tel. 022 7672742, mailto:Barbara.Bordjah@cern.ch).

  5. The National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs. Preventing Substance Abuse: Major Findings from the National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs. Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, J. Fred; Sambrano, Soledad; Sale, Elizabeth; Kasim, Rafa; Herman, Jack

    This multiple-site study assessed 48 prevention programs for high-risk youth funded by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, identifying program characteristics associated with strong substance abuse prevention outcomes. Data analysis indicated that substance abuse programs reduced rates of substance use, and the positive effects of program…

  6. Substance abuse issues among women in domestic violence programs: findings from North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sandra L; Moracco, Kathryn E; Chang, Judy C; Council, Carol L; Dulli, Lisa S

    2008-09-01

    This article discusses the results of a survey of North Carolina domestic violence programs that found that substance abuse problems are common among program clients, yet only half of the programs had policies concerning substance-abusing clients, and one fourth had memoranda of agreement with substance abuse treatment providers. Most programs with shelters asked clients about substance use; however, one third of the shelters would not admit women if they were noticeably under the influence of substances while seeking shelter residence, instead referring them to substance abuse programs. Approximately one tenth of the domestic violence programs did not have any staff or volunteers with training in substance abuse issues. Implications are discussed.

  7. Investible benchmarks & hedge fund liquidity

    OpenAIRE

    Freed, Marc S; McMillan, Ben

    2011-01-01

    A lack of commonly accepted benchmarks for hedge fund performance has permitted hedge fund managers to attribute to skill returns that may actually accrue from market risk factors and illiquidity. Recent innovations in hedge fund replication permits us to estimate the extent of this misattribution. Using an option-based model, we find evidence that the value of liquidity options that investors implicitly grant managers when they invest may account for part or even all hedge fund returns. C...

  8. ARGICULTURAL LAND PROTECTION FUND AND FOREST FUND AS ECOLOGICAL FUNDS

    OpenAIRE

    Bartosz Bartniczak

    2009-01-01

    Funds for environmental protection and water management, Agricultural Land Protection Fund and Forest Fund make up the Polish system of special fund in environment protection. The main aim of this article is to analyze the activity of two latest funds. The article tries to answer the question whether that funds could be considered as ecological funds. The author described incomes and outlays of that funds and showed which reform should be done in Polish special funds system.

  9. Building an Interdisciplinary Research Program in Water Conservation: Approach, preliminary findings, and next steps

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, David E.; Endter-Wada, Joanna; Caplan, Arthur; Glenn, Diana T.; Ballard, Guy; Henderson, Katie

    2011-01-01

    Effective urban water conservation programs must harness a synergy of new technologies, public policies, social cost pricing, information dissemination, citizen engagement, and coordinated actions across decision making scales. Together, these factors affect the volume of water an individual user ultimately saves and the overall success of a conservation program or programs. Over the past 18 months, we have started building an interdisciplinary research program in urban water conservation to ...

  10. The National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs: Findings on Designing and Implementing Effective Prevention Programs for Youth at High Risk. Monograph Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Jack; Sambrano, Soledad; Springer, J. Fred; Nister, Mary; Sale, Elizabeth; Brounstein, Paul J.; Cordray, David; Shadish, Will; Kasim, Rafa; Pan, Wei

    This document summarizes findings from the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention's National Cross-Site Evaluation of High-Risk Youth Programs, which identified characteristics associated with strong substance abuse prevention outcomes in 48 prevention programs. It provides concrete guidance regarding what elements of design and implementation are…

  11. Admission criteria to the Danish Brain Cancer Program are moderately associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Mie Kiszka; Nepper-Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Danish Brain Cancer Program by examining the criteria for admission to the program and the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in 359 patients referred to the program at the Odense University Hospital during one year...

  12. Perceived Impacts of a Public Health Training Center Field Placement Program among Trainees: Findings from a Small Group Externship Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Patrik; Grimm, Brandon; Abdel-Monem, Tarik; Hoffman, Stacey J; DeKraai, Mark; McMillan, Analisa

    2014-01-01

    There is heightened interest in identifying the impact of the federally funded Public Health Training Center (PHTC) program. Although evaluation studies have been conducted of public health training in general, evaluations of PHTC programs are rare. Field placement components are congressionally mandated requirements of PHTCs. Field placements are typically intensive, supervised externships for students to gain public health experience with local health departments or non-profit organizations. We have found no published evaluations of PHTC field placement components. This may be because of their small size and unique nature. We designed and evaluated a 200-h field placement program at an established PHTC. The evaluation included pre/post surveys measuring public health core competencies, and post-experience interviews. We found significant increases in three competency domains among trainees: policy development and program planning, communication skills, and community dimensions of practice. These outcomes contribute to evidence based on the efficacy of PHTC field placement programs, and underscore their role in public health training.

  13. Terms and conditions for Diesel Emissions Reduction Act Smartway financing projects where an eligible nonprofit grantee is implementing a loan program and loan Recipients will use the loan funds for activities that trigger Davis Bacon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use this T&C for DERA Smartway financing projects where an eligible nonprofit grantee is implementing a loan program and loan Recipients will use the loan funds for activities that trigger Davis Bacon.

  14. What impact have tobacco control policies, cigarette price and tobacco control programme funding had on Australian adolescents' smoking? Findings over a 15-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Victoria M; Warne, Charles D; Spittal, Matthew J; Durkin, Sarah; Purcell, Kate; Wakefield, Melanie A

    2011-08-01

    To assess the impact of tobacco control policies relating to youth access, clean indoor air and tobacco advertising at point-of-sale and outdoors, in addition to cigarette price and per capita tobacco control spending, on adolescent smoking prevalence. Repeated cross-sectional surveys. Logistic regression analyses examined association between policies and smoking prevalence. Australia, 1990-2005. A nationally representative sample of secondary students (aged 12-17 years) participating in a triennial survey (sample size per survey range: 20 560 to 27 480). Students' report of past-month smoking. In each jurisdiction, extent of implementation of the three policies for the year of the survey was determined. For each survey year, national per capita tobacco control spending was determined and jurisdiction-specific 12-month change in cigarette price obtained. Extent of implementation of the three policy areas varied between states and over the survey years. Multivariate analyses that adjusted for demographic factors, year and all tobacco control variables showed that 12-month cigarette price increases [odds ratio (OR): 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.97-0.99], greater per capita tobacco control spending (OR: 0.99, 95% CI: 0.98-0.99) and stronger implementation of clean indoor air policies (OR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.92-0.94) were associated with reduced smoking prevalence. Adult-directed, population-based tobacco control policies such as clean indoor air laws and increased prices of cigarettes, implemented as part of a well-funded comprehensive tobacco control programme are associated with lower adolescent smoking. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. The importance of assessing out-of-pocket payments when the financing of antiretroviral therapy is transitioned to domestic funding: findings from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Benjamin; Chau, Le Bao; Hanh, Kieu Huu; Huong, Nguyen Thuy; Do, Hoa Mai; Duong, Anh Thuy; Nguyen, Long Hoang

    2017-07-01

    To assess out-of-pocket payments and catastrophic health expenditures among antiretroviral therapy (ART) patients in Vietnam, and to model catastrophic payments under different copayment scenarios when the primary financing of ART changes to social health insurance. Cross-sectional facility-based survey of 843 patients at 42 health facilities representative of 87% of ART patients in 2015. Because of donor and government funding, no payments were made for antiretroviral drugs. Other health expenditures were about $66 per person per year (95% CI: $30-$102), of which $15 ($7-$22) were directly for HIV-related health services, largely laboratory tests. These payments resulted in a 4.9% (95% CI: 3.1-6.8%) catastrophic payment rate and 2.5% (95% CI: 0.9-4.1%) catastrophic payment rate for HIV-related health services. About 32% of respondents reported, they were eligible for SHI without copayments. If patients had to pay 20% of costs of ART under social health insurance, the catastrophic payment rate would increase to 8% (95% CI: 5.5-10.0%), and if patients without health insurance had to pay the full costs of ART, the catastrophic payment rate among all patients would be 24% (95% CI: 21.1-27.4%). Health and catastrophic expenditures were substantially lower than in previous studies, although different methods may explain some of the discrepancy. The 20% copayments required by social health insurance would present a financial burden to an additional 0.6% to 5.1% of ART patients. Ensuring access to health insurance for all ART patients will prevent an even higher level of financial hardship. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Nonenergy Benefits from the Weatherization Assistance Program: A Summary of Findings from the Recent Literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, M.

    2002-04-25

    The purpose of this project is to summarize findings reported in the recent literature on nonenergy benefits attributable to the weatherizing of low income homes. This study is a follow-up to the seminal research conducted on the nonenergy benefits attributable to the Department of Energy's national Weatherization Assistance Program by Brown et al. (1993). For this review, nonenergy benefits were broken into three major categories: (1) ratepayer benefits; (2) household benefits; and (3) societal benefits. The ratepayer benefits can be divided into two main subcategories: payment-related benefits and service provision benefits. Similarly, there are two key types of household benefits: those associated with affordable housing and those related to safety, health, and comfort. Societal benefits can be classified as either environmental, social, or economic. Fig. E.S. 1 presents point estimates of the average lifetime monetary value per weatherized home resulting from low income weatherization programs for the key benefit types listed above. These benefits represent net present value estimates (i.e., estimates of the current worth of all benefits expected over the lifetime of the weatherization measures), assuming a 20-year lifetime for installed energy efficiency measures and a 3.2% discount rate. Overall, societal benefits are estimated to be substantially larger than ratepayer and household benefits. Ranges for the societal benefits are also much greater than for the other two categories of nonenergy benefits. The total monetized value for all nonenergy benefit categories associated with weatherizing a home is estimated to be $3346, in 2001 dollars. This represents a national average which, like any point estimate, has considerable uncertainty associated with it. This figure is substantially higher than the total value of nonenergy benefits presented a decade ago in the national weatherization evaluation (Brown et al. 1993) because the current study quantified a

  17. 34 CFR 403.116 - How does a State allocate funds under the Postsecondary and Adult Vocational Education Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Adult Vocational Education Programs? 403.116 Section 403.116 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Secretary Assist Under the Basic Programs? Secondary, Postsecondary, and Adult Vocational Education Programs...

  18. SemDiff: Finding Semtic Differences in Binary Programs based on Angr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shi-Chao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce SemDiff, a novel technology for finding semantic differences between two binary files. Now, the vendor will release the information to patch the previous version which has vulnerability. Then, we can compare the differences and similarities between the two versions to get the unpublished details of the 1day vulnerabilities. Tools, such as BinDiff, BinHunt and iBinHunt, have worked on this project before, however, there are some weaknesses on them. Just like BinDiff, a comparison method based on structure, can not be effective for judging the semantic differences. Though the other two tools(BindHunt and iBinHunt can recognize the differences we focus on, they can not effectively verify the functional inlining and spend a pretty long time to finish the process because the use of graph-based isomorphism algorithm. In the paper, we first propose SemDiff, which uses the existing tool(angr to generate the intermediate language(VEX. Then, because of the nature of program, the data read from and written to the memories, we record these information to implement the comparison. Last, an improved BinDiff algorithm is used to match the basic blocks. In this paper, we take some real vulnerabilities as examples, such as CVE-2010-3974-Microsoft Windows to test our tool, reaching a good goal, matching more blocks than BinDiff and taking less time than BinHunt and iBinHunt.

  19. Finding an Optimal Location of Line Facility using Evolutionary Algorithm and Integer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taji, Takenao; Tanigawa, Shin-Ichi; Kamiyama, Naoyuki; Katoh, Naoki; Takizawa, Atsushi

    In this paper, we consider the problem for determining an optimal location of a line facility in a city such as railway system. A line facility is modeled as a spanning tree embedded on the plane whose vertices represent stations and edges represent the rails connecting two stations, and people can travel not only by walk but also by using the line facility quickly. Suppose there are a finite number of towns in a city, only in which people lives. Then, our problem is to find a location of the stations as well as a connection of the stations such that the sum of travel time between all pairs of towns is minimum. Tsukamoto, Katoh and Takizawa proposed a heuristic algorithm for the problem which consists of two phases as follows. In the first phase, fixing the position of stations, it determines the topology of the line facility. The second phase optimizes the position of stations while the topology is fixed. The algorithm alternately executes these two phases until a converged solution is obtained. Tsukamoto et al. determined the topology of the line facility by solving minimum spanning tree (MST) in the first phase. In this paper, we propose two methods for determining the topology of the line facility so that the sum of travel time is minimized hoping to improving the previous algorithm. The first proposed method heuristically determine the topology by using evolutionary algorithm (EA). In the second method, we reduce our problem to minimum communication spanning tree (MCST) problem by making a further assumption, and solve it by formulating the problem as an integer program. We show the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm through the numerical experiments.

  20. Funding innovation

    CERN Multimedia

    Marina Giampietro

    2012-01-01

    For the first time, six knowledge and technology transfer activities are set to benefit from a dedicated fund made available by the Knowledge Transfer group. This initiative cements CERN’s commitment to sharing its technological knowledge and expertise with society.   GEM detectors for flame detection and early earthquake prediction, radio-frequency absorbers for energy recovery, and exotic radioisotopes for medical applications are among the projects funded by the recently introduced KT Fund. “CERN’s scientific programme generates a considerable amount of intellectual property, a natural driver for innovation,” explains Giovanni Anelli, Head of the Knowledge Transfer Group. “Very often, though, financial support is needed to bring the newly-born technologies a step further and make them ready for transfer to other research institutes or to companies.” This is where the KT fund comes into play. It provides vital support in the early sta...

  1. Pension Fund

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    In line with the decisions taken by the Council in June and September 2007 concerning the new governance of the Pension Fund, amendments to Section 2 «Structure and Functions» of the Rules of the Fund entered into force on 1st January 2009 (Article I 2.08 – Composition of the Investment Committee and Article I 2.08bis – Chairman of the Investment Committee). Amendment n°27 may be downloaded (PDF document) directly from the Pension Fund website: http://pensions.web.cern.ch/Pensions/statuts___rules.htm or obtained from the Administration of the Fund (Tel. 022 767 2742, mailto:Barbara.Bordjah@cern.ch).

  2. A national cohort study of MD-PhD graduates of medical schools with and without funding from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences' Medical Scientist Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffe, Donna B; Andriole, Dorothy A

    2011-08-01

    To determine whether prematriculation characteristics and career-setting preferences of MD-PhD graduates differ according to their schools' funding from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences' Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). The Association of American Medical Colleges provided deidentified records for the national cohort of all 1993-2000 U.S. medical school matriculants, 3,180 of whom graduated with dual MD-PhD degrees by March 2, 2009. The authors examined prematriculation characteristics, educational outcomes, and career-setting preferences at graduation in association with MD-PhD program graduation from schools with long-standing MSTP-funded, recent MSTP-funded, and non-MSTP-funded programs. Of 3,142 MD-PhD graduates with prematriculation data, 30% were women and 36% were nonwhite. Graduates from long-standing MSTP-funded schools (63% of 3,142 graduates) composed a more highly selective group academically (based on Medical College Admission Test scores) than did graduates from recent MSTP-funded (6%) and non-MSTP-funded schools (31%). Women and nonwhite graduates were more likely to have graduated from long-standing MSTP-funded schools. Controlling for MSTP funding and other variables, graduates with total debt of $100,000 or more were more likely to indicate non-research-related career-setting preferences (nonuniversity clinical practice: odds ratio [OR] 3.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.86-6.87; undecided/other: OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.29-3.60). Neither gender nor race/ethnicity was independently associated with graduates' career-setting preferences. Women and nonwhite MD-PhD graduates more likely graduated from long-standing MSTP than non-MSTP-funded schools. Controlling for institutional MSTP funding, MD-PhD graduates with high debt were more likely to indicate non-research-related career-setting preferences.

  3. Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Pension Fund Governing Board (PFGB) held two meetings over the summer, the first on 9 June and the second on 1st September. The agendas of the two meetings had several items in common, including progress reports on the work of the four working groups. Group 1, which is responsible for the revision of Chapter I, Section 2 of the Rules of the Fund, has made good progress but will need more time to complete its terms of reference in view of the number and complexity of the articles to be amended. In parallel, the Group has approved a code of conduct for the Pension Fund, which is based, in particular, on the new charter introduced for Swiss pension funds by the Swiss Association of Provident Institutions (ASIP) and the CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) code of ethics applicable to members of pension fund bodies. The PFGB took note that the Group had also been working on the rules relating to the status of the personnel of the Fund and the composition of the Investment Committee. The work of Group 2, responsi...

  4. A meta-analytic review of eating disorder prevention programs: encouraging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C Nathan

    2007-01-01

    This meta-analytic review found that 51% of eating disorder prevention programs reduced eating disorder risk factors and 29% reduced current or future eating pathology. Larger effects occurred for programs that were selected (versus universal), interactive (versus didactic), multisession (versus single session), solely offered to females (versus both sexes), offered to participants over 15 years of age (versus younger ones), and delivered by professional interventionists (versus endogenous providers). Programs with body acceptance and dissonance-induction content and without psychoeducational content and programs evaluated in trials using validated measures and a shorter follow-up period also produced larger effects. Results identify promising programs and delineate sample, format, and design features associated with larger effects, which may inform the design of more effective prevention programs in the future.

  5. Involvement of the US Department of Defense in Civilian Assistance, Part I: a quantitative description of the projects funded by the Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdeaux, Margaret Ellis; Lawry, Lynn; Bonventre, Eugene V; Burkle, Frederick M

    2010-03-01

    To review the history and goals of the US Department of Defense's largest civilian assistance program, the Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster and Civic Aid Program and to describe the number, geographic regions, years, key words, countries, and types of projects carried out under this program since 2001. Using the program's central database, we reviewed all approved projects since 2001 and tabulated them by year, combatant command, country, and key word. We also reviewed the project descriptions of projects funded between January 1, 2006, and February 9, 2008, and examined how their activities varied by combatant command and year. Of the 5395 projects in the database, 2097 were funded. Projects took place in more than 90 countries, with Southern, Pacific, and Africa Command hosting the greatest number. The most common types of projects were school, health, disaster response, and water infrastructure construction, and disaster-response training. The "global war on terror" was the key word most frequently tagged to project descriptions. Project descriptions lacked stated goals as well as implementation and coordination strategies with potential partners, and did not report outcome or impact indicators. The geographic reach of the program is vast and projects take place in a wide variety of public sectors. Yet their security and civilian assistance value remains unclear given the lack of stated project goals, implementation strategies, or measures of effectiveness. To facilitate transparency and policy discussion, we recommend project proposals include hypotheses as to how they will enhance US security, their relevance to the public sector they address, and outcome and impact indicators that can assess their value and effectiveness.

