WorldWideScience

Sample records for program eeap feasibility

  1. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). Energy surveys of Army central heating and power plants. Volume I. Executive summary, Fort Wainwright

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-04-01

    This is the Executive Summary of the energy survey and project documentation that resulted from the Energy Survey of the Central Heating and Power Plant (CHPP) at Fort Wainwright. It is a part of the continuing effort under the Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). Similar energy surveys and reports have been developed for Fort Richardson and Fort Greely Central Heating and Power Plants concurrently. The Scope of Work of this program was developed by the Huntsville Division Corps of Engineers for use at all Army central heating and power plants. The purpose of this study is to review and study all potential energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) at the Port Wainwright Central Heating and Power Plant (CHPP). These ECOs would then be developed to determine the economics and feasibility of implementation. The equipment at this plant is over 30 years old. The plant is meeting the requirements of providing steam for heating the base. It is a functional operating plant that will, with proper maintenance and repairs, continue to perform for many more years. With a heating plant of this age there was reason to believe that many energy conservation opportunities do exist. Section 4 describes the ECOs found and studied.

  2. Energy surveys of army central heating and power plants. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). Fort Greely. Volume 1, executive summary. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-04-01

    This is the Executive Summary of the energy survey and project documentation that resulted from the Energy Survey of the Central Heating and Power Plant at Fort Greely. It is a part of the continuing effort under the Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). Similar energy surveys and reports have been developed for Fort Richardson and Fort Wainwright Central Heating and Power Plants concurrently. The Scope of Work of this program was developed by the Huntsville Division Corps of Engineers for use at all Army central heating and power plants. Representatives from the Huntsville Division of the Corps, U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) and John Graham Company, Architect-Engineer visited the Fort Greely power plant during the summer of 1984. At that time, a generic Scope of Work was reviewed. From it, a detailed scope was developed for Fort Greely. A complete Scope of Work can be found in Appendix H Volume 4 of this report. The purpose of this study is to review and study all potential energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) at the Fort Greely Central Heating and Power Plant (CHPP). These ECOs would then be developed to determine the economics and feasibility of implementation. The equipment at this plant is over 30 years old. The plant is meeting the requirements of providing steam for heating the base. It is a functional operating CHPP plant that will, with proper maintenance and repairs, continue to perform for many more years. With a heating plant of this age there was reason to believe that many energy conservation opportunities do exist. Section 4 describes the ECOs found and studied. The study also required that the condition and efficiency of the boilers and auxiliaries of the entire plant be evaluated.

  3. Energy surveys of army central heating and power plants, Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Fort Richardson. Volume 1 - executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to review and study all potential energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) at the Fort Richardson Central Heating and Power Plant (CHPP). These ECOs would then be developed to determine the economies and feasibility of implementation. The equipment at this plant is over 30 years old. The CHPP is meeting the requirements of providing electrical power generation steam for heating the base. It is a functional operating plant that will, with proper maintenance and repairs, continue to perform for many more years. With a CHPP of this age there was reason to believe that many energy conservation opportunities do exist.

  4. 75 FR 80827 - Compliance Policy Guide; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ...) Sec. 400.210 entitled ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs... ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs.'' Previous extensions of...; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs; Notice To Extend Expiration Date...

  5. The Adult Roles Models Program: Feasibility, Acceptability, and Initial Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarossi, Lisa; Silver, Ellen Johnson; Dean, Randa; Perez, Amanda; Rivera, Angelic

    2014-04-01

    We present the feasibility and acceptability of a parent sexuality education program led by peer educators in community settings. We also report the results of an outcome evaluation with 71 parents who were randomized to the intervention or a control group, and surveyed one month prior to and six months after the 4-week intervention. The program was highly feasible and acceptable to participants, and the curriculum was implemented with a high level of fidelity and facilitator quality. Pilot data show promising outcomes for increasing parental knowledge, communication, and monitoring of their adolescent children.

  6. Feasibility Study for Aviation Programs at Hudson Valley Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Edward P.

    This is a report on a survey to determine the feasibility of establishing aviation training programs at a New York community college. It examines existing sources, and present and future needs for commercial pilots, aviation mechanics, and airline stewardesses. Among the conclusions are the discovery that the aviation industry is on the threshold…

  7. Pilot Feasibility Study of an Oncology Financial Navigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Veena; Leahy, Tony; Steelquist, Jordan; Watabayashi, Kate; Linden, Hannah; Ramsey, Scott; Schwartz, Naomi; Kreizenbeck, Karma; Nelson, Judy; Balch, Alan; Singleton, Erin; Gallagher, Kathleen; Overstreet, Karen

    2018-02-01

    Few studies have reported on interventions to alleviate financial toxicity in patients with cancer. We developed a financial navigation program in collaboration with our partners, Consumer Education and Training Services (CENTS) and Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF), to improve patient knowledge about treatment costs, provide financial counseling, and to help manage out-of-pocket expenses. We conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility and impact of this program. Patients with cancer received a financial education course followed by monthly contact with a CENTS financial counselor and a PAF case manager for 6 months. We measured program adherence, self-reported financial burden and anxiety, program satisfaction, and type of assistance provided. Thirty-four patients (median age, 60.5 years) were consented (85% white and 50% commercially insured). Debt, income declines, and loans were reported by 55%, 55%, and 30% of patients, respectively. CENTS counselors assisted most often with budgeting, retirement planning, and medical bill questions. PAF case managers assisted with applications for appropriate insurance coverage, cost of living issues (eg, housing, transportation), and disability applications. High financial burden and anxiety about costs (4 or 5 on a Likert scale) were reported at baseline by 37% and 47% of patients, respectively. Anxiety about costs decreased over time in 33% of patients, whereas self-reported financial burden did not substantially change. Implementing an oncology financial navigation program is feasible, provides concrete assistance in navigating the cost of care, and mitigates anxiety about costs in a subset of patients. Future work will focus on measuring the program's impact on financial and clinical outcomes.

  8. On the Feasibility of a Unified Modelling and Programming Paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth; Peleska, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the feasibility of a unified modelling and programming paradigm is discussed from the perspective of large scale system development and verification in collaborative development environments. We motivate the necessity to utilise multiple formalisms for development and verification......, in particular for complex cyber-physical systems or systems of systems. Though modelling, programming, and verification will certainly become more closely integrated in the future, we do not expect a single formalism to become universally applicable and accepted by the development and verification communities....... The multi-formalism approach requires to translate verification artefacts (assertions, test cases, etc.) between different representations, in order to allow for the verification of emergent properties based on local verification results established with different methods and modelling techniques...

  9. Feasibility

    OpenAIRE

    Bokdam, J.; Braeckel, van, Liesbeth

    2002-01-01

    Extensive livestock farming, including hay making, seems the most feasible management strategy for open peatland. In the longer term, wilderness grazing may become more feasible. The loss of economic viability of traditional livestock farming and related haymaking may be reversed by innovation of new marketable 'Biebrza' products, 'green services', e.g. eco- and agro-tourism, and by financial subventions by the EU and the Polish Government. Large scale mechanical harvesting of hay and litter ...

  10. Solving a class of generalized fractional programming problems using the feasibility of linear programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Peiping; Zhang, Tongli; Wang, Chunfeng

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a new approximation algorithm for globally solving a class of generalized fractional programming problems (P) whose objective functions are defined as an appropriate composition of ratios of affine functions. To solve this problem, the algorithm solves an equivalent optimization problem (Q) via an exploration of a suitably defined nonuniform grid. The main work of the algorithm involves checking the feasibility of linear programs associated with the interesting grid points. It is proved that the proposed algorithm is a fully polynomial time approximation scheme as the ratio terms are fixed in the objective function to problem (P), based on the computational complexity result. In contrast to existing results in literature, the algorithm does not require the assumptions on quasi-concavity or low-rank of the objective function to problem (P). Numerical results are given to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Feasibility of an appliance energy testing and labeling program for Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermayer, Peter; Busch, John; Hakim, Sajid; Turiel, Issac; du Pont, Peter; Stone, Chris

    2000-04-01

    A feasibility study evaluated the costs and benefits of establishing a program for testing, labeling and setting minimum efficiency standards for appliances and lighting in Sri Lanka. The feasibility study included: refrigerators, air-conditioners, flourescent lighting (ballasts & CFls), ceiling fans, motors, and televisions.

  12. Secretarial Internships: A Feasible Program for Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Doris D.

    1982-01-01

    The benefits of a secretarial internship program to the student, the employer, and the college are explored. The author suggests a strategy for developing such a program and discusses curriculum design. (CT)

  13. Balneotherapy Together with a Psychoeducation Program for Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: A Feasibility Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De Maricourt, P; Gorwood, P; Hergueta, Th; Galinowski, A; Salamon, R; Diallo, A; Vaugeois, C; Lépine, J. P; Olié, J. P; Dubois, O

    2016-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and the impact of a program including cognitive behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, and balneotherapy in a spa resort to facilitate long-term...

  14. Martial Arts: A Discussion of the Feasibility of a University Martial Arts Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Hiroshi; Tow, Patrick

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of some of the martial arts is provided along with some discussion of the feasibility of offering one or more of these disciplines as part of the college physical education program. (JMF)

  15. 77 FR 74668 - Compliance Policy Guide; Radiofrequency Identification Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... ``Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) Feasibility Studies and Pilot Programs for Drugs'' to December 31, 2014. FOR... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Compliance Policy Guide; Radiofrequency Identification... 67360), FDA announced the ] availability of CPG Sec. 400.210 entitled ``Radiofrequency Identification...

  16. A pilot feasibility study of a peer-led mindfulness program for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon Danilewitz

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: A peer-led MMP is feasible and may be a promising approach to enhance medical student wellbeing. Further research is needed to explore strategies to improve program compliance in this student population.

  17. Home-based exercise program in TSP/HAM individuals: a feasibility and effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinetti, Lívia D; Araújo, Abelardo Q; Silva, Marcus Tt; Leite, Ana Claudia C; Azevedo, Mariana F; Chequer, Gisele L; Oliveira, Raquel Vc; Ferreira, Arthur S; Lima, Marco Antonio

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of a home-based exercise program in TSP/HAM individuals. Twenty-three TSP/HAM individuals divided in two groups according to Timed Up and Go (TUG) score (TSP/HAM.

  18. Feasibility of Mind-Body Movement Programs for Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Kristine K; Kue, Jennifer; Lyons, Felisha; Overcash, Janine

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate mind-body movement exercise (MBME) classes (yoga, tai chi, and Qigong) for cancer survivors. 
. A single-group, repeated-measures design.
. The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center-Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital in Columbus.
. 33 adult cancer survivors, with any cancer diagnosis, participating in MBME classes.
. The researchers sought to examine feasibility of multiple data collection time points and data collection measures; acceptability; and changes to physical, emotional, and biometric measures over time, as a result of participation in MBME classes.
. Quality of life, sleep, depressive symptomatology, fatigue, stress, upper body strength, gait and balance, body mass index, heart rate, and blood pressure.
. The current study was feasible because survivors were willing to participate and completed most of the questionnaires. Participants found these classes to be beneficial not only for exercise, but also for social support and social connectedness. Poor sleep quality was consistently reported by participants. MBME classes should be recommended to survivors and are beneficial for oncology practices to offer.
. Conducting MBME research with cancer survivors is feasible, and participants find the MBME acceptable and a way of addressing health and managing cancer-related symptoms.
. Nurses should help patients and caregivers identify locations and times when MBME class participation is possible, assess MBME class participation during each clinic visit to promote continued involvement and to understand if positive effects are occurring, and continue to provide support for MBME classes throughout the survivorship experience.

  19. Feasibility of a Knowledge Translation CME Program: "Courriels Cochrane"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland; Granikov, Vera; Theriault, Guylene; Fremont, Pierre; Burnand, Bernard; Mercer, Jay; Marlow, Bernard; Arroll, Bruce; Luconi, Francesca; Legare, France; Labrecque, Michel; Ladouceur, Roger; Bouthillier, France; Sridhar, Soumya Bindiganavile; Moscovici, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Systematic literature reviews provide best evidence, but are underused by clinicians. Thus, integrating Cochrane reviews into continuing medical education (CME) is challenging. We designed a pilot CME program where summaries of Cochrane reviews ("Courriels Cochrane") were disseminated by e-mail. Program participants…

  20. Feasibility of an LPN to ADN Articulation Program at LSUA. Vocational Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Univ., Alexandria.

    A feasibility study examined the need for and likelihood of success for a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) articulation program for Louisiana State University (LSU) at Alexandria. Following a literature search on the theoretical establishment and implementation of such a program, three schools with successful…

  1. Feasibility Study for Hotel/Motel Career Program for Harper College. Volume XIX, No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, John A.; And Others

    In spring 1990, a study was conducted at William Rainey Harper College (WRHC) to determine the feasibility of adding a career program in Hotel/Motel Management (HMM) to the current Food Service Program. Surveys were sent to 53 hotels and motels in the WRHC service area to determine employment demands that would affect the hiring of graduates of…

  2. Keep Your Brain Fit! A Psychoeducational Training Program for Healthy Cognitive Aging: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Jennifer; van Heugten, Caroline; van Boxtel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A psychoeducational face-to-face training program (Keep Your Brain Fit!) was developed to support the working population in coping with age-related cognitive changes and taking proactive preventive measures to maintain cognitive health. A feasibility study was conducted to test the training program presented in a workshop format. Participants…

  3. Feasibility and acceptance of a robotic surgery ergonomic training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franasiak, Jason; Craven, Renatta; Mosaly, Prithima; Gehrig, Paola A

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of ergonomic strain during robotic surgery indicates there is a need for intervention. However, limited data exist detailing the feasibility and acceptance of ergonomic training (ET) for robotic surgeons. This prospective, observational pilot study evaluates the implementation of an evidence-based ET module. A two-part survey was conducted. The first survey assessed robotic strain using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Participants were given the option to participate in either an online or an in-person ET session. The ET was derived from Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidelines and developed by a human factors engineer experienced with health care ergonomics. After ET, a follow-up survey including the NMQ and an assessment of the ET were completed. The survey was sent to 67 robotic surgeons. Forty-two (62.7%) responded, including 18 residents, 8 fellows, and 16 attending physicians. Forty-five percent experienced strain resulting from performing robotic surgery and 26.3% reported persistent strain. Only 16.6% of surgeons reported prior ET in robotic surgery. Thirty-five (78%) surgeons elected to have in-person ET, which was successfully arranged for 32 surgeons (91.4%). Thirty-seven surgeons (88.1%) completed the follow-up survey. All surgeons participating in the in-person ET found it helpful and felt formal ET should be standard, 88% changed their practice as a result of the training, and 74% of those reporting strain noticed a decrease after their ET. Thus, at a high-volume robotics center, evidence-based ET was easily implemented, well-received, changed some surgeons' practice, and decreased self-reported strain related to robotic surgery.

  4. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Limited Energy Study-Lighting Fort Campbell, Kentucky: Volume 1-Sections 1-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-23

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  5. Smartphone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Program: Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heewon; Ko, Hoon; Thap, Tharoeun; Jeong, Changwon; Noh, Se-Eung; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) that utilizes only a smartphone, with no external devices. As an efficient guide for cardiac rehabilitation exercise, we developed an application to automatically indicate the exercise intensity by comparing the estimated heart rate (HR) with the target heart rate zone (THZ). The HR is estimated using video images of a fingertip taken by the smartphone's built-in camera. The introduced CRP app includes pre-exercise, exercise with intensity guidance, and post-exercise. In the pre-exercise period, information such as THZ, exercise type, exercise stage order, and duration of each stage are set up. In the exercise with intensity guidance, the app estimates HR from the pulse obtained using the smartphone's built-in camera and compares the estimated HR with the THZ. Based on this comparison, the app adjusts the exercise intensity to shift the patient's HR to the THZ during exercise. In the post-exercise period, the app manages the ratio of the estimated HR to the THZ and provides a questionnaire on factors such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and leg pain during exercise, as objective and subjective evaluation indicators. As a key issue, HR estimation upon signal corruption due to motion artifacts is also considered. Through the smartphone-based CRP, we estimated the HR accuracy as mean absolute error and root mean squared error of 6.16 and 4.30bpm, respectively, with signal corruption due to motion artifacts being detected by combining the turning point ratio and kurtosis.

  6. The Feasibility and Acceptability of "Arise": An Online Substance Abuse Relapse Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Rebecca Polley; Bartel, Chelsea M

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and acceptability of a novel online adolescent substance abuse relapse prevention tool, "Arise" (3C Institute, Cary, NC). The program uses an innovative platform including interactive instructional segments and skill-building games to help adolescents learn and practice coping skills training strategies. We conducted a pilot test with nine adolescents in substance abuse treatment (44 percent female) and a feasibility test with treatment providers (n=8; 50 percent female). Adolescents interacted with the program via a secure Web site for approximately 30 minutes for each of two instructional units. Treatment providers reviewed the same material at their own pace. All participants completed a questionnaire with items assessing usability, acceptability, understanding, and subjective experience of the program. Regarding feasibility, recruitment of this population within the study constraints proved challenging, but participant retention in the trial was high (no attrition). Adolescents and treatment providers completed the program with no reported problems, and overall we were able to collect data as planned. Regarding acceptability, the program received strong ratings from both adolescents and providers, who found the prototype informative, engaging, and appealing. Both groups strongly recommended continuing development. We were able to deliver the intervention as intended, and acceptability ratings were high, demonstrating the feasibility and acceptability of online delivery of engaging interactive interventions. This study contributes to our understanding of how interactive technologies, including games, can be used to modify behavior in substance abuse treatment and other health areas.

  7. Point-of-Care Programming for Neuromodulation: A Feasibility Study Using Remote Presence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Ivar; Song, Michael; Chiasson, Paula; Bustamante, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of neuromodulation and its indications has resulted in hundreds of thousands of patients with implanted devices worldwide. Because all patients require programming, this growth has created a heavy burden on neuromodulation centers and patients. Remote point-of-care programming may provide patients with real-time access to neuromodulation expertise in their communities. To test the feasibility of remotely programming a neuromodulation device using a remote-presence robot and to determine the ability of an expert programmer to telementor a nonexpert in programming the device. A remote-presence robot (RP-7) was used for remote programming. Twenty patients were randomly assigned to either conventional programming or a robotic session. The expert remotely mentored 10 nurses with no previous experience to program the devices of patients assigned to the remote-presence sessions. Accuracy of programming, adverse events, and satisfaction scores for all participants were assessed. There was no difference in the accuracy or clinical outcomes of programming between the standard and remote-presence sessions. No adverse events occurred in any session. The patients, nurses, and the expert programmer expressed high satisfaction scores with the remote-presence sessions. This study establishes the proof-of-principle that remote programming of neuromodulation devices using telepresence and expert telementoring of an individual with no previous experience to accurately program a device is feasible. We envision a time in the future when patients with implanted devices will have real-time access to neuromodulation expertise from the comfort of their own home.

  8. Feasibility of a Prototype Web-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Prevention Program for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael E.; Pistorello, Jacqueline; Seeley, John R.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the feasibility of a prototype Web-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) program for preventing mental health problems among college students. Participants: Undergraduate first-year students ("N" = 76) participated between May and November 2011. Methods: Participants were randomized to ACT or a…

  9. An online self-care education program to support patients after total laryngectomy : feasibility and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Ingrid C; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Eerenstein, Simone E J; Jansen, Femke; Witte, Birgit I; Lacko, Martin; Hardillo, José A; Honings, Jimmie; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Goedhart-Schwandt, Noortje L Q; de Bree, Remco; Leemans, C René; Leeuw, Irma M Verdonck-de

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an online self-care education program supporting early rehabilitation of patients after total laryngectomy (TLPs) and factors associated with satisfaction. Health care professionals (HCPs) were invited to participate and to recruit

  10. Feasibility of recruiting families into a heart disease prevention program based on dietary patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offspring of parents with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) inherit a similar genetic profile and share diet and lifestyle behaviors. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of recruiting families at risk of CVD to a dietary prevention program, determine the changes in diet achieved, an...

  11. Teen Choices, an Online Stage-Based Program for Healthy, Nonviolent Relationships: Development and Feasibility Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Deborah A.; Johnson, Janet L.; Prochaska, Janice M.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the theoretical foundation, development, and feasibility testing of an online, evidence-based intervention for teen dating violence prevention designed for dissemination. Teen Choices, a program for healthy, nonviolent relationships, relies on the transtheoretical model of behavior change and expert system technology to…

  12. Developing a Mindfulness-Based Program for Infant Schools: Feasibility, Acceptability, and Initial Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Lisa-Marie; Rowse, Georgina; Sills, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence points to the success of mindfulness for supporting the well-being of older children in schools; less is known about the effects with younger schoolchildren. This study sought to test the feasibility and acceptability of a program of mindfulness-based activities with a nonclinical sample of young children within a school setting.…

  13. A Preventive Intervention Program for Urban African American Youth Attending an Alternative Education Program: Background, Implementation, and Feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, Steven B.; Hanlon, Thomas E.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Watts, Amy M.; Pothong, Pattarapan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents background, implementation, and feasibility findings associated with planning and conducting an after-school intervention program in an alternative education setting designed to prevent the initiation and escalation of violence and substance abuse among urban African American youth at high risk for life-long problem behaviors.…

  14. A Preventive Intervention Program for Urban African American Youth Attending an Alternative Education Program: Background, Implementation, and Feasibility

    OpenAIRE

    Carswell, Steven B.; Hanlon, Thomas E.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Watts, Amy M.; Pothong, Pattarapan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents background, implementation, and feasibility findings associated with planning and conducting an after-school intervention program in an alternative education setting designed to prevent the initiation and escalation of violence and substance abuse among urban African American youth at high risk for life-long problem behaviors. Evolving from earlier preventive interventions implemented in clinic and school settings, the program, entitled The Village Model of Care, consisted...

  15. Feasibility and effectiveness of a cosmetic intervention program for institutionalized older women in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohko Hayakawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined the feasibility and effectiveness of a cosmetic intervention program for frail older women. Thirty-nine older adults (83.0 ± 8.65 years from two nursing homes in Tokyo were allocated to a cosmetic (intervention: n = 27 or a light-exercise (control: n = 12 group according to their nursing home residence. Both groups attended weekly classes over a 5-week period from May to June 2009. The program feasibility was examined using class participation, class attendance, and program adherence rates, while the effectiveness of the program was examined using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS and participants' engagement in positive activities (i.e., engaging in social activities and going outside. The intervention group showed significantly higher rates on all feasibility measures than did the control group (class participation: 24.1% vs. 13.3%, class attendance: 75.5% vs. 32.6%, program adherence: 70.8% vs. 10.0%. Furthermore, the GDS scores decreased significantly in the intervention group, but not the control group. Although the change in GDS score was larger in the intervention group (−1.30 ± 2.36 than in the control group (−0.75 ± 3.53, the inter-group difference in this change was not significant. No significant differences were found between pre- and post-intervention positive activity rates in either group, or in the inter-group comparisons of changes in these rates. Overall, the cosmetic program was highly feasible and effective for improving the mental health of frail older women. However, further studies using longer intervention periods and larger samples would be needed to identify the program effectiveness.

  16. A Tandem Cycling Program: Feasibility and Physical Performance Outcomes in People With Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Ellen L; Robinson, Cynthia A; Nelson, Mark D; Houle, Raymond; Fraser, Gabriell; Handley, Leslie; Jones, Emilie R; Amtmann, Dagmar; Kelly, Valerie E

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) have motor and nonmotor impairments that interfere with exercise participation. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and physical performance outcomes of a community-based indoor tandem cycling program that was designed to facilitate a higher cadence, consistency, and intensity of training. Forty-one participants with mild to moderate PD were enrolled. A high-cadence cycling protocol using mechanically augmented (or forced) exercise on a tandem bicycle was adapted for our program. Participants cycled 3 times per week for 10 weeks. Feasibility measures included program retention, attendance, and adverse events, as well as the ability to reach training goals for heart rate (HR) and cadence. Physical performance outcomes included the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand (FTSTS) Test, Timed Up and Go (TUG), and gait parameters during usual and fast-paced walking. Program feasibility was demonstrated with a high attendance rate (96%) and retention rate (100%). There were no adverse events. The majority of participants reached their exercise training goals for target HR (87%) and cadence (95%). Statistically significant physical performance improvement (P physical performance outcomes were demonstrated in individuals with mild to moderate PD participating in a community-based indoor tandem cycling program.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see supplemental digital content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A146).

  17. Department of Energy Small-Scale Hydropower Program: Feasibility assessment and technology development summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinehart, B.N.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes two subprograms under the US Department of Energy's Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program. These subprograms were part of the financial assistance activities and included the Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) feasibility assessments and the technology development projects. The other major subprograms included engineering research and development, legal and institutional aspects, and technology transfer. These other subprograms are covered in their respective summary reports. The problems of energy availability and increasing costs of energy led to a national effort to develop economical and environmental attractive alternative energy resources. One such alternative involved the utilization of existing dams with hydraulic heads of <65 ft and the capacity to generate hydroelectric power of 15 MW or less. Thus, the PRDA program was initiated along with the Technology Development program. The purpose of the PRDA feasibility studies was to encourage development of renewable hydroelectric resources by providing engineering, economic, environmental, safety, and institutional information. Fifty-five feasibility studies were completed under the PRDA. This report briefly summarizes each of those projects. Many of the PRDA projects went on to become technology development projects. 56 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Feasibility of an altruistic sperm donation program in Canada: results from a population-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Daria; Bowen, James M; Perampaladas, Kuhan; Qureshi, Riaz; Xie, Feng; Hughes, Edward

    2017-01-14

    Stringent donor-screening criteria and legislation prohibiting payment for donor gametes have contributed to the radical decline of donor insemination (DI) using sperm provided by Canadian men. Thus, many individuals rely on imported sperm. This paper examines the feasibility of an altruistic sperm donation (ASD) program to meet the needs of Canadians. Using Canadian census data, published literature and expert opinions, two population-based, top-down mathematical models were developed to estimate the supply and demand for donor sperm and the feasibility of an ASD program. It was estimated that 63 donors would pass Canadian screening criteria, which would provide 1,575 donations. The demand for DI by women was 7,866 samples (4,319 same sex couples, 1,287 single women and 2,260 heterosexual couples). Considerable effort would be necessary to create the required increase in awareness of the program and change in societal behaviour towards sperm donation for an ASD program to be feasible in Canada.

  19. Indicators to assess the quality of programs to prevent occupational risk for tuberculosis: are they feasible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Raquel dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to analyze the feasibility of quality indicators for evaluation of hospital programs for preventing occupational tuberculosis. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional study. We tested indicators for evaluating occupational tuberculosis prevention programs in six hospitals. The criterion to define feasibility was the time spent to calculate the indicators. Results: time spent to evaluate the indicators ranged from 2h 52min to 15h11min 24sec. The indicator for structure evaluation required less time; the longest time was spent on process indicators, including the observation of healthcare workers' practices in relation to the use of N95 masks. There was an hindrance to test one of the indicators for tuberculosis outcomes in five situations, due to the lack of use of tuberculin skin test in these facilities. The time requires to calculate indicators in regarding to the outcomes for occupational tuberculosis largely depends upon the level of organizational administrative structure for gathering data. Conclusions: indicators to evaluate the structure for occupational tuberculosis prevention are highly feasible. Nevertheless, the feasibility of indicators for process and outcome is limited due to relevant variations in administrative issues at healthcare facilities.

  20. Feasibility of a Community-Based Sickle Cell Trait Testing and Counseling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housten, Ashley J.; Abel, Regina A.; Lindsey, Terianne; King, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell trait (SCT) screening is required at birth in the United States; however, adults rarely know their SCT status prior to having children. Purpose Assess feasibility of a community-based SCT education and testing intervention. Methods Participants were recruited from eight community sites to complete an educational program and offered a hemoglobin analysis. A genetic counselor met individually with participants to discuss lab results. Results Between July 14, 2010 and May 31, 2012, 637 participants completed the educational program. Five hundred seventy (89.5%) provided a blood sample, and 61 (10.9%) had SCT or other hemoglobinopathies. The genetic counselor met with 321 (56.3%) participants. Conclusions Community-based SCT testing shows initial feasibility and may increase the number of individuals who know their trait status. PMID:27774352

  1. Feasibility of a Nurse-Led Weekend Group Exercise Program for People after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Scrivener

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Additional physical activity including repetitive task practice can improve outcomes after stroke. The additional practice can be facilitated by therapists and family members or could also be delivered by nursing staff. Objective. To investigate the feasibility of a nurse-led weekend exercise program after stroke. Participants. Individuals after stroke, who participated in a weekend exercise program during their hospital admission. Methods. A retrospective audit of the number of referrals to and amount of exercise repetitions achieved in a nurse-led weekend exercise program was undertaken. The weekend exercise program occurs on each Saturday and Sunday for one hour. The repetitions of exercise completed during each class were documented by staff. An audit was conducted to ascertain the amount and type of exercise completed within the class. Results. During the study period 284 people were referred to the exercise program. The mean number of exercise repetitions completed per participant in each class was 180.7 (SD 205.4. The number of exercise repetitions completed by participants was highly variable ranging from 0 to 1190 per class. Conclusion. The amount of average exercise repetitions completed in the Weekend Warrior program was large but with significant variability. A nurse-led exercise class is a feasible method of delivering exercise opportunities to individuals in hospital after stroke.

  2. Feasibility of Recruiting Families into a Heart Disease Prevention Program Based on Dietary Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy L. Schumacher

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Offspring of parents with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD inherit a similar genetic profile and share diet and lifestyle behaviors. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of recruiting families at risk of CVD to a dietary prevention program, determine the changes in diet achieved, and program acceptability. Families were recruited into a pilot parallel group randomized controlled trial consisting of a three month evidence-based dietary intervention, based on the Mediterranean and Portfolio diets. Feasibility was assessed by recruitment and retention rates, change in diet by food frequency questionnaire, and program acceptability by qualitative interviews and program evaluation. Twenty one families were enrolled over 16 months, with fourteen families (n = 42 individuals completing the study. Post-program dietary changes in the intervention group included small daily increases in vegetable serves (0.8 ± 1.3 and reduced usage of full-fat milk (−21%, cheese (−12% and meat products (−17%. Qualitative interviews highlighted beneficial changes in food purchasing habits. Future studies need more effective methods of recruitment to engage families in the intervention. Once engaged, families made small incremental improvements in their diets. Evaluation indicated that feedback on diet and CVD risk factors, dietetic counselling and the resources provided were appropriate for a program of this type.

  3. An adjunct exercise program for serious mental illness: who chooses to participate and is it feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, Louisa G; Kopeski, Lynne; Brown, Carrie; Bolton, Paula; Laudate, Corina; DiGangi, Gina; Martin, Paula; Reid, James A; Martowski, Jules C; Meade, Amy; Sarmiento, Ingrid A; Wang, Jianping; Utschig, Angela C; Siegel, Arthur; Neuhaus, Edmund C

    2013-04-01

    Despite evidence that exercise is beneficial for serious mental illness, it continues to be an under utilized adjunct treatment strategy. Thus, the aims of this study were to examine if self-selected or volunteer exercise programs are feasible in a structured outpatient program and who might choose to participate in such a program. Individuals with serious mental illness admitted to a partial hospital program were offered an adjunct exercise group or a control, psychoeducation group. The exercise group (N = 38) met three times a week for 50 min. Individuals who chose not to exercise (N = 28), attended a psychoeducational control group. Those who self-selected the exercise group tended to have a higher level of education, employment rate and to be Caucasian. The control group had more medical problems, a higher body mass index and alcohol intake. The groups did not differ on age, sex, or use of cigarettes and caffeine. The exercise group was regularly attended. Both groups improved equally on all outcomes symptom and psychological well-being outcomes. These data highlight that certain individuals with serious mental illness may be more likely to exercise based on demographic opposed to clinical features, or illness characteristics. Thus, adjunct exercise programs for individuals with serious mental illness seem to be feasible, but certain groups of individuals (i.e., ethnic minorities, unemployed) should be targeted for recruitment as they are less likely to volunteer for such adjunct exercise programs.

  4. Balneotherapy Together with a Psychoeducation Program for Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: A Feasibility Study

    OpenAIRE

    P. De Maricourt; Gorwood, P.; Th. Hergueta; Galinowski, A.; Salamon, R; Diallo, A.; Vaugeois, C.; Lépine, J P; J. P. Olié; O. Dubois

    2016-01-01

    Benzodiazepines should be prescribed on a short-term basis, but a significant proportion of patients (%) use them for more than 6 months, constituting a serious public health issue. Indeed, few strategies are effective in helping patients to discontinue long-term benzodiazepine treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and the impact of a program including cognitive behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, and balneotherapy in a spa resort to facilitate long-term discontinu...

  5. Assessment of the feasibility of a rehabilitation intervention program for breast cancer survivors with cognitive complaints

    OpenAIRE

    Ercoli, LM; Castellon, SA; Hunter, AM; Kwan, L.; Kahn-Mills, BA; Cernin, PA; Leuchter, AF; Ganz, PA

    2013-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a cognitive rehabilitation program in breast cancer survivors (BCS) with persistent post-treatment cognitive complaints. BCS with cognitive complaints, 18-months to 5-years post-treatment, were recruited for a once-weekly, five-week, group cognitive training intervention. Outcome measures included selfreported mood and cognitive function, and neurocognitive tests administered at pre-intervention, immediate-, twomonth and four-month post-intervention. A sub-study i...

  6. Feasibility and acceptability of a resilience training program for intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealer, Meredith; Conrad, David; Evans, John; Jooste, Karen; Solyntjes, Janet; Rothbaum, Barbara; Moss, Marc

    2014-11-01

    The critical nursing shortage is particularly apparent in specialty areas such as intensive care units (ICUs). Some nurses develop resilient coping strategies and adapt to stressful work experiences, mitigating the development of common maladaptive psychological symptoms. To determine if a multimodal resilience training program for ICU nurses was feasible to perform and acceptable to the study participants. In a randomized and controlled 12-week intervention study, treatment and control groups completed demographic questions and measures of resilience, anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and burnout syndrome before and after the intervention. The intervention included a 2-day educational workshop, written exposure sessions, event-triggered counseling sessions, mindfulness-based stress reduction exercises, and a protocolized aerobic exercise regimen. Nurses in the intervention arm also completed satisfaction surveys for each component of the intervention. This mulitmodal resilience training program was feasible to conduct and acceptable to ICU nurses. Both nurses randomized to the treatment group and nurses randomized to the control group showed a significant decrease in PTSD symptom score after the intervention. A multifaceted resilience training program for ICU nurses was both feasible and acceptable. A sufficiently powered, randomized clinical trial is needed to assess the effect of the intervention on improving individuals' level of resilience and improving psychological outcomes such as symptoms of anxiety, depression, burnout syndrome, and PTSD. ©2014 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  7. 200 Areas Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study ImplementationPlan - Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Knepp.

    1999-04-19

    The 200 Areas Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Implementation Plan - Environmental Restoration Program (Implementation Plan) addresses approximately 700 soil waste sites (and associated structures suchas pipelines) resulting from the discharge of liquids and solids fromprocessing facilities to the ground (e.g., ponds, ditches, cribs,burial grounds) in the 200 Areas and assigned to the Environmental Restoration Program. The Implementation Plan outlines the frameworkfor implementing assessment activities in the 200 Areas to ensure consistency in documentation, level of characterization, and decisionmaking. The Implementation Plan also consolidates background information and other typical work plan materials, to serve as a single referenceable source for this type of information.

  8. Feasibility, physical capacity, and health benefits of a multidimensional exercise program for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Midtgaard, Julie; Rorth, Mikael

    2003-01-01

    Cancer patients frequently experience considerable loss of physical capacity and general wellbeing when diagnosed and treated for their disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, physical capacity, and health benefits of a multidimensional exercise program for cancer patients...... during advanced stages of disease who are undergoing adjuvant or high-dose chemotherapy. The supervised program included high- and low-intensity activities (physical exercise, relaxation, massage, and body-awareness training). A total of 23 patients between 18 and 65 years of age (median 40 years...

  9. The development and feasibility of an online aphasia group intervention and networking program - TeleGAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Rachelle; Theodoros, Deborah; Hill, Anne J; Russell, Trevor

    2017-09-04

    Aphasia group therapy offers many benefits, however people with aphasia report difficulty accessing groups and speech-language pathologists are faced with many challenges in providing aphasia group therapy. Telerehabilitation may offer an alternative service delivery option. An online aphasia group therapy program - Telerehabilitation Group Aphasia Intervention and Networking (TeleGAIN) - has been developed according to the guidelines of the Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for complex interventions. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of TeleGAIN and the results of a pilot trial to determine feasibility and acceptability. The development of TeleGAIN was informed through literature reviews in relevant topic areas, consideration of expert opinion and application of the social cognitive theory. TeleGAIN was then modelled through a feasibility pilot trial with four people with aphasia. TeleGAIN appeared to be feasible and acceptable to participants and able to be implemented as planned. Participant satisfaction with treatment was high and results suggested some potential for improvements in language functioning and communication-related quality of life. TeleGAIN appeared to be feasible and acceptable, however the study highlighted issues related to technology, clinical implementation and participant-specific factors that should be addressed prior to a larger trial.

  10. Feasibility of a Latin Dance Program for Older Latinos With Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiñaga, Susan; Marquez, David X

    2017-12-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of a Latin dance program in older Latinos with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) via a feasibility mixed methods randomized controlled design. Spanish-speaking older Latinos (N = 21, 75.4 [6.3] years old, 16 females/5 males, 22.4 [2.8] Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] score) were randomized into a 16-week dance intervention (BAILAMOS) or wait-list control; the control group crossed over at week 17 and received the dance intervention. Feasibility was determined by assessing reach, retention, attendance, dance logs, and postintervention focus groups. Reach was 91.3% of people who were screened and eligible. Program retention was 95.2%. The dropout rate was 42.8% (n = 9), and attendance for all participants was 55.76%. The focus group data revealed 4 themes: enthusiasm for dance, positive aspects of BAILAMOS, unfavorable aspects of BAILAMOS, and physical well-being after BAILAMOS. In conclusion, older Latinos with MCI find Latin dance as an enjoyable and safe mode of physical activity.

  11. Development and feasibility of a mobile experience sampling application for tracking program implementation in youth well-being programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, TanChyuan; Rickard, Nikki S; Vella-Brodrick, Dianne A

    Well-being program evaluations mostly focus on identifying effective outcomes rather than measuring the actual extent to which program participants may apply learned skills in subsequent everyday lives. This study examined the feasibility of using a newly developed mobile experience sampling app called Wuzzup to study program implementation in young people participating in well-being programs. Ninety-six participants (60 females; 36 males) between the ages of 13 and 15 years (M = 13.87, SD = 0.71) were recruited to respond to two random prompts each day, for 7 days, at each of the three data collection time-points. Responses from 69 participants (72 % of initial sample) that met study criteria were retained for analysis. The average response rate was 92.89 %, with an average of 85.92 s to complete each ESM survey. Significant associations between first and second halves of the ESM week, and their respective positive affect and negative affect survey responses, demonstrate internal reliability and construct validity of the Wuzzup app to capture momentary affect and activation states of young people. This study also demonstrated the feasibility and practical utility of the Wuzzup app to profile and track an individual's learning over time.

  12. How feasible are lifestyle modification programs for disease prevention in general practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Heike; Rix, Elizabeth F; Laws, Rachel A; Passey, Megan; Fanaian, Mahnaz; Harris, Mark F

    2012-01-01

    Vascular disease is a leading cause of death and disability. While it is preventable, little is known about the feasibility or acceptability of implementing interventions to prevent vascular disease in Australian primary health care. We conducted a cluster randomised controlled trial assessing prevention of vascular disease in patients aged 40-65 by providing a lifestyle modification program in general practice. Interviews with 13 general practices in the intervention arm of this trial examined their views on implementing the lifestyle modification program in general practice settings. Qualitative study, involving thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with 11 general practitioners, four practice nurses and five allied health providers between October 2009 and April 2010. Providing brief lifestyle intervention fitted well with routine health-check consultations; however, acceptance and referral to the program was dependent on the level of facilitation provided by program coordinators. Respondents reported that patients engaged with the advice and strategies provided in the program, which helped them make lifestyle changes. Practice nurse involvement was important to sustaining implementation in general practice, while the lack of referral services for people at risk of developing vascular disease threatens maintenance of lifestyle changes as few respondents thought patients would continue lifestyle changes without long-term follow up. Lifestyle modification programs to prevent vascular disease are feasible in general practice but must be provided in a flexible format, such as being offered out of hours to facilitate uptake, with ongoing support and follow up to assist maintenance. The newly formed Medicare Locals may have an important role in facilitating lifestyle modification programs for this target group.

  13. Encuentro: Feasibility, Acceptability, and Outcomes of a Culturally Tailored Teen-Parent Health Promotion Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieving, Renee E; Allen, Michele L; Galvan, Adriana; Rodriguez-Hager, Rosemarie; Beckman, Kara; Castillo, Marina; Gadea, Abigail; Jimbo-Llapa, Fanny; Porta, Carolyn; Svetaz, Maria Veronica

    2017-09-01

    The growth of the Latino youth population, combined with the reality that many Latino adolescents live in environments characterized by social disparities, reveals a compelling need to address health inequalities affecting Latinos through effective health promotion programs designed by and for this population. This article presents findings from a pilot study of Encuentro, a health promotion program for young Latino teens and their parents. Developed by a community-university partnership, Encuentro aims to bolster internal assets, familial and cultural supports for young teens' positive development, and healthy sexual decision making and behaviors. Encuentro was pilot tested with 49 Latino families at 3 community sites in Minneapolis/St. Paul. Families were assigned to a program group or a control group. Pilot study findings confirm program feasibility and acceptability. Compared to the control group, program group youth reported substantially more involvement in activities celebrating Latino culture, and greater communication with their parents about sexual health topics. Parents in the program group reported greater ethnic pride, engaging in more activities to share Latino values and traditions with their teens, greater communication with their teens about sexual health topics, and increased parental monitoring than did parents in the control group. Findings demonstrate the potential of the Encuentro program.

  14. An online self-care education program to support patients after total laryngectomy: feasibility and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnossen, Ingrid C; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Eerenstein, Simone E J; Jansen, Femke; Witte, Birgit I; Lacko, Martin; Hardillo, José A; Honings, Jimmie; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Goedhart-Schwandt, Noortje L Q; de Bree, Remco; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an online self-care education program supporting early rehabilitation of patients after total laryngectomy (TLPs) and factors associated with satisfaction. Health care professionals (HCPs) were invited to participate and to recruit TLPs. TLPs were informed on the self-care education program "In Tune without Cords" (ITwC) after which they gained access. A study specific survey was used (at baseline T0 and postintervention T1) on TLPs' uptake. Usage, satisfaction (general impression, willingness to use, user-friendliness, satisfaction with self-care advice and strategies, Net Promoter Score (NPS)), sociodemographic, and clinical factors were analyzed. HCPs of 6 out of 9 centers (67% uptake rate) agreed to participate and recruited TLPs. In total, 55 of 75 TLPs returned informed consent and the baseline T0 survey and were provided access to ITwC (73% uptake rate). Thirty-eight of these 55 TLPs used ITwC and completed the T1 survey (69% usage rate). Most (66%) TLPs were satisfied (i.e., score ≥7 (scale 1-10) on 4 survey items) with the self-care education program (mean score 7.2, SD 1.1). NPS was positive (+5). Satisfaction with the self-care education program was significantly associated with (higher) educational level and health literacy skills (P = .004, P = .038, respectively). No significant association was found with gender, age, marital status, employment status, Internet use, Internet literacy, treatment modality, time since total laryngectomy, and quality of life. The online self-care education program ITwC supporting early rehabilitation was feasible in clinical practice. In general, TLPs were satisfied with the program.

  15. Feasibility of a community-based Functional Power Training program for older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan QLL

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Queenie Lin Ling Tan,1 Lilian Min Yen Chye,1 Daniella Hui Min Ng,1 Mei Sian Chong,1 Tze Pin Ng,1,2 Shiou Liang Wee1,3 1Frailty Research Program, Geriatric Education and Research Institute (GERI, Singapore; 2Department of Psychological Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 3Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Singapore Institute of Technology, Singapore Purpose: Community-based programs can increase and sustain physical activity participation in older adults, even for those who are physically frail. We studied the feasibility and potential effect of a 12-week structured Functional Power Training (FPT program involving high velocities and low loads for older adults conducted in a common area of their housing estate.Patients and methods: The structured FPT program was conducted in collaboration with a health promotion social enterprise and a community service provider based in a public housing site. We recruited nine inactive residents as participants to the single, group-based, twice-weekly program. Attendance and adverse event(s were recorded throughout the program. The Short Physical Performance Battery, Timed Up and Go (TUG, and 30s Sit-to-Stand tests were used to assess functional outcomes pre- and postprogram. The FRAIL Scale was used to assess their frailty status, and a postprogram experience survey was conducted.Results: Eight subjects (aged 74±10 years completed the program with an average overall attendance of 90.3%, with at least five participants present for each session. Changes in functional outcomes showed a moderate-to-large effect with significant improvement in TUG (p<0.01. In addition, participants either reversed or maintained their frailty status (p<0.01. Overall, the program was perceived to be well structured, engaging, as well as providing physical and psychosocial benefits. No exercise-related adverse events occurred during the program, and participants were keen to recommend this program to others

  16. Feasibility of a computer-assisted alcohol SBIRT program in an urban emergency department: patient and research staff perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Mary K; Bijur, Polly E; Rosenbloom, David; Bernstein, Steven L; Gallagher, E John

    2013-01-01

    ...) program to identify at-risk alcohol users among adult emergency department (ED) patients. The study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of implementing a computerized screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment...

  17. Examining the Feasibility and Acceptability of a Motivational Interviewing Early Intervention Program to Prevent High School Dropout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iachini, Aidyn L.; Rogelberg, Sandra; Terry, John David; Lutz, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This article describes Aspire, a new motivational interviewing (MI) early intervention program designed to prevent dropout among students repeating the ninth grade, and then examines the feasibility and acceptability of this program through a mixed-methods approach. The Aspire program is a nine-lesson curriculum grounded in MI with an emphasis on…

  18. Brief Report: The Feasibility and Effectiveness of an Advocacy Program for Latino Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Meghan M.; Magaña, Sandra; Garcia, Marlene; Mello, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    Latino, Spanish-speaking families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face unique barriers in special education advocacy. Although advocacy programs are becoming more common in the United States, none of these programs target Latino families. This is a pilot study to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of an advocacy program for…

  19. Feasibility and Outcomes of an Internet-Based Mindfulness Training Program: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvillemo, Pia; Brandberg, Yvonne; Bränström, Richard

    2016-07-22

    Interventions based on meditation and mindfulness techniques have been shown to reduce stress and increase psychological well-being in a wide variety of populations. Self-administrated Internet-based mindfulness training programs have the potential to be a convenient, cost-effective, easily disseminated, and accessible alternative to group-based programs. This randomized controlled pilot trial with 90 university students in Stockholm, Sweden, explored the feasibility, usability, acceptability, and outcomes of an 8-week Internet-based mindfulness training program. Participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention (n=46) or an active control condition (n=44). Intervention participants were invited to an Internet-based 8-week mindfulness program, and control participants were invited to an Internet-based 4-week expressive writing program. The programs were automated apart from weekly reminders via email. Main outcomes in pre- and postassessments were psychological well-being and depression symptoms. To assess the participant's experiences, those completing the full programs were asked to fill out an assessment questionnaire and 8 of the participants were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide. Descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as content analysis, were performed. In the mindfulness program, 28 out of 46 students (60%) completed the first week and 18 out of 46 (39%) completed the full program. In the expressive writing program, 35 out of 44 students (80%) completed the first week and 31 out of 44 (70%) completed the full program. There was no statistically significantly stronger intervention effect for the mindfulness intervention compared to the active control intervention. Those completing the mindfulness group reported high satisfaction with the program. Most of those interviewed were satisfied with the layout and technique and with the support provided by the study coordinators. More frequent contact with study coordinators was

  20. Text4Peds: Feasibility of an Educational Text-Messaging Program for Pediatrics Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Gregory T.; Draper, Lauren R.; Broom, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing effort to maximize educational material provided to residents who are in a time-constrained work environment. Mobile technology, principally smartphone applications and online modules, has shown educational promise. Intervention We developed a text-messaging program, Text4Peds, to assist residents with preparation for their pediatric board examinations. Goals were to assess (1) the feasibility of texting educational messages to residents, and (2) resident satisfaction and perceived usefulness of a texting program. Methods We conducted a prospective study of pediatrics and combined internal medicine-pediatrics residents. Messages derived from the most missed pediatric in-training examination questions were sent daily to residents. After 3 months, residents completed surveys that gauged their perception on the educational value of the text messages and the effect on their pediatric board preparation. Feasibility of the system was assessed as a total percentage of messages successfully received by residents. Results Of 55 residents, 35 (64%) participated in the program. Of 2534 messages sent out to participants, 2437 (96.2%) were delivered successfully. Positive comments cited the texting of board facts as a quick, helpful, daily study tool. Residents liked that messages were sent at 2:00 pm, and most felt that 1 to 5 messages per week was appropriate. Drawbacks included character restrictions of messages, content limitations, and the lack of a question-answer format. Conclusions An educational text message–based program was successfully implemented in our residency program. Messages were delivered with a high success rate, and residents found educational value in the messages. PMID:26140130

  1. Acceptance and commitment therapy universal prevention program for adolescents: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckhardt, Rowan; Manicavasagar, Vijaya; Batterham, Philip J; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Shand, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    There is a need to prevent anxiety and depression in young people and mindfulness contains important emotion regulation strategies. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), a mindfulness-based therapy, has yet to be evaluated as a prevention program, but has demonstrated an ability to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression in adult and adolescent populations. This study examines the feasibility of using an ACT-based prevention program in a sample of year 10 (aged 14-16 years) high school students from Sydney, Australia. Participants were allocated to either their usual classes or to the ACT-based intervention. Participants were followed for a period of 5 months post-intervention and completed the Flourishing Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, and a program evaluation questionnaire. Analyses were completed using intention-to-treat mixed models for repeated measures. The results indicated that the intervention was acceptable to students and feasible to administer in a school setting. There were no statistically significant differences between the conditions, likely due to the small sample size (N = 48). However, between-group effect sizes demonstrated small to large differences for baseline to post-intervention mean scores and medium to large differences for baseline to follow-up mean scores, all favouring the ACT-based condition. The results suggest that an ACT-based school program has potential as a universal prevention program and merits further investigation in a larger trial. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry. Trial ID: ACTRN12616001383459. Registered 06/10/2016. Retrospectively registered.

  2. Feasibility and acceptability of a workers’ health surveillance program for hospital physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn M. Ruitenburg

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A Workers’ Health Surveillance (WHS program is an occupational health strategy used to detect and address the health of individual workers to improve their ability to work. This study aims to investigate the feasibility and acceptability of a new job-specific WHS for hospital physicians. Material and Methods: All hospital physicians of the general surgery, radiotherapy and obstetrics and gynecology departments from 1 academic hospital were invited to participate in the WHS by the in-company occupational health service. An occupational physician and a medical assistant were trained to use the protocol. Feasibility was operationalized as the received and delivered dose, observed success factors and potential obstacles. Acceptability was assessed by asking whether the WHS was desirable and feasible for future use and by estimating the effects on health and work ability. Written questions and semi-structured interviews were conducted with the participating physicians, 5 department managers and the 2 occupational health professionals involved in the study. Results: One-third of the hospital physicians (34% participated in every part of the WHS. The delivered dose was 77/84 (92%. Almost all hospital physicians who received recommendations expected to adhere to this advice. The study participants appreciated the organization of the WHS. This WHS was positively graded (8 out of 10 max in terms of acceptability. Positive effects of the WHS on health, work functioning and long-term work ability were perceived by 2/3 of the physicians. Conclusions: The new job-specific WHS for hospital physicians showed good feasibility and acceptability among participating hospital physicians, occupational health professionals and medical managers.

  3. Feasibility of a skills-based substance abuse prevention program following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vungkhanching, Martha; Heinemann, Allen W; Langley, Mervin J; Ridgely, Mary; Kramer, Karen M

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a skills-based substance abuse prevention counseling program in a community setting for adults who sustained traumatic brain injury. Convenience sample of 117 participants (mean age=35 years) with preinjury history of alcohol or other drug use. Intervention group participants (n=36) from 3 vocational rehabilitation programs; a no-intervention comparison group (n=81) from an outpatient rehabilitation service. 12 individual counseling sessions featuring skills-based intervention. Changes in self-reported alcohol and other drug use, coping skillfulness, affect, and employment status from baseline to 9 months postintervention. Significant differences were noted at baseline for the intervention and comparison groups on ethnicity, time postinjury, marital status, and employment (Pskillfulness (Pskills-based intervention provides a promising approach to promoting abstinence from all substances and increasing readiness for employment for adults with traumatic brain injuries in outpatient settings.

  4. Exhaustively characterizing feasible logic models of a signaling network using Answer Set Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guziolowski, Carito; Videla, Santiago; Eduati, Federica; Thiele, Sven; Cokelaer, Thomas; Siegel, Anne; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio

    2013-09-15

    Logic modeling is a useful tool to study signal transduction across multiple pathways. Logic models can be generated by training a network containing the prior knowledge to phospho-proteomics data. The training can be performed using stochastic optimization procedures, but these are unable to guarantee a global optima or to report the complete family of feasible models. This, however, is essential to provide precise insight in the mechanisms underlaying signal transduction and generate reliable predictions. We propose the use of Answer Set Programming to explore exhaustively the space of feasible logic models. Toward this end, we have developed caspo, an open-source Python package that provides a powerful platform to learn and characterize logic models by leveraging the rich modeling language and solving technologies of Answer Set Programming. We illustrate the usefulness of caspo by revisiting a model of pro-growth and inflammatory pathways in liver cells. We show that, if experimental error is taken into account, there are thousands (11 700) of models compatible with the data. Despite the large number, we can extract structural features from the models, such as links that are always (or never) present or modules that appear in a mutual exclusive fashion. To further characterize this family of models, we investigate the input-output behavior of the models. We find 91 behaviors across the 11 700 models and we suggest new experiments to discriminate among them. Our results underscore the importance of characterizing in a global and exhaustive manner the family of feasible models, with important implications for experimental design. caspo is freely available for download (license GPLv3) and as a web service at http://caspo.genouest.org/. Supplementary materials are available at Bioinformatics online. santiago.videla@irisa.fr.

  5. Feasibility of Connecting, a Substance-Abuse Prevention Program for Foster Teens and their Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Susan E.; Skinner, Martie; Ben Packard, W.; Cole, Janice J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the feasibility, usability, and proximal outcomes of Connecting, an adaptation of a low-cost, self-directed, family-based substance use prevention program, Staying Connected with Your Teen, with foster families in a randomized, waitlist control pilot study. Method Families (n = 60) fostering teens between 11 and 15 years of age were recruited into the study and randomly assigned into the self-administered program with telephone support from a family consultant (n = 32) or a waitlist control condition (n = 28). Results Overall satisfaction with the program was high, with 100% of parents reporting they would recommend the program to other caregivers and reporting being “very satisfied” or “satisfied with the program. Program completion was good, with 62% of families completing all 91 specified tasks. Analyses of proximal outcomes revealed increased communication about sex and substance use (posttest1 OR = 1.97, and 2.03, respectively). Teens in the intervention vs. the waitlist condition reported lower family conflict (OR=.48), and more family rules related to monitoring (OR = 4.02) and media use (OR = 3.24). Caregivers in the waitlist group reported significant increases in the teen’s positive involvements (partial eta sq = 17% increase) after receiving the intervention. Conclusions Overall, program participation appeared to lead to stronger family management, better communication between teens and caregivers around monitoring and media use, teen participation in setting family rules, and decreased teen attitudes favorable to antisocial behavior. This small pilot study shows promising results for this adapted program. PMID:27891209

  6. Feasibility of using E-mail counseling as part of a smoking-cessation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polosa, Riccardo; Russo, Cristina; Di Maria, Annalisa; Arcidiacono, Giuseppe; Morjaria, Jaymin B; Piccillo, Giovita A

    2009-08-01

    The need for more effective smoking-cessation interventions is firmly established. However, access to these services can be problematic in real life. E-mail messages may be a convenient alternative to deliver smoking-cessation interventions. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the effectiveness of incorporating tailored e-mail consultation messages in a smoking-cessation program for smokers willing to quit. This pilot study examined the feasibility of integrating e-mail consultation messages in a smoking-cessation program for smokers willing to quit and with Internet access. At baseline, demographic data, smoking history and expired carbon monoxide (CO) levels were collected at a clinic visit. The subjects were provided with the specialist's e-mail address and instructed to prepare e-mail messages containing simple and clear information about their quitting progress. The counselor offered e-mail counseling throughout the smoking-cessation program. A 6-month follow-up visit was arranged, at which abstinence was reviewed. Of the 30 participants initially enrolled in the study, 21 (70%) attended the follow-up 6-month visit. E-mail counseling was more frequently offered (4-8 times) to the participants who completed the study, compared to those lost to follow-up (1-4 times). Comparisons with baseline exhaled CO values showed a significant within-group reduction at 6 months after smoking-cessation (P e-mail consultation counseling in a smoking-cessation intervention is feasible and effective. E-mail counseling as part of a smoking-cessation program warrants further evaluation.

  7. Feasibility and effectiveness of an educational program in Italian COPD patients undergoing rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneroni, Mara; Clini, Enrico; Crisafulli, Ernesto; Guffanti, Enrico; Fumagalli, Alessia; Bernasconi, Antonella; Cabiaglia, Antonella; Nicolini, Antonello; Brogi, Stefania; Ambrosino, Nicolino; Peroni, Roberta; Bianchi, Luca; Vitacca, Michele

    2013-02-01

    Self-management education is associated with improvement in quality of life and reduction of hospital admissions. Nevertheless, the data are insufficient to formulate clear recommendations regarding the type and content of education programs for COPD patients, and few data are available on knowledge of the disease itself. To test the level of patients' knowledge of their disease and therapy at baseline and after an educational program (COPD-EP); the feasibility of structured educational sessions; the influence of clinical status (degree of severity of disease, presence of comorbidities, oxygen use), demographics status (age, sex), previous knowledge level, previous lessons attendance and adherence of COPD-EP to the variation of knowledge after program. Selected COPD in-patients and out-patients referred to rehabilitative hospital departments were enrolled. The study was divided into 2 parts: a pre-study phase (educational materials and health team preparation) and a study phase. All COPD subjects received one educational brochure and were invited to attend seven 30-min group lessons to complete the educational program. Learning effect was evaluated by a 20-questions multiple choice learning questionnaire (LQ). We enrolled 158 subjects, of whom 44.9% had previous formal education lessons on COPD management and 69.6% had previous rehabilitative hospitalizations. At baseline, the LQ total score was 15.2 ± 3.5 points, which increased to 16.9 ± 3.0 points post COPD-EP (P educational COPD lessons improved more than subjects who had attended previous education. A formal COPD-EP is feasible and effective in improving subject knowledge and self-management. Specific learning instruments to follow up this population should be validated. © 2013 Daedalus Enterprises.

  8. Evidence and Feasibility of Implementing an Integrated Wellness Program in Northeast Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Amber; Salm Ward, Trina

    2017-08-01

    Evidence for the connection between physical and mental health is growing, as is interest in providing a holistic, mind-body approach to improving mental health and wellness. A needs assessment in northeast Georgia identified several regional health priorities, including mental health and substance abuse, access to care, and cardiovascular health. The study's purpose is threefold: to (1) review evidence for integrated mind-body wellness services, (2) explore the feasibility of implementing wellness services in a small mental health agency serving northeast Georgia, and (3) conduct a brief survey assessing interest in a wellness program. The literature search identified articles within the past 10 years with these key words: "yoga," "mental health," "wellness program," "complementary alternative medicine," "tai chi," "mindfulness," "meditation," and "nutrition." The survey was distributed to the agency's affiliates. The literature review identified strong evidence for an integrated mind-body wellness program that includes yoga, tai chi, mindfulness meditation, and nutrition education. Among 73 survey respondents, 86 percent indicated interest in wellness services, and 85 percent agreed that wellness services are important to mental health and well-being. Authors suggest a model to incorporate a holistic wellness program to complement mental health services and help facilitate physical and mental health. © 2017 National Association of Social Workers.

  9. Balneotherapy Together with a Psychoeducation Program for Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. De Maricourt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines should be prescribed on a short-term basis, but a significant proportion of patients (% use them for more than 6 months, constituting a serious public health issue. Indeed, few strategies are effective in helping patients to discontinue long-term benzodiazepine treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and the impact of a program including cognitive behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, and balneotherapy in a spa resort to facilitate long-term discontinuation of benzodiazepines. We conducted a prospective multicentre cohort study. Patients with long-term benzodiazepine use were recruited with the aim of anxiolytic withdrawal by means of a psychoeducational program and daily balneotherapy during 3 weeks. The primary efficacy outcome measure was benzodiazepine use 6 months after the program, compared to use at baseline. A total of 70 subjects were enrolled. At 6 months, overall benzodiazepine intake had decreased by 75.3%, with 41.4% of patients completely stopping benzodiazepine use. The results also suggest a significantly greater improvement in anxiety and depression symptoms among patients who discontinued benzodiazepines compared to patients who only reduced their use. Our findings suggest that balneotherapy in association with a psychoeducative program is efficient in subjects with benzodiazepine addiction.

  10. Balneotherapy Together with a Psychoeducation Program for Benzodiazepine Withdrawal: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maricourt, P; Gorwood, P; Hergueta, Th; Galinowski, A; Salamon, R; Diallo, A; Vaugeois, C; Lépine, J P; Olié, J P; Dubois, O

    2016-01-01

    Benzodiazepines should be prescribed on a short-term basis, but a significant proportion of patients (%) use them for more than 6 months, constituting a serious public health issue. Indeed, few strategies are effective in helping patients to discontinue long-term benzodiazepine treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and the impact of a program including cognitive behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, and balneotherapy in a spa resort to facilitate long-term discontinuation of benzodiazepines. We conducted a prospective multicentre cohort study. Patients with long-term benzodiazepine use were recruited with the aim of anxiolytic withdrawal by means of a psychoeducational program and daily balneotherapy during 3 weeks. The primary efficacy outcome measure was benzodiazepine use 6 months after the program, compared to use at baseline. A total of 70 subjects were enrolled. At 6 months, overall benzodiazepine intake had decreased by 75.3%, with 41.4% of patients completely stopping benzodiazepine use. The results also suggest a significantly greater improvement in anxiety and depression symptoms among patients who discontinued benzodiazepines compared to patients who only reduced their use. Our findings suggest that balneotherapy in association with a psychoeducative program is efficient in subjects with benzodiazepine addiction.

  11. Development and Feasibility of a Childhood Obesity Prevention Program for Rural Families: Application of the Social Cognitive Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knol, Linda L.; Myers, Harriet H.; Black, Sheila; Robinson, Darlene; Awololo, Yawah; Clark, Debra; Parker, Carson L.; Douglas, Joy W.; Higginbotham, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effective childhood obesity prevention programs for preschool children are limited in number and focus on changes in the child care environment rather than the home environment. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop and test the feasibility of a home environment obesity prevention program that incorporates mindful eating…

  12. A 3-Month Jump-Landing Training Program: A Feasibility Study Using the RE-AIM Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, I.; Cumps, E.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Mathieu, N.; Van Schuerbeeck, S.; Meeusen, R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Evaluating the translatability and feasibility of an intervention program has become as important as determining the effectiveness of the intervention. Objective: To evaluate the applicability of a 3-month jumplanding training program in basketball players, using the RE-AIM (reach,

  13. Qualitative evaluation of a high school yoga program: feasibility and perceived benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conboy, Lisa A; Noggle, Jessica J; Frey, Jessica L; Kudesia, Ravi S; Khalsa, Sat Bir S

    2013-01-01

    This is the first published qualitative assessment of a yoga program applied in a high school setting. This qualitative interview study was nested in a randomized, controlled trial studying the effects of a yoga program offered in place of a semester of physical education classes at a rural public high school. Student interviews were conducted after taking part in a semester of the yoga program. A formal passive consent with information about the qualitative study was sent home to parents/guardians of all students in the parent study before the interviews. Most students enjoyed the yoga classes and felt benefits. Negative reports of yoga practice were associated with gender as most males sensed peer pressure against practicing yoga. Despite this finding, most students wanted to continue yoga and would continue if it were offered in school. Positive reports include a greater kinesthetic awareness, which some students associated with a greater respect for the body and improved self-image. Among students reporting psychological benefits, many cited stress reduction; many used yoga to manage negative emotions; and some propagated more optimism. Most thought yoga could reduce interest in the use of drugs and alcohol and increase social cohesion with family and peers. We found that a yoga program is feasible in this sample of 9th and 10th graders, especially after benefits are perceived. We also found evidence that yoga may lead to emergent positive benefits in health behaviors not directly prescribed by the program. These results suggest that school-based yoga programs may be appropriate for promoting healthy behaviors at a societal level by focusing on the prevention of negative patterns during the adolescent transition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Expanding The INSPIRED COPD Outreach ProgramTM to the emergency department: a feasibility assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillis D

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Darcy Gillis,1 Jillian Demmons,1 Graeme Rocker1,2 1Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Nova Scotia Health Authority, Halifax, NS, Canada; 2Division of Respirology, Nova Scotia Health Authority, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada Background: The Halifax-based INSPIRED COPD Outreach Program™ is a facility-to-community home-based novel clinical initiative that through improved care transitions, self-management, and engagement in advance care planning has demonstrated a significant (60%–80% reduction in health care utilization with substantial cost aversion. By assessing the feasibility of expanding INSPIRED into the emergency department (ED we anticipated extending reach and potential for positive impact of INSPIRED to those with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD who avoid hospital admission.Methods: Patients were eligible for the INSPIRED-ED study if >40 years of age, diagnosed with AECOPD and discharged from the ED, willing to be referred, community dwelling with at least one of: previous use of the ED services, admission to Intermediate Care Unit/Intensive Care Unit, or admission to hospital with AECOPD in the past year. We set feasibility objectives for referral rates, completion of action plans, advance care planning participation, and reduction in ED visit frequency.Results: Referral rates were 0.5/week. Among eligible patients (n=174 33 (19% were referred of whom 15 (M=4, F=11 enrolled in INSPIRED-ED. Mean (SD age was 68 (7 years, post-bronchdilator FEV1 44.2 (15.5 % predicted, and Medical Research Council (MRC dyspnea score 3.8 (0.41. We met feasibility objectives for action plan and advance care planning completion. Frequency of subsequent ED visits fell by 54%. Mean (SD Care Transition Measure (CTM-3 improved from 8.6 (2.0 to 11.3 (1.3, P=0.0004, and of 14 patients responding 12 (86% found the program very helpful. An additional 34

  15. Environmental Restoration Program pollution prevention checklist guide for the feasibility study project phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Feasibility studies (FS) determine what remedial alternatives are presented to regulators for site cleanup. A key consideration in this process is the waste to be generated. Minimizing the volume and toxicity of this waste will ultimately contribute to the selection of the best remedial option. The purpose of this checklist guide is to assist the user in incorporating pollution prevention/waste minimization (PP/WM) in all FS phase projects of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This guide will help users document PP/WM activities for technology transfer and reporting requirements. Automated computer screens will be created from the checklist data to assist users with implementing and evaluating waste reduction. Users can then establish numerical performance measures to measure progress in planning, training, self-assessments, field implementation, documentation, and technology transfer. Cost savings result as users train and assess themselves and perform preliminary waste assessments.

  16. Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, David E; Buis, Lorraine R; Janney, Adrienne W; Ditty, Megan D; Krause, Christine W; Zheng, Kai; Sen, Ananda; Strecher, Victor J; Hess, Michael L; Piette, John D; Richardson, Caroline R

    2011-06-24

    Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH) and to monitor participant progress in the program. In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1) a recruitment page, 2) a summary page, and 3) a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27%) enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps/day from pre- to post-intervention (t = (36) = 4.13, p

  17. A Linear Programming Approach to the Development of Contrail Reduction Strategies Satisfying Operationally Feasible Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Sridhar, Banavar; Chen, Neil Yi-Nan; Sun, Dengfent

    2012-01-01

    A class of strategies has been proposed to reduce contrail formation in the United States airspace. A 3D grid based on weather data and the cruising altitude level of aircraft is adjusted to avoid the persistent contrail potential area with the consideration to fuel-efficiency. In this paper, the authors introduce a contrail avoidance strategy on 3D grid by considering additional operationally feasible constraints from an air traffic controller's aspect. First, shifting too many aircraft to the same cruising level will make the miles-in-trail at this level smaller than the safety separation threshold. Furthermore, the high density of aircraft at one cruising level may exceed the workload for the traffic controller. Therefore, in our new model we restrict the number of total aircraft at each level. Second, the aircraft count variation for successive intervals cannot be too drastic since the workload to manage climbing/descending aircraft is much larger than managing cruising aircraft. The contrail reduction is formulated as an integer-programming problem and the problem is shown to have the property of total unimodularity. Solving the corresponding relaxed linear programming with the simplex method provides an optimal and integral solution to the problem. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the methodology.

  18. Enhanced recovery program (ERP) in major laryngeal surgery: building a protocol and testing its feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemma, M; Toma, S; Lira Luce, F; Beretta, L; Braga, M; Bussi, M

    2017-12-01

    Enhanced recovery programs (ERP) represent a multimodal approach to perioperative patient care. The benefits of ERP are well demonstrated in colorectal surgery and Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS®) programs, that epitomise the ERP concept, have being introduced in different specialties, including vascular, gastric, pancreatic, urogynecologic and orthopaedic surgery. However, no ERP has been proposed for head and neck surgery. We developed an expert-opinion-based ERP for laryngeal surgery based on the key principles of colorectal surgery ERAS®. Twenty-four patients undergoing major laryngeal surgery (total and partial laryngectomies or surgical removal of oropharyngeal tumour with muscle flap reconstruction) were treated according to such an ERP protocol, which differed under several respects from our previous standard practice (described in 70 consecutive patients who underwent major laryngeal surgery before ERP implementation. The adherence rate to the different ERP items is reported. Adherence to ERP items was high. Nutritional assessment, antibiotic prophylaxis, postoperative nausea and vomit (PONV) prophylaxis and postoperative speech therapy targets were applied as required in 100% of cases. Some ERP items (antibiotic prophylaxis, intraoperative infusion rate, and postoperative speech therapy) were already frequently implemented before ERP adoption. Postoperative medical complications occurred in 8.3% of patients. Our expert opinion-based ERP protocol for major laryngeal surgery proved feasible. The degree of benefit deriving from its implementation has yet to be assessed. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  19. Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ananda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH and to monitor participant progress in the program. Methods In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. Results In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1 a recruitment page, 2 a summary page, and 3 a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27% enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps

  20. A feasibility and pilot randomized controlled trial of the "Timing it Right Stroke Family Support Program".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jill I; Naglie, Gary; Green, Theresa L; Gignac, Monique A M; Bayley, Mark; Huijbregts, Maria; Silver, Frank L; Czerwonka, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Examine feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial of the Timing it Right Stroke Family Support Program (TIRSFSP) and collect pilot data. Multi-site mixed method randomized controlled trial. Acute and community care in three Canadian cities. Caregivers were family members or friends providing care to individuals who experienced their first stroke. The TIRSFSP offered in two formats, self-directed by the caregiver or stroke support person-directed over time, were compared to standard care. Caregivers completed baseline and follow-up measures 1, 3 and 6 months post-stroke including Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression, Positive Affect, Social Support, and Mastery Scales. We completed in-depth qualitative interviews with caregivers and maintained intervention records describing support provided to each caregiver. Thirty-one caregivers received standard care (n=10), self-directed (n=10), or stroke support person-directed (n=11) interventions. We retained 77% of the sample through 6-months. Key areas of support derived from intervention records (n=11) related to caregiver wellbeing, caregiving strategies, patient wellbeing, community re-integration, and service delivery. Compared to standard care, caregivers receiving the stroke support person-directed intervention reported improvements in perceived support (estimate 3.1, P=.04) and mastery (estimate .35, P=.06). Qualitative caregiver interviews (n=19) reflected the complex interaction between caregiver needs, preferences and available options when reporting on level of satisfaction. Preliminary findings suggest the research design is feasible, caregivers' needs are complex, and the support intervention may enhance caregivers' perceived support and mastery. The intervention will be tested further in a large scale trial. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Program for Childcare Professionals: Comparison of a Web-Based and In-Person Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheingold, Alyssa A.; Zajac, Kristyn; Patton, Meghan

    2012-01-01

    Recent prevention research has established the efficacy of some child sexual abuse prevention programs targeting adults; however, less is known about the feasibility of implementing such programs. The current study examines the feasibility and acceptability of a child sexual abuse prevention program for child care professionals provided in two…

  2. Feasibility of a pancreatic cancer surveillance program from a psychological point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harinck, Femme; Nagtegaal, Tanja; Kluijt, Irma; Aalfs, Cora; Smets, Ellen; Poley, Jan-Werner; Wagner, Anja; van Hooft, Jeanin; Fockens, Paul; Bruno, Marco; Bleiker, Eveline M A

    2011-12-01

    : The success of any surveillance program depends not solely on its technological aspects but also on the commitment of participants to adhere to follow-up investigations, which is influenced by the psychological impact of surveillance. This study investigates the psychological impact of participating in a pancreatic cancer surveillance program. : High-risk individuals participating in an endoscopic ultrasonography-magnetic resonance imaging-based pancreatic cancer surveillance program received a questionnaire assessing experiences with endoscopic ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, reasons to participate, psychological distress, and benefits and barriers of surveillance. High-risk individuals were individuals with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer or carriers of pancreatic cancer-prone gene mutations. : Sixty-nine participants (85%) completed the questionnaire. Surveillance was reported as "very to extremely uncomfortable" by 15% for magnetic resonance imaging and 14% for endoscopic ultrasonography. Most reported reason to participate was that pancreatic cancer might be detected in a curable stage. Abnormalities were detected in 27 respondents, resulting in surgical resection in one individual and a shorter follow-up interval in five individuals. Surveillance outcomes did not influence cancer worries. Overall, 29% was "often" or "almost always" concerned about developing cancer. Six respondents (9%) had clinical levels of depression and/or anxiety. According to 88% of respondents, advantages of surveillance outweighed disadvantages. : Although endoscopic ultrasonography is more invasive than magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasonography was not perceived as more burdensome. Despite one third of respondents worrying frequently about cancer, this was not related to the surveillance outcomes. Anxiety and depression levels were comparable with the general population norms. Advantages of participation outweighed disadvantages according

  3. A patient recall program to enhance decisions about prostate cancer screening: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denberg Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of time and competing demands limit the ability of patients and providers to engage in informed decision-making discussions about prostate cancer screening during primary care visits. We evaluated a patient recall invervention to mitigate these challenges. Methods Using mail and telephone outreach we invited men age 50-74 years without a PSA test in the prior 12 months to make appointments with their primary care providers in order to discuss the pros and cons of PSA-based prostate cancer screening. We assessed patient responsiveness to the program, provider documentation of screening discussions, orders for PSA laboratories, and provider attitudes. Results Out of 80 eligible patients, 37 (46% scheduled and 28 (35% completed a recall appointment. A large majority (91% of patients eligible for PSA screening received an order for this test. Providers documented PSA discussions more often for these patients than for a recent sample of their other patients who received traditional care (47.8% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.009. Twelve of 14 participating providers felt the program improved their ability to impart information about the risks and benefits of screening, but were uncertain whether it influenced their patients' preexisting preferences for screening. Some expressed doubts about the advisability of PSA-specific appointments. Conclusion To a limited extent, this pilot recall intervention enhanced opportunities for discussions of prostate cancer screening between patients and their primary care providers. As currently configured, however, this program was not found to be feasible for this purpose. A future version should promote screening discussions in the context of a broader range of health maintenance concerns and include more detailed, low-literacy information to educate patients in advance of clinic visits.

  4. The ABC's of Studying the Feasibility of Implementing a Year Round School Program in Your School District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allan S.

    In determining the feasibility of a year-round school program, administrators should judge its potential for facilities utilization, relief of overcrowding, personnel utilization, curriculum improvement, and better learning opportunities -- especially for the slow and fast learners. To determine the potential of a year-round school, a Steering…

  5. Control of water distribution networks with dynamic DMA topology using strictly feasible sequential convex programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robert; Abraham, Edo; Parpas, Panos; Stoianov, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    The operation of water distribution networks (WDN) with a dynamic topology is a recently pioneered approach for the advanced management of District Metered Areas (DMAs) that integrates novel developments in hydraulic modeling, monitoring, optimization, and control. A common practice for leakage management is the sectorization of WDNs into small zones, called DMAs, by permanently closing isolation valves. This facilitates water companies to identify bursts and estimate leakage levels by measuring the inlet flow for each DMA. However, by permanently closing valves, a number of problems have been created including reduced resilience to failure and suboptimal pressure management. By introducing a dynamic topology to these zones, these disadvantages can be eliminated while still retaining the DMA structure for leakage monitoring. In this paper, a novel optimization method based on sequential convex programming (SCP) is outlined for the control of a dynamic topology with the objective of reducing average zone pressure (AZP). A key attribute for control optimization is reliable convergence. To achieve this, the SCP method we propose guarantees that each optimization step is strictly feasible, resulting in improved convergence properties. By using a null space algorithm for hydraulic analyses, the computations required are also significantly reduced. The optimized control is actuated on a real WDN operated with a dynamic topology. This unique experimental program incorporates a number of technologies set up with the objective of investigating pioneering developments in WDN management. Preliminary results indicate AZP reductions for a dynamic topology of up to 6.5% over optimally controlled fixed topology DMAs. This article was corrected on 12 JAN 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  6. The tailored activity program (TAP) to address behavioral disturbances in frontotemporal dementia: a feasibility and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Claire M; Clemson, Lindy; Brodaty, Henry; Low, Lee-Fay; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Gitlin, Laura N; Piguet, Olivier; Mioshi, Eneida

    2017-10-15

    To explore the feasibility of implementing the Tailored Activity Program with a cohort of people with frontotemporal dementia and their carers (dyads). The Tailored Activity Program is an occupational therapy based intervention that involves working collaboratively with family carers and prescribes personalized activities for behavioral management in people with dementia. Twenty dyads randomized into the study (Tailored Activity Program: n = 9; Control: n = 11) were assessed at baseline and 4-months. Qualitative analyzes evaluated feasibility and acceptability of the program for the frontotemporal dementia cohort, and quantitative analyzes (linear mixed model analyzes, Spearman's rho correlations) measured the impact of the program on the dyads. The Tailored Activity Program was an acceptable intervention for the frontotemporal dementia dyads. Qualitative analyses identified five themes: "carer perceived benefits", "carer readiness to change", "strategies used by carer to engage person with dementia", "barriers to the Tailored Activity Program uptake/implementation", and "person with dementia engagement". Quantitative outcomes showed an overall reduction of behavioral symptoms (F 18.34  = 8.073, p = 0.011) and maintenance of functional performance in the person with dementia (F 18.03  = 0.375, p = 0.548). This study demonstrates the potential for using an activity-based intervention such as the Tailored Activity Program in frontotemporal dementia. Service providers should recognize that while people with frontotemporal dementia present with challenging issues, tailored therapies may support their function and reduce their behavioral symptoms. Implications for rehabilitation The Tailored Activity Program is an occupational therapy based intervention that involves prescribing personalized activities for behavioral management in dementia. The Tailored Activity Program is an acceptable and feasible intervention approach to address some of the

  7. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases in Costa Rica: a feasibility study toward a national screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Wesseling

    2013-12-01

    was as expected. Conclusion: Proposed protocol adjustments will increase test specificity and reduce administration time. A routine screening program is feasible within the public healthcare system of Costa Rica.

  8. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases in Costa Rica: a feasibility study toward a national screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseling, Catharina; Román, Norbel; Quirós, Indiana; Páez, Laura; García, Vilma; Mora, Ana María; Juncos, Jorge L; Steenland, Kyle N

    2013-12-27

    will increase test specificity and reduce administration time. A routine screening program is feasible within the public healthcare system of Costa Rica.

  9. Assessment of the feasibility of a rehabilitation intervention program for breast cancer survivors with cognitive complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercoli, Linda M; Castellon, Steven A; Hunter, Aimee M; Kwan, Lorna; Kahn-Mills, Barbara A; Cernin, Paul A; Leuchter, Andrew F; Ganz, Patricia A

    2013-12-01

    To assess the feasibility of a cognitive rehabilitation program in breast cancer survivors (BCS) with persistent post-treatment cognitive complaints. BCS with cognitive complaints, 18-months to 5-years post-treatment, were recruited for a once-weekly, five-week, group cognitive training intervention. Outcome measures included self-reported mood and cognitive function, and neurocognitive tests administered at pre-intervention, immediate-, two-month and four-month post-intervention. A sub-study in eight participants evaluated resting state quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) changes from pre- to immediate post-intervention in relationship to post-intervention changes in cognitive complaints. Twenty-seven BCS completed the protocol and tolerated the intervention well. We observed significant reductions in total and memory-specific cognitive complaints from pre-intervention to immediate post-intervention (p = 0.031 and p = 0.009, respectively) and at four-months post-intervention (p Stroop, and Trails A tests (df = 26, all p's <0.05). Effect sizes for changes from pre-intervention to immediate and to four-month post intervention ranged from 0.429 to 0.607, and from 0.439 to 0.741, respectively. Increase in qEEG absolute alpha power over the course of the intervention was associated with reduced complaints at immediate post-intervention (r = -0.78, p = 0.021), two-months (r range = -0.76 to -0.82, p-value range 0.004 to 0.03), and four-months (r = -0.71, p = 0.048). A five-week group cognitive training intervention is feasible and well tolerated. Cognitive complaints and neurocognitive test performances showed positive changes. qEEG may serve as a potential biomarker for improvement in self-reported complaints. A randomized clinical trial is underway to test the efficacy of the intervention.

  10. Establishing Ongoing, Early Identification Programs for Mental Health Problems in Our Schools: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeroff, Robin; Levitt, Jessica Mass; Faul, Lisa; Wonpat-Borja, Ahtoy; Bufferd, Sara; Setterberg, Stephen; Jensen, Peter S.

    2008-01-01

    The study evaluates the feasibility and effectiveness of several mental health screening and assessment tools in schools. A computerized version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-IV proved to be feasible bridging the gap between mental health providers and unmet need of children accompanying risks.

  11. Bridges self-management program for people with stroke in the community: A feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Suzanne; Jones, Fiona; Glenfield, Pauline; Lennon, Sheila

    2015-07-01

    Enabling self-management behaviors is considered important in order to develop coping strategies and confidence for managing life with a long-term condition. However, there is limited research into stroke-specific self-management interventions. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering the Bridges stroke self-management program in addition to usual stroke rehabilitation compared with usual rehabilitation only. Participants recruited from the referrals to a community stroke team were randomly allocated to the Bridges stroke self-management program, receiving either one session of up to one-hour per week over a six-week period in addition to usual stroke rehabilitation, or usual rehabilitation only. Feasibility was measured using a range of methods to determine recruitment and retention; adherence to the program; suitability and variability of outcome measures used; application and fidelity of the program; and acceptability of the program to patients, carers and professionals. Twenty-five people were recruited to the study over a 13-month period. Eight out of the 12 participants in the Bridges stroke self-management program received all six sessions; there was one withdrawal from the study. There were changes in outcomes between the two groups. Participants who received the Bridges stroke self-management program appeared to have a greater change in self-efficacy, functional activity, social integration and quality of life over the six-week intervention period and showed less decline in mood and quality of life at the three-month follow-up. Professionals found the program acceptable to use in practice, and feedback from participants was broadly positive. The findings from this study appear promising, but questions remain regarding the feasibility of delivering the Bridges stroke self-management program in addition to usual rehabilitation. The dose response of receiving the program cannot be ruled out, and the next stage

  12. Indicators to assess the quality of programs to prevent occupational risk for tuberculosis: are they feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Talita Raquel Dos; Padoveze, Maria Clara; Nichiata, Lúcia Yasuko Izumi; Takahashi, Renata Ferreira; Ciosak, Suely Itsuko; Gryschek, Anna Luiza de Fátima Pinho Lins

    2016-06-07

    to analyze the feasibility of quality indicators for evaluation of hospital programs for preventing occupational tuberculosis. a descriptive cross-sectional study. We tested indicators for evaluating occupational tuberculosis prevention programs in six hospitals. The criterion to define feasibility was the time spent to calculate the indicators. time spent to evaluate the indicators ranged from 2h 52min to 15h11min 24sec. The indicator for structure evaluation required less time; the longest time was spent on process indicators, including the observation of healthcare workers' practices in relation to the use of N95 masks. There was an hindrance to test one of the indicators for tuberculosis outcomes in five situations, due to the lack of use of tuberculin skin test in these facilities. The time requires to calculate indicators in regarding to the outcomes for occupational tuberculosis largely depends upon the level of organizational administrative structure for gathering data. indicators to evaluate the structure for occupational tuberculosis prevention are highly feasible. Nevertheless, the feasibility of indicators for process and outcome is limited due to relevant variations in administrative issues at healthcare facilities. analisar a viabilidade de indicadores de qualidade para avaliação de programas hospitalares de prevenção de tuberculose ocupacional. estudo descritivo transversal. Testaram-se indicadores de avaliação de programas de prevenção de tuberculose ocupacional em seis hospitais. O critério para definir a viabilidade foi o tempo necessário para aplicar os indicadores. o tempo necessário para avaliar os indicadores variou de 02'52'' até 15h11'24''. O indicador para a avaliação da estrutura demandou menor tempo; o maior tempo foi utilizado com os indicadores de processo, incluindo a observação das práticas dos trabalhadores de saúde em relação ao uso de máscaras N95. Um dos indicadores de resultados de tuberculose deixou de ser

  13. A pilot feasibility evaluation of the CALM Program for anxiety disorders in early childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Puliafico, Anthony C.; Aschenbrand, Sasha G.; McKnight, Kate; Robin, Joanna A.; Goldfine, Matthew E.; Albano, Anne Marie

    2011-01-01

    As many as 9% of preschoolers suffer from an anxiety disorder, and earlier onset of disorder is associated with more intractable forms of psychopathology in later life. At present there is a relative dearth of empirical work examining the development of evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders presenting in early childhood. Building on previous work supporting extensions of PCIT for separation anxiety disorder, the present study examines the preliminary feasibility and efficacy of an anxiety-based modification of PCIT (The CALM Program; Coaching Approach behavior and Leading by Modeling) for the treatment of youth between the ages of three and eight presenting with separation anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and/or specific phobias (N=9; Mage=5.4 years, ranging 4–8 years; 55.6% of families endorsing racial or ethnic minority status). Intent-to-treat (ITT; N=9) and treatment completer (N=7) analyses were conducted to evaluate diagnostic and functional response across participants. Pre- and posttreatment structured diagnostic interviews were conducted (ADIS-C/P), and clinical impression measures were completed (e.g., CGI, CGAS). Roughly 80% of the sample completed all treatment sessions. All treatment completers were categorized as global treatment responders by independent evaluators, with all but one showing full diagnostic improvements, and all but one showing meaningful functional improvements. These findings lend preliminary support for the promising role of live parent coaching for the treatment of a range of anxiety disorders that present in early childhood. Future work is needed to replicate the present findings in larger samples utilizing randomized controlled comparisons. PMID:21917417

  14. Use of an interactive video gaming program compared with conventional physiotherapy for hospitalised older adults: a feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, Kate; George, Stacey; Ratcliffe, Julie; Quinn, Steve; Whitehead, Craig; Davies, Owen; Crotty, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a physiotherapy intervention using an interactive gaming program compared with conventional physiotherapy for hospitalised older people. Randomised controlled pilot study in a geriatric rehabilitation unit within an acute public hospital. Participants were randomly allocated to physiotherapy using an interactive gaming program (n = 22) or conventional physiotherapy in a ward-based gym (n = 22). Feasibility was assessed by comparing the effects of the intervention on clinical outcome measures (primary outcome: mobility as assessed by the Timed Up and Go test, secondary outcomes: safety, adherence levels, eligibility and consent rates). Participants (n = 44) had a mean age of 85 years (SD 4.5) and the majority (80%) were women. Univariable analyses showed no significant difference between groups following intervention. However, multivariable analyses suggested that participants using the interactive gaming program improved more on the Timed Up and Go test (p = 0.048) than participants receiving conventional physiotherapy. There were no serious adverse events and high levels of adherence to therapy were evident in both groups. Only a small proportion of patients screened were recruited to the study. In this feasibility study, the use of a commercially available interactive gaming program by physiotherapists with older people in a hospital setting was safe and adherence levels were comparable with conventional therapy. Preliminary results suggest that further exploration of approaches using games as therapy for older people could include commonly used measures of balance and function.

  15. Maintaining Cognitive Functioning in Healthy Seniors with a Technology-Based Foreign Language Program: A Pilot Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Caitlin; Damnee, Souad; Djabelkhir, Leila; Cristancho, Victoria; Wu, Ya-Huei; Benovici, Judith; Pino, Maribel; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have hypothesized that learning a foreign language could be beneficial for seniors, as language learning requires the use of extensive neural networks. We developed and qualitatively evaluated an English training program for older French adults; our principal objective was to determine whether a program integrating technology is feasible for this population. We conducted a 4-month pilot study (16, 2-h sessions) with 14 French participants, (nine women, five men, average age 75). Questionnaires were administered pre- and post-intervention to measure cognitive level and subjective feelings of loneliness or social isolation; however, these scores did not improve significantly. Post-intervention, semi-directive interviews were carried out with participants, and a content/theme analysis was performed. Five main themes were identified from the interviews: Associations with school, attitudes toward English, motivation for learning English, attitudes toward the program's organization, and social ties. The program was found to be feasible for this age group, yet perceived as quite difficult for participants who lacked experience with English. Nonetheless, most participants found the program to be stimulating and enjoyable. We discuss different suggestions for future programs and future directions for foreign-language learning as a therapeutic and cognitive intervention.

  16. Feasibility and effectiveness of a pilot health promotion program for adults with type 2 diabetes: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluding, Patricia M; Singh, Rupali; Goetz, Jeanine; Rucker, Jason; Bracciano, Sarah; Curry, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of an intense health promotion program in older adults with diabetes. The program combined individually prescribed and supervised exercise with nutrition and education programs on glycemic control and aerobic fitness. Various recruitment and retention strategies were analyzed for effectiveness. Out of 28 potential subjects assessed for eligibility, 6 subjects with type 2 diabetes (2 male and 4 female; all white; age, 60.2 +/- 4.7 years) participated in the 10-week intervention. Aerobic and resistance exercise was performed on alternate days (3-4 days per week), with individualized nutrition counseling and diabetes health education sessions once weekly. The primary outcome measures were aerobic fitness and glycemic control (A1C), and secondary outcome measures included body mass index (BMI), self-efficacy, and symptoms of neuropathy. Changes in outcomes were assessed using descriptive statistics and paired t test analysis (alpha = .05). Following the intervention, subjects had improvements that approached significance in A1C and pain, with significant improvements in self-efficacy. A systematic approach to analysis of feasibility revealed issues with recruitment and retention that would need to be addressed for future studies or clinical implementation of this program. However, for the subset of subjects who did complete the intervention, adherence was excellent, and satisfaction with the program was confirmed by exit interview comments. Following participation in this pilot health promotion program, subjects had meaningful improvements in glycemic control, pain, and self-efficacy.

  17. Feasibility of a pedometer-based walking program for survivors of breast and head and neck cancer undergoing radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaheri, Pantea Amin; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl; Haennel, Robert; Parliament, Matthew B; McNeely, Margaret L

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of a pedometer-based walking program for people with breast cancer and head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing radiation therapy treatment. Participants were given a pedometer and prescribed a home-based walking program that included an individualized weekly step-count goal during the 3- to 5-week course of radiation therapy. Feasibility was determined by calculating recruitment rate, completion rate, and rate of adherence. Secondary outcomes included 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distance, step count, physical activity level, and psychological outcomes of depression, happiness, self-esteem, and sleep quality. A total of 21 participants were recruited. All participants completed the study; adherence to prescribed step counts was 91% at follow-up. Analysis found a significant improvement in happiness, as measured by the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire (mean difference 0.3, p=0.003), and a borderline significant improvement in 6MWT distance (mean difference 35 m, p=0.008). This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of a pedometer-based walking program for survivors of breast cancer and HNC undergoing radiation therapy.

  18. ReCAP: Feasibility and Effectiveness of a Pilot Program to Facilitate Quality Improvement Learning in Oncology: Experience of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Arif H; Quinn, Doris; Gilligan, Timothy D; Davis, Barbara Corning; Dalby, Carole K; Bretsch, Jennifer; McNiff, Kristen K; Jacobson, Joseph O; Kamal, Arif H; Quinn, Doris; Gilligan, Timothy D; Corning Davis, Barbara; Dalby, Carole K; Bretsch, Jennifer; McNiff, Kristen K; Jacobson, Joseph O

    2016-02-01

    Studies have demonstrated that structured training programs can improve health professionals' skills in performing clinical care or research. We sought to develop and test a novel quality training program (QTP) tailored to oncology clinicians. The American Society of Clinical Oncology QTP consisted of three in-person learning sessions and four phases: prework, planning, implementation, and sustain and spread. We measured two primary outcomes: program feasibility and effectiveness. Feasibility was evaluated by recording participation. Effectiveness was measured using the Kirkpatrick model, which evaluates four outcomes: reaction, learning, behavior, and results. We collected qualitative feedback through a focus group of participants and mixed quantitative–qualitative results from a 6-month follow-up evaluation survey. Results are presented using descriptive statistics. We received feedback from of 80% of participants who took part in 92% of in-person program days. QTP deliverables were completed by 100% of teams; none withdrew from the program. Regarding reaction, 100% of respondents expressed interest in actively contributing to future QTP courses. For learning, most teams continued to use the core methodology tools (eg, project charter, aims statements) after the program. Regarding behavior, when asked about intention to serve as a local quality improvement leader, a majority said they “definitely will” serve as: team leader on a specific project (75%), project champion or sponsor (75%), or teacher or trainer for others (64%). In evaluating outcomes, 50% reported applying learned methodology to new projects at their local institution. We demonstrate one of the first feasible and effective training programs to facilitate quality improvement learning for oncology clinicians. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Economic feasibility of converting cow manure to electricity: a case study of the CVPS Cow Power program in Vermont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Thompson, E; Parsons, R; Rogers, G; Dunn, D

    2011-10-01

    A case study of the Central Vermont Public Service Corporation (CVPS) Cow Power program examines the economic feasibility for dairy farms to convert cow manure into electricity via anaerobic methane digestion. The study reviews the mechanism for CVPS, dairy farms, electricity customers, and government agencies to develop and operate the program since 2004, examines the costs and returns for the participating dairy farms, and assesses their cash flow over a period of 7 yr under different scenarios. With 6 dairy farms generating about 12 million kilowatt-hours of electricity per year and more than 4,600 CVPS electricity customers voluntarily paying premiums of $0.04 per kilowatt-hour, or a total of about $470,000 per year, the CVPS Cow Power program represents a successful and locally sourced renewable energy project with many environmental and economic benefits. Factors for the successful development and operation of the program include significant grants from government agencies and other organizations, strong consumer support, timely adjustments to the basic electricity price paid to the farms, and close collaboration among the participating parties. This study confirms that it is technically feasible to convert cow manure to electricity on farms, but the economic returns depend highly on the base electricity price, premium rate, financial supports from government agencies and other organizations, and sales of the byproducts of methane generation. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acceptability and feasibility of CyberSenga, an Internet-based HIV prevention program for adolescents in Mbarara, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Sheana; Prescott, Tonya L.; Birungi, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Capitalizing on emerging data suggesting that HIV preventive behaviors can be positively affected by Internet-based programs, we developed and tested CyberSenga, an Internet-based, comprehensive sexuality education program for adolescents in Mbarara, Uganda. Three hundred and sixty-six secondary school students were randomly assigned to either the 5-lesson program (+ booster) or a treatment-as-usual control. At three-month follow-up, intervention participants provided feedback on program acceptability. Six focus groups with intervention participants were additionally conducted after the final follow-up at 6 months. Data support a hypothesis of feasibility: Despite schedule interruptions, 95% of intervention participants completed all 5 modules; only 17% deviated from the once-a-week intended delivery schedule. Internet service was uninterrupted during the field period and, in general, the technology performed to specifications. The intervention also appears to be acceptable: 94% of intervention youth somewhat or strongly agreed that they learned a lot and 93% said they were somewhat or very likely to recommend the program. Although more than two in three youth somewhat or strongly agreed that the program talked too much about sex (70%) and condoms (75%), 89% somewhat or strongly disagreed that “I do not think kids like me should do the CyberSenga program”. Feedback from focus group participants further suggested that the content was generally acceptable and did not contradict local norms in most cases. In fact, despite concerns from some local stakeholders to the contrary, information about condoms did not appear to be confusing or contradictory for youth who were abstinent. Nonetheless, some of the sexual topics seemed to be unfamiliar or uncomfortable for some participants – particularly brief references to oral and anal sex. Together, both qualitative and quantitative data suggest that the program is a feasible and acceptable way of delivering HIV

  1. The Feasibility of a Customized, In-Home, Game-Based Stroke Exercise Program Using the Microsoft Kinect Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Proffitt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of a 6-week, game-based, in-home telerehabilitation exercise program using the Microsoft Kinect® for individuals with chronic stroke. Four participants with chronic stroke completed the intervention based on games designed with the customized Mystic Isle software. The games were tailored to each participant’s specific rehabilitation needs to facilitate the attainment of individualized goals determined through the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Likert scale questionnaires assessed the feasibility and utility of the game-based intervention. Supplementary clinical outcome data were collected. All participants played the games with moderately high enjoyment. Participant feedback helped identify barriers to use (especially, limited free time and possible improvements. An in-home, customized, virtual reality game intervention to provide rehabilitative exercises for persons with chronic stroke is practicable. However, future studies are necessary to determine the intervention’s impact on participant function, activity, and involvement.

  2. Evaluating an Adaptive and Interactive mHealth Smoking Cessation and Medication Adherence Program: A Randomized Pilot Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Jennifer B; Anderson, Melissa L; Bradley, Katharine; An, Lawrence C; Catz, Sheryl L

    2016-08-03

    Mobile health (mHealth) interventions hold great promise for helping smokers quit since these programs can have wide reach and facilitate access to comprehensive, interactive, and adaptive treatment content. However, the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of these programs remain largely untested. To assess feasibility and acceptability of the My Mobile Advice Program (MyMAP) smoking cessation program and estimate its effects on smoking cessation and medication adherence to inform future research planning. Sixty-six smokers ready to quit were recruited from a large regional health care system and randomized to one of two mHealth programs: (1) standard self-help including psychoeducational materials and guidance how to quit smoking or (2) an adaptive and interactive program consisting of the same standard mHealth self-help content as controls received plus a) real-time, adaptively tailored advice for managing nicotine withdrawal symptoms and medication side-effects and b) asynchronous secure messaging with a cessation counselor. Participants in both arms were also prescribed a 12-week course of varenicline. Follow-up assessments were conducted at 2 weeks post-target quit date (TQD), 3 months post-TQD, and 5 months post-TQD. Indices of program feasibility and acceptability included acceptability ratings, utilization metrics including use of each MyMAP program component (self-help content, secure messaging, and adaptively tailored advice), and open-ended feedback from participants. Smoking abstinence and medication adherence were also assessed to estimate effects on these treatment outcomes. Utilization data indicated the MyMAP program was actively used, with higher mean program log-ins by experimental than control participants (10.6 vs 2.7, Pprogram could help other people quit smoking (22/24, 92%) and consistently take their stop-smoking medication (17/22, 97%) and would recommend the program to others (20/23, 87%). They also rated the program as

  3. Initial Feasibility and Validity of a Prospective Memory Training Program in a Substance Use Treatment Population

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney, Mary M.; Rass, Olga; Johnson, Patrick S.; Strain, Eric C.; Berry, Meredith S.; Vo, Hoa T.; Fishman, Marc J.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Rebok, George W.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Johnson, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with substance use disorders have shown deficits in the ability to implement future intentions, called prospective memory. Deficits in prospective memory and working memory, a critical underlying component of prospective memory, likely contribute to substance use treatment failures. Thus, improvement of prospective memory and working memory in substance use patients is an innovative target for intervention. We sought to develop a feasible and valid prospective memory training prog...

  4. A Pilot Study to Assess the Feasibility of the Spanish Diabetes Self-Management Program in the Basque Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estibaliz Gamboa Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of the Spanish Diabetes Self-Management Program (SDSMP in the primary care setting of the Basque Health Service and offer initial estimations of the randomized controlled trial (RCT effects. Methods. Ten health centers (HCs participated in a single-arm pilot study with a 6-month follow-up period between February 2011 and June 2012. Recruitment was performed via invitation letters, health professionals, and the local media. Each intervention group consisted of 8–15 people. The ability of each HC in forming up to 2 groups, participants’ compliance with the course, and coordination and data collection issues were evaluated. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c was the main outcome variable. Secondary outcomes were cardiovascular risk factors, drugs consumption, medical visits, quality of life, self-efficacy, physical exercise, and diet. Results. Two HCs did not organize a course. A total of 173 patients initiated the program, 2 dropped out without baseline data, and 90% completed it. No pre-post HbA1c differences existed. Certain improvements were observed in blood pressure control, self-efficacy, physical activity, and some dietary habits. Conclusion. The SDSMP is feasible in our setting. Our experience can be of interest when planning and conducting this program in similar health settings. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01642394.

  5. Telephonic screening and brief intervention for alcohol misuse among workers contacting the employee assistance program: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Tracy L; Goplerud, Eric; Derr, Dennis; Mickenberg, Judy; Courtemanche, Sherry

    2010-11-01

    Substantial empirical support exists for alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) in medical, but not non-medical settings such as the workplace. Workplace settings remain underutilised for delivering evidenced-based health services. This research aims to translate medical research into behavioural health-care practice in a telephonic call centre acting as a point of entry into an Employee Assistance Program (EAP). The goal of the study is to examine the feasibility of implementing routine telephonic alcohol SBIRT in an EAP call centre and assess whether routine SBIRT results in increased identification of workers who misuse alcohol. The design was pretest-posttest, one-group, pre-experimental. An alcohol SBIRT program developed based on World Health Organization recommendations was implemented in one EAP call centre serving one large employer. Workers were offered screening using the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) during intake, brief counselling using motivational interviewing, referral to counselling, and follow-up. At 5 months, 93% of workers contacting the EAP completed the AUDIT-C: 40% prescreened positive and 52% went on to screen at moderate or high risk for an alcohol problem. Overall identification rate (18%) approached general US population estimates. Most agreed to follow-up and three-quarters set an appointment for face-to-face counselling. Integration of routine alcohol SBIRT into EAP practice is feasible in telephonic delivery systems and increases identification and opportunity for brief motivational counselling. When SBIRT is seamlessly integrated workers are willing to answer questions about alcohol and participate in follow-up.[McPherson TL, Goplerud E, Derr D, Mickenberg J, Courtemanche S. Telephonic screening and brief intervention for alcohol misuse among workers contacting the employee assistance program: A feasibility study. © 2010 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  6. Development and feasibility of need-based yoga program for family caregivers of in-patients with schizophrenia in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Jagannathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context and Aim: Yoga has been found to be effective in the management of stress. This paper describes the development of a yoga program aimed to reduce burden and improve coping of family caregivers of inpatients with schizophrenia in India. Materials and Methods: Based on the assessment of caregiver needs, literature review, and expert opinion, a ten-day group yoga program was initially developed using the qualitative inductive method of inquiry. Each day′s program included warm-up exercises, yogic asanas, pranayama, and satsang. A structured questionnaire eliciting comments on each day′s contents was given independently to ten experienced yoga professionals working in the field of health for validation. The final version of the program was pilot-tested on a group of six caregivers of in-patients with schizophrenia admitted at NIMHANS, Bangalore. Results: On the question of whether the program would help reduce the burden of caregivers, six of the ten experts (60% gave a rank of four of five (very much useful. Based on comments of the experts, several changes were made to the program. In the pilot-testing stage, more than 60% of the caregivers assigned a score of four and above (on a five-point Likert scale, five being extremely useful for the overall program, handouts distributed, and performance of the trainer. Qualitative feedback of the caregivers further endorsed the feasibility and usefulness of the program. Conclusion: The developed yoga program was found to be acceptable to caregivers of in-patients with schizophrenia.

  7. An Examination of the Feasibility of Integrating Motivational Interviewing Techniques into FCS Cooperative Extension Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radunovich, Heidi Liss; Ellis, Sarah; Spangler, Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Demonstrating program impact through behavior change is critical for the continued success of Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Cooperative Extension programming. However, the literature suggests that simply providing information to participants does not necessarily lead to behavior change. This study pilot tested the integration of Motivational…

  8. A 12-week supervised exercise therapy program for young adults with a meniscal tear: Program development and feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T.; Thorlund, Jonas B.

    2018-01-01

    interview. Feedback from patients was included to finalize the exercise therapy program. Median improvements (Range) in KOOS subscales were 15 (0–33) for Pain, 11 (−11 to 50) for Symptoms, 16 (3–37) for Function in daily living, 23 (10–45) for Function in sport and recreation, and 9 (−6 to 31) for Quality...... on clinical expertise and available evidence. Six patients (age range 22–39 years) considered eligible for meniscal surgery by an orthopedic surgeon underwent the program. Patients completed the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and evaluated the program during a semi-structured qualitative...... of life. The patients found the program relevant and effective with only a few short-lasting adverse events and important clinical improvements after four to ten weeks. Physical therapist supervision was considered important. No patients wanted surgery up to 6 month after the exercise therapy program...

  9. Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project: Feasibility of BNFP Site as MOX Fuel Supply Facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-30

    An evaluation was made of the technical feasibility, cost, and schedule for converting the existing unused Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Facility (BNFP) into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) CANDU fuel fabrication plant for disposition of excess weapons plutonium. This MOX fuel would be transported to Ontario where it would generate electricity in the Bruce CANDU reactors. Because CANDU MOX fuel operates at lower thermal load than natural uranium fuel, the MOX program can be licensed by AECB within 4.5 years, and actual Pu disposition in the Bruce reactors can begin in 2001. Ontario Hydro will have to be involved in the entire program. Cost is compared between BNFP and FMEF at Hanford for converting to a CANDU MOX facility.

  10. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 3: Applied and direct uses, resource feasibility, economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant: design, testing, and operation summary; Feasibility of hydraulic energy recovery from geopressured-geothermal resources: economic analysis of the Pelton turbine; Brine production as an exploration tool for water drive gas reservoirs; Study of supercritical Rankine cycles; Application of the geopressured-geothermal resource to pyrolytic conversion or decomposition/detoxification processes; Conclusions on wet air oxidation, pyrolytic conversion, decomposition/detoxification process; Co-location of medium to heavy oil reservoirs with geopressured-geothermal resources and the feasibility of oil recovery using geopressured-geothermal fluids; Economic analysis; Application of geopressured-geothermal resources to direct uses; Industrial consortium for the utilization of the geopressured-geothermal resource; Power generation; Industrial desalination, gas use and sales, pollutant removal, thermal EOR, sulfur frasching, oil and natural gas pipelining, coal desulfurization and preparation, lumber and concrete products kilning; Agriculture and aquaculture applications; Paper and cane sugar industries; Chemical processing; Environmental considerations for geopressured-geothermal development. 27 figs., 25 tabs.

  11. Safety, feasibility, and tolerance of early oral feeding after colorectal resection outside an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotti, Luca; Nespoli, Luca; Torselli, Laura; Panelli, Mariarita; Nespoli, Angelo

    2011-06-01

    It is generally believed that resumption of feeding after colorectal resection is indicated only after recovery of bowel function. This study was designed to verify safety, feasibility, and tolerance of early oral postoperative feeding (EOF) outside an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program. One hundred patient candidates to elective colorectal resection were prospectively enrolled in an EOF program. Feeding was started on postoperative day (POD) 1 with oral nutritional supplement (ONS). On POD 2, patients had normal food plus ONS to reach 1,000-1,200 kcal/day with progressive increase until 1,800-2,000 kcal/day. Results were compared with historical controls (n = 100) in whom oral feeding was allowed only after full bowel function recovery. The ERAS program was not applied in both groups. The EOF group had a better recovery of short half-life protein synthesis compared with the control group (P days (range, 1-6 days) in the EOF group versus 5 days (range, 2-8 days) in the control group (P = 0.001). The feeding protocol was completed in 89 patients within POD 5. Tolerance to resumption of feeding was similar in the two groups. The overall rate of postoperative complication was 22% in the EOF group vs. 27% in the control group (P = 0.51). The median length of hospitalization was 9 days (range, 6-25 days) in the EOF group vs. 12 days (range, 6-31 days) in controls (P = 0.01). EOF after colorectal operations is feasible and safe outside an ERAS program.

  12. Feasibility of a group-based self-management program for ethnically diverse people with HIV/AIDS in Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M. Sullivan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available HIV/AIDS has transformed from a terminal to a chronic health condition affecting individuals for decades rather than years. Yet the development of care models that enhance client-focused HIV disease management skills is still in progress, especially in HIV resource-poor locales. This pilot study tested the feasibility of implementing the group-based Positive Self-Management Program (PSMP to participants recruited from Oahu, Hawaii. The PSMP is a self-management program developed at Stanford University. A paucity of data exists on the efficacy of implementing the specialized PSMP that addresses unique needs of persons living with HIV. With a focus on enhancing self-efficacy beliefs, examples of topics addressed during seven weekly 2-hr group sessions include managing the physiological and psychological aspects of HIV, adherence to treatment regimes, symptom management, and fostering healthy lifestyle behaviors. Using a randomized waitlist control design, participants were recruited via convenience sampling and active outreach. The manualized PSMP was delivered by trained seropositive lay leaders. The completion rate for those who attended any sessions was 93.5%. The average attendance rate was 85%. The majority of participants reported being comfortable in the PSMP group setting and very satisfied with program activities. Almost all participants reported that the PSMP was a useful and easy method to learn new ways of managing their illness. The majority (93.8% were most satisfied with skill development in goal setting and action planning. Implementation of the program for persons living with HIV in Hawaii was feasible. Lessons learned for future research and application to practice are discussed.

  13. Acceptance and commitment therapy universal prevention program for adolescents: a feasibility study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rowan Burckhardt; Vijaya Manicavasagar; Philip J Batterham; Dusan Hadzi-Pavlovic; Fiona Shand

    2017-01-01

    .... Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), a mindfulness-based therapy, has yet to be evaluated as a prevention program, but has demonstrated an ability to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression in adult and adolescent populations...

  14. Economy, efficacy, and feasibility of a risk-based control program against paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudahl, Anne Braad; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Østergaard, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Long-term effects of paratuberculosis on within-herd prevalence and on-farm economy of implementing risk-based control strategies were compared with alternative strategies by using a herd-simulation model. Closing transmission routes is essential for effective control of paratuberculosis. However......, many farmers lack the resources to carry out these procedures for all cows in the herd. When using risk-based control strategies 1) all cows are tested quarterly with a milk ELISA, 2) specific cows with a high risk of being infectious are identified, and 3) the farmer can focus only on these infectious...... animals to close infection routes. In this way the workload can be reduced, making these control strategies more feasible. This study evaluates potential long-term effects of the risk-based approach compared with non-risk-based strategies by simulations conducted with the herd-simulation model PTB...

  15. Structured Exercise Program is Feasible and Improves Functional Capacity among Older Adults in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo J Hernandez Soto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity is a major risk factor affecting overall health and functional capacity among older adults. In this study we evaluated functional capacity in 22 older adults in Puerto Rico (mean age ± standard deviation = 73.3 ± 8.2 years before, during and after eight weeks participation in a structured exercise program. Functional capacity was evaluated using a field test battery (body composition, flexibility, coordination, agility and balance, muscle endurance and cardiorespiratory endurance validated for this population. Also, cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max and blood lipid levels were evaluated in a sub-sample (n = 7. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to detect changes in functional capacity before, during and after the exercise program. A paired t-test was used to evaluate changes in VO2max and lipids before and after the program. Flexibility improved significantly during the exercise program (51.6 ± 12.2 vs. 57.7 ± 8.1 cm, p=0.04 and this change was sustained at the end of the program (54.4 ± 10.2 cm. At eight weeks into the program, time in the agility and balance test improved by two seconds and muscle endurance improved by five repetitions (p<0.05 for all. No changes were observed in body composition, coordination, VO2max and lipid levels (p>0.05. These results suggest that participation in a structured exercise program for eight weeks can positively impact factors that improve movement capacity in older adults.

  16. Evaluation of a continuous quality improvement program in anticoagulant therapy: Feasibility, satisfaction and perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, Ariane; Lahaie, Alexandre; Odobasic, Bojan; Tremblay, Marie-Philip; Wazzan, Dana; Caron, Stéphanie; Leblanc, Caroline; Martineau, Josée; Lalonde, Lyne

    2016-11-01

    The ACO Program (Programme ACO), a continuous quality improvement program (CQIP) in anticoagulation therapy, was offered in community pharmacies as a pilot project. To evaluate the participants' appreciation for the various activities of the program. Participants had access to training activities, including an audit with feedback, online training activities (OTA), clinical tools and support from facilitators. Cognitive behavioural learning determinants were evaluated before and 5 months after the beginning of the program. Participants' satisfaction and perception were documented via online questionnaires and a semistructured interview. Of the 52 pharmacists in the ACO Program, 47 participated in this evaluation. Seventy-seven percent of the participants completed at least 1 OTA and 6% published on the forum. The feeling of personal effectiveness rose from 8.01 (7.67-8.35) to 8.62 (8.24-8.99). The audit and feedback, as well as the high-quality OTA and their lecturers, were the most appreciated elements. There was a high OTA participation rate. The facilitators seemed to play a key role in the CQIP. The low level of participation in the forum reflects the known phenomenon of social loafing. Technical difficulties affecting the platform and data collection for the audit with feedback constituted limitations. The CQIP in anticoagulation therapy is appreciated by community pharmacists and is associated with an improved feeling of personal effectiveness.

  17. Resident selection for a physical medicine and rehabilitation program: feasibility and reliability of the multiple mini-interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Heather C; Townson, Andrea F

    2011-04-01

    The development of a process to select the best residents for training programs is challenging. There is a paucity of literature to support the implementation of an evidence-based approach or even best practice for program directors and selection committees. Although assessment of traditional academic markers such as clerkship grades and licensing examination scores can be helpful, these measures typically fail to capture performance in the noncognitive domains of medicine. In the specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation, physician competencies such as communication, health advocacy, and managerial and collaborative skills are of particular importance, but these are often difficult to evaluate in admission interviews. Recent research on admission processes for medical schools has demonstrated reliability and validity of the "multiple mini-interview." The objective of our project was to develop and evaluate the multiple mini-interview for a physical medicine and rehabilitation residency training program, with a focus on assessment of the noncognitive physician competencies. We found that the process was feasible, time efficient, and cost-efficient and that there was good interrater reliability. The multiple mini-interview may be applied to other physical medicine and rehabilitation residency programs. Further research is needed to confirm reliability and determine validity.

  18. School-based sleep promotion programs: effectiveness, feasibility and insights for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassoff, Jamie; Knäuper, Bärbel; Michaelsen, Sonia; Gruber, Reut

    2013-06-01

    Adolescent sleep restriction is prevalent in today's society and is associated with major negative consequences for adolescent development and well-being. In the present review, we examine efforts to reduce adolescent sleep restriction via school-based sleep promotion programs. Such programs effectively enhance sleep knowledge but usually do not succeed in maintaining sleep behavioral changes. This may be because insufficient consideration is given to the importance of integrating motivational components into the programs. We suggest that future interventions should consider the use of individually tailored approaches to sleep promotion. We recommend the use of motivational interviewing, which can detect individual differences in the degree of willingness to change, thus allowing motivational barriers to be adequately addressed on an individual basis. Furthermore, we suggest that individually tailored sleep promotion strategies could be delivered to a significant proportion of adolescents via internet-based communication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Study of the Feasibility of Duplicating JAMPS Applications Software in the Ada Programming Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    the Sieve of 33 Eratosthenes 4 Sizing Analysis for Existing Software Written in "C" 44 5 Sizing Data with Adjustments 45 6 Conversion from "C" to Ada...benchmark program based on the Sieve of EratoSthenes [7 ]. This program finds all of the prime numbers between 3 and 16381. The benchmark test results shown in...appears to be quite reasonable for the JAMPS application. 32 - Table 3 Benchmark Test Results Using the Sieve of Eratosthenes [7 ] Execution Operating Time

  20. The Aging, Community and Health Research Unit-Community Partnership Program for older adults with type 2 diabetes and multiple chronic conditions: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle-Reid, Maureen; Ploeg, Jenny; Fisher, Kathryn; Reimer, Holly; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Gafni, Amiram; Gruneir, Andrea; Kirkconnell, Ross; Marzouk, Sam; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Thabane, Lehana; Rojas-Fernandez, Carlos; Upshur, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effectiveness of community-based self-management interventions in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and multiple chronic conditions (MCC). The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility of implementation in practice (primary) and the feasibility of study methods and potential effectiveness (secondary) of the Aging, Community and Health-Community Partnership Program, a new 6-month interprofessional, nurse-led program to promote diabetes self-management in older adults (>65 years) with T2DM and MCC. This study used a prospective one-group pre-test/post-test design. Participants were recruited from a specialized diabetes clinic. They received a median of three in-home/clinic visits by certified diabetes educators (CDEs) and attended a median of three group wellness sessions provided by the CDEs in partnership with a community-based seniors' association. The primary outcome was the feasibility of the program (acceptability, fidelity, implementation barriers/facilitators). Secondary outcomes included the feasibility of the study methods (recruitment/retention rates and procedures, eligibility criteria, data collection and analysis methods) and potential effectiveness of the program based on 6-month changes in self-reported outcomes including self-management behavior (diet, exercise, self-monitoring), health status (quality of life, mental health), and costs of service use. Analysis of feasibility outcomes was primarily based on descriptive statistics. The potential effectiveness of the program was explored using different tests, with the results expressed using descriptive statistics and effect estimates (95 % confidence intervals). In total, 45 (88 %) of 51 eligible persons consented to participate. Of these, 37 (82 %) completed the 6-month follow-up. Participants and providers viewed the program as acceptable and feasible. Participants had a higher SF-12 physical component summary score at 6

  1. The Feasibility and Effects of a Parent-Facilitated Social Skills Training Program on Social Engagement of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radley, Keith C.; Jenson, William R.; Clark, Elaine; O'Neill, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Due to impairments in social interactions and communication, children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have a need for effective social skills training programs. However, many programs fail due to a lack of acquisition, maintenance, and generalization of target skills. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and…

  2. Feasibility of a pancreatic cancer surveillance program from a psychological point of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harinck, Femme; Nagtegaal, Tanja; Kluijt, Irma; Aalfs, Cora; Smets, Ellen; Poley, Jan-Werner; Wagner, Anja; van Hooft, Jeanin; Fockens, Paul; Bruno, Marco; Bleiker, Eveline M. A.

    2011-01-01

    : The success of any surveillance program depends not solely on its technological aspects but also on the commitment of participants to adhere to follow-up investigations, which is influenced by the psychological impact of surveillance. This study investigates the psychological impact of

  3. Effectiveness and feasibility of early physical rehabilitation programs for geriatric hospitalized patients : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosse, Nienke M.; Dutmer, Alisa L.; Dasenbrock, Lena; Bauer, Juergen M.; Lamoth, Claudine J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Old adults admitted to the hospital are at severe risk of functional loss during hospitalization. Early in-hospital physical rehabilitation programs appear to prevent functional loss in geriatric patients. The first aim of this review was to investigate the effect of early physical

  4. The Operational Feasibility of the Leadership Evaluation and Analysis Program (LEAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    organizational/management development COD) type programs presently being used in the Navy, Army, and Air Force (Forbes, 1976; Shaum , 1976; Hackman...Oldham, G. R. Development of the job diagnostic survey. Journal of Applied Psychology, 1975, 60(2), 159-170. Shaum , F. W. Organizational

  5. The Danish large wind turbine program. [feasibility of wind power in a utility grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the Danish wind energy program and its present status is given. Results and experiences from tests on the Gedser windmill (200 kW) are presented. The key results are presented from the preliminary design study and detailed design of two new WECS (630 kW each) is described.

  6. A Strengths-Based Group Program on Self-Harm: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Margaret; Hasking, Penelope; Estefan, Andrew; McClenaghan, Kerry; Lowe, John

    2010-01-01

    Every day in Queensland, Australia, student services within schools are responding to children who have deliberately self-injured. Although school nurses are in a prime position to effectively intervene, mitigate risk, and promote healthy self-caring behaviors, no programs that focus specifically on self-harm currently exist. This feasibility…

  7. Installation restoration program. Operable Unit B1 remedial investigation/feasibility study. Appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-30

    This document presents the results from the remedial investigation and feasibility study for Operable Unit (OU) B1 at McClellan AFB, Sacramento, CA. Operable Unit B1 includes the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) storage lot and Civil Engineering storage lot at McClellan AFB. The main chemicals of concern are PCBs, dioxins, and furans which may have leaked from transformers stored at OU B1 or were constituents of waste oil applied to soils to control dust. Sections 1.0 through 4.0 of the report present results from the RI, the potential for contaminant migration/transport from OU B1 and the current and future risks associated with OU B1. The FS begins in Section 5.0 identifying the remedial action objectives, in Sections 6.0 and 7.0, technologies are screened and potential remedial alternatives are developed. The final six remedial alternatives are analyzed and compared to each other using the criteria established in the NCP in Section 8.0.

  8. On the valorisation of public real estate properties: the valuation of programs and projects (feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampiero Bambagioni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Building construction and improvement and development require a holistic approach that allows an overall valuation of the investment, also as regards its town-planning/technical/economic aspects. The valuation can be done ex ante through feasibility studies (which are expressly provided for in the cases referred to in the Regulation for Implementation and Enforcement of the code of Public Contracts (D.P.R. 207/2010; to this end it is necessary to reconcile the “project constraints” that take shape in four macro-areas: Resources (and Economic Sustainability, Cost Engineering, Time Frames, Performance/Quality. Demonstrating the economic sustainability of a building project by combining principles and definite rules consistent with international best practices – even more so in the current international economic-financial situation – constitutes the essential prerequisite for raising resources, sometimes even among international institutional investors, that make it possible to develop all stages of the building process with continuity. An intelligent promotion and development of the immense national public real estate heritage will also promote the country’s economic-social development.

  9. The Feasibility of Using Nature-Based Settings for Physical Activity Programming: Views from Urban Youth and Program Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Jedediah E.; Oregon, Evelyn M.; Flett, M. Ryan; Gould, Daniel R.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Given the urgency to design programs to increase physical activity, especially to combat obesity in children, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate perceptions and opinions of a nature-based physical activity intervention designed for low-income urban adolescents. Methods: Four focus groups of adolescents,…

  10. Feasibility and Preliminary Effectiveness of the Homework Intervention Strategy (eHIS) Program to Enhance Male Condom Use: Research Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacka, Marta; Yardley, Lucy; Stone, Nicole; Graham, Cynthia A

    2018-01-02

    Although condoms are effective in reducing the risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancy, they are still often not used consistently and correctly. Negative impact on sensation and pleasure, ruining the mood, causing problems with maintaining erection, and condom slippage or breakage are some of the reasons given by men explaining why they do not want to use condoms. Although many interventions promoting condom use exist, some of them delivered online are complex and time- and resource-intensive. The Homework Intervention Strategy (eHIS) program, adapted from the existing face-to-face Kinsey Institute Homework Intervention Strategy (KIHIS) program, aims to address these issues by encouraging men to focus on sensation and pleasure when trying different types of condoms and lubricants in a low-pressure situation (on their own, without a partner present). The objectives of this study are to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and users' engagement with the eHIS program, its preliminary effectiveness in increasing condom use frequency and consistency, as well as the feasibility of the program's evaluation approach, including choice of measures and participant recruitment and retaining strategies (primary outcomes). Secondary outcomes include condom use experience, condom use attitudes, condom use self-efficacy, condom use errors and problems, and condom fit-and-feel. All of these will be analyzed in the context of participants' demographics, sexual history, and previous condom use. The study has a pre-post-test, within-subjects design. Men aged 18 to 69 and living in the United Kingdom are recruited through posters, leaflets, social media, and emails. Study participants are asked to complete T1 (baseline) measures before entering the eHIS website. After completing the T1 measures, they can order a free condoms and lubricants kit and have access to the eHIS website for 4 weeks. During that time they are asked to practice using different

  11. Consolidation of Military Voluntary Education Program: Feasibility and Cost Benefit Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    ashore and afloat, to help service members improve their writing, mathematics, and reading skils . The course is offered free to the service member...college programs, atai, f career p iomotions, achievement of full workplace literacy , and completion of requirements for certificates and degrees. The...counseled concerning the requirements for earning an apprenticeship certification in their skil !. The service mewrber tabulates his daily production hours

  12. Coach to cope: feasibility of a life coaching program for young adults with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knudsen KB

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Karin Bæk Knudsen,1 Tacjana Pressler,2 Laust Hvas Mortensen,3 Mary Jarden,3,4 Kirsten Arntz Boisen,5 Marianne Skov,2 Alexandra L Quittner,6 Terese Lea Katzenstein1,7 1Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; 2Cystic Fibrosis Center Copenhagen, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 4University Hospital Center for Health Research (UCSF, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; 5Center of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; 6Miami Children’s Research Institute, Miami, FL, USA; 7Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Background: Over the last two decades, lifespan has increased significantly for people living with cystic fibrosis (CF. However, several studies have demonstrated that many young adults with CF report mental health problems and poor adherence to their prescribed treatments, challenging their long-term physical health. Treatment guidelines recommend interventions to improve adherence and self-management. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of a life coaching intervention for young adults with CF. Methods: A randomized, controlled feasibility study was conducted at the CF Center at Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet. Participants were young adults with CF, aged 18–30 years without severe intellectual impairments. Participants were randomized to either life coaching or standard care. The intervention consisted of up to 10 individual, face-to-face or telephone coaching sessions over a period of 1 year. Primary outcomes were recruitment success, acceptability, adherence to the

  13. Feasibility of a web-based continuing medical education program in dermatology: the DermoFAD experience in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, Luigi; Manfrini, Roberto; Martin, Leigh; Deligant, Christian; Dri, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    Web-based systems are increasingly being considered for medical education. A draft legislation on distance-learning programs was licensed in Italy by the National Commission for Continuous Education in November 2003. A series of pilot studies were developed, among these the DermoFAD project, based on five simulated clinical cases of acne and a systematic appraisal of the evidence for their clinical management. From July 1 to August 27, 2004, a total of 500 medical doctors participated in a free of charge evaluation program of the project. Users were distributed all over Italy. Two hundred and eighty-one (56.2%) were primary care physicians, 83 (16.6%) dermatologists, and 136 (27.2%) other medical specialists. A wide range of connecting times was observed. The pass rate of each individual case, at first attempt, ranged from 44 to 77%. When asked to assess the overall distance-learning experience, 98% of the doctors considered it to be enjoyable. A total of 2,152 continuing medical education (CME) credits were awarded. Over 50% of the users stated they would still use the system if they had to pay for it. Our experience shows that distance learning is feasible and is well accepted by physicians. The DermoFAD program was an efficient means of delivering CME to the Italian medical community at large.

  14. Feasibility and Acute Care Utilization Outcomes of a Post-Acute Transitional Telemonitoring Program for Underserved Chronic Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Cecile; Bender, Miriam; Smith, Tyler; Broad, Jason

    2015-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and heart failure (HF) are chronic diseases that impart significant health and care costs to the patient and health system. Limited access to health services affects disease severity and functional status. Telemonitoring has shown promise in reducing acute care utilization for chronic disease patients, but the benefit for the underserved has not been determined. We evaluated acute care utilization outcomes following an acute event of a 90-day transitional care program integrating telemonitoring technology and home visits for underserved COPD and HF patients. Patients were enrolled into the program between October 2010 and August 2012. Primary outcomes included rates of emergency department (ED) visits and all-cause re-admission at 30, 90, and 180 days postdischarge. Program and functional status at enrollment and discharge and satisfaction with telemonitoring at discharge were measured. Telemonitoring included daily symptomatology recording and was removed at 90 days. A control cohort was identified through electronic health records and propensity-matched via 15 variables to achieve a sample size with balanced baseline characteristics. Program patients showed 50% reduction in 30-day re-admission and 13-19% reduction in 180-day re-admission compared with control patients. There was no significant difference in ED utilization. Patients were satisfied with telemonitoring services, and functional status improved by program end. This feasibility study suggests telemonitoring in the context of a transitional care model following an acute event may reduce all-cause 30-day re-admissions by up to 50% and has the potential to reduce long-term acute care utilization and thus care costs. More rigorous and long-term investigation is warranted.

  15. A Group-Based Mobile Application to Increase Adherence in Exercise and Nutrition Programs: A Factorial Design Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Honglu; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Youngblood, Gregory Michael; Ram, Ashwin; Pirolli, Peter

    2016-01-15

    Novel methods of promoting self-monitoring and social support are needed to ensure long-term maintenance of behavior change. In this paper, we directly investigate the effects of group support in an exercise and nutrition program delivered by an mHealth application called Fittle. Our first specific study aim was to explore whether social support improved adherence in wellness programs. Our second specific study aim was to assess whether media types (ePaper vs mobile) were associated with different levels of compliance and adherence to wellness programs. The third aim was to assess whether the use of an mHealth application led to positive changes to participants' eating behavior, physical activity, and stress level, compared to traditional paper-based programs. A 2 × 2 (eg, Media: Mobile vs ePaper × Group Type: Team vs Solo) factorial design feasibility study was conducted. A sample of 124 volunteers who were interested in improving eating behavior, increasing physical activity, or reducing stress participated in this study. The study duration was 8 weeks. All groups were self-directed with no ongoing human input from the research team. Participants in ePaper conditions had higher attrition rates compared to participants in Mobile conditions, χ3(2)=9.96, P=.02 (N=124). Participants in Mobile conditions reported their compliance with a much higher frequency closer to the time of challenge activity completion (2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test comparing distributions was highly significant-KS=0.33, PMobile conditions-χ1(2)=25.25, Pmobile app allowed a more accurate method to report and track health behaviors over a longer period than traditional ePaper-based diaries or log books. There was a significant difference in the overall compliance score for Mobile-Solo (Mean [SD] 0.30 [0.39]) and Mobile-Team (Mean [SD] 0.49 [0.35]) conditions (t50.82=1.94, P=.05). This suggests that working in a team increased participants' overall compliance within Fittle. Survival

  16. An Internet administered treatment program for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Bethany M; Titov, Nickolai; Dear, Blake F; Spence, Jay; Andrews, Gavin; Johnston, Luke; Solley, Karen

    2011-12-01

    The present study evaluates efficacy of a new Internet-administered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol, The OCD Program, designed to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) remotely. This protocol comprises 8 online lessons delivered over 8 weeks and incorporates cognitive and behavioral techniques. Twenty-two individuals with a principal diagnosis of OCD received CBT-based online lessons, homework assignments, twice weekly contact from a clinical psychologist, and automated emails. Eighty-one percent of participants completed the lessons within the 8-week program. Post-treatment and 3-month follow-up data were collected from 21/21 (100%) and 19/21 (91%) participants, respectively. Participants improved significantly on the primary outcome measures, the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised, with within-groups effect sizes (Cohen's d) at follow-up of 1.28 and 0.60, respectively. Participants rated the procedure as highly acceptable despite receiving an average of only 86min (SD=54.4min) telephone contact with the therapist over the 8 weeks. These results provide preliminary support for efficacy of Internet-administered treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Feasibility study of an Integrated Program for Aerospace vehicle Design (IPAD). Volume 4: IPAD system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, W.; Carpenter, L. C.; Redhed, D. D.; Hansen, S. D.; Anderson, L. O.; Kawaguchi, A. S.

    1973-01-01

    The computing system design of IPAD is described and the requirements which form the basis for the system design are discussed. The system is presented in terms of a functional design description and technical design specifications. The functional design specifications give the detailed description of the system design using top-down structured programming methodology. Human behavioral characteristics, which specify the system design at the user interface, security considerations, and standards for system design, implementation, and maintenance are also part of the technical design specifications. Detailed specifications of the two most common computing system types in use by the major aerospace companies which could support the IPAD system design are presented. The report of a study to investigate migration of IPAD software between the two candidate 3rd generation host computing systems and from these systems to a 4th generation system is included.

  18. Feasibility, acceptability, and initial efficacy of an online sexual health promotion program for LGBT youth: the Queer Sex Ed intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustanski, Brian; Greene, George J; Ryan, Daniel; Whitton, Sarah W

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth experience multiple sexual health inequities driven, in part, by deficits in parental and peer support, school-based sex education programs, and community services. Research suggests that the Internet may be an important resource in the development of sexual health among LGBT youth. We examined the feasibility of recruiting youth in same-sex relationships into an online sexual health intervention, evaluated intervention acceptability, and obtained initial estimates of intervention efficacy. LGBT youth (16 to 20 years old) completed Queer Sex Ed (QSE), an online, multimedia sexual health intervention consisting of five modules. The final sample (N = 202) completed the pretest, intervention, and posttest assessments. The primary study outcomes were sexual orientation identity and self-acceptance (e.g., coming-out self-efficacy), sexual health knowledge (e.g., sexual functioning), relationship variables (e.g., communication skills), and safer sex (e.g., sexual assertiveness). Analyses indicated that 15 of the 17 outcomes were found to be significant (p acceptability, and initial efficacy of QSE, an innovative online comprehensive sexual health program for LGBT youth.

  19. Cervical Cancer Screening Program by Visual Inspection: Acceptability and Feasibility in Health Insurance Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apollinaire G. Horo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess willingness to participate and diagnostic accuracy of visual inspection for early detection of cervical neoplasia among women in a health insurance company. Patients and Method. Cervical cancer screening was systematically proposed to 800 women after consecutive information and awareness sessions. The screening method was visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA or Lugol’s iodine (VILI. Results. Among the 800 identified women, 640 (82% have accepted the screening, their mean age was 39 years, and 12.0% of them were involved in a polygamist couple. 28.2% of women had prior cervical screening. VIA has been detected positive in 5.9% of women versus 8.6% for VILI. The sensitivity was 72.9% and specificity was 95.2% for VIA versus 71.2% and 97.3% for VILI respectively. The histological examination highlighted a nonspecific chronic cervicitis in 4.6%, CIN1 lesions in 5.91%, and CIN2/3 in 1.2% of the cases. Conclusion. Cervical cancer screening by visual inspection showed appropriate diagnostic accuracy when used to detect early cervical lesions. It is a simple and easy to perform method that could be introduced progressively in the health insurance policy while waiting for a national screening program.

  20. Effects and feasibility of an Integrative Medicine program for geriatric patients– a cluster-randomized pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teut M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael Teut, Katharina Schnabel, Roland Baur, Annette Kerckhoff, Frauke Reese, Niels Pilgram, Franziska Berger, Rainer Luedtke, Claudia M Witt Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany Background: Older adults often use complementary medicine; however, very few interventional studies have focused on them. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and to obtain preliminary data on effectiveness of an Integrative Medicine (IM program compared to usual medical care. Methods: The study consisted of older adults living in shared apartment communities including caregiving. The shared apartments were cluster-randomized to the IM program or Usual Care (UC. IM consisted of additional lifestyle modification (exercise and diet, external naturopathic applications, homeopathic treatment, and modification of conventional drug therapy for 12 months. The UC group received conventional care alone. The following outcomes were used: Nurses Observation Scale for Geriatric Patients (NOSGER; Assessment of Motor and Process Skills; Barthel Index; Qualidem; Profile of Wellbeing; and Mini-mental State Examination. Exploratory effect sizes (Cohen’s d, means adjusted for differences of baseline values were calculated to analyze group differences. Results: A total of eight shared apartment communities were included; four were allocated to IM (29 patients, median seven patients; [mean ± standard deviation] 82.7 ± 8.6 years and four to UC (29 patients, median eight patients; 76.0 ± 12.8 years of age. After 12 months, effect sizes ≥0.3 were observed for activities of daily living on the NOSGER-Activities of Daily Living subscale (0.53, Barthel Index (0.30, Qualidem total sum score (0.39, Profile of Wellbeing (0.36, NOSGER-Impaired Social Behavior (0.47, and NOSGER-Depressed Mood subscales (0.40. Smaller or no effects were observed for all other outcomes. The intervention

  1. Running Head: Feasibility of Blood Management. Feasibility Study of a Blood Management Program in the Mike O’Callaghan Federal Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-02

    beneficiaries (99th Medical Group, 2007). The MOFH averages as many as 2,000 outpatient visits a day and performs as many as 30 inpatient and...dental residents, general surgery residents, and certified registered nurse anesthetists. The MOFH initiated a Family Medicine Residency program in...the most experience in the field. A comprehensive program includes techniques to conserve and manage blood in the preoperative setting

  2. Preparing for aging: Development, feasibility and preliminary results of an educational program for midlife and older based on proactive coping theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, C.; Ridder, D.T.D. de; Bensing, J.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: This article describes the development, content, feasibility and first results of a short educational program for preparing for aging, based on the process model of proactive coping [Aspinwall LG, Taylor SE. A stitch in time: self regulation and proactive coping. Psychol Bull 1997; 121:

  3. Feasibility of a Combined Aerobic and Strength Training Program and Its Effects on Cognitive and Physical Function in Institutionalized Dementia Patients. A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossers, W.J.R; Scherder, E.J.A.; Boersma, F.; Hortobágyi, T.; van der Woude, L.H.V.; van Heuvelen, M.J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We examined the feasibility of a combined aerobic and strength training program in institutionalized dementia patients and studied the effects on cognitive and physical function. Methods: Thirty-three patients with dementia, recruited from one nursing home, participated in this

  4. Feasibility of a combined aerobic and strength training program and its effects on cognitive and physical function in institutionalized dementia patients. A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossers, Willem J R; Scherder, Erik J A; Boersma, Froukje; Hortobágyi, Tibor; van der Woude, Lucas H V; van Heuvelen, Marieke J G

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We examined the feasibility of a combined aerobic and strength training program in institutionalized dementia patients and studied the effects on cognitive and physical function. Methods: Thirty-three patients with dementia, recruited from one nursing home, participated in this

  5. Pilot Evaluation of the Feasibility and Acceptability of StressOFF Strategies: A Single-Session School-Based Stress Management Program for Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Amy J.; Heath, Nancy L.; Carsley, Dana

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the pilot evaluation of the feasibility and acceptability of StressOFF Strategies, a "single-session" (45 min) adolescent-targeted, school-based psychoeducational program, which introduces cognitive behavioral techniques and mindfulness-based techniques. Five hundred and sixty-five Grade 9 students (57% female;…

  6. A feasibility study and pilot randomised trial of a tailored prevention program to reduce falls in older people with mild dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Wesson, Jacqueline; Clemson, Lindy; Brodaty, Henry; Lord, Stephen; Taylor, Morag; Gitlin, Laura; Close, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Background People with dementia have a disproportionately high rate of falls and fractures and poorer outcomes, yet there is currently no evidence to guide falls prevention in this population. Methods A randomised trial design was used to test feasibility of study components and acceptability of a home hazard reduction and balance and strength exercise fall prevention program. The program was tailored to participant?s individual cognitive levels and implemented as a carer-supported interventi...

  7. Determination of the feasibility of a multicomponent intervention program to prevent delirium in the Intensive Care Unit: A modified RAND Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenaar, Annelies; van den Boogaard, Mark; Underpin-Icu Study Group; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Pickkers, Peter

    2017-01-10

    Delirium is common in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients and associated with poor outcome. In non-ICU patients a multicomponent intervention program with non-pharmacological interventions has shown to reduce delirium. Currently, there is insufficient evidence regarding the effects of such a program in ICU patients. We developed a draft program based on a review. As most studies were conducted in non-ICU patients, the feasibility of the program in ICU patients needs to be assessed before investigating its effectiveness. To determine experts' opinion and to achieve group consensus on the feasibility and completeness of the multicomponent intervention program for ICU patients. A modified RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method Delphi study was used. A total of 38 experts were selected following purposive sampling. Round one informed the experts about the draft program and asked for their opinion about its feasibility and completeness. In round two the experts were asked to reconsider their opinion based on changes made, and to rank the interventions in order of importance. The feasibility was scored using a 9-point Likert scale. A disagreement index (DI) and panel median were calculated to determine the level of agreement. During Delphi round one 100% of the questionnaires was completed, during round two 79%. After two rounds the experts agreed on the feasibility of the interventions targeting sleep deprivation (panel median 7.00, DI 0.26), immobility (panel median 8.00, DI 0.22), visual and hearing impairment (panel median 8.00, DI 0.19), and cognitive impairment (panel median 8.00, DI 0.23), except for cognitive training (panel median 5.00, DI 0.52). During this study a feasible multicomponent intervention program to prevent ICU delirium was developed based on expert consensus. As no consensus was reached on cognitive training, a pilot study is planned to determine the feasibility of cognitive training in the ICU. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Critical Care

  8. Community-based adaptive physical activity program for chronic stroke: feasibility, safety, and efficacy of the Empoli model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Mary; Benvenuti, Francesco; Macko, Richard; Taviani, Antonio; Segenni, Lucianna; Mayer, Federico; Sorkin, John D; Stanhope, Steven J; Macellari, Velio; Weinrich, Michael

    2009-09-01

    To determine whether Adaptive Physical Activity (APA-stroke), a community-based exercise program for participants with hemiparetic stroke, improves function in the community. Nonrandomized controlled study in Tuscany, Italy, of participants with mild to moderate hemiparesis at least 9 months after stroke. Forty-nine participants in a geographic health authority (Empoli) were offered APA-stroke (40 completed the study). Forty-four control participants in neighboring health authorities (Florence and Pisa) received usual care (38 completed the study). The APA intervention was a community-based progressive group exercise regimen that included walking, strength, and balance training for 1 hour, thrice a week, in local gyms, supervised by gym instructors. No serious adverse clinical events occurred during the exercise intervention. Outcome measures included the following: 6-month change in gait velocity (6-Minute Timed Walk), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Berg Balance Scale, Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), Barthel Index, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Index of Caregivers Strain. After 6 months, the intervention group improved whereas controls declined in gait velocity, balance, SPPB, and SIS social participation domains. These between-group comparisons were statistically significant at PAPA-stroke appears to be safe, feasible, and efficacious in a community setting.

  9. A high school-based voluntary cardiovascular risk screening program: issues of feasibility and correlates of electrocardiographic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadlani, Gul H; Wilkinson, James D; Ludwig, David A; Harmon, William G; O'Brien, Robert; Sokoloski, Mary C; Epstein, Michael L; Miller, Tracie L; Messiah, Sarah E; Landy, David C; Franco, Vivian I; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2013-10-01

    Risk factors for adult cardiovascular events can be identified from the prenatal period through childhood. We performed a cardiovascular risk-screening program in students from grades 9-12 in 7 high schools in Hillsborough County, FL. We obtained blood pressure (BP) measurements and calculated body mass index (BMI) as risk factors for future cardiovascular events as well as obtained an electrocardiogram (ECG) for the purposes of detecting possible life-threatening arrhythmias. Of ~14,000 students contacted, 600 (4 %) participated in the screening. Of these, 517 (86 %) were diagnosed with normal, 71 (12 %) with borderline, and 12 (1 %) with abnormal ECGs. Although no participant had any cardiac history, two of the abnormal ECGs indicated a cardiac diagnosis associated with the potential for sudden cardiac death. Both systolic and diastolic BP increased as the ECG diagnosis moved from normal (115.6/73.8) through borderline (121.0/75.9) to an abnormal (125.0/80.7) diagnosis (all P ≤ .0016). An increase in BMI was only observed when an ECG diagnosis was abnormal (P = .0180). Boys had a greater prevalence (18.97 %) of borderline or abnormal ECGs compared with girls (6.75 %), whereas no discernible differences were seen in ECG diagnosis between white and nonwhite individuals (15.09 and 12.26 %, respectively). Although participation rates were low, a high school-based cardiovascular risk-screening program including ECG is feasible. Although ECG diagnosis tended to be related to other known cardiovascular risk factors (BP, BMI), the utility of an abnormal ECG in adolescence as a predictor of future cardiovascular risk will require further evaluation in more controlled settings.

  10. Parents Working Together: development and feasibility trial of a workplace-based program for parents that incorporates general parenting and health behaviour messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wilson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parenting programs integrating general parenting and health behaviour messaging may be an effective childhood obesity prevention strategy. The current study explored workplaces as an alternate setting to deliver parenting programs. Methods This study involved two phases. The objective of the first phase was to explore interest in and preferred delivery mode of a workplace program that addresses general parenting and health behaviours. The objective of the second phase was to adapt and test the feasibility and acceptability of a pre-existing program that has been successfully run in community settings for parents in their workplace. To achieve the first objective, we conducted 9 individual or small group qualitative interviews with 11 workplace representatives involved in employee wellness/wellness programming from 8 different organizations across Southwestern Ontario. To achieve the second objective, we adapted a pre-existing program incorporating workplace representatives’ suggestions to create Parents Working Together (PWT. We then tested the program using a pre/post uncontrolled feasibility trial with 9 employees of a large manufacturing company located in Guelph, Ontario. Results Results from the qualitative phase showed that a workplace parenting program that addresses general parenting and health behaviour messages is of interest to workplaces. Results from the feasibility trial suggest that PWT is feasible and well received by participants; attendance rates were high with 89 % of the participants attending 5 or more sessions and 44 % attending all 7 sessions offered. All participants stated they would recommend the program to co-workers. Just over half of our parent participants were male (55.6 %, which is a unique finding as the majority of existing parenting programs engage primarily mothers. Impact evaluation results suggest that changes in children’s and parents’ weight-related behaviours, as well as

  11. Parents Working Together: development and feasibility trial of a workplace-based program for parents that incorporates general parenting and health behaviour messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L; Lero, Donna; Smofsky, Allan; Gross, Deborah; Haines, Jess

    2016-11-10

    Parenting programs integrating general parenting and health behaviour messaging may be an effective childhood obesity prevention strategy. The current study explored workplaces as an alternate setting to deliver parenting programs. This study involved two phases. The objective of the first phase was to explore interest in and preferred delivery mode of a workplace program that addresses general parenting and health behaviours. The objective of the second phase was to adapt and test the feasibility and acceptability of a pre-existing program that has been successfully run in community settings for parents in their workplace. To achieve the first objective, we conducted 9 individual or small group qualitative interviews with 11 workplace representatives involved in employee wellness/wellness programming from 8 different organizations across Southwestern Ontario. To achieve the second objective, we adapted a pre-existing program incorporating workplace representatives' suggestions to create Parents Working Together (PWT). We then tested the program using a pre/post uncontrolled feasibility trial with 9 employees of a large manufacturing company located in Guelph, Ontario. Results from the qualitative phase showed that a workplace parenting program that addresses general parenting and health behaviour messages is of interest to workplaces. Results from the feasibility trial suggest that PWT is feasible and well received by participants; attendance rates were high with 89 % of the participants attending 5 or more sessions and 44 % attending all 7 sessions offered. All participants stated they would recommend the program to co-workers. Just over half of our parent participants were male (55.6 %), which is a unique finding as the majority of existing parenting programs engage primarily mothers. Impact evaluation results suggest that changes in children's and parents' weight-related behaviours, as well as parents' reports of family interfering with work were in the

  12. ECHO: Machine feasibility program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip H. Steele; Craig Boden; Philip A. Araman

    2000-01-01

    Reductions in saw kerf (the term saw kerf refers to both the sawtooth width as well as the actual sawline made in sawing) on headrigs and resaws can dramatically increase lumber recovery. Research has also shown that lumber target size reductions are even more important than kerf reductions in providing increased lumber recovery. Decreases in either kerf or lumber size...

  13. Feasibility and effectiveness of a web-based positive psychology program for youth mental health: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicavasagar, Vijaya; Horswood, Deserae; Burckhardt, Rowan; Lum, Alistair; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Parker, Gordon

    2014-06-04

    Youth mental health is a significant public health concern due to the high prevalence of mental health problems in this population and the low rate of those affected seeking help. While it is increasingly recognized that prevention is better than cure, most youth prevention programs have utilized interventions based on clinical treatments (eg, cognitive behavioral therapy) with inconsistent results. This study explores the feasibility of the online delivery of a youth positive psychology program, Bite Back, to improve the well-being and mental health outcomes of Australian youth. Further aims were to examine rates of adherence and attrition, and to investigate the program's acceptability. Participants (N=235) aged 12-18 years were randomly assigned to either of two conditions: Bite Back (n=120) or control websites (n=115). The Bite Back website comprised interactive exercises and information across a variety of positive psychology domains; the control condition was assigned to neutral entertainment-based websites that contained no psychology information. Participants in both groups were instructed to use their allocated website for 6 consecutive weeks. Participants were assessed pre- and postintervention on the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-Short form (DASS-21) and the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (SWEMWBS). Of the 235 randomized participants, 154 (65.5%) completed baseline and post measures after 6 weeks. Completers and dropouts were equivalent in demographics, the SWEMWBS, and the depression and anxiety subscales of the DASS-21, but dropouts reported significantly higher levels of stress than completers. There were no differences between the Bite Back and control conditions at baseline on demographic variables, DASS-21, or SWEMWBS scores. Qualitative data indicated that 49 of 61 Bite Back users (79%) reported positive experiences using the website and 55 (89%) agreed they would continue to use it after study completion. Compared to the

  14. Using health promotion guidelines for persons with disabilities to develop and evaluate a physical activity program for individuals with multiple sclerosis: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Ibarra, Alicia; Nery-Hurwit, Mara; Driver, Simon; MacDonald, Megan

    2017-04-01

    The Health Education for Persons with Multiple Sclerosis (HEMS) program was developed in response to the need for interventions aimed at increasing physical activity for individuals with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). It was developed and evaluated using Drum and colleagues (2009) guidelines for implementing health promotion programs for individuals with disabilities. The purpose of this feasibility study is to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of the HEMS program. Thirteen individuals with MS completed the 8-week health education program. A mixed method approach for evaluation was implemented (i.e., survey and focus groups). Process and resource feasibility demonstrated that over half of the participants attended at least 80% of the weekly sessions. Focus group data provided valuable feedback for future iterations of the program including critiques on the delivery, content, and group support provided. Outcome evaluation showed increases in self-efficacy (survey), improvements in theoretical constructs (focus groups), and increased physical activity (focus groups). Results show that health promotion programs for persons with MS can improve physical activity and related constructs. Next steps will be to revise, implement, and reevaluate the HEMS program in a larger randomized control trial. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Is the Counterweight Program a feasible and acceptable option for structured weight management delivered by practice nurses in Australia? A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jodi; Hoon, Elizabeth A; Afzali, Hossein Haji Ali; Spooner, Catherine; Harris, Mark F; Karnon, Jonathan

    2017-05-11

    Nurse-led weight management programs, like the Counterweight Program in the United Kingdom, may offer a way for Australian general practices to provide weight management support to adults who are overweight or obese. During Counterweight, nurses provide patients with six fortnightly education sessions and three follow-up sessions to support weight maintenance. This study examined the feasibility, acceptability and perceived value of the Counterweight Program in the Australian primary care setting using a mixed-methods approach. Six practice nurses, from three general practices, were trained and subsidised to deliver the program. Of the 65 patients enrolled, 75% (n=49) completed the six education sessions. General practitioners and practice nurses reported that the training and resource materials were useful, the program fitted into general practices with minimal disruption and the additional workload was manageable. Patients reported that the program created a sense of accountability and provided a safe space to learn about weight management. Overall, Counterweight was perceived as feasible, acceptable and valuable by Australian practice staff and patients. The key challenge for future implementation will be identifying adequate and sustainable funding. An application to publically fund Counterweight under the Medicare Benefits Schedule would require stronger evidence of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness in Australia.

  16. An Analysis of a Novel, Short-Term Therapeutic Psychoeducational Program for Children and Adolescents with Chronic Neurological Illness and Their Parents; Feasibility and Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Bonglim Joo; Young-Mock Lee; Heung Dong Kim; Soyong Eom

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this intervention was to develop a therapeutic psycho-educational program that improves quality of life in children and adolescents who are experiencing chronic neurological illness, including epilepsy, and their parents, and to analyze the intervention's feasibility and efficacy and participants' satisfaction. Participants were eight children (n = 8) and adolescents and their parents; participating children were experiencing chronic neurological illness with psychological como...

  17. A randomized controlled trial of two simple mind-body programs, Kirtan Kriya meditation and music listening, for adults with subjective cognitive decline: Feasibility and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Kim E; Selfe, Terry Kit; Khalsa, Dharma Singh; Kandati, Sahiti

    2016-06-01

    In this randomized controlled trial (RCT), we assessed the feasibility and acceptability of two simple home-based relaxation programs in adults experiencing subjective cognitive decline, a strong predictor of Alzheimer's disease. Sixty participants were randomized to a beginner Kirtan Kriya meditation (KK) program or a music listening (ML) program. Participants were asked to practice 12min daily for the first 12 weeks, then as often as they liked for the following 3 months. Participants underwent assessments at baseline, 12 weeks, and 6 months to evaluate changes in key outcomes. Feasibility and acceptability were evaluated by measuring recruitment and retention rates, assessment visit attendance, practice adherence, and treatment expectancy; exit questionnaires completed at 12 weeks and 6 months provided additional data regarding participant experience with the study, perceived barriers to and facilitators of practice, reasons for drop-out, and views regarding the assigned intervention. Fifty-three participants (88%) completed the 6 month study. Adherence in both groups was excellent, with participants completing 93% (91% KK, 94% ML) of sessions on average in the first 12 weeks, and 71% (68% KK, 74% ML) during the 3 month, practice-optional, follow-up period. At week 12, over 80% of participants indicated they were likely to continue practicing following study completion. Responses to both structured and open-ended exit questionnaire items also suggested high satisfaction with both programs. Findings of this RCT of a beginner meditation practice and a simple ML program suggest that both programs were well accepted and the practices are feasible in adults with early memory loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reporting of feasibility factors in publications on integrated treatment programs for women with substance abuse issues and their children: a systematic review and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henderson Joanna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementation of evidence-based practices in real-world settings is a complex process impacted by many factors, including intervention, dissemination, service provider, and organizational characteristics. Efforts to improve knowledge translation have resulted in greater attention to these factors. Researcher attention to the applicability of findings to applied settings also has increased. Much less attention, however, has been paid to intervention feasibility, an issue important to applied settings. Methods In a systematic review of 121documents regarding integrated treatment programs for women with substance abuse issues and their children, we examined the presence of feasibility-related information. Specifically, we analysed study descriptions for information regarding feasibility factors in six domains (intervention, practitioner, client, service delivery, organizational, and service system. Results On average, fewer than half of the 25 feasibility details assessed were included in the documents. Most documents included some information describing the participating clients, the services offered as part of the intervention, the location of services, and the expected length of stay or number of sessions. Only approximately half of the documents included specific information about the treatment model. Few documents indicated whether the intervention was manualized or whether the intervention was preceded by a standardized screening or assessment process. Very few provided information about the core intervention features versus the features open to local adaptation, or the staff experience or training required to deliver the intervention. Conclusions As has been found in reviews of intervention studies in other fields, our findings revealed that most documents provide some client and intervention information, but few documents provided sufficient information to fully evaluate feasibility. We consider possible explanations

  19. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TEST BED PROGRAM FOR NOVEL DETECTORS AND DETECTOR MATERIALS AT SRS H-CANYON SEPARATIONS FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexton, L.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Hanks, D.

    2011-06-07

    Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have proposed that a test bed for advanced detectors be established at the H-Canyon separations facility located on the DOE Savannah River Site. The purpose of the proposed test bed will be to demonstrate the capabilities of emerging technologies for national and international safeguards applications in an operational environment, and to assess the ability of proven technologies to fill any existing gaps. The need for such a test bed has been expressed in the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) program plan and would serve as a means to facilitate transfer of safeguards technologies from the laboratory to an operational environment. New detectors and detector materials open the possibility of operating in a more efficient and cost effective manner, thereby strengthening national and international safeguards objectives. In particular, such detectors could serve the DOE and IAEA in improving timeliness of detection, minimizing uncertainty and improving confidence in results. SRNL's concept for the H Canyon test bed program would eventually open the facility to other DOE National Laboratories and establish a program for testing national and international safeguards related equipment. The initial phase of the test bed program is to conduct a comprehensive feasibility study to determine the benefits and challenges associated with establishing such a test bed. The feasibility study will address issues related to the planning, execution, and operation of the test bed program. Results from the feasibility study will be summarized and discussed in this paper.

  20. Evaluating the Feasibility of a Play-Based Telehealth Intervention Program for Children with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitropoulos, Anastasia; Zyga, Olena; Russ, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Here we report the feasibility and acceptability of telehealth for direct intervention in children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Children with PWS have social-cognitive challenges that are similar to children with ASD. However, developing behavioral interventions for individuals with PWS is faced with the significant challenge of enrolling…

  1. Assessing the accuracy and feasibility of a refractive error screening program conducted by school teachers in pre-primary and primary schools in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanlaya Teerawattananon

    Full Text Available As part of the development of a system for the screening of refractive error in Thai children, this study describes the accuracy and feasibility of establishing a program conducted by teachers.To assess the accuracy and feasibility of screening by teachers.A cross-sectional descriptive and analytical study was conducted in 17 schools in four provinces representing four geographic regions in Thailand. A two-staged cluster sampling was employed to compare the detection rate of refractive error among eligible students between trained teachers and health professionals. Serial focus group discussions were held for teachers and parents in order to understand their attitude towards refractive error screening at schools and the potential success factors and barriers.The detection rate of refractive error screening by teachers among pre-primary school children is relatively low (21% for mild visual impairment but higher for moderate visual impairment (44%. The detection rate for primary school children is high for both levels of visual impairment (52% for mild and 74% for moderate. The focus group discussions reveal that both teachers and parents would benefit from further education regarding refractive errors and that the vast majority of teachers are willing to conduct a school-based screening program.Refractive error screening by health professionals in pre-primary and primary school children is not currently implemented in Thailand due to resource limitations. However, evidence suggests that a refractive error screening program conducted in schools by teachers in the country is reasonable and feasible because the detection and treatment of refractive error in very young generations is important and the screening program can be implemented and conducted with relatively low costs.

  2. Assessing the accuracy and feasibility of a refractive error screening program conducted by school teachers in pre-primary and primary schools in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerawattananon, Kanlaya; Myint, Chaw-Yin; Wongkittirux, Kwanjai; Teerawattananon, Yot; Chinkulkitnivat, Bunyong; Orprayoon, Surapong; Kusakul, Suwat; Tengtrisorn, Supaporn; Jenchitr, Watanee

    2014-01-01

    As part of the development of a system for the screening of refractive error in Thai children, this study describes the accuracy and feasibility of establishing a program conducted by teachers. To assess the accuracy and feasibility of screening by teachers. A cross-sectional descriptive and analytical study was conducted in 17 schools in four provinces representing four geographic regions in Thailand. A two-staged cluster sampling was employed to compare the detection rate of refractive error among eligible students between trained teachers and health professionals. Serial focus group discussions were held for teachers and parents in order to understand their attitude towards refractive error screening at schools and the potential success factors and barriers. The detection rate of refractive error screening by teachers among pre-primary school children is relatively low (21%) for mild visual impairment but higher for moderate visual impairment (44%). The detection rate for primary school children is high for both levels of visual impairment (52% for mild and 74% for moderate). The focus group discussions reveal that both teachers and parents would benefit from further education regarding refractive errors and that the vast majority of teachers are willing to conduct a school-based screening program. Refractive error screening by health professionals in pre-primary and primary school children is not currently implemented in Thailand due to resource limitations. However, evidence suggests that a refractive error screening program conducted in schools by teachers in the country is reasonable and feasible because the detection and treatment of refractive error in very young generations is important and the screening program can be implemented and conducted with relatively low costs.

  3. Effects of a "test in-train out" walking program versus supervised standard rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients: a feasibility and pilot randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagoni, Anna M; Cavazza, Stefano; Ferraresi, Giovanni; Grassi, Guido; Felisatti, Michele; Lamberti, Nicola; Basaglia, Nino; Manfredini, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    The loss of normal ambulatory function after stroke, besides causing disability, leads to progressive deconditioning and exposes patients to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and recurrent stroke. Conventional rehabilitation is mainly limited to the subacute period after stroke. Effective, safe and sustainable interventions for patients and healthcare system, including the long-term, should be identified. To verify the feasibility, safety and preliminary efficacy of an original home-based rehabilitation model compared to a standard supervised program in chronic hemiplegic stroke survivors. Pilot, two-arm, parallel group, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Community-dwelling poststroke patient/Hospital. Twelve chronic hemiplegic stroke patients (age=66.5±11.9 years, males, N.=9). Participants were randomly assigned for a 10-week period to a structured home-based exercise program (N.=6) and a standard supervised group-setting program (N.=6). The feasibility outcomes included adherence to interventions, retention rate and safety. Satisfaction was also evaluated by the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. Efficacy was assessed by the 6-minute walk test, Timed Up and Go and Stair Climb tests. The impact on Quality-of-life was estimated using the physical activity domain of the Short Form-36 questionnaire. Operators' time consuming was also calculated. Adherence was 91% in the home-based exercise group and 92% in the standard supervised group. The retention rate was 100%, with no adverse events reported and high satisfaction scores for both interventions. 6-minute walk test and physical activity domain significantly increased in both groups (P=0.03). Timed Up and Go improved in both groups, significantly for the home-based exercise group (P=0.03) while Stair Climb remained stable. Time required to operators to implement the home-based exercise program was 15 hours vs. 30 hours for the standard supervised one. In a sample of hemiplegic chronic stroke patients

  4. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C. M.; El-Messidi, O. E.; Cowser, D. K.; Kannard, J. R.; Carvin, R. T.; Will, III, A. S.; Clark, Jr., C.; Garland, S. B.

    1993-05-01

    This Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be followed during the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. This ES&H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to direct and control implementation of the project ES&H program. The subsections that follow describe the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES&H program to individual waste area grouping (WAG) remedial investigations. Hazardous work permits (HWPs) will be used to provide task-specific health and safety requirements.

  5. 14-plex Feasibility Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotongan, Victoria Hazel [Native Village of Unalakleet

    2013-06-21

    The Native Village of Unalakleet project was a feasibility study for a retrofit of a “tribally owned” three story, 14 apartment complex located in Unalakleet, Alaska. The program objective and overall goal was to create a plan for retrofitting to include current appraised value and comparable costs of new construction to determine genuine feasibility as low-income multi-family housing for tribal members.

  6. Feasibility and acceptability of a prevention program for eating disorders (Me, You and Us) adapted for young adolescents in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gi Young; Park, Eun Jin; Kim, Youl-Ri; Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Park, Jin Hong; An, So Hyun; Lee, Ji Hyun; Sim, Jeong Hun; Treasure, Janet

    2017-09-04

    The aim of this study was to assess the adaptability and acceptability of a prevention program. A total of 169 Korean students (83 boys and 86 girls) with a mean age of 12.3 years from a 6th grade class at an elementary school participated in the study. Mental health social workers delivered Me, You and Us, a school-based body image intervention program originally developed in the UK, through a set of six sessions. The participants were assessed in terms of their body satisfaction and self-esteem before the program, after the program, and at 1-month follow-up. They were also surveyed about their satisfaction and acceptability levels after the program. At baseline, girls had lower body satisfaction and self-esteem than boys, and their body satisfaction and self-esteem improved after the program. The improved body satisfaction was maintained at the 1-month follow-up. The efficacy of the program on body satisfaction was positively correlated with the frequency of their baseline level of "fat talk." The program was more effective in girls with possible symptoms of an eating disorder at baseline. 93.7% of boys and 77.4% of girls responded that they enjoyed the program. The program Me, You and Us was well-accepted by early adolescents in Korea and it can play a role in increasing body satisfaction and self-esteem by reducing "fat talk" in 6th grade students. Level III, cohort study with intervention.

  7. Installation restoration program, remedial investigation/feasibility study report addendum for Indian Mountain Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Final report, 1 August-18 December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The following report is an addendum to the Indian Mountain Long Range Radar Station (LRRS) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) report dated October 1995 (Air Force 1995a). This report and the activities described were undertaken to fulfill the goals and objectives of the Air Force Installation Restoration Program (IRP). This report includes findings from additional characterization activities conducted in August 1995 at five of 11 Indian Mountain IRP source areas and revisions to RI/FS report conclusions for those source areas.

  8. A Cost-Benefit Analysis on the Feasibility of Implementing A Same-Day Surgery Program at the 121ST General Hospital, Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-27

    of child care when surgery is performed under an inpatient status) Some of the disadvantages of same-day surgery that Pollock report include...56.00 105.00 111.00 BEZ Chiropractic 25.00 47.00 50.00 Psychiatric and/or Mental Health Care BFA Psychiatry 124.00 230.00 243.00 BFB Psychology 93.00...U.S. Army-Baylor University Graduate Program in Health Care Administration A Cost-Benefit Analysis on the Feasibility of Implementing A Same-Day

  9. [Evaluation of the feasibility of a program of adapted physical activity in day hospital of digestive oncology: From the point of view of patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespel, Céline; Brami, Cloé; de Boissieu, Paul; Mazza, Camille; Chauvet, Kevin; Lemoine, Amélie; Gavlak, Benoit; Léandri, Chloé; Brasseur, Mathilde; Bertin, Eric; Bouché, Olivier

    2018-02-06

    Adapted physical activity (APA) is recognized as an effective supportive care for asthenia and quality of life in oncology. Before an APA program was organized, the feasibility of such a program was evaluated among the patients. Descriptive, prospective, semi-qualitative, single-center study over a 3-month period in patients treated with ambulatory chemotherapy for digestive cancer. A self-questionnaire was offered to all patients to evaluate their practice and knowledge about APA. In ten patients, fatigue, anxiety and depression were assessed, before and after 9 weeks