WorldWideScience

Sample records for program frequently asked

  1. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transporation Program - State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets: Frequently Asked Questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-03-01

    Factsheet answering frequently asked questions about the U.S. Department of Energy's Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (the Program) that implements provisions of Titles III–V of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct). Answers to questions that are frequently asked about the Program by managers of state government and alternative fuel provider fleets are provided in the factsheet.

  2. IC: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ICA staff and volunteers answer questions from patients, healthcare providers, researchers and the public. Below are some of the most commonly asked ... Exercise & IC Managing Stress Sleep & IC Quitting Smoking Public Restrooms ... IC & Healthcare Toolkit Health Insurance Finding the Right Doctor Pain ...

  3. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funded Arthritis Programs Arthritis Basics FAQs Arthritis Types Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Fibromyalgia Gout Childhood Arthritis Management Risk Factors Physical Activity for Arthritis Data and Statistics National ...

  4. LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FCA - A A + A You are here Home LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions Order this publication Printer- ... service or organization is open to working with LGBT families? Kudos to you for managing to “go ...

  5. Frequently Asked Questions about Chiropractic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Federal Programs FEP/FECA ERISA Veteran's Affairs Marketing Patient Fact Sheets Contact the ACA State Licensing ... Backpack Safety Spinal Health Winter Activities Kids and Sports Exercising Outdoors with Baby Gardening Chronic Pain and ...

  6. CARIAA Call - Frequently Asked Questions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    2013-03-28

    Mar 28, 2013 ... The call states that CARIAA will also collaborate with the consortia on programmatic functions that support the program as a whole, including communication, outreach and engagement, knowledge management, and monitoring and evaluation. What kind of activities are envisaged? 48). The call states that ...

  7. Head Lice: Treatment Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter ...

  8. Head Lice: Malathion Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter ...

  9. Body Lice Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter ...

  10. Head Lice: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter ...

  11. Suicide in America: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For more information on Suicide in America Share Suicide in America: Frequently Asked Questions (2015) Download PDF ... their White and AI/AN counterparts. How can suicide be prevented? Effective suicide prevention is based on ...

  12. Treatment of Anthrax Disease Frequently Asked Questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Young, Joan E.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Malone, John D.

    2010-05-14

    This document provides a summary of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the treatment of anthrax disease caused by a wide-area release of Bacillus anthracis spores as an act bioterrorism. These FAQs are intended to provide the public health and medical community, as well as others, with guidance and communications to support the response and long-term recovery from an anthrax event.

  13. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Local Foods, Local Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Answers to frequently asked questions about EPA's Local Foods, Local Places planning assistance program to help communities revitalize downtowns, create economic opportunities, and improve access to healthy food by promoting local foods.

  14. Frequently asked questions in hypoxia research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenger RH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Roland H Wenger,1,2 Vartan Kurtcuoglu,1,2 Carsten C Scholz,1,2 Hugo H Marti,3 David Hoogewijs1,2,4 1Institute of Physiology and Zurich Center for Human Physiology (ZIHP, University of Zurich, 2National Center of Competence in Research “Kidney.CH”, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 4Institute of Physiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: “What is the O2 concentration in a normoxic cell culture incubator?” This and other frequently asked questions in hypoxia research will be answered in this review. Our intention is to give a simple introduction to the physics of gases that would be helpful for newcomers to the field of hypoxia research. We will provide background knowledge about questions often asked, but without straightforward answers. What is O2 concentration, and what is O2 partial pressure? What is normoxia, and what is hypoxia? How much O2 is experienced by a cell residing in a culture dish in vitro vs in a tissue in vivo? By the way, the O2 concentration in a normoxic incubator is 18.6%, rather than 20.9% or 20%, as commonly stated in research publications. And this is strictly only valid for incubators at sea level. Keywords: gas laws, hypoxia-inducible factor, Krogh tissue cylinder, oxygen diffusion, partial pressure, tissue oxygen levels

  15. Quality Circles: Answers to 100 Frequently Asked Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Donald L.

    This booklet contains frequently asked questions--and their answers--about "quality circles," a factory program first introduced in Japan in which workers participate voluntarily in quality control and management decisions through various means of communication. Following an introductory chapter, the remainder of the booklet answers…

  16. (GrOW) Frequently Asked Questions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Alejandra

    How many applications will be shortlisted at the end of the first stage? GrOW envisages that up to 4 selected teams will be asked to submit a full research proposal for review and funding consideration. How is the review process conducted? Upon receiving complete applications, a review process begins by the GrOW team, ...

  17. Frequently Asked Questions about Colorectal Cancer and IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBD Go Back Frequently Asked Questions About Colorectal Cancer & IBD Email Print + Share CCFA's Chair of Professional Education, Tom Ullman, MD, Answers Frequently Asked Questions About Colorectal Cancer & IBD Each year, in the United States, 147, ...

  18. Frequently Asked Questions about Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tests Statute and Legislation Database Newsroom Calendar of Events Current News Releases Image Gallery GenomeTV Media Contacts Media ... and Genomic Science and Research Genetic and Genomic Science and Research See ... NHGRI Clinical Studies Clinical Research Program Overview On ...

  19. Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act frequently asked questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    One stop shop for Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act (FFATA) questions. This frequently asked document will assist with Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act (FFATA) related questions.

  20. Frequently Asked Questions about Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Safety Frequently Asked Questions about Ventilator-associated Pneumonia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is a Ventilator-associated Pneumonia (VAP)? Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a lung ...

  1. MedlinePlus Connect: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/connect/faqs.html MedlinePlus Connect: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) To use the sharing ... for the MedlinePlus Connect email list . Using MedlinePlus Connect How does MedlinePlus Connect work? MedlinePlus Connect responds ...

  2. Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC): Frequently Asked Questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-11-01

    An ESPC is a working relationship between a Federal agency and an energy service company (ESCO). The ESCO conducts a comprehensive energy audit for the Federal facility and identifies improvements to save energy. The following sections present a number of frequently asked questions from ESPC end-users and stakeholders.

  3. Demystifying the Electoral College: 12 Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    As the presidential election of 2012 draws closer, Americans will witness a resurgence of references to the Electoral College in news reports. Here, "Looking at the Law" hopes to demystify the Electoral College, and refresh many social studies memories--just in time for the next election--with some frequently asked questions about electing the…

  4. Competence-Based Education and Training– about Frequently Asked Questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article follows the author's previous piece on practical guidelines for the development of comprehensive competence-based education and training (Mulder, 2012). It is about the questions that have been and are still frequently asked in presentations, workshops and classes about the introduction

  5. 75 FR 59322 - Notice of Availability of Answers to Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Buy America & FRA's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... Buy America & FRA's High-Speed Intercity Passenger Rail Program AGENCY: Federal Railroad...'s High Speed Intercity ] Passenger Rail Program. The Answers to Frequently Asked Questions can be... to support intercity passenger rail service (Sec. 301), high-speed corridor development (Sec. 501...

  6. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 604 - Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Pt. 604, App. C Appendix C to Part 604—Frequently... free shuttle service during football games for persons with disabilities, is that charter? A: Yes. Even... transit agency to provide shuttle service to football games and graduation, is that charter? A: Yes. The...

  7. FAQs: Frequently Asked Questions regarding the IDRC Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    The review of research proposals follows set procedures that do not involve feedback at this stage of your application. Candidates can check out the research currently being supported by. IDRC's programs and become familiar with the objectives of each award. Program staff may be contacted if there is a doubt concerning ...

  8. Frequently Asked Questions for Parents of Children with PH

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PH Find a Doctor PH Care Centers PHA Classroom PHA Registry Insurance Guide Specialty Pharmacy Other Resources ... Forums PH Associations Worldwide Tom Lantos Awards Take Action ... Research PHA’s Research Program Named Research Grants Other Opportunities ...

  9. 78 FR 68460 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Frequently Asked Questions About Medical Foods; Second Edition...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Frequently Asked Questions About Medical Foods; Second Edition; Reopening of the Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; reopening of the comment period. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration...

  10. Management of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease: frequently asked questions and answers (if any).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalena, L; Chiovato, L; Vitti, P

    2016-10-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in iodine-replete areas. Although progress has been made in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, no treatment targeting pathogenic mechanisms of the disease is presently available. Therapies for Graves' hyperthyroidism are largely imperfect because they are bound to either a high rate of relapsing hyperthyroidism (antithyroid drugs) or lifelong hypothyroidism (radioiodine treatment or thyroidectomy). Aim of the present article is to offer a practical guidance to the reader by providing evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions in clinical practice.

  11. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays: answers to frequently asked questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenevier-Gobeaux, Camille; Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Éric; Charpentier, Sandrine; Dehoux, Monique; Lefevre, Guillaume; Meune, Christophe; Ray, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Cardiac troponin (cTn) assays have quickly gained in analytical sensitivity to become what are termed 'high-sensitivity cardiac troponin' (hs-cTn) assays, bringing a flurry of dense yet incomplete literature data. The net result is that cTn assays are not yet standardized and there are still no consensus-built data on how to use and interpret cTn assay results. To address these issues, the authors take cues and clues from multiple disciplines to bring responses to frequently asked questions. In brief, the effective use of hs-cTn hinges on knowing: specific assay characteristics, particularly precision at the 99th percentile of a reference population; factors of variation at the 99th percentile value; and the high-individuality of hs-cTn assays, for which the notion of individual kinetics is more informative than straight reference to 'normal' values. The significance of patterns of change between two assay measurements has not yet been documented for every hs-cTn assay. Clinicians need to work hand-in-hand with medical biologists to better understand how to use hs-cTn assays in routine practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Public information report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The document presents answers to frequently asked questions about plans for cleanup and decontamination activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Answers to the questions asked are based on information in the NRC 'Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2,' NUREG-0683.

  13. Ten Frequently Asked Questions About Veterans’ Transitions: Results of a Decade of RAND Work on Veteran Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    health professionals; developing creative strategies to restrict access to lethal means for those who appear to be a suicide risk; and providing...C O R P O R A T I O N Ten Frequently Asked Questions About Veterans’ Transitions Results of a Decade of RAND Work on Veteran Life Christopher Guo...research on many facets of veteran life into a set of ten questions and answers gleaned from this work. Overview In this report, a decade of RAND

  14. Plague: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a vaccine available to prevent plague? What is plague? Plague is an infectious disease that affects rodents, ... United States. How do people become infected with plague? People most commonly acquire plague when they are ...

  15. Frequently Asked Questions: Hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... safe for most people with hemophilia, while American football, rugby, and boxing are usually not recommended. What ... issues in inhibitors Resources Prophylaxis Types of Prophylaxis Administration & Dosing Schedules Monitoring outcomes When to Start & Stop ...

  16. Blood Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Education Annual Meeting International Cord Blood Symposium eLearning AABB Education Website CareerLink Specialist in Blood Bank Technology AABB-Fenwal Scholarships Calendar of Events Research AABB Hemovigilance National Blood Foundation Transfusion Journal White ...

  17. Triglycerides : Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products, meat and some tropical oils, such as coconut oil), added sugars, and refined grains and emphasizes more ... such as those found in canola oil, olive oil or liquid margarine —for saturated ... ("good") cholesterol in some people. • Keep dietary fat to 25- ...

  18. Pertussis Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over time Acellular pertussis vaccines may not prevent colonization (carrying the bacteria in your body without getting ... with Infectious Diseases (PKIDs) Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  19. Frequently Asked Questions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    IDRC response: Please be advised that references to be included with each submission, as indicated in Part A- Instructions, Item 4, should be individuals who may be contacted by IDRC who have first-hand knowledge and experience with the candidate's (whether individual or team) relevant work in development finance.

  20. Finite Element Analysis as a response to frequently asked questions of machine tool mechanical design-engineers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehl Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The finite element analysis (FEA nowadays is indispensable in the product development of machining centres and production machinery for metal cutting processes. It enables extensive static, dynamic and thermal simulation of digital prototypes of machine tools before production start-up. But until now less reflection has been made about what are the most pressing questions to be answered in this application field, with the intention to align the modelling and simulation methods with substantial requirements. Based on 3D CAD geometry data for a modern machining centre (Deckel-Maho-Gildemeister DMG 635 V eco merely the basic steps of a static analysis are reconstructed by FEA. Particularly the two most frequently asked questions by the design departments of machine tool manufacturers are discussed and highlighted. For this authentic simulation results are used, at which their selection is a consequence of long lasting experience in the industrial application of FEA in the design process chain. Noticing that such machine tools are mechatronic systems applying a considerable number of actuators, sensors and controllers in addition to mechanical structures, the answers to those core questions are required for design enhancement, to save costs and to improve the productivity and the quality of machined workpieces.

  1. Asking complex questions of the genome without programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollard, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, vast amounts of genomics and genetic data are available. Although much of the data is largely accessible to relatively simple web queries, in some cases, more complex queries are required. This paper reviews the hierarchy of tools for querying genetic and genomic data. For querying multiple genes, variants or regions ENSEMBL BioMart and the UCSC Table Browser offer flexible interfaces. For more complex queries, GALAXY is a sophisticated tool for building workflows over existing internet resources. For the most challenging genome scale queries, programmatic access may be required through a defined application programming interface (API) - such as the one provided by Ensembl. All these tools allow one to rapidly ask many questions that were difficult to answer a few years ago, but choosing the appropriate tool for the job is critical.

  2. Ask-Elle: An Adaptable Programming Tutor for Haskell Giving Automated Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Alex; Heeren, Bastiaan; Jeuring, Johan; van Binsbergen, L. Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Ask-Elle is a tutor for learning the higher-order, strongly-typed functional programming language Haskell. It supports the stepwise development of Haskell programs by verifying the correctness of incomplete programs, and by providing hints. Programming exercises are added to Ask-Elle by providing a task description for the exercise, one or more…

  3. Carcinoid Tumor: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... serotonin is made and is also a useful marker sometimes. Carcinoid Heart Disease How do carcinoids in the liver affect heart ... many cases it can be supplemented by other markers which should have been ... heart disease in patients with functioning tumors.In other neuroendocrine ...

  4. Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reduce body-heat loss caused by wind. Wool, silk, or polypropylene inner layers of clothing will hold ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  5. Frequently Asked Questions about Pharmacogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... colon cancer patients whose tumors have a particular genetic change. Pharmacogenomics may also help to quickly identify the best drugs to treat people with certain mental health disorders. For example, while some patients with depression respond to the first drug they are given, ...

  6. Frequently Asked Questions - GHRI Calls

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Genevieve Prud'homme

    16 mai 2014 ... Vous ne devez pas téléverser un document excel pour la manifestation d'intérêt. Quels organismes sont admissibles pour administrer des fonds? • Les établissements éligibles doivent être constitués en personne morale dans un des pays ciblés où ils exercent leurs activités. Le CRDI, l'entité qui gère les ...

  7. Frequently Asked Questions: The Higgs!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    Why have we tried so hard to find the Higgs particle? How does the Higgs mechanism work? What is the difference in physics between strong evidence and a discovery? Why do physicists speak in terms of "sigmas"? Find out here!   Why have we tried so hard to find the Higgs particle? Because it could be the answer to the question: how does Nature decide whether or not to assign mass to particles? All the fundamental particles making up matter – the electron, the quarks, etc. – have masses. Moreover, quantum physics requires that forces are also carried by particles. The W and Z particles that carry the weak force responsible for radioactivity must also have masses, whereas the photon, the carrier of the electromagnetic force, has no mass at all. This is the root of the “Higgs problem”: how to give masses to the fundamental particles and break the symmetry between the massive W and Z and the massless photon? Just assigning masses by hand...

  8. Wilson Disease: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... copper supplements. If you are trying to gain weight and have been on appropriate therapy, drinking one can of Vanilla Boost Plus per day should not give you too much copper. You also can make your own high calorie drinks by mixing protein supplements with a milk shake. - Fred Askari, M.D., ...

  9. Scabies: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as nursing homes, extended-care facilities, and prisons are often sites of scabies outbreaks. Child care ... during the asymptomatic incubation period. For example, a nurse or caretaker who works in a nursing home ...

  10. Frequently Asked Questions about Sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Blood Pressure Healthy Hey Kids, Learn About Cholesterol Hey Kids, Learn About Blood Sugar and Diabetes ... such as whole-grain cereal, flavored milk or yogurt—to improve their taste, especially for children, is ...

  11. Japanese Encephalitis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the vaccine, what should I do? What is Japanese encephalitis? Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a potentially severe ... cause inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). Where does Japanese encephalitis occur? JE occurs in Asia and parts ...

  12. CIFSRF 2015 Frequently Asked Questions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Helen Raij

    Can IDRC provide help in identifying potential Canadian institution partners? • Unfortunately not. For ethical reasons in a competitive call, IDRC cannot assist applicant organizations and/or companies in identifying partners. We can, however, suggest some umbrella organizations that may provide helpful information.

  13. Frequently Asked Questions about Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, although they happen very rarely. The reality is that vaccinations play a vital role in ... thimerosal-containing vaccines. So what could explain the increased rates of autism in recent years? For one ...

  14. Frequently Asked Questions about Rotavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their fifth birthday. It is often accompanied by fever, vomiting as well as diarrhea. Rotavirus is not the only cause of severe diarrhea, ... to top What are other symptoms of rotavirus? Rotavirus often begins with a mild fever and is followed by vomiting and an upset ...

  15. Frequently Asked Questions - GHRI Calls

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Genevieve Prud'homme

    2014-05-16

    May 16, 2014 ... CVs are needed only for principal applicant and co-principal applicants: Canadian researcher and African decision-maker. Is it acceptable to recruit a PhD student and use some of IRTs funds to support one PhD? • Please consult the IDRC guidance note on Acceptable Project Expenditures (especially the.

  16. Organ Transplantation: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for me? How are organs distributed? What is organ transplantation? If you have a medical condition that may ... age limits or medical conditions that rule out organ transplantation? There is no standard age limit to be ...

  17. Diving Medicine: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Malaria Medicines & Diving Medical Questionnaire / Statement Can the truth hurt? Is it dangerous to be totally honest ... headaches can affect diving. Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Paraplegia Post Brain Tumor Surgery Ophthalmology (Eyes) Blurred Vision Detached ...

  18. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is to “conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs with respect to blinding ... NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos ...

  19. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language Information Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of Extramural Science Programs Division of Extramural ...

  20. Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts: Frequently Asked Questions on the Scope of 42 U.S.C. § 8287 et seq.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-12-21

    Document provides clarification and guidance on issues commonly raised regarding the scope of 42 U.S.C. § 8287 et seq. It is a supplement to the Federal Energy Management Program's extensive collection of materials that are available to assist federal agencies execute successful energy savings performance contract (ESPC) projects.

  1. Ask a Periodontist (Frequently Asked Questions about Gum Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Academy of Periodontology Announces First Recipient of SUNSTAR Innovation Grant American Academy of Periodontology Names New Executive ... in adolescents. However, children should still learn the importance of keeping their teeth and gums healthy to ...

  2. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content FAQ About Genetic Counseling Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding Opportunities ...

  3. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as sickle cell disease, cystic fibrosis , and Tay-Sachs disease . The mutated gene is passed down ... cell disease , cystic fibrosis , polycystic kidney disease , and Tay-Sachs disease . Monogenic disorders are relatively rare in ...

  4. Frequently Asked Questions about Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and Quotes ... m Having Trouble Logging In/Staying Logged In Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? What do music therapists ...

  5. Lyme Disease Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should I do? If you are pregnant and suspect you have contracted Lyme disease, contact your physician ... A research tool called PCR can detect bacterial DNA in some patients. Unfortunately, this is also not ...

  6. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... malaria, most of them children in Africa. Because malaria causes so much illness and death, the disease is ... tiredness. Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may also occur. Malaria may cause anemia and jaundice (yellow coloring of the skin ...

  7. Women and Diabetes: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Association Events Messaging Tools Recruiting Advocates Local Market Planning Training Webinars News & Events Advocacy News Call ... overall health. Can women with diabetes breastfeed their babies? Unless your health care team advises you otherwise, ...

  8. Prader-Willi Syndrome: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help some individuals, the essential strategies for minimizing difficult behaviors in PWS are careful structuring of the person’s environment and consistent use of positive behavior management and support. Get Involved About Prader-Willi Syndrome ...

  9. Frequently Asked Questions about Radiation Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn more Back to top What does it mean to shelter-in-place during a radiation emergency? “ ... Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR) Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC ...

  10. Frequently Asked Questions about Digital Mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the use of a cassette that contains an imaging plate), or digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). What is DBT? Digital breast tomosynthesis is a relatively new technology. In DBT, the X-ray tube moves in an arc around the breast ...

  11. Frequently Asked Questions and Answers on Smallpox

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it be treated? There is no cure for smallpox, but vaccination can be used very effectively to prevent infection ... were directly exposed to the virus which causes smallpox, a repeat vaccination would be recommended. What is WHO doing now? ...

  12. Frequently asked questions on filtered noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens

    This note was made in response to several returning questions on noise and ways to calculate covariance of filtered random signals, where filters could origin from residual generators. Reference is made to stochastic signals treated in appendix 2 of the book Diagnosis and Fault-tolerant Control...

  13. Frequently Asked Questions about Bunion Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detectors? Not usually. It can depend on the device chosen for your procedure, as well as how sensitive the metal detectors are. Find an ACFAS Physician Search Search Tools Find an ACFAS Physician: Search by Mail Address Search by GPS Please enter a city or last name. Use ...

  14. Frequently Asked Questions (Palliative Care: Conversations Matter)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chaplains, and counselors. Support may involve art and music therapists, home health aides, nutritionists, and respite care providers. How does palliative care help children and their families? A child’s serious illness affects the entire family. Pediatric palliative care can support ...

  15. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Groups Health and Wellness Outreach Materials Posters Safety Gun Safety Medication Safety Reproductive Health Healthy Pregnancy Preconception ... where specific authority is given to VA by law. Contact your nearest VA health care facility (found ...

  16. Frequently Asked Questions about Improved Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    A healthy school environment is one of the keys to keeping young minds and bodies strong. In fact, a healthy school environment is one of eight core components in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) model “Healthy Youth! Coordinated

  17. Frequently Asked Questions about Personal Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sign an acknowledgement that you received the notice. The law does NOT say you HAVE to sign it, ... my health information be shared without my consent? The law says that anyone can see your health record ...

  18. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Extreme Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or Traumatic Event Resources for Families Resources for Leaders Resources for State and Local Governments Emergency Responders: ... Emergency Wound Care Wound Management for Healthcare Pros Power Outages When the Power Goes Out Worker Safety ...

  19. Alcohol and Public Health: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affects a person most, not the type of alcoholic drink. Top of Page What does moderate drinking mean? According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans , 1 moderate alcohol consumption is defined as having up to 1 drink ...

  20. FAQs: Frequently Asked Questions regarding documents requested ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    on the original affiliated institution, you will have to submit a paragraph explaining the reasons for the change. The evaluators will then decide whether to approve this change or not. This step may delay your departure to the field. 5) Can I submit the letter of affiliation in Spanish? Yes, the letter of affiliation can be submitted ...

  1. Grants to Institutions: Frequently Asked Questions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    is essential to allow electronic fund transfers. Any changes to your institution's banking information must immediately be brought to the ... IDRC will advise you in writing if there are any errors, omissions, or clarifications required in your submissions. Payments are held until you provide the additional information and the ...

  2. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Yersinia pestis ( Y. pestis ), a bacterium found in rodents and their fleas in many areas around the ... disease. Naturally occurring pneumonic plague is uncommon, although small outbreaks do occur. Both types of plague are ...

  3. Frequently Asked Questions about Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urologic care and management . Q: Are people with Spina Bifida at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes? ... on obesity and diabetes . Q: Are people with Spina Bifida at increased risk of getting osteoporosis? A: 50% ...

  4. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP): Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PSP in some cases. Sinemet. This is the brand name for a combination of “levodopa” and “carbidopa.” ... A major goal of CurePSP is to increase awareness of PSP, CBD, MSA and related brain diseases ...

  5. Lymphatic Filariasis: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQs) Vectors of Lymphatic Filariasis Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology ... microscopic, thread-like worms. The adult worms only live in the human lymph system. The lymph system maintains the body's fluid balance ...

  6. Prader-Willi Syndrome: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Legal Issues Family Concerns Effective Advocacy WYATT SPECIAL EDUCATION ADVOCACY TRAINING (2017-2018) Research Research Announcements Oxytocin Study GRANTS AWARDED ARTICLES AND ABSTRACTS Advisory Boards Clinical Advisory Board Scientific ...

  7. Frequently Asked Questions about Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in which certain mutations increase the risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers (See: Learning About Breast Cancer ), and the FAP gene, in which mutations increase the risk for hereditary ...

  8. Frequently asked questions about ATIP | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    What are the costs involved to submit a request under the Access to Information Act or Privacy Act? I have received my information from your Crown corporation and I am not satisfied with the results. What are my options?

  9. Frequently Asked Questions about Surgical Site Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQ CRE Definition Facilities/Settings State Health Departments Gram-negative Bacteria Hepatitis HIV Occupationally Acquired HIV/AIDS in ... ESBLs Detection of Imipenem or Meropenem-resistance in Gram-negative Organisms Detection of: Oxacillin/MRSA Detection of VISA/ ...

  10. ASK Florida; a climate change education professional development program for middle school teachers in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihs, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    A series of professional development workshops covering the fundamentals of climate change have been developed and facilitated for two groups of middle school science teachers in three Florida counties. The NASA-supported joint venture between Florida State University's Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) and the University of South Florida's (USF's) Coalition for Science Literacy, ASK Florida, focuses on expanding and deepening teachers' content knowledge of a wide range of climate change topics, connecting local and regional changes to the global picture, and supporting classroom implementation and effective teaching practices. Education experts from USF, climate scientists from COAPS, and Hillsborough county teachers and science coaches coordinated and developed the workshop content, which is based on Florida's Next Generation Sunshine State Standards in science, science curriculum guides for 6th grade, and teacher interest. Several scientists have facilitated activities during the workshop, including professors in meteorology and climatology, research scientists in the field, a NOAA program manager, the state climatologists for Florida, and others. Having these climate scientists present during the workshop provides teachers an opportunity to interact directly with the scientists and gain insight into the climatology field. Additionally, we host an open-forum discussion panel during which teachers can ask the experts about any topics of interest. Activities are designed to enhance the scientific skill level of the teachers. Introductory activities reinforce teachers' abilities to distinguish facts from opinions and to evaluate sources. Other activities provide hands-on experience using actual scientific data from NASA and other agencies. For example, teachers analyze precipitation data to create distributions of Florida rainfall, examine sea level trends at various locations, identify Atlantic hurricane frequencies during the phases of ENSO

  11. Ask: a health advocacy program for adolescents with an intellectual disability: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Adolescents with intellectual disability often have poor health and healthcare. This is partly as a consequence of poor communication and recall difficulties, and the possible loss of specialised paediatric services. Methods/Design A cluster randomised trial was conducted with adolescents with intellectual disability to investigate a health intervention package to enhance interactions among adolescents with intellectual disability, their parents/carers, and general practitioners (GPs). The trial took place in Queensland, Australia, between February 2007 and September 2010. The intervention package was designed to improve communication with health professionals and families’ organisation of health information, and to increase clinical activities beneficial to improved health outcomes. It consisted of the Comprehensive Health Assessment Program (CHAP), a one-off health check, and the Ask Health Diary, designed for on-going use. Participants were drawn from Special Education Schools and Special Education Units. The education component of the intervention was delivered as part of the school curriculum. Educators were surveyed at baseline and followed-up four months later. Carers were surveyed at baseline and after 26 months. Evidence of health promotion, disease prevention and case-finding activities were extracted from GPs clinical records. Qualitative interviews of educators occurred after completion of the educational component of the intervention and with adolescents and carers after the CHAP. Discussion Adolescents with intellectual disability have difficulty obtaining many health services and often find it difficult to become empowered to improve and protect their health. The health intervention package proposed may aid them by augmenting communication, improving documentation of health encounters, and improving access to, and quality of, GP care. Recruitment strategies to consider for future studies in this population include ensuring potential

  12. Frequent statement and dereference elimination for imperative and object-oriented distributed programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zawawy, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces new approaches for the analysis of frequent statement and dereference elimination for imperative and object-oriented distributed programs running on parallel machines equipped with hierarchical memories. The paper uses languages whose address spaces are globally partitioned. Distributed programs allow defining data layout and threads writing to and reading from other thread memories. Three type systems (for imperative distributed programs) are the tools of the proposed techniques. The first type system defines for every program point a set of calculated (ready) statements and memory accesses. The second type system uses an enriched version of types of the first type system and determines which of the ready statements and memory accesses are used later in the program. The third type system uses the information gather so far to eliminate unnecessary statement computations and memory accesses (the analysis of frequent statement and dereference elimination). Extensions to these type systems are also presented to cover object-oriented distributed programs. Two advantages of our work over related work are the following. The hierarchical style of concurrent parallel computers is similar to the memory model used in this paper. In our approach, each analysis result is assigned a type derivation (serves as a correctness proof).

  13. Frequent Statement and Dereference Elimination for Imperative and Object-Oriented Distributed Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. El-Zawawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces new approaches for the analysis of frequent statement and dereference elimination for imperative and object-oriented distributed programs running on parallel machines equipped with hierarchical memories. The paper uses languages whose address spaces are globally partitioned. Distributed programs allow defining data layout and threads writing to and reading from other thread memories. Three type systems (for imperative distributed programs are the tools of the proposed techniques. The first type system defines for every program point a set of calculated (ready statements and memory accesses. The second type system uses an enriched version of types of the first type system and determines which of the ready statements and memory accesses are used later in the program. The third type system uses the information gather so far to eliminate unnecessary statement computations and memory accesses (the analysis of frequent statement and dereference elimination. Extensions to these type systems are also presented to cover object-oriented distributed programs. Two advantages of our work over related work are the following. The hierarchical style of concurrent parallel computers is similar to the memory model used in this paper. In our approach, each analysis result is assigned a type derivation (serves as a correctness proof.

  14. Unique program aims to connect frequent ED utilizers with medical homes, resources to meet complex needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Sinai Hospital of Baltimore in Baltimore, MD, is partnering with HealthCare Access Maryland, a non-profit organization in the state, to link patients who frequent the ED for care with medical homes and other resources that can better meet their medical and social needs. Under the Access Health Program, ED-based care coordinators intervene with patients who meet program criteria, linking them with medical homes and other resources that address their complex needs. The hospital has devised a flag to notify the ED when a frequent-utilizing patient presents in the department for care. Care coordinators then meet with these patients and get their consent to participate in the program. Within a week of the ED visit, care coordinators schedule a home visit with the patient to establish a care plan containing specific goals and a time frame to carry out these goals. Patients remain in the program for 90 days as care coordinators work to hand them off to longer-term resources. Many of the patients enrolled in the program have substance abuse and mental health problems. Patients are also often uninsured and/or homeless. Within two months of launching the program, care coordinators enrolled 74 patients, with the goal of eventually bringing that number to 200.

  15. Outcomes of a telemonitoring-based program (telEPOC) in frequently hospitalized COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Cristóbal; Moraza, Javier; Iriberri, Milagros; Aguirre, Urko; Goiria, Begoña; Quintana, José M; Aburto, Myriam; Capelastegui, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic diseases requires changes in health care delivery. In COPD, telemedicine appears to be a useful tool. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy (in improving health care-resource use and clinical outcomes) of a telemonitoring-based program (telEPOC) in COPD patients with frequent hospitalizations. We conducted a nonrandomized observational study in an intervention cohort of 119 patients (Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital) and a control cohort of 78 patients (Cruces Hospital), followed up for 2 years (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02528370). The inclusion criteria were two or more hospital admissions in the previous year or three or more admissions in the previous 2 years. The intervention group received telemonitoring plus education and controls usual care. Most participants were men (13% women), and the sample had a mean age of 70 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 45%, Charlson comorbidity index score of 3.5, and BODE (body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity) index score of 4.1. In multivariate analysis, the intervention was independently related to lower rates of hospital admission (odds ratio [OR] 0.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27-0.54; Ptelemonitoring and education was able to reduce the health care-resource use and stabilize the clinical condition of frequently admitted COPD patients.

  16. Effectiveness of simple balancing training program in elderly patients with history of frequent falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuptniratsaikul V

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Vilai Kuptniratsaikul1, Rungnirand Praditsuwan2, Prasert Assantachai3, Teerada Ploypetch1, Suthipol Udompunturak4, Julaporn Pooliam41Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, 2Department of Medicine, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, 4Office for Research and Development, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, ThailandObjective: To study the effectiveness of simply-performed balancing exercises in fall prevention.Design: Pre- and post-trial.Setting: University hospital from January 2009 to May 2010.Participants: Elderly with falls in the previous year.Intervention: Simple balancing exercise was performed at home every day and was recorded in the booklet.Measurements: New falling events and a battery of balancing abilities including the Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT, chair stand, functional reach, and Berg balance scale-short form were evaluated at baseline, 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month periods. Fear of falling and quality of life scores were assessed at baseline and 12-month periods.Results: 146 subjects were recruited, 116 female (79.5% with a mean age of 67.1 years. At the end of the study, 49% of participants had not fallen. All of the balancing abilities were compared between frequent and infrequent fallers and were significantly improved (P < 0.001 except for functional reach in the frequent fall group. Most subjects (72%–79% complied well with the exercise program. However, compliance had no effect on balancing abilities. About 36.4% of participants had adverse events from exercise, of which knee pain was the top ranked. The quality of life and the fall efficacy scores increased significantly at the end of the study. Factors affecting falling were compliance with exercise (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 2.55, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.04, 6.30 and a history of falling ≥3 times in the previous year (adjusted OR: 3.76, 95% CI: 1.18, 11.98.Conclusion: Performing simply-designed balancing exercises, at least 3 days per week, can increase

  17. Outcomes of a telemonitoring-based program (telEPOC in frequently hospitalized COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban C

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cristóbal Esteban,1,2 Javier Moraza,1 Milagros Iriberri,3 Urko Aguirre,2,4 Begoña Goiria,5 José M Quintana,2,4 Myriam Aburto,1 Alberto Capelastegui1 1Pneumology Department, Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital, Galdakao, 2Red de Investigación en Servicios Sanitarios y Enfermedades Crónicas (REDISSEC, Bilbao, 3Pneumology Department, Cruces Hospital, Barakaldo, 4Research Unit, Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital, Galdakao, 5Primary Care Unit, Barrualde Integrated Healthcare Organisation (OSI-Barrualde, Spain Background: The increasing prevalence of chronic diseases requires changes in health care delivery. In COPD, telemedicine appears to be a useful tool. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy (in improving health care-resource use and clinical outcomes of a telemonitoring-based program (telEPOC in COPD patients with frequent hospitalizations. Materials and methods: We conducted a nonrandomized observational study in an intervention cohort of 119 patients (Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital and a control cohort of 78 patients (Cruces Hospital, followed up for 2 years (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02528370. The inclusion criteria were two or more hospital admissions in the previous year or three or more admissions in the previous 2 years. The intervention group received telemonitoring plus education and controls usual care. Results: Most participants were men (13% women, and the sample had a mean age of 70 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 45%, Charlson comorbidity index score of 3.5, and BODE (body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity index score of 4.1. In multivariate analysis, the intervention was independently related to lower rates of hospital admission (odds ratio [OR] 0.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27–0.54; P<0.0001, emergency department attendance (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.35–0.92; P<0.02, and 30-day readmission (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.29–0.74; P<0.001, as well as cumulative length of stay (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0

  18. PROGRAM RATIONALE OF TREATMENT AND PREVENTION IN CHILDREN WITH FREQUENT RESPIRATORY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Deryusheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of complex clinical and laboratory examination of 146 children aged 2—3 years attending kindergarten were presented. The leading predictors of frequent respiratory disease: disturbance of microbiocenosis oropharyngeal mucosa, immunoglobulins decrease, respiratory allergic pathology were established and scientifically substantiated. The results obtained prove the main directions of therapeutic and preventive measures.

  19. EFFECTIVENESS OF SECRETOLYTIC THERAPY IN REHABILITATION PROGRAM IN FREQUENTLY AILING CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Kiselev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A problem of rehabilitation of frequently ailing children (FAC is one of the actual problems in pediatrics. Disorders of mucosal immunity, depending on different factors including the state of mucociliary transport, play important role in formation of FAC group including patients with recurrent episodes of obstructive bronchitis. Morphological and functional unity of mucous tunic of respiratory tract allows determining the state of mucociliary clearance and effectiveness of secretolytic therapy by the state of mucosal tunic of nose and nasopharynx (it is the most accessible mucosal tunic for the objective examination. Specified rates of time of mucociliary transport in different groups of FAC are presented in this article. An effectiveness of mucoregulatory medication ambroxol in complex treatment of FAC with adenoids and recurrent episodes of obstructive bronchitis, and advisability of its prolonged (14–18 days use for the recovery of disturbed system of mucociliary transport were described in this article.Key words: frequently ailing children, somatotype, mucociliary clearance, treatment.

  20. Impact of Frequent Interruption on Nurses' Patient-Controlled Analgesia Programming Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoe, Kristi R; Giuliano, Karen K

    2017-12-01

    The purpose was to add to the body of knowledge regarding the impact of interruption on acute care nurses' cognitive workload, total task completion times, nurse frustration, and medication administration error while programming a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump. Data support that the severity of medication administration error increases with the number of interruptions, which is especially critical during the administration of high-risk medications. Bar code technology, interruption-free zones, and medication safety vests have been shown to decrease administration-related errors. However, there are few published data regarding the impact of number of interruptions on nurses' clinical performance during PCA programming. Nine acute care nurses completed three PCA pump programming tasks in a simulation laboratory. Programming tasks were completed under three conditions where the number of interruptions varied between two, four, and six. Outcome measures included cognitive workload (six NASA Task Load Index [NASA-TLX] subscales), total task completion time (seconds), nurse frustration (NASA-TLX Subscale 6), and PCA medication administration error (incorrect final programming). Increases in the number of interruptions were associated with significant increases in total task completion time ( p = .003). We also found increases in nurses' cognitive workload, nurse frustration, and PCA pump programming errors, but these increases were not statistically significant. Complex technology use permeates the acute care nursing practice environment. These results add new knowledge on nurses' clinical performance during PCA pump programming and high-risk medication administration.

  1. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish ... Select a video below to get answers to questions like these and more with our Ask a ...

  2. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... 5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language Information Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division ...

  3. Frequently Asked Questions about Congenital Melanocytic Nevus (CMN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dean Rogers Donor Challenge Issued Total Body Photography (TBP) The 2010 International Nevus Outreach Conference Memory DV ... Dean Rogers Donor Challenge Issued Total Body Photography (TBP) The 2010 International Nevus Outreach Conference Memory DV ...

  4. Telehealth Regulatory and Legal Considerations: Frequently Asked Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Cason

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available As telehealth gains momentum as a service delivery model in the United States within the rehabilitation professions, regulatory and legal questions arise. This article examines the following questions:1. Is there a need to secure licenses in two states (i.e., where the practitioner resides, and where the client is located, before engaging in telehealth?2. Do state laws differ concerning if and how telehealth can occur?3. Do any states expressly disallow telehealth?4. Can services delivered through telehealth be billed the same way as services provided in-person?5. If practitioners fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure (e.g., continuing education obligations in their state of residence, do they also need to fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure for the state in which the client resides?6. Will professional malpractice insurance cover services delivered through telehealth?7. Does a sole practitioner need to abide by HIPAA regulations?Responses to these questions are offered to raise awareness of the regulatory and legal implications associated with the use of a telehealth service delivery model

  5. Frequently Asked Questions about Measles in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases and outbreaks. Q: What does “measles elimination” mean? A: CDC defines measles elimination as the absence ... Respiratory Diseases , Division of Viral Diseases Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC ...

  6. Prosthetic Frequently Asked Questions for the New Amputee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it with your favorite color or pattern. The prosthesis is an extension of you and your style – wear it proudly! Technology continues to change the prosthetic market. With advances in the microprocessor knee and foot, and advanced hands and sockets, prosthetics ...

  7. Frequently Asked Questions about Cell Phones and Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Body Radiation Basics What is Radiation? The Electromagnetic Spectrum Ionizing Radiation Non-ionizing Radiation The Ionized ... people wonder if cell phones can cause health problems. Here’s what you should know about cell phones ...

  8. Frequently Asked Questions about Monitored Natural Attenuation in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    not be sustainable over the long- term. 1 HIGH r , • Cit izen’s groups and others could be skeptical of MNA, and therefore site owners were...Chlorinated ethanes ( I, I, I ,2-T eCA to CA); Chlorinated methanes (CT to CH4). 13 different scenarios based on 5 hydrogeologic settings and 3...BASIS FOR MNA M NA for the source zone too? (Page 2) Source Attenuat ion Prot o cols One research group has developed a "Source Zone Natural

  9. 7 Frequently Asked Quesitons (FAQs) in Urban Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baycan, T.; Nijkamp, P.

    2008-01-01

    Urban planning has, in its rich history, often been reviewed from the perspective of different philosophical, ideological and methodological approaches by planners, architects and social scientists. In this paper, we aim to highlight the debate on urban planning in the context of planning history

  10. Telehealth regulatory and legal considerations: frequently asked questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Jana; Brannon, Janice A

    2011-01-01

    As telehealth gains momentum as a service delivery model in the United States within the rehabilitation professions, regulatory and legal questions arise. This article examines the following questions: Is there a need to secure licenses in two states (i.e., where the practitioner resides, and where the client is located), before engaging in telehealth?Do state laws differ concerning if and how telehealth can occur?Do any states expressly disallow telehealth?Can services delivered through telehealth be billed the same way as services provided in-person?If practitioners fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure (e.g., continuing education obligations) in their state of residence, do they also need to fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure for the state in which the client resides?Will professional malpractice insurance cover services delivered through telehealth?Does a sole practitioner need to abide by HIPAA regulations?Responses to these questions are offered to raise awareness of the regulatory and legal implications associated with the use of a telehealth service delivery model within the professions of occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech-language pathology and audiology.

  11. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic and Genomic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... example of cloning. The success rates of reproductive animal cloning, however, have been very low. In 2005, South Korean researchers claimed to have produced human embryonic stem cell lines by cloning genetic material from patients. However, this data was later ...

  12. Frequently Asked Questions about Drug Testing in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... June 2002, the U.S. Supreme Court broadened the authority of public schools to test students for illegal ... drug testing as a means of achieving substance abuse intervention. 3 Relevant studies include the following: A ...

  13. Kernicterus in the 21st century: frequently asked questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutani, V K; Johnson, L

    2009-02-01

    Acute kernicterus remains a clinical emergency and its delayed management represents an easily preventable neonatal brain injury. Yet, practitioners encounter recurrent questions regarding the risk and timing of bilirubin-related neurotoxicity. These include the following: does bilirubin damage the brain of healthy infants? Is there a re-emergence of kernicterus in the United States? Was kernicterus previously prevented in the United States? What was the public health impact of 1994 American Academy of Pediatrics Guidelines? What is the current incidence of kernicterus and severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia? What is the estimated risk of kernicterus in infants with excessive hyperbilirubinemia? Is there a specific bilirubin threshold total serum bilirubin (TSB) value for neurotoxicity? Are there sequelae of severe or prolonged moderate hyperbilirubinemia in the absence of recognized acute bilirubin encephalopathy? Can we define a bilirubin level that is safe in newborns? We address these questions in the context of available data and evidence, and estimate the current risk of chronic kernicterus is about one in seven in infants with TSB >30 mg per 100 ml (513 micromol l(-1)).

  14. Newborn Screening (NBS): Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PARENTS: FREE ADDITONAL NEWBORN SCREENING PACKETS What is Newborn Screening (NBS)? NBS is a system that helps ... of the condition. What are the benefits of Newborn Screening? Early detection of disorders and conditions detectable ...

  15. Frequently Asked Questions about Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... like other physicians. In particular, we specialize in spasticity management. This includes prescribing specialized medications and invasive procedures. PM&R physicians prescribe braces/splints to improve arm or leg position or function, ...

  16. Creating robust vocabulary frequently asked questions and extended examples

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Isabel L

    2008-01-01

    Bringing Words to Life has enlivened the classrooms of hundreds of thousands of teachers. Responding to readers' success stories, practical questions, and requests for extended examples, this ideal volume builds on the groundbreaking work of Bringing Words to Life. The authors present additional tools, tips, and detailed explanations of such questions as which words to teach, when and how to teach them, and how to adapt instruction for English language learners. They provide specific instructional sequences, including assessments, for grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12, as well as interactive less

  17. Mergers and acquisitions. Frequently asked questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S M; Smeltzer, C H; Thomas, C

    2000-03-01

    This article is structured in a question/answer format based on interviews with Dr. Carolyn Hope Smeltzer and Salima Manji Lin of PricewaterhouseCoopers, Chicago, and Chuck Thomas of Hinshaw & Culbertson, Rockford. The questions come from CEO's, healthcare executives, and nurse executives at hospitals that are contemplating mergers or that have both succeeded and failed to merge their institutions. The experts share their knowledge.

  18. Frequently Asked Questions about ALS and the ALS Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... studies suggested a link with exposure to trace elements, solvents, radiation, and agricultural chemicals. No confirmed link ... Links Registry Testimonials External Research Get the Facts Infographic Research Resources Biorepository ALS Biorepository Pilot ALS Biorepository ...

  19. Frequently Asked Questions: Minimum Legal Drinking Age/Age 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides answers to questions about minimum legal drinking age. The questions include: (1) Youth in other countries are exposed to alcohol at earlier ages and engage in less alcohol abuse and have healthier attitudes toward alcohol. Don't those countries have fewer alcohol-related problems than we do?; (2) Does educating teens about…

  20. Climate Leadership Awards Frequent Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides answers to frequently asked questions regarding the Climate Leadership Awards, sponsored by EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership with co-sponsorship from the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions and The Climate Registry.

  1. Question-Asking and Advocacy by African American Parents at Individualized Education Program Meetings: A Social and Cultural Capital Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Natasha M.

    2015-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 mandates parental involvement during Individualized Education Program (IEP) meetings. Several factors including previous IEP experiences, level of ongoing communication between parents and education professionals, or existence of social and cultural capital resources can impact…

  2. Asking Questions in Academia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity In academia the most important skill is to ask academically relevant and sound questions. This is not easy and students need to practice asking questions orally and in writing before they write research papers.......Motivation for the activity In academia the most important skill is to ask academically relevant and sound questions. This is not easy and students need to practice asking questions orally and in writing before they write research papers....

  3. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language ... Office of the Scientific Director Office of the Clinical Director Laboratories, Sections and Units Division of Epidemiology ...

  4. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Anna Harper - Media Relations afh@nei.nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos ...

  5. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... Accomplishments Budget and Congress About the NEI Director History of the NEI NEI 50th Anniversary NEI Women ... Relations afh@nei.nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions ...

  6. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind.” ... Health Information Frequently asked questions ...

  7. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... Relations afh@nei.nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions ... is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this ...

  8. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Anna Harper - Media Relations afh@nei.nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions ...

  9. What to Ask: Delirium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join our e-newsletter! Resources What to Ask: Delirium Tools and Tips Under recognition of delirium is a major problem. It is important to ... questions you can ask your healthcare professional about delirium. What is delirium? What are its symptoms? How ...

  10. Web life: Ask Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Ask Nature is a site devoted to biomimicry, an interdisciplinary field in which practitioners study how animals and plants solve problems, and then use those solutions to develop better human technologies.

  11. ASK Magazine; No. 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Alexander (Editor); Little, Terry (Editor); Davis, Marty (Editor); Simmons, Jessica (Editor); Margolies, Donald (Editor); Goshorn, Larry (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    THIS ISSUE FEATURES A VISUAL DEPICTION OF THE ACADEMY of Program and Project Leadership (APPL). I imagine a variety of initial reactions to the drawing. One might be, "What is a cartoon doing in a magazine about project management?" Or perhaps, "Wow, nice colors-and fun." Another may be to closely search the image for signs, symbols and meaning. Still another, to read a new level of innovation and creativity into the picture. Undoubtedly, some readers will raise questions about the cost. Of course, any reaction is a sign of engagement. The stronger, the more energized the emotional and cognitive processing, the better. It is a sign of attention and interaction. For I've heard it said, "You only need to worry if they don t care one way or the other." So what is the point of the picture? To stimulate interest, raise questions, promote discussion, and maybe raise a smile.. .That, at least, was my initial reaction when I was introduced to the work of Nancy Hegedus, who helps to create these drawings for Root Learning Inc. At the NASA PM Conference, I was first shown the work Nancy had been doing with the help of Goddard s Knowledge Management Architect, Dr. Ed Rogers. I was immediately drawn into the power of visualization as a tool for more effective learning, communicating, and conveying complex knowledge concepts. We need new tools in today s world, where information and data overwhelms by sheer volume. There are articles, pamphlets, communications, and white papers-all aiming to convince and influence. Reactions to these tend to be either avoidance or mind-numbing, heavy-eyed consent; the message never registers or enters the soul. That s one of the reasons that APPL s Knowledge Sharing Initiative (KSI) has turned to storytelling as a memorable way of transfer- ring knowledge, inspiring imitation of best practices, and spurring reflection. ASK Magazine s recent fourth birthday marks an important milestone in APPL s continuing quest to provide ongoing support to

  12. It can't hurt to ask; a patient-centered quality of service assessment of health canada's medical cannabis policy and program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Philippe

    2012-01-03

    In 2001 Health Canada responded to a series of Ontario court decisions by creating the Marihuana Medical Access Division (MMAD) and the Marihuana Medical Access Regulations (MMAR). Although Health Canada has conducted a small number of stakeholder consultations, the federal government has never polled federally authorized cannabis patients. This study is an attempt to learn more about patient needs, challenges and experiences with the MMAD. Launched in the spring of 2007, Quality of Service Assessment of Health Canada's Medical Cannabis Policy and Program pairs a 50 question online survey addressing the personal experiences of patients in the federal cannabis program with 25 semi-guided interviews. Data gathering for this study took place from April 2007 to Jan. 2008, eventually garnering survey responses from 100 federally-authorized users, which at the time represented about 5% of the patients enrolled in Health Canada's program. This paper presents the results of the survey portion of the study. 8% of respondents report getting their cannabis from Health Canada, while 66% grow it for themselves. >50% report that they frequent compassion clubs or dispensaries, which remain illegal and unregulated in Canada. 81% of patients would chose certified organic methods of cultivation; >90% state that not all strains are equally effective at relieving symptoms, and 97% would prefer to obtain cannabis from a source where multiple strains are available. Of the 48 patients polled that had tried the Health Canada cannabis supply, >75% rank it as either "1" or "2" on a scale of 1-10 (with "1" being "very poor", and 10 being "excellent"). 72% of respondents report they are either "somewhat" or "totally unsatisfied" with Canada's medical cannabis program. These survey results and relevant court decisions suggest that the MMAR are not meeting the needs of most of the nation's medical cannabis patient community. It is hoped this research will help inform policy changes that will

  13. It can't hurt to ask; a patient-centered quality of service assessment of health canada's medical cannabis policy and program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2001 Health Canada responded to a series of Ontario court decisions by creating the Marihuana Medical Access Division (MMAD and the Marihuana Medical Access Regulations (MMAR. Although Health Canada has conducted a small number of stakeholder consultations, the federal government has never polled federally authorized cannabis patients. This study is an attempt to learn more about patient needs, challenges and experiences with the MMAD. Methods Launched in the spring of 2007, Quality of Service Assessment of Health Canada's Medical Cannabis Policy and Program pairs a 50 question online survey addressing the personal experiences of patients in the federal cannabis program with 25 semi-guided interviews. Data gathering for this study took place from April 2007 to Jan. 2008, eventually garnering survey responses from 100 federally-authorized users, which at the time represented about 5% of the patients enrolled in Health Canada's program. This paper presents the results of the survey portion of the study. Results 8% of respondents report getting their cannabis from Health Canada, while 66% grow it for themselves. >50% report that they frequent compassion clubs or dispensaries, which remain illegal and unregulated in Canada. 81% of patients would chose certified organic methods of cultivation; >90% state that not all strains are equally effective at relieving symptoms, and 97% would prefer to obtain cannabis from a source where multiple strains are available. Of the 48 patients polled that had tried the Health Canada cannabis supply, >75% rank it as either "1" or "2" on a scale of 1-10 (with "1" being "very poor", and 10 being "excellent". Discussion 72% of respondents report they are either "somewhat" or "totally unsatisfied" with Canada's medical cannabis program. These survey results and relevant court decisions suggest that the MMAR are not meeting the needs of most of the nation's medical cannabis patient community. It is

  14. Frequent major errors in antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial strains distributed under the Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Quality Assurance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, R

    2012-07-01

    The Quality Assurance Program (QAP) of the Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) was a proficiency testing system developed to service the laboratory animal discipline. The QAP comprised the distribution of bacterial strains from various species of animals for identification to species level and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST). Identification capabilities were below acceptable standards. This study evaluated AST results using the DKFZ compilations of test results for all bacterial strains showing the number of participants reporting the strain as resistant (R), sensitive (S) or intermediate susceptible (I) to each antibiotic substance used. Due to lack of information about methods used, it was assumed that what the majority of the participants reported (R or S) was the correct test result and that an opposite result was a major error (ME). MEs occurred in 1375 of 14,258 (9.7%) of test results and ME% ranged from 0% to 23.2% per bacterial group-agent group combination. Considerable variation in MEs was found within groups of bacteria and within groups of agents. In addition to poor performance in proper species classification, the quality of AST in laboratory animal diagnostic laboratories seems far below standards considered acceptable in human diagnostic microbiology.

  15. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vision Research & Ophthalmology (DIVRO) Student Training Programs To search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home > NEI for Kids > Ask a Scientist Video Series All About Vision About the Eye ...

  16. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vision Research & Ophthalmology (DIVRO) Student Training Programs To search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home > NEI for Kids > Ask a Scientist Video Series All About Vision About the Eye ...

  17. Asking the Right Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Line

    Based on fieldwork in Mali this paper discusses the role of anthropology (and the anthropologist) in a large public health research project on children's health. In the uncertainty and disquiet that comes with the battle to combat and avoid diseases in a setting where poverty and abysmal diseases......, is the ability to move beyond even the best hidden assumptions and question our own questions, thereby enabling us to ask the right questions....

  18. Panspermia asks new questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyce, Brig

    2001-08-01

    There is a widespread sentiment that panspermia is uninteresting is because it does not answer fundamental questions about the origin of life. The strongest version of panspermia asks entirely new questions. While barriers to the acceptance of panspermia are falling and evidence supporting it is accumulating, the mere possibility of panspermia unhinges the Darwinian account of evolutionary progress. The new theory removes an issue dividing science and religion, but it requires an amendment to the big bang theory.

  19. ASK Magazine. No. 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Todd (Editor); Laufer, Alexander (Editor); Collins, Michelle (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    What makes a successful team? In this issue our contributors look closely at the subject and come up with several answers. Working on team chemistry is the "Activation Energy" Dr. Owen Gadeken's story is about. Scott Cameron thinks it's getting to know people one to one. Tony Maturo says it's getting the most out of your support staff. Dr. Michael Hecht finds the best people he can and build the team around their talents. Teamwork is a theme we explore often in Academy Sharing Knowledge (ASK), but never so directly as in this issue. You'll not only find formulas for building successful teams, you'll see examples of ones in action, strategies for how project managers can motivate their teams, and expert advice on how to choose who to work with and who not to work with. It seems like all the stories make one common point: everyone on a team counts. Few project managers can pull off a project alone, and when the whole team is performing to everyone's potential, the chances of pulling off a successful project goes up exponentially. If that doesn't seem like enough by itself, listen to this... Discerning fans of ASK will note the last two issues our Special Feature was "There are no Mistakes, Only Lessons." We have not abandoned this feature, but for now we want to broaden our repertoire. In this issue we add a new Special Feature, "My Metaphor," starting with Paul Espinosa's article "My Big Wall" about his rock climbing adventures on El Capitan in Yosemite National Park. If you think getting to Mars is work, read what it's like to scale a 3,000-foot rock face. This issue we're also welcoming two new members to our Review Board, Hugh Woodward and Jody Kusek. Hugh and Jody are our first reviewers from outside NASA, and we are delighted to have them on our team. Read their bios on the ASK Review Board page and see why we feel privileged to have them on our team.

  20. An Investigation into the Impact of Service Quality, Frequent Flier Programs and Safety Perception on Satisfaction and Customer Loyalty in the Airline Industry in Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandada Maxwell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the factors that make passengers loyal to an airline in Southern Africa by investigating the impact of service quality and safety perception on customer satisfaction and how satisfaction and frequent flyer programs (FFP subsequently influence customer loyalty. The key finding was that service quality positively influenced customer satisfaction, and satisfaction was an important antecedent of customer loyalty. The analysis also suggested that safety perception and FFP positively influence customer loyalty, while their relationship with satisfaction was not significant. An analysis of switching behaviour revealed that satisfied customers may still switch to other airlines. The main contribution of this study is the development of a customer loyalty model for the aviation industry in Southern Africa. Knowledge of customer loyalty drivers will assist airline marketing managers in developing strategies for improving passenger load factors and profitability.

  1. Children's Question Asking and Curiosity: A Training Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirout, Jamie; Klahr, David

    2011-01-01

    A primary instructional objective of most early science programs is to foster children's scientific curiosity and question-asking skills (Jirout & Klahr, 2011). However, little is known about the relationship between curiosity, question-asking behavior, and general inquiry skills. While curiosity and question asking are invariably mentioned in…

  2. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and ...

  3. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... National Eye Institute’s mission is to “conduct and support research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs ... search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home > NEI for Kids > Ask a Scientist Video Series ...

  4. Asking Research Questions: Theoretical Presuppositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenberg, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Asking significant research questions is a crucial aspect of building a research foundation in computer science (CS) education. In this article, I argue that the questions that we ask are shaped by internalized theoretical presuppositions about how the social and behavioral worlds operate. And although such presuppositions are essential in making…

  5. Genetic Programming and Frequent Itemset Mining to Identify Feature Selection Patterns of iEEG and fMRI Epilepsy Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Otis; Burrell, Lauren

    2015-03-01

    Pattern classification for intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals has furthered epilepsy research toward understanding the origin of epileptic seizures and localizing dysfunctional brain tissue for treatment. Prior research has demonstrated that implicitly selecting features with a genetic programming (GP) algorithm more effectively determined the proper features to discern biomarker and non-biomarker interictal iEEG and fMRI activity than conventional feature selection approaches. However for each the iEEG and fMRI modalities, it is still uncertain whether the stochastic properties of indirect feature selection with a GP yield (a) consistent results within a patient data set and (b) features that are specific or universal across multiple patient data sets. We examined the reproducibility of implicitly selecting features to classify interictal activity using a GP algorithm by performing several selection trials and subsequent frequent itemset mining (FIM) for separate iEEG and fMRI epilepsy patient data. We observed within-subject consistency and across-subject variability with some small similarity for selected features, indicating a clear need for patient-specific features and possible need for patient-specific feature selection or/and classification. For the fMRI, using nearest-neighbor classification and 30 GP generations, we obtained over 60% median sensitivity and over 60% median selectivity. For the iEEG, using nearest-neighbor classification and 30 GP generations, we obtained over 65% median sensitivity and over 65% median selectivity except one patient.

  6. Frequent Questions on Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a list of frequent questions on recycling, broken down into five categories. These are answers to common questions that EPA has received from press and web inquiries. This list is located on the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle website.

  7. Frequent Bowel Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/irritable-bowel-syndrome. Accessed Nov. 15, 2017. Nov. 18, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/frequent-bowel- ...

  8. Ask Me 3: improving communication in a Hispanic pediatric outpatient practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Virginia Seguin; Wood, Pamela R; Weiss, Barry D; Treviño, Leah

    2007-01-01

    To implement Ask-Me-3, a program that encourages patients to ask questions of physicians, in a low-income, predominantly Hispanic pediatric practice. We publicized Ask-Me-3 with posters/brochures in clinic. We interviewed parents before and 6 months after implementation to determine if they knew about and used the Ask-Me- 3 questions. No parents knew about Ask-Me-3 before implementation. Of 393 parents interviewed 6 months later, 42% knew about Ask-Me-3, and half of these used the questions. With a simple strategy for introducing Ask-Me-3, 20% of parents were using Ask-Me-3 six months later.

  9. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... NEI for Kids > Ask a Scientist Video Series All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see ...

  10. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... call to find more information about driving and epilepsy? What should I discuss with my boss at ...

  11. 2016 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    OPA), has been conducting surveys of gender issues for the active duty military since 1988. RSSC uses scientific state of the art statistical...misunderstood. The following details some common questions about our methodology as a whole and the 2016 WGRA specifically. 1. What was the population of...subgroups. 2016 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members 2017 434 | OPA OPA scientifically weights the data so findings can

  12. The Trump Administrations March 2017 Defense Budget Proposals: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-03

    modernization and infrastructure investment . It represents a critical first step in investing in a larger, more ready, and more capable military force...the Budget Control Act of 2011 (P.L. 112-25), as amended; National Defense Budget Estimates for FY2017 ( Green Book); Office of Management and Budget...FY2017 ( Green Book); Office of Management and Budget, America First: A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again, March 16, 2017; and Senator John

  13. Frequently Asked Questions on Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS‐CoV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of clinical care to an infected patient without strict hygiene measures. Transmission between people has been limited ... determine outbreak response priorities, treatment strategies, and clinical management approaches. WHO is also working with affected countries ...

  14. A question asked frequently in mathematics examina-tions in India ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. A Note on the Formula C=paid for the Circumference of a Circle. K P Ramakrishnan. Classroom Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 91-96. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. What Employers Need to Know: Frequently Asked Questions about High School Students in Workplaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobs For the Future, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Employers may not know the best way to reach out or how to structure opportunities for young people to explore careers within their organization. In addition, employers may be uncertain about liability, privacy policies, and safety regulations for employees under the age of 18. State and federal laws and policies pertaining to youth employment can…

  16. Effective Schooling in Rural Africa Report 4: Frequently Asked Questions about Effective Schooling in Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Bank, Washington, DC. Human Development Network.

    The challenges of making rural schools more effective vary with different types of rural conditions. But typically these challenges might include any of the following: teacher shortages, lack of facilities, isolation, HIV/AIDS and related social stigma, war crises and displaced populations, multigrade and shift teaching, administration of small…

  17. Matching Queries to Frequently Asked Questions: Search Functionality for the MRSA Web-Portal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tigelaar, A.S.; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Verhoeven, F.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the long-term EUREGIO MRSA-net project a system was developed which enables health care workers and the general public to quickly find answers to their questions regarding the MRSA pathogen. This paper focuses on how these questions can be answered using Information Retrieval (IR) and

  18. H1N1 Flu & U.S. Schools: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    A severe form of influenza known as H1N1, commonly being called swine flu, has health officials around the world concerned. In the United States, the outbreak of H1N1 has prompted school closures and cancellation of school-related events. As the flu spreads, the Department of Education encourages school leaders, parents and students to know how to…

  19. EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT (ED OVERCROWDING: EVIDENCE-BASED ANSWERS TO FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RJ Salway

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Overcrowding in emergency departments is a problem in many countries around the world, including the United States and Chile. Emergency department (ED overcrowding causes problems for patients and staff, including increased waiting times, increased ambulance diversion, increased length of stay, increased medical errors, increased patient mortality, and increased harm to hospitals due to financial losses. This article aims to describe the etiology of ED overcrowding and potential solutions through an examination of the evidence. Ultimately, ED overcrowding originates from hospital overcrowding and thus the solutions to this complex problem lie in the ED itself as well as outside of the ED.

  20. In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater. Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    byproducts inhibit or enhance bioprocesses ? ….. BOTH! Bioprocesses are likely to be disrupted over the short-term in the zone where oxidant is...points − Science-based text − Look-up tables − Spreadsheet calculators − Models (analytical and numerical) o General groundwater flow and...and monitoring. The goal of the Observational Method is to integrate performance monitoring results and decision logic real- time, allowing for

  1. PANDAS: Frequently Asked Questions about Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal ....

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... episodic course of symptoms? My child has had strep throat before, and he has tics and/or OCD. ... suddenly appear following a strep infection (such as strep throat or scarlet fever); or The symptoms of OCD ...

  2. Frequently Asked Questions on BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy or Mad Cow Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... had confirmed a case of BSE in a dairy cow in California. Before this latest detection, USDA ... gov/animal_health/animal_diseases/bse/index.shtml Return to top Main navigation - Footer Home Topics Our ...

  3. U.S. Military Action Against the Islamic State: Answers to Frequently Asked Legal Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-09

    Parte Milligan, 71 U.S. (4 Wall.) 2 (1866) (giving effect to a statute suspending habeas corpus for prisoners of war rather than a presidential order...47 Litigation concerning the scope of persons covered by the AUMF has primarily arisen in the context of habeas

  4. Scalable Frequent Subgraph Mining

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhamid, Ehab

    2017-06-19

    A graph is a data structure that contains a set of nodes and a set of edges connecting these nodes. Nodes represent objects while edges model relationships among these objects. Graphs are used in various domains due to their ability to model complex relations among several objects. Given an input graph, the Frequent Subgraph Mining (FSM) task finds all subgraphs with frequencies exceeding a given threshold. FSM is crucial for graph analysis, and it is an essential building block in a variety of applications, such as graph clustering and indexing. FSM is computationally expensive, and its existing solutions are extremely slow. Consequently, these solutions are incapable of mining modern large graphs. This slowness is caused by the underlying approaches of these solutions which require finding and storing an excessive amount of subgraph matches. This dissertation proposes a scalable solution for FSM that avoids the limitations of previous work. This solution is composed of four components. The first component is a single-threaded technique which, for each candidate subgraph, needs to find only a minimal number of matches. The second component is a scalable parallel FSM technique that utilizes a novel two-phase approach. The first phase quickly builds an approximate search space, which is then used by the second phase to optimize and balance the workload of the FSM task. The third component focuses on accelerating frequency evaluation, which is a critical step in FSM. To do so, a machine learning model is employed to predict the type of each graph node, and accordingly, an optimized method is selected to evaluate that node. The fourth component focuses on mining dynamic graphs, such as social networks. To this end, an incremental index is maintained during the dynamic updates. Only this index is processed and updated for the majority of graph updates. Consequently, search space is significantly pruned and efficiency is improved. The empirical evaluation shows that the

  5. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... Kids > Ask a Scientist Video Series All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun ...

  6. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... NEI for Kids > Ask a Scientist Video Series All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video ... Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information ...

  7. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - child; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - child ... should I discuss with my child's teachers about epilepsy? Will my child need to take medicines during ...

  8. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see colors ... like these and more with our Ask a Scientist video series. Dr. Sheldon Miller answers questions about ...

  9. Ileostomy - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostomy - what to ask your doctor; What to ask your doctor about ileostomy or colostomy; Colostomy - what ... the stoma? Does insurance cover the cost of ostomy supplies? What should I do if there is ...

  10. Concussion - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about concussion - child; Mild brain injury - what to ask your doctor - child ... school people I should tell about my child's concussion? Can my child stay for a full day? ...

  11. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease - what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... Alzheimer's Association. Dementia Care Practice Recommendations ... in a Home Setting. Updated 2009. Alz.org. www.alz.org/national/ ...

  12. Transtornos neurológicos mais frequentes: contribuição para a definição de temas do conteúdo programático do curso de neurologia, para a graduação médica The most frequent neurologic disturbances: a contribution to the definition of topics for the programmatic content to the program of neurology in medical graduation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOÃO ELIEZER FERRI-DE-BARROS

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O acúmulo de conhecimentos tem sobrecarregado o conteúdo curricular do curso de graduação médica. As escolas médicas devem estar preocupadas em definir um conteúdo temático mínimo, relacionado com os transtornos mais frequentes; buscamos sugerir o conteúdo temático mínimo, para o curso de Neurologia na graduação médica. MÉTODO: 1. Identificamos os locais de trabalho dos médicos jovens, fora do Hospital Escola(HE pela análise de resposta às cartas enviadas a 6415 médicos residentes (MR do Estado de São Paulo e de 201 entrevistas pessoais com MR; 2. Verificamos quais os transtornos neuro-psiquiátricos (TNP mais frequentes na população, através da análise dos registros diagnósticos de pacientes que procuraram o Pronto Socorro (PS de três instituições: Municipal de Taubaté-SP, Municipal de São José dos Campos-SP e Faculdade de Medicina da Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo-SP. RESULTADOS: 1. Os MR são jovens e, fora do HE, trabalham em PS. 2.Os diagnósticos mais frequentes nas três instituições foram: alcoolismo, cefaléia, coma, demência, desmaio, doença encéfalo-vascular, epilepsia, hemiplegias ou paraplegias, meningite, neuropatia periférica, paralisia facial, tontura, transtornos psíquicos e traumatismo craniencefálico. CONCLUSÃO: Estes diagnósticos mais frequentes são os temas relevantes para o conteúdo programático do curso de Neurologia na graduação médica.INTRODUCTION: Knowledge accumulation is overfilling the thematic content of medical graduation. Medical Schools must be alert to define a minimal content related with the most frequent disturbs. We intent to suggest topics for the minimal content, to the program of Neurology in medical graduation. METHOD: 1. To identify the places where young doctors are working outside the School Hospital (SH: we analysed the answers of the letters sent to 6415 resident - doctors (RD in São Paulo's State and we made personal

  13. Diarrhea - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about diarrhea - child; Loose stools - what to ask your doctor - child ... FOODS What foods can make my child's diarrhea worse? How should I prepare the foods for my child? If my child is still breastfeeding or bottle feeding, do I ...

  14. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series ...

  15. Discovery of Frequent Itemsets: Frequent Item Tree-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Senthil Kumar

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Mining frequent patterns in large transactional databases is a highly researched area in the field of data mining. Existing frequent pattern discovering algorithms suffer from many problems regarding the high memory dependency when mining large amount of data, computational and I/O cost. Additionally, the recursive mining process to mine these structures is also too voracious in memory resources. In this paper, we describe a more efficient algorithm for mining complete frequent itemsets from transactional databases. The suggested algorithm is partially based on FP-tree hypothesis and extracts the frequent itemsets directly from the tree. Its memory requirement, which is independent from the number of processed transactions, is another benefit of the new method. We present performance comparisons for our algorithm against the Apriori algorithm and FP-growth.

  16. Discovery of Frequent Itemsets: Frequent Item Tree-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Senthil Kumar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mining frequent patterns in large transactional databases is a highly researched area in the field of data mining. Existing frequent pattern discovering algorithms suffer from many problems regarding the high memory dependency when mining large amount of data, computational and I/O cost. Additionally, the recursive mining process to mine these structures is also too voracious in memory resources. In this paper, we describe a more efficient algorithm for mining complete frequent itemsets from transactional databases. The suggested algorithm is partially based on FP-tree hypothesis and extracts the frequent itemsets directly from the tree. Its memory requirement, which is independent from the number of processed transactions, is another benefit of the new method. We present performance comparisons for our algorithm against the Apriori algorithm and FP-growth.

  17. "This is a question we have to ask everyone": asking young people about self-harm and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, M; Kiyimba, N; Karim, K

    2016-10-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: An essential part of the mental health assessment is to evaluate the risk of harm to self. Fundamentally this involves asking directly about self-harming behaviour and suicidal thoughts or urges, but practitioners often find it difficult to open up these conversations. This evaluation of risk is particularly important as self-harm and suicidal thoughts are frequently found in young people who attend mental health services. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Young people are not always routinely asked directly about self-harm or suicidal thoughts when they are assessed. There are two ways that mental health practitioners introduce this topic: first, by building up to it by initially asking about general feelings, and second by stating that it is a requirement to ask everyone. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: These questions should not be avoided by mental health practitioners just because they are difficult. We offer suggestions as to how to ask questions about self-harm and suicide based on real-world practice. Introduction Questions about self-harm and suicide are essential in risk assessments with children and young people, yet little is known about how mental health practitioners do this. Aim The core aim was to examine how questions about self-harm and suicidal ideation are asked in real-world practice. Method A qualitative design was employed to analyse 28 video-recorded naturally occurring mental health assessments in a child and adolescent mental health service. Data were analysed using conversation analysis (CA). Results In 13 cases young people were asked about self-harm and suicide, but 15 were not. Analysis revealed how practitioners asked these questions. Two main styles were revealed. First was an incremental approach, beginning with inquiries about emotions and behaviours, building to asking about self-harm and suicidal intent. Second was to externalize the question as being required by outside agencies

  18. ASK1 and ASK2 differentially regulate the counteracting roles of apoptosis and inflammation in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriyama, Takayuki; Takeda, Kohsuke; Nakamura, Hiromi; Morimoto, Yoshifumi; Kuroiwa, Takumi; Mizukami, Junya; Umeda, Tsuyoshi; Noguchi, Takuya; Naguro, Isao; Nishitoh, Hideki; Saegusa, Kaoru; Tobiume, Kei; Homma, Toshiki; Shimada, Yutaka; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Aiko, Satoshi; Imoto, Issei; Inazawa, Johji; Chida, Kazuhiro; Kamei, Yoshimasa; Kozuma, Shiro; Taketani, Yuji; Matsuzawa, Atsushi; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2009-04-08

    Apoptosis and inflammation generally exert opposite effects on tumorigenesis: apoptosis serves as a barrier to tumour initiation, whereas inflammation promotes tumorigenesis. Although both events are induced by various common stressors, relatively little is known about the stress-induced signalling pathways regulating these events in tumorigenesis. Here, we show that stress-activated MAP3Ks, ASK1 and ASK2, which are involved in cellular responses to various stressors such as reactive oxygen species, differentially regulate the initiation and promotion of tumorigenesis. ASK2 in cooperation with ASK1 functioned as a tumour suppressor by exerting proapoptotic activity in epithelial cells, which was consistent with the reduction in ASK2 expression in human cancer cells and tissues. In contrast, ASK1-dependent cytokine production in inflammatory cells promoted tumorigenesis. Our findings suggest that ASK1 and ASK2 are critically involved in tumorigenesis by differentially regulating apoptosis and inflammation.

  19. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  20. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  1. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Updated:May 9, ... you? This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  2. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see ... I become a scientist? Click to Watch Did You Know? An eagle’s eyesight is about five times ...

  3. Radiation therapy - questions to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about radiation therapy ... National Cancer Institute. Radiation therapy and you: support for people with cancer. Cancer.gov. Updated May 2007. www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/radiationttherapy. ...

  4. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  5. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  7. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  8. Newborn jaundice - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about newborn jaundice ... What causes jaundice in a newborn child? How common is newborn jaundice? Will the jaundice harm my child? What are the treatments for jaundice? How long does ...

  9. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  10. More frequent elements in coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krejci-Graf, K.

    1982-04-01

    On frequent elements in coals: in the case of bioelements (H, C, N, O) even bare quantities may offer evidence of origin and transformation of coals. With those as with other frequent elements it is not so much quantity (as is still with S), as variability, and ratios of pairs of elements, which may give evidence of transformation. Enrichments in different plants and tissues - excepting H, C, N, O - are extremely different in different samples. In coalification original contents are lowered, mixed, or veiled by import. Influences of surroundings change during the stages of coalification, while the surroundings themselves are in continual transformation. Only with frequent elements one may hope to recognize traces of original conditions. More exact knowledge of seams may help in prospection and parallelization.

  11. Targeted Feedback in the Milestones Era: Utilization of the Ask-Tell-Ask Feedback Model to Promote Reflection and Self-Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Judith C; Colbert, Colleen Y; Pien, Lily C; Dannefer, Elaine F; Taylor, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Milestones Project focuses trainee education on the formation of valued behaviors and skills believed to be necessary for trainees to become independent practitioners. The development and refinement of behaviors and skills outlined within the milestones will require learners to monitor, reflect, and assess their own performance over time. External feedback provides an opportunity for learners to recalibrate their self-assessments, thereby enabling them to develop better self-monitoring and self-assessment skills. Yet, feedback to trainees is frequently generic, such as "great job," "nice work," or "you need to read more." In this article, we describe a feedback model that faculty can use to provide specific feedback, while increasing accountability for learners. We offer practical examples of its use in a variety of settings in the milestone era. The Ask-Tell-Ask (ATA) patient communication skills strategy, which was adapted for use as a trainee feedback model 10 years ago at our institution, is a learner-centered approach for reinforcing and modifying behaviors. The model is efficient, promotes learner accountability, and helps trainees develop reflection and self-assessment skills. A feedback agreement further enhances ATA by establishing a shared understanding of goals for the educational encounter. The ATA feedback model, combined with a feedback agreement, encourages learners to self-identify strengths and areas for improvement, before receiving feedback. Personal monitoring, reflection, self-assessment, and increased accountability make ATA an ideal learner-centered feedback model for the milestones era, which focuses on performance improvement over time. We believe the introduction of the ATA feedback model in surgical training programs is a step in the right direction towards meaningful programmatic culture change. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier

  12. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  13. How to find frequent patterns?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); W.A. Koster

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAn improved version of DF, the depth-first implementation of Apriori, is presented. Given a database of (e.g., supermarket) transactions, the DF algorithm builds a so-called trie that contains all frequent itemsets, i.e., all itemsets that are contained in at least `minsup'

  14. The Most Frequent English Homonyms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This article distinguishes homonymy, homophony, homography and polysemy, and provides a list of the most frequent homonyms using corpus-derived data. For most of the homonyms, the most common meaning accounts for 90% or more of the total uses of the form. The pedagogical and research implications of these findings are discussed. (Contains 5…

  15. Learning How to Ask: Women and Negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Lauren H; Bajaj, Anureet K

    2017-03-01

    Women are less likely to reach top-level leadership positions, and more likely to leave academic positions, than men, and are likely to earn less money than men. Women are also less likely to initiate a negotiation-a process that is crucial for professional advancement. This reluctance to ask hinders their advancement and can have long-lasting consequences-both financial and professional. The reasons that women do not ask are multifactorial. In this article, we will explore reasons why women are less likely to negotiate, the barriers they face when they do, and strategies that women can apply to improve their negotiation skills.

  16. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  17. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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    Full Text Available ... and other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of ... National Eye Health Education Program (NEHEP) Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education ...

  18. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  19. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  20. Who asks questions at astronomy meetings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Davenport, James R. A.

    2017-06-01

    Over the last decade, significant attention has been drawn to the gender ratio of speakers at conferences, with ongoing efforts for meetings to better reflect the gender representation in the field. We find that women are significantly under-represented, however, among the astronomers asking questions after talks.

  1. The Question Each Citizen Must Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Educating students to be good, informed citizens remains a core purpose of K-12 schools. The purposes of civic education, however, are contested, notes Levine, director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement. Levine argues that a citizen is someone who seriously asks, "What should we do?"--someone who…

  2. Teaching Children with Autism to Ask Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Katie E.; Bickel, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism have impairments in communication that make it difficult for them to acquire the ability to ask appropriate wh- questions. This is a very important skill, and one that clinicians often do not know how to target. Search terms were entered into several databases to locate studies published in peer-reviewed journals. The studies…

  3. Children Ask Questions about West African Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Denice; Cochran, Mathilda; Mims, Margaret

    1997-01-01

    Presents a collection of questions that fifth-grade students asked about African artwork and answers provided by staff from the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Texas. Observes that students' interest in important visual aspects of the art creates lead-ins to more detailed discussions of West African art and culture. (DSK)

  4. Questions About Physics: The Case of a Turkish `Ask a Scientist' Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerdelen-Damar, Sevda; Eryılmaz, Ali

    2010-03-01

    The physics questions submitted to an ‘ask a scientist’ website were classified with respect to field of interest in physics, type of requested information in the question (factual, explanatory, etc.), and motivation for asking the question (applicative or non--applicative). In addition, differences in the number of females’ and males’ questions in these classifications were determined. Analysis of 995 physics questions submitted to the website indicated that modern physics questions (30.7%) were the most frequent while vibrations and wave motion questions (3.3%) were the least frequent. More than half of the questions (57.8%) were submitted to request factual information. Motivation to ask a question was inferred from the question, and was generally not related to direct and/or personal application. There were obvious differences in the number of questions asked by females and males: 84.7% of questions were asked by males while 15.3% were asked by females. However, significant gender differences were not observed in field of interest in physics, type of information requested in the question, and motivation for asking the question.

  5. It doesn't hurt to ask: Question-asking increases liking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Karen; Yeomans, Michael; Brooks, Alison Wood; Minson, Julia; Gino, Francesca

    2017-09-01

    Conversation is a fundamental human experience that is necessary to pursue intrapersonal and interpersonal goals across myriad contexts, relationships, and modes of communication. In the current research, we isolate the role of an understudied conversational behavior: question-asking. Across 3 studies of live dyadic conversations, we identify a robust and consistent relationship between question-asking and liking: people who ask more questions, particularly follow-up questions, are better liked by their conversation partners. When people are instructed to ask more questions, they are perceived as higher in responsiveness, an interpersonal construct that captures listening, understanding, validation, and care. We measure responsiveness with an attitudinal measure from previous research as well as a novel behavioral measure: the number of follow-up questions one asks. In both cases, responsiveness explains the effect of question-asking on liking. In addition to analyzing live get-to-know-you conversations online, we also studied face-to-face speed-dating conversations. We trained a natural language processing algorithm as a "follow-up question detector" that we applied to our speed-dating data (and can be applied to any text data to more deeply understand question-asking dynamics). The follow-up question rate established by the algorithm showed that speed daters who ask more follow-up questions during their dates are more likely to elicit agreement for second dates from their partners, a behavioral indicator of liking. We also find that, despite the persistent and beneficial effects of asking questions, people do not anticipate that question-asking increases interpersonal liking. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  9. Mastectomy and breast reconstruction - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastectomy - what to ask your doctor; Breast reconstruction - what to ask your doctor; TRAM flap - what to ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about mastectomy and breast reconstruction; Breast cancer - mastectomy - what to ...

  10. The frequent occurrence of MIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, Matthias [Gesellschaft fuer Technische Mikrobiologie und Hygieneueberwachung - Dr. Graff und Partner, Stadtweg 9, D-38176 Wendeburg (Germany); Neubert, Volkmar [Institut fuer Materialpruefung und Werkstofftechnik Dr. Doelling und Dr. Neubert GmbH, Freiberger Strasse 1, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Microbial induced corrosion (MIC) is not as rare as many materials scientist and corrosion practitioners do believe. It is not an exotic and scarce event, but can be found frequently in many fields of corrosion research, provided that it is looked for. The reason for the relatively few descriptions of MIC cases seems to be the fact, that the microbiological approach is not widely known and applied in the world of materials science. MIC is not so much a corrosion mechanism on its own, but it enhances the corrosion rates of the 'normal' mechanisms to such an extent, that in some cases 'incredible' fast corrosion progress can be observed. The reason is the microorganisms' function as bio-catalysts: Chemical reactions, which are very slow under normal chemical conditions can be highly accelerated by living organisms. Besides that, several microorganisms do produce very corrosive substances which in natural environments do not occur without the activity of microorganisms, e. g. sulfuric or nitric acid. We want to point out, that it can be very worthy to take microbial induced corrosion into account. MIC is not the general answer for all unsolved corrosion problems, but to think about it helps in many corrosion cases as the authors had to experience. The initial indication for the presence of MIC are markedly increased corrosion rates. In the following, some of our 'lessons' are presented as short case studies: Two of them deal with steel corrosion characterized by increased corrosion rates. The third example presents corrosion damage of aluminium structures, where from a technical point of view corrosion was not expected, least of all microbial induced corrosion. (authors)

  11. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  12. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  14. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  16. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  17. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  18. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  19. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  20. New Center Asks: Does Merit Pay Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2007-01-01

    In the 1980s, school districts dabbled with programs that offered teachers cash inducements, such as bonuses or raises, for doing their jobs well. But those merit-pay programs were mostly short-lived, hotly debated, and understudied. Even after all this time, no one knows definitively whether children learn more when teachers are paid extra for…

  1. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  2. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  3. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  4. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  5. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  6. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  7. High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about high blood pressure; Hypertension - what to ask your doctor ... problems? What medicines am I taking to treat high blood pressure? Do they have any side effects? What should ...

  8. Hepatitis C: Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Treatment

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    ... Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... treatment? Other questions you want to ask: _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ Search Hepatitis Search this website Submit Share this page Related ...

  9. Hepatitis C: Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Your Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Ask Your Doctor about Your Diagnosis Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... me? Other questions you want to ask: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Search Hepatitis Search this website Submit Share this page Related ...

  10. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  11. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

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  12. 77 FR 65006 - Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Air Cargo Advance Screening (ACAS) Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S... targeting could occur in the pre-loading air cargo environment, thus establishing the ACAS pilot. Since then... July 27, 2012, CBP published ``Air Cargo Advance Screening Pilot Frequently Asked Questions'' at http...

  13. Ostomy Home Skills Program

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  15. Significant efficiency findings while controlling for the frequent confounders of CAI research in the PlanAlyzer project's computer-based, self-paced, case-based programs in anemia and chest pain diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, H C; Healy, J C; Bell, J R; O'Donnell, J F; Shultz, E K; Wigton, R S; Hirai, F; Beck, J R

    1991-04-01

    Richard E. Clark in his widely published comprehensive studies and meta-analyses of the literature on computer assisted instruction (CAI) has decried the lack of carefully controlled research, challenging almost every study which shows the computer-based intervention to result in significant post-test proficiency gains over a non-computer-based intervention. We report on a randomized study in a medical school setting where the usual confounders found by Clark to plague most research, were carefully controlled. PlanAlyzer is a microcomputer-based, self-paced, case-based, event-driven system for medical education which was developed and used in carefully controlled trials in a second year medical school curriculum to test the hypothesis that students with access to the interactive programs could integrate their didactic knowledge more effectively and/or efficiently than with access only to traditional textual "nonintelligent" materials. PlanAlyzer presents cases, elicits and critiques a student's approach to the diagnosis of two common medical disorders: anemias and chest pain. PlanAlyzer uses text, hypertext, images and critiquing theory. Students were randomized, one half becoming the experimental group who received the interactive PlanAlyzer cases in anemia, the other half becoming the controls who received the exact same content material in a text format. Later in each year there was a crossover, the controls becoming the experimentals for a similar intervention with the cardiology PlanAlyzer cases. Preliminary results at the end of the first two full trials shows that the programs have achieved most of the proposed instructional objectives, plus some significant efficiency and economy gains. 96 faculty hours of classroom time were saved by using PlanAlyzer in their place, while maintaining high student achievement. In terms of student proficiency and efficiency, the 328 students in the trials over two years were able to accomplish the project's instructional

  16. I Wish I'd Asked That: The Culture of Asking Questions in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleisis, Audra

    2009-01-01

    I will present the results from a qualitative study of the values and norms for thinking about science in academic astronomy, as seen through astronomers’ beliefs about departmental speech events. In-depth interviews were carried out with 12 graduate students and 9 faculty members from a prominent astronomy department at a large, public university. Interviewees were asked about a variety of speaking events in their department. The speaking events chosen were those at which: (1) graduate students could be presenters and/or ask questions, and (2) presenters spoke about science research to an audience of academic peers. This included Coffee Hour, Journal Club, research seminars, Colloquium, and dissertation defense talks. These events are part of the socialization of students into "acting like an astronomer.” Socialization is a process by which novices learn the rules (can and can't do), norms (should and shouldn't do), and values of a culture. The values of astronomy culture are encoded within the rules for participation in these events and the assumptions that audience members make about speakers. When these values contradict each other speakers face the dilemma of choosing between conflicting behaviors. One of the central dilemmas that arose in this study was that of whether or not to ask a question during a talk. Both graduate students and faculty members wanted students to speak up more often. However, students had conflicting worries - of voicing a question and it being a "stupid question” vs. having remained silent if it turned out to have been a "good question.” I will argue that this anxiety is a product of academic culture and not an indicator of individual failure, and discuss a number of factors that influence this situation, such as the perceived goals of each event, and astronomers’ beliefs about intelligence and learning.

  17. Predictors of Frequent Emergency Room Visits among a Homeless Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinna Thakarar

    Full Text Available Homelessness, HIV, and substance use are interwoven problems. Furthermore, homeless individuals are frequent users of emergency services. The main purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for frequent emergency room (ER visits and to examine the effects of housing status and HIV serostatus on ER utilization. The second purpose was to identify risk factors for frequent ER visits in patients with a history of illicit drug use.A retrospective analysis was performed on 412 patients enrolled in a Boston-based health care for the homeless program (HCH. This study population was selected as a 2:1 HIV seronegative versus HIV seropositive match based on age, sex, and housing status. A subgroup analysis was performed on 287 patients with history of illicit drug use. Chart data were analyzed to compare demographics, health characteristics, and health service utilization. Results were stratified by housing status. Logistic models using generalized estimating equations were used to predict frequent ER visits.In homeless patients, hepatitis C was the only predictor of frequent ER visits (OR 4.49, p<0.01. HIV seropositivity was not predictive of frequent ER visits. In patients with history of illicit drug use, mental health (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.07-5.95 and hepatitis C (OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.37-5.93 were predictors of frequent ER use. HIV seropositivity did not predict ER use (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.21 - 0.97.In a HCH population, hepatitis C predicted frequent ER visits in homeless patients. HIV seropositivity did not predict frequent ER visits, likely because HIV seropositive HCH patients are engaged in care. In patients with history of illicit drug use, hepatitis C and mental health disorders predicted frequent ER visits. Supportive housing for patients with mental health disorders and hepatitis C may help prevent unnecessary ER visits in this population.

  18. Adolescent interest in human sexuality: the questions kids ask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, T A; Campbell, D E

    1986-01-01

    This study demonstrates a method for obtaining data on developmental changes in adolescents' interest in human sexuality. A content analysis was done on a sample of 874 student-generated questions. Question boxes were placed in classrooms so students could anonymously submit questions. In deference to perceived community pressure, questions on abortion, homosexuality, and masturbation were not allowed. Students who wrote the questions are 7th, 8th, and 10th graders enrolled in 13 different public schools. The schools are located in several small communities and on an American Indian reservation in a rural area of northern California. All children who participated did so voluntarily and with parental permission. Of the total 874 questions. 7th and 8th graders provided 593, while sophomores accounted for 233. Gender information was available only for 7th and 8th graders. Boys asked 173 questions while girls asked 241. The data are broken down by gender and by grade (7th and 8th vs. 10th). Findings reveal that younger students show more interest in the meaning of slang terms, their reproductive physiology, and intercourse. Older students show greater interest in contraception and health risks. Males are interested in slang and intercourse while females are more concerned with health risks and communication. One unexpected finding indicates that among younger children, boys and girls are equally interested in birth control and pregnancy; in the lower grades then, may be the prime time to use sex education programs to strengthen the sense of dual responsibility for knowledge about contraception and pregnancy. Also, the relative absence of questions on disallowed issues (2.5%) makes it apparent that sex educators can effectively suppress inquiry into topics that are of great interest to youngsters; only about 1/3 of the students indicated that their parents had discussed these disllowed issues, yet 48% of the students expressed interest in knowing more about abortion.

  19. On finding frequent patterns in event sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagna, Andrea; Pagh, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    concerning finding frequent patterns in event sequences. Our motivation comes from working with a data set of 2 million RFID readings from baggage trolleys at Copenhagen Airport. The question of finding frequent passenger movement patterns is mapped to the above problem. We report on experimental findings...

  20. Teacher Resistance to Frequent Rewards and Praise: Lack of Skill or a Wise Decision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, George G.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance and the lack of fidelity or integrity in the use of rewards and praise are commonly cited in the behavioral consultation literature, particularly when teachers are asked to manage student behavior using frequent rewards and praise in a systematic manner. There are multiple potential reasons for resistance and lack of implementation…

  1. Computing arbitrage upper bounds on basket options in the presence of bid–ask spreads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pena, J.; Vera, J.C.; Zuluaga, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    We study the problem of computing the sharpest static-arbitrage upper bound on the price of a European basket option, given the bid–ask prices of vanilla call options in the underlying securities. We show that this semi-infinite problem can be recast as a linear program whose size is linear in the

  2. Frequent Pattern Mining Algorithms for Data Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimek, Arthur; Assent, Ira; Vreeken, Jilles

    2014-01-01

    that frequent pattern mining was at the cradle of subspace clustering—yet, it quickly developed into an independent research field. In this chapter, we discuss how frequent pattern mining algorithms have been extended and generalized towards the discovery of local clusters in high-dimensional data......Discovering clusters in subspaces, or subspace clustering and related clustering paradigms, is a research field where we find many frequent pattern mining related influences. In fact, as the first algorithms for subspace clustering were based on frequent pattern mining algorithms, it is fair to say....... In particular, we discuss several example algorithms for subspace clustering or projected clustering as well as point out recent research questions and open topics in this area relevant to researchers in either clustering or pattern mining...

  3. Academy Sharing Knowledge (ASK). The NASA Source for Project Management Magazine, Volume 11, March 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    APPL is a research-based organization that serves NASA program and project managers, as well as project teams, at every level of development. In 1997, APPL was created from an earlier program to underscore the importance that NASA places on project management and project teams through a wide variety of products and services, including knowledge sharing, classroom and online courses, career development guidance, performance support, university partnerships, and advanced technology tools. ASK Magazine grew out of APPL's Knowledge Sharing Initiative. The stories that appear in ASK are written by the 'best of the best' project managers, primarily from NASA, but also from other government agencies and industry. Contributors to this issue include: Teresa Bailey, a librarian at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Roy Malone, Deputy Director in the Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) Office at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), W. Scott Cameron, Capital Systems Manager for the Food and Beverage Global Business Unit of Procter and Gamble, Ray Morgan, recent retiree as Vice President of AeroVironment, Inc., Marty Davis, Program Manager of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland, Todd Post, editor of ASK Magazine, and works for EduTech Ltd. in Silver Spring, Maryland, Dr. Owen Gadeken, professor of Engineering Management at the Defense Acquisition University, Ken Schwer, currently the Project Manager of Solar Dynamics Observatory, Dr. Edward Hoffmwan, Director of the NASA Academy of Program and Project Leadership, Frank Snow, a member of the NASA Explorer Program at Goddard Space Flight Center since 1992, Dr. Alexander Laufer, Editor-in-Chief of ASK Magazine and a member of the Advisory Board of the NASA Academy of Program and Project Leadership, Judy Stokley, presently Air Force Program Executive Officer for Weapons in Washington, D.C. and Terry Little, Director of the Kinetic

  4. 'Any questions?'--Clinicians' usage of invitations to ask questions (IAQs) in outpatient plastic surgery consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, Katherine; Patrick, Peter L

    2014-12-01

    To explore use of 'Invitations to Ask Questions' (IAQs) by plastic surgeons in outpatient consultations, and consider how type of IAQ impacts on patients' responses to, and recollection of, IAQs. Descriptive study: 63 patients were audio recorded in consultation with 5 plastic surgeons, and completed a brief questionnaire immediately after the consultation. Consultation transcripts were analyzed using inductive qualitative methods of Discourse Analysis and compared with questionnaire findings. A taxonomy of IAQs was developed, including three types of IAQ (Overt, Covert, and Borderline). Overt IAQs were rarely identified, and almost all IAQs occurred in the closing stages of the consultation. However, when an overt IAQ was used, patients always recollected being asked if they had any questions after the consultation. Patients are rarely explicitly offered the opportunity to ask questions. When this does occur, it is often in the closing stages of the consultation. Clinicians should openly encourage patients to ask questions frequently throughout the consultation, and be mindful that subtle differences in construction of these utterances may impact upon interpretation. Clear communication, of message and intention, is essential in clinical encounters to minimize misunderstanding, misinterpretation, or missed opportunities for patients to raise concerns. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Performance Evaluation of Frequent Subgraph Discovery Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Ur Rehman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to rapid development of the Internet technology and new scientific advances, the number of applications that model the data as graphs increases, because graphs have highly expressive power to model a complicated structure. Graph mining is a well-explored area of research which is gaining popularity in the data mining community. A graph is a general model to represent data and has been used in many domains such as cheminformatics, web information management system, computer network, and bioinformatics, to name a few. In graph mining the frequent subgraph discovery is a challenging task. Frequent subgraph mining is concerned with discovery of those subgraphs from graph dataset which have frequent or multiple instances within the given graph dataset. In the literature a large number of frequent subgraph mining algorithms have been proposed; these included FSG, AGM, gSpan, CloseGraph, SPIN, Gaston, and Mofa. The objective of this research work is to perform quantitative comparison of the above listed techniques. The performances of these techniques have been evaluated through a number of experiments based on three different state-of-the-art graph datasets. This novel work will provide base for anyone who is working to design a new frequent subgraph discovery technique.

  6. Frequently cited journals in forensic psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Steve

    2012-02-01

    Works cited in six forensic psychology journals published 2008-2010 were counted to identify the most frequently cited journals. The sample of works cited (N = 21,776) was not a definitive ranked list of important journals in forensic psychology, but was large enough to indicate high-impact journals. The list of frequently cited publications included more general psychiatry and psychology journals than titles specific to forensic psychology. The implications of the proportion of general versus specific titles for collections supporting research in forensic psychology were discussed.

  7. Frequent price changes under menu costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Svejstrup

    1999-01-01

    , the price may be changed more frequent in the short run, and in the long run it definitely will. Hence, observing frequent price changes is not necessarily inconsistent with a firm operating under menu costs. This paper relies on an article by Dixit (1991), (Review of Economic studies, 58, 141......This paper investigates the effect of uncertainty on a single firm's pricing behaviour in a dynamic menu cost model that results in (S,s)-rules where the price is fixed inside a band. It will be demonstrated that even though the band of inaction widens in response to increased uncertainty...

  8. Ask the rheumatologist online: a qualitative analysis of a web-based service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Steven J

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the use of an Ask-the-Rheumatologist website service. All questions submitted were analyzed for gender, geographic location, topic area, disease, appropriateness, personal experience, and whether the answer is found elsewhere on the hosting website. The number of total visits and their geographic location was determined. The web service was visited 7985 times. Two hundred twenty-seven questions were submitted, with a majority related to personal experience and inflammatory rheumatic disease. One hundred six questions did not have answers available elsewhere on the website. Seventy questions were deemed inappropriate. Ask-the-Rheumatologist was visited frequently, demonstrating an innovative method of knowledge-transfer between health professionals, patients, and the general public.

  9. Chronic frequent headache in the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiendels, Natalie Janette

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the results of a large questionnaire-based study on the epidemiology of chronic frequent headache (CFH) in the Dutch adult population. It also includes information on triptan (over)use from the Drug Information Project (GIP database) and the results of a withdrawal trial in

  10. Weight-loss surgery - after - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart disease Gastric bypass surgery Laparoscopic gastric banding Obstructive sleep apnea - adults Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions Gastric bypass surgery - discharge Laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge Weight-loss surgery - before - what to ask your doctor Your ...

  11. Weight-loss surgery - before - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart disease Gastric bypass surgery Laparoscopic gastric banding Obstructive sleep apnea - adults Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions Gastric bypass surgery - discharge Laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge Weight-loss surgery - after - what to ask your doctor Your ...

  12. Colds and the flu - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000250.htm Colds and the flu - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... Nasal congestion Sneezing Sore throat Cough Headache The flu is an infection of the nose, throat, and ...

  13. Substance Abuse Treatment for Children and Adolescents: Questions to Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Families - Vietnamese Substance Abuse Treatment For Children And Adolescents: Questions To Ask No. 41; Reviewed July 2013 Many children and adolescents use alcohol and other drugs. Some develop serious ...

  14. Questions to Ask Your Doctor--Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Questions to Ask Your Doctor - Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) Updated:Dec 21,2016 Implantable cardioverter defibrillators are ... are the benefits versus the limitations of the ICD? What is the general prognosis and how might ...

  15. Disposable and frequent replacement contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, William H; Donshik, Peter C; Suchecki, Jeanine K

    2003-09-01

    Disposable and frequent replacement contact lenses dominate the marketplace. They are available in a wide variety of parameters for use in refractive errors, including myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism, and presbyopia. They are convenient and affordable and lend themselves to most wearing modalities, including daily wear, flexible wear, and extended wear for up to 30 days. In addition, they have been shown to be the most trouble-free contact lens wear modality for daily wear or extended wear. They are an appropriate choice for patients who desire occasional contact lens wear and have gained wide acceptance as therapeutic bandage contact lenses. Disposable and frequent replacement lenses will remain important modalities for some time to come as the variety of contact lenses and contact lens parameters that are offered continue to expand. New contact lens varieties, such as the high-Dk silicone hydrogel lenses, will further expand the role of these contact lenses in vision correction.

  16. Design Improvements for Frequently Misrecognized Letters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Sofie; Larson, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    To enhance typeface legibility we studied how to improve the design of individual letters. Three diff erent fonts were created, each containing several variations of the most frequently misrecognized letters. These variations were tested both with distance and short exposure methodologies. Creati...... letters benefi t from being widened, and that x-height characters benefi t from using more of the ascending and descending area. These fi ndings can be used to improve the design of future typefaces.......To enhance typeface legibility we studied how to improve the design of individual letters. Three diff erent fonts were created, each containing several variations of the most frequently misrecognized letters. These variations were tested both with distance and short exposure methodologies. Creating...

  17. 100 commonly asked questions in math class answers that promote mathematical understanding, grades 6-12

    CERN Document Server

    Posamentier, Alfred S (Steven); Germain-Williams, Terri L (Lynn); Paris, Elaine S; Lehmann, Ingmar H (Horst)

    2013-01-01

    100 ways to get students hooked on math! That one question got you stumped? Or maybe you have the answer, but it's not all that compelling. Al Posamentier and his coauthors to the rescue with this handy reference containing fun answers to students'100 most frequently asked math questions. Even if you already have the answers, Al's explanations are certain to keep kids hooked. The big benefits? You'll discover high-interest ways to Teach to the Common Core's math content standards Promote inquiry and process in mathematical thinking Build procedural skills and conceptual understanding Encourage

  18. Frequent users of the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Jade; Osmanlliu, Esli; Zhang, Xun; Clavel, Virginie; Eisman, Harley; Rodrigues, Robert; Oskoui, Maryam

    2017-04-06

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its etiology is multifactorial, and frequent ED use (defined as more or equal to five visits per year) is a major contributor to high patient volumes. Our primary objective is to characterize the frequent user population. Our secondary objective is to examine risk factors for frequent emergency use. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of pediatric emergency department (PED) visits at the Montreal Children's Hospital using the Système Informatique Urgence (SIURGE), electronic medical record database. We analysed the relation between patient's characteristics and the number of PED visits over a 1-year period following the index visit. Patients totalling 52,088 accounted for 94,155 visits. Of those, 2,474 (4.7%) patients had five and more recurrent visits and accounted for 16.6% (15,612 visits) of the total PED visits. Lower level of acuity at index visit (odds ratio [OR] 0.85) was associated with a lower number of recurrent visits. Lower socioeconomic status (social deprivation index OR 1.09, material deprivation index OR 1.08) was associated with a higher number of recurrent visits. Asthma (OR 1.57); infectious ear, nose, and sinus disorders (OR 1.33); and other respiratory disorders (OR 1.56) were independently associated with a higher incidence of a recurrent visit within the year following the first visit. Our study is the first Canadian study to assess risk factors of frequent pediatric emergency use. The identified risk factors and diagnoses highlight the need for future evidence-based, targeted innovative research evaluating strategies to minimize ED crowding, to improve health outcomes and to improve patient satisfaction.

  19. Botulism: A Frequently Forgotten Old Malady

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Thajeb

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A frequently forgotten old malady called botulism has been recognized for more than a century. This ailment occurs worldwide, afflicts human of all age groups from infants to elderly and affects Oriental people more often in several regions of China. Occurrence in Taiwan is uncommon, and therefore, it is often overlooked. The outbreaks of human botulism in various regions of the world, the clinical types, the molecular mechanisms, and the electrophysiologic findings will be highlighted.

  20. Spatial patterns of frequent floods in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Klaus; Rössler, Ole; Weingartner, Rolf

    2017-04-01

    Information about the spatial characteristics of high and extreme streamflow is often needed for an accurate analysis of flood risk and effective co-ordination of flood related activities, such as flood defence planning. In this study we analyse the spatial dependence of frequent floods in Switzerland across different scales. Firstly, we determine the average length of high and extreme flow events for 56 runoff time series of Swiss rivers. Secondly, a dependence measure expressing the probability that streamflow peaks are as high as peaks at a conditional site is used to describe and map the spatial extend of joint occurrence of frequent floods across Switzerland. Thirdly, we apply a cluster analysis to identify groups of sites that are likely to react similarly in terms of joint occurrence of high flow events. The results indicate that a time interval with a length of 3 days seems to be most appropriate to characterise the average length of high streamflow events across spatial scales. In the main Swiss basins, high and extreme streamflows were found to be asymptotically independent. In contrast, at the meso-scale distinct flood regions, which react similarly in terms of occurrence of frequent flood, were found. The knowledge about these regions can help to optimise flood defence planning or to estimate regional flood risk properly.

  1. Parents' Qualitative Perspectives on Child Asking for Fruit and Vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Alicia; O'Connor, Teresia M; Hughes, Sheryl O; Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Janice; Nicklas, Theresa A; Baranowski, Tom

    2017-06-05

    Children can influence the foods available at home, but some ways of approaching a parent may be better than others; and the best way may vary by type of parent. This study explored how parents with different parenting styles would best receive their 10 to 14 years old child asking for fruits and vegetables (FV). An online parenting style questionnaire was completed and follow-up qualitative telephone interviews assessed home food rules, child influence on home food availability, parents' preferences for being asked for food, and common barriers and reactions to their child's FV requests. Parents ( n = 73) with a 10 to 14 years old child were grouped into authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, or uninvolved parenting style categories based on responses to questionnaires, and interviewed. Almost no differences in responses were detected by parenting style or ethnicity. Parents reported their children had a voice in what foods were purchased and available at home and were receptive to their child's asking for FV. The most important child asking characteristic was politeness, especially among authoritarian parents. Other important factors were asking in person, helping in the grocery store, writing requests on the grocery shopping list, and showing information they saw in the media. The barrier raising the most concern was FV cost, but FV quality and safety outside the home environment were also considerations.

  2. Parents’ Qualitative Perspectives on Child Asking for Fruit and Vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Alicia; O’Connor, Teresia M.; Hughes, Sheryl O.; Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Janice; Nicklas, Theresa A.; Baranowski, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Children can influence the foods available at home, but some ways of approaching a parent may be better than others; and the best way may vary by type of parent. This study explored how parents with different parenting styles would best receive their 10 to 14 years old child asking for fruits and vegetables (FV). An online parenting style questionnaire was completed and follow-up qualitative telephone interviews assessed home food rules, child influence on home food availability, parents’ preferences for being asked for food, and common barriers and reactions to their child’s FV requests. Parents (n = 73) with a 10 to 14 years old child were grouped into authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, or uninvolved parenting style categories based on responses to questionnaires, and interviewed. Almost no differences in responses were detected by parenting style or ethnicity. Parents reported their children had a voice in what foods were purchased and available at home and were receptive to their child’s asking for FV. The most important child asking characteristic was politeness, especially among authoritarian parents. Other important factors were asking in person, helping in the grocery store, writing requests on the grocery shopping list, and showing information they saw in the media. The barrier raising the most concern was FV cost, but FV quality and safety outside the home environment were also considerations. PMID:28587236

  3. Frequent video game players resist perceptual interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron V Berard

    Full Text Available Playing certain types of video games for a long time can improve a wide range of mental processes, from visual acuity to cognitive control. Frequent gamers have also displayed generalized improvements in perceptual learning. In the Texture Discrimination Task (TDT, a widely used perceptual learning paradigm, participants report the orientation of a target embedded in a field of lines and demonstrate robust over-night improvement. However, changing the orientation of the background lines midway through TDT training interferes with overnight improvements in overall performance on TDT. Interestingly, prior research has suggested that this effect will not occur if a one-hour break is allowed in between the changes. These results have suggested that after training is over, it may take some time for learning to become stabilized and resilient against interference. Here, we tested whether frequent gamers have faster stabilization of perceptual learning compared to non-gamers and examined the effect of daily video game playing on interference of training of TDT with one background orientation on perceptual learning of TDT with a different background orientation. As a result, we found that non-gamers showed overnight performance improvement only on one background orientation, replicating previous results with the interference in TDT. In contrast, frequent gamers demonstrated overnight improvements in performance with both background orientations, suggesting that they are better able to overcome interference in perceptual learning. This resistance to interference suggests that video game playing not only enhances the amplitude and speed of perceptual learning but also leads to faster and/or more robust stabilization of perceptual learning.

  4. Frequent Video Game Players Resist Perceptual Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, Aaron V.; Cain, Matthew S.; Watanabe, Takeo; Sasaki, Yuka

    2015-01-01

    Playing certain types of video games for a long time can improve a wide range of mental processes, from visual acuity to cognitive control. Frequent gamers have also displayed generalized improvements in perceptual learning. In the Texture Discrimination Task (TDT), a widely used perceptual learning paradigm, participants report the orientation of a target embedded in a field of lines and demonstrate robust over-night improvement. However, changing the orientation of the background lines midway through TDT training interferes with overnight improvements in overall performance on TDT. Interestingly, prior research has suggested that this effect will not occur if a one-hour break is allowed in between the changes. These results have suggested that after training is over, it may take some time for learning to become stabilized and resilient against interference. Here, we tested whether frequent gamers have faster stabilization of perceptual learning compared to non-gamers and examined the effect of daily video game playing on interference of training of TDT with one background orientation on perceptual learning of TDT with a different background orientation. As a result, we found that non-gamers showed overnight performance improvement only on one background orientation, replicating previous results with the interference in TDT. In contrast, frequent gamers demonstrated overnight improvements in performance with both background orientations, suggesting that they are better able to overcome interference in perceptual learning. This resistance to interference suggests that video game playing not only enhances the amplitude and speed of perceptual learning but also leads to faster and/or more robust stabilization of perceptual learning. PMID:25807394

  5. Dental Management of Frequent Childhood Hemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    iffet Yazicioglu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobinopaties are important in the context of childhood chronical disease due to their potential of being the most frequent genetical diseases. Abnormal hemoglobins are in general harmless however in some situations oxygen instabillity can occur. Those instabilities can effect dental health negatively or dental helath can stimulate the symptoms of the genetical disease. With the consultation of Medical doctor Dentist with adequit knowledge would apply dental treatment safely and eliminate the inconvinience of children. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 469-483

  6. Inspiring Sustainable Behaviour 19 Ways to Ask for Change

    CERN Document Server

    Payne, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    What is the answer to inspiring sustainable behaviour? It starts with a question - or nineteen. With this simple and inspiring guide you'll learn how to ask for persistent, pervasive, and near-costless change by uncovering our hidden quirks, judgmental biases, and apparent irrationalities.  The only change you'll need to make is how you ask.Businesses, larger or small, will soon have to cut costs and cut carbon, irrespective of the products they sell, or the services they perform. National government has structural policy and legislative needs, and local government has implementation and docum

  7. Bladder injuries frequently missed in polytrauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanweer Karim

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Tanweer Karim, Margaret Topno, Vinod Sharma, Raymond Picardo, Ankur HastirSurgery, MGM Medical College, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, IndiaAbstract: Bladder injuries are very common in patients who have had road traffic accidents. The method of diagnosis and management of such injuries is well established and accepted. However, trauma to the bladder can be associated with other life-threatening injuries which are frequently missed, and often diagnosed during laparotomy for other reasons. The aim of this study was to diagnose bladder injury in polytrauma patients as early as possible, taking into consideration the fact that these patients are hemodynamically unstable and require rapid evaluation and management. In order to achieve our objective, we used bedside sonography with retrograde instillation of normal saline to diagnose bladder injury in addition to use of the conventional retrograde cystogram.Keywords: bladder injury, bladder rupture, retrograde cystogram

  8. [Cholecystectomy and inguinal repair: frequent laparoscopic interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemann, P; Probst, H; Vuilleumier, H; Demartines, N

    2008-06-25

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy reduces postoperative pain, hospital stay and recovery in comparison with the open procedure. This approach allows to treat most of vesicular pathologies, as acute cholecystitis and choledocal lithiasis, with excellent results. Biliary tract injuries represent however the most feared complication. Concerning groin hernia pathology, two different laparoscopic approaches are described, as the trans-abdominal pre-peritoneal approach (TAPP) and the total extra-peritoneal approach (TEP). The first technique is easier to perform, but associated with more frequent significant intraabdominal morbidity. Results are comparable to the classic open Lichtenstein technique in term of reccurence. Laparoscopic approach could be associated with a lower chronic pain rate, but further studies should confirm this statement.

  9. The Importance of Asking Questions–in Different Ways!

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Importance of Asking Questions - in Different Ways! Uday Maitra. Classroom Volume 20 Issue 1 January 2015 pp 73-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/020/01/0073-0075. Keywords. Questions; answers; creativity; classroom teaching. Author Affiliations.

  10. Men ask more questions than women at a scientific conference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Hinsley

    Full Text Available Gender inequity in science and academia, especially in senior positions, is a recognised problem. The reasons are poorly understood, but include the persistence of historical gender ratios, discrimination and other factors, including gender-based behavioural differences. We studied participation in a professional context by observing question-asking behaviour at a large international conference with a clear equality code of conduct that prohibited any form of discrimination. Accounting for audience gender ratio, male attendees asked 1.8 questions for each question asked by a female attendee. Amongst only younger researchers, male attendees also asked 1.8 questions per female question, suggesting the pattern cannot be attributed to the temporary problem of demographic inertia. We link our findings to the 'chilly' climate for women in STEM, including wider experiences of discrimination likely encountered by women throughout their education and careers. We call for a broader and coordinated approach to understanding and addressing the barriers to women and other under-represented groups. We encourage the scientific community to recognise the context in which these gender differences occur, and evaluate and develop methods to support full participation from all attendees.

  11. Asking Better Questions: Approaching the Process of Thesis Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manderson, Desmond

    1996-01-01

    The questions typically asked by a law student in different stages of the process of thesis supervision are re-formulated to encourage more student reflection on the experience. The stages include approaching the supervision concept, selecting an appropriate supervisor, considering rights and responsibilities of both parties in developing a…

  12. IRS Releases Tax Questionnaire that Asks Colleges to Disclose More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelderman, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 400 colleges across the United States are about to be asked to disclose intimate financial details of their operations to the Internal Revenue Service. This article reports on a highly detailed financial questionnaire designed by the IRS for the first phase of its Colleges and Universities Compliance Project, which is part of a continuing…

  13. Asking the Right Questions: Teaching about Islam and Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafar, Afshan

    2017-01-01

    This article describes an exercise designed to introduce the topic of Islam and Muslims in a Sociology of Globalization course. The activity asks students to complete a sentence regarding Muslim women. Rather than provide any definitive answers regarding Islam or Muslims, the purpose of the exercise is for students to see the reductive nature of…

  14. The Retarded Child: Answers to Questions Parents Ask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwell, Arthur A.; Clabby, D. Ann

    Specific questions that parents ask and answers to them are presented on the following areas of mental retardation: categories and terminology; causes; diagnosis and referral; mental age and IQ; problems and adjustments in family relationships; behavior of the retarded child; speech; schooling; parent organizations; sex education;…

  15. What's the Harm in Asking about Suicidal Ideation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Charles W.; Furr, Michael; Sheftall, Arielle H.; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie; Crum, Paige; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Both researchers and oversight committees share concerns about patient safety in the study-related assessment of suicidality. However, concern about assessing suicidal thoughts can be a barrier to the development of empirical evidence that informs research on how to safely conduct these assessments. A question has been raised if asking about…

  16. Parents' qualitative perspectives on child asking for fruit and vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children can influence the foods available at home, but some ways of approaching a parent may be better than others; and the best way may vary by type of parent. This study explored how parents with different parenting styles would best receive their 10 to 14 year old child asking for fruit and vege...

  17. SIMULATION OF EARTH'S POLES DYNAMICS USING ASK-ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Cherednychenko N. A.; Lutsenko Y. V.; Trunev A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Based on local semantic information models, we have examined the dependence of the dynamics of the displacement of the pole positions of celestial objects. We have also developed and differentiated an analysis of ASK-pole modeling of dynamics within sixty-year cycles of reference points and substantiated reasons for the population inversion and singular states in the dynamics of the pole

  18. Musharraf asks for Hamas to be given a chance

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "President General Pervez Musharraf friday asked to give Haams a chance for peace and underscored that the worls which is already in turmoil cannot afford another confrontationist course, says a report received here from Geneva in Switzerlan" (1/2 page)

  19. Most frequent calf diseases in industrial breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić Sava

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is possible to conduct an analysis of the incidence of viral diseases in calves if these diseases are divided into two basic groups. One group comprises diseases of respiratory organs which are manifested by symptoms of a respiratory syndrome, and the second group comprises diseases of digestive tract organs in the form of a gastrointestinal syndrome. It is considered that viruses have the dominant role in the complex etiology of the respiratory syndrome, primarily the IBR virus or the Bovine Herpes Virus-1 (BHV-1, followed by the parainfluenza 3 virus (RSV, the Bovine Viral Diahrrea Virus (BVDV, the bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV, but also other viruses, such as adenoviruses, rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, can also influence the appearance of the respiratory syndrome. The respiratory syndrome is rarely caused by a single viral agent, but most frequently by mixed viruses, but also by bacterial infections. Mixed viral infections often have a lethal outcome. Investigations of the etiology of the gastrointestinal syndrome so far indicate that, in addition to bacteria, viruses can also be a significant etiological factor. Rotaviruses, coronaviruses, adenoviruses parvoviruses, herpesviruses (the IBR virus, pestiviruses (BVDV, can be the causes of a gastrointestinal syndrome. It is believed that viruses can be the cause in about 10% cases in the ethiopathogenesis of this syndrome. The paper describes the etiopathogenesis of calf diseases of viral etiology which are most often found in the local conditions of industrial breeding of calves.

  20. Nature of frequent deletions in CEBPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Ota; Kostecka, Arnost; Provaznikova, Dana; Krasna, Blazena; Brezinova, Jana; Filkukova, Jitka; Kotlin, Roman; Kouba, Michal; Kobylka, Petr; Neuwirtova, Radana; Jonasova, Anna; Caniga, Miroslav; Schwarz, Jiri; Markova, Jana; Maaloufova, Jacqueline; Sponerova, Dana; Novakova, Ludmila; Cermak, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    C/EBPalpha (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha) belongs to the family of leucine zipper transcription factors and is necessary for transcriptional control of granulocyte, adipocyte and hepatocyte differentiation, glucose metabolism and lung development. C/EBPalpha is encoded by an intronless gene. CEBPA mutations cause a myeloid differentiation block and were detected in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients. In this study we identified in 41 individuals from 824 screened individuals (290 AML patients, 382 MDS patients, 56 NHL patients and 96 healthy individuals) a single class of 23 deletions in CEBPA gene which involved a direct repeat of at least 2 bp. These mutations are characterised by the loss of one of two same repeats at the ends of deleted sequence. Three most frequent repeats included in these deletions in CEBPA gene are CGCGAG (493-498_865-870), GCCAAGCAGC (508-517_907-916) and GG (486-487_885-886), all according to GenBank accession no. NM_004364.2. A mechanism for deletion formation between two repetitive sequences can be recombination events in the repair process. Double-stranded cut in DNA can initiate these recombination events of adjacent DNA sequences.

  1. Frequent detection of benzodiazepines in drugged drivers in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophersen, Asbjørg S; Mørland, Jørg

    2008-06-01

    To describe the Norwegian system for handling suspected drugged driving cases according to an impairment-based law, with primary focus on benzodiazepines (BZDs), blood concentrations and combination with other psychoactive compounds. Routines for handling suspected driving under the influence of drugs other than alcohol are described. These include primary police investigation, blood sampling, and clinical tests of impairment performed by a police physician, a standard analytical program covering the most relevant illegal drugs and medicines relevant to traffic safety (approximately 25 compounds), and expert witness statements prepared for the court. The drug use patterns, blood drug concentrations, and frequency of multi-drug use have been recorded, with primary focus on benzodiazepines (BZDs). Use of BZDs among apprehended drivers has been compared with patient prescriptions recorded for the same BZDs. One or more drugs have been detected in approximately 80% of the cases received for analysis every year. BZDs have been the most prevalent drugs and have been detected in 38-57% of the cases, which is more frequent than other common illegal drugs; e.g., tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; 30-43%) and amphetamine (33-39%). The majority of the BZDs have been detected at supratherapeutic blood concentrations and frequently in combination with illegal drugs, other psychoactive medicines, or alcohol. Less than 5% of the BZDs (except for nitrazepam - 7.6%) have been found to be the only drug present at therapeutic blood levels. The majority of the drivers were 20-39 years old (median age 29-33), while the majority of BZDs prescribed were to users over 50 years of age. Drivers with BZD detected are probably not representative of ordinary patients with BZD prescriptions, as shown by the age disparity of drivers and patients. The frequent detection of BZDs suggests that these compounds should be included in the analytical program used for blood samples from apprehended drivers and

  2. What’s the Harm in Asking about Suicidal Ideation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Charles W.; Furr, R. Michael; Sheftall, Arielle H.; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie; Crum, Paige; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Both researchers and oversight committees share concerns about patient safety in the study-related assessment of suicidality. However, concern about assessing suicidal thoughts can be a barrier to the development of empirical evidence that informs research on how to safely conduct these assessments. A question has been raised if asking about suicidal thoughts can result in iatrogenic increases of such thoughts, especially among at-risk samples. The current study repeatedly tested suicidal ideation at 6-month intervals for up to 2-years. Suicidal ideation was measured with the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire Junior, and administered to adolescents who had previously received inpatient psychiatric care. Change in suicidal ideation was tested using several analytic techniques, each of which pointed to a significant decline in suicidal ideation in the context of repeated assessment. This and previous study outcomes suggest that asking an at-risk population about suicidal ideation is not associated with subsequent increases in suicidal ideation. PMID:22548324

  3. Parents? Qualitative Perspectives on Child Asking for Fruit and Vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Beltran, Alicia; O?Connor, Teresia M.; Hughes, Sheryl O.; Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Janice; Nicklas, Theresa A.; Baranowski, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Children can influence the foods available at home, but some ways of approaching a parent may be better than others; and the best way may vary by type of parent. This study explored how parents with different parenting styles would best receive their 10 to 14 years old child asking for fruits and vegetables (FV). An online parenting style questionnaire was completed and follow-up qualitative telephone interviews assessed home food rules, child influence on home food availability, parents? pre...

  4. Trend arbitrage, bid-ask spread and market dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Zaitsev, Nikolai

    2006-01-01

    Microstructure of market dynamics is studied through analysis of tick price data. Linear trend is introduced as a tool for such analysis. Trend arbitrage inequality is developed and tested. The inequality sets limiting relationship between trend, bid-ask spread, market reaction and average update frequency of price information. Average time of market reaction is measured from market data. This parameter is interpreted as a constant value of the stock exchange and is attributed to the latency ...

  5. Parental Ease in Asking Others Not to Smoke and Respiratory Symptoms and Illness among Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Spangler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Childhood exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS increases a child’s burden of respiratory conditions, but parental smoking bans may reduce such morbidity. This study evaluated household smoking bans and their relationship to respiratory illness in an outpatient otolaryngology clinic. Methods: The study was performed at the Heim Pal National Children’s Hospital, Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT Department (Budapest, Hungary from July to November, 2010. A consecutive series of children’s caregivers were approached to participate in a survey measuring household smoking bans, upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms and illnesses, and socioeconomic factors. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: Of the 215 caregivers recruited for the study, 208 agreed to participate (response rate of 96.7%. More than half of the children were male (54%, and 39% lived in a household with at least one member who smoked. Smoking was frequently banned inside the car (91.3% and home (85.1%. Respondents felt it easiest to ask friends (97.1% and family members not living in the household (98.1% to refrain from smoking inside the home. Respondents also found it easier to ask a stranger (81.7% or a family member (61.1% not to smoke around the child. Logistic regression showed that respondents for children with a history of pneumonia found it less difficult to ask visitors in the home not to smoke compared to children without pneumonia (OR = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.06–0.98. Conversely, respondents for children who had had adenoidectomy found it over three times more difficult to ask strangers not to smoke near the child compared to those of children without adenoidectomy (OR = 3.20, 95% CI = 1.43–6.38. Conclusions: In a population of children visiting an outpatient ENT clinic in Budapest, Hungary, we found a high degree of exposure to SHS. The ease with which caregivers felt towards asking others not to smoke predicted

  6. [The most frequent mistakes in intraoral radiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, U; Schwarz, H M

    1976-01-01

    The authors analysed 2000 intra-oral radiographs that had been taken, using the bisecting technique according to the isometry rule of Cieszynski/Dieck, at an institution being typical of the ambulatory public health service during a period of 5 months. 602 (30.1%) faulty radiographs were detected. The classification of the faulty radiographs showed that 395 (65.6%) were caused by errors in projection; 116 (19.3%), by errors in the dark-room; 59 (9.8%), by errors in exposure; and 32 (5.3%), by defective equipment. Defects in the film material used in the present study were not observed. The relatively high rate of faults calls for improvements of the programs for the education and the advanced training of stomatologists and stomatological nurses, and for improvement of the radiographic technique.

  7. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Quality in Geriatric Surgery Project Coalition for Quality in Geriatric Surgery Project Project Goals and Activities Stakeholder Organizations ... News Frequently Asked Questions Inquiry Form Surgeon Specific ...

  8. Implementing US Department of Energy lessons learned programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The DOE Lessons Learned Handbook is a two-volume publication developed to supplement the DOE Lessons Learned Standard (DOE-STD-7501-95) with information that will organizations in developing or improving their lessons learned programs. Volume 1 includes greater detail than the Standard in areas such as identification and documentation of lessons learned; it also contains sections on specific processes such as training and performance measurement. Volume 2 (this document) contains examples of program documents developed by existing lessons learned programs as well as communications material, functional categories, transmittal documents, sources of professional and industry lessons learned, and frequently asked questions about the Lessons Learned List Service.

  9. CHILDREN DO ASK, BUT DO NOT KNOW HOW TO DO ASKING: EPI-PRAGMATIC VS. META-PRAGMATIC SKILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Savic

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Old fi ndings on children’s comprehension of ask and tell were subject todifferent interpretations refl ecting progress in the fi eld of language acquisition.We want to show that acquiring a particular skill does not necessarily includecompetence of its intentional control and use. Development of linguistic skillstakes place at different levels starting from early spontaneous, implicit abilitiesto the level of meta-pragmatic refl exive knowledge that enables deliberatemonitoring, planning, and practice. The present study was aimed at exploringtwo extreme points in development: early epi-pragmatic and late refl exive metapragmaticcompetence. The fi rst part aims at fi nding the earliest instancesof children spontaneous ability to pass ask-instructions, and the evidence isprovided for the ages as early as 22 to 40 months (much earlier than recorded inthe previous studies. The second part is experimental and focuses on children’sability to respond to ask- and tell-instructions in the context of a cancelledconversational rule (Gricean Maxim of Quantity which requires deliberatemonitoring and use. The results show that this meta-pragmatic refl exive abilitybecomes stable only at the age of 6 years.

  10. The AskIT Service Desk: A Model for Improving Productivity and Reducing Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashcraft, Phillip Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fogle, Blythe G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cummings, Susan M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lopez, Leon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-29

    This was prepared for the business process improvement presentation to the Department of Energy. Los Alamos National Laboratory provides a single point of contact, the AskIT Service Desk, to address issues that impact customer productivity. At the most basic level, what customers want is for their calls to be received, to get a response from a knowledgeable analyst, and to have their issues resolved and their requests fulfilled. Providing a centralized, single point of contact service desk makes initiating technical or business support simple for the customer and improves the odds of immediately resolving the issue or correctly escalating the request to the next support level when necessary. Fulfilling customer requests through automated workflow also improves customer productivity and reduces costs. Finally, customers should be provided the option to solve their own problems through easy access to self-help resources such as frequently asked questions (FAQs) and how-to guides. To accomplish this, everyone who provides and supports services must understand how these processes and functions work together. Service providers and those who support services must “speak the same language” and share common objectives. The Associate Directorate for Business Innovation (ADBI) began the journey to improve services by selecting a known service delivery framework (Information Technology Infrastructure Library, or ITIL). From this framework, components that contribute significant business value were selected.

  11. Can undergraduate biology students learn to ask higher level questions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Sokolove, Phillip G.

    2000-10-01

    Our goals in this study were to explore the type of written questions students ask after reading one or more chapters from their textbook, and to investigate the ability of students to improve their questions during the course of a single semester. In order to classify student's questions we used a taxonomy that we have developed specifically for this purpose. Two comparable populations were examined: Undergraduate students in a large, introductory biology class who were taught in traditional lecture format, and students in a similar class who were taught in cooperative/active learning style. After the taxonomy was presented to the active learning class, more students were able to pose better, written questions. Their questions became more insightful, thoughtful, and content-related, and were not easily answered by consulting the textbook or another readily available source. The best questions could be recast as scientific research questions (i.e., hypotheses). In contrast, when the taxonomy was presented to students in the traditionally taught class, the quality of student-posed questions was largely unchanged. Various explanations for the difference in outcomes are discussed, and methods are suggested about how generally to encourage students' questions and to improve their question-asking skills regardless of overall teaching style.

  12. Do Clinicians Ask Pregnant Women about Exposures to Tobacco and Cannabis Smoking, Second-Hand-Smoke and E-Cigarettes? An Australian National Cross-Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian S. Gould

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinicians often ask pregnant women about tobacco smoking, but their practices of asking about other smoking and nicotine exposures are unknown. This study analysed how often clinicians ask pregnant women about their use of e-cigarettes, cannabis, chewing tobacco, and second-hand smoke (SHS exposure. Two cross-sectional surveys were undertaken. A random sample of 500 General Practitioner (GP members were invited from the National Faculty of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (NFATSIH to complete an on-line survey, and 5571 GP and Obstetrician (OBS members of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG were sent a paper survey by mail. Questions on frequency of asking about the exposures used Likert Scales, later dichotomized to “often-always” and “never-sometimes”. Logistic regressions estimated associations between clinician type and asking about cannabis, e-cigarettes, chewing tobacco, and SHS. An adjusted model reduced potential confounders of location, guidelines, gender and population. n = 378 GPs and OBS participated (6.2% response. In total, 13–14% asked “often-always” about e-cigarettes; 58% cannabis; 38% cannabis with tobacco; 27% SHS, and 10% chewing tobacco—compared to 95% of the sample asking about cigarette smoking. After adjustment, the odds of RANZCOG GPs (OR 0.34 and OBS (OR 0.63 asking about cannabis were lower compared to NFATSIH GPs. Clinician type was non-significant for asking about e-cigarettes, chewing tobacco and SHS. Surveyed Australian GPs and obstetricians asked less frequently about e-cigarettes, chewing, SHS exposure, and cannabis, potentially missing important exposures for mother and child.

  13. Question-Asking Patterns during Problem-Based Learning Tutorials: Formal Functional Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtanen, Juri

    2014-01-01

    Question-asking is essential for being, knowing and learning. However, classroom research has confirmed that students do not ask questions spontaneously and teachers ask the most questions, mainly low-level ones. The purpose of this qualitative case-study is to investigate question-asking during problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials, a subject…

  14. An ASK demodulator for data telemetry in biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bin; Yang, Zhi; Liu, Wentai

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a demodulator design for Amplitude Shift Keying (ASK) based wireless telemetry system in biomedical application. It supports up to 300Kbits per second (bps) data rate and detects envelope with modulation index of 1% or more. The design includes a single-to-differential OTA, a current mode full-wave rectifier, a log-domain peak detector, a variable-gain amplifier and a comparator. The rising and falling time constants of our design are tunable through varying off-chip components to support a wide range of modulation indexes and data rate. The circuit blocks are designed and simulated in Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) 0.18microm process and occupying 120x420microm(2). The power consumption is 1mW with 1.8V supply voltage.

  15. The science and art of asking questions in cognitive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ian Andrew; Morse, Rachel; Howarth, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Questions underpin all aspects of therapeutic assessment and intervention and are a vital component of the clinical process. Over recent years frameworks have started to be applied to obtain a greater understanding of questioning formats and processes. This paper examines the use of questions in cognitive therapy (CT). An overview of the main types of questions identified in the literature is presented. In addition, we examine a range of client and therapist characteristics that may impact on the questioning process. Asking questions in therapy is a complex, yet under-taught, skill. This paper provides a set of frameworks to assist in identifying helpful and unhelpful questioning skills. Thus the article has implications for further training and research.

  16. Three questions you need to ask about your brand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kevin Lane; Sternthal, Brian; Tybout, Alice

    2002-09-01

    Traditionally, the people responsible for positioning brands have concentrated on the differences that set each brand apart from the competition. But emphasizing differences isn't enough to sustain a brand against competitors. Managers should also consider the frame of reference within which the brand works and the features the brand shares with other products. Asking three questions about your brand can help: HAVE WE ESTABLISHED A FRAME?: A frame of reference--for Coke, it might be as narrow as other colas or as broad as all thirst-quenching drinks--signals to consumers the goal they can expect to achieve by using a brand. Brand managers need to pay close attention to this issue, in some cases expanding their focus in order to preempt the competition. ARE WE LEVERAGING OUR POINTS OF PARITY?: Certain points of parity must be met if consumers are to perceive your product as a legitimate player within its frame of reference. For instance, consumers might not consider a bank truly a bank unless it offers checking and savings plans. ARE THE POINTS OF DIFFERENCE COMPELLING?: A distinguishing characteristic that consumers find both relevant and believable can become a strong, favorable, unique brand association, capable of distinguishing the brand from others in the same frame of reference. Frames of reference, points of parity, and points of difference are moving targets. Maytag isn't the only dependable brand of appliance, Tide isn't the only detergent with whitening power, and BMWs aren't the only cars on the road with superior handling. The key questions you need to ask about your brand may not change, but their context certainly will. The saviest brand positioners are also the most vigilant.

  17. What to ask the person in the mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert S

    2007-01-01

    Every leader gets off track from time to time. But as leaders rise through the ranks, they have fewer and fewer opportunities for honest and direct feedback. Their bosses are no longer monitoring their actions, and by the time management missteps have a negative impact on business results, it's usually too late to make course corrections that will set things right. Therefore, it is wise to go through a self-assessment, to periodically step back from the bustle of running a business and ask some key questions of yourself. Author Robert S. Kaplan, who during his 22-year career at Goldman Sachs chaired the firm's senior leadership training efforts and cochaired its partnership committee, identifies seven areas for self-reflection: vision and priorities, managing time, feedback, succession planning, evaluation and alignment, leading under pressure, and staying true to yourself. The author sets out a series of questions in each of the areas, illustrating the impact of self-assessment through vivid accounts of real executives. Although the questions sound simple, people are often shocked-even horrified- by their own answers. Executives are aware that they should be focusing on their most important priorities, for instance, but without stepping back to reflect, few actually know where they are allocating their time. Kaplan advocates writing down what you do every working hour for a week and checking how well your actions match up with your intentions. As for feedback, managers should ask themselves whether they're getting truthful evaluations from their subordinates. (In all likelihood, they aren't). It takes time and discipline to persuade your employees to tell you about your failings.

  18. THE FREQUENT USE OF TEACHING STRATEGIES/METHODS AMONG TEACHERS ACCORDING TO THE TEACHER CANDIDATES OBSERVATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mukaddes SAKALLI; Hürsen, Çiğdem; Zehra ÖZÇINAR

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to show the frequent use of teaching stratergies/methods amongteachers which has been observed by teacher candidates currently undergoing their own field/area teaching program.This study undertakes the general research model and the tools used to obtain the necessary data are personalinformation form and a questionaire. “Teachers frequent use of teaching methods/stratergies” to obtain necessarydata a 4 likert scale type of questionaire has been used. The scale develop...

  19. Influence of Frequent Nocturnal Home Hemodialysis on Food Preference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ipema, Karin; Franssen, Casper; van der Schans, Cees; Smit, Lianne; Noordman, Sabine; Haisma, Hinke

    Objective: Dialysis patients frequently report a change of taste that is reversible after renal transplantation, suggesting that uremic toxins may negatively influence taste. Currently, frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis (NHHD) is the most effective method of hemodialysis, and is associated with

  20. Analysis of Frequent Item set Mining on Variant Datasets

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Alexander; Rohit Bansal; Robin Singh Bhadoria

    2011-01-01

    Association rule mining is the process of discovering relationships among the data items in large database. It is one of the most important problems in the field of data mining. Finding frequent itemsets is one of the most computationally expensive tasks in association rule mining. The classical frequent itemset mining approaches mine the frequent itemsets from the database where presence of an item in a transaction is certain. Frequent itemset mining under uncertain data model is a new area ...

  1. ML-Ask: Open Source Affect Analysis Software for Textual Input in Japanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Ptaszynski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We present ML-Ask – the first Open Source Affect Analysis system for textual input in Japanese. ML-Ask analyses the contents of an input (e.g., a sentence and annotates it with information regarding the contained general emotive expressions, specific emotional words, valence-activation dimensions of overall expressed affect, and particular emotion types expressed with their respective expressions. ML-Ask also incorporates the Contextual Valence Shifters model for handling negation in sentences to deal with grammatically expressible shifts in the conveyed valence. The system, designed to work mainly under Linux and MacOS, can be used for research on, or applying the techniques of Affect Analysis within the framework Japanese language. It can also be used as an experimental baseline for specific research in Affect Analysis, and as a practical tool for written contents annotation.   Funding statement: This research has been supported by: a Research Grant from the Nissan Science Foundation (years 2009–2010, The GCOE Program founded by Japan’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (years 2009–2010, (JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows (Project Number: 22-00358 (years 2010–2012, (JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Project Number: 24600001 (years 2012–2015, (JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Research Activity Start-up (Project Number: 25880003 (years 2013–2015, and (JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Encouragement of Young Scientists (B (Project Number: 15K16044 (years 2015-present, project estimated to end in March 2018.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in infectious diseases of the nervous system: when to ask, what to ask, what to expect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis dos Ramos Machado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis very frequently makes the difference to the diagnosis, not only in relation to infections but also in other diseases of the nervous system such as inflammatory, demyelinating, neoplastic and degenerative diseases. The authors review some practical and important features of CSF analysis in infectious diseases of the nervous system, with regard to acute bacterial meningitis, herpetic meningoencephalitis, neurotuberculosis, neurocryptococcosis, neurocysticercosis and neurosyphilis.

  3. Everything you might want to know about the Internet but are afraid to ask!. A new users resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, E.

    1993-09-01

    This document is a guide to accessing the Internet and the services available on Internet. The document contains a short explanation of the Internet by E. Kroll and E. Hoffman, brief descriptions of the primary access tools, a glossary, answers to frequently asked questions about the Internet, J. Martin`s `Search for Internet Treasure` and other helpful information. The data access tools discussed in this document include Gopher, World Wide Web, WAIS, ASTRA, ARCHIE, WHOIS, NETSERV, and TRICKLE. The file transfer tool discussed is BITFTP. The two communication services discussed are NETNEWS and LISTSERV.

  4. Refugees' advice to physicians: how to ask about mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Patricia J

    2014-08-01

    About 45.2 million people were displaced from their homes in 2012 due to persecution, political conflict, generalized violence and human rights violations. Refugees who endure violence are at increased risk of developing chronic psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression. The primary care visit may be the first opportunity to detect the devastating psychological effects of trauma. Physicians and refugees have identified communication barriers that inhibit discussions about mental health. In this study, refugees offer advice to physicians about how to assess the mental health effects of trauma. Ethnocultural methodology informed 13 focus groups with 111 refugees from Burma, Bhutan, Somali and Ethiopia. Refugees responded to questions concerning how physicians should ask about mental health in acceptable ways. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using thematic categorization informed by Spradley's Developmental Research Sequence. Refugees recommended that physicians should take the time to make refugees comfortable, initiate direct conversations about mental health, inquire about the historical context of symptoms and provide psychoeducation about mental health and healing. Physicians may require specialized training to learn how to initiate conversations about mental health and provide direct education and appropriate mental health referrals in a brief medical appointment. To assist with making appropriate referrals, physicians may also benefit from education about evidence-based practices for treating symptoms of refugee trauma. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. AskIT Service Desk Support Value Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashcraft, Phillip Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cummings, Susan M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fogle, Blythe G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valdez, Christopher D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-07

    The value model discussed herein provides an accurate and simple calculation of the funding required to adequately staff the AskIT Service Desk (SD).  The model is incremental – only technical labor cost is considered.  All other costs, such as management, equipment, buildings, HVAC, and training are considered common elements of providing any labor related IT Service. Depending on the amount of productivity loss and the number of hours the defect was unresolved, the value of resolving work from the SD is unquestionably an economic winner; the average cost of $16 per SD resolution can commonly translate to cost avoidance exceeding well over $100. Attempting to extract too much from the SD will likely create a significant downside. The analysis used to develop the value model indicates that the utilization of the SD is very high (approximately 90%).  As a benchmark, consider a comment from a manager at Vitalyst (a commercial IT service desk) that their utilization target is approximately 60%.  While high SD utilization is impressive, over the long term it is likely to cause unwanted consequences to staff such as higher turnover, illness, or burnout.  A better solution is to staff the SD so that analysts have time to improve skills through training, develop knowledge, improve processes, collaborate with peers, and improve customer relationship skills.

  6. Excessive daytime sleepiness and hepatic encephalopathy: it is worth asking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rui, Michele; Schiff, Sami; Aprile, Daniele; Angeli, Paolo; Bombonato, Giancarlo; Bolognesi, Massimo; Sacerdoti, David; Gatta, Angelo; Merkel, Carlo; Amodio, Piero; Montagnese, Sara

    2013-06-01

    The relationship between hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and the sleep-wake disturbances exhibited by patients with cirrhosis remains debated. The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of sleep-wake interview within the context of HE assessment. One-hundred-and-six cirrhotic patients were asked three yes/no questions investigating the presence of difficulty falling asleep, night awakenings and daytime sleepiness. All underwent formal HE assessment, quantitative electroencephalography and standardised psychometry. Fifty-eight were monitored for 8 ± 6 months in relation to the occurrence of HE. Patients complaining of daytime sleepiness (n = 75, 71 %) had slower EEGs than those who did not report it (relative alpha power: 37 ± 19 vs. 48 ± 17 %, p history (72 vs. 45 %, p < 0.05). Finally, the absence of excessive daytime sleepiness had a Negative Predictive Value of 92 % (64-100) in relation to the development of HE during the follow-up period. These data support the appropriateness of adding a yes/no question on the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness to routine assessment of patients with cirrhosis, to help identify those who do not need further, formal HE screening.

  7. Eight questions to ask before writing an article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Tim

    2017-06-02

    Health professionals often have to write articles for publication in academic journals. Many of them find this difficult and suffer from one or more variations of writer's block. A good way of avoiding these setbacks is to prepare thoroughly for the writing project, and this article proposes eight different questions writers can ask before they start. The first is whether they are in a good position to complete the task, and if not whether they should try to negotiate their way out of the project. If they commit to going ahead, writers should work out where they will find the necessary time, and set deadlines for ensuring that they do. They should also decide on their co-authors, because getting them involved early should make the rewriting more straightforward as well as reducing the danger of ghost authors emerging once the work has been done. Writers should put their research away and reflect on the most appropriate message - a simple sentence that sums up the main implication of the paper. Armed with this message, they can identify a suitable journal for publication - and thereafter can use articles in this journal to guide them on matters of substance and style. If the article is published in that target journal authors can consider that they have written a successful paper.

  8. Why physicians and nurses ask (or don’t about partner violence: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beynon Charlene E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV against women is a serious public health issue and is associated with significant adverse health outcomes. The current study was undertaken to: 1 explore physicians’ and nurses’ experiences, both professional and personal, when asking about IPV; 2 determine the variations by discipline; and 3 identify implications for practice, workplace policy and curriculum development. Methods Physicians and nurses working in Ontario, Canada were randomly selected from recognized discipline-specific professional directories to complete a 43-item mailed survey about IPV, which included two open-ended questions about barriers and facilitators to asking about IPV. Text from the open-ended questions was transcribed and analyzed using inductive content analysis. In addition, frequencies were calculated for commonly described categories and the Fisher’s Exact Test was performed to determine statistical significance when examining nurse/physician differences. Results Of the 931 respondents who completed the survey, 769 (527 nurses, 238 physicians, four whose discipline was not stated provided written responses to the open-ended questions. Overall, the top barriers to asking about IPV were lack of time, behaviours attributed to women living with abuse, lack of training, language/cultural practices and partner presence. The most frequently reported facilitators were training, community resources and professional tools/protocols/policies. The need for additional training was a concern described by both groups, yet more so by nurses. There were statistically significant differences between nurses and physicians regarding both barriers and facilitators, most likely related to differences in role expectations and work environments. Conclusions This research provides new insights into the complexities of IPV inquiry and the inter-relationships among barriers and facilitators faced by physicians and nurses. The

  9. Adolescents’ comfort answering questions about sexuality asked by their physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Natacha; Beaulieu, Émilie; Tremblay, Marie-Michelle; Laflamme, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the attitudes of adolescents toward communicating with their doctor about different aspects of their sexuality. METHODS: The present descriptive survey was conducted with the participation of teenagers from four high schools in Sherbrooke, Quebec. In each school, the students of two grade 8 classes (≤14 years of age) and two grade 10 classes (≥15 years of age) anonymously completed a self-administered questionnaire. Permission from the school board and parental consent for every participant was obtained. RESULTS: A total of 387 adolescents completed the self-administered questionnaire. The response rate for the study was 98%. Only 27% of the respondents remembered being questioned by their doctor about sexuality, and 17% of the respondents had already brought up the topic of sexuality themselves with their doctor. More than one-half (57%) of the adolescents reported they would be moderately comfortable to totally comfortable discussing sexuality with their doctor if they felt the need to. Overall, when asked to evaluate their degree of comfort if questioned on specific questions about their sexuality, 73.8% to 99.5% believed they would be moderately to totally comfortable responding. Nevertheless, there was a statistically significant difference between age groups, with the older age group being more comfortable than the younger age group (P<0.001). There was no difference between the level of comfort among boys and girls answering the same questions. Respondents believed that their treating physician should discuss sexuality with them (73.8%) and, in the majority of cases (78%), that he/she should initiate the conversation. CONCLUSION: Regardless of age or sex, teenagers considered themselves to be at ease discussing sexuality with their doctor and found it an important topic best brought up by their practitioner. PMID:24421673

  10. Physics of Toys: The Joy of Asking Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Beverley

    2014-03-01

    Children are natural scientists. They ask questions, they observe, they try things to see what happens. Often school-based science does little to nurture the young scientist and, in fact, may do just the opposite with thick textbooks, fact heavy lessons, and too many equations. The exploration of common toys produces deep learning by emphasizing concepts and connections before formal definitions and mathematics. It also connects the classroom to the familiar world outside of school and gets students writing and talking about physics ideas. At the university level, investigating what toys do and how they do it can be a challenging application of undergraduate physics from the introductory course up through senior mechanics. Toys provide an ideal system for the kind of open-ended inquiry that introduces students to what scientists really do. They can pose their own questions, explore the behavior of the system sufficiently to create a hypothesis, use their theoretical knowledge to make a simplified model of the system and predict an outcome, design an experiment, discover that the real world is messy, think about what they haven't taken into account with their simple model and try to improve it. I have spent close to 30 years thinking about how to use toys to enhance physics education from 4th grade through college. In the process I have collected hundreds of toys the majority of which relate to mechanics, but also to sound, light, electricity and magnetism. I will discuss the pedagogical reasons for using toys in physics education and the many different ways to use them from demonstrations to laboratory experiments to discussion starters as well as how it is possible to use the same toy with many different age levels by approaching the analysis differently. I will share a number of my favorite toys, but focus particularly on those related to energy concepts.

  11. Children’s Reports of Parents’ Education Level: Does it Matter Whom You Ask and What You Ask About?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke Kreuter

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Education researchers who study the effect of family social background on student achievement often use students’ survey reports of parental education to investigate these effects. However, past research has demonstrated that students misreport their parents’ education levels. We expand upon this research in two ways. First we use cognitive theories about the response process to develop and test hypotheses about reporting inconsistencies across these variables. Second we evaluate the impact of student misreporting on estimates of the relationship between parental education levels and student math achievement. Using data from the German administration of PISA 2000 (OECD Programme for International Student Assessment in which both students and parents were asked to report parental variables, we show that reporting inconsistencies are a function of student achievement: students with higher math scores tend to provide reports that are more consistent with their parents' reports. This interesting case of differential measurement error has consequences for comparisons of the effects of parental background on student achievement across different subgroups of the population and across countries (a common use of PISA data and other international studies similar to PISA.

  12. Signs of Bullying: Important Questions for Parents to Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... size, age, political advantage, economic advantage or social advantage. Bullying is common, happening every seven seconds to a child in the U.S. It reaches victims in school and online via social media apps and programs like Instagram, SnapChat, WhatsApp, Burn Note, ...

  13. Undocumented Students Ask Jesuit Higher Ed: "Just Us" or Justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryscavage, Richard; Canaris, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    More than three-quarters of administrators, faculty and staff at Jesuit colleges agree or strongly agree that "admitting, enrolling, and supporting undocumented students fits with the mission of the institution." And yet 40% recently said there were no known programs or outreach to undocumented students of which they were aware. There is…

  14. Ask-Upmark kidney with bilateral pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renal segmental hypoplasia (Ask-Upmark kidney) is a congenital disorder, first described by Eric Ask- Upmark in 1929. Habib et al. called it “segmental hypoplasia of the kidney in 1965. Ask Upmark kidney is more in females and present with hypertension or sometimes as recurrent urinary tract infections. Usually unilateral ...

  15. Feed Forward Neural Network Algorithm for Frequent Patterns Mining

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. K.R.Pardasani; Sanjay Sharma; Amit Bhagat

    2010-01-01

    Association rule mining is used to find relationships among items in large data sets. Frequent patterns mining is an important aspect in association rule mining. In this paper, an efficient algorithm named Apriori-Feed Forward(AFF) based on Apriori algorithm and the Feed Forward Neural Network is presented to mine frequent patterns. Apriori algorithm scans database many times to generate frequent itemsets whereas Apriori-Feed Forward(AFF) algorithm scans database Only Once. Computational resu...

  16. Perceived Quality of Social Relations and Frequent Drunkenness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Thora M; Rivera, Francisco; Jiménez-Iglesias, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to examine, for female and male students separately, whether perceived quality of relationships with peers and parents and relations in school predict self-reported frequent drunkenness among Spanish adolescents. METHODS: The Spanish data from the Health Behaviour...... were associated with decreased odds of frequent drunkenness, whereas low perceived maternal knowledge as well as medium and low satisfaction with the family increased odds of being frequently drunk. The proportion of male students reporting medium satisfaction with friendships had significantly lower...... predictors of frequent drunkenness among female than male students and that other factors than social relations may contribute to explain excessive alcohol use among Spanish adolescents....

  17. Classification and Target Group Selection Based Upon Frequent Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); R. Potharst (Rob)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn this technical report , two new algorithms based upon frequent patterns are proposed. One algorithm is a classification method. The other one is an algorithm for target group selection. In both algorithms, first of all, the collection of frequent patterns in the training set is

  18. Complex regional pain syndrome in children: Asking the right questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschneider, Kenneth R

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful disorder without a known unifying mechanism. There are little data on which to base evaluation and treatment decisions, and what data are available come from studies involving adults; however, even that literature is relatively sparse. Developing robust research for CRPS in children is essential for the progress toward optimal treatment. OBJECTIVES: To determine potential avenues of research in pediatric CRPS based on a review of the literature. Areas of concern include diagnostic criteria, peripheral mechanisms, central nervous system mechanisms, the role of the autonomic nervous system, possible risk factors, options for prevention and potential avenues of treatment. METHODS: A literature review was performed and the results applied to form the hypotheses posited in the form of research questions. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: CRPS is a complicated entity that is more than a painful sensory condition. There is evidence for peripheral inflammatory and neurological changes, and reorganization in both sensory and motor cortexes. In addition, a significant motor component is frequently observed and there appear to be tangible risk factors. Many of these pieces of evidence suggest options for prevention, treatment and monitoring progress and outcome. Most of the data are derived from adult studies and need to be replicated in children. Furthermore, there may be factors unique to pediatrics due to developmental changes in neuroplasticity as well as somatic, endocrinological and emotional growth. Some of these developmental factors may shed light on the adult condition. PMID:23248811

  19. Stability of the frequent COPD exacerbator in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reilev, Mette; Lykkegaard, Jesper; Halling, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Exacerbation frequency is central in treatment strategies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, whether chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients from the general population with frequent exacerbations continue to have frequent exacerbations over an extended period of time...... is currently unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the stability of the frequent exacerbator in a population-based setting. To this end, we conducted a nationwide register-based descriptive study with a 10-year follow-up period of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with at least one...... medically treated exacerbation in 2003. Each subsequent year, we divided the population into frequent, infrequent and non-exacerbators and quantified the flow between categories. Further, we estimated the percentage of frequent exacerbators at baseline who stayed in this category each year during a 5-year...

  20. Ask: a health advocacy program for adolescents with an intellectual disability: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lennox, Nicholas; Ware, Robert; Carrington, Suzanne; O'Callaghan, Michael; Williams, Gail; McPherson, Lyn; Bain, Chris

    2012-01-01

    .... The intervention package was designed to improve communication with health professionals and families' organisation of health information, and to increase clinical activities beneficial to improved health outcomes...

  1. Ask: a health advocacy program for adolescents with an intellectual disability: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lennox, Nicholas; Ware, Robert; Carrington, Suzanne; O'Callaghan, Michael; Williams, Gail; McPherson, Lyn; Bain, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents with intellectual disability often have poor health and healthcare. This is partly as a consequence of poor communication and recall difficulties, and the possible loss of specialised paediatric services...

  2. Asking the Right Questions: Action Learning and PMT 401

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    forward, engaged in animated give­and­take. The students are enrolled in the Program Manager’s Course (PMT 401), an intensive case­based, 10­week...there is universal agreement that there is one way to solve the problem, but students have come to a meeting of minds on an approach and how to...stakeholders are. Leaders must model this approach. Figure 4. Attributes of Great Questions • Do not have a preconceived answer in mind • Are fresh

  3. Building capacity through urban agriculture: report on the askîy project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Wanda; Vold, Lindsey

    2018-01-01

    Many North American cities have a built environment that provides access to energy-dense food and little opportunity for active living. Urban agriculture contributes to a positive environment involving food plant cultivation that includes processing, storing, distributing and composting. It is a means to increase local food production and thereby improve community health. The purpose of this study was to understand how participating in urban agriculture can help to empower young adults and build capacity for growing food in the city. This was a qualitative study of seven participants (five Indigenous and two non-Indigenous) between the ages of 19 and 29 years, engaged as interns in an urban agriculture project known as "askîy" in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada in 2015. We used a case-study design and qualitative analysis to describe the participants' experience based on the sustainable livelihoods framework. A collaborative approach had a great effect on the interns' experiences, notably the connections formed as they planned, planted, tended, harvested and sold the produce. Some of the interns changed their grocery shopping habits and began purchasing more vegetables and questioning where and how the vegetables were produced. All interns were eager to continue gardening next season, and some were planning to take their knowledge and skills back to their home reserves. Urban agriculture programs build capacity by providing skills beyond growing food. Such programs can increase local food production and improve food literacy skills, social relationships, physical activity and pride in community settings.

  4. Effectiveness of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training for frequent neck/shoulder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Saervoll, Charlotte A; Mortensen, Ole S

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical exercise is a cornerstone in rehabilitation programs, but adherence to comprehensive exercise remains low. This study determined the effectiveness of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training for relieving neck/shoulder pain in healthy adults with frequent symptoms......; 174 women and 24 men working at least 30 h per week and with frequent neck/shoulder pain were randomly assigned to resistance training with elastic tubing for 2 or 12 minutes per day 5 times per week, or weekly information on general health (control group). Primary outcomes were changes in intensity...

  5. THE FREQUENT SKIN DISEASES DIAGNOSED AT UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim KAYMAK

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of some skin diseases are increasing at adolescent and early adulthood period. The most frequent disease at this period is acne vulgaris whereas fungal diseases, dermatitis, dermatosis which are due to stress and other reasons, oral mucosal lesions and herpetic lesions of perioral region are also frequent. In this research we aim to determine the frequent dermatologic diseases of university students and 147 female, 74 male, a total of 221 students are included. We questioned the dermatologic complaints of students, then examined dermatologically in detail and registered ages, sexes, findings of the dermatological examination and dermatological diagnostic informations. As a result it is found out that the most frequent diseases are acne vulgaris (34.1%, allergic and pruritic dermatosis (16.6%, fungal diseases ( 13.0%, and eritamatous-squamous disease (8.3%. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(6.000: 313-320

  6. Four frequently confused species of Typhonium Schott (Araceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolson, Dan H.; Sivadasan, M.

    1981-01-01

    Typhonium trilobatum, T. flagelliforme, T. roxburghii, and T. blumei are taxonomically distinct, but their epithets (including that of T. divaricatum, nom. illegit.) frequently have been interchanged, primarily because of nomenclatural problems involving synonymy and (mis)typifications. It is

  7. Understanding spatial concentrations of road accidents using frequent item sets

    OpenAIRE

    GEURTS, Karolien; I Thomas; Wets, Geert

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims at understanding why road accidents tend to cluster in specific road segments. More particularly, it aims at analyzing which are the characteristics of the accidents occurring in "black" zones compared to those scattered all over the road. A technique of frequent item sets (data mining) is applied for automatically identifying accident circumstances that frequently occur together, for accidents located in and outside "black" zones. A Belgian periurban region is used as case st...

  8. FREQUENTLY AILING CHILDREN’S: HOW TO PROTECT A CHILD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Krasnov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors present literature and proper data on effectiveness of vitamin-mineral complex Pikovit in syrup and tablets for the health improvement in frequently ailing children. Authors prove clinical and laboratory effect of vitamin-mineral complex.Key words: frequently ailing children, health improvement, vitamins, minerals.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(2:161-164

  9. Excess Frequent Insufficient Sleep in American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Chapman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Frequent insufficient sleep, defined as ≥14 days/past 30 days in which an adult did not get enough rest or sleep, is associated with adverse mental and physical health outcomes. Little is known about the prevalence of frequent insufficient sleep among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN. Methods. We assessed racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of frequent insufficient sleep from the combined 2009-2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey among 810,168 respondents who self-identified as non-Hispanic white (NHW, , non-Hispanic black (NHB, , Hispanic (, or AI/AN (. Results. We found significantly higher unadjusted prevalences (95% CI of frequent insufficient sleep among AI/AN (34.2% [32.1–36.4] compared to NHW (27.4% [27.1–27.6]. However, the age-adjusted excess prevalence of frequent insufficient sleep in AI/AN compared to NHW was decreased but remained significant with the addition of sex, education, and employment status; this latter relationship was further attenuated by the separate additions of obesity and lifestyle indicators, but was no longer significant with the addition of frequent mental distress to the model (PR  =  1.05; 95% CI : 0.99–1.13. This is the first report of a high prevalence of frequent insufficient sleep among AI/AN. These results further suggest that investigation of sleep health interventions addressing frequent mental distress may benefit AI/AN populations.

  10. Enumerating all maximal frequent subtrees in collections of phylogenetic trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background A common problem in phylogenetic analysis is to identify frequent patterns in a collection of phylogenetic trees. The goal is, roughly, to find a subset of the species (taxa) on which all or some significant subset of the trees agree. One popular method to do so is through maximum agreement subtrees (MASTs). MASTs are also used, among other things, as a metric for comparing phylogenetic trees, computing congruence indices and to identify horizontal gene transfer events. Results We give algorithms and experimental results for two approaches to identify common patterns in a collection of phylogenetic trees, one based on agreement subtrees, called maximal agreement subtrees, the other on frequent subtrees, called maximal frequent subtrees. These approaches can return subtrees on larger sets of taxa than MASTs, and can reveal new common phylogenetic relationships not present in either MASTs or the majority rule tree (a popular consensus method). Our current implementation is available on the web at https://code.google.com/p/mfst-miner/. Conclusions Our computational results confirm that maximal agreement subtrees and all maximal frequent subtrees can reveal a more complete phylogenetic picture of the common patterns in collections of phylogenetic trees than maximum agreement subtrees; they are also often more resolved than the majority rule tree. Further, our experiments show that enumerating maximal frequent subtrees is considerably more practical than enumerating ordinary (not necessarily maximal) frequent subtrees. PMID:25061474

  11. ASK Family Kinases Are Required for Optimal NLRP3 Inflammasome Priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, David E; Samir, Parimal; Karki, Rajendra; Briard, Benoit; Vogel, Peter; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2018-01-31

    Activation of the multimeric inflammasome complex leads to inflammatory responses to biotic and abiotic triggers. The inflammasome sensor, Nod-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3), is activated by a range of stimuli and is tightly regulated to restrict excessive inflammation. Because NLRP3 responds broadly to cellular insults and regulates cell death similar to the stress-activated apoptosis signal-regulating kinases 1 and 2 (ASK1/2), we hypothesized that ASK1/2 may regulate NLRP3 activity. Although essential for mediating NLRP3 inflammasome activation, ASK1/2 were not required for NLRC4 or absent in melanoma 2 inflammasome activation. ASK1/2 was required for NLRP3 up-regulation after lipopolysaccharide treatment in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages and lung fibroblasts as well as during infection with Burkholderia thailandensis and influenza virus. Consistent with reduced NLRP3 expression in response to B. thailandensis, caspase-1 cleavage and cell death were reduced in infected bone marrow-derived macrophages, and mice lacking ASK1/2 were resistant to Burkholderia intranasal infection. Single knockouts of either ASK1 or ASK2 showed a partial role for both ASK1 and ASK2 in NLRP3 up-regulation in response to lipopolysaccharide or B. thailandensis, but ASK2 was required primarily to mediate lethal pathology during intranasal infection in vivo. Our findings identify the ASK1/2 complex as a regulator of NLRP3 activation and highlight a larger role for ASK2 in lung infection during B. thailandensis infection. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The effect of different levels of constructive teaching practices on teacher question asking behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Ibrahim

    The purposes of the study were: (1) to examine the effectiveness of the Iowa Chautauqua Professional Development Program (ICPDP) in moving elementary science teachers toward the use of more constructive teaching practices and (2) to investigate the effectiveness of different levels of teaching practices, especially in terms of a sample of teachers achieving "expert" state at the end of program compared with some attaining only with "competent" level. The variables considered were their perceptions of their own classroom practices, stated philosophy of teaching and learning, and their actual classroom practices and question asking behaviors observed via videotape recording. Structured questionnaires, focus group interviews, teacher reflections, and examination of lesson modules were used to collect data from thirty-three K-5 in-service teachers who were involved in a one-year ICPDP. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of data revealed that: (1) Teacher perceptions regarding their teaching and learning, and their actual teaching practices in classroom in terms of constructivist approaches were significantly changed after participation in the ICPDP. (2) Teacher perceptions of their classroom practices and stated philosophies of teaching and learning have a great affect on their actual practices that can be observed. (3) Teacher stated philosophies of teaching and learning significantly influence the quantity and quality of their use of questions in their classrooms. (4) The "expert" teachers accept students' alternative answers and deliberately ask high cognitive level questions that enable students to think critically and to guide them based on what the students are thinking. Alternatively, the "competent" teachers do not follow student responses and used questions which do not help students to understand their current level of understanding nor encourage students to reflect on their own thinking. (5) The role of "expert" teacher is more geared toward challenging

  13. Ask versus tell: Potential confusion when child witnesses are questioned about conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Stacia N; McWilliams, Kelly; Lyon, Thomas D

    2017-12-01

    Children's potential confusion between "ask" and "tell" can lead to misunderstandings when child witnesses are asked to report prior conversations. The verbs distinguish both between interrogating and informing, and between requesting and commanding. Children's understanding was examined using both field (Study 1) and laboratory methods (Studies 2-4). Study 1 examined 100 5- to 12-year-olds' trial testimony in child sexual abuse cases, and found that potentially ambiguous use of ask and tell was common, typically found in yes-no questions that elicited unelaborated answers, and virtually never clarified by attorneys or child witnesses. Studies 2 to 4 examined 345 maltreated 6- to 11-year-olds' understanding of ask and tell. The results suggest that children initially comprehend telling as saying, and thus believed that asking is a form of telling. As such, they often endorsed asking as telling when asked yes-no questions, but distinguished between asking and telling when explicitly asked to choose. Their performance was impaired by movement between different use of the words. Child witnesses' characterization of their conversations can easily be misconstrued by the way in which they are questioned, leading questioners to misinterpret whether they were coached by disclosure recipients or coerced by abuse suspects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Konstruksi Makna Media Sosial Ask.fm Bagi Pengguna di Kota Pekanbaru

    OpenAIRE

    Salam, Noor Efni; Elza, Putri

    2015-01-01

    The development of technology in communication raises the growth of social networking sites that Ask.fm now becomes a popular social network that is loved by many people everywhere, especially in Pekanbaru. The use of social networking Ask.fm as a virtual communication media raises various meanings associated with the reasons why they choose to use the Ask.fm as a social network they use. This study aims to determine the motive, meaning features Ask.fm, and the meaning of friendship on the us...

  15. If we ask, what they might tell: clinical assessment lessons from LGBT military personnel post-DADT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Maria Heliana; Rogers, Stephen Joseph; Johnson, Harriet Lee; Banks, Jon; Seay, Wanda Penny; Tinsley, Billy Lee; Grant, Andrew Warren

    2013-01-01

    Following repeal of the Don't Ask Don't Tell Policy, nearly one million lesbian, gay, and bisexual veterans and service members may increasingly seek access to Veterans Affairs services (G. Gates, 2004; G. J. Gates, 2010). Limited data exist regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) military personnel posing a unique challenge to clinicians and healthcare systems serving veterans with evidence-based and culturally relevant practice. In an effort to fill this information void, participatory program evaluation is used to inform recommendations for LGBT-affirmative health care systems change in a post-DADT world.

  16. U.S. clinicians' perspectives on less frequent routine gynecologic examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Jillian T; Yu, Jean M; Harper, Cynthia C; Sawaya, George F

    2014-05-01

    With newer recommendations for less frequent cervical cancer screening, longer intervals between routine gynecologic examinations might also be considered. A nationally representative mailed survey of U.S. obstetrician-gynecologists (n=521, response rate 62%) was conducted in 2010-11. Clinicians were asked their views on annual gynecologic examinations and on the consequences of extending the interval from annually to every 3 years for asymptomatic patients. Over two-thirds considered annual gynecologic examination very important for women in their reproductive years (69%); fewer consider it very important for women in menopause (55%). Most anticipated that shifting examinations to every 3 years would result in lower patient satisfaction (78%), contraceptive provision (74%), and patient health and well-being (74%). Decreases in clinic volume (93%) and financial reimbursement (78%) were also expected. Anticipated effects of longer intervals varied by provider characteristics, geography, and practice setting. Obstetrician-gynecologists in the U.S. believed that longer intervals between routine examinations would have negative repercussions for patients and medical practice, but there were differences by region, practice, and personal characteristics. Redefining annual gynecologic visits as contraceptive counseling and health maintenance visits could address financial and patient volume concerns, and perspectives from patients and other providers might reveal possible benefits of less frequent gynecologic examinations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lower life satisfaction related to materialism in children frequently exposed to advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opree, Suzanna J; Buijzen, Moniek; Valkenburg, Patti M

    2012-09-01

    Research among adults suggests that materialism and life satisfaction negatively influence each other, causing a downward spiral. So far, cross-sectional research among children has indicated that materialistic children are less happy, but causality remains uncertain. This study adds to the literature by investigating the longitudinal relation between materialism and life satisfaction. We also investigated whether their relation depended on children's level of exposure to advertising. A sample of 466 children (aged 8-11; 55% girls) participated in a 2-wave online survey with a 1-year interval. We asked children questions about material possessions, life satisfaction, and advertising. We used structural equation modeling to study the relationship between these variables. For the children in our sample, no effect of materialism on life satisfaction was observed. However, life satisfaction did have a negative effect on materialism. Exposure to advertising facilitated this effect: We only found an effect of life satisfaction on materialism for children who were frequently exposed to advertising. Among 8- to 11-year-old children, life satisfaction leads to decreased materialism and not the other way around. However, this effect only holds for children who are frequently exposed to television advertising. It is plausible that the material values portrayed in advertising teach children that material possessions are a way to cope with decreased life satisfaction. It is important to reduce this effect, because findings among adults suggest that materialistic children may become less happy later in life. Various intervention strategies are discussed.

  18. Examination of Operation Quality for High-frequent Railway Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex; Kaas, Anders H.

    2009-01-01

    The examination of operation quality for high-frequent operation requires other approaches than the typical evaluation of punctuality (trains on time) and reliability (operated trains). This is because passengers in high-frequent railway systems do not necessarily notice train delays as they just...... take the first train in their direction. The article examines four different approaches to examine operation quality for high-frequent operation that are based on the experiences of the passengers. These approaches are the service frequency of the operation, travel time extension, a combination...... operation simulation software. Combining the passenger delay model with simulation software gives the possibility to forecast future infrastructure and operation scenarios which make it possible to improve the planning....

  19. What Are Youth Asking about Drugs? A Report of NIDA Drug Facts Chat Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Cory M.; Hoefinger, Heidi; Linn-Walton, Rebecca; Aikins, Ross; Falkin, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    The current study analyzes a sample of questions about drugs asked online by youth who participated in the National Institute on Drug Abuse's (NIDA) "Drug Facts Chat Day." The types of drugs youth asked about were coded into 17 substance categories, and the topics they raised were coded into seven thematic categories. The top five…

  20. The Question Asking Skills of Preschool Teacher Candidates: Turkey and America Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, D. Neslihan

    2016-01-01

    Question asking is an important skill that teachers should use during class activities. Teachers need to get used to this ability while they are teacher candidates. The aim of this research is to identify the cognitive taxonomy and the structure of the questions asked by the candidate of preschool teachers and to compare the questioning skills of…

  1. How Are Questions That Students Ask in High Level Mathematics Classes Linked to General Giftedness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leikin, Roza; Koichu, Boris; Berman, Avi; Dinur, Sariga

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a part of a larger study, in which we asked "How are learning and teaching of mathematics at high level linked to students' general giftedness?" We consider asking questions, especially student-generated questions, as indicators of quality of instructional interactions. In the part of the study presented in this…

  2. Improving Chinese Junior High School Students' Ability to Ask Critical Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao; Lederman, Norman G.; Cai, Chaojing

    2017-01-01

    The present study explores ways to enhance students' question-asking ability (i.e., the ability to ask critical questions), which is the premise of scientific inquiry and a precondition for effective science teaching. A survey of junior high school students in Zhejiang province in China showed that students' questioning behavior was not well…

  3. Questions Students Ask: Bridging the Gap between Scientists and Students in a Research Institute Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Bev; Bay, Jacquie L.

    2010-01-01

    It was proposed that an analysis of the questions students anticipate asking, and ask, could provide information about an enculturation encounter between Year 13 biology students and scientists working in a biomedical-clinical research unit. As part of a day-long intervention at this research institute, small groups of students (10-15) met with…

  4. Little Pitchers Use Their Big Ears: Preschoolers Solve Problems by Listening to Others Ask Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Candice M.; Danovitch, Judith H.; Grant, Meridith G.; Elashi, Fadwa B.

    2012-01-01

    Children ask questions and learn from the responses they receive; however, little is known about how children learn from listening to others ask questions. Five experiments examined preschoolers' ("N" = 179) ability to solve simple problems using information gathered from listening to question-and-answer exchanges between 2 parties present in the…

  5. Ask the Posts of Our House: Using Cultural Spaces to Encourage Quality Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adds, Peter; Hall, Meegan; Higgins, Rawinia; Higgins, Te Ripowai

    2011-01-01

    When the Maori goddess, "Hinetitama", asked the Maori god, "Tane", who her father was, he replied, "Uia ki nga pou o t whare ... Ask the posts of your house". This traditional Maori (indigenous people of New Zealand) story implies a cultural teaching pedagogy that utilises the "marae" (a Maori building…

  6. Asking Questions as a Key Strategy in Guiding a Novice Teacher: A Self-Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsher, Gila; Kantor, Itay-Danny

    2012-01-01

    This self-study explores the instruction of a novice teacher by an expert mentor teacher, while applying the strategy of asking questions instead of the more common pattern of giving advice and guidance in the form of telling. The study examines the educational potential embedded in the question-asking strategy as a key mentoring resource when…

  7. Building capacity through urban agriculture: report on the askîy project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Martin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many North American cities have a built environment that provides access to energy-dense food and little opportunity for active living. Urban agriculture contributes to a positive environment involving food plant cultivation that includes processing, storing, distributing and composting. It is a means to increase local food production and thereby improve community health. The purpose of this study was to understand how participating in urban agriculture can help to empower young adults and build capacity for growing food in the city. Methods: This was a qualitative study of seven participants (five Indigenous and two non-Indigenous between the ages of 19 and 29 years, engaged as interns in an urban agriculture project known as “askîy” in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada in 2015. We used a case-study design and qualitative analysis to describe the participants’ experience based on the sustainable livelihoods framework. Results: A collaborative approach had a great effect on the interns’ experiences, notably the connections formed as they planned, planted, tended, harvested and sold the produce. Some of the interns changed their grocery shopping habits and began purchasing more vegetables and questioning where and how the vegetables were produced. All interns were eager to continue gardening next season, and some were planning to take their knowledge and skills back to their home reserves. Conclusion: Urban agriculture programs build capacity by providing skills beyond growing food. Such programs can increase local food production and improve food literacy skills, social relationships, physical activity and pride in community settings.

  8. Frequent Errors in Chinese EFL Learners' Topic-Based Writings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Huifang

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated a large number of errors found in the topic-based writings of Chinese EFL learners, especially provided an analysis on frequent errors, to find useful pedagogical implications for English grammar teaching and writing instruction in Chinese EFL setting. Students' topic-based writings were examined by the author. The findings…

  9. Use of contraception among US women with frequent mental distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Sherry L; Curtis, Kathryn M; Robbins, Cheryl L; Zapata, Lauren B; Dietz, Patricia M

    2011-02-01

    This study examines whether a woman's mental health is associated with use of contraception. We used national data from 2004 and 2006 to calculate the prevalence of contraceptive use among women with frequent mental distress. We examined associations among mental distress and permanent contraception and any highly or moderately effective, reversible contraceptive method. Women with (86%) and without (87%) frequent mental distress reported using contraception, but contraceptive type varied by mental distress and income. Among women who use contraception, those with frequent mental distress had 1.4 times higher odds (95% CI: 1.2-1.6) of using permanent contraception. Among lower income women who use reversible contraception, those with frequent mental distress had lower odds of using highly [adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=0.5, 95% CI: 0.4-0.8] and moderately (aOR=0.6, 95% CI: 0.4-0.9) effective methods than less effective methods. Contraceptive providers should consider mental health when providing counseling about contraception. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Most frequent location of the sentinel lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao Lo

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: The area between these four landmarks is the most frequent location of the sentinel lymph node identified using the radioisotope method. We suggest that this area should be carefully evaluated preoperatively by ultrasound for appropriate surgical planning. A skin incision in this area is also recommended when sentinel lymph node dissection is guided by blue dye.

  11. Frequent Pairs in Data Streams: Exploiting Parallelism and Skew

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagna, Andrea; Kutzkow, Konstantin; Pagh, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    , confirmed for several real-world datasets. Additionally, the algorithm parallelizes easily, which opens up for real-time processing of large transactions. Unlike previous algorithms we make no assumptions on the order of arrival of transactions and pairs. Our algorithm builds upon approaches for frequent...

  12. An Adaptive Algorithm for Finding Frequent Sets in Landmark Windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Xuan-Hong; Ong, Kok-Leong; Lee, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We consider a CPU constrained environment for finding approximation of frequent sets in data streams using the landmark window. Our algorithm can detect overload situations, i.e., breaching the CPU capacity, and sheds data in the stream to “keep up”. This is done within a controlled error thresho...

  13. Social environment and frequent attendance in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A lack of social support is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased effect of prevention. Frequent attenders to primary care are characterised by poorer social conditions than other patients in general practice, but we do not know whether this is due to socia...

  14. Predictors of frequent visits to a psychiatric emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Aagaard, Andreas; Buus, Niels

    2014-01-01

    of the psychiatric emergency room throughout the whole period. Furthermore, the emergence and continual presence of the predictors: severe mental illness (1999-onwards), substance abuse (2002-onwards) and sheltered housing (2002-2003-2005-onwards) indicated changes in the general profile of frequent visitors...

  15. how frequent should we investigate for urinary tract infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    John CC. Ogbe P. Donli A. Oguche S. The febrile child: how frequent should we investigate for urinary tract infection. Accepted: 3rd August 2015. Ocheke OI. John CC, Ogbe P, Donli A, Oguche S. Department of Paediatrics,. Jos University Teaching Hospital. P. M. B 2076, Jos, Nigeria. Email: ieocheke@yahoo.com. ( ).

  16. Fraternity Membership & Frequent Drinking. NBER Working Paper No. 16291

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSimone, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Reinforcing earlier findings from other data, college senior fraternity/sorority members are more likely to consume alcohol frequently. Large reductions in estimates upon controlling for time spent partying, and to a lesser extent cigarette use and intramural sports involvement, suggest considerable unobserved heterogeneity in the relationship.…

  17. Injury patterns in children with frequent emergency department visits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, B

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare injury patterns in children with many and few emergency department (ED) visits in order to reveal the causes for the frequent visits. METHODS: Three cohorts of Danish children (total 579 721 children) were followed for three years when their ages were 0-2, 6-8, and 12-14 ye...

  18. Frequent involvement of chromatin remodeler alterations in gastric field cancerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Hideyuki; Niwa, Tohru; Takahashi, Takamasa; Wakabayashi, Mika; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ando, Takayuki; Inagawa, Yuki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Katai, Hitoshi; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Kiyono, Tohru; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2015-02-01

    A field for cancerization, or a field defect, is formed by the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in normal-appearing tissues, and is involved in various cancers, especially multiple cancers. Epigenetic alterations are frequently present in chronic inflammation-exposed tissues, but information on individual genes involved in the formation of a field defect is still fragmental. Here, using non-cancerous gastric tissues of cancer patients, we isolated 16 aberrantly methylated genes, and identified chromatin remodelers ACTL6B and SMARCA1 as novel genes frequently methylated in non-cancerous tissues. SMARCA1 was expressed at high levels in normal gastric tissues, but was frequently silenced by aberrant methylation in gastric cancer cells. Moreover, somatic mutations of additional chromatin remodelers, such as ARID1A, SMARCA2, and SMARCA4, were found in 30% of gastric cancers. Mutant allele frequency suggested that the majority of cancer cells harbored a mutation when present. Depletion of a chromatin remodeler, SMARCA1 or SMARCA2, in cancer cell lines promoted their growth. These results showed that epigenetic and genetic alterations of chromatin remodelers are induced at an early stage of carcinogenesis and are frequently involved in the formation of a field defect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Readiness Assessment Tests versus Frequent Quizzes: Student Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Suzanne E.; Wu, Shao-Wei

    2009-01-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of two different assessment techniques; readiness assessment tests (RATs) and frequent quizzing. We report student perceptions of the impact of these techniques on the number of readings done prior to the class period, thorough reading of assignments, ability to follow class discussions, ability to participate…

  20. GRAMI: Generalized Frequent Subgraph Mining in Large Graphs

    KAUST Repository

    El Saeedy, Mohammed El Sayed

    2011-07-24

    Mining frequent subgraphs is an important operation on graphs. Most existing work assumes a database of many small graphs, but modern applications, such as social networks, citation graphs or protein-protein interaction in bioinformatics, are modeled as a single large graph. Interesting interactions in such applications may be transitive (e.g., friend of a friend). Existing methods, however, search for frequent isomorphic (i.e., exact match) subgraphs and cannot discover many useful patterns. In this paper we propose GRAMI, a framework that generalizes frequent subgraph mining in a large single graph. GRAMI discovers frequent patterns. A pattern is a graph where edges are generalized to distance-constrained paths. Depending on the definition of the distance function, many instantiations of the framework are possible. Both directed and undirected graphs, as well as multiple labels per vertex, are supported. We developed an efficient implementation of the framework that models the frequency resolution phase as a constraint satisfaction problem, in order to avoid the costly enumeration of all instances of each pattern in the graph. We also implemented CGRAMI, a version that supports structural and semantic constraints; and AGRAMI, an approximate version that supports very large graphs. Our experiments on real data demonstrate that our framework is up to 3 orders of magnitude faster and discovers more interesting patterns than existing approaches.

  1. Constraint based frequent pattern mining for generalized query ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Constraint based frequent pattern mining for generalized query templates from web log. ... International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader).

  2. The occurrences of chest pains and frequent coughing among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at establishing occurrences of chest pains and frequent coughing among different classes of residents within Selebi Phikwe, Botswana where there are on going nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) mining and smelting activities. Through the administration of questionnaires and structured questions to 600 individuals, ...

  3. Pigeon-Frequented Areas, Garbage Piles and Dog Faeces as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out to establish the presence of Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida species in two pigeon-frequented areas; garbage piles from two separate sites in Nairobi, and dog faeces from Small animal clinic, University of Nairobi, Kabete. The sampling included both solid materials and air. Potato Dextrose ...

  4. Finding frequent trajectories by clustering and sequential pattern mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur A. Shaw

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Data mining is a powerful emerging technology that helps to extract hidden information from a huge volume of historical data. This paper is concerned with finding the frequent trajectories of moving objects in spatio-temporal data by a novel method adopting the concepts of clustering and sequential pattern mining. The algorithms used logically split the trajectory span area into clusters and then apply the k-means algorithm over this clusters until the squared error minimizes. The new method applies the threshold to obtain active clusters and arranges them in descending order based on number of trajectories passing through. From these active clusters, inter cluster patterns are found by a sequential pattern mining technique. The process is repeated until all the active clusters are linked. The clusters thus linked in sequence are the frequent trajectories. A set of experiments conducted using real datasets shows that the proposed method is relatively five times better than the existing ones. A comparison is made with the results of other algorithms and their variation is analyzed by statistical methods. Further, tests of significance are conducted with ANOVA to find the efficient threshold value for the optimum plot of frequent trajectories. The results are analyzed and found to be superior than the existing ones. This approach may be of relevance in finding alternate paths in busy networks (congestion control, finding the frequent paths of migratory birds, or even to predict the next level of pattern characteristics in case of time series data with minor alterations and finding the frequent path of balls in certain games.

  5. Material Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna; Boer, Laurens; Tsaknaki, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    , and color, but additionally being capable of sensing, actuating, and computing. Indeed, computers will not be things in and by themselves, but embedded into the materials that make up our surroundings. This also means that the way we interact with computers and the way we program them, will change....... Consequently we ask what the practice of programming and giving form to such materials would be like? How would we be able to familiarize ourselves with the dynamics of these materials and their different combinations of cause and effect? Which tools would we need and what would they look like? Will we program...... these computational composites through external computers and then transfer the code them, or will the programming happen closer to the materials? In this feature we outline a new research program that floats between imagined futures and the development of a material programming practice....

  6. [The methods of prognostic evaluation of risk of child joining the dispensary group of frequently ill children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maĭorov, R V; Chereshneva, M V; Verzilin, S D; Chereshnev, V A

    2013-01-01

    The study was organized to develop the formalized diagnostic methods and computer program to evaluate the risk of child joining the dispensary group of frequently ill children. The sampling included 2742 children of different age groups. It is established that size of groups of frequently ill children consists 38.2% among children of preschool age, 32% among children of early school age and 21% among adolescents of senior school age. The risk factors of development of frequent respiratory diseases in child are revealed. The impact of these factors on the rate of respiratory diseases depending on the age of child is established. The methods and computer program are developed for prognostic evaluation of risk of child joining the dispensary group of frequently ill children according the results of analysis of hereditary factors, pathology of delivery and pregnancy, characteristics of breast feeding and conditions of life. The methods are approved during additional examination of 400 children of different age.

  7. Asking why

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The growth of a solid, knowledge-intensive firm, OutSystems—an IT company recognized in 2003 by Fortune magazine as one of the most promising start-ups in the world—is accompanied by efforts to create a strong culture that preserves the traits that have driven OutSystems’ success and that drives innovation, adaptability, high performance, and accountability. The lessons OutSystems learned from previous international experiences are presented along with its latest growth model of branded local...

  8. Ask Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusak, Laurence (Editor); Cohen, Don (Editor); Ellis, Kerry (Editor); Kohut, Matt (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The topics covered include: The Summer of Hydrogen; Leading Your Leaders; Dawn: Cooperation, not Control; Best Buy: Planning for Disaster The Astronaut Glove Challenge: Big Innovation from a (Very) Small Team; Using the Space Glove to Teach Spatial Thinking; The Power of Story; Interview with Jay O'Callahan; Learning from Space Entrepreneurs; Featured Invention: Laser Scaling Device; Reaching for the APEX at Ames; The Project Manager Who Saved His Country; Choosing and Developing the Right Leadership Styles for Projects; and The Costs of Knowledge.

  9. AskHERMES: An online question answering system for complex clinical questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, YongGang; Liu, Feifan; Simpson, Pippa; Antieau, Lamont; Bennett, Andrew; Cimino, James J; Ely, John; Yu, Hong

    2011-04-01

    Clinical questions are often long and complex and take many forms. We have built a clinical question answering system named AskHERMES to perform robust semantic analysis on complex clinical questions and output question-focused extractive summaries as answers. This paper describes the system architecture and a preliminary evaluation of AskHERMES, which implements innovative approaches in question analysis, summarization, and answer presentation. Five types of resources were indexed in this system: MEDLINE abstracts, PubMed Central full-text articles, eMedicine documents, clinical guidelines and Wikipedia articles. We compared the AskHERMES system with Google (Google and Google Scholar) and UpToDate and asked physicians to score the three systems by ease of use, quality of answer, time spent, and overall performance. AskHERMES allows physicians to enter a question in a natural way with minimal query formulation and allows physicians to efficiently navigate among all the answer sentences to quickly meet their information needs. In contrast, physicians need to formulate queries to search for information in Google and UpToDate. The development of the AskHERMES system is still at an early stage, and the knowledge resource is limited compared with Google or UpToDate. Nevertheless, the evaluation results show that AskHERMES' performance is comparable to the other systems. In particular, when answering complex clinical questions, it demonstrates the potential to outperform both Google and UpToDate systems. AskHERMES, available at http://www.AskHERMES.org, has the potential to help physicians practice evidence-based medicine and improve the quality of patient care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. AskHERMES: An online question answering system for complex clinical questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, YongGang; Liu, Feifan; Simpson, Pippa; Antieau, Lamont; Bennett, Andrew; Cimino, James J.; Ely, John; Yu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Objective Clinical questions are often long and complex and take many forms. We have built a clinical question answering system named AskHERMES to perform robust semantic analysis on complex clinical questions and output question-focused extractive summaries as answers. Design This paper describes the system architecture and a preliminary evaluation of AskHERMES, which implements innovative approaches in question analysis, summarization, and answer presentation. Five types of resources were indexed in this system: MEDLINE abstracts, PubMed Central full-text articles, eMedicine documents, clinical guidelines and Wikipedia articles. Measurement We compared the AskHERMES system with Google (Google and Google Scholar) and UpToDate and asked physicians to score the three systems by ease of use, quality of answer, time spent, and overall performance. Results AskHERMES allows physicians to enter a question in a natural way with minimal query formulation and allows physicians to efficiently navigate among all the answer sentences to quickly meet their information needs. In contrast, physicians need to formulate queries to search for information in Google and UpToDate. The development of the AskHERMES system is still at an early stage, and the knowledge resource is limited compared with Google or UpToDate. Nevertheless, the evaluation results show that AskHERMES’ performance is comparable to the other systems. In particular, when answering complex clinical questions, it demonstrates the potential to outperform both Google and UpToDate systems. Conclusions AskHERMES, available at http://www.AskHERMES.org, has the potential to help physicians practice evidence-based medicine and improve the quality of patient care. PMID:21256977

  11. Method presented for finding Frequent Itemsets in web data streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Kaviani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Continual data checking is considered as one of the most common search tools for frequent itemsets which requires storage on memory. On the other hand, according to properties of data stream which are unlimited productions with a high-speed, it is not possible saving these data on memory and we need for techniques which enables online processing and finding repetitive standards. One of the most popular techniques in this case is using sliding windows. The benefits of these windows can be reducing memory usage and also search acceleration. In this article, a new vertical display and an algorithm is provided based on the pins in order to find frequent itemsets in data streams. Since this new display has a compressed format itself so, the proposed algorithm in terms of memory consumption and processing is more efficient than any other similar algorithms.

  12. Evidence for frequent incest in a cooperatively breeding mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, H J; Cant, M A; Hoffman, J I; Sanderson, J L

    2014-12-01

    As breeding between relatives often results in inbreeding depression, inbreeding avoidance is widespread in the animal kingdom. However, inbreeding avoidance may entail fitness costs. For example, dispersal away from relatives may reduce survival. How these conflicting selection pressures are resolved is challenging to investigate, but theoretical models predict that inbreeding should occur frequently in some systems. Despite this, few studies have found evidence of regular incest in mammals, even in social species where relatives are spatio-temporally clustered and opportunities for inbreeding frequently arise. We used genetic parentage assignments together with relatedness data to quantify inbreeding rates in a wild population of banded mongooses, a cooperatively breeding carnivore. We show that females regularly conceive to close relatives, including fathers and brothers. We suggest that the costs of inbreeding avoidance may sometimes outweigh the benefits, even in cooperatively breeding species where strong within-group incest avoidance is considered to be the norm.

  13. Lymphedema following cancer therapy in Slovenia: a frequently overlooked condition?:

    OpenAIRE

    Rucigaj, Tanja Planinsek; Leskovec, Nada Kecelj; Zunter*, Vesna Tlaker

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Secondary lymphedema following cancer therapy is a frequent, often painful, quality of life disturbing condition, reducing the patients’ mobility and predisposing them to complications, e.g. infections and malignancies. The critical aspect of lymphedema therapy is to start as soon as possible to prevent the irreversible tissue damage. Patients and methods We performed a retrospective study of patients with lymphedema, treated at the Department of Dermatovenereology, University Me...

  14. Forest Administration in Romania: Frequent Problems and Expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Mihai MARINCHESCU; Aureliu Florin HALALISAN; Popa, Bogdan; Abrudan, Ioan Vasile

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the status and evolution of forest management in Romania in terms of forest regime, as well as to highlight the most frequent problems and common expectations of forest district managers. Underlying the presented results are an analysis of the compiled statistical indicators used in Romanian forestry and the outcome of a sociological survey conducted on a sample of 345 forest district managers. In early 2013, over 4.4 million hectares of state, public and ...

  15. THE EXPERIENCE OF MULTIVITAMINS USE IN FREQUENTLY ILL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Frolenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During this study the influence on the clinical and immunological characteristics of frequently ill children at the age of 3–6 years of a complex drug containing β-carotene and vitamins E and C was investigated. It was found that the frequency and duration of respiratory tract diseases decreased in children received the vitamin complex. The improvement of phagocytic parameters and contain of circulating immune complexes was established in such patients.

  16. Incremental Frequent Subgraph Mining on Large Evolving Graphs

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhamid, Ehab

    2017-08-22

    Frequent subgraph mining is a core graph operation used in many domains, such as graph data management and knowledge exploration, bioinformatics and security. Most existing techniques target static graphs. However, modern applications, such as social networks, utilize large evolving graphs. Mining these graphs using existing techniques is infeasible, due to the high computational cost. In this paper, we propose IncGM+, a fast incremental approach for continuous frequent subgraph mining problem on a single large evolving graph. We adapt the notion of “fringe” to the graph context, that is the set of subgraphs on the border between frequent and infrequent subgraphs. IncGM+ maintains fringe subgraphs and exploits them to prune the search space. To boost the efficiency, we propose an efficient index structure to maintain selected embeddings with minimal memory overhead. These embeddings are utilized to avoid redundant expensive subgraph isomorphism operations. Moreover, the proposed system supports batch updates. Using large real-world graphs, we experimentally verify that IncGM+ outperforms existing methods by up to three orders of magnitude, scales to much larger graphs and consumes less memory.

  17. Determinants of frequent attendance in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeanette Therming; Andersen, John Sahl; Tjønneland, Anne

    2016-01-01

    .57-0.69, >4 years higher education vs. no vocational training) and employment (0.61; 0.57-0.65) were inversely associated with frequent attendance. Finally, obesity (1.54; 1.14-2.08), smoking (1.21; 1.12-1.30, current vs. never), physical activity (0.84; 0.80-89), alcohol consumption (0.83; 0.78-0.87 above vs.......26; 1.09-1.47) model. In a fully adjusted model, strongest determinants of frequent attendance were pre-existing medical conditions, with hypertension (2.58; 2.42-2.75), diabetes (2.24; 1.94-2.59), and mental illness (2.29; 2.09-2.52) more than doubling the odds of being FA. High education (0.63; 0....... below recommended level), and hormone therapy in women (1.52; 1.42-1.63) were all significant determinants of frequent attendance. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to pre-existing medical conditions, gender, socio-demographic and gender-specific factors, lifestyle (obesity, smoking, exercise and alcohol use...

  18. IMPLEMENTASI ALGORITMA APRIORI UNTUK MENEMUKAN FREQUENT ITEMSET DALAM KERANJANG BELANJA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adie Wahyudi Oktavia Gama

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Algoritma apriori menggunakan pendekatan iteratif dimana k-itemset digunakan untuk mengeksplorasi (k+1-itemset. Calon (k+1-itemset yang mengandung frekuensi subset yang jarang muncul atau dibawah threshold akan dipangkas dan tidak dipakai menentukan aturan asosiasi. Aturan asosiasi berbentuk if antecedent then consequent. Implementasi algoritma apriori didahului dengan persiapan database transaksi serta penentuan batas minimum support dan confidence. Algoritma apriori akan menemukan kombinasi dengan cara iterasi yaitu scaning database berulang-ulang, memasangkan satu item dengan item lainnya dan mencatat jumlah kemunculan kombinasi dalam keseluruhan transaksi. Frequent itemset ditentukan dengan memilih itemset yang nilai kemuculannya diatas atau sama dengan nilai minimum support dan kemudian menjadi calon aturan asosiasi. Persentase nilai support dan confidence dari masing-masing calon aturan asosiasi kemudian dihitung. Aturan asosiasi yang berlaku dipilih dari yang memenuhi syarat minimum support dan confidence. Penelitian ini membuktikan bahwa algoritma apriori cocok diimplementasikan untuk mencari frequent itemset pada keranjang belanja. Aturan asosiasi yang dibentuk dari frequent itemset tersebut dapat dipakai sebagai pendukung keputusan dalam penjualan.

  19. Qualitative assessment of pica experienced by frequent blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansky, Melanie C; King, Melissa R; Bialkowski, Walter; Bryant, Barbara J; Kiss, Joseph E; D'Andrea, Pam; Cable, Ritchard G; Spencer, Bryan R; Mast, Alan E

    2017-04-01

    Pica, the compulsive consumption of ice or other nonnutritious substances, is associated with iron deficiency, a common negative consequence of frequent blood donation. Because of this, blood donors, such as those participating in the Strategies to Reduce Iron Deficiency (STRIDE) study, are an ideal population to explore pica and iron deficiency. STRIDE was a 2-year intervention trial to assess the effectiveness of iron supplementation for mitigating iron deficiency in frequent blood donors. Subjects completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires that included questions about pica symptoms. In-depth telephone interviews were conducted with 14 of these subjects reporting pica symptoms and eight presumed controls (casual ice chewers) to gain a deeper understanding of pica symptoms and their impact on daily life and to make a final determination on the presence of pica. Pica was confirmed in five of the 14 subjects reporting symptoms and in two of eight controls. Outcome misclassification based on the questionnaire was attributed to inadequate assessment of several pica symptoms identified during the interview. Comparison of subjects' repeated quantitative iron measurements taken throughout STRIDE with subjects' final adjudicated pica status revealed a positive relationship between development of pica and worsening iron status; the opposite was found in those whose pica symptoms resolved. Continued refinement of pica symptom questions will allow for rapid and accurate detection of pica in frequent blood donors and confirmation of successful treatment with iron supplements. © 2016 AABB.

  20. Review of financial incentive, low-income, elderly and multifamily residential conservation programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, L.; Hubbard, M.; White, D.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes thirty-nine utility-sponsored residential conservation programs for four types of markets. The program types considered are: (1) financial incentive programs for the general residential market, (2) programs for low-income households, (3) programs for the elderly, and (4) programs for the multifamily market. Each program description contains information on incentive terms, eligibility, conservation measures, program history, design and marketing, and the utility/agency motivation for operating the program. The names, addresses and phone numbers of contact persons also are included. Two methods were used to select the programs to be described. First, nominations of successful programs of each type were solicited from experts on residential energy conservation. Second, managers of the programs on this initial list were asked to describe their programs and to suggest other successful programs that should be included in the sample. Because of the selection process used, this report covers mainly the best known and most frequently studied programs that are aimed at the four market types.

  1. THE FREQUENT USE OF TEACHING STRATEGIES/METHODS AMONG TEACHERS ACCORDING TO THE TEACHER CANDIDATES OBSERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaddes SAKALLI

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to show the frequent use of teaching stratergies/methods amongteachers which has been observed by teacher candidates currently undergoing their own field/area teaching program.This study undertakes the general research model and the tools used to obtain the necessary data are personalinformation form and a questionaire. “Teachers frequent use of teaching methods/stratergies” to obtain necessarydata a 4 likert scale type of questionaire has been used. The scale developed on behalf of the researcher involves 35teaching methods/stratergies.The data obtained through 71 quetionaires where evaluated from 4 (always and 1(none as points and has been evaluated through the SPSS package program. In addition, the resultsof the data havebeen analysed through the following techniques: percentage (%, average (X and standard deviation (SS.According to the observations made by the teacher candidates the following teaching methods/stratergies wereundertaken by the teachers according to thier teaching field: lecturing, question-answer method were always used,homework, practice in the classroom, problem solving, showing and practicing methods were frequently used,project work, anaylsing example situations, debates, similarity, computer based education, observing privatetutorials, eduational games, cooperative learning, brainstroming, field trips and reflecting/miroring situations,group/team work, experiment, role play, micro-learning technique, statement, speech,meeting, display, drama,conference, formal debates, sempozium, seminar, panel, umbrella technique, forum and opposite panel

  2. Programming by Non-Programmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    Non-programers were asked to organize natural English commands of a laboratory programing language into programs for solving name-sorting problems. The problems differed in the sort concept to be programed (conjunction vs. disjunction) and in the form of expression of the letter tests to be made on the names (affirmation vs. negation). (Author)

  3. Lung Cancer, Questions to Ask Your Health Professional | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Questions to Ask Your Health Professional Past Issues / ... answer questions about cancer at 1-800-4-CANCER. The NCI Lung Cancer Home Page provides up-to-date information ...

  4. RISIKO INVESTASI, BID-ASK SPREAD, DAN COST OF EQUITY CAPITAL DI PASAR MODAL INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Haryono

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies investigated how financial information affected investment decisions. The study extendedthis line of research by examining the effect of risk, proxied by price per share, number of shareholders, numberof dealers, trading volume, accounting risk and market risk measures on the bid ask spread. Further, theresearch tried to test the relationship between bid ask spread and cost of equity capital. The samples of thisresearch were the manufacturing companies listed at Indonesian Stock Exchange which shared the dividendfor 3 years; there were 40 companies. Data analysis technique used multiple regression analysis. The results ofregression provided evidence of statistically significant effect of price per share, market value, asset size andprice variability on bid ask spread. At last, there was a positive relationship between bid ask spread and cost ofequity capital

  5. Question-asking behavior as a form of cognitive activity in primary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranova, Elvira A.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Children’s questions are an indicator of active cognitive perception of reality. Questions but not answers are relevant in revealing a child’s mental life, consciousness and thinking. The lack of question-asking skills can hinder learning, searching and exploration in children. To determine in 7- and 8-year-old school children the common and variable peculiarities of designing a search process for necessary information concerning an unknown object by volitionally formulated questions, as well as the dynamics of the questioning process throughout a school year. The study was based on an experimental methodology, codenamed Guess what there is in the box, and was conducted in four schools in Cheboksary. The sample comprised 158 primary school first-graders who took part in a confirmatory experiment twice, once in September and once in May. The research showed that 96.3% of the questions asked were search questions. Only 30% of the first-graders initiated their searching activities of their own will without having to resort to the given search algorithm, while 70% did not begin asking questions without outside stimulation. The analysis of the dynamics of children’s question-asking behavior exhibited a tendency to decrease in a number of questions asked over the course of the school year. Primary school children need psychological and pedagogical scaffolding aimed at developing a question-asking behavior as a form of cognitive activity to achieve a possible age potential in development.

  6. Deletion of ASK1 Protects against Hyperoxia-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutaro Fukumoto

    Full Text Available Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1, a member of the MAPK kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K family, is activated by various stimuli, which include oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, calcium influx, DNA damage-inducing agents and receptor-mediated signaling through tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR. Inspiration of a high concentration of oxygen is a palliative therapy which counteracts hypoxemia caused by acute lung injury (ALI-induced pulmonary edema. However, animal experiments so far have shown that hyperoxia itself could exacerbate ALI through reactive oxygen species (ROS. Our previous data indicates that ASK1 plays a pivotal role in hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury (HALI. However, it is unclear whether or not deletion of ASK1 in vivo protects against HALI. In this study, we investigated whether ASK1 deletion would lead to attenuation of HALI. Our results show that ASK1 deletion in vivo significantly suppresses hyperoxia-induced elevation of inflammatory cytokines (i.e. IL-1β and TNF-α, cell apoptosis in the lung, and recruitment of immune cells. In summary, the results from the study suggest that deletion of ASK1 in mice significantly inhibits hyperoxic lung injury.

  7. The Moderating Effect of Frequent Singing on Voice Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lortie, Catherine L; Rivard, Julie; Thibeault, Mélanie; Tremblay, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    The effects of aging on voice production are well documented, including changes in loudness, pitch, and voice quality. However, one important and clinically relevant question that remains concerns the possibility that the aging of voice can be prevented or at least delayed through noninvasive methods. Indeed, discovering natural means to preserve the integrity of the human voice throughout aging could have a major impact on the quality of life of elderly adults. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the potentially positive effect of singing on voice production. To this aim, a group of 72 healthy nonsmoking adults (20-93 years old) was recruited and separated into three groups based on their singing habits. Several voice parameters were assessed (fundamental frequency [f0] mean, f0 standard deviation [SD], f0 minimum and f0 maximum, mean amplitude and amplitude SD, jitter, shimmer, and harmonic-to-noise ratio) during the sustained production of vowel /a/. Other parameters were assessed during standardized reading passage (speaking f0, speaking f0 SD). As was expected, age effects were found on most acoustic parameters with significant sex differences. Importantly, moderation analyses revealed that frequent singing moderates the effect of aging on most acoustic parameters. Specifically, in frequent singers, there was no decrease in the stability of pitch and amplitude with age, suggesting that the voice of frequent singers remains more stable in aging than the voice of non-singers, and more generally, providing empirical evidence for a positive effect of singing on voice in aging. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of frequent announced parasitology quizzes on the academic achievement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Zamini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of frequent examinations on the students' learning has had inconsistent results. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of frequent announced quizzes on the learning of a representative sample of Iranian medical students.This experimental study was conducted among 37 fifth semester medical students who had taken the course in Protozoology and Helminthology, in which the same basic information were provided about different types of protozoa and worms. Initially, in the teaching of helminthology, ten routine sessions were handled with lectures and interactive questions and answers. Then at the beginning of the protozoology topic in the beginning of all of the next 9 sessions, the students were informed that they will have a quiz at the end of each session. At the end of the semester, the total scores of quizzes were compared with the mean final scores of protozoology and helminthology using paired t and repeated measure tests.The mean final scores of the protozoology lesson were not significantly different from that of the helminthology (10.45 ± 2.75 vs.11.25 ± 2.56 on the scale of 20, respectively, P=0.13. There was no significant difference in the mean score of the five quizzes compared with the mean final term score of protozoology. The overall mean scores in the helminthology lesson (11.25±2.56, protozoology lesson (10.45±2.75, and the quizzes (9.16 ± 3.55 were significantly different (P <0.0001.Frequent announced quizzes were not effective on increasing the medical students' motivation and learning.

  9. Managing for Old Growth in Frequent-fire Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl E. Fiedler

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no one-size-fits-all approach to managing frequent-fire, old-growth forests. However, there are general guidelines to follow: 1 set objectives for both structure (tree density, diameter distribution, tree species composition, spatial arrangement, amount of coarse woody debris and function (nutrient cycling, desired tree species regeneration; 2 prioritize treatments according to ecological, economic, and social needs and risks; 3 identify the potential treatments (natural fire, prescribed fire, silvicultural cutting that best meet the objectives and scale of the project; and 4 implement the treatment(s. We discuss each of these guidelines in this article.

  10. Oral fluid cannabinoid concentrations following controlled smoked cannabis in chronic frequent and occasional smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anizan, Sebastien; Milman, Garry; Desrosiers, Nathalie; Barnes, Allan J; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-10-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is an alternative biological matrix for monitoring cannabis intake in drug testing, and drugged driving (DUID) programs, but OF cannabinoid test interpretation is challenging. Controlled cannabinoid administration studies provide a scientific database for interpreting cannabinoid OF tests. We compared differences in OF cannabinoid concentrations from 19 h before to 30 h after smoking a 6.8% THC cigarette in chronic frequent and occasional cannabis smokers. OF was collected with the Statsure Saliva Sampler™ OF device. 2D-GC-MS was used to quantify cannabinoids in 357 OF specimens; 65 had inadequate OF volume within 3 h after smoking. All OF specimens were THC-positive for up to 13.5 h after smoking, without significant differences between frequent and occasional smokers over 30 h. Cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) had short median last detection times (2.5-4 h for CBD and 6-8 h for CBN) in both groups. THCCOOH was detected in 25 and 212 occasional and frequent smokers' OF samples, respectively. THCCOOH provided longer detection windows than THC in all frequent smokers. As THCCOOH is not present in cannabis smoke, its presence in OF minimizes the potential for false positive results from passive environmental smoke exposure, and can identify oral THC ingestion, while OF THC cannot. THC ≥ 1 μg/L, in addition to CBD ≥ 1 μg/L or CBN ≥ 1 μg/L suggested recent cannabis intake (≤13.5 h), important for DUID cases, whereas THC ≥ 1 μg/L or THC ≥ 2 μg/L cutoffs had longer detection windows (≥30 h), important for workplace testing. THCCOOH windows of detection for chronic, frequent cannabis smokers extended beyond 30 h, while they were shorter (0-24 h) for occasional cannabis smokers.

  11. Analyzing the Number of Varieties in Frequently Found Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomura, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Kenichi

    Abnormal traffic that causes various problems on the Internet, such as P2P flows, DDoS attacks, and Internet worms, is increasing; therefore, the importance of methods that identify and control abnormal traffic is also increasing. Though the application of frequent-itemset-mining techniques is a promising way to analyze Internet traffic, the huge amount of data on the Internet prevents such techniques from being effective. To overcome this problem, we have developed a simple frequent-itemset-mining method that uses only a small amount of memory but is effective even with the large volumes of data associated with broadband Internet traffic. Using our method also involves analyzing the number of distinct elements in the itemsets found, which helps identify abnormal traffic. We used a cache-based implementation of our method to analyze actual data on the Internet and demonstrated that such an implementation can be used to provide on-line analysis of data while using only a small amount of memory.

  12. Cannabis consumption patterns among frequent consumers in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boidi, María Fernanda; Queirolo, Rosario; Cruz, José Miguel

    2016-08-01

    In 2013, Uruguay became the first country to fully regulate the cannabis market, which now operates under state control. Cannabis can be legally acquired in three ways: growing it for personal use (self-cultivation), cannabis club membership, and from pharmacies (not yet implemented). Users must be entered into a confidential official registry to gain access. This article presents findings of a Respondent Driven Sample survey of 294 high-frequency cannabis consumers in the Montevideo metropolitan area. Frequent consumers resort to more than one method for acquiring cannabis, with illegal means still predominating after 1 year of the new regulation law. Cannabis users overwhelmingly support the current regulation, but many of them are reluctant to register. Some of the attitudes and behaviors of the high-frequency consumers pose a challenge to the success of the cannabis law. Individuals relying on more than one method of access defy the single access clause, a prerequisite for legal use, while the maximum amount of cannabis individuals can access monthly seems too high even for most frequent consumers, which might promote the emergence of a grey market. Reluctance to register among a significant proportion of high-frequency consumers raises doubts about the law's ability to achieve its stated objectives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Field visual perspective during autobiographical memory recall is less frequent among patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potheegadoo, Jevita; Berna, Fabrice; Cuervo-Lombard, Christine; Danion, Jean-Marie

    2013-10-01

    There is growing interest in clinical research regarding the visual perspective adopted during memory retrieval, because it reflects individuals' self-attitude towards their memories of past personal events. Several autobiographical memory deficits, including low specificity of personal memories, have been identified in schizophrenia, but visual perspective during autobiographical memory retrieval has not yet been investigated in patients. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the visual perspective with which patients visualize themselves when recalling autobiographical memories and to assess the specificity of their memories which is a major determinant of visual perspective. Thirty patients with schizophrenia and 30 matched controls recalled personal events from 4 life periods. After each recall, they were asked to report their visual perspective (Field or Observer) associated with the event. The specificity of their memories was assessed by independent raters. Our results showed that patients reported significantly fewer Field perspectives than comparison participants. Patients' memories, whether recalled with Field or Observer perspectives, were less specific and less detailed. Our results indicate that patients with schizophrenia adopt Field perspectives less frequently than comparison participants, and that this may contribute to a weakened sense of the individual of being an actor of his past events, and hence to a reduced sense of self. They suggest that this may be related to low specificity of memories and that all the important aspects involved in re-experiencing autobiographical events are impaired in patients with schizophrenia. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ask an anatomist: Identifying global trends, topics and themes of academic anatomists using twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsland, Madeleine J; Lazarus, Michelle D

    2017-10-04

    Social media (SoMe) is increasingly used in higher education (HE) to access knowledge and enable global communication. The SoMe platform Twitter ® is particularly beneficial in these contexts because it is readily accessible, easily searchable (via hashtags) and global. Given these advantages, the twitter platform @AskAnatomist was created to foster a global weekly tweet chat, where students and academics can ask and address anatomy-related questions. The aim of this study was to identify themes arising in the early stages of the @AskAnatomy Twitter community to gain insights into current needs/key areas for academic anatomists, students, and other followers. A qualitative analysis of tweets including the hashtag #AnatQ, (the associated @AskAnatomist hashtag), was undertaken to achieve this aim. Thematic analysis revealed three core themes arising in the formative stages of the @AskAnatomist Twitter site: (1) anatomical education modalities, (2) specific anatomy content, and (3) research motivations. These themes reveal controversies within the field of anatomical sciences, areas for potential education resource improvement and research, as well as the humor of anatomists. Though the original intent of the @AskAnatomist site was to engage the general public in anatomy content and knowledge, tweet analysis suggests that academic anatomists were the primary active "tweeters". Interestingly, this analysis reveals that the @AskAnatomist site progressed into a web-based community of practice (CoP), suggesting an additional benefit of SoMe communities in the field of anatomy. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  15. Do Pediatricians Ask About Adverse Childhood Experiences in Pediatric Primary Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerker, Bonnie D; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Szilagyi, Moira; Stein, Ruth E K; Garner, Andrew S; O'Connor, Karen G; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Horwitz, Sarah M

    2016-03-01

    The stress associated with adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) has immediate and long-lasting effects. The objectives of this study were to examine 1) how often pediatricians ask patients' families about ACEs, 2) how familiar pediatricians are with the original ACE study, and 3) physician/practice characteristics, physicians' mental health training, and physicians' attitudes/beliefs that are associated with asking about ACEs. Data were collected from 302 nontrainee pediatricians exclusively practicing general pediatrics who completed the 2013 American Academy of Pediatrics Periodic Survey. Pediatricians indicated whether they usually, sometimes, or never inquired about or screened for 7 ACEs. Sample weights were used to reduce nonresponse bias. Weighted descriptive and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Only 4% of pediatricians usually asked about all 7 ACEs; 32% did not usually ask about any. Less than 11% of pediatricians reported being very or somewhat familiar with the ACE study. Pediatricians who screened/inquired about ACEs usually asked about maternal depression (46%) and parental separation/divorce (42%). Multivariable analyses showed that pediatricians had more than twice the odds of usually asking about ACEs if they disagreed that they have little effect on influencing positive parenting skills, disagreed that screening for social emotional risk factors within the family is beyond the scope of pediatricians, or were very interested in receiving further education on managing/treating mental health problems in children and adolescents. Few pediatricians ask about all ACEs. Pediatric training that emphasizes the importance of social/emotional risk factors may increase the identification of ACEs in pediatric primary care. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Environmental Impact from Outdoor/Environmental Education Programs: Effects of Frequent Stream Classes on Aquatic Macroinvertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossley, Jon P.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stewardship is an underlying theme in outdoor education (OE) and environmental education (EE), but maintaining natural areas in a sustainable balance between conservation and preservation requires knowledge about how natural areas respond to anthropogenic disturbance. My five-part study investigated the effects of disturbance on…

  17. New techniques for mining frequent patterns in unordered trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sen; Du, Zhihui; Wang, Jason T L

    2015-06-01

    We consider a new tree mining problem that aims to discover restrictedly embedded subtree patterns from a set of rooted labeled unordered trees. We study the properties of a canonical form of unordered trees, and develop new Apriori-based techniques to generate all candidate subtrees level by level through two efficient rightmost expansion operations: 1) pairwise joining and 2) leg attachment. Next, we show that restrictedly embedded subtree detection can be achieved by calculating the restricted edit distance between a candidate subtree and a data tree. These techniques are then integrated into an efficient algorithm, named frequent restrictedly embedded subtree miner (FRESTM), to solve the tree mining problem at hand. The correctness of the FRESTM algorithm is proved and the time and space complexities of the algorithm are discussed. Experimental results on synthetic and real-world data demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  18. Deranged Wnt signaling is frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Therkildsen, Christina; Bernstein, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deranged in colorectal cancer and is a key target for future preventive and therapeutic approaches. Colorectal cancers associated with the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome are characterized by wide-spread microsatellite instability......, but show few gross genomic alterations. We characterized expression of the Wnt signaling pathway markers β-catenin, E-cadherin, TCF-4, and PTEN using immunohistochemical staining in colorectal cancers from individuals with HNPCC. Reduced membranous staining for β-catenin was found in 64% and for E......% of the tumors. In summary, altered expression of target molecules in the Wnt signaling pathway was demonstrated in the vast majority of the HNPCC-associated tumors, which support deranged Wnt-signaling as a central tumorigenic mechanism also in MMR defective colorectal cancer....

  19. [Frequent nursing diagnoses and interventions for women under critical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Mirna Fontenele de; Freitas, Maria Célia de

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the most frequent Nursing Diagnoses and propose interventions for women under critical care into a maternal intensive care unit in a public hospital in Fortaleza, CE, Brazil. Retrospective study conducted with women's hospital health records. Ten Nursing Diagnoses were elaborated, being four risk: risk of infection, risk of unbalance of liquids volume, risk of aspiration, risk of damaged skin integrity and six real: altered maternity, impaired physical mobility, anxiety and impaired verbal communication. For the referred Nursing Diagnoses, nursing interventions are proposed according to the link between NANDA, NIC and NOC. It was concluded that the use of ND is a necessary technology for the Nursing reality, as it makes possible the integral care.

  20. A Frequent Childhood Tumor in Mediterranean Basin: Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhan Kupeli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a rare malignancy of childhood having different epidemiological, histopathological and clinical characteristics. The most frequent histopathological type is undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma and is associated with advanced locoregional disease and distant metastasis in childhood. Because of high incidence of systemic disease in childhood, chemotherapy is the first choice in treatment of advanced disease. Although 5 year's survival rates have reached 70% with combined therapy modalities, late complications continue to be major problem. Parallel to improvement in the diagnostic skills and therapy, there is an increase in survivors of childhood cancer. Since late effects of cancer therapy can be encountered more often, closer follow-up of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients who are under serious treatment schemes is an obligation. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(2.000: 260-270

  1. Additives contained in drug formulations most frequently prescribed in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolly, M; Pécoud, A; Frei, P C

    1989-01-01

    The presence of substances known to induce pseudoallergic reactions was investigated by means of a questionnaire to the manufacturers of 1,467 frequently administered formulations. Benzoates were found in 15% of the formulations, sorbates in 5.5%, sulfites in 3.8%, and benzalkonium in 3.0%. The occurrence of the seven artificial colours studied was as follows: indigotin 7.8, erythrosine 7.4, sunset yellow 6.6, tartrazine 4.9, quinoline yellow 2.8%, ponceau (new coccine) 2.6, and amaranth 1.7%. A significant risk of exposure to preservatives and dyes likely to induce asthma, urticaria, or other pseudoallergic reactions exists for all individuals taking commercial drug products.

  2. Deranged Wnt signaling is frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Therkildsen, Christina; Bernstein, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deranged in colorectal cancer and is a key target for future preventive and therapeutic approaches. Colorectal cancers associated with the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome are characterized by wide-spread microsatellite instability......, but show few gross genomic alterations. We characterized expression of the Wnt signaling pathway markers ß-catenin, E-cadherin, TCF-4, and PTEN using immunohistochemical staining in colorectal cancers from individuals with HNPCC. Reduced membranous staining for ß-catenin was found in 64% and for E......% of the tumors. In summary, altered expression of target molecules in the Wnt signaling pathway was demonstrated in the vast majority of the HNPCC-associated tumors, which support deranged Wnt-signaling as a central tumorigenic mechanism also in MMR defective colorectal cancer....

  3. Gastrocnemius tendinosis--A frequent finding on MRI knee examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawahar, Anugayathri; Lu, Yanan; Okur, Gokcan; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Lomasney, Laurie

    2015-12-01

    Gastrocnemius tendinosis (GT) is one potential cause for posterior knee pain, commonly overlooked on clinical examinations and imaging. This study assesses the frequency of GT on MR imaging in a convenience sample based on a database search and associations with other articular pathologies and clinical findings. With IRB approval, retrospective review was completed on 300 randomly selected MR knee exams performed from February 2009 to June 2010. Following de-identification, axial T2 and sagittal PD images, with or without fat suppression, were reviewed by 2 radiologists. The gastrocnemius tendon femoral attachments were graded as normal, mild (few cysts, thickening, intermediate signal) or severe GT (multiple cysts, marrow edema, tear). Select associated MR findings of internal derangement were documented. Clinical charts were reviewed for clinical presentation, physical exam findings, and select demographics. The inter-observer reliability for presence/grading of GT was very high (kappa statistic=0.97). Frequency of GT was 50.33%, most frequently involving medial head of gastrocnemius (63.6%). Grades of GT were 41.7% and 17.2% for mild and severe respectively. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant relationship between grade of GT with arthrosis (p=0.05) and clinical joint effusion (p=0.02). Multivariate analysis showed higher odds of severe GT for individuals with medial plus lateral GT. Statistical significance was noted for presence of both GT and ACL tear (13.9%; p=0.02). Significant findings of our analysis included GT presented with predominant involvement of medial head of gastrocnemius tendon, mild in severity, strong association with ACL tear, presented frequently as posterior knee pain, limited joint motion and clinical joint effusion. However, there was no statistically significant association between demographic features and medical comorbidities in the patients. Increased understanding of frequency of GT allows more accurate reporting of

  4. Baker's asthma: still among the most frequent occupational respiratory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, X; Degens, P O; Sander, I

    1998-12-01

    Baker's asthma and rhinitis are among the most frequent occupational respiratory disorders. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency of work-related symptoms and the clinical relevance of sensitization to allergens in screened and symptomatic bakers. Eighty-nine bakers participating in a screening study and 104 bakers filing a claim for compensation were examined with regard to occupational and clinical case history, lung function parameters, and sensitization to bakery allergens by skin prick tests, specific IgE analyses, and inhalative challenge tests. A high prevalence of respiratory disorders, abnormal lung function parameters, and sensitization to bakery allergens exists. Most frequently, bakers with workplace-related respiratory symptoms showed sensitization to wheat flour (64%), rye flour (52%), soy bean flour (25%), and alpha-amylase (21%). The correlation between these sensitizations and asthma case history and inhalative challenge test responses was significant. However, approximately 29% of the bakers with respiratory symptoms showed no sensitization to these bakery allergens, whereas 32% of the sensitized bakers in the screening group had no workplace-related symptoms. Atopic status defined by skin prick test sensitization to common allergens or elevated total IgE levels was found to be a risk factor for the development of sensitization to bakery allergens and respiratory symptoms. On the other hand, there is evidence for an increased frequency of elevated total IgE as the result of occupational allergen exposure because respective findings were observed in bakers without symptoms. Sensitization to bakery allergens seems to be the main cause of baker's asthma and rhinitis but cannot explain the asthma case history in each case. Further methods are required to objectively assume irritative pathomechanisms. Our findings indicate the necessity for an improved primary prevention of exposure to inhalative noxae in bakeries.

  5. Finding Neural Assemblies with Frequent Item Set Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePicado-Muiño

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell assemblies, defined as groups of neurons exhibiting precise spike coordination, were proposed as a model of network processing in the cortex. Considerable progress made in recent years in multi-electrode technology enables to record massively parallel spike trains of hundred(s of neurons. Nevertheless, due to the challenges inherent in multivariate approaches, most studies favoring cortical cell assemblies still resorted to analyzing pairwise interactions. However, to recoverthe underlying correlation structures, higher-order correlations need to be identified directly. Inspired by the Accretion method (Gerstein et al. 1978 we propose a new assembly detection method based on frequent item set mining (FIM, which searches effectively and without redundancy for individual spike patterns that exceed a given support threshold. We study search methods, with which the space of potential cell assemblies may be explored, as well as test statistics and subsetconditions with which candidate assemblies may be assessed and filtered. It turns out that a core challenge of assembly detection is multiple testing, which causes a large number of false discoveries. Unfortunately, criteria that address individual candidate assemblies and try to assess them with statistical tests and/or subset conditions do not help much to tackle this problem. The core idea of our method is to shift the focus of statistical testing from specific assemblies (consisting of a specific set of neurons to spike patterns of a certain size (i.e. with a certain number of neurons. This significantly reduces the number of necessary tests, thus alleviating the multiple testing problem. We demonstrate that our method is able to reliably suppress false discoveries, while it is still very sensitive in discovering synchronous activity. Since we exploit high-speed computational techniques from frequent item set mining (FIM for the tests, our method is also computationally efficient.

  6. [Loyal frequent users of hospital emergency departments: the FIDUR project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Alonso, Cesáreo; Romero Pareja, Rodolfo; Rivas García, Aristides; Jiménez Gallego, Rosa; Majo Carbajo, Yolanda; Aguilar Mulet, Juan Mariano

    2016-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of frequent users of hospital emergency departments and analyze whether characteristics varied in relation to how revisits were distributed over the course of the year studied. Retrospective study of patients over the age of 14 years who were treated in a hospital emergency department at least 10 times in 2013. Patients were identified in 17 public hospitals in the Spanish autonomous community of Madrid. Data related to the first and successive visits were gathered and analyzed by quarter year. We included 2340 patients with a mean (SD) age of 54 (21) years. A total of 1361 (58.%) were women, 1160 (50%) had no concomitant diseases, 1366 (58.2%) were substance abusers, and 25 (1.1%) were homeless. During the first visit, 2038 (87.1%) complained of a recent health problem, and 289 (12.4%) were admitted. Sixty (2.6%) patients concentrated their revisits in a single quarters 335 (14.3%) in 2 quarters, 914 (39.1%) in 3, and 1005 (42.9%) in 4. Patients whose revisits were distributed over more quarters were older (> 65 years), had more concomitant conditions, were on more medications (P < .001), showed cognitive impairment (P = .039), and were more functionally dependent (P = .007). They were also more likely to have been hospitalized on the first visit (P < .001). Patients whose revisits were concentrated in fewer quarters were more often women (P = .012) and more likely to have a specific diagnosis (P < .001) and revisit for a reason related to the initial visit (P = .012). Our study shows that the frequent user has specific characteristics and loyally comes to the same emergency department over the course of a year. Patients whose revisits are dispersed over a longer period have more complex problems and use more resources during their initial visit.

  7. [Frequent attendance in a Primary Health Care District].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez Granados, Nicolás; Vaquero Abellán, Manuel; Toledano Estepa, Manuel; Pérez Díaz, Manuel Modesto; Redondo Pedraza, Rosa

    2017-10-09

    To describe the distribution of frequent attenders (FA) through the different primary care practices in Cordoba-Guadalquivir Health District (Córdoba, Spain). An ecological study was performed, including data from 2011 to 2015. Defining FA as those subjects who made12 or more appointments per year; independently analysed for nursing, general practice and paediatrics. Prevalence of frequent attendance and FA/professional ratio were used as dependent variables. Demographic characteristics from district population, number of health professionals and use of general facilities were also examinated. Aiming to understand FA distribution, primary health settings were classified according to facility size and environmental location (urban, suburban and rural). The mean prevalence for FA was 10.86% (0.5 SE) for nursing; general practice 21.70% (0.7 SE) and for paediatrics 16.96% (0.7 SE). FA/professional ratios for the different professional categories were: 101.07 (5.0 SE) for nursing, 239.74 (9.0 SE) for general practice and 159.54 (9.8 SE) for paediatrics. A major part of primary health care users make a high number of consultations. From this group, women overuse nursing and general practitioner services more compared to men. A higher prevalence of FAs was observed in smaller settings, in rural areas. Although taking the FAs:professional ratio as the bar, medium-size practices are more highly overused. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. The Ethiopian Health Extension Program

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    Program, HEP is to provide equitable access to promotive, preventive and select ... two survey periods used the same sampling design and questionnaire, asking ..... database; gross national income per capita 2007, atlas method. p. 2007.

  9. Unsupervised class labeling of diffuse lung diseases using frequent attribute patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabu, Shingo; Obayashi, Masanao; Kuremoto, Takashi; Hashimoto, Noriaki; Hirano, Yasushi; Kido, Shoji

    2017-03-01

    For realizing computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of computed tomography (CT) images, many pattern recognition methods have been applied to automatic classification of normal and abnormal opacities; however, for the learning of accurate classifier, a large number of images with correct labels are necessary. It is a very time-consuming and impractical task for radiologists to give correct labels for a large number of CT images. In this paper, to solve the above problem and realize an unsupervised class labeling mechanism without using correct labels, a new clustering algorithm for diffuse lung diseases using frequent attribute patterns is proposed. A large number of frequently appeared patterns of opacities are extracted by a data mining algorithm named genetic network programming (GNP), and the extracted patterns are automatically distributed to several clusters using genetic algorithm (GA). In this paper, lung CT images are used to make clusters of normal and diffuse lung diseases. After executing the pattern extraction by GNP, 1,148 frequent attribute patterns were extracted; then, GA was executed to make clusters. This paper deals with making clusters of normal and five kinds of abnormal opacities (i.e., six-class problem), and then, the proposed method without using correct class labels in the training showed 47.7 % clustering accuracy. It is clarified that the proposed method can make clusters without using correct labels and has the potential to apply to CAD, reducing the time cost for labeling CT images.

  10. Consumo frequente de bebidas alcoólicas por adolescentes escolares: estudo de fatores associados Frequent consumption of alcohol by school age adolescents: study of associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analy Marquardt de Matos

    2010-06-01

    were a self-administered questionnaire designed in compliance with WHO recommendations and other valid questionnaires from similar studies. Anonymous confidential data collecting was assured. Adolescents who reported frequent alcohol drinking (at least every weekend were considered exposed. RESULTS: Frequent alcohol drinking was associated with the male gender; early consumption; little-known sexual partner; problems with other drugs in the family; living with a partner; own income; drug trafficking; consumption with friends, activities at school, motivations (anxiety, excitement/pleasure, and consequences (other drugs, fights, debts in work/school CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of personal, interpersonal, family and environmental factors associated with alcohol use in adolescents should be considered in the implementation of school programs and public policies for alcohol use prevention focusing on behaviors that could minimize exposure to risk.

  11. Optical label swapping and packet transmission based on ASK/DPSK orthogonal modulation format in IP-over-WDM networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Nan; Xu, Lin; Christiansen, Lotte Jin

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate all-optical label swapping based on SOA, EAM and HNLF for a two-level optically labeled packet using orthogonal ASK/DPSK modulation format. The ASK/DPSK packet is successfully transmitted over 80 km NZDSF.......We demonstrate all-optical label swapping based on SOA, EAM and HNLF for a two-level optically labeled packet using orthogonal ASK/DPSK modulation format. The ASK/DPSK packet is successfully transmitted over 80 km NZDSF....

  12. Epidemiology of frequent attenders: a 3-year historic cohort study comparing attendance, morbidity and prescriptions of one-year and persistent frequent attenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ter Riet Gerben

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General Practitioners spend a disproportionate amount of time on frequent attenders. So far, trials on the effect of interventions on frequent attenders have shown negative results. However, these trials were conducted in short-term frequent attenders. It would be more reasonable to target intervention at persistent frequent attenders. Typical characteristics of persistent frequent attenders, as opposed to 1-year frequent attenders and non-frequent attenders, may generate hypotheses regarding modifiable factors on which new randomized trials may be designed. Methods We used the data of all 28,860 adult patients from 5 primary healthcare centers. Frequent attenders were patients whose attendance rate ranked in the (age and sex adjusted top 10 percent during 1 year (1-year frequent attenders or 3 years (persistent frequent attenders. All other patients on the register over the 3-year period were referred to as non-frequent attenders. The lists of medical problems coded by the GP using the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC were used to assess morbidity. First, we determined which proportion of 1-year frequent attenders was still a frequent attender during the next two consecutive years and calculated the GPs' workload for these patients. Second, we compared morbidity and number of prescriptions for non-frequent attenders, 1-year frequent attenders and persistent frequent attenders. Results Of all 1-year frequent attenders, 15.4% became a persistent frequent attender equal to 1.6% of all patients. The 1-year frequent attenders (3,045; 10.6% were responsible for 39% of the face-to-face consultations; the 470 patients who would become persistent frequent attenders (1.6% were responsible for 8% of all consultations in 2003. Persistent frequent attenders presented more social problems, more psychiatric problems and medically unexplained physical symptoms, but also more chronic somatic diseases (especially diabetes

  13. Directly Printable Organic ASK Based Chipless RFID Tag for IoT Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Habib

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A chipless RFID tag with unique ASK encoding technique is presented in this paper. The coding efficiency is enhanced regarding tag capacity. The amplitude varia¬tions of the backscattered RFID signal is used for encoding data instead of OOK. Strips of different widths are used to have amplitude variations. The ASK technique is applied using three different substrates of Kapton®HN, PET, and paper. To incorporate ASK technique, dual polarized rhombic shaped resonators are designed. These tags operate in the frequency range of 3.1–10.6 GHz with size of 70 × 42 mm^2. The presented tags are flexible and offer easy printability. The paper-based decomposable organic tag appears as an ultra low-cost solution for wide scale tracking. This feature enables them to secure a prominent position in the emerging fields of IoT and green electronics.

  14. [THE CHROMOGENIC SYNTHETIC MEDIUM "KLEBSIELLA 5-ASK CHROM-C" FOR ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF KLEBSIELLAE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivolodskii, E P

    2015-05-01

    The chromogenic synthetic medium "Klebsiella 5-ASK CHROM-C was developedfor isolation and identification of klebsiellae of species of K. pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae K. oxytoca, K. mobilis according chromogenic reaction to enzyme 5-aminosalycilate decarboxylase as a unique marker of genus Klebsiella. The L-proline and L-calcium glutamate are used as a source of nitrogen and carbon in medium. The consistency of composition of growth medium that ensure its regularity. The diagnostic sensitivity of chromogenic medium is 95.3 ± 1.7%; diagnostic specificity is 100%; analytical sensitivity is 1-2 colony-forming units per ml-1. The identification of Klebsiella is achieved simultaneously with their isolation during 24 = 48 hours. The test of 5-ASK decarboxylase using two chromogenic mediums "Klebsiella 5-ASK CHROM-C" permits identifying additionally K. pneumoniae subsp, ozaenae, K .pneumoniae subsp. Rhinoscleromatis.

  15. Quantifying bid-ask spreads in the Chinese stock market using limit-order book data. Intraday pattern, probability distribution, long memory, and multifractal nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, G.-F.; Chen, W.; Zhou, W.-X.

    2007-05-01

    The statistical properties of the bid-ask spread of a frequently traded Chinese stock listed on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange are investigated using the limit-order book data. Three different definitions of spread are considered based on the time right before transactions, the time whenever the highest buying price or the lowest selling price changes, and a fixed time interval. The results are qualitatively similar no matter linear prices or logarithmic prices are used. The average spread exhibits evident intraday patterns consisting of a big L-shape in morning transactions and a small L-shape in the afternoon. The distributions of the spread with different definitions decay as power laws. The tail exponents of spreads at transaction level are well within the interval (2,3) and that of average spreads are well in line with the inverse cubic law for different time intervals. Based on the detrended fluctuation analysis, we found the evidence of long memory in the bid-ask spread time series for all three definitions, even after the removal of the intraday pattern. Using the classical box-counting approach for multifractal analysis, we show that the time series of bid-ask spread do not possess multifractal nature.

  16. Primary Care Providers' Use of a Child Psychiatry Telephone Support Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cleave, Jeanne; Holifield, Chloe; Perrin, James M

    2017-11-29

    The Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project (MCPAP) provides telephone support from mental health specialists to primary care providers (PCPs). Understanding PCPs' use may inform implementation of similar programs. We sought to examine PCPs' decision-making process to use or not use MCPAP when encountering mental health problems. We analyzed data regarding calls from PCPs to MCPAP from October 1, 2010, to July 31, 2011, and interviewed 14 PCPs with frequent use (≥7 calls) and infrequent use (≤4 calls). PCPs were asked about recent patients with mental health problems, and they were asked to describe reasons for calling or not calling MCPAP. Frequent callers were asked what sustained use; infrequent callers were asked about alternative management strategies. Comparisons were made between these groups in qualitative analysis. PCPs (n = 993) made 6526 calls (mean = 6.6; median = 3). Factors influencing calling included: MCPAP's guidance is timely and tailored to individual scope of practice; MCPAP's ability to arrange therapy referrals exceeds PCPs' ability; providing a plan at point of care relieves anxious families; and MCPAP's assistance helps accommodate families' preference to keep mental health in primary care. Some infrequent callers had gained skills through MCPAP before 2010 and now called only for complex cases. Other reasons for infrequent calling: PCPs have other consultation sources, have fear of being asked to manage more than they are comfortable, or have misperceptions of MCPAP's offerings. MCPAP enhanced PCPs' ability to deliver mental health care consistent with families' preferences. PCPs applied knowledge gained from calls to subsequent patients. Promoting MCPAP components through outreach and tailoring guidance to PCPs' scope of practice may entice greater use. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. DMBT1 is frequently downregulated in well-differentiated gastric carcinoma but more frequently upregulated across various gastric cancer types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conde, Ana R; Martins, Ana P; Brito, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    in cell differentiation and protection and has been proposed as a candidate tumour suppressor for brain and epithelial cancer. One study reported a loss of DMBT1 expression in 12.5% (5/40) of gastric cancer samples. Here, we examined in more detail DMBT1 protein and mRNA expression in 78 primary gastric...... preferentially take place in well-differentiated gastric carcinoma. However, an upregulation of DMBT1 expression is more frequently found across all gastric cancer types.......Well-differentiated gastric carcinomas are considered to represent a distinct entity emerging via specific molecular changes different from those found in other gastric carcinoma types. The gene deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1) at 10q25.3-q26.1 codes for a protein presumably involved...

  18. ASK2 Bioactive Compound Inhibits MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae by Antibiofilm Activity, Modulating Macrophage Cytokines and Opsonophagocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheepurupalli Lalitha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of pathogens harboring extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL like carbapenem resistant Gram negative bacteria are the major emerging threat to public health. Of particular concern Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenamase- producing strains have been recorded worldwide. Catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI caused by K. pneumoniae are significantly associated with morbidity and mortality. Hence the present work was aimed to develop a strategy for addressing these issues through an innovative approach of antibiofilm and immunomodulation. These two independent activities were analyzed in a Streptomyces derived ASK2 bioactive compound. While analysing the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs, 0.5x of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC was found to be more effective in preventing biofilm formation on coverslip and silicone catheter. The minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC was found to be 15-fold higher MIC with eradication of 75% of 3 day old biofilm. Apart from its antibiofilm potential, ASK2 also acts as an opsonin and enhances phagocytic response of macrophages against multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae. In addition, ASK2 resulted in elevated levels of nitric oxide generation by the macrophages and has a stimulating effect on IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α proinflammatory cytokines. The opsonic role of ASK2 and its potential in modulating proinflammatory cytokines secreted by macrophages implies the importance of ASK2 in modulating cellular immune response of macrophages against MDR K. pneumoniae. The present study proposes ASK2 as a promising candidate for treating MDR K. pneumoniae infections with its dual properties of antibiofilm and immunomodulatory activities.

  19. ASK2 Bioactive Compound Inhibits MDRKlebsiella pneumoniaeby Antibiofilm Activity, Modulating Macrophage Cytokines and Opsonophagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalitha, Cheepurupalli; Raman, Thiagarajan; Rathore, Sudarshan S; Ramar, Manikandan; Munusamy, Arumugam; Ramakrishnan, Jayapradha

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and spread of pathogens harboring extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) like carbapenem resistant Gram negative bacteria are the major emerging threat to public health. Of particular concern Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenamase- producing strains have been recorded worldwide. Catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) caused by K. pneumoniae are significantly associated with morbidity and mortality. Hence the present work was aimed to develop a strategy for addressing these issues through an innovative approach of antibiofilm and immunomodulation. These two independent activities were analyzed in a Streptomyces derived ASK2 bioactive compound. While analysing the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs), 0.5x of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was found to be more effective in preventing biofilm formation on coverslip and silicone catheter. The minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) was found to be 15-fold higher MIC with eradication of 75% of 3 day old biofilm. Apart from its antibiofilm potential, ASK2 also acts as an opsonin and enhances phagocytic response of macrophages against multidrug resistant K. pneumoniae . In addition, ASK2 resulted in elevated levels of nitric oxide generation by the macrophages and has a stimulating effect on IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α proinflammatory cytokines. The opsonic role of ASK2 and its potential in modulating proinflammatory cytokines secreted by macrophages implies the importance of ASK2 in modulating cellular immune response of macrophages against MDR K. pneumoniae . The present study proposes ASK2 as a promising candidate for treating MDR K. pneumoniae infections with its dual properties of antibiofilm and immunomodulatory activities.

  20. 76 FR 45221 - Notice of Funding Availability: Inviting Applications for the Food for Progress Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    .... Frequently Asked Questions: Please see the FAS Web site for frequently asked questions on applying for the... frameworks are available on the FAS Web site at: http://www.fas.usda.gov/excredits/FoodAid/FFP/Results... assessment should focus on the country specific context for the project including key problems or barriers...

  1. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Frequently Relapsing Nephrotic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Subhankar; Sinha, Aditi; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Agarwala, Anuja; Saxena, Anita; Hari, Pankaj; Bagga, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    To screen patients with frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome (FRNS) for the presence of ambulatory hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. Following ethical and parental approvals, consecutive patients with FRNS of ≥2 y duration were enrolled. Those with estimated glomerular filtration rate ambulatory blood pressure was recorded by Spacelab 90207; echocardiography was done for left ventricular mass. Ambulatory hypertension was defined as the presence of clinic blood pressure >95th centile for age, sex and height, and systolic blood pressure load exceeding 25 %. Of 99 patients, 73 were boys; their median (IQR) age was 120 (84-156) mo. Clinic blood pressure was >95th percentile in 63 (63.6 %) patients. Ambulatory hypertension was present in 33 (33.3 %), including 14 patients with severe hypertension; 16 (16.1 %) had masked hypertension and 30 (30.3 %) had white coat hypertension. Non-dipping was seen in 72 and 55 patients had high nocturnal systolic blood pressure load. Of 21 patients with increased left ventricular mass index, 9 (42.9 %) had ambulatory hypertension, 3 (14.3 %) had masked hypertension and 6 (28.6 %) patients had white coat hypertension. Compared to those with normal blood pressure, patients with ambulatory hypertension were younger at onset of nephrotic syndrome (odds ratio, OR 0.94; 95 % CI 0.91-0.98; P = 0.002), longer duration of frequently relapsing disease (OR 1.05; 95 % CI 1.00-1.10; P = 0.034) and higher body mass index (BMI) (OR 1.61; 95 % CI 1.07-4.40; P = 0.020). BMI was positively correlated with 24-h systolic blood pressure load (r = 0.23; P = 0.002) and with the left ventricular mass index (r = 0. 57; P = 0.001). Many patients with FRNS showed high prevalence of clinic, ambulatory and white coat hypertension, emphasizing the need to carefully screen these patients in order to ensure their appropriate management. While clinic blood pressure monitoring detects most patients with hypertension, it

  2. Conjunctival Changes in Wearers of Frequent Replacement Hydrogel and Frequent Replacement Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lenses: Comparison Using Impression Cytology Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukiye Aydın FEBO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the level of conjunctival changes using conjunctival impression cytology in wearers of frequent replacement hydrogel (FRHL and frequent replacement silicone hydrogel contact lens FRSHL. Materials and Methods: Forty-two contact lens users who were seen at the Cornea and Contact Lens Unit, Department of Ophthalmology, Dokuz Eylül University were evaluated in this study. The first group consisted of wearers of FRHL used for minimum one year and maximum five years. The second group consisted of wearers who used FRSHL for minimum one year and maximum 5 years. Twenty healthy individuals with no contact lens history were included in the control group. Conjunctival impression cytology was applied to all contact lens users and the control group in order to evaluate the conjunctival changes, and the results of impression cytology were graded by the Nelson’s method. Results: In the comparison of the groups according to impression cytology scoring, there was no difference between the users of FRHL and FRSHL. Similar amounts of squamous metaplasia and goblet cell loss were encountered in both groups. Nonetheless, impression cytology grading was significantly lower in the control group than in the other two groups. Conclusion: In conclusion, the use of FRHL and FRSHL for over a year causes some histological changes in the conjunctiva such as squamous metaplasia and goblet cell loss eventually leading to dry eye symptoms. However, no differences were determined between FRHL and FRSHL users with regard to severity of conjunctival changes. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 47-52

  3. A maximum (non-extensive) entropy approach to equity options bid-ask spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapiero, Oren J.

    2013-07-01

    The cross-section of options bid-ask spreads with their strikes are modelled by maximising the Kaniadakis entropy. A theoretical model results with the bid-ask spread depending explicitly on the implied volatility; the probability of expiring at-the-money and an asymmetric information parameter (κ). Considering AIG as a test case for the period between January 2006 and October 2008, we find that information flows uniquely from the trading activity in the underlying asset to its derivatives. Suggesting that κ is possibly an option implied measure of the current state of trading liquidity in the underlying asset.

  4. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures as a frequent diagnostic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škrijelj Fadil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures represent a paroxysmal event followed by a sudden change of behavior, cognition or consciousness, mostly of short duration, which resemble or can be understood as epileptic seizures. They occur in persons without epilepsy and in patients with epilepsy. They are not associated with abnormal EEG discharges because their cause is a psychic disorder. Case report: A 20-year-old patient has been suffering of occasional 'morning short-lasting jerking hand movements, staring and fainting' since the age of 14 years. Beside a symptomatic anamnesis for epilepsy and non-specifically changed standard EEG, antiepileptic therapy (valproate and lamotrigine was introduced. Because of non-response to antiepileptic therapy, the patient was forwarded for further clinical examination involving video EEG telemetry, which indicated that this was a case of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. A successive withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs was initiated, and also, a psychologist and psychiatrist were included into treatment, which resulted in the reduction of seizures and improvement of the patient's general condition. Conclusion: Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures represent a frequent diagnostic problem requiring team's work, while the video EEG telemetry is the method of choice for diagnosis.

  5. Causal illusions in children when the outcome is frequent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Manuela Moreno-Fernández

    Full Text Available Causal illusions occur when people perceive a causal relation between two events that are actually unrelated. One factor that has been shown to promote these mistaken beliefs is the outcome probability. Thus, people tend to overestimate the strength of a causal relation when the potential consequence (i.e. the outcome occurs with a high probability (outcome-density bias. Given that children and adults differ in several important features involved in causal judgment, including prior knowledge and basic cognitive skills, developmental studies can be considered an outstanding approach to detect and further explore the psychological processes and mechanisms underlying this bias. However, the outcome density bias has been mainly explored in adulthood, and no previous evidence for this bias has been reported in children. Thus, the purpose of this study was to extend outcome-density bias research to childhood. In two experiments, children between 6 and 8 years old were exposed to two similar setups, both showing a non-contingent relation between the potential cause and the outcome. These two scenarios differed only in the probability of the outcome, which could either be high or low. Children judged the relation between the two events to be stronger in the high probability of the outcome setting, revealing that, like adults, they develop causal illusions when the outcome is frequent.

  6. Evidence and Implications of Frequent Fires in Ancient Shrub Tundra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuera, P E; Brubaker, L B; Anderson, P M; Brown, T A; Kennedy, A T; Hu, F S

    2008-03-06

    Understanding feedbacks between terrestrial and atmospheric systems is vital for predicting the consequences of global change, particularly in the rapidly changing Arctic. Fire is a key process in this context, but the consequences of altered fire regimes in tundra ecosystems are rarely considered, largely because tundra fires occur infrequently on the modern landscape. We present paleoecological data that indicate frequent tundra fires in northcentral Alaska between 14,000 and 10,000 years ago. Charcoal and pollen from lake sediments reveal that ancient birchdominated shrub tundra burned as often as modern boreal forests in the region, every 144 years on average (+/- 90 s.d.; n = 44). Although paleoclimate interpretations and data from modern tundra fires suggest that increased burning was aided by low effective moisture, vegetation cover clearly played a critical role in facilitating the paleo-fires by creating an abundance of fine fuels. These records suggest that greater fire activity will likely accompany temperature-related increases in shrub-dominated tundra predicted for the 21st century and beyond. Increased tundra burning will have broad impacts on physical and biological systems as well as land-atmosphere interactions in the Arctic, including the potential to release stored organic carbon to the atmosphere.

  7. Smartphone gaming and frequent use pattern associated with smartphone addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Hao; Lin, Sheng-Hsuan; Pan, Yuan-Chien; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors of smartphone addiction in high school students.A total of 880 adolescents were recruited from a vocational high school in Taiwan in January 2014 to complete a set of questionnaires, including the 10-item Smartphone Addiction Inventory, Chen Internet Addiction Scale, and a survey of content and patterns of personal smartphone use. Of those recruited, 689 students (646 male) aged 14 to 21 and who owned a smartphone completed the questionnaire. Multiple linear regression models were used to determine the variables associated with smartphone addiction.Smartphone gaming and frequent smartphone use were associated with smartphone addiction. Furthermore, both the smartphone gaming-predominant and gaming with multiple-applications groups showed a similar association with smartphone addiction. Gender, duration of owning a smartphone, and substance use were not associated with smartphone addiction.Our findings suggest that smartphone use patterns should be part of specific measures to prevent and intervene in cases of excessive smartphone use.

  8. Smartphone gaming and frequent use pattern associated with smartphone addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Hao; Lin, Sheng-Hsuan; Pan, Yuan-Chien; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors of smartphone addiction in high school students. A total of 880 adolescents were recruited from a vocational high school in Taiwan in January 2014 to complete a set of questionnaires, including the 10-item Smartphone Addiction Inventory, Chen Internet Addiction Scale, and a survey of content and patterns of personal smartphone use. Of those recruited, 689 students (646 male) aged 14 to 21 and who owned a smartphone completed the questionnaire. Multiple linear regression models were used to determine the variables associated with smartphone addiction. Smartphone gaming and frequent smartphone use were associated with smartphone addiction. Furthermore, both the smartphone gaming-predominant and gaming with multiple-applications groups showed a similar association with smartphone addiction. Gender, duration of owning a smartphone, and substance use were not associated with smartphone addiction. Our findings suggest that smartphone use patterns should be part of specific measures to prevent and intervene in cases of excessive smartphone use. PMID:27428191

  9. Frequent occurrence of mixed Enterocytozoon bieneusi infections in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Giovanni; Dilo, Julia; Tumwine, James K; Tzipori, Saul; Akiyoshi, Donna E

    2013-09-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi (phylum Microsporidia) is a human pathogen with a broad host range. Following the sequencing of 3.8 Mb of the estimated 6-Mb E. bieneusi genome, simple sequence repeats (micro- and minisatellites) were identified. Sequencing of four such repeats from various human and animal E. bieneusi isolates identified extensive sequence polymorphism and enabled the development of a multilocus genotyping method to study the epidemiology of this pathogen. We genotyped E. bieneusi DNA extracted from 197 fecal samples originating from children with diarrhea who were residing in Kampala, Uganda. Three newly identified microsatellite markers and the internal transcribed spacer were PCR amplified, and multiple cloned amplicons for each marker were sequenced from each individual. Most microsatellite sequences were unique to the Ugandan population. Significantly, polymorphism not only was present among isolates but was also found within isolates. This observation suggests that infections with heterogeneous E. bieneusi populations are common in this region. However, the data do not exclude that some of the polymorphism originates from divergent paralogs within the genome. The frequent occurrence of multiple sequences within an isolate precluded the identification of multilocus genotypes. This observation raises the possibility that in a region in which the prevalence of E. bieneusi is high, sequencing of uncloned PCR products may not be adequate for multilocus genotyping.

  10. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and hypomagnesemia: A frequent association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardain, A; Mesnage, V; Alamowitch, S; Bourdain, F; Crozier, S; Lenglet, T; Psimaras, D; Demeret, S; Graveleau, P; Hoang-Xuan, K; Levy, R

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a serious neurological condition encountered in various medical fields. Pathophysiological factor(s) common to PRES cases of apparently unrelated etiologies are yet to be found. Based on the hypothesis that hypomagnesemia might participate in the cascade leading to PRES, our study sought to verify whether hypomagnesemia is frequently associated with PRES regardless of etiology. From a retrospective study of a cohort of 57 patients presenting with PRES of different etiologies, presented here are the findings of 19 patients with available serum magnesium levels (SMLs) during PRES. In the acute phase of PRES, hypomagnesemia was present in all 19 patients in spite of differences in etiology (including immunosuppressive drugs, hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematosus, iatrogenic etiology and unknown). SMLs were within normal ranges prior to PRES and below normal ranges during the first 48h of PRES, with a significant decrease in SMLs during the acute phase. In this retrospective study, constant hypomagnesemia was observed during the acute phase of PRES regardless of its etiology. These results now require larger studies to assess the particular importance of acute hypomagnesemia in PRES and especially the possible need to treat PRES with magnesium sulfate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The semiology of febrile seizures: Focal features are frequent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasu, Michihiko; Kubota, Tetsuo; Tsuji, Takeshi; Kurahashi, Hirokazu; Numoto, Shingo; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Akihisa

    2017-08-01

    To clarify the semiology of febrile seizures (FS) and to determine the frequency of FS with symptoms suggestive of focal onset. FS symptoms in children were reported within 24h of seizure onset by the parents using a structured questionnaire consisting principally of closed-ended questions. We focused on events at seizure commencement, including changes in behavior and facial expression, and ocular and oral symptoms. We also investigated the autonomic and motor symptoms developing during seizures. The presence or absence of focal and limbic features was determined for each patient. The associations of certain focal and limbic features with patient characteristics were assessed. Information was obtained on FS in 106 children. Various events were recorded at seizure commencement. Behavioral changes were observed in 35 children, changes in facial expression in 53, ocular symptoms in 78, and oral symptoms in 90. In terms of events during seizures, autonomic symptoms were recognized in 78, and convulsive motor symptoms were recognized in 68 children. Focal features were evident in 81 children; 38 children had two or more such features. Limbic features were observed in 44 children, 9 of whom had two or more such features. There was no significant relationship between any patient characteristic and the numbers of focal or limbic features. The semiology of FS varied widely among children, and symptoms suggestive of focal onset were frequent. FS of focal onset may be more common than is generally thought. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictors and Therapy of Cardiomyopathy Caused by Frequent Ventricular Ectopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, Ghaith Sharaf; Bogun, Frank

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this review is to describe predictors and therapeutic principles for PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. PVC-induced cardiomyopathy is a treatable condition resulting in a reversible form of cardiomyopathy. PVC-induced cardiomyopathy has only recently been recognized as an entity that causes a reversible form of cardiomyopathy. The mechanism of development of PVC-induced cardiomyopathy has not yet been elucidated, although dyssynchrony appears to play a major role. Multiple factors have been described that are independently associated with PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. Predictors of PVC-induced cardiomyopathy include PVC prevalence, epicardial origin, male gender, longer symptom duration and asymptomatic status, presence of interpolated PVCs, lack of circadian variability, and a broader PVC-QRS width. In the presence of cardiomyopathy, work-up for structural heart disease and its etiology should be performed, followed by aggressive attempts at PVC reduction. There is evidence that ablation therapy is superior to medical therapy for frequent PVCs, but treatment decisions need to be individualized depending on the patients symptoms, PVC prevalence, PVC origin, patients comorbidities, and patient preference. The potential of sudden cardiac death associated with the presence of structural heart disease needs to be recognized, and appropriate risk stratification is mandatory.

  13. Chest Pain: The Need to Consider Less Frequent Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Magalhães

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is one of the most frequent patient’s complaints. The commonest underlying causes are well known, but, sometimes, in some clinical scenarios, it is necessary to consider other diagnoses. We report a case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male, chronically hypertensive, who complained of recurrent episodes of chest pain and fever with elevated acute phase reactants. The first investigation was negative for some of the most likely diagnosis and he quickly improved with anti-inflammatory drugs. Over a few months, his symptoms continued to recur periodically, his hypertension was aggravated, and he developed headaches and lower limbs claudication. After a temporal artery biopsy that was negative for vasculitis, he underwent a positron emission tomography suggestive of Takayasu Arteritis. Takayasu Arteritis is a rare chronic granulomatous vasculitis of the aorta and its first-order branches affecting mostly females up to 50 years old. Chest pain is experienced by >40% of the patients and results from the inflammation of the aorta, pulmonary artery, or coronaries.

  14. Chronic HIV-1 infection frequently fails to protect against superinfection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Piantadosi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Reports of HIV-1 superinfection (re-infection have demonstrated that the immune response generated against one strain of HIV-1 does not always protect against other strains. However, studies to determine the incidence of HIV-1 superinfection have yielded conflicting results. Furthermore, few studies have attempted to identify superinfection cases occurring more than a year after initial infection, a time when HIV-1-specific immune responses would be most likely to have developed. We screened a cohort of high-risk Kenyan women for HIV-1 superinfection by comparing partial gag and envelope sequences over a 5-y period beginning at primary infection. Among 36 individuals, we detected seven cases of superinfection, including cases in which both viruses belonged to the same HIV-1 subtype, subtype A. In five of these cases, the superinfecting strain was detected in only one of the two genome regions examined, suggesting that recombination frequently occurs following HIV-1 superinfection. In addition, we found that superinfection occurred throughout the course of the first infection: during acute infection in two cases, between 1-2 y after infection in three cases, and as late as 5 y after infection in two cases. Our results indicate that superinfection commonly occurs after the immune response against the initial infection has had time to develop and mature. Implications from HIV-1 superinfection cases, in which natural re-exposure leads to re-infection, will need to be considered in developing strategies for eliciting protective immunity to HIV-1.

  15. Culturally Responsive Education: Diversity in Our Classrooms. Frequently Asked Questions for Saundra Tomlinson-Clarke, Ph.D., and Penelope Lattimer, Ph.D. REL Mid-Atlantic Webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The webinar, "Culturally Responsive Education: Diversity in Our Classrooms" focused on the concept of culturally responsive education. Goals of the webinar included: (1) Learning what the research says about effective ways to promote culturally responsive education; (2) Discussion of ways to meet the cultural and linguistic needs of all…

  16. Pengaruh Return Saham, Volume Perdagangan dan Varian Return Terhadap Bid-Ask Spread Pada Perusahaan Perbankan di Bursa Efek Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Nathanael, Alfredo Amalburga

    2015-01-01

    Bid-ask spread is the spread of bid price and ask price. Bid-ask spread is being use for investor to buy stock in broker. Bid-ask spread in this research is dependent variable. The purpose of this research is to obtain empirical evidence about the effect of stock return, trading volumeandreturn variance to bid-ask spread both partially and simultaneously. The type of this research is quantitative research and the data which was used for this research is secondary data which came fromstock pri...

  17. Finding neural assemblies with frequent item set mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picado-Muiño, David; Borgelt, Christian; Berger, Denise; Gerstein, George; Grün, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Cell assemblies, defined as groups of neurons exhibiting precise spike coordination, were proposed as a model of network processing in the cortex. Fortunately, in recent years considerable progress has been made in multi-electrode recordings, which enable recording massively parallel spike trains of hundred(s) of neurons simultaneously. However, due to the challenges inherent in multivariate approaches, most studies in favor of cortical cell assemblies still resorted to analyzing pairwise interactions. However, to recover the underlying correlation structures, higher-order correlations need to be identified directly. Inspired by the Accretion method proposed by Gerstein et al. (1978) we propose a new assembly detection method based on frequent item set mining (FIM). In contrast to Accretion, FIM searches effectively and without redundancy for individual spike patterns that exceed a given support threshold. We study different search methods, with which the space of potential cell assemblies may be explored, as well as different test statistics and subset conditions with which candidate assemblies may be assessed and filtered. It turns out that a core challenge of cell assembly detection is the problem of multiple testing, which causes a large number of false discoveries. Unfortunately, criteria that address individual candidate assemblies and try to assess them with statistical tests and/or subset conditions do not help much to tackle this problem. The core idea of our new method is that in order to cope with the multiple testing problem one has to shift the focus of statistical testing from specific assemblies (consisting of a specific set of neurons) to spike patterns of a certain size (i.e., with a certain number of neurons). This significantly reduces the number of necessary tests, thus alleviating the multiple testing problem. We demonstrate that our method is able to reliably suppress false discoveries, while it is still very sensitive in discovering

  18. A population model of chaparral vegetation response to frequent wildfires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy A; Johns, Garrett; Jiang, Wancen; Yang, Lucie

    2013-12-01

    The recent increase in wildfire frequency in the Santa Monica Mountains (SMM) may substantially impact plant community structure. Species of Chaparral shrubs represent the dominant vegetation type in the SMM. These species can be divided into three life history types according to their response to wildfires. Nonsprouting species are completely killed by fire and reproduce by seeds that germinate in response to a fire cue, obligate sprouting species survive by resprouting from dormant buds in a root crown because their seeds are destroyed by fire, and facultative sprouting species recover after fire both by seeds and resprouts. Based on these assumptions, we developed a set of nonlinear difference equations to model each life history type. These models can be used to predict species survivorship under varying fire return intervals. For example, frequent fires can lead to localized extinction of nonsprouting species such as Ceanothus megacarpus while several facultative sprouting species such as Ceanothus spinosus and Malosma (Rhus) laurina will persist as documented by a longitudinal study in a biological preserve in the SMM. We estimated appropriate parameter values for several chaparral species using 25 years of data and explored parameter relationships that lead to equilibrium populations. We conclude by looking at the survival strategies of these three species of chaparral shrubs under varying fire return intervals and predict changes in plant community structure under fire intervals of short return. In particular, our model predicts that an average fire return interval of greater than 12 years is required for 50 % of the initial Ceanothus megacarpus population and 25 % of the initial Ceanothus spinosus population to survive. In contrast, we predict that the Malosma laurina population will have 90 % survivorship for an average fire return interval of at least 6 years.

  19. Pediatric autoimmune enteropathy: an entity frequently associated with immunodeficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Aatur D; Goyal, Alka; Davison, Jon M; Regueiro, Miguel D; Roche, Robyn L; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan

    2014-04-01

    . Although anti-enterocyte antibodies were identified in the majority of the cases, their presence was variable and insensitive. In addition, pediatric autoimmune enteropathy was frequently encountered in the setting of immunodeficiency disorders.

  20. The Most Frequently Cited 100 Articles in Liver Transplantation Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbilgin, M; Ünek, T; Egeli, T; Ağalar, C; Özbilgin, Ş; Hancı, V; Ellidokuz, H; Astarcıoğlu, I

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the liver transplantation literature since 1975 and found the most frequently cited 100 articles and assessed the distribution of authors and journals of these articles. Using the advanced mode of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (WOS) search engine, the words "SU = transplantation AND TI = liver OR SU = transplantation AND TS = liver" were used to scan articles and determine the most-cited 100 articles on July 18, 2016. From 1975 to date, it appears a total of 43,369 articles were published in the field of liver transplantation in the WOS. Although the most cited article had 677 citations, the least cited article had 180 citations. The mean citation number for the 100 articles was 252.31 ± 96.75. The mean annual citation number for the articles varied from 61.55 to 5 and the mean was 15.31 ± 8.63. The most cited article was by Feng et al "Characteristics Associated With Liver Graft Failure: The Concept of a Donor Risk Index" published in the American Journal of Transplantation (677 citations). Bibliometric analysis highlights the key topics and publications that have shaped the understanding and management of liver transplantation. According to our research, this is the first study to investigate articles with most citations in the field of liver transplantation. In our study the article with the most citations was cited 677 times, whereas the 100th article was cited 180 times with a mean citation number for the 100 articles of 252.31 ± 96.75. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mental health insurance claims among spouses of frequent business travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimberg, L A; Striker, J; Nordanlycke-Yoo, C; Nagy, L; Mundt, K A; Sulsky, S I

    2002-03-01

    Following up on two earlier publications showing increased psychological stress and psychosocial effects of travel on the business travellers this study investigated the health of spouses of business travellers. Medical claims of spouses of Washington DC World Bank staff participating in the medical insurance programme in 1997-8 were reviewed. Only the first of each diagnosis with the ninth revision of the international classification of diseases (ICD-9) recorded for each person was included in this analysis. The claims were grouped into 28 diagnostic categories and subcategories. There were almost twice as many women as men among the 4630 identified spouses. Overall, male and female spouses of travellers filed claims for medical treatment at about a 16% higher rate than spouses of non-travellers. As hypothesised, a higher rate for psychological treatment was found in the spouses of international business travellers compared with non-travellers (men standardised rate ratios (RR)=1.55; women RR=1.37). For stress related psychological disorders the rates tripled for both female and male spouses of frequent travellers (>or= four missions/year) compared with those of non-travelling employees. An increased rate of claims among spouses of travellers versus non-travellers was also found for treatment for certain other diagnostic groups. Of these, diseases of the skin (men RR=2.93; women RR=1.41) and intestinal diseases (men RR=1.31; women RR=1.47) may have some association with the spouses' travel, whereas others, such as malignant neoplasms (men RR=1.97; women RR=0.79) are less likely to have such a relation. The previously identified pattern of increased psychological disorders among business travellers is mirrored among their spouses. This finding underscores the permeable boundary between family relations and working life which earlier studies suggested, and it emphasises the need for concern within institutions and strategies for prevention.

  2. Ask-Upmark kidney with bilateral pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.K. Sokhal

    2016-07-26

    Jul 26, 2016 ... www.ees.elsevier.com/afju · www.sciencedirect.com. Pediatric Urology. Case report. Ask-Upmark kidney with bilateral pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction – A rare entity. A.K. Sokhal. ∗. , B.P. Singh, S. Sankhwar, D. Kumar Saini. King George's Medical College, Lucknow, India. Received 7 March 2016; ...

  3. An analysis of question asking on scientific texts explaining natural phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jorge; Caldeira, Helena; Gallástegui, Juan R.; Otero, José

    2000-08-01

    This article relays results of a study focused on questions invoked to correct declarative knowledge deficits while readers process science texts explaining natural phenomena. Firstly, the authors focused on finding out what kind of questions are asked by students who read these texts and, secondly how task demand influences quantity and quality of formulated questions. Two hundred and eighty nine Portuguese students from 8th, 10th, and 12th grade participated in the study. The students were instructed to ask questions on two short science paragraphs that explained natural phenomena. Three task conditions were chosen. Thus, in the Class condition, the task was introduced as an activity aimed at developing the capacity to ask questions. In the Examination condition, the task was presented as a test on question generation. Finally, in the Extra-academic condition the questioning task was camouflaged as a participation in a research project sponsored by the Ministry of Education and geared at the improvement of science textbooks. The results have shown that students are able to ask many questions when given an opportunity to do so. The study has also proven that students are capable of generating a large volume of causal-antecedent questions relative to this kind of texts. Finally, no clear effects were found between grade level and/or task demand as defined in the conducted study.

  4. Teaching individuals with autism spectrum disorder to ask questions: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raulston, T.; Carnett, A.; Lang, Russell; Tostanoski, A.; Lee, A.; Machalicek, W.A.; Sigafoos, J.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Didden, H.C.M.; Lancioni, G.E.

    2013-01-01

    This review involved a systematic search and analysis of studies aimed at teaching individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to ask questions (i.e., teaching mands for information). A systematic search of databases, reference lists, and journals identified 21 studies that met predetermined

  5. On the Value of Asking Students What They Want to Know about Child Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Douglas A.

    1983-01-01

    At the beginning of this course in child and adolescent psychology, students are asked to write out one question they wish answered. Using this method, professors can be responsive to student needs without sacrificing the academic integrity of their courses. (CS)

  6. Are mental health staff getting better at asking about abuse and neglect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Maria; Read, John

    2017-02-01

    This study ascertained the extent to which abuse and neglect are identified and recorded by mental health services. A comprehensive audit of 250 randomly selected files from four community mental health centres in Auckland, New Zealand was conducted, using similar methodology to that of a 1997 audit in the same city so as to permit comparisons. Significant increases, compared to the 1997 audit, were found in the rates of child sexual and physical abuse, and adulthood sexual assault (but not adulthood physical assault) identified in the files. Identification of physical and emotional neglect, however, was poor. Male service users were asked less often than females; and male staff enquired less often than female staff. People with a diagnosis indicative of psychosis, such as 'schizophrenia', tended to be asked less often and had significantly lower rates of abuse/neglect identified. Despite the overall improvement, mental health services are still missing significant amounts of childhood and adulthood adversities, especially neglect. All services need clear policies that all service users be asked about both abuse and neglect, whatever their gender or diagnosis, and that staff receive training that address the barriers to asking and to responding therapeutically to disclosures. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  7. An Investigation of the Look-Ask-Pick Mnemonic to Improve Fraction Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Gregory E.; Harsy, Jennifer D.; Hupp, Stephen D. A.; Jewell, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effects of the Look-Ask-Pick (LAP) mnemonic on the addition and subtraction of fraction skills of 3 general education sixth graders. Following identification of fraction skill deficits, participants were taught to add and subtract fractions with like denominators, unlike denominators where one divides evenly into…

  8. Don\\'t Ask, Don\\'t Tell: Ethical Issues Concerning Learning and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Informed consent procedures and requirements must be clearly established and communicated. The learning and proficiency practices should be restricted to the staff that can truly benefit from the experience. The practice of 'don't ask, don't tell' is not an option. South African Journal of Family Practice Vol. 50 (4) 2008: pp.

  9. Do women give the same information on binge drinking during pregnancy when asked repeatedly?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Olsen, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study if pregnant women give the same answers to questions on frequency and timing of binge drinking when asked more than once during and after pregnancy. DESIGN: Cohort study.Setting:The Danish National Birth Cohort. SUBJECTS: The study is based on 76 307 pregnant women with repeat...

  10. The Development of Children's Information Gathering: To Look or to Ask?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitneva, Stanka A.; Lam, Nietzsche H. L.; Dunfield, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    The testimony of others and direct experience play a major role in the development of children's knowledge. Children actively use questions to seek others' testimony and explore the environment. It is unclear though whether children distinguish when it is better to ask from when it is better to try to find an answer by oneself. In 2 experiments,…

  11. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Autism Stigma and Knowledge Questionnaire (ASK-Q)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Ashley J.; Bradshaw, Laine P.; Naqvi, Nilofer C.; Paff, Madison L.; Campbell, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    ASD knowledge deficits contribute to disparities in the timing and quality of ASD services. To address the limitations with existing measures of ASD knowledge, we developed and examined the Autism Stigma and Knowledge Questionnaire (ASK-Q), which comprehensively assesses multiple subdomains of ASD knowledge while maintaining strong psychometric…

  12. Redox-Inactive Peptide Disrupting Trx1-Ask1 Interaction for Selective Activation of Stress Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekulandara, Dilini N; Nagi, Shima; Seo, Hyosuk; Chow, Christine S; Ahn, Young-Hoon

    2018-01-05

    Thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) and glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) are two ubiquitous redox enzymes that are central for redox homeostasis but also are implicated in many other processes, including stress sensing, inflammation, and apoptosis. In addition to their enzymatic redox activity, a growing body of evidence shows that Trx1 and Grx1 play regulatory roles via protein-protein interactions with specific proteins, including Ask1. The currently available inhibitors of Trx1 and Grx1 are thiol-reactive electrophiles or disulfides that may suffer from low selectivity because of their thiol reactivity. In this report, we used a phage peptide library to identify a 7-mer peptide, 2GTP1, that binds to both Trx1 and Grx1. We further showed that a cell-permeable derivative of 2GTP1, TAT-2GTP1, disrupts the Trx1-Ask1 interaction, which induces Ask1 phosphorylation with subsequent activation of JNK, stabilization of p53, and reduced viability of cancer cells. Notably, as opposed to a disulfide-derived Trx1 inhibitor (PX-12), TAT-2GTP1 was selective for activating the Ask1 pathway without affecting other stress signaling pathways, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress and AMPK activation. Overall, 2GTP1 will serve as a useful probe for investigating protein interactions of Trx1.

  13. Homologous expression of aspartokinase (ask) gene in Streptomyces clavuligerus and its hom-deleted mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okay, Sezer; Ünsaldı, Eser; Taşkın, Bilgin; Liras, Paloma; Piret, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effect of homologous multiple copies of the ask gene, which encodes aspartokinase catalyzing the first step of the aspartate pathway, on cephamycin C biosynthesis in S. clavuligerus NRRL 3585 and its hom mutant was investigated. The intracellular pool levels of aspartate pathway amino acids accorded well with the Ask activity levels in TB3585 and AK39. When compared with the control strain carrying vector alone without any gene insert, amplification of the ask gene in the wild strain resulted in a maximum of 3.1- and 3.3-fold increase in specific, 1.7- and 1.9-fold increase in volumetric cephamycin C production when grown in trypticase soy broth (TSB) and a modified chemically defined medium (mCDM), respectively. However, expression of multicopy ask gene in a hom-deleted background significantly decreased cephamycin C yields when the cells were grown in either TSB or mCDM, most probably due to physiological disturbance resulting from enzyme overexpression and high copy number plasmid burden in an auxotrophic host, respectively. PMID:21326925

  14. On the Problems of Asking for a Definition of Quality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittek, Line; Kvernbekk, Tone

    2011-01-01

    In this article we discuss the problems of asking for a definition of quality in education from a philosophy of language perspective. We take the concept of quality as it appears in higher education discourse as our example. More specifically we discuss the possibility of obtaining a precise, unified definition of quality by addressing the problem…

  15. Bid-Ask Spreads, Trading Volume and Return Volatility: Intraday Evidence from Indian Stock Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Ranjan Paital

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper empirically examines the relationship between stock return volatility, trading volume and bid-ask spread within the scope of mixture of distribution hypothesis (MDH and sequential information arrival hypothesis (SIAH in the Indian stock market using high frequency 5-minute data set over the period of 2 July 2012 to 31 December 2012. This is the first kind of study in India using bid-ask spread as an additional information variable along with trading volume to investigate the relationship with stock return volatility. Our empirical findings provide evidence of a positive contemporaneous relationship between return volatility and trading volume, and also between return volatility and bid-ask spread. Moreover, the results of Granger causality test show that the information content of trading volume and bid-ask spread are useful for predicting stock return volatility. Our results indicate that information arrival to investors tends to follow a sequential rather than a simultaneous process. This finding is consistent with the sequential information arrival hypothesis and contradicts the mixture of distribution hypothesis.

  16. Interventions before consultations to help patients address their information needs by encouraging question asking: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnersley, Paul; Edwards, Adrian; Hood, Kerry; Ryan, Rebecca; Prout, Hayley; Cadbury, Naomi; MacBeth, Fergus; Butow, Phyllis; Butler, Christopher

    2008-07-16

    To assess the effects on patients, clinicians, and the healthcare system of interventions before consultations to help patients or their representatives gather information in consultations by question asking. Systematic review with meta-analysis. Electronic literature searches of seven databases and hand searching of one journal and bibliographies of relevant articles. Review methods Inclusion criteria included randomised controlled trials. Primary outcomes were question asking; patients' anxiety, knowledge, and satisfaction; and length of consultation. 33 randomised trials of variable quality involving 8244 patients were identified. A few studies showed positive effects. Meta-analyses showed small and statistically significantly increases in question asking (standardised mean difference 0.27, 95% confidence interval 0.19 to 0.36) and patients' satisfaction (0.09, 0.03 to 0.16). Non-statistically significant changes occurred in patients' anxiety before consultations (weighted mean difference -1.56, -7.10 to 3.97), patients' anxiety after consultations (standardised mean difference -0.08, -0.22 to 0.06), patients' knowledge (-0.34, -0.94 to 0.25), and length of consultation (0.10, -0.05 to 0.25). Interventions comprising written materials had similar effects on question asking, consultation length, and patients' satisfaction as those comprising the coaching of patients. Interventions with additional training of clinicians had little further effect than those targeted at patients alone for patients' satisfaction and consultation length. Interventions for patients before consultations produce small benefits for patients. This may be because patients and clinicians have established behaviours in consultations that are difficult to change. Alternatively small increases in question asking may not be sufficient to make notable changes to other outcomes.

  17. Students and Doctors are Unaware of the Cost of Drugs they Frequently Prescribe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Tim; Tichelaar, Jelle; Nanayakkara, Prabath; Richir, Milan; van Agtmael, Michiel

    2017-03-01

    Given the increasing healthcare costs of an ageing population, there is growing interest in rational prescribing, which takes costs of medication into account. We aimed to gain insight into the attitude to and knowledge of medication costs of medical students and doctors in daily practice. This was a cross-sectional electronic survey among medical students (bachelor/master) and doctors (consultants/registrars). Attitude to costs was evaluated using a cost-consciousness scale. In open questions, the participants estimated the cost of commonly prescribed (generic/non-generic) drugs (including separate pharmacy dispensing costs). They were asked where they could find information about drug costs. Overall, a reasonable cost-consciousness was found. Students were less conscious of the cost than were doctors (15.56 SD 3.25 versus 17.81 SD 2.25; scale 0-24; p = 0.001). In contrast to this consciousness, actual estimated drug costs were within a 25% margin for only 5.4% of generic and 13.7% of proprietary drugs (Wilcoxon signed-rank, p doctors (84%) and a minority of students (40%) were able to identify at least one source of information about drug costs. While doctors and students considered it important to be aware of the cost of drugs, this attitude is not reflected in their ability to estimate the cost of frequently prescribed drugs. Cost awareness is important in therapeutic reasoning and cost-effective prescribing. Both should be better addressed in (undergraduate) pharmacotherapy education. © 2016 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  18. Insomnia is a frequent finding in adults with Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Wendt Lennart

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asperger syndrome (AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder belonging to autism spectrum disorders with prevalence rate of 0,35% in school-age children. It has been most extensively studied in childhood while there is scarcity of reports concerning adulthood of AS subjects despite the lifelong nature of this syndrome. In children with Asperger syndrome the initiation and continuity of sleep is disturbed because of the neuropsychiatric deficits inherent of AS. It is probable that sleep difficulties are present in adulthood as well. Our hypothesis was that adults with AS suffer from difficulty in initiating and maintaining sleep and nonrestorative sleep (insomnia. Methods 20 AS without medication were compared with 10 healthy controls devoid of neuropsychiatric anamnesis. Clinical examination, blood test battery and head MRI excluded confounding somatic illnesses. Structured psychiatric interview for axis-I and axis-II disorders were given to both groups as well as Beck Depression Inventory and Wechsler adult intelligence scale, revised version. Sleep quality was assessed with sleep questionnaire, sleep diary during 6 consecutive days and description of possible sleep problems by the participants own words was requested. Results compared with controls and with normative values of good sleep, AS adults had frequent insomnia. In sleep questionnaire 90% (18/20, in sleep diary 75% (15/20 and in free description 85% (17/20 displayed insomnia. There was a substantial psychiatric comorbidity with only 4 AS subject devoid of other axis-I or axis-II disorders besides AS. Also these persons displayed insomnia. It can be noted that the distribution of psychiatric diagnoses in AS subjects was virtually similar to that found among patient with chronic insomnia. Conclusions the neuropsychiatric deficits inherent of AS predispose both to insomnia and to anxiety and mood disorders. Therefore a careful assessment of sleep quality should be an

  19. Insomnia is a frequent finding in adults with Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Pekka; Lindberg, Nina; Nieminen-von Wendt, Taina; von Wendt, Lennart; Alanko, Lauri; Appelberg, Björn; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2003-01-01

    Background Asperger syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder belonging to autism spectrum disorders with prevalence rate of 0,35% in school-age children. It has been most extensively studied in childhood while there is scarcity of reports concerning adulthood of AS subjects despite the lifelong nature of this syndrome. In children with Asperger syndrome the initiation and continuity of sleep is disturbed because of the neuropsychiatric deficits inherent of AS. It is probable that sleep difficulties are present in adulthood as well. Our hypothesis was that adults with AS suffer from difficulty in initiating and maintaining sleep and nonrestorative sleep (insomnia). Methods 20 AS without medication were compared with 10 healthy controls devoid of neuropsychiatric anamnesis. Clinical examination, blood test battery and head MRI excluded confounding somatic illnesses. Structured psychiatric interview for axis-I and axis-II disorders were given to both groups as well as Beck Depression Inventory and Wechsler adult intelligence scale, revised version. Sleep quality was assessed with sleep questionnaire, sleep diary during 6 consecutive days and description of possible sleep problems by the participants own words was requested. Results compared with controls and with normative values of good sleep, AS adults had frequent insomnia. In sleep questionnaire 90% (18/20), in sleep diary 75% (15/20) and in free description 85% (17/20) displayed insomnia. There was a substantial psychiatric comorbidity with only 4 AS subject devoid of other axis-I or axis-II disorders besides AS. Also these persons displayed insomnia. It can be noted that the distribution of psychiatric diagnoses in AS subjects was virtually similar to that found among patient with chronic insomnia. Conclusions the neuropsychiatric deficits inherent of AS predispose both to insomnia and to anxiety and mood disorders. Therefore a careful assessment of sleep quality should be an integral part of the treatment

  20. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Saldivar, María Luisa; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Martínez-Avalos, Armando; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Espinosa-Hernández, Laura; Flores-Chapa, José de Diego; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Francisco Javier; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María Del Carmen; Rivera-Luna, Roberto; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Alvarado-Ibarra, Martha; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Duarte-Rodríguez, David Aldebarán; Paredes-Aguilera, Rogelio; Del Campo-Martínez, María de Los Ángeles; Cárdenas-Cardos, Rocío; Alamilla-Galicia, Paola Hillary; Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Ortega-Alvarez, Manuel Carlos; Mejia-Arangure, Juan Manuel

    2011-08-17

    Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR), and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR) per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level). Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million), followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million), and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million). The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million). For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million) and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million). The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8%) were classified as high risk. There was a positive

  1. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekker-Méndez Vilma

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR, and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level. Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3; acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million, followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million, and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million. The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million. For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million. The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8% were

  2. Spatiotemporal Frequent Pattern Discovery from Solar Event Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, B.; Angryk, R.; Filali Boubrahimi, S.; Hamdi, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    Solar physics researchers entered the big data era with the launch of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, which captures approximately 60,000 high-resolution images every day and generates 0.55 petabytes of raster data each year. The big data trend in solar data is anticipated to be sustained by the ground-based DKIST telescope, which is expected to generate three to five petabytes of data each year. Many software modules continuously work on SDO's image data to detect spatial boundaries of solar events. Recently, a solar event tracking algorithm and interpolation methodologies have been proposed for creating large-scale solar event vector data sets in GSU's Data Mining Lab. The solar event tracking algorithm utilizes the spatial locations and corresponding image parameters for linking the polygon-based instances; therefore, creates spatiotemporal trajectory objects with extended geometric representations. Thus, we can access and make use of vector-based solar event metadata, which is in the form of continuously evolving region trajectories. Spatial and temporal patterns such as co-occurrences, sequences, periodicity and convergences frequently transpire among solar event instances. Here, we will concentrate on spatiotemporal co-occurrences and event sequences. Spatiotemporal co-occurrences are the spatial and temporal overlap among two or more solar event instances. On the other hand, spatiotemporal event sequences appear among the events that are temporally following each other and spatially in close-by locations. Our study includes approximately 120,000 trajectory-based instances of seven solar event types (Active Regions, Coronal Holes, Emerging Flux, Filaments, Flares, Sigmoids, and Sunspots) that occurred between January 2012 and December 2014. The tracked solar events are interpolated at each 10-minute interval. We will present the results of our spatiotemporal co-occurrence pattern mining and spatiotemporal event sequence mining algorithms

  3. Ruminal and blood responses to propylene glycol during frequent feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y-H; Martinez, C M; Brown, N E; Cassidy, T W; Varga, G A

    2009-09-01

    The objective of the current experiment was to study the responses of ruminal and blood metabolites of Holstein dairy cows to propylene glycol (PG) under different methods of delivery during frequent feeding. By providing the same amount (200 mL or 200 g) of PG, delivery methods for PG were assessed: 1) control treatment: no PG; 2) dietary treatment: 200 g of PG as a dry product (65% purity; corresponded to 308 g of the dry product) mixed into the TMR; 3) oral-drench treatment: 200 mL of liquid PG (100% purity) orally drenched; and 4) rumen-drench treatment: 200 g of PG as a dry product drenched via the rumen cannula to mimic top dressing. Eight multiparous (lactation = 3 +/- 1.1 SD) ruminally cannulated Holstein dairy cows (DIM = 204 +/- 104.5 SD) were fed PG for 4 d (d 11 to 14) in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with an experimental length of 14 d for each period. On the last day of each period, serial blood samples were removed from an indwelling catheter placed in the right jugular vein immediately before and for 4 h after PG administration. Cows were fed at 12x feeding/d for 2 d before entering the serial sampling period to minimize postprandial influences on blood metabolites. Ruminal content was also sampled hourly for 4 h on d 14. Milk was sampled from 2 consecutive milkings on d 13 during each period. Dry matter intake and milk yield were not affected by PG. Percentages of milk lactose were increased by PG delivered by all methods tested in the current experiment. Ruminal concentrations (as percentages of total volatile fatty acids) of acetate were decreased and concentrations of propionate and isovalerate were increased by PG, regardless of the delivery method; however, total volatile fatty acid concentration was not affected by PG. Ruminal concentrations of butyrate were decreased and concentrations of valerate were increased by PG drench, via either an oral or ruminal drench. The degree of reduction in butyrate concentration or increase in

  4. 4SC-202 activates ASK1-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway to inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Meili, E-mail: fumeilidrlinyi@tom.com [Department of Infectious Disease, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi 276000 (China); Wan, Fuqiang [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Linyi Tumor Hospital, Linyi 276000 (China); Li, Zhengling [Department of Nursing, Tengzhou Central People' s Hospital, Tengzhou 277500 (China); Zhang, Fenghua [Department of Operating Room, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi 276000 (China)

    2016-03-04

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the potential anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell activity by 4SC-202, a novel class I HDAC inhibitor (HDACi). The associated signaling mechanisms were also analyzed. We showed that 4SC-202 treatment induced potent cytotoxic and proliferation–inhibitory activities against established HCC cell lines (HepG2, HepB3, SMMC-7721) and patient-derived primary HCC cells. Further, adding 4SC-202 in HCC cells activated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, which was evidenced by mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, cytochrome C cytosol release and caspase-3/-9 activation. Inhibition of this apoptosis pathway, by caspase-3/-9 inhibitors, mPTP blockers, or by shRNA-mediated knockdown of cyclophilin-D (Cyp-D, a key component of mPTP), significantly attenuated 4SC-202-induced HCC cell death and apoptosis. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D enhanced 4SC-202's sensitivity in HCC cells. Further studies showed that 4SC-202 induced apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) activation, causing it translocation to mitochondria and physical association with Cyp-D. This mitochondrial ASK1-Cyp-D complexation appeared required for mediating 4SC-202-induced apoptosis activation. ASK1 stable knockdown by targeted-shRNAs largely inhibited 4SC-202-induced mPTP opening, cytochrome C release, and following HCC cell apoptotic death. Together, we suggest that 4SC-202 activates ASK1-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway to potently inhibit human HCC cells. - Highlights: • 4SC-202 exerts potent anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activity against established/primary HCC cells. • SC-202-induced anti-HCC cell activity relies on caspase-dependent apoptosis activation. • 4SC-202 activates Cyp-D-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in HCC cells. • 4SC-202 activates ASK1 in HCC cells, causing it translocation to mitochondria. • Mitochondrial ASK1-Cyp-D complexation mediates 4SC-202's activity in HCC cells.

  5. Identifying Frequent Users of an Urban Emergency Medical Service Using Descriptive Statistics and Regression Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Chenelle; Mello, Michael; Choi, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective cohort study provides a descriptive analysis of a population that frequently uses an urban emergency medical service (EMS) and identifies factors that contribute to use among all frequent users. For purposes of this study we divided frequent users into the following groups: low- frequent users (4 EMS transports in 2012), medium-frequent users (5 to 6 EMS transports in 2012), high-frequent users (7 to 10 EMS transports in 2012) and super-frequent users (11 or more EMS transports in 2012). Overall, we identified 539 individuals as frequent users. For all groups of EMS frequent users (i.e. low, medium, high and super) one or more hospital admissions, receiving a referral for follow-up care upon discharge, and having no insurance were found to be statistically significant with frequent EMS use (Pstatistically significant with frequent EMS use.

  6. The rise of repeal: policy entrepreneurship and Don't Ask, Don't Tell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Christopher L; Edgell, Luke R

    2013-01-01

    We report on policy entrepreneurship by Servicemembers Legal Defense Network (SLDN) and how its legislative strategies used mini-windows of opportunity to shift Capitol Hill perspectives of Don't Ask, Don't Tell (DADT) from political plutonium to an emerging issue requiring a second look. Four phases in the legislative history of DADT are identified: radioactive, contested, emerging, and viable. In all, this article argues that SLDN's entrepreneurship focused on contesting congressional sensibilities to wait or defer on repeal, maintained that every discharge was damaging and transitioned toward a post-repeal mind set. Finally, we illustrate the importance of these transitions by comparing SLDN's 2004 estimated vote count for the introduction of the Military Readiness Enhancement Act with the final 2010 voting results on the Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act.

  7. Te contaria mi vida: I would tell you my life, if only you would ask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belknap, Ruth Ann; Sayeed, Pilar

    2003-01-01

    Universal screening for domestic violence is recommended in many health care settings. This qualitative study was undertaken to explore the thoughts and feelings of Mexican American women regarding being asked questions about domestic violence by a health care provider. We wanted to further explore what characteristics about a nurse, or other health care provider, would give a woman confianza, the trust necessary to discuss this issue. Seven women, who self identified as abused or formerly abused, were recruited from a pool of Spanish-speaking women receiving services from a rural domestic violence agency in the midwestern United States. The researchers found that, given certain characteristics and actions of the health care provider, women welcome the opportunity to discuss this issue. The implications for practice are these: be sincerely present for the client, ask about her life, listen to her response, and when necessary assist her to connect with appropriate domestic violence community services.

  8. Corwin-Schultz Bid-ask Spread Estimator in the Brazilian Stock Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Ripamonti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper tests the validity of the Corwin-Schultz bid-ask spread estimator in the Brazilian stock market. The Corwin-Schultz estimator arises as an easy way to compute asymmetric information throughout daily high and low stock prices for estimating overnight and non-negative adjusted spreads. The sample consisted of Ibovespa firms from 1986 to 2014 and was analysed with time series econometrics. The findings show that the measures of spread have stationarity properties, allowing for forecasting in a period of lagged variables, besides having the property of time-varying cointegration with market-to-book ratio, debt on equity, size and return and also presenting sensibility to different periods, industries and listing segments. Thus, the Corwin-Schultz bid-ask spread estimator seems to be a valid and reliable measure for forecasting aggregate-data variables through the weighted average of firm-level variables.

  9. Repealing Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell: Addressing the Ripple Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    the U.S. military throughout its history , but they have not served openly. The existing policy, “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” (DADT), allows homosexuals...the ban. Finally, the paper will provide recommendations for strategic leaders on the implementation of the policy change. History of Policy...groups,” such as transgender individuals (those who have undergone treatment to change his or her anatomical sex). Society appears to view gays

  10. The Role Of Gender In Asking Questions At Cool Stars 18 And 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Douglas, Stephanie; Gosnell, Natalie M.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Booth, Rachel S.; Davenport, James R. A.; Mace, Gregory N.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the gender balance of the 18th and 19th meetings of the Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stellar Systems and the Sun (CS18 and CS19). The percent of female attendees at both meetings (31% at CS18 and 37% at CS19) was higher than the percent of women in the American Astronomical Society (25%) and the International Astronomical Union (18%). The representation of women in Cool Stars as SOC members, invited speakers, and contributed speakers was similar to or exceeded the percent of women attending the meetings. We requested that conference attendees assist in a project to collect data on the gender of astronomers asking questions after talks. Using this data, we found that men were over-represented (and women were under-represented) in the question sessions after each talk. Men asked 79% of the questions at CS18 and 75% of the questions at CS19, but were 69% and 63% of the attendees respectively. Contrary to findings from previous conferences, we did not find that the gender balance of questions was strongly affected by the session chair gender, the speaker gender, or the length of the question period. We also found that female and male speakers were asked a comparable number of questions after each talk. The contrast of these results from previous incarnations of the gender questions survey indicate that more data would be useful in understanding the factors that contribute to the gender balance of question askers. We include a preliminary set of recommendations based on this and other work on related topics, but also advocate for additional research on the demographics of conference participants. Additional data on the intersection of gender with race, seniority, sexual orientation, ability and other marginalized identities is necessary to fully address the role of gender in asking questions at conferences.

  11. Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell: A Time to Go, But How

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    enforcement prohibiting nonconsensual sexual activity and harassment regardless of gender , senior military officials must ensure that their message...Managing the Diverse Organization: The Imperative for a New Multicultural Paradigm. p 44 Doan, Petra, “Cognitive Dimensions of Queer Space: The...Implications for Gender Dissonance for Wayfinding in Gay and Lesbian Neighborhoods,” Florida State University, 2006 45 Benjamin, Stephen, “Don’t Ask

  12. The Effects of Measuring Emotion: Physiological Reactions to Emotional Situations Depend on whether Someone Is Asking

    OpenAIRE

    Kassam, Karim S.; Wendy Berry Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Measurement effects exist throughout the sciences-the act of measuring often changes the properties of the observed. We suggest emotion research is no exception. The awareness and conscious assessment required by self-report of emotion may significantly alter emotional processes. In this study, participants engaged in a difficult math task designed to induce anger or shame while their cardiovascular responses were measured. Half of the participants were asked to report on their emotional stat...

  13. In-service teacher education: asking questions for higher order thinking in visual literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Visvaganthie Moodley

    2013-01-01

    The kinds of questions teachers ask may thwart or promote learner high-order thinking; teachers themselves must have expertise in questioning skills to promote higher order cognition among learners. Drawing on experiential knowledge of assessment, and as an English-teaching professional development programme (PDP) facilitator, I demonstrate that within the framework of a carefully structured subject-specific PDP, teachers can be taught how to enhance thinking skills in the English visual lite...

  14. Pragmatic Failure and Referential Ambiguity when Attorneys Ask Child Witnesses "Do You Know/Remember" Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Angela D; Stolzenberg, Stacia N; Lyon, Thomas D

    2017-05-01

    "Do you know" and "Do you remember" (DYK/R) questions explicitly ask whether one knows or remembers some information while implicitly asking for that information. This study examined how 104 4- to 9-year-old children testifying in child sexual abuse cases responded to DYK/R wh- and yes/no questions. When asked DYK/R questions containing an implicit wh- question requesting information, children often provided unelaborated "Yes" responses. Attorneys' follow-up questions suggested that children usually misunderstood the pragmatics of the questions. When DYK/R questions contained an implicit yes/no question, unelaborated "Yes" or "No" responses could be responding to the explicit or the implicit questions resulting in referentially ambiguous responses. Children often provided referentially ambiguous responses and attorneys usually failed to disambiguate children's answers. Although pragmatic failure following DYK/R wh- questions decreased with age, the likelihood of referential ambiguity following DYK/R yes/no questions did not. The results highlight the risks of serious miscommunications caused by pragmatic misunderstanding and referential ambiguity when children testify.

  15. Asking to Speak to Another: A Skill for Soliciting Survey Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Douglas W; Hollander, Matthew M

    2014-01-01

    This paper is in the vein of applied conversation analysis, dealing with a problem of declining participation rates for survey interviews. When calling a household to request participation in a survey, interviewers may ask for a pre-selected "sample person." We first explore how interviewers design this request in a more or less presumptive way, depending on how and when they identify themselves. Secondly, we analyze different linguistic structures that embody degrees of entitlement. Thirdly, we examine greeting items for their degree of ceremoniousness and in terms of what work they do when not part of an explicit greeting sequence. We examine other features of asking to speak to another as well, including "please" and references to the sample person. Our strategy for analyzing survey interview data is to explore the design of "switchboard" requests in ordinary telephone calls. We relate our analysis to previous research that addresses whether the detailed practices for asking to speak to another matter for obtaining consent to do an interview. We draw implications for obtaining participation in the survey interview and other kinds of phone call solicitations. Data in American English.

  16. Asking About Pets Enhances Patient Communication and Care: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Kate; Darling, Marcia; Freeman, Douglas; Monavvari, Alan

    2017-01-01

    This research explored whether asking patients about their pets would enable better environmental/social history taking, and improve patient communication/care. Primary health care providers (PHPs) were surveyed about prevalence of patients living with pets, the health impact of pets, and influences on patient communication. Following an educational intervention, they committed to asking patients about their pets. A follow-up survey was conducted electronically. PHPs were recruited at a continuing medical education (CME) conference and at CME workshops. All 225 participants were PHPs. At the conference, participants were educated one-on-one about the clinical relevance of pets in the family. CME sessions were large or small group teaching. Baseline and final surveys measured awareness of pets in patients' families, assessment of determinants of health, impact on rapport with patients, and patient care. A sign test assessed difference in scores using repeated-measures analysis. Binomial outcomes were assessed using Fisher's exact test. Comments were themed. Ninety-four PHPs (42%) completed the study. Pet-related discussions opened communication with patients. Two-thirds of participants identified positive effects on practice and on relationships with patients. PHPs were able to leverage the health benefits of pets (zooeyia) and mitigate zoonotic risk. Asking patients about pets in the family reveals clinically relevant information, improves communication, and strengthens the therapeutic alliance.

  17. Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell: The Law and Military Policy on Same-Sex Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    are the essence of military capability. Under this policy, but not the law , service members are not to be asked about nor allowed to discuss their...34same-sex orientation." The law itself does not prevent service members from being asked about their sexuality. This compromise notwithstanding, the...34don’ ask, don’ tell." At least two bills would repeal the law and replace it with a policy of nondiscrimination on the basis of sexual orientation

  18. "The medicine from behind": The frequent use of enemas in western African traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Andel, Tinde; van Onselen, Sabine; Myren, Britt; Towns, Alexandra; Quiroz, Diana

    2015-11-04

    Purgative enemas form an integral part of African traditional medicine. Besides possible benefits, serious health risks of rectal herbal therapy have been described in literature. To design appropriate health education programs, it is essential to understand traditional herbal practices and local perceptions of health and illness. Little is known about the herbal ingredients of enemas in Sub-Saharan Africa and consumers' personal reasons to use them. To analyze the importance of enema use with regard to plant species used and illnesses treated in West and Central Africa, to understand the local health beliefs that underlie frequent enema use and to evaluate which recipes and practices could be beneficial or harmful. We extracted data from 266 ethnobotanical questionnaires on medicinal (in particular women's health and childcare) and ritual plant use in Ghana, Benin and Gabon. Plants mentioned during interviews were vouchered and identified in herbaria. Health issues treated by means of enemas were ranked according to the number of plant species used for a specific illness. We compared our results with findings of medical research on benefits and risks of enema use in Sub-Saharan Africa. We recorded ca. 213 different plant species used in hundreds of recipes for rectal insertions, mostly in Ghana and Gabon. Stomachache, abdominal pain, female infertility and birth facilitation were treated with the highest number of plants species. Cleansing the intestines of young children to promote their health by getting rid of 'dirt', instead of treating constipation, was an important cultural practice that required the rectal application of herbal medicine, as well as other cultural bound health issues like stimulating children to walk at an early age. Tradition, the bitter taste of herbal medicine and the rapid effect of enemas were frequently mentioned reasons for enema use. Literature indicates that although enemas can help to improve the hygienic conditions of a household

  19. Temporal Concurrent Constraint Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valencia, Frank Dan

    Concurrent constraint programming (ccp) is a formalism for concurrency in which agents interact with one another by telling (adding) and asking (reading) information in a shared medium. Temporal ccp extends ccp by allowing agents to be constrained by time conditions. This dissertation studies...

  20. Developing An Internship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Valerie

    1984-01-01

    Provided are suggestions for developing museum/aquarium internship programs. These include writing detailed job descriptions, advertising, designing application forms asking all the information needed, supervising the interns, interviewing applicants as they were applying for a paid position, and others. (JN)

  1. Supplementary Educational Models in Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hyung A; Chan, Sonny; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2017-03-01

    The proposed implementation of work hour restrictions has presented a significant challenge of maintaining the quality of resident education and ensuring adequate hands-on experience that is essential for novice surgeons. To maintain the level of resident surgical competency, revision of the apprentice model of surgical education to include supplementary educational methods, such as laboratory and virtual reality (VR) simulations, have become frequent topics of discussion. We aimed to better understand the role of supplementary educational methods in Canadian neurosurgery residency training. An online survey was sent to program directors of all 14 Canadian neurosurgical residency programs and active resident members of the Canadian Neurosurgical Society (N=85). We asked 16 questions focusing on topics of surgeon perception, current implementation and barriers to supplementary educational models. Of the 99 surveys sent, 8 out of 14 (57%) program directors and 37 out of 85 (44%) residents completed the survey. Of the 14 neurosurgery residency programs across Canada, 7 reported utilizing laboratory-based teaching within their educational plan, while only 3 programs reported using VR simulation as a supplementary teaching method. The biggest barriers to implementing supplementary educational methods were resident availability, lack of resources, and cost. Work-hour restrictions threaten to compromise the traditional apprentice model of surgical training. The potential value of supplementary educational methods for surgical education is evident, as reported by both program directors and residents across Canada. However, availability and utilization of laboratory and VR simulations are limited by numerous factors such as time constrains and lack of resources.

  2. Statistical Literacy Among Academic Pathologists: A Survey Study to Gauge Knowledge of Frequently Used Statistical Tests Among Trainees and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Robert L; Chute, Deborah J; Colbert-Getz, Jorie M; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; James, Daniel S; Karp, Julie K; Miller, Douglas C; Milner, Danny A; Smock, Kristi J; Sutton, Ann T; Walker, Brandon S; White, Kristie L; Wilson, Andrew R; Wojcik, Eva M; Yared, Marwan A; Factor, Rachel E

    2017-02-01

    -Statistical literacy can be defined as understanding the statistical tests and terminology needed for the design, analysis, and conclusions of original research or laboratory testing. Little is known about the statistical literacy of clinical or anatomic pathologists. -To determine the statistical methods most commonly used in pathology studies from the literature and to assess familiarity and knowledge level of these statistical tests by pathology residents and practicing pathologists. -The most frequently used statistical methods were determined by a review of 1100 research articles published in 11 pathology journals during 2015. Familiarity with statistical methods was determined by a survey of pathology trainees and practicing pathologists at 9 academic institutions in which pathologists were asked to rate their knowledge of the methods identified by the focused review of the literature. -We identified 18 statistical tests that appear frequently in published pathology studies. On average, pathologists reported a knowledge level between "no knowledge" and "basic knowledge" of most statistical tests. Knowledge of tests was higher for more frequently used tests. Greater statistical knowledge was associated with a focus on clinical pathology versus anatomic pathology, having had a statistics course, having an advanced degree other than an MD degree, and publishing research. Statistical knowledge was not associated with length of pathology practice. -An audit of pathology literature reveals that knowledge of about 12 statistical tests would be sufficient to provide statistical literacy for pathologists. On average, most pathologists report they can interpret commonly used tests but are unable to perform them. Most pathologists indicated that they would benefit from additional statistical training.

  3. How Do People Who Frequently Attend Emergency Departments for Alcohol-Related Reasons Use, View, and Experience Specialist Addiction Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkman, Thomas; Neale, Joanne; Day, Ed; Drummond, Colin

    2017-09-19

    People who frequently attend emergency departments (EDs) for alcohol-related reasons, cost health systems greatly. Although specialist addiction services may be more appropriate for their needs, drinkers often experience barriers accessing specialist alcohol-related support. This study explores how people who frequently attend EDs for alcohol-related reasons use, view, and experience specialist addiction services. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 30 individuals recruited from six EDs across London, United Kingdom. Data relating to participants' socio-demographic characteristics and service use were systematically coded using qualitative software, and analyzed following the Framework. ED usage over the last 12 months was high, whereas current use of specialist addiction services was low. We found little evidence that structural barriers were preventing participants from attending specialist services; rather, participants seemed not to require help with their alcohol use. When asked what support they desired for their drinking, only 11/30 participants identified alcohol-specific treatment. More commonly, they wanted help relating to mental health problems; social contact; paid or voluntary work; housing-related issues; or gym access. Women were more likely to be receiving, and to have support from a specialist addiction service. Conclusions/Importance: People who frequently attended EDs for alcohol-related reasons expressed low levels of interest in, and motivation for, alcohol-specific treatment but desired broader psychosocial support. Case management and assertive outreach appear to be valuable models of service delivery for this population (particularly for men). However, further qualitative and quantitative research is now needed to verify these findings in different countries, regions, and health care systems.

  4. 'Asking the Right Question'. A Comparison of Two Approaches to Gathering Data on 'Herbals' Use in Survey Based Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S McLay

    Full Text Available Over the last decade academic interest in the prevalence and nature of herbal medicines use by pregnant women has increased significantly. Such data are usually collected by means of an administered questionnaire survey, however a key methodological limitation using this approach is the need to clearly define the scope of 'herbals' to be investigated. The majority of published studies in this area neither define 'herbals' nor provide a detailed checklist naming specific 'herbals' and CAM modalities, which limits inter-study comparison, generalisability and the potential for meta-analyses. The aim of this study was to compare the self-reported use of herbs, herbal medicines and herbal products using two different approaches implemented in succession.Cross-sectional questionnaire surveys of women attending for their mid-trimester scan or attending the postnatal unit following live birth at the Royal Aberdeen Maternity Hospital, North-East Scotland. The questionnaire utilised two approaches to collect data on 'herbals' use, a single closed yes/no answer to the question "have you used herbs, herbal medicines and herbal products in the last three months"; and a request to tick which of a list of 40 'herbals' they had used in the same time period.A total of 889 responses were obtained of which 4.3% (38 answered 'yes' to herbal use via the closed question. However, using the checklist 39% (350 of respondents reported the use of one or more specific 'herbals' (p<0.0001. The 312 respondents who reported 'no' to 'herbals' use via the closed question but "yes" via the checklist consumed a total of 20 different 'herbals' (median 1, interquartile range 1-2, range 1-6.This study demonstrates that the use of a single closed question asking about the use of 'herbals', as frequently reported in published studies, may not yield valid data resulting in a gross underestimation of actual use.

  5. Ask Suicide-Screening Questions to Everyone in Medical Settings: The asQ’em Quality Improvement Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Lisa M.; Snyder, Deborah; Ludi, Erica; Rosenstein, Donald L.; Kohn-Godbout, Julie; Lee, Laura; Cartledge, Tannia; Farra, Adrienne; Pao, Maryland

    2013-01-01

    Background Suicide in hospital settings is a frequently reported sentinel event to the Joint Commission (JC). Since 1995, over 1,000 inpatient deaths by suicide have been reported to the JC; 25% occurred in non-behavioral health settings. Lack of proper “assessment” was the leading root cause for 80% of hospital suicides. This paper describes the “Ask Suicide-Screening Questions to Everyone in Medical Settings (asQ’em)” Quality Improvement Project. We aimed to pilot a suicide screening tool and determine feasibility of screening in terms of prevalence, impact on unit workflow, impact on mental health resources, and patient/nurse acceptance. Methods We piloted the asQ’em 2-item screening instrument that assesses suicidal thoughts and behaviors, designed specifically for nurses to administer to medical patients. Educational in-services were conducted. A convenience sample of adult patients 18 years or older, from three selected inpatient units in the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, participated. Results 331 patients were screened. 13 (4%) patients screened “positive” for suicide risk and received further evaluation. No patient had acute suicidal thoughts or required an observational monitor. Screening took approximately 2 minutes; 87% of patients reported feeling comfortable with screening. 81% of patients, 75% of nurses, and 100% of social workers agreed that all patients in hospitals should be screened for suicide risk. Discussion Nurses can feasibly screen hospitalized medical/surgical patients for suicide risk with a 2-item screening instrument. Patients, nurses, and social workers rated their experience of screening as positive, and supported the idea of universal suicide screening in the hospital. PMID:23398908

  6. Ask suicide-screening questions to everyone in medical settings: the asQ'em Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Lisa M; Snyder, Deborah; Ludi, Erica; Rosenstein, Donald L; Kohn-Godbout, Julie; Lee, Laura; Cartledge, Tannia; Farrar, Adrienne; Pao, Maryland

    2013-01-01

    Suicide in hospital settings is a frequently reported sentinel event to the Joint Commission (JC). Since 1995, over 1,000 inpatient deaths by suicide have been reported to the JC; 25% occurred in non-behavioral health settings. Lack of proper "assessment" was the leading root cause for 80% of hospital suicides. This paper describes the "Ask Suicide-Screening Questions to Everyone in Medical Settings (asQ'em)" Quality Improvement Project. We aimed to pilot a suicide screening tool and determine feasibility of screening in terms of prevalence, impact on unit workflow, impact on mental health resources, and patient/nurse acceptance. We piloted the asQ'em two-item screening instrument that assesses suicidal thoughts and behaviors, designed specifically for nurses to administer to medical patients. Educational in-services were conducted. A convenience sample of adult patients, 18 years or older, from three selected inpatient units in the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, participated. A total of 331 patients were screened; 13 (4%) patients screened "positive" for suicide risk and received further evaluation. No patient had acute suicidal thoughts or required an observational monitor. Screening took approximately 2 minutes; 87% of patients reported feeling comfortable with screening; 81% of patients, 75% of nurses, and 100% of social workers agreed that all patients in hospitals should be screened for suicide risk. Nurses can feasibly screen hospitalized medical/surgical patients for suicide risk with a two-item screening instrument. Patients, nurses, and social workers rated their experience of screening as positive and supported the idea of universal suicide screening in the hospital. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. A Novel Fractional Fourier Transform-Based ASK-OFDM System for Underwater Acoustic Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Ashri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A key research area in wireless transmission is underwater communications. It has a vital role in applications such as underwater sensor networks (UWSNs and disaster detection. The underwater channel is very unique as compared to other alternatives of transmission channels. It is characterized by path loss, multipath fading, Doppler spread and ambient noise. Thus, the bit error rate (BER is increased to a large extent when compared to its counterpart of cellular communications. Acoustic signals are the current best solution for underwater communications. The use of electromagnetic or optical waves obviously entails a much higher data rate. However, they suffer from high attenuation, absorption or scattering. This paper proposes a novel fractional fast Fourier transform (FrFT—orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (FrFT-OFDM system for underwater acoustic (UWA communication—which employs the amplitude shift keying (ASK modulation technique (FrFT-ASK-OFDM. Specifically, ASK achieves a better bandwidth efficiency as compared to other commonly used modulation techniques, such as quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM and phase shift keying (PSK. In particular, the system proposed in this article can achieve a very promising BER performance, and can reach higher data rates when compared to other systems proposed in the literature. The BER performance of the proposed system is evaluated numerically, and is compared to the corresponding M-ary QAM system in the UWA channel for the same channel conditions. Moreover, the performance of the proposed system is compared to the conventional fast Fourier transform (FFT-OFDM (FFT-OFDM system in the absence and presence of the effect of carrier frequency offset (CFO. Numerical results show that the proposed system outperforms the conventional FFT-based systems for UWA channels, even in channels dominated by CFO. Moreover, the spectral efficiency and data rate of the proposed system are approximately double

  8. ’Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’: The Law and Military Policy on Same-Sex Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    are the essence of military capability. Under this policy, but not the law , service members are not to be asked about nor allowed to discuss their...34same-sex orientation." The law itself does not prevent service members from being asked about their sexuality. This compromise notwithstanding, the

  9. Mutant p53 disrupts the stress MAP kinase activation circuit induced by ASK1-dependent stabilization of Daxx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tetsuya; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Inoue, Masahiro; Horikoshi, Nobuko T; Shindoh, Masanobu; Rogers, Buck E.; Usheva, Anny; Horikoshi, Nobuo

    2009-01-01

    Daxx is a regulatory protein for apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) which activates Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways in response to stressors such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Here we show that TNFα treatment induces the accumulation of Daxx protein through ASK1 activation by preventing its proteasome-dependent degradation. ASK1 directly phosphorylates Daxx at Ser176 and Ser184 and Daxx is required for the sustained activation of JNK. Tumorigenic mutant p53, which binds to Daxx and inhibits Daxx-dependent activation of ASK1, prevents Daxx phosphorylation and stabilization. When mutant p53 was depleted in cancer cells, Daxx was accumulated and the cell killing effect of TNFα was restored. Our results indicate that Daxx not only activates ASK1 but also is a downstream target of ASK1 and that accumulated Daxx further activates ASK1. Thus, the Daxx-ASK1 positive feedback loop amplifying JNK/p38 signaling plays an important role for cell killing effects of stressors, such as TNFα. Tumorigenic mutant p53 disrupts this circuit and makes cells more tolerable to stresses, as its gain-of-function mechanism. PMID:19789335

  10. "Why Can't We Just Have Sex?": An Analysis of Anonymous Questions about Sex Asked by Ninth Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariera, Katrina L.; McCormack, Tiffany A.

    2017-01-01

    During the high school years, most young people in the United States receive school-based sexuality education, but there is little research on what they want to know about sex and sexuality but may be afraid to ask. This study is a content analysis of anonymous questions about sex (N = 645) asked by ninth-grade students from the greater Los…

  11. 49 CFR 40.407 - May a service agent ask to have a PIE reduced or terminated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May a service agent ask to have a PIE reduced or... agent ask to have a PIE reduced or terminated? (a) Yes, as a service agent concerning whom the Department has issued a PIE, you may request that the Director terminate a PIE or reduce its duration and/or...

  12. Interviewing asylum seekers : A vignette study on the questions asked to assess credibility of claims about origin and persecution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuizen, Tanja S.; Horselenberg, Robert; Landström, Sara; Granhag, Pär Anders; van Koppen, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current vignette study is to map the style, type, and themes of questions that are asked when assessing the credibility of asylum seekers' claims. Sixty-five officials from the Swedish Migration Agency (Migrationsverket), were asked to respond to one out of four different vignettes

  13. How do I ask about your disability? An examination of interpersonal communication processes between medical students and patients with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Ashley; Bradshaw, Ylisabyth S; Altman, Wayne

    2010-04-01

    Medical student behaviors were examined through digital recordings of interpersonal skills communication training framed around a brief curriculum on disability within a family medicine clerkship. This analysis focuses on interpersonal communication processes and ways medical students ask standardized patient educators about visually apparent disability (N = 142). Primary themes of asking about or avoiding disability were identified with regard to language and nonverbal communication in how medical students asked and whether they integrated chronic disability with new musculoskeletal pain complaints. Secondary themes related to timing and communication further contextualized the primary themes. Seventy-four percent of students asked about the disability. Analysis of feedback sessions immediately following the interactions revealed that more than half the students who did not ask about disability spontaneously recognized that they avoided disability language. Results suggest that some ways of asking about disability may inhibit patient disclosure and restrict relationship building. In particular, asking about disability, but then avoiding integrating disability disclosure into the treatment plan, or responding to disability-related disclosure with overly positive, infantilizing-type communication, may pose more difficult dilemmas than never asking about the disability. On the contrary, students who ignored disability altogether often also recognized they missed disability cues, thus providing a learning experience of considerable value. Underlying student attitudes and possibilities for integrating biomedical concerns with social-psychological impacts of disability are addressed.

  14. Modulador-Demodulador ASK con codificación Manchester implementado en un microcontrolador PIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Tarifa Amaya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el diseño de un Modulador-Demodulador Digital ASK con codificación Manchester implementado en el firmware de un microcontrolador PIC 18F4455, utilizando el estándar de baja frecuencia (LF el cual maneja valores de 125kHz. Este modulador-demodulador se utiliza en la implementación de una etiqueta RFID activa. Transmite a solicitud de un dispositivo lector el valor de temperatura de un sensor y su identificador. El dispositivo lector, controla la comunicación con la etiqueta. Según la literatura especializada no se reporta un sistema similar.

  15. A low-power ASK demodulator for inductively coupled implantable electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudnason, Gunnar

    2000-01-01

    An amplitude shift keying (ASK) demodulator is presented which is suitable for implantable electronic devices that are powered through an inductive link. The demodulator has been tested with carrier frequencies in the range 1-15 MHz, covering most commonly used frequencies. Data rates up to several...... 100kbit/s are supported, suitable for complex implants such as stimulating electrode arrays or visual implants. The circuit is compatible with modulation depths in the range 10-100%. The low end of the range permits data transmission without significant reduction in power transfer, or the use...

  16. The “Creative Dolphin” Revisited: What Do Dolphins Do When Asked to Vary their Behavior?

    OpenAIRE

    Stan A. Kuczaj II; Holli C. Eskelinen

    2014-01-01

    The variability of dolphin behavior is evident in their communication, foraging, and play. Dolphins can also vary their behavior when asked to do so by humans. Following the work of Karen Pryor and her colleagues, this ability is commonly referred to as creative behavior, a bit of a misnomer since dolphins need not always create a new behavior to succeed on this task. Nonetheless, when given a task in which success depends on not repeating what one has already done, dolphins are able to remem...

  17. Calibration of short rate term structure models from bid-ask coupon bond prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Gonçalves, Erika; Gzyl, Henryk; Mayoral, Silvia

    2018-02-01

    In this work we use the method of maximum entropy in the mean to provide a model free, non-parametric methodology that uses only market data to provide the prices of the zero coupon bonds, and then, a term structure of the short rates. The data used consists of the prices of the bid-ask ranges of a few coupon bonds quoted in the market. The prices of the zero coupon bonds obtained in the first stage, are then used as input to solve a recursive set of equations to determine a binomial recombinant model of the short term structure of the interest rates.

  18. Pain Management Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mission The program is patient and family centered Work together for common, agreed upon goals Develop treatment plans based on individual needs Mutual respect and open communication as a team Frequent communication between primary provider and team members ...

  19. Florida-focused climate change lesson demonstrations from the ASK Florida global and regional climate change professional development workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihs, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of Florida-focused climate change activities will be featured as part of the ASK Florida global and regional climate change professional development workshops. In a combined effort from Florida State University's Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) and University of South Florida's Coalition for Science Literacy (CSL), and supported by NASA's NICE initiative, the ASK Florida professional development workshops are a series of workshops designed to enhance and support climate change information and related pedagogical skills for middle school science teachers from Title-I schools in Florida. These workshops took place during a two-year period from 2011 to 2013 and consisted of two cohorts in Hillsborough and Volusia counties in Florida. Featured activities include lab-style exercises demonstrating topics such as storm surge and coastal geometry, sea level rise from thermal expansion, and the greenhouse effect. These types of labs are modified so that they allow more independent, inquiry thinking as they require teachers to design their own experiment in order to test a hypothesis. Lecture based activities are used to cover a broad range of topics including hurricanes, climate modeling, and sink holes. The more innovative activities are group activities that utilize roll-playing, technology and resources, and group discussion. For example, 'Climate Gallery Walk' is an activity that features group discussions on each of the climate literacy principles established by the United States Global Change Research Program. By observing discussions between individuals and groups, this activity helps the facilitators gather information on their previous knowledge and identify possible misconceptions that will be addressed within the workshops. Furthermore, 'Fact or Misconception' presents the challenge of identifying whether a given statement is fact or misconception based on the material covered throughout the workshops. It serves as a way to

  20. Ask the right question: a critical step for practicing evidence-based laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Christopher P; Christenson, Robert H

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of laboratory medicine is to facilitate better decision making in clinical practice and healthcare delivery. Decision making implies an unresolved issue, problem or unmet need. The most important criterion for any investigation to be of value in clinical practice is that it addresses an unmet need. The different ways in which laboratory investigations are utilized in patient care can be represented in the form of questions. It is important that these questions are articulated to highlight the variables that will impact on the effectiveness of the investigation in the scenario being considered. These variables include the characteristics of the patient (or population) and clinical setting, the nature of the decision and action taken on receipt of the test result and the expected outcome. Asking a question is the first step of the evidence-based laboratory medicine (EBLM) cycle, the other steps being acquiring the evidence, critically appraising the evidence, applying the evidence and auditing use of the evidence. Getting the question right determines the quality of the whole process, thus, defines the quality in practice of laboratory medicine. Whilst the main focus of the EBLM cycle is to provide a strong evidence base for use in clinical practice, it is clear that the five steps are equally applicable in commissioning, delivery and audit (performance management) of services. Asking the right question is crucial to improving the quality of evidence, and practice, in laboratory medicine, and should be used in routine laboratory medicine practice and management throughout healthcare.