  6. A constraint programming solution for the military unit path finding problem

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Leenen, L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this chapter the authors present an algorithm to solve the Dynamic Military Unit Path Finding Problem (DMUPFP) which is based on Stentz’s well-known D* algorithm to solve dynamic path finding problems. The Military Unit Path Finding Problem...

  7. Get Your Wishes Granted: Supplementary Funds for School Music Programs Are Available from a Wide Array of Sources, but Tapping into Them Requires Time, Effort, and Savvy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Mac

    2009-01-01

    Music teachers across the country are taking advantage of a wide range of grants from any number of sources--cities and towns, states, the federal government, nonprofit foundations, businesses, even generous individuals--to lend extra strength to their programs. Finding the right grantor for one's program is a major part of the equation. Before…

  8. The Assessment of Afterschool Program Practices Tool (APT): Findings from the APT Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Allison; Surr, Wendy; Richer, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The Assessment of Afterschool Program Practices Tool ("APT"), developed by the National Institute of Out-of-School Time (NIOST), is an observational instrument designed to measure the aspects of afterschool program quality that research suggests contribute to the 21st century skills, attitudes, and behaviors youth need to be successful…

  9. Current Telephone-Based Schoolwork Assistance Programs: An Analysis of Their Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Alan

    This paper reviews the literature on telephone-based schoolwork assistance programs and describes the activities of several such programs. Research literature indicates that properly organized lessons and assignments result in greater student achievement. Research on characteristics of students who procrastinate in doing their schoolwork is…

  10. Understaning the "funding effect"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreskes, N.

    2016-12-01

    There is a long history of industry funding of scientific and engineering research in the USA. Much of this work has been of high quality. Research demonstrates, however, that corporate funding can represent a threat to scientific independence and integrity. Studies show that sponsors' interests can affect research results, particularly when sponsors have a strong interest in a particular research outcome. The effects may occur through the impact of subconscious bias on sampling, study design, data interpretation, and/or reporting of results. Corporate funding can also skew research toward investigating certain questions at the expense of others, downplaying the significance of adverse findings, and/or failing to report adverse results. Gifts can affect behavior, even when they are unrelated to research activities. These impacts that are so substantial that they have a name: "the funding effect."[i] Evidence shows that scientists who strive to be objective and fair-minded may nonetheless fall prey to the funding effect. In many cases, the challenges of corporate gifts and funding can be addressed through education and improved self-awareness, agreements that protect researchers' freedom to publish without sponsor approval, sensible disclosure policies, and reasonable sanctions for failures of disclosure. However, in some cases, it may be appropriate for researchers and scientific societies to decline funding.

  11. 34 CFR 403.111 - How must funds be used under the Secondary School Vocational Education Program and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... programs in teacher preparation, which seek to use fully the skills and work experience of individuals... for activities that include, but are not limited to— (1) Upgrading of curriculum; (2) Purchase of... programs; (8) Supplementary services designed to meet the needs of special populations; (9) Payment in...

  12. 34 CFR 403.112 - How does a State allocate funds under the Secondary School Vocational Education Program to local...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... School Vocational Education Program to local educational agencies? 403.112 Section 403.112 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAM What Kinds of Activities...

  13. Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The PFGB held two meetings over the summer, the first on 9 June and the second on 1st September. The agendas of the two meetings had several items in common, including progress reports on the work of the four working groups. Group 1, which is responsible for the revision of Chapter I, Section 2 of the Rules of the Fund, has made good progress but will need more time to complete its terms of reference in view of the number and complexity of the articles to be amended. In parallel, the Group has approved a code of conduct for the Pension Fund, which is based, in particular, on the new charter introduced for Swiss pension funds by the Swiss Association of Provident Institutions (ASIP) and the CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) code of ethics applicable to members of pension fund bodies. The PFGB took note that the Group had also been working on the rules relating to the status of the personnel of the Fund and the composition of the Investment Committee. The work of Group 2, resp...

  14. PENSION FUND

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The Governing Board of the Pension Fund held its first three meetings of the year on 2 February, 2 March and 13 April.At the first of these meetings the Board first heard a presentation by Mrs H. Richmond of JP Morgan on the results of the currency overlay programme applied to the Fund's assets. Thanks to the policy pursued by this company, volatility, i.e. portfolio risk for assets denominated in currencies other than the Swiss franc, has been reduced. However, despite the fact that JP Morgan has considerable expertise in this field, no gain has been achieved over the past year. The Governing Board heard a report by the Investment Committee Chairman G. Maurin on the meetings of 21-22 and 28 January at which the Pension Fund's various fund managers had been interviewed on their results. Decisions were taken on benchmarks aimed at optimising management and on the terms of reference of the Internal Management Unit. It was also decided to place two fund managers on a watching list and to request them to make eve...

  15. Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual General Asssembly to be held in the CERN Auditorium on Wednesday 8 October 2003 at 14.30 hrs The Agenda comprises: 1. Opening RemarksJ. Bezemer 2. Annual Report 2002: Presentation and results Copies of the Report are available from divisional secretariats. C. Cuénoud 3. Overview of the present situation with regard to pension funds C. Cuénoud 4. Performance of the Fund since the year 2000 and aspects of the ongoing asset/liability modelling exercise G. Maurin 5. Questions from members and beneficiariesPersons wishing to ask questions are encouraged to submit them, where possible, in writing in advance, addressed to Mr C. Cuénoud, Administrator of the Fund. 6. Conclusions J. Bezemer As usual, participants are invited to drinks after the assembly. NB The minutes of the 2002 General Assembly are available from the Administration of the Fund tel.(+4122)767 27 42; e-mail Sophia.Revol@cern.ch)

  16. Finding of no significant impact for the joint DOE/EPA program on national industrial competitiveness through energy efficiency and economics (NICE{sup 3})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA), to assess the environment impacts associated with a joint DOE/EPA cost-sharing grant program named National Industrial Competitiveness through Energy Efficiency, Environment and Economics (NICE{sup 3}). The purpose of the NICE{sup 3} Program is to encourage waste minimization technology in industry by funding projects that develop activities and process improvements to conserve energy and reduce pollution. The proposed action would provide Federal financial assistance in the form of grants to industry in order to promote pollution prevention, energy efficiency, and cost competitiveness. Based on the analysis presented in the PEA, DOE has determined that the proposed action (providing NICE{sup 3} grants for projects which are consistent with the goals of the PPA and EPACT) does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not needed and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  17. Postpartum Family Planning During Sociopolitical Transition: Findings from an Integrated Community-Based Program in Egypt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chelsea M. Cooper; Elaine Charurat; Issam El-Adawi; Young-Mi Kim; Mark R. Emerson; Wael Zaki; Anne Schuster

    2016-01-01

    .... : A quasi-experimental evaluation of an integrated reproductive and maternal and child health program implemented in selected sites in Upper and Lower Egypt was conducted between 2012 and 2014...

  18. Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Amendment No 19 to the Rules and Regulations of the Pension Fund has just been published and can be obtained from Divisional secretariats or, in the case of pensioners, directly from the Administration of the Fund (tel. 767-91 94/27 38), bldg 5, 1-030. This Amendment, which entered into force on 1.1.2003, concerns 1) the fixed sums and allowances adjusted at same date (Annex B) and 2) the articles which have been amended, in accordance with the Finance Committee's decision, regarding voting rules of the Governing Board and the role and composition of the Investment Committee.

  19. 34 CFR 403.151 - How must funds be used under the Consumer and Homemaking Education Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... consumers, and to help improve the home environment and the quality of family life. (b)(1) The State board..., services, and activities under this program. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2362(c), 2363) Comprehensive Career...

  20. 25 CFR 170.157 - What is the IRR Program Coordinating Committee's role in the funding process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... regarding: (a) New IRR Inventory Data Format and Form; (b) Simplified Cost to Construct (CTC) Methodology (including formula calculations, formula program and design, and bid tab methodology); (c) Cost Elements; (d...

  1. ISLAMIC MICROFINANCE AND POVERTY ALLEVIATION PROGRAM: PRELIMINARY RESEARCH FINDINGS FROM INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Suzuki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Poverty should be defined, measured, and scrutinized its root causes from a multi-dimension perspectives. Therefore, in designing and implementation of poverty alleviation program, it should consider economic factors, social and political contexts surrounding the poor. Sen (1982; 1999 views poverty as a multifaceted world and ethical dimension essentially should be placed underpinning it as a vital economic problem. The paper takes the stance that the poor themselves have potential capacity to alleviate their condition in resolving poverty trap. Community development program is one of the strategies to deal with the poverty problem. Islamic microfinance can play an important role in combating poverty dilemma especially in Muslim majority population communities. Through the approach proposed by Bigg and Satterthwaite (2005 with strengthening local organizations and community development programs, Islamic microfinance should engage a strategic partnership with the Masjid and Islamic charity institutions (zakat and waqf organization. This strategic alliance will result more integrated programs and also capacity building of the institutions involved. This paper aims to contribute a grass root model in the purpose of combating poverty in the framework of Islamic economic system. =========================================== Kemiskinan harus didefinisikan, diukur, dan diteliti akar penyebabnya dari berbagai perspektif. Oleh karena itu, dalam merancang dan mengimplementasikan program pengentasan kemiskinan, faktor-faktor ekonomi, konteks sosial dan politik yang mengelilingi kemiskinan juga harus dipertimbangkan. Sen (1982; 1999 memandang kemiskinan sebagai sebuah dunia yang kompleks, dan dimensi dasar etika harus ditempatkan sebagai sebuah masalah ekonomi yang vital. Peneliti sendiri dalam hal ini berpandangan bahwa orang-orang miskin pada dasarnya punya kapasitas yang memadai untuk keluar dari garis kemiskinan. Salah satunya adalah dengan program

  2. Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Following the approval by the CERN Council, at its Session in March 2006, of the amendments to Administrative Circular No. 14 (Protection of the members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability) and the resulting amendments to the Rules and Regulations of the Pension Fund, which entered into force on 1st July 2006, the Administration of the Fund has decided to publish a complete new edition of the Rules and Regulations incorporating all amendments up to 1st July 2006. Members of the Fund will be informed once the new edition of the Rules and Regulations is available from Departmental secretariats.In the meantime, the amendments to the text of the Pension Fund Rules and Regulations, which entered into force on 1st July 2006, are presented below (Previous text/Amended text): Chapter II - Section 1: Contributions and benefits Article II 1.04 - Reference Salary - Part-time Work OLD TEXT: The reference salary of a member with a contract for part-time work shall b...

  3. Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Following the approval by the CERN Council, at its Session in March 2006, of the amendments to Administrative Circular No. 14 (Protection of the members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability) and the resulting amendments to the Rules and Regulations of the Pension Fund, which entered into force on 1st July 2006, the Administration of the Fund has decided to publish a complete new edition of the Rules and Regulations incorporating all amendments up to 1st July 2006. Members of the Fund will be informed once the new edition of the Rules and Regulations is available from Departmental secretariats. In the meantime, the amendments to the text of the Pension Fund Rules and Regulations, which entered into force on 1st July 2006, are presented below (Previous text/Amended text) : Chapter II - Section 1: Contributions and benefits Article II 1.04 - Reference Salary - Part-time Work OLD TEXT: the reference salary of a member with a contract for part-time work shall be e...

  4. PENSION FUND

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The Governing Board of the Pension Fund held its 104th and 105th meetings on 8th November and 4th December 2001, respectively. The agenda of the 8th November meeting was devoted to a single item, namely the outcome of the Finance Committee's meeting the previous day. The Governing Board noted with satisfaction that both its proposed amendments to the Rules and Regulations of the Fund - allowing, in particular, the award of a deferred retirement pension after five years of service - and its proposal for the adjustment of pensions on 1.1.2002 had been approved for recommendation to the Council in December. At its meeting on 4th December, the Governing Board dealt mainly with the items examined at the latest meeting of the Investment Committee. The Committee's chairman, G. Maurin, stated that the 2001 return on the Fund's overall investments was likely to be between -2% and -3%. He also noted that a new study of the Fund's cash flows (incomings and outgoings) had been performed. He underlined that, while the flo...

  5. Research Ethics Capacity Building in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review of NIH Fogarty-Funded Programs 2000–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndebele, Paul; Wassenaar, Douglas; Benatar, Solomon; Fleischer, Theodore; Kruger, Mariana; Adebamowo, Clement; Kass, Nancy; Hyder, Adnan A.; Meslin, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    The last fifteen years have witnessed a significant increase in investment in research ethics capacity development throughout the world. We examine nine research ethics training programs that are focused on Sub-Saharan Africa and supported by the US National Institutes of Health. We collected data from grants awards’ documents and annual reports supplemented by questionnaires completed by the training program directors. Together, these programs provided long-term training in research ethics to 275 African professionals, strengthened research ethics committees in 19 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, and created research ethics curricula at many institutions and bioethics centers within Africa. Trainees’ leadership resulted in new national systems and policies on research ethics, human tissue storage and export, and methods of monitoring compliance with research ethics guidelines. Training programs adapted to challenges that arose due to varied trainees’ background knowledge in ethics, duration of time available for training, spoken and written English language skills, administrative obstacles, and the need to sustain post-training research ethics activities. Our report showcases the development of awareness of research ethics and building/strengthening of basic research ethics infrastructure in Sub-Saharan Africa. Nevertheless, the increasing amount and complexity of health research being conducted in Sub-Saharan Africa suggests the need for continued investment in research ethics capacity development in this region. This paper is part of a collection of papers analyzing the Fogarty International Center’s International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum Development program. PMID:24782070

  6. The "RAPID" Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Program for Inattentive Children: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of the current study were to ascertain feasibility and acceptability of directly delivering a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) group intervention for inattentive children in a school setting, to examine the reliability of the RATE-C Questionnaires that accompany the program, and to determine whether they can be used to…

  7. Creating a Platform for Sustained Neighborhood Improvement: Interim Findings from Chicago's New Communities Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David; Verma, Nandita; Dillman, Keri-Nicole; Chaskin, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Distressed urban neighborhoods face challenges on multiple fronts, but most efforts to confront these problems work in isolation of one another. The New Communities Program (NCP) is an exception, helping selected Chicago neighborhoods develop partnerships to address challenges involving employment, education, housing, and safety in a…

  8. Credit Building in IDA Programs: Early Findings of a Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenmaier, Julie; Curley, Jami; Kelly, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This article reports on the impact of the Individual Development Account (IDA) program on credit. Method: Using a convenience sample of IDA participants (N = 165), data were analyzed using paired sample "t" tests, independent sample "t" test, one-way analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney "U" Tests, and…

  9. Exploring Saving Performance in an IDA Program: Findings for People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombe, Margaret; Huang, Jin; Putnam, Michelle; Cooney, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Asset development policies have been promoted as a means to create a more inclusive "ownership society." During the past few years, asset-building scholarship has begun to focus specifically on marginalized groups, including people with disabilities. Using a sample of individual development account (IDA) program participants (N = 376), the authors…

  10. Research Findings on Neurolinguistic Programming: Nonsupportive Data or an Untestable Theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpley, Christopher F.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the experimental literature on neurolinguistic programming (NLP). Sharpley (l984) and Einspruch and Forman (l985) concluded that the effectiveness of this therapy was yet to be demonstrated. Presents data from seven recent studies that further question the basic tenets of NLP and their application in counseling situations. (Author/KS)

  11. Mutual Fund Performances of Polish Domestic Equity Fund Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ömer faruk tan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the article: The main purpose of the paper is empirically evaluating selectivity skills and market timing ability of Polish fund managers during the period from January 2009 to November 2014. After the global financial crisis of 2008, in this period of quantitative easing (QE, thanks to an increase in the money supply, a capital flow from developed countries to developing countries was observed. In this study, we try to analyse that although the financial market in Poland made an incredible progress, whether fund managers show better or worse performance than the market. Methodology/Methods: In order to evaluate fund manager performances, Jensen alpha (1968 is computed, which depicts selectivity skills of fund managers. For determining market timing ability of fund managers, Treynor & Mazuy (1966 regression analysis and Henriksson & Merton (1981 regression analysis are applied. Fund performances are evaluated using Warsaw Stock Exchange Index as the benchmark index. Scientific aim: In this study, we have tried to evaluate selectivity skills and market timing ability of Polish fund managers. A total of 14 equity fund managers’ performances are analysed. The study can be guiding especially for investors who are interested in Polish equity fund performances in a period where emerging stock markets outperformed with quantitative easing. Findings: Jensen (1968 alphas indicate that over this period fund managers did not have selective ability, as none of the 14 funds had statistically significant positive alphas. Furthermore, Treynor & Mazuy (1966 and Henriksson & Merton (1981 regression analysis indicate that over the same period fund managers did not also have market timing ability, as again none of the 14 funds had statistically significant positive coefficients. Conclusions: In this work, we can detect that in the era of quantitative easing, although the financial market in Poland made an incredible progress, the fund returns were

  12. Enhancing organizational capacity to provide cancer control programs among Latino churches: design and baseline findings of the CRUZA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jennifer D; Torres, Maria Idali; Tom, Laura S; Rustan, Sarah; Leyva, Bryan; Negron, Rosalyn; Linnan, Laura A; Jandorf, Lina; Ospino, Hosffman

    2015-04-09

    Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have been successful in delivering health promotion programs for African Americans, though few studies have been conducted among Latinos. Even fewer have focused on organizational change, which is required to sustain community-based initiatives. We hypothesized that FBOs serving Latinos would be more likely to offer evidence-based strategies (EBS) for cancer control after receiving a capacity enhancement intervention to implement health programs, and designed the CRUZA trial to test this hypothesis. This paper describes the CRUZA design and baseline findings. We identified Catholic parishes in Massachusetts that provided Spanish-language mass (n = 65). A baseline survey assessed organizational characteristics relevant to adoption of health programs, including readiness for adoption, "fit" between innovation and organizational mission, implementation climate, and organizational culture. In the next study phase, parishes that completed the baseline assessment will be recruited to a randomized cluster trial, with the parish as the unit of analysis. Both groups will receive a Program Manual and Toolkit. Capacity Enhancement parishes will also be offered technical support, assistance forming health committees and building inter-institutional partnerships, and skills-based training. Of the 49 parishes surveyed at baseline (75%), one-third (33%) reported having provided at least one health program in the prior year. However, only two program offerings were cancer-specific. Nearly one-fifth (18%) had an active health ministry. There was a high level of organizational readiness to adopt cancer control programs, high congruence between parish missions and CRUZA objectives, moderately conducive implementation climates, and organizational cultures supportive of CRUZA programming. Having an existing health ministry was significantly associated with having offered health programs within the past year. Relationships between health program

  13. From Pilot to Permanent: A Case Study of the Institutionalization of A Grant-Funded Transition Program for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities in A Public Research Institution in the Midwest of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavulic, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative intrinsic case study explored the institutionalization of a Transition and Postsecondary Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (TPSID) grant-funded program into a public four-year university in the Midwestern U.S. The study employed an ecological framework, and analyzed interview data from program stakeholders and…

  14. 77 FR 27475 - Announcement of Funding Awards; Choice Neighborhoods Grant Program for Fiscal Years (FY) 2010 and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... transformation. The program aims to transform neighborhoods of poverty into viable mixed-income neighborhoods.... Housing Authority of the City 170,000 Civic Park Apartments; of Salisbury, NC, 200 S. Westend neighborhood...; Mantua PA 19104-2047. neighborhood. Norfolk Redevelopment and 250,000 Tidewater Park Gardens; Housing...

  15. 75 FR 27353 - List of Programs Eligible for Inclusion in Fiscal Year 2010 Funding Agreements To Be Negotiated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (Pub. L. 93-638, as amended). Section 403(b)(2... interpretation of geology, history, and natural and cultural resources. Some elements of the following programs... Ruins National Monument--New Mexico. 43. Bandelier National Monument--New Mexico. 44. Carlsbad Caverns...

  16. 76 FR 45282 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... Street S Tacoma WA 98444 $179,013 25 SPOKANE HOUSING AUTHORITY 55 W Mission Avenue........ Spokane WA...-VASH) Program for Fiscal Years (FY) 2010 AGENCY: Office of Public and Indian Housing, HUD. ACTION..., Office of Public and Indian Housing, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street, SW...

  17. Promoting Policy and Environmental Change in Faith-Based Organizations: Description and Findings From a Mini-Grants Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola, Kimberly R Jacob; Hermstad, April; Flemming, Shauna St Clair; Honeycutt, Sally; Carvalho, Michelle L; Cherry, Sabrina T; Davis, Tamara; Frazier, Sheritta; Escoffery, Cam; Kegler, Michelle C

    2017-05-01

    The Emory Prevention Research Center's Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network mini-grant program funded faith-based organizations to implement policy and environmental change to promote healthy eating and physical activity in rural South Georgia. This study describes the existing health promotion environment and its relationship to church member behavior. Cross-sectional. Data were obtained from parishioners of six churches in predominantly rural South Georgia. Participants were 319 church members with average age of 48 years, of whom 80% were female and 84% were black/African-American. Questionnaires assessed perceptions of the existing church health promotion environment relative to nutrition and physical activity, eating behavior and intention to use physical activity facilities at church, and eating and physical activity behaviors outside of church. Multiple regression and ordinal logistic regression using generalized estimating equations were used to account for clustered data. Results indicate that delivering messages via sermons and church bulletins, having healthy eating programs, and serving healthy foods are associated with participants' self-reported consumption of healthy foods at church (all p values ≤ .001). Serving more healthy food and less unhealthy food was associated with healthier eating in general but not to physical activity in general (p values ≤ .001). The church environment may play an important role in supporting healthy eating in this setting and more generally.

  18. How does the domiciliation decision affect mutual fund fees?

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Gunnar; Köhler, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze whether the domiciliation decision of mutual funds has an impact on fund fees. To explain the fee price-setting of mutual funds, we consider characteristics specific to funds, fund companies, and countries. We find that fees vary considerably across fund types and countries. Positive impacts of financial market integration can be confirmed, though funds set up under the UCITS directive are more expensive. If funds are sold in multiple countries it drives up fees; how...

  19. Funding Music: Guidelines for Grant Writing in the Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Rekha S.

    2016-01-01

    With music education's continued unstable role within the school system, music educators are actively seeking external funding to support and augment their programs. However, there are many challenges involved with grant writing including understanding where to find potential funders, writing the proposal, developing a budget, and including an…

  20. To Enroll or Not to Enroll? Why Many Americans Have Gained Insurance Under the Affordable Care Act While Others Have Not. Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March-May 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sara R; Gunja, Munira; Doty, Michelle M; Beutel, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    According to the most recent Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March-May 2015, an estimated 25 million adults remain uninsured. To achieve the Affordable Care Act's goal of near-universal coverage, policymakers must understand why some people are enrolling in the law's marketplace plans or in Medicaid coverage and why others are not. This analysis of the survey finds that affordability--whether real or perceived--is playing a significant role in adults' choice of marketplace plans and the decision whether to enroll at all. People who have gained coverage report significantly more positive experiences shopping for health plans than do those who did not enroll. Getting personal assistance--from telephone hotlines, navigators, and insurance brokers, among other sources--appears to make a critical difference in whether people gain health insurance

  1. Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    Pension Fund

    2006-01-01

    Amendment No. 22 to the Rules and Regulations of the Pension Fund has just been published and can be obtained from Department/Unit secretariats or, in the case of pensioners, directly from the Administration of the Fund (tel. 767-91 94/27 38), bldg 5, 1-030. This Amendment, which entered into force following the CERN Council's decisions of 16 December 2005, includes the following new articles: Art. II 5.08 : Non-entitlement to Pension for Surviving Spouse Art. II 5.09 : Procurement of an entitlement to Pension for Surviving Spouse Art. II 6.09 : Non-entitlement to Pension for Orphans Art. II 7.01 c) : Entitlement to Allowances Art. III 1.07 : Extension of the contract beyond the age limit of 65 as well as the following amended articles : Article II 1.07 - Contributions Annex B - Fixed sums and allowances

  2. A comparison of current practice in school-based substance use prevention programs with meta-analysis findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennett, Susan T; Ringwalt, Christopher L; Thorne, Judy; Rohrbach, Louise Ann; Vincus, Amy; Simons-Rudolph, Ashley; Jones, Shelton

    2003-03-01

    The series of seminal meta-analytic studies of school-based substance use prevention program studies conducted by the late Nancy S. Tobler and colleagues concluded that programs with content focused on social influences' knowledge, drug refusal skills, and generic competency skills and that use participatory or interactive teaching strategies were more effective than programs focused on knowledge and attitudes and favoring traditional didactic instruction. The present study compared current school practice against evidence-based standards for "effective content" and "effective delivery," derived from the Tobler findings. Respondents were the lead staff who taught substance use prevention in the 1998-1999 school year in a national sample of public and private schools that included middle school grades (N = 1,795). Results indicate that most providers (62.25%) taught effective content, but few used effective delivery (17.44%), and fewer still used both effective content and delivery (14.23%). Those who taught an evidence-based program (e.g., Life Skills Training, Project ALERT), however, were more likely to implement both effective content and delivery, as were those teachers who were recently trained in substance use prevention and were comfortable using interactive teaching methods. The findings indicate that the transfer to practice of research knowledge about school-based substance use prevention programming has been limited.

  3. 24 CFR 1000.122 - May NAHASDA grant funds be used as matching funds to obtain and leverage funding, including any...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May NAHASDA grant funds be used as matching funds to obtain and leverage funding, including any Federal or state program and still be... Housing Activities § 1000.122 May NAHASDA grant funds be used as matching funds to obtain and leverage...

  4. Finding Funding: Making School Improvements Possible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Green Bay Packer coach Vince Lombardi is quoted as saying, "Winning isn't everything, but wanting to win is." Whether it's a major university or an urban school district, pulling together and developing a plan and being confident in the financing through performance contracting is the best way to meet student, taxpayer and community…

  5. Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Governing Board of the Pension Fund held its hundred and seventeenth meeting on 3 June 2003. On that occasion, it examined the recommendations made by the External Auditors in their report on their audit of the 2002 annual accounts and the replies by the Pension Fund's Administration. The Governing Board was gratified by the small number of remarks by the External Auditors. It also confirmed its agreement to the procedure followed by the Administration of the Pension Fund in the handling of transfer values. Under other items on the agenda, the Board once again examined ESO's request relating to the terms and conditions of membership by its staff members. In this regard, the Board wishes to receive from ESO a definitive request (following the necessary consultation procedures with the representatives of the personnel and discussions within ESO's governing bodies) so that the working group can continue its work on a clear basis and so that the Governing Board is in a position to take up a position in the m...

  6. PENSION FUND

    CERN Document Server

    Administration of the Fund

    2001-01-01

    The Administration of the Fund has just signed a contract with the 'La Suisse' insurance company, making life insurance available to persons leaving CERN under very similar conditions to those offered to the members of the CERN personnel. From now on, persons retiring from the Organization will be able to take out this new insurance at the moment of retirement, provided that they have been members of CERN's collective life insurance scheme for the last five years of service. Exceptionally, until the end of 2001, 'La Suisse' has agreed to allow persons who are already retired to take out this insurance, subject to their state of health (health questionnaire to be completed) and with a maximum insured amount set at 150,000 CHF. We therefore invite any retired persons interested in this insurance to consult the detailed terms and conditions, either on the Pension Fund's Web site (http://pensions.web.cern.ch/pensions) or by writing to the Administration of the Fund. For those wishing to apply, the documents to be...

  7. Pension Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Governing Board of the Pension Fund held its one-hundred-and-twenty-second meeting on 3 February 2004. Opening the meeting, the Chairman, J. Bezemer, welcomed W. Zapf's alternate T. Lagrange, A. Naudi's alternate P. Geeraert, and M. Goossens' alternate M. Vitasse, who were attending the Governing Board for the first time. The Governing Board heard a report from its Chairman on the meeting of the CERN Council on 19 December 2003, at which, under Pension Fund matters, the Council had approved a pensions adjustment of 0.7%. The Governing Board then heard a report on the main elements of the Investment Committee's meeting on 3 December 2003. During a presentation, Expert Timing System (Madrid) and the Compagnie de Trésorerie Benjamin de Rothschild (Geneva) had proposed a bond portfolio investment following the same quantitative investment principles as the equities portfolio they already managed for the Fund. After some deliberation, the Investment Committee had decided, on that basis, to award t...

  8. (Almost) a slam dunk: Assessing the experiences and opinions of participants in a National Basketball Association (NBA)-funded dropout prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Tray J; Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey

    2017-10-01

    Researchers conducted an evaluation of participants' perceptions of a dropout prevention program - the NBA High School program - involving a National Basketball Association (NBA) team, a high school located in downtown [City], and the College of Education (COE) at the local State University (SU). The program targeted "at-risk" high school students while utilizing student-teachers as tutors and mentors. Researchers utilized mixed methods to assess student, student-teacher, and high school teacher participants' experiences with and opinions of the program. Researchers found (1) students enjoyed the program, especially given the involvement of the student-teachers; (2) students believed the program helped improve their grades; (3) student-teachers enjoyed working with their students, although student-teachers found some of the expectations surrounding their positions and roles as tutors/mentors within the high school to be unclear and frustrating; (4) high school teachers felt significantly better about the program than the student-teachers; and (5) overall, all sets of respondents categorically supported the program and its benefits. Findings indicated that the involvement of mentors or role models matters to students, and clear and organized logistics, planning, and communication are integral for program success. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Implementation of the Wetland Mitigation Bank Program at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    1999-04-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1205) for the proposed implementation of a wetland mitigation bank program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

  10. Space Shuttle: Incomplete data and funding approach increase cost risk for upgrade program. Report to Congressional Requesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, David R.; Edwards, Lee; Beard, James; Wyatt, Terry

    1994-05-01

    The space shuttle is the only U.S. launch system capable of carrying people to and from space. It has operated for over 10 years and is likely to be used well into the next century. As the shuttle ages, NASA will be faced with increased need to update and replace various components due to obsolescence or to enhance safety. A review is presented of the shuttle program to determine (1) the assumptions NASA has made regarding the length of time the current shuttle fleet will be in operation and (2) NASA's processes and criteria for selecting needed safety and obsolescence upgrades.

  11. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Programs and Projects for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR)/(STTR) technologies into NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) projects. Other Government and commercial projects managers can also find this useful.

  12. 75 FR 32495 - Operating Fund Subsidies Allocation Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Operating Fund Subsidies Allocation Formula AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information... the Operating Fund Program. PHAs compute their operating subsidy eligibility by completing the...-52722); Operating Fund Calculation of Operating Subsidy (HUD-52723); and Calculation of Subsidies for...

  13. A community-based hip-hop dance program for youth in a disadvantaged community in Ottawa: implementation findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulac, Julie; Olavarria, Marcela; Kristjansson, Elizabeth

    2010-05-01

    Participation in physical activity is important for the positive development and well-being of youth. A community- academic partnership was formed to improve access to physical activity for youth in one disadvantaged community in Ottawa, Canada. After consulting this community, a new hip-hop dance intervention was implemented. Adolescents aged 11 to 16 years participated in one of two 3-month sessions. A girls-only and a boys-and-girls format were offered both sessions. This article investigates the implementation of the intervention from the perspective of the youth participants, parents, staff, and researchers. Multiple methods were used, including document review, observation, questionnaire, focus groups, and interviews. Overall, the consistency and quality of program implementation were moderately satisfactory; however, important concerns were noted and this program appeared to be only partially delivered as planned. These findings will be discussed in terms of suggestions for improving the implementation of this intervention and similar recreation programs prioritizing disadvantaged communities.

  14. Employment funding under review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In February 1998, the Vietnam Women's Union (VWU) hosted a conference to review experience with the National Employment Program (NEP) that was instituted in 1993 to fund projects that create jobs. The 1.5 billion VND in funding distributed by the VWU that year has increased to 21 billion VND in 1997 and has supported 559 projects in 61 provinces and cities, creating 139,162 jobs. The 14 mountainous provinces have benefitted from 140 projects implemented with 4 billion VND in loans to ethnic minorities. In one case, a revolving loan fund of 100 million VND recovered most of the principle loaned as well as 54 million VND in interest. In another, investment of 70 million VND generated 48 million VND in income in a single year. The availability of the loans has allowed families to rise from chronic poverty as women have generated employment and income for their families. In order to expand, however, the program needs more funding and more cooperation from the State Treasury, and VWU members need training in order to be able to manage large projects.

  15. Smoking Prevention for Students: Findings From a Three-Year Program of Integrated Harm Minimization School Drug Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midford, Richard; Cahill, Helen; Lester, Leanne; Foxcroft, David R; Ramsden, Robyn; Venning, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of the Drug Education in Victorian Schools (DEVS) program on tobacco smoking. The program taught about licit and illicit drugs in an integrated manner over 2 years, with follow up in the third year. It focused on minimizing harm, rather than achieving abstinence, and employed participatory, critical-thinking and skill-based teaching methods. A cluster-randomized, controlled trial of the program was conducted with a student cohort during years 8 (13 years), 9 (14 years), and 10 (15 years). Twenty-one schools were randomly allocated to the DEVS program (14 schools, n = 1163), or their usual drug education program (7 schools, n = 589). One intervention school withdrew in year two. There was a greater increase in the intervention students' knowledge about drugs, including tobacco, in all 3 years. Intervention students talked more with their parents about smoking at the end of the 3-year program. They recalled receiving more education on smoking in all 3 years. Their consumption of cigarettes had not increased to the same extent as controls at the end of the program. Their change in smoking harms, relative to controls, was positive in all 3 years. There was no difference between groups in the proportionate increase of smokers, or in attitudes towards smoking, at any time. These findings indicate that a school program that teaches about all drugs in an integrated fashion, and focuses on minimizing harm, does not increase initiation into smoking, while providing strategies for reducing consumption and harm to those who choose to smoke.

  16. Collaborative funding to facilitate airport ground access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    This report presents the findings and conclusions from a research study that has examined the challenges of funding airport ground access projects and the role of collaborative funding strategies between the different agencies that typically become i...

  17. Economies of scale in federally-funded state-organized public health programs: results from the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trogdon, Justin G; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Subramanian, Sujha; Crouse, Wesley

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the existence of economies of scale in the provision of breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services by state National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) grantees. A translog cost function is estimated as a system with input factor share equations. The estimated cost function is then used to determine output levels for which average costs are decreasing (i.e., economies of scale exist). Data were collected from all state NBCCEDP programs and District of Columbia for program years 2006-2007, 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 (N = 147). Costs included all programmatic and in-kind contributions from federal and non-federal sources, allocated to breast and cervical cancer screening activities. Output was measured by women served, women screened and cancers detected, separately by breast and cervical services for each measure. Inputs included labor, rent and utilities, clinical services, and quasi-fixed factors (e.g., percent of women eligible for screening by the NBCCEDP). 144 out of 147 program-years demonstrated significant economies of scale for women served and women screened; 136 out of 145 program-years displayed significant economies of scale for cancers detected. The cost data were self-reported by the NBCCEDP State programs. Quasi-fixed inputs were allowed to affect costs but not economies of scale or the share equations. The main analysis accounted for clustering of observations within State programs, but it did not make full use of the panel data. The average cost of providing breast and cervical cancer screening services decreases as the number of women screened and served increases.

  18. [Nasopharyngeal Hib Carriage Among Healthy Children Attending Daycare Centers in Yokohama After One Year of a Publicly Funded Vaccine Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ayako; Sumita, Hiroko; Minohara, Yutaka; Fujita, Shinji; Yazaki, Shigeyoshi; Kitamura, Miyoshi; Kawai, Shigehiko; Kamata, Kazumi; Oota, Yoshimi; Yamada, Mikiko; Matsumoto, Yuko; Takeyasu, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    Yokohama city started a regular, free vaccine program for Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) from February of 2011. This study was completed to verify the effectiveness of the vaccine on the nasopharyngeal Hib carriage among healthy children attending daycare centers in the Isogo area. The research was conducted during the late spring (Jun--Jul) and fall (Oct-Nov) of 2012. There was a significant decrease in the Hib carriage rate (spring 8.8%, fall 1.6%). During this period there was no increase in the Hib vaccine coverage. The Hib carriage rate of each daycare center was 0-18.4% in spring and 0-4.9% in fall. There was no significant relationship between the rate of non immunized children and that of Hib carriage. This improvement in nasopharyngeal Hib carriage shows the impact of community immunity.

  19. Effective Bug Finding in C Programs with Shape and Effect Abstractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abal, Iago; Brabrand, Claus; Wasowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Software projects tend to suffer from conceptually simple resource manipulation bugs, such as accessing a de-allocated memory region, or acquiring a non-reentrant lock twice. Static code scanners are used extensively to remove these bugs from projects like the Linux kernel. Yet, when the manipula......Software projects tend to suffer from conceptually simple resource manipulation bugs, such as accessing a de-allocated memory region, or acquiring a non-reentrant lock twice. Static code scanners are used extensively to remove these bugs from projects like the Linux kernel. Yet, when...... the Linux kernel. Our results show that our tool is more effective at finding bugs than similar code-scanning tools. EBA analyzes the drivers/ directory of Linux (nine thousand files) in less than thirty minutes, and uncovers a handful previously unknown double-lock bugs in various drivers....

  20. Human Rights and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria: How Does a Large Funder of Basic Health Services Meet the Challenge of Rights-Based Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Ralf; Csete, Joanne; Lim, Hyeyoung; Timberlake, Susan; Smith, Matthew

    2017-12-01

    The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria was created to greatly expand access to basic services to address the three diseases in its name. From its beginnings, its governance embodied some human rights principles: civil society is represented on its board, and the country coordination mechanisms that oversee funding requests to the Global Fund include representatives of people affected by the diseases. The Global Fund's core strategies recognize that the health services it supports would not be effective or cost-effective without efforts to reduce human rights-related barriers to access and utilization of health services, particularly those faced by socially marginalized and criminalized persons. Basic human rights elements were written into Global Fund grant agreements, and various technical support measures encouraged the inclusion in funding requests of programs to reduce human rights-related barriers. A five-year initiative to provide intensive technical and financial support for the scaling up of programs to reduce these barriers in 20 countries is ongoing.

  1. Farmers' Market Utilization among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Recipients in New Orleans, Louisiana: Preliminary Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Henry; Skizim, Meg; Afaneh, Hasheemah; Miele, Lucio; Sothern, Melinda

    2017-01-01

    Farmers' markets are increasingly being promoted as a means to provide fresh produce to poor and underserved communities. However, farmers' market (FM) use remains low among low-income patrons. The purpose of our study was to examine FM awareness and use, grocery shopping behaviors, and internet use among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients. A descriptive analysis of preliminary data was performed to evaluate quantitative baseline data among SNAP recipients between June and August 2016 in New Orleans, Louisiana (N=51). Data were collected via a 42-item online survey that included demographics, internet use, FM awareness and use, health information seeking behaviors and fruit and vegetable purchasing behaviors. Less than half of the survey respondents (n=24) had ever been to a FM. Local grocery stores and Wal-Mart were most used for purchasing fruits and vegetables (88% and 84%, respectively). The most common sources of healthy eating information were Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and the internet, frequently accessed via smartphones. More than 80% of participants were not aware that local FMs accepted electronic benefit transfer payments as a form of payment. These results support the incorporation of promotional methodology that combines internet-based mobile technology and existing services (eg, WIC) as a viable strategy to improve farmers' market use among low-income populations. As most participants were not aware that participating FMs accept electronic benefit transfer payments, this fact should be emphasized in promotional material.

  2. Comparison of NPDES program findings for selected cities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Kenneth D.; McDoniel, Dawn S.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, under section 402 (p) of the Water Quality Act of 1987, has required municipalities with populations of more than 100,000 to obtain National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for urban stormwater discharge. This regulation is intended to minimize pollutant loadings from urbanized areas and preserve the quality of streams that receive stormwater. To apply for a NPDES permit, a municipality must monitor the chemistry of stormwater from basins having residential, commercial, and industrial land uses, and estimate storm- and annual pollutant loads and event-mean concentrations of 12 selected properties and constituents. The properties and constituents include biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), suspended solids, dissolved solids, total nitrogen, total ammonia plus organic nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved phosphorus, total recoverable cadmium, total recoverable copper, total recoverable lead, and total recoverable zinc. These estimates will be used by the municipalities to evaluate the magnitude of pollutant loadings and the ef ficiency of management strategies that are intended to reduce pollutant loads. As part of a national synthesis of the study units in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) NPDES program, data were compiled on concentrations of the 12 properties and constituents required for load calculations. This report presents a comparison of these data.

  3. Health in All Social Work Programs: Findings From a US National Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachman, Madeline K.; Marshall, Jamie W.; Backman, Allison R.; Harrington, Calla B.; Schultz, Neena S.; Ouimet, Kaitlyn J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To establish a baseline of health content in 4 domains of US social work education—baccalaureate, master’s, doctoral, and continuing education programs—and to introduce the Social Work Health Impact Model, illustrating social work’s multifaceted health services, from clinical to wide-lens population health approaches. Methods. We analyzed US social work programs’ Web site content to determine amount and types of health content in mission statements, courses, and specializations. Coding criterion determined if content was (1) health or health-related (HHR) and (2) had wide-lens health (WLH) emphasis. A second iteration categorized HHR and WLH courses into health topics. Results. We reviewed 4831 courses. We found broad HHR content in baccalaureate, master’s, and continuing education curricula; doctoral programs had limited health content. We identified minimal WLH content across all domains. Topical analysis indicated that more than 50% of courses concentrated on 3 areas: mental and behavioral health, abuse and violence, and substance use and addictions. Conclusions. As a core health profession, social work must strengthen its health and wide-lens content to better prepare graduates for integrated practice and collaboration in the changing health environment. PMID:29236538

  4. Mutual Fund Exit and Mutual Fund Fees

    OpenAIRE

    Philip C. English II; Ilhan Demiralp; William P. Dukes

    2011-01-01

    We examine the effect of mutual fund fee structure on mutual fund exit mode and timing. The evidence presented herein is consistent with fee maximization by mutual fund sponsors or managers, increased conflicts of interest for funds charging 12b-1 fees and higher management fees, and a pecking order for mutual fund exit method. Specifically, mutual fund exits that result in decreased fee income are delayed relative to exits that do not and exit strategies that retain fee income are more likel...

  5. PENSION FUND

    CERN Multimedia

    Administration of the Fund

    2001-01-01

    The Administration of the Fund has just signed a contract with the 'La Suisse' insurance company, making life insurance available to persons leaving CERN under very similar conditions to those offered to the members of the CERN personnel. From now on, persons retiring from the Organization will be able to take out this new insurance at the moment of retirement, provided that they have been members of CERN's collective life insurance scheme for the last five years of service. Exceptionally, until the end of 2001, 'La Suisse' has agreed to allow persons who are already retired to take out this insurance, provided that they are less than 70 years old and subject to their state of health (health questionnaire to be completed) and with a maximum insured amount set at 150,000 CHF. We therefore invite any retired persons interested in this insurance to consult the detailed terms and conditions, either on the Pension Fund's Web site (http://pensions.web.cern.ch/pensions) or contacting to the Administration of the Fun...

  6. a History of Funding for WOMEN’S Programs at the National Science Foundation: from Individual Powre Approaches to the Advance of Institutional Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Sue V.; Lane, Eliesh O'neil

    The biennial reports on women, minorities, and persons with disabilities produced by the National Science Foundation (NSF) because of congressional mandate laid the statistical foundation for NSF initiatives to redress the underrepresentation of these groups. Programs established in the 1980s such as Research Opportunities for Women, Visiting Professorships for Women, Graduate Fellowships for Women, and Career Advancement Awards provided support to individual women for their research. In the 1990s, the NSF also began to focus on systemic initiatives, creating the Program for Women and Girls, although it continued to address the problem through support of individual researchers in the newly created Professional Opportunities for Women in Research and Education (POWRE) initiative. The responses from more than 400 awardees during the 4 years of POWRE provide insights into the current issues these women perceive surrounding their grants, funding, and interactions with NSF bureaucracy and staff members. The results of the POWRE survey support the institutional, systemic thrust of the NSF’s new ADVANCE initiative to attempt to solve problems such as balancing career and family that cannot be addressed solely by supporting research projects of individual female scientists and engineers.

  7. School Programs and Characteristics and Their Influence on Student BMI: Findings from Healthy Passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Tracy K.; Elliott, Marc N.; Franzini, Luisa; Kawachi, Ichiro; Caughy, Margaret O.; Gilliland, M. Janice; Walls, Courtney E.; Franklin, Frank A.; Lowry, Richard; Banspach, Stephen W.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the contribution of school contextual factors to individual student body mass index (BMI). We set out to determine if school characteristics/resources: (1) are associated with student BMI; (2) explain racial/ethnic disparities in student BMI; and (3) explain school-level differences in student BMI. Methods Using gender-stratified multi-level modeling strategies we examined the association of school characteristics/resources and individual BMI in 4,387 5th graders in the Healthy Passages Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Additionally, we examined the association of race/ethnicity and individual BMI as well as the between-school variance in BMI before and after adding individual and school characteristics to test for attenuation. Results The school-level median household income, but not physical activity or nutrition resources, was inversely associated with female BMI (β = −0.12, CI: −0.21,−0.02). Neither school demographics nor physical activity/nutrition resources were predictive of individual BMI in males. In Black females, school characteristics attenuated the association of race/ethnicity and BMI. Individual student characteristics—not school characteristics/resources-reduced the between-school variation in BMI in males by nearly one-third and eliminated it in females. Conclusions In this cohort of 5th graders, school SES was inversely associated with female BMI while school characteristics and resources largely explained Black/White disparities in female weight status. Between-school differences in average student weight status were largely explained by the composition of the student body not by school characteristics or programming. PMID:24454697

  8. Vitamin D status of refugees arriving in Canada: findings from the Calgary Refugee Health Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, Michael; Weaver, Rob; Thomas, Roger; Jones, Lanice

    2013-04-01

    To determine the 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) serum levels in refugee women of childbearing age and in refugee children; to compare their 25(OH)D levels with the recommended levels in order to determine the prevalence of deficiency; to compare their 25(OH)D levels with those in the general Canadian population in the appropriate age and sex groups; and to investigate the association of vitamin D deficiency with potential risk factors. Cross-sectional chart review. The Calgary Refugee Health Program, an urban family practice that serves newly arrived refugees in Calgary, Alta. A total of 1217 refugee women and children screened between June 2005 and January 2010. Serum 25(OH)D values that were measured during initial screening visits. Overall, 1217 of the 1768 eligible participants (69%) had 25(OH)D laboratory values recorded. The mean concentration of 25(OH)D was 52.0 nmol/L (95% CI 50.6 to 53.3 nmol/L). Using the Institute of Medicine guideline for adequate serum vitamin D levels (>50 nmol/L), 61% of women and 42% of children had lower-than-desirable 25(OH)D levels. Considering the Osteoporosis Canada guidelines, 88% of women and 81% of children had lower-than-desirable 25(OH)D levels (population (Prefugees between the ages of 12 and 19 years old had lower mean values of 25(OH)D than male refugees in the same age group did (P=.01). Most refugees had lower-than-desirable vitamin D levels. All age groups studied had lower mean 25(OH)D levels compared with the general Canadian population. Health care providers should be aware of this concern and consider vitamin D supplementation among refugees.

  9. School programs and characteristics and their influence on student BMI: findings from healthy passages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy K Richmond

    Full Text Available Little is known about the contribution of school contextual factors to individual student body mass index (BMI. We set out to determine if school characteristics/resources: (1 are associated with student BMI; (2 explain racial/ethnic disparities in student BMI; and (3 explain school-level differences in student BMI.Using gender-stratified multi-level modeling strategies we examined the association of school characteristics/resources and individual BMI in 4,387 5(th graders in the Healthy Passages Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Additionally, we examined the association of race/ethnicity and individual BMI as well as the between-school variance in BMI before and after adding individual and school characteristics to test for attenuation.The school-level median household income, but not physical activity or nutrition resources, was inversely associated with female BMI (β = -0.12, CI: -0.21,-0.02. Neither school demographics nor physical activity/nutrition resources were predictive of individual BMI in males. In Black females, school characteristics attenuated the association of race/ethnicity and BMI. Individual student characteristics-not school characteristics/resources-reduced the between-school variation in BMI in males by nearly one-third and eliminated it in females.In this cohort of 5(th graders, school SES was inversely associated with female BMI while school characteristics and resources largely explained Black/White disparities in female weight status. Between-school differences in average student weight status were largely explained by the composition of the student body not by school characteristics or programming.

  10. Workforce Training and Economic Development Fund: 2014 Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Workforce Training and Economic Development (WTED) Fund was established in 2003 as part of the Grow Iowa Values Fund and is currently funded through the Iowa Skilled Worker and Job Creation Fund. This fund has become an important source of financing for community college new program innovation, development, and capacity building, particularly…

  11. Decision Making in the Pension Fund Board Room : An Experiment with Dutch Pension Fund Trustees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, H.P.; Henkens, K.; Koedijk, C.G.; Slager, A.M.H.

    2010-01-01

    We ask how pension fund trustees deal with the booms and busts that funds encounter, and to what extent the decisions of pension fund trustees are affected by behavioral biases. We examine these issues by using a vignette-method field experiment among Dutch pension fund trustees. We find that

  12. Integration of Academic and Vocational Programs in Illinois Community Colleges. The Status of Integration Activities Funded through the Quality Assurance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    Quality Assurance Program (QAP) integration activities were studied at eight Illinois community and junior colleges. Data collection involved telephone interviews with career deans at the colleges, 11 follow-up site observations, and attendance at a regional vocational education system directors meeting. When classroom observations occurred,…

  13. Healthy Bread Initiative: Methods, Findings, and Theories—Isfahan Healthy Heart Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaei, Mohammad; Khaje, Mohammad-Reza; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Sajjadi, Firoozeh; Alikhasi, Hasan; Maghroun, Maryam; Iraji, Farhad; Ehteshami, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    The scientific evidences show that the content, baking methods, and types of bread can make health impacts. Bread, as a major part of Iranian diet, demonstrates a significant potential to be targeted as health promotion subject. Healthy Food for Healthy Communities (HFHC) was a project of Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP), consisting of a wide variety of strategies, like Healthy Bread (HB) Initiative. The HB Initiative was designed to improve the behaviour of both producers and consumers, mainly aiming at making high-fibre, low-salt bread, eliminating the use of baking soda, providing enough rest time for dough before baking (at least one hour), and enough baking time (at least one minute in oven). A workshop was held for volunteer bakers, and a baker-to-baker training protocol under direct supervision was designed for future volunteers. Cereal Organization was persuaded to provide less refined flour that contained more bran. Health messages in support of new breads were disseminated by media and at bakeries by health professionals. Evaluation of the HB Initiative was done using before-after assessments and population surveys. While HB was baked in 1 (0.01%) bakery at baseline, 402 (41%) bakeries in the intervention area joined the HB Initiative in 2009. Soda was completely eliminated and fibre significantly increased from 4±0.4 g% before study to 12±0.6 g% after the intervention (p<0.001). The preparation and baking times remarkably increased. Wastage of bread decreased from 13±1.8 g% to 2±0.5 g% and was expressed as the most important advantage of this initiative by consumers. People who lived in Isfahan city consumed whole bread 6 times more than those who lived in reference area Arak (p<0.001). The HB Initiative managed to add new breads as a healthy choice that were compatible with local dishes and made a model to solve the long-standing problems of bread. It used various health promotion approaches but was best consistent with Beattie's model. PMID

  14. LTRC Annual Research Program : Fiscal Year July 1, 2017 - June 30, 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    FHWA Part II SPR Research Program FAP Number SPR-0010(34) & FHWA Funded Research Program & FHWA LTAP Funded Program & FHWA STP Funded Program & Federal & Self-Generated Funded Research Program & Other DOTD Funded Projects

  15. 40 CFR 35.117 - Unused funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Unused funds. 35.117 Section 35.117 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants Post-Award Requirements § 35.117 Unused funds. If funds for an...

  16. Program Innovations and Character in Cub Scouts: Findings from Year 1 of a Mixed-Methods, Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacey J. Hilliard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Youth development programs seek to promote positive development through mentoring and engaging youth in opportunities for individual growth and community connectedness. We present findings from the initial phase of a mixed-methods, longitudinal study aimed at assessing the impact of one such program, Cub Scouts, on character development. We assessed if Scouting, and a recent innovation in Scouting focused on program quality, are associated with the development of character and other positive youth outcomes. Participants were 1,083 Scouts and non-Scouts, aged 5-12 years. At the start of the study, there was no difference in indicators of character between Scouts and non-Scouts, once matched through propensity score analyses. Through content analyses of interviews and short- answer questionnaires administered to leaders, we found that leaders’ views of character and of their roles corresponded to those envisioned by Cub Scouts. Implications for character development, and for the role of program components in character development, are discussed.

  17. Educational Technology. Hearing of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session, on Examining Legislation Authorizing Funds for the Elementary Secondary Education Act, Focusing on Education Technology Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.

    This hearing before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions on examining legislation authorizing funds for the Elementary Secondary Education Act, focusing on educational technology programs, contains statements by: James M Jeffords, Chairman, Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions; Barbara Means, Assistant…

  18. Initial Findings from a Novel School-Based Program, EMPATHY, Which May Help Reduce Depression and Suicidality in Youth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Silverstone

    Full Text Available We describe initial pilot findings from a novel school-based approach to reduce youth depression and suicidality, the Empowering a Multimodal Pathway Towards Healthy Youth (EMPATHY program. Here we present the findings from the pilot cohort of 3,244 youth aged 11-18 (Grades 6-12. They were screened for depression, suicidality, anxiety, use of drugs, alcohol, or tobacco (DAT, quality-of-life, and self-esteem. Additionally, all students in Grades 7 and 8 (mean ages 12.3 and 13.3 respectively also received an 8-session cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT based program designed to increase resiliency to depression. Following screening there were rapid interventions for the 125 students (3.9% who were identified as being actively suicidal, as well as for another 378 students (11.7% who were felt to be at higher-risk of self-harm based on a combination of scores from all the scales. The intervention consisted of an interview with the student and their family followed by offering a guided internet-based CBT program. Results from the 2,790 students who completed scales at both baseline and 12-week follow-up showed significant decreases in depression and suicidality. Importantly, there was a marked decrease in the number of students who were actively suicidal (from n=125 at baseline to n=30 at 12-weeks. Of the 503 students offered the CBT program 163 (32% took part, and this group had significantly lower depression scores compared to those who didn't take part. There were no improvements in self-esteem, quality-of-life, or the number of students using DAT. Only 60 students (2% of total screened required external referral during the 24-weeks following study initiation. These results suggest that a multimodal school-based program may provide an effective and pragmatic approach to help reduce youth depression and suicidality. Further research is required to determine longer-term efficacy, reproducibility, and key program elements.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  19. Good Stewards, Cheap Talkers, or Family Men? The Impact of Mutual Fund Closures on Fund Managers, Flows, Fees, and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Arturo Bris; Huseyin Gulen; Padmaja Kadiyala; Raghavendra Rau

    2005-01-01

    We examine a sample of 125 equity mutual funds that closed to new investment between 1993 and 2004. We find that funds close following a period of superior performance and abnormal fund inflows. Fund managers raise their fees when they close to compensate managers for losses in income due to the restrictions in size imposed by the fund closure decision. Managers reopen when fund size declines. However, they do not earn superior returns after re-opening, suggesting that the fund closure decisi...

  20. How Do School-Based Prevention Programs Impact Teachers? Findings from a Randomized Trial of an Integrated Classroom Management and Social-Emotional Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrovich, Celene E; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Berg, Juliette K; Pas, Elise T; Becker, Kimberly D; Musci, Rashelle; Embry, Dennis D; Ialongo, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    A number of classroom-based interventions have been developed to improve social and behavioral outcomes for students, yet few studies have examined how these programs impact the teachers who are implementing them. Impacts on teachers may affect students and therefore also serve as an important proximal outcome to examine. The current study draws upon data from a school-based randomized controlled trial testing the impact of two prevention programs. In one intervention condition, teachers were trained in the classroom behavior management program, PAX Good Behavior Game (PAX GBG). In a second intervention condition, teachers were trained to use an integrated program, referred to as PATHS to PAX, of the PAX GBG and a social and emotional learning curriculum called Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS©). This study aimed to determine whether both interventions positively impacted teachers, with a particular interest in the teachers' own beliefs and perceptions regarding self-efficacy, burnout, and social-emotional competence. The sample included 350 K-5 teachers across 27 schools (18 schools randomized to intervention, 9 to control). Multilevel latent growth curve analyses indicated that the PATHS to PAX condition generally demonstrated the most benefits to teachers, relative to both the control and PAX GBG conditions. These findings suggest that school-based preventive interventions can have a positive impact on teachers' beliefs and perceptions, particularly when the program includes a social-emotional component. Several possible mechanisms might account for the added benefit to teachers. Additional research is needed to better understand how these programs impact teachers, as well as students.

  1. Pension fund

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Letter sent on Monday 8 December 2014 to the delegates of the Member States to CERN Council An item on the agenda of the CERN Council of Thursday 11 December concerned the CERN Pension Fund, namely a discussion of a document that proposes how to respond to the many questions concerning pensions that had been submitted by thirteen Member State delegations. That document lists all these questions and proposes, as a first step, to consider the legal feasibility and the actuarial cost to transform our current defined-benefit pension scheme into a defined-contribution scheme. Once again, several delegates show their determination to worsen our pension conditions. The Staff Association’s Pension Commission, in a special meeting on Thursday, 4 December, has decided to send an open letter to the delegates of the CERN Council. In this letter (shown below) the Staff Association and CERN-ESO Pensions’ Association express their opposition to these intentions. We underline, once more, that the 2010...

  2. Comparison of Dijkstra's algorithm and dynamic programming method in finding shortest path for order picker in a warehouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Noraimi Azlin Mohd; Omar, Mohd; Sharif, S. Sarifah Radiah

    2017-04-01

    Companies are looking forward to improve their productivity within their warehouse operations and distribution centres. In a typical warehouse operation, order picking contributes more than half percentage of the operating costs. Order picking is a benchmark in measuring the performance and productivity improvement of any warehouse management. Solving order picking problem is crucial in reducing response time and waiting time of a customer in receiving his demands. To reduce the response time, proper routing for picking orders is vital. Moreover, in production line, it is vital to always make sure the supplies arrive on time. Hence, a sample routing network will be applied on EP Manufacturing Berhad (EPMB) as a case study. The Dijkstra's algorithm and Dynamic Programming method are applied to find the shortest distance for an order picker in order picking. The results show that the Dynamic programming method is a simple yet competent approach in finding the shortest distance to pick an order that is applicable in a warehouse within a short time period.

  3. Unforeseen consequences: Medicaid and the funding of nonprofit service organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Scott W; Smith, Steven Rathgeb

    2014-12-01

    Medicaid reimbursements have become a key source of funding for nonprofit social service organizations operating outside the medical care sector, as well as an important tool for states seeking resources to fund social service programs within a devolving safety net. Drawing on unique survey data of more than one thousand nonprofit social service agencies in seven urban and rural communities, this article examines Medicaid funding of nonprofit social service organizations that target programs at working-age, nondisabled adults. We find that about one-quarter of nonprofit service organizations--mostly providers offering substance abuse and mental health treatment in conjunction with other services--report receiving Medicaid reimbursements, although very few are overly reliant on these funds. We also find Medicaid-funded social service nonprofits to be less accessible to residents of high-poverty neighborhoods or areas with concentrations of black or Hispanic residents than to residents of more affluent and white communities. We should expect that the role of Medicaid within the nonprofit social service sector will shift in the next few years, however, as states grapple with persistent budgetary pressures, rising Medicaid costs, and decisions to participate in the Medicaid expansion provisions contained within the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Copyright © 2014 by Duke University Press.

  4. Funding | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC funds projects that aim to bring employment, food security, health, peace, and prosperity to developing regions of the world. We offer grants, funding, and awards to researchers and institutions to find solutions for global development challenges. Current opportunities All open calls for funding are found below, under ...

  5. Multicriteria approaches for a private equity fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammer, Christiane; Tannert, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    We develop a new model for a Private Equity Fund based on stochastic differential equations. In order to find efficient strategies for the fund manager we formulate a multicriteria optimization problem for a Private Equity Fund. Using the e-constraint method we solve this multicriteria optimization problem. Furthermore, a genetic algorithm is applied in order to get an approximation of the efficient frontier.

  6. Kryolize - KT Fund Project

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Safety standards and best practices do exist in the field of cryogenics but, as in most domains, they are generally inserted in a few ‘envelope’ cases commonly used in the industry, whereas applicability to the particularity of research facilities are not fully tailored to its needs. The main objective in these cases is to find a harmonised approach, based on lessons learnt and scientific knowledge. The Kryolize Project was created in order to produce tools with a harmonized approach to size pressure relief devices for cryogenic applications. In view of disseminating such tools to other institutes and industrial partners, the project was submitted to CERN’s KT Fund committee. This talk will focus on the process and deliverables of the KT-Funded Kryolize project, including the method on how to cope with the sizing of pressure relief devices and the R&D collaboration agreement between CERN and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology for an experimental programme.

  7. Subjective Outcome Evaluation Findings: Factors Related to the Perceived Effectiveness of the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T.L. Shek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available After completion of the Tier 2 Program of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes, 8,489 participants in 196 schools responded to the Subjective Outcome Evaluation Form (Form C to assess their views of the program, program workers, and perceived effectiveness of the program. Four major program elements were identified, including programs based on the adventure-based counseling approach (n = 48, programs concentrated on volunteer training and services (n = 44, programs with both the adventure-based counseling approach and volunteer training activities (n = 63, and other programs with different foci (n = 41. Descriptive statistics showed that the respondents had positive perceptions of the program, workers, and benefits of the program. Perceived qualities of the program and the program workers were positively associated with perceived effectiveness of the program. Multiple regression analysis revealed that perceived qualities of the program, but not the program workers, predicted perceived effectiveness of the program. The theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  8. [The Management of Depression in Older Adults and Their Family Caregivers: Findings from a Research Program in Quebec].

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Jane; Yaffe, Mark; Sussman, Tamara; Cole, Martin; Sewitch, Maida; Strumpf, Erin; Freeman, Ellen; Lambert, Sylvie; de Raad, Manon

    Objectives A research group based at St. Mary's Research Centre, St. Mary's Hospital, Montreal, has conducted a research program over the past two decades that aims to inform improvements in the management of depression in primary care and general medical settings, among older adults. This paper reviews the findings from this research program, discusses the findings in the context of other research, and highlights the implications for practice and health policy.Methods Narrative review and synthesis of 25 published articles, that included: 4 systematic reviews, 10 observational studies, 9 intervention trials, and 2 consensus conference reports.Results The results pertain to 4 research areas: detection of depression in primary care and general medical settings; collaborative care of depression; depression self-care interventions; and the role of family and friends in supporting depression self-care interventions.Conclusions We propose six recommendations for improving the management of depression in the target population. 1) Depression detection and treatment can be improved through collaborative care models that involve primary care physicians, mental health specialists and non-physician mental health workers who are trained to assist with the detection of depression, with the delivery of brief, low-intensity psychological interventions and with self-care support. More research and evaluation are necessary to determine the factors that enhance the effectiveness, cost-efficiency, and consumer-centeredness of these interventions. 2) Supported depression self-care (and other low-intensity interventions such as short problem-solving therapy) offered by telephone or via internet, either as part of collaborative or usual care are feasible treatment options but more research is necessary to determine their effectiveness in different clinical populations. Some populations (e.g., those aged 75 and over, with visual and/or mild cognitive impairment) are likely to need

  9. 2014 Wind Program Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-10-01

    The Wind Program Peer Review Meeting was held March 24-28, 2014 in Arlington, VA. Principle investigators from the Energy Department, National Laboratories, academic, and industry representatives presented the progress of their DOE-funded research. This report documents the formal, rigorous evaluation process and findings of nine independent reviewers who examined the technical, scientific, and business results of Wind Program funded projects, as well as the productivity and management effectiveness of the Wind Program itself.

  10. The U.N. Population Fund: Background and the U.S. Funding Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-24

    Order Code RL32703 The U.N. Population Fund: Background and the U.S. Funding Debate Updated July 24, 2008 Luisa Blanchfield Analyst in International...The U.N. Population Fund: Background and the U.S. Funding Debate 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 The U.N. Population Fund: Background and the U.S. Funding Debate Summary

  11. Evaluation of a funded FY00 ITS integration component of the ITS deployment program "Traveler Information Integration Project" within the East Bay SMART Corridors project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-07

    The project originally was granted funding from the earmark in an application dated June 1, 2000. A revised application received approval on May 19, 2003 to reflect a different proposed implementation of the project, while still achieving the project...

  12. Independent Auditors Report on the FY 2015 DoD Detailed Accounting Report for the Funds Obligated for National Drug Control Program Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-29

    No. DODIG-2016-041 J A N U A R Y 2 9 , 2 0 1 6 Independent Auditor’s Report on the FY 2015 DoD Detailed Accounting Report for the Funds...Defense that supports the warfighter; promotes accountability , integrity, and efficiency; advises the Secretary of Defense and Congress; and informs...THE ARMY SUBJECT: Independent Auditor’s Report on the FY 2015 DoD Detailed Accounting Report for the Funds Obligated for National Drug Control

  13. Mutual Fund Flight-to-Liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rzeznik, Aleksandra

    of their portfolio towards more liquid assets in order to meet potential redemptions. This causal chain is consistent with Vayanos (2004), who argues that fund managers are investors with time-varying liquidity preferences due to threat of withdrawal. Aggregated over funds, the effect is substantial: a one standard......This paper examines the liquidity choices of mutual funds during times of market uncertainty. I find that when markets are uncertain, mutual funds actively increase the liquidity of their portfolio { often referred to as a `flight-to-liquidity.' In aggregate, mutual fund behaviour has implications...... for the market; the market driven flight-toliquidity places upward pressure on the liquidity premium. I examine the underlying mechanisms driving fund behaviour. I show that market volatility is associated with lower fund performance and withdrawals, which causes funds to adjust the composition...

  14. Funding bill sets $105m increase for AIDS care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, F

    1996-01-01

    The passage of the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 1996 (H.R. 3019) funds numerous AIDS programs whose fiscal year 1996 funding was caught in limbo during 6 months of budget debates between the Republican congressional leadership and the Clinton administration. AIDS care programs received a significant funding increase, the AIDS Education & Training Centers (AETC) program has been reestablished, and a provision mandating the discharge from active duty of HIV-positive troops was repealed. There was a $105.5 million funding increase for the Ryan White CARE program. However, for the second consecutive fiscal year, Congress has not increased funding for the Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) program.

  15. 45 CFR 235.66 - Sources of State funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sources of State funds. 235.66 Section 235.66...), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION OF FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 235.66 Sources of State funds. (a) Public funds. Public funds may be considered as the...

  16. Endoscopic findings in a mass screening program for gastric cancer in a high risk region - Guilan province of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Sokhanvar, Homayoon; Joukar, Farahnaz; Shafaghi, Afshin; Yousefi-Mashhour, Mahmud; Valeshabad, Ali Kord; Fakhrieh, Saba; Aminian, Keyvan; Ghorbani, Kambiz; Taherzadeh, Zahra; Sheykhian, Mohammad Reza; Rajpout, Yaghoub; Mehrvarz, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in both sexes in Iran. This study was designed to assess upper GI endoscopic findings among people>50 years targeted in a mass screening program in a hot-point region. Based on the pilot results in Guilan Cancer Registry study(GCRS), one of the high point regions for GC - Lashtenesha - was selected. The target population was called mainly using two methods: in rural regions, by house-house direct referral and in urban areas using public media. Upper GI endoscopy was performed by trained endoscopists. All participants underwent biopsies for rapid urea test (RUT) from the antrum and also further biopsies from five defined points of stomach for detection of precancerous lesions. In cases of visible gross lesions, more diagnostic biopsies were taken and submitted for histopathologic evaluation. Of 1,394 initial participants, finally 1,382 persons (702 women, 680 men) with a mean age of 61.7 ± 9.0 years (range:50-87 years) underwent upper GI endoscopy. H.pylori infection based on the RUT was positive in 66.6%. Gastric adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus were detected in seven (0.5%) and one(0.07%) persons, respectively. A remarkable proportion of studied participants were found to have esophageal hiatal hernia(38.4%). Asymptomatic gastric masses found in 1.1% (15) of cases which were mostly located in antrum (33.3%), cardia (20.0%) and prepyloric area (20.0%). Gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 5.9% (82) and 6.9% (96) of the screened population. Upper endoscopy screening is an effective technique for early detection of GC especially in high risk populations. Further studies are required to evaluate cost effectiveness, cost benefit and mortality and morbidity of this method among high and moderate risk population before recommending this method for GC surveillance program at the national level.

  17. Danish mutual fund performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article provides the first independent performance analysis of Danish mutual funds. We analyse selectivity and market timing abilities for 71 mutual funds that have been in operation from 2001 to 2010. The results show great fund performance diversity. Half the funds have performed neutrally...

  18. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Projects for 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2017-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) technologies into NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) projects. Other Government and commercial project managers interested in ARMD funding opportunities through NASA's SBIR program will find this report useful as well.

  19. 76 FR 59718 - Announcement of Funding Awards Capital Fund Education and Training Community Facilities (CFCF...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards Capital Fund Education and Training Community Facilities (CFCF) Program Fiscal Year 2010 AGENCY: Office of Public and Indian Housing, HUD. ACTION... INFORMATION: The CFCF program provides grants to Public Housing Agencies (PHAs) to develop facilities to...

  20. Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems, and Environmental Management Science Program research award abstracts. Volume 2 of 3 -- Appendix B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation`s nuclear complex. Appendix B provides details about each of the 202 research awards funded by the EMSP. This information may prove useful to researchers who are attempting to address the Department`s environmental management challenges in their work, program managers who are planning, integrating, and prioritizing Environmental Management projects, and stakeholders and regulators who are interested in the Department`s environmental challenges. The research award information is organized by the state and institution in which the lead principal investigator is located. In many cases, the lead principal investigator is one of several investigators at a number of different institutions. In these cases, the lead investigator (major collaborator) at each of the additional institutions is listed. Each research award abstract is followed by a list of high cost projects that can potentially be impacted by the research results. High cost projects are Environmental Management projects that have total costs greater than $50 million from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and have costs or quantities of material associated with an Environmental Management problem area. High cost projects which must remain active in the year 2007 and beyond to manage high risk are also identified. Descriptions of these potentially related high cost Environmental Management projects can be found in Appendix C. Additional projects in the same problem area as a research award can be located using the Index of High Cost Environmental Management Projects by Problem Area, at the end of Appendices B and C.

  1. Integrating Equity in a Public Health Funding Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Kristy T; Rice, Ketra; Li, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Equity can be valuable to guide decision makers about where to target funds; however, there are few studies for modeling vertical equity in public health program funding strategies. This case study modeled vertical equity in the funding strategy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Colorectal Cancer Control Program. To integrate vertical equity by using historical funding and health data, we (a) examined the need for colorectal cancer screening, (b) conducted multiple regressions to examine the relationship between factors of need and funding of states, (c) stratified states into similar need groups, (d) estimated vertical equity within groups, and (e) assessed equity in the funding distribution. Certain states with similar needs had high relative funding, whereas other states with similar needs had low relative funding. The methods used to integrate vertical equity in this case study could be applied in publicly funded programs to potentially minimize inequities and improve outcomes.

  2. A pilot training program for people in recovery of mental illness as vocational peer support workers in Hong Kong - Job Buddies Training Program (JBTP): A preliminary finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Kevin Kei Nang; Lo, William Tak Lam; Chiu, Rose Lai Ping; Lau, Bien Shuk Yin; Lau, Charles Ka Shing; Wu, Jen Kei Yu; Wan, Siu Man

    2016-10-24

    The present study reviews the delivery of a pilot curriculum-mentorship-based peer vocational support workers training in a Hong Kong public psychiatric hospital. The present paper reports (1) on the development of a peer vocational support workers training - Job Buddies Training Program (JBTP) in Hong Kong; and (2) preliminary findings from both quantitative and qualitative perspectives. The curriculum consists of 15-session coursework, 8-session storytelling workshop and 50-hour practicum to provide Supported Employment Peer Service (SEPS) under the mentorship of occupational therapists. Six trainees were assessed using three psychosocial assessments and qualitative methods. Compared to the baseline, the Job Buddies (JB) trainees showed an increase in awareness of their own recovery progress, occupational competence and problem-solving skills at the end of the training. Their perceived level of self-stigma was also lessened. In post-training evaluation, all Job Buddies trainees said they perceived positive personal growth and discovered their own strengths. They also appreciated the help from their mentors and gained mutual support from other trainees and from exposure with various mini-projects in the training. This pilot study provides an example of incorporating peer support and manualized training into existing work rehabilitation service for our JB trainees. Further studies on the effectiveness of service provided by peer support workers and for development on the potential use of peer support workers in other clinical and rehabilitation settings with larger subjects will be fruitful. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. State Pre-K Funding for 2015-16 Fiscal Year: National Trends in State Preschool Funding. 50-State Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Emily; Atchison, Bruce; Workman, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This report highlights significant investments made by both Republican and Democratic policymakers in state-funded pre-k programs for the fourth year in a row. In the 2015-16 budget year, 32 states and the District of Columbia raised funding levels of pre-k programs. This increased support for preschool funding came from both sides of the…

  4. An Evaluation of Manpower Training Needs in the Hotel-Restaurant Industry on Kauai, 1968, with Recommendations on Programs, Sources of Students, Instructors, and Funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Robert W.

    This report, requested and funded by a committee of community leaders, investigates the recruiting, training and employment of cooks, waitresses, maids, and small business managers needed on the island of Kauai through the year 1973. Projected increases in tourism and hotel construction indicate substantial need for well trained personnel. Courses…

  5. Independent Auditors Report on the FY 2015 DoD Performance Summary Report of the Funds Obligated for National Drug Control Program Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-29

    Defense that supports the warfighter; promotes accountability , integrity, and efficiency; advises the Secretary of Defense and Congress; and informs...Activities (Report No. DODIG-2016-042) The Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) Circular, “ Accounting of Drug Control Funding and...of Certified Public Accountants and in compliance with generally accepted government auditing standards. Those standards required that we plan and

  6. The Influence of Neighborhood Poverty on Blood Glucose Levels: Findings from the Community Initiative to Eliminate Stroke (CITIES program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Cathorall

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:  To examine the relationship between both individual and neighborhood level characteristics and non-fasting blood glucose levels.Study design: This study used a cross sectional design using data from the Community Initiative to Eliminate Stroke Program in NC (2004-2008.  A total of 12,809 adults nested within 550 census block groups from two adjacent urban counties were included in the analysis.Methods:   Participants completed a cardiovascular risk factor assessment with self-reported demographics, stroke-risk behaviors, and biometric measurements.  Neighborhood level characteristics were based upon census data.  Three multilevel models were constructed for data analysis.Results:  Mean blood glucose level of this sample population was 103.61mg/dL.  The unconditional model 1 suggested a variation in mean blood glucose levels among the neighborhoods (τ00 = 13.39; P < .001.  Both models 2 and 3 suggested that the neighborhood composite deprivation index had a significant prediction on each neighborhood’s mean blood glucose level (¡01= .69; P < 0.001,¡01= .36; P = .004.  Model 3 also suggested that across all the neighborhoods, on average, after controlling for individual level risk factors, deprivation remained a significant predictor of blood glucose levels.Conclusions:  The findings provide evidence that neighborhood disadvantage is a significant predictor of neighborhood and individual level blood glucose levels.  One approach to diabetes prevention could be for policymakers to address the problems associated with environmental determinants of health.

  7. 76 FR 32073 - Investing in Innovation Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ... CFR Chapter II Investing in Innovation Fund AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department...: The Assistant Deputy Secretary for Innovation and Improvement amends the final priorities, requirements, and selection criteria under the Investing in Innovation Fund (i3) program as established in the...

  8. Differentiating indexation in Dutch pension funds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beetsma, R.M.W.J.; Bucciol, A.

    2011-01-01

    Funded social security programs are particularly vulnerable to economic and financial market shocks. As a consequence of the recent crisis, a large fraction of the Dutch pension funds had to submit restoration plans for the recovery of their buffers. Such plans will have to rely primarily on a mix

  9. Unauthorized Immigrants Prolong the Life of Medicare's Trust Fund

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zallman, Leah; Wilson, Fernando A; Stimpson, James P; Bearse, Adriana; Arsenault, Lisa; Dube, Blessing; Himmelstein, David; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2016-01-01

    Unauthorized immigrants seldom have access to public health insurance programs such as Medicare Part A, which pays hospitals and other health facilities and is funded through the Medicare Trust Fund...

  10. 29 CFR 95.28 - Period of availability of funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., ORGANIZATIONS UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS, AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Financial and Program Management § 95.28 Period of availability of funds. (a) Where a funding...

  11. Indexing Pension Funds with Exchange-Traded Funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alcina Rodrigues Batista Sanfins

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the use of Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs for indexing the portfolios of pension funds in Brazil. A methodology is proposed to allow the portfolio managers to combine ETFs and the assets composing its benchmark. The methodology is based on a mathematical programming model, with the resulting problem solved by any global optimization algorithm. The results obtained for two ETFs – BOVA11 (indexed to the Ibovespa and BRAX11 (indexed to the IBrX-100 – are presented for illustrative purposes. All constraints imposed by the Brazilian regulatory environment have been incorporated in the studies presented. The methodology proved to be an interesting alternative to pension fund managers, with good results with respect to the control of tracking errors.

  12. Crowdfunding : Determinants of success and funding dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Crosetto, Paolo; Regner, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Over the past years crowdfunding emerged as an alternative funding channel for entrepreneurs. In contrast to traditional financiers (banks, venture capital firms or angel investors), crowdfunding allows individuals to fund entrepreneurs directly even with small amounts. We received individual- level data from Startnext, the biggest crowdfunding platform in Germany, enabling us to investigate funding dynamics, explore pledgers' motivations and analyze projects' success determinants. We find su...

  13. Physician Engagement Strategies in Care Coordination: Findings from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Health Care Innovation Awards Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Megan; Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Singer, Rachel Friedman; Ruiz, Sarah; Rotondo, Christina; Ahn, Roy; Snyder, Lynne Page; Colligan, Erin M; Giuriceo, Katherine; Moiduddin, Adil

    2017-02-01

    To identify roles physicians assumed as part of new health care delivery models and related strategies that facilitated physician engagement across 21 Health Care Innovation Award (HCIA) programs. Site-level in-depth interviews, conducted from 2014 to 2015 (N = 672) with program staff, leadership, and partners (including 95 physicians) and direct observations. NORC conducted a mixed-method evaluation, including two rounds of qualitative data collected via site visits and telephone interviews. We used qualitative thematic coding for data from 21 programs actively engaging physicians as part of HCIA interventions. Establishing physician champions and ensuring an innovation-values fit between physicians and programs, including the strategies programs employed, facilitated engagement. Among engagement practices identified in this study, tailoring team working styles to meet physician preferences and conducting physician outreach and education were the most common successful approaches. We describe engagement strategies derived from a diverse range of programs. Successful programs considered physicians' values and engagement as components of process and policy, rather than viewing them as exogenous factors affecting innovation adoption. These types of approaches enabled programs to accelerate acceptance of innovations within organizations. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  14. Intergenerational Relationships at the Center: Finding Shared Meaning from Programs in the U.S. and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Elizabeth; Kaplan, Matthew S.

    2010-01-01

    Newcomers to intergenerational programs in early childhood settings tend to recognize immediately the value of bringing younger and older age groups together. However, they then ask, "But what do they do together?" The goal of intergenerational programs is to promote bonds between younger and older generations--relationships that will…

  15. Effects of a Modified Conditional Cash Transfer Program in Two American Cities: Findings from Family Rewards 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cynthia; Miller, Rhiannon; Verma, Nandita; Dechausay, Nadine; Yang, Edith; Rudd, Timothy; Rodriguez, Jonathan; Honig, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Family Rewards was an innovative approach to poverty reduction in the United States that was modeled on the conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs common in lower- and middle-income countries. The program offered cash assistance to low-income families, provided that they met certain conditions related to family health care, children's education,…

  16. High Schools That Work: Program Description, Literature Review, and Research Findings. Research Report. ETS RR-11-33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John W.; Cline, Frederick; King, Teresa C.; Jackson, Avis D.; Timberlake, Allison

    2011-01-01

    Interest in setting high educational standards is at the forefront of many school reform programs in the United States. States' pursuit of high standards can be advanced through implementation of programs such as High Schools That Work ("HSTW"), which emphasizes high expectations and rigorous academics for all students, including Career…

  17. Southeastern superpave center pooled-fund activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Much has been learned about materials characteristics, testing procedures, new equipment, mix design, and pavement performance through the many studies conducted as a part of the Southeastern Superpave Center (SSC) pooled-fund program. Lessons learne...

  18. Shifting investments strategy from equity funds to money market funds – the case of Romanian open - end fund market during the financial crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu, I.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutual funds are one of the key suppliers of liquidity in Romanian capital market. This paper uses quarterly data on Romanian open-end funds starting with 2006 until 2010. We find that significant negative flows (outflows were registered beginning with the end of 2007 (equity funds, during 2008 (equity funds, balanced funds, other funds and bond funds in the last 2 quarters of the year and from 2009 to 2010 (in the case of money market funds. There is evidence that the changing market conditions attract differently the incoming flows in these mutual funds. This is the reason why such perturbations affect investors’ confidence for these investment vehicles and impose the reorientation of the investment funds and of their investors to other alternatives in order to preserve their capital.

  19. Barriers to foundation funding of gay organizations: evidence from Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, S A

    2001-01-01

    Gay, lesbian, and bisexual service organizations in the United States receive a small share of the philanthropic grants awarded by foundations and other institutional donors. A survey of Massachusetts gay organizations provides explanations for this phenomenon and suggests that a variety of barriers impedes foundation giving. The findings are consistent with those of two national surveys of lesbian organizations and a survey of gay service needs in California. The most commonly cited barriers include: a difficulty in finding foundations sympathetic to gay service programs; a lack of paid grant writers; the perceived need for 501 (c)(3) nonprofit status in order to qualify for most grants; foundations' predilection for funding established service organizations, and their reluctance to fund political advocacy, a lack of familiarity with gay service needs; and homophobia. Although the AIDS crisis helped educate foundations about the gay community, consider-able barriers remain.

  20. The funding black hole

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Two physics students at the University of Bristol have organised a petition against the recently-announced funding cut of 80 million by the body that funds physics research in the UK, the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC).

  1. Rating mutual funds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Ken L.; Rangvid, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    obtained a risk-adjusted excess return that is approximately 3-4 percentage points higher per annum than if the funds with the highest costs had been invested in. We compare the atpRating with the Morningstar Rating. We show that one reason why the atpRating and the Morningstar Rating contain different...... the return of a fund in a certain year generally contains only little information about the future return that the fund will generate. Finally, we have information on the investments in different mutual funds made by a small subgroup of investors known to have been exposed to both the atp......We develop a new rating of mutual funds: the atpRating. The atpRating assigns crowns to each individual mutual fund based upon the costs an investor pays when investing in the fund in relation to what it would cost to invest in the fund's peers. Within each investment category, the rating assigns...

  2. Rating mutual funds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Ken L.; Rangvid, Jesper

    obtained an annual risk-adjusted excess return that is approximately 3-4 percentage points higher per annum than if the funds with the highest costs had been invested in. We compare the atpRating with the Morningstar Rating. We show that one reason why the atpRating and the Morningstar Rating contain......, whereas the return of a fund in a certain year generally contains only little information about the future return that the fund will generate. Finally, we have information on the investments in different mutual funds made by a small subgroup of investors known to have been exposed to both the atp......We develop a new rating of mutual funds: the atpRating. The atpRating assigns crowns to each individual mutual fund based upon the costs an investor pays when investing in the fund in relation to what it would cost to invest in the fund's peers. Within each investment category, the rating assigns...

  3. National findings regarding health IT use and participation in health care delivery reform programs among office-based physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisey-Grove, Dawn; Patel, Vaishali

    2017-01-01

    Our objective was to characterize physicians' participation in delivery and payment reform programs over time and describe how participants in these programs were using health information technology (IT) to coordinate care, engage patients, manage patient populations, and improve quality. A nationally representative cohort of physicians was surveyed in 2012 (unweighted N = 2567) and 2013 (unweighted N = 2399). Regression analyses used those survey responses to identify associations between health IT use and participation in and attrition from patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), accountable care organizations (ACOs), and pay-for-performance programs (P4Ps). In 2013, 45% of physicians participated in PCMHs, ACOs, or P4Ps. While participation in each program increased (P Health IT use was associated with greater program participation (RR = 1.07-1.16). PCMH, ACO, and P4P participants were more likely than nonparticipants to perform quality improvement and patient engagement activities electronically (RR = 1.09-1.14); only ACO participants were more likely to share information electronically (RR = 1.07-1.09). Participation in delivery and payment reform programs increased between 2012 and 2013. Participating physicians were more likely to use health IT. There was significant attrition from and switching between PCMHs, ACOs, and P4Ps. This work provides the basis for understanding physician participation in and attrition from delivery and payment reform programs, as well as how health IT was used to support those programs. Understanding health IT use by program participants may help to identify factors enabling a smooth transition to alternative payment models. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  4. Waking Up the Mind: Qualitative Study Findings About the Process Through Which Programs Combining Income Generation and Health Education Can Empower Indigenous Guatemalan Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, Tilly A; Ballard, Anne; Kerr, Samantha; Walsh, Janée; Petrocy, Amy

    2016-01-01

    We explored the process through which two income-generation programs that include health education empower indigenous Guatemalan women artisans. Both artisans (n = 44) and program staff (n = 11) participated in semistructured interviews. Respondents expressed that women gained support about personal issues and experienced an awakening of the mind (despertar la mente). Through active participation, women's fear of strangers and speaking in public decreased. Women also gained mobility, awareness of their rights as women, and self-confidence from earning and managing their own income. Given our findings, we suggest that programs combining income generation and health education have the potential to empower women.

  5. Maximising intercultural learning in short term international placements: Findings associated with orientation programs, guided reflection and immersion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Coral JL; Walta, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Short-term international practicum experience is now a feature of many university education programs in Australia in an attempt to engage students with the growing multi-cultural aspects of Australian life...

  6. NSCAT funding left to NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggs, William Ward

    The Eos news article “Conference OKs Science Budgets” (August 23, 1988, p. 801) stated that a House-Senate conference had agreed to fund the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's scatterometer at the requested and Senate-approved Fiscal Year 1989 level of $15.7 million rather than the House-approved level of $5.7 million. However, while the conference report did propose up to $10 million more than the House recommendation, it also said that the money would only be available if “the administrator elects to exercise the option of transferring u p to $30 million of funding from the construction of facilities account” to the research and development account, which includes NSCAT.According to NASA's William F. Townsend, NSCAT Program Manager, because of other stipulations in the conference report the ultimate source of the proposed funds for NSCAT would not be the construction of facilities account, but would be the research and program management account, which pays NASA employee salaries, not the construction of facilities account. Such a shift of funds is highly unlikely, he said, and the scatterometer will probably receive only $5.7 million for FY 1989, 64% less than the budget request.

  7. Factors influencing property selection for conservation revolving funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Mathew J; Fitzsimons, James A; Bekessy, Sarah A; Gordon, Ascelin

    2017-07-20

    Finding sustainable ways to increase the amount of private land protected for biodiversity is a challenge for many conservation organizations. In a number of countries, organizations use 'revolving fund' programs, whereby land is purchased, and then on-sold to conservation-minded owners with a condition to enter into a conservation covenant or easement. The proceeds from sale are then used to purchase, protect and on-sell additional properties, incrementally increasing the amount of protected private land. As the effectiveness of this approach relies upon selecting the right properties, we sought to explore the factors currently considered by practitioners and how these are integrated into decision-making. We conducted exploratory, semi-structured interviews with managers from each of the five major revolving funds in Australia. Responses suggest that whilst conservation factors are important, financial and social factors are also highly influential, with a major determinant being whether the property can be on-sold within a reasonable timeframe, and at a price that replenishes the fund. To facilitate the on-sale process, often selected properties include the potential for the construction of a dwelling. Practitioners are faced with clear trade-offs between conservation, financial, amenity and other factors in selecting properties; and three main potential risks: difficulty recovering the costs of acquisition, protection, and resale; difficulty on-selling the property; and difficulty meeting conservation goals. Our findings suggest that the complexity of these decisions may be limiting revolving fund effectiveness. We draw from participant responses to identify potential strategies to mitigate the risks identified, and suggest that managers could benefit from a shared learning and adaptive approach to property selection given the commonalities between programs. Understanding how practitioners are dealing with complex decisions in the implementation of revolving

  8. Are fund of hedge fund returns asymmetric?

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Margaret; Hutson, Elaine; Stevenson, Max

    2004-01-01

    We examine the return distributions of 332 funds of hedge funds and associated indices. Over half of the sample is significantly skewed according to the skewness statistic, and these are split 50/50 positive and negative. However, we argue that the skewness statistic can lead to erroneous inferences regarding the nature of the return distribution, because the test statistic is based on the normal distribution. Using a series of tests that make minimal assumptions about the shape of the ...

  9. Translation of tobacco control programs in schools: findings from a rapid review of systematic reviews of implementation and dissemination interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, L; Carruthers, J; Wyse, R; Yoong, S

    2014-08-01

    School-based programs targeting the prevention of tobacco use are a key strategy for reducing the overall tobacco-related mortality and morbidity in the community. While substantial research investment has resulted in the identification of various effective tobacco prevention interventions in schools, this research investment will not result in public health benefits, unless effectively disseminated and implemented. This rapid review aimed to identify effective implementation or dissemination interventions, targeting the adoption of school-based tobacco prevention programs. A systematic search was conducted to identify published systematic reviews that examined the effectiveness of implementation and dissemination strategies for facilitating the adoption of tobacco policies or programs in schools from 1992 to 2012. The search yielded 1028 results, with one relevant systematic review being identified. The review included two controlled studies examining the implementation and dissemination of tobacco prevention programs and guidelines. The two randomised trials examined the delivery of active face-to-face training to implement a school-based curriculum compared with video-delivered or mail-based training. Improvements in the implementation of the programs were reported for the face-to-face training arm in both trials. Little rigorous evidence exists to guide the implementation and dissemination of tobacco prevention programs in schools. SO WHAT? Few systematic reviews exist to inform the implementation of evidence-based tobacco prevention programs in schools. In the absence of a strong evidence base, health care policymakers and practitioners may need to draw on setting-based frameworks or parallel evidence from other settings to design strategies to facilitate the adoption of tobacco prevention initiatives.

  10. Analysis of the performance and cost effectiveness of nine small wind energy conversion systems funded by the DOE small grants program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Joshua [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1982-04-01

    This report presents an analysis of the technical performance and cost effectiveness of nine small wind energy conversion systems (SWECS) funded during FY 1979 by the U.S. Department of Energy. Chapter 1 gives an analytic framework with which to evaluate the systems. Chapter 2 consists of a review of each of the nine projects, including project technical overviews, estimates of energy savings, and results of economic analysis. Chapter 3 summarizes technical, economic, and institutional barriers that are likely to inhibit widespread dissemination of SWECS technology.

  11. A Transdisciplinary Approach to Training: Preliminary Research Findings Based on a Case Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimpitsos, Christos; Petridou, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the benefits, barriers and challenges of the transdisciplinary approach to training, and to present findings of a case analysis. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on the research findings of an experimental training program for Greek local government managers co-funded by the European…

  12. Too high a price: out-of-pocket health care costs in the United States. Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Health Care Affordability Tracking Survey. September-October 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sara R; Rasmussen, Petra W; Doty, Michelle M; Beutel, Sophie

    2014-11-01

    Whether they have health insurance through an employer or buy it on their own, Americans are paying more out-of-pocket for health care now than they did in the past decade. A Commonwealth Fund survey fielded in the fall of 2014 asked consumers about these costs. More than one of five 19-to-64-year-old adults who were insured all year spent 5 percent or more of their income on out-of-pocket costs, not including premiums, and 13 percent spent 10 percent or more. Adults with low incomes had the highest rates of steep out-of-pocket costs. About three of five privately insured adults with low incomes and half of those with moderate incomes reported that their deductibles are difficult to afford. Two of five adults with private insurance who had high deductibles relative to their income said they had delayed needed care because of the deductible.

  13. Experiences and Attitudes of Primary Care Providers Under the First Year of ACA Coverage Expansion: Findings from the Kaiser Family Foundation/Commonwealth Fund 2015 National Survey of Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A new survey from The Kaiser Family Foundation and The Commonwealth Fund asked primary care providers--physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants--about their views of and experiences with the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and other changes in health care delivery and payment, as well as their thoughts on the future of primary care. In this first brief based on the survey, many providers reported seeing an increased number of patients since the coverage expansions went into effect, but not an accompanying compromise in quality of care. A large majority of primary care providers are satisfied with their medical practice, but a substantial percentage of physicians expressed pessimism about the future of primary care. Similar to the population overall, providers' views of the ACA are divided along party lines. A second brief will report on providers' reactions to other changes occurring in primary care delivery and payment.

  14. Admission Policies and Attrition Rates in California Community College Nursing Programs. Background and Summary of Findings and Recommendations of the California Postsecondary Education Commission. Commission Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seago, Jean Ann; Spetz, Joanne

    Most analyses of California's nursing shortage find that too few nurses are being educated to meet future demand. Coffman and Spetz (1999) estimate that state nursing programs need to educate an additional 3,600 students per year between 2000 and 2010, and 5,000 more per year between 2010 and 2020 to maintain an adequate nursing force. Unless the…

  15. Public-private partnerships to build human capacity in low income countries: findings from the Pfizer program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connelly Patrick

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of health organizations in developing countries to expand access to quality services depends in large part on organizational and human capacity. Capacity building includes professional development of staff, as well as efforts to create working environments conducive to high levels of performance. The current study evaluated an approach to public-private partnership where corporate volunteers give technical assistance to improve organizational and staff performance. From 2003 to 2005, the Pfizer Global Health Fellows program sent 72 employees to work with organizations in 19 countries. This evaluation was designed to assess program impact. Methods The researchers administered a survey to 60 Fellows and 48 Pfizer Supervisors. In addition, the team conducted over 100 interviews with partner organization staff and other key informants during site visits in Uganda, Kenya, Ghana, South Africa and India, the five countries where 60% of Fellows were placed. Results Over three-quarters of Fellowships appear to have imparted skills or enhanced operations of NGOs in HIV/AIDS and other health programs. Overall, 79% of Fellows reported meeting all or most technical assistance goals. Partner organization staff reported that the Fellows provided training to clinical and research personnel; strengthened laboratory, pharmacy, financial control, and human resource management systems; and helped expand Partner organization networks. Local staff also reported the Program changed their work habits and attitudes. The evaluation identified problems in defining goals of Fellowships and matching Organizations with Fellows. Capacity building success also appears related to size and sophistication of partner organization. Conclusion Public expectations have grown regarding the role corporations should play in improving health systems in developing countries. Corporate philanthropy programs based on "donations" of personnel can help build

  16. 'You find yourself.' Perceptions of nursing students from non-English speaking backgrounds of the effect of an intensive language support program on their oral clinical communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Fran; San Miguel, Caroline; Brown, Di; Kilstoff, Kathleen

    2006-10-01

    Nurses of ethnically diverse backgrounds are essential in providing multicultural populations in western societies with culturally and linguistically competent health care. However, many nurses from non-English speaking backgrounds (NESB) are at high risk of failure in university programs particularly during clinical placements. Few studies investigate the clinical experiences of students from NESB and strategies to support their learning. This study describes perceptions of fifteen undergraduate nursing students from NESB about their first clinical placement in an Australian university program and the effect of a language support program on their oral clinical communication skills. Three categories arose: *Wanting to belong but feeling excluded; *Wanting to learn how to...; and *You find yourself. While many students find clinical placement challenging, it appeared difficult for students in this study as language and cultural adjustments required some modification of their usual ways of thinking and communicating, often without coping strategies available to other students.

  17. Maximising Intercultural Learning in Short Term International Placements: Findings Associated with Orientation Programs, Guided Reflection and Immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Coral J. L.; Walta, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Short-term international practicum experience is now a feature of many university education programs in Australia in an attempt to engage students with the growing multi-cultural aspects of Australian life. The stated purposes of such practicum experiences generally highlight intercultural learning, which is associated with the development of…

  18. Improving Dementia Health Literacy Using the FLOW Mnemonic: Pilot Findings from the Old SCHOOL Hip-Hop Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, James M.; Hedmann, Monique G.; Williams, Olajide

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dementia health literacy is low among the public and likely poses a significant barrier to Alzheimer's disease (AD) symptom recognition and treatment, particularly among minority populations already facing higher AD burden. We evaluated the pilot phase of a novel AD health education program, Old SCHOOL (Seniors Can Have Optimal…

  19. Evaluation of Professional Development in the Use of Arts-Integrated Activities with Mathematics Content: Findings about Program Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Meredith Jane; Mengli, Song; Kouyate-Tate, Akua; Cooper, Jennifer E.; Phillips, Lori; Greenbaum, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts, Institute for Early Learning Through the Arts, was awarded an Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grant to develop, implement, and disseminate a research-based program of professional development (PD) that equips prekindergarten and kindergarten teachers to infuse…

  20. Evaluation of the School Breakfast Program Pilot Project: Summary of Findings from the Final Report. Report No. CN-04-SBP

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Joan E.; Bernstein, Lawrence S.; Crepinsek, Mary Kay; Daft, Lynn M.

    2004-01-01

    There is concern that low-income children might be coming to school without eating breakfast and still not be participating in the School Breakfast Program (SBP) for a variety of reasons, including a perceived stigma associating school breakfast participation with poverty. One approach to increasing participation in the SBP is to offer free…

  1. SKI*HI Home-Based Programming for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Recent Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Carol J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Data relating to 2,768 children served by the SKI*HI model of early, home-based programming for children with hearing impairments revealed that SKI*HI children, on average, were identified by 18 months of age, had higher rates of language development during intervention than prior to intervention, and had greater language gains than expected based…

  2. Pilot assessment of two disordered eating prevention programs. Preliminary findings on maladaptive beliefs related to eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Marisol; Penelo, Eva; Rosés, Rocío; González, Marcela L; Espinoza, Paola; Deví, Josep; Raich, Rosa M

    2017-04-01

    As eating disorders have severe consequences, they require prevention. We aimed to compare maladaptive beliefs related to eating disorders by following two programs based on media literacy in adolescents at post-test intervention, and after 6 and 12month-follow-ups. The Male and Female Nutrition and Media Literacy Model preventive program (NUT+MEF+MEM+ML in Spanish) and the Theater Alive program are both based on the same contents, the former being presented in a multimedia and interactive format and the latter in a drama format. Both were compared to a control group without intervention, whose participants received usual classes before the assessments. Participants were 178 adolescents in the second year of compulsory secondary education from fours schools of Terrassa (Catalonia, Spain). All participants in each school were assigned to the same group, depending on school schedules. A mixed 3 (group: Theater Alive, NUT+MEF+MEM+ML, control)×3 (time: post-test, 6-month-follow-up, 12-month-follow-up) factorial design was used to evaluate the effect on maladaptive beliefs measured using a CE-TCA tool. When compared to the control group, both Theater Alive (d=0.88) and NUT+MEM+MEF+ML (d=0.60) obtained lower scores over time, the latter being not statistically significant. The Theater Alive program may produce an effect of cognitive dissonance that might eliminate the discrepancy between the contents of the play and those that are internalized, thus modifying maladaptive beliefs. Participants in the Theater Alive program, as actors in front of an audience, had to defend certain content that was rehearsed over and over again to the point until it became internalized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Funding ATLAS 2012 key indicators for publicly funded research in Germany

    CERN Document Server

    Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)

    2013-01-01

    The Funding ATLAS is a reporting system (previously referred to as the Funding Ranking) employed by the German Research Foundation (DFG) to provide information in the form of indicators of key developments in publicly funded research in Germany every three years. This English version of the Funding ATLAS 2012 presents selected findings from the more comprehensive German edition. At the core of the report are indicators that provide information on which subject areas have received funding at higher education and other research institutions in the period 2008-2010. This report also includes, as a supplement not found in the German edition, the decisions on the Excellence Initiative, which were taken shortly after the German edition of the Funding ATLAS 2012 was published. The report also addresses the subject of internationality by presenting selected indicators that show how attractive Germany's research institutions are for visiting scientists. In summary, the DFG Funding ATLAS furnishes reliable indicators o...

  4. 38 CFR 61.60 - Notice of Fund Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Notice of Fund Availability. 61.60 Section 61.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.60 Notice of Fund Availability. When funds...

  5. 38 CFR 61.61 - Agreement and funding actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) VA HOMELESS PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.61 Agreement and funding actions. (a) When... designated for use, to assist homeless veterans. (j) VA may obligate any recovered funds without fiscal year... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agreement and funding...

  6. Spainish Trust Funds at the Inter-American Development Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Inter-American Development Bank

    2010-01-01

    This brochure contains general information about the creation of the Spanish trust funds at the IDB as well as brief descriptions of various funds and their impacts on the region. This document is designed to give an overview of the projects financed by the Spanish trust funds and their role in preparing large scale IDB lending programs.

  7. Government-Funded Students and Courses: January to June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report provides a summary of data relating to students, programs, training providers and funding in Australia's government-funded vocational education and training (VET) system (broadly defined as all activity delivered by government providers and government-funded activity delivered by community education and private training providers). The…

  8. Findings of an evaluation of public involvement programs associated with the development of a Land and Resource Management Plan for the Ouachita National Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holthoff, M.G. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Howell, R.E. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Federal regulations require the United States Forest Service (USFS) to integrate public input and values into decisions concerning land and resource management planning. The USFS has typically relied on traditional methods of involving the public, whereby public access and input to policy development are unilaterally controlled by the agency. Because of the highly political nature of land and resource management planning, such technocratic forms of public involvement and decision-making appear to be proving ineffective. This paper describes and evaluates two public involvement programs associated with the Ouachita National Forest`s (ONF) lengthy forest planning process. The research consisted of personal interviews with key program leaders and knowledgeable citizen participants, collection of secondary data, and a survey of citizen participants. Because of controversial planning decisions made during an initial planning process, the ONF was forced to re-enter the planning process in order to address unresolved planning issues and to conduct a more effective public involvement program. The supplemental planning process also resulted in a considerable degree of public contention. The survey revealed that although citizen participants were somewhat more satisfied with the supplemental public involvement program relative to the initial program, neither program was viewed as satisfactory. The findings of the study suggest that in order to be more effective, USFS public involvement programs should be more responsive to public concerns and conducted in adherence to principles of collaborative planning.

  9. Evaluation of Professional Development in the Use of Arts-Integrated Activities with Mathematics Content: Findings About Program Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Meredith Jane; Song, Mengli; Kouyate-Tate, Akua; Cooper, Jennifer E.; Phillips, Lori; Greenbaum, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts, Institute for Early Learning Through the Arts, was awarded an Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination (AEMDD) grant to develop, implement, and disseminate a research-based program of professional development (PD) that equips prekindergarten and kindergarten teachers to infuse mathematics instruction with arts instruction in their classrooms. The PD includes summer institutes and classroom-based residencies in which music...

  10. How Mentor Identity Evolves: Findings From a 10-Year Follow-Up Study of a National Professional Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Dorene F; Darden, Alix; Chandran, Latha; D'Alessandro, Donna; Gusic, Maryellen E

    2018-02-20

    Despite academic medicine's endorsement of professional development and mentoring, little is known about what junior faculty learn about mentoring in the implicit curriculum of professional development programs, and how their mentor identity evolves in this context. The authors explored what faculty-participants in the Educational Scholars Program implicitly learned about mentoring and how the implicit curriculum affected mentor identity transformation. Semi-structured interviews with 19 of 36 former faculty-participants were conducted in 2016. Consistent with constructivist grounded theory, data collection and analysis overlapped. The authors created initial codes informed by Ibarra's model for identity transformation, iteratively revised codes based on patterns in incoming data, and created visual representations of relationships amongst codes in order to gain a holistic and shared understanding of the data. In the implicit curriculum, faculty-participants learned the importance of having multiple mentors, the value of peer mentors, and the incremental process of becoming a mentor. The authors used Ibarra's model to understand how the implicit curriculum worked to transform mentor identity: faculty-participants reported observing mentors, experimenting with different ways to mentor and to be a mentor, and evaluating themselves as mentors. The Educational Scholars Program's implicit curriculum facilitated faculty-participants taking on a mentor identity via opportunities it afforded to watch mentors, experiment with mentoring, and evaluate self as mentor, key ingredients for professional identity construction. Leaders of professional development programs can develop faculty as mentors by capitalizing on what faculty-participants learn in the implicit curriculum and deliberately structuring post-graduation mentoring opportunities.

  11. STRATEGI PENGORGANISASIAN LEMBAGA KESEHATAN NAHDLATUL ULAMA (LKNU DALAM PENGELOLAAN PROGRAM HIV/AIDS (Studi Kasus Pengelolaan Dana Hibah Global Fund AIDS di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri Puteranto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The problems of managing HIV/AIDS programs arises when religious social organizations run the program. Religious organizations are required to run the program effectively. However, the implementation is not easy since they have to faced the “body of knowledge” of HIV/AIDS programs. Therefore, the ability of the organization to undertake this program is crucial. Religious organizations have a role to still keep the significance of religious values, at the same time to avoid conflct with the strategies possessed in HIV programs. This study explores three issues in the Health Organization of Nahdlatul Ulama, the interaction of values and norms, efforts to establish the organization legitimacy, and the ability to perform knowledge management. Qualitative research methods is used to explore the three issues mentioned above. The study results showed that the Health Organization of Nahdlatul Ulama as a socioreligious organization is able to answer sensitive issues in HIV/AIDS programs to reduce stigma and discrimination, building of organization legitimacy and conducting of knowledge management effectively

  12. Character recognition as an alternate measure of television exposure among children: findings from the Alam Simsim program in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimal, Rajiv N; Figueroa, Maria Elena; Storey, J Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of effects of mass media-based health interventions requires accurate assessments of exposure, which can be difficult to obtain when young children are the primary audience. Alam Simsim, the Egyptian version of Sesame Street, aired nationally in Egypt to teach preschoolers about numeracy, literacy, and gender-equitable attitudes. The purpose of this article was to assess the effect of the program through a first-of-its-kind household-level survey that interviewed caretakers (n = 426) and preschoolers (n = 486). The authors introduced and tested the efficacy of a parsimonious measure of exposure: children's recognition of the primary characters of the program. Overall, the authors' models explained as much as 53% of the variance in children's learning; exposure to the program was significantly associated with learning. Furthermore, the parsimonious measure of exposure was as effective as a more elaborate child-reported measure. Relative to these two measures of exposure, caretakers' report of children's viewing was not as good a predictor of learning.

  13. Prior authorization policies in Medicaid programs: The importance of study design and analysis on findings and outcomes from research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keast, Shellie L; Farmer, Kevin; Smith, Michael; Nesser, Nancy; Harrison, Donald

    2016-01-01

    U.S. State Medicaid programs for the medically indigent strive to deliver quality health care services with limited budgets. An often used cost management strategy is prior authorization of services or prescription medications. The goal of this strategy is to shape the pharmaceutical market share in the most efficient manner for the particular state Medicaid program, much like commercial managed care organizations. These policies are often scrutinized due to the population Medicaid serves, which in the past was largely composed of individuals with vulnerable health status. Unintended consequences can occur if these policies are not carried out in an appropriate manner or if they greatly restrict services. The data used for policy implementation research is prone to certain problems such as skewness and multimodality. Previous guidelines have been published regarding the best practices when analyzing these data. These guidelines were used to review the current body of literature regarding prior authorization in Medicaid. Further discussed are additional characteristics such as therapeutic areas researched and the outcomes identified. Finally, the importance of considering state-specific characteristics when reviewing individual policies and the usefulness of these results for other programs are also considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Follow Me on Twitter: Attracting Mutual Fund Investor Attention through Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sora

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies mutual funds' use of social media (Twitter) as a new marketing instrument and its effects on the behavior of mutual fund investors. Using hand-collected data from Twitter regarding 175 mutual fund families, I find that mutual fund families are more likely to introduce Twitter when they have star funds in the family and when they are introducing new funds. The average inception size of new funds after a family joined Twitter is significantly larger than before joining Twitte...

  15. Faculty Perceptions of Race to the Top Policy Influence on a University-Based Preparation Program Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Guerra, Daniel; Lochmiller, Chad R.

    2016-01-01

    Florida's Race to the Top (RTTT) competition invited university-district partnerships to compete for funds aimed at improving principal preparation programs. In this article, we report findings from a qualitative case study focused on one program partnership funded by RTTT. Drawing upon interviews with faculty and relevant documents, we conducted…

  16. Ultrametricity in fund of funds diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, M. A.; Susinno, G.

    2004-12-01

    Minimum market transparency requirements impose hedge fund (HF) managers to use the statement declared strategy in practice. However, each declared strategy may actually generate a multiplicity of implemented management decisions. Is then the “actual ” strategy the same as the “announced” strategy? Can the actual strategy be monitored or compared to the actual strategy of HF belonging to the same “announced” class? Can the announced or actual strategy be used as a quantitative argument in the fund of funds policy? With the appropriate metric, it is possible to draw a minimum spanning tree (MST) to emphasize the similarity structure that could be hidden in the raw correlation matrix of HF returns.

  17. A Fund of Wisdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard; Broome, André

    2006-01-01

    The International Monetary Fund spends most of its time monitoring its member states' economic performance and advising on institutional change. While much of the literature sees the Fund as a policy enforcer in "emerging market" and "frontier" economies, little attention has been paid to exploring...... for change on the basis of like-characteristics among economies. Many Western states, particularly small open economies, consider the Fund's advice as important not only for technical know-how, but because Fund assessments are significant to international and domestic political audiences. This article traces...... the Fund's advice on taxation and monetary reform to two coordinated market economies, Denmark and Sweden, and two liberal market economies, Australia and New Zealand from 1975 to 2004. It maps how the Fund advocated "policy revolutions" and "policy recombinations" during this period, advice that coincided...

  18. Funding begets biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrends, Antje; Burgess, Neil David; Gereau, Roy E.

    2011-01-01

    . Location Eastern Arc Mountains, Tanzania. Methods We analysed time series data (1980–2007) of funding (n = 134 projects) and plant species records (n = 75,631) from a newly compiled database. Perceived plant diversity, over three decades, is regressed against funding and environmental factors......, and variances decomposed in partial regressions. Cross-correlations are used to assess whether perceived biodiversity drives funding or vice versa. Results Funding explained 65% of variation in perceived biodiversity patterns – six times more variation than accounted for by 34 candidate environmental factors...... facilitating further research that results in more species discoveries. Here, we test whether there is circularity between funding and perceived biodiversity, which may reinforce the conservation status of areas already perceived to be important while other areas with less initial funding may remain overlooked...

  19. SRI funds: Nomen est omen

    OpenAIRE

    Kempf, Alexander; Osthoff, Peer

    2007-01-01

    We test the frequently made claim that SRI funds are conventional funds in disguise. For this purpose, we compare the portfolio holdings of SRI funds to conventional funds concerning their social and environmental standards. Our empirical study of US equity funds shows that SRI funds have a significantly higher ethical ranking than standard funds, i.e., they are not conventional funds in disguise. This result holds for all ethical criteria we investigate. It is stable over time and holds afte...

  20. CERN Pension Fund move

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The CERN Pension Fund has moved to new offices on the 5th floor of Building 5. The Benefits Service of the Fund is now located in Offices 5-5-017 - 5-5-021 - 5-5-023. We remind you that the office hours are: Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday from 10 am to 12 am and from 3 pm to 5 pm. The Fund would like to take this opportunity to warmly thank all the persons involved in the relocation.

  1. INDEXING AND INDEX FUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAKAN SARITAŞ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Proponents of the efficient market hypothesis believe that active portfolio management is largely wasted effort and unlikely to justify the expenses incurred. Therefore, they advocate a passive investment strategy that makes no attempt to outsmart the market. One common strategy for passive management is indexing where a fund is designed to replicate the performance of a broad-based index of stocks and bonds. Traditionally, indexing was used by institutional investors, but today, the use of index funds proliferated among individual investors. Over the years, both international and domestic index funds have disproportionately outperformed the market more than the actively managed funds have.

  2. "Finding my own time": examining the spatially produced experiences of rural RNs in the rural nursing certificate program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Jessica; MacLeod, Martha; John, Norma; Adamack, Monica; Lindsey, A Elizabeth

    2012-07-01

    Rural nurses require access to education that exposes them to the most up-to-date information and skill development. However, since most education opportunities are located in urban centers and focused on providing skills to urban nurses, geography effectively acts as a barrier to accessing education that meets the needs of rural nurses. The Rural Nursing Certificate Program is a post-basic education program that addresses these concerns by providing rural-relevant content online, with limited campus sessions. Does online delivery of rural nursing curriculum overcome challenges related to geography? This study employed surveys with some open-ended questions. Analysis included descriptive statistics and content analysis. Students reported that online delivery improved access. Benefits included not having to relocate; being able to continue working; and, flexibility. Challenges included travel for practical experiences and time management related to staffing shortages, personal-professional overlap and family responsibilities. Online learning improved access to nursing education. However, the realities of rural nursing made it impossible to completely overcome geography: sense of obligation to work overtime, cost and time of traveling to workshops and practicums, uneven access to the Internet and computer services, and distance from peer and university support remained challenges. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Intergenerational Programs May Be Especially Engaging for Aged Care Residents With Cognitive Impairment: Findings From the Avondale Intergenerational Design Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jess Rose; Webster, Lindl; Lynn, Nigel; Rogers, Julie; Belcher, Jessica

    2017-06-01

    Intergenerational programs are an authentic way to engage elders in meaningful activity and report benefits to both elders and youth. The Avondale Intergenerational Design Challenge (AVID) randomly assigned small teams of technology students aged 13 to 15 years (total N = 59) to 1 of 24 aged care residents with a range of cognitive impairment. Students met with the resident 4 times over 15 weeks and ultimately crafted a personalized item for them. Students showed no change in self-reported attitudes to elders, empathy, or self-esteem post-AVID or at 3-month follow-up, compared to a 3-month within-subject control period pre-AVID. Compared to usual lifestyle activities, residents showed significant improvements in self-reported positive affect and negative affect after student visits and were observed to be significantly more engaged during visits, especially residents with greater cognitive impairment. The personal and guided nature of intergenerational programs may be especially effective in engaging elders with cognitive impairment in meaningful activity.

  4. The Effectiveness of the Within Our Reach Relationship Education Program for Couples: Findings from a Federal Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Galena K

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a couple-based relationship education program, Within Our Reach. Secondary data (n = 3,609) were analyzed from the federal Supporting Healthy Marriage project. Couples were randomly assigned to receive Within Our Reach and associated services or to a no-treatment (treatment-as-usual) control group. Those assigned to Within Our Reach reported better couple and individual outcomes on 8 of 12 outcomes measured (M ES = .15) at the 12-month follow-up and 6 of 10 outcomes measured at the 30-month follow-up (M ES = .14), including higher relationship happiness, more warmth and support, more positive communication, less negative behavior and emotion, less psychological abuse, less physical assault (for men), lower psychological distress (for women), and less infidelity. They were also less likely to report that their marriage was in trouble. These effects were generally small in size and many were replicated across the two follow-ups. There were no significant differences between those assigned to Within Our Reach versus control on cooperative parenting, severe psychological assault, or percent married. Implications for future research, programming, and policy are discussed. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  5. Following the ACA Repeal-and-Replace Effort, Where Does the U.S. Stand on Insurance Coverage? Findings from the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March--June 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sara R; Gunja, Munira Z; Doty, Michelle M

    2017-09-01

    After Congress's failure to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, some policy leaders are calling for bipartisan approaches to address weaknesses in the law’s coverage expansions. To do this, policymakers will need data about trends in insurance coverage, reasons why people remain uninsured, and consumer perceptions of affordability. To examine U.S. trends in insurance coverage and the demographics of the remaining uninsured population, as well as affordability and satisfaction among adults with marketplace and Medicaid coverage. Analysis of the Commonwealth Fund Affordable Care Act Tracking Survey, March–June 2017 The uninsured rate among 19-to-64-year-old adults was 14 percent in 2017, or an estimated 27 million people, statistically unchanged from one year earlier. Uninsured rates ticked up significantly in three subgroups: 35-to-49-year-olds, adults with incomes of 400 percent of poverty or more (about $48,000 for an individual), and adults living in states that had not expanded Medicaid. Half of uninsured adults, or an estimated 13 million, are likely eligible for marketplace subsidies or the Medicaid expansion in their state. Four of 10 uninsured adults are unaware of the marketplaces. Adults in marketplace plans with incomes below 250 percent of poverty are much more likely to view their premiums as easy to afford compared with people with higher incomes. Policies to improve coverage include a federal commitment to supporting the marketplaces and the 2018 open enrollment period, expansion of Medicaid in 19 remaining states, and enhanced subsidies for people with incomes of 250 percent of poverty or more.

  6. A Policy Review on The Distribution of Health Operational Aid Funds in Achieving Maternal and Child Health Program (MDGs 4, 5 in Three Districts/Cities of East Java Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niniek Lely Pratiwi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health Policy Regulation Number 494/Menkes/SK/IV/2010 on the distribution of BOK funds to local government is one of the government’s responsibility for the development of public health in improving health promotion and prevention efforts in order to accelerate the achievement of MDGs in Health. The purpose of the study is to provide policy recommendations regarding to BOK in achieving the goals of maternal and child health programs. Methods: Secondary data review of the district health profile in 2009-2011 and analysis on the primary data collected from focus group discussion (FGD with invited technical implementor from district health office and health centers as well as some of the staffs of the local government that handle BOK. Results: The decline in maternal and infant mortality rates are still slow and cases of malnutrition increased from the three profile data review Sampang, Gresik and Sidoarjo. Local governments pay little commitment in developing priority strategies of maternal and child health programs in the form of a local action and innovation plan. BOK preventive promotive activities are lacking of monitoring and accountability controls, especially in health centers located far from the district center. Financial accountability is less precise to the programs and targetes, having seen the data of maternal and child health outcomes KN1-KN4 coverage which rose in 2010, but then fell back in 2011. Conclusion: Evaluation and monitoring are needed on the utilization of BOK funds, supervising the activities by the district/city health office, as well as by local community leaders. Prioritise monitoring the health centers in the area with high MMR and IMR. Suggestion: Needed routine and periodic mentoring and coaching in the form of technical assistance related to the utilization of BOK.

  7. An Original Notion to Find Maximal Solution in the Fuzzy Neutrosophic Relation Equations (FNRE with Geometric Programming (GP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda E. Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, finding - a maximal solution is introduced to (, fuzzy neutrosophic relation equation. the notion of fuzzy relation equation was first investigated by Sanchez in 1976, while Florentin Smarandache put forward a fuzzy neutrosophic relation equations in 2004 with innovative investigation. This paper is first attempt to establish the structure of solution set on model. The NRE have a wide applications in various real world problems like flow rate in chemical plants, transportation problem, study of bounded labor problem, study of interrelations among HIV/AIDS affected patients and use of genetic algorithms in chemical problems.

  8. Findings From the National Machine Guarding Program: Safety Climate, Hazard Assessment, and Safety Leadership in Small Metal Fabrication Businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David L; Yamin, Samuel; Xi, Min; Gordon, Robert; Most, Ivan; Stanley, Rod

    2017-12-01

    This manuscript assesses safety climate data from the National Machine Guarding Program (NMGP)-a nationwide intervention to improve machine safety. Baseline safety climate surveys were completed by 2161 employees and 341 owners or managers at 115 businesses. A separate onsite audit of safety management practices and machine guarding equipment was conducted at each business. Safety climate measures were not correlated with machine guarding or safety management practices. The presence of a safety committee was correlated with higher scores on the safety management audit when contrasted with those without one. The presence of a safety committee is easily assessed and provides a basis on which to make recommendations with regard to how it functions. Measures of safety climate fail to provide actionable information. Future research on small manufacturing firms should emphasize the presence of an employee-management safety committee.

  9. Findings from the Community Health Intervention Program in South Carolina: Implications for Reducing Cancer-Related Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, James Lyndon; Friedman, Daniela B.; Brandt, Heather M.; Adams, Swann Arp; Xirasagar, Sudha; Ureda, John R.; Mayo, Rachel M.; Comer, Kimberly; Evans, Miriam; Fedrick, Delores; Talley, Jacqueline; Broderick, Madeline; Hebert, James R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The South Carolina Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (SC-CPCRN) implemented the Community Health Intervention Program (CHIP) mini-grants initiative to address cancer-related health disparities and reduce the cancer burden among high-risk populations across the state. The mini-grants project implemented evidence-based health interventions tailored to the specific needs of each community. OBJECTIVE To support the SC-CPCRN’s goals of moving toward greater dissemination and implementation of evidence-based programs in the community to improve public health, prevent disease, and reduce the cancer burden. METHODS Three community-based organizations were awarded $10,000 each to implement one of the National Cancer Institute’s evidence-based interventions. Each group had 12 months to complete their project. SC-CPCRN investigators and staff provided guidance, oversight, and technical assistance for each project. Grantees provided regular updates and reports to their SC-CPCRN liaisons to capture vital evaluation information. RESULTS The intended CHIP mini-grant target population reach was projected to be up to 880 participants combined. Actual combined reach of the three projects reported upon completion totaled 1,072 individuals. The majority of CHIP participants were African-American females. Participants ranged in age from 19 to 81 years. Evaluation results showed an increase in physical activity, dietary improvements, and screening participation. CONCLUSIONS The success of the initiative was the result of a strong community-university partnership built on trust. Active two-way communication and an honest open dialogue created an atmosphere for collaboration. Communities were highly motivated. All team members shared a common goal of reducing cancer-related health disparities and building greater public health capacity across the state. PMID:23645547

  10. Funding | Page 2 | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC funds projects that aim to bring employment, food security, health, peace, and prosperity to developing regions of the world. We offer grants, funding, and awards to researchers and institutions to find solutions for global development challenges. Current opportunities All open calls for funding are found below, under ...

  11. Social Inclusion Trust Fund Annual Report 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Inter-American Development Bank

    2008-01-01

    The Social Inclusion Trust Fund is intended to support sustained and integrated programs and policies to address social inclusion in the IDB and in Latin America and the Caribbean member countries. Meeting this objective entails dedicated resources to increase awareness among governments in the region regarding the importance of social inclusion as a development objective. This annual report details the activities of the Fund in 2007. A total of 47 proposals were eligible for support and the ...

  12. Federal Research and Development Funding: FY2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Landsat provides sensing data for space policy and land use and climate change research. This account would be funded at $5.0 million in FY2012...and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2011, and the Military Construction and Veterans Affairs and Related Agencies...February 14, 2011. For additional information on the USGCRP, see CRS Report RL33817, Climate Change: Federal Program Funding and Tax Incentives, by

  13. National Education Trust Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapp, Milton J.

    1975-01-01

    A proposal from the governor of Pennsylvania for financing all levels of education through a National Education Trust Fund (NETF) that would operate as the present Federal Highway Trust Fund does on a revolving, self-liquidating basis with the cost of an individual's education repaid through a progressive education tax on income. (JT)

  14. New Funding Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Janet S.

    2002-01-01

    Describes five major developments that are changing the way schools are funded: Linking finance to achievement; changing demographics, such as fewer households with school-age children; teacher shortages, especially for certain fields and certain locations; funding technology; and school choice. (PKP)

  15. Addressing Achievement Gaps: School Finance and the Achievement Gap--Funding Programs That Work. Policy Notes. Volume 16, Number 3, Fall 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    In education reform, money matters, but so does spending it wisely--on programs designed to meet the ambitious goal of helping low-income and minority children achieve at the same levels as their more affluent peers. The latest in the Educational Testing Service's (ETS's) series of symposia on Addressing Achievement Gaps brought researchers,…

  16. Oceanography and Geoscience Scholars at Texas A&M University Funded through the NSF S-STEM (Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M. J.; Gardner, W. D.

    2016-02-01

    Over the last seven years we have led the creation and implementation of the Oceanography and Geoscience Scholars programs at Texas A&M University. Through these programs we have been able to provide scholarship support for 92 undergraduates in Geosciences and 29 graduate students in Oceanography. Fifty-seven undergraduate scholars have graduated in Geosciences: 30 undergraduate students in Meteorology, 7 in Geology, and 20 in Environmental Geosciences. Two students have graduated in other STEM disciplines. Twenty-four students are in the process of completing their undergraduate degrees in STEM disciplines. Twenty-three students have graduated with MS or PhD degrees in Oceanography and five PhD students are completing their dissertations. As specified in the program solicitation all of the scholars are academically talented students with demonstrated financial need as defined by the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). We have endeavored to recruit students from underrepresented groups. One-third of the undergraduate scholars were from underrepresented groups; 28% of the graduate students. We will present the challenges and successes of these programs.

  17. Failure to protect: why the individual insurance market is not a viable option for most U.S. families: findings from the Commonwealth Fund Biennial Health Insurance Survey, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Michelle M; Collins, Sara R; Nicholson, Jennifer L; Rustgi, Sheila D

    2009-07-01

    Between 2001 and 2007, an increasing share of adults with private insurance--whether employer-based coverage or individual market plans--spent a large amount of their income on premiums and out-of-pocket medical costs, were underinsured, and/or avoided needed health care because of costs. Those with coverage obtained in the individual market were the most affected. Over the last three years, nearly three-quarters of people who tried to buy coverage in this market never actually purchased a plan, either because they could not find one that fit their needs or that they could afford, or because they were turned down due to a preexisting condition. Even people enrolled in employer-based plans are spending larger amounts of their income on health care and curtailing their use of needed services to save money. The findings underscore the need for an expansion of affordable health insurance options, particularly during a time of mounting job losses.

  18. Developmental Programming of Cardiovascular Disease Following Intrauterine Growth Restriction: Findings Utilising A Rat Model of Maternal Protein Restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohdi, Vladislava; Lim, Kyungjoon; Pearson, James T.; Black, M. Jane

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years, studies have demonstrated links between risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood and adverse events that occurred very early in life during fetal development. The concept that there are embryonic and fetal adaptive responses to a sub-optimal intrauterine environment often brought about by poor maternal diet that result in permanent adverse consequences to life-long health is consistent with the definition of “programming”. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge of the effects of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) on long-term cardiac structure and function, with particular emphasis on the effects of maternal protein restriction. Much of our recent knowledge has been derived from animal models. We review the current literature of one of the most commonly used models of IUGR (maternal protein restriction in rats), in relation to birth weight and postnatal growth, blood pressure and cardiac structure and function. In doing so, we highlight the complexity of developmental programming, with regards to timing, degree of severity of the insult, genotype and the subsequent postnatal phenotype. PMID:25551250

  19. Efficacy of a web-based, tailored, alcohol prevention/intervention program for college students: initial findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, C Raymond; Barretto, Andrea Ippel; Walton, Maureen A; Bryant, Christopher M; Shope, Jean T; Raghunathan, Trivellore E

    2010-01-01

    Reduce college student at-risk drinking (ARD) using a Web-based brief motivational alcohol prevention/intervention called Michigan Prevention and Alcohol Safety for Students (M-PASS). Participants included 1,137 randomly sampled first-year college students, including 59% female, 80% white, and averaged age 18.1 years. Intervention group participants (n = 616) attended 4 online M-PASS sessions, receiving feedback tailored to individual drinking patterns and concepts from 4 behavior change theories. Control group participants (n = 521) completed a mid-phase survey, and both groups were surveyed at baseline and posttest. Evidence of M-PASS's efficacy was found. The intervention was associated with advanced stage of change, lower tolerance of drinking and drink/driving, fewer reasons to drink, and use of more strategies to avoid ARD. Preliminary evidence of behavioral change was also found. Efficacy was greater for women than men. Web-based programs may be useful in reducing alcohol-related risk among college students. Further evaluation is needed.

  20. Leadership and management influences the outcome of wildlife reintroduction programs: findings from the Sea Eagle Recovery Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Alexandra E

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife reintroductions and translocations are statistically unlikely to succeed. Nevertheless, they remain a critical part of conservation because they are the only way to actively restore a species into a habitat from which it has been extirpated. Past efforts to improve these practices have attributed the low success rate to failures in the biological knowledge (e.g., ignorance of social behavior, poor release site selection), or to the inherent challenges of reinstating a species into an area where threats have already driven it to local extinction. Such research presumes that the only way to improve reintroduction outcomes is through improved biological knowledge. This emphasis on biological solutions may have caused researchers to overlook the potential influence of other factors on reintroduction outcomes. I employed a grounded theory approach to study the leadership and management of a successful reintroduction program (the Sea Eagle Recovery Project in Scotland, UK) and identify four critical managerial elements that I theorize may have contributed to the successful outcome of this 50-year reintroduction. These elements are: 1. Leadership & Management: Small, dedicated team of accessible experts who provide strong political and scientific advocacy ("champions") for the project. 2. Hierarchy & Autonomy: Hierarchical management structure that nevertheless permits high individual autonomy. 3. Goals & Evaluation: Formalized goal-setting and regular, critical evaluation of the project's progress toward those goals. 4. Adaptive Public Relations: Adaptive outreach campaigns that are open, transparent, inclusive (esp. linguistically), and culturally relevant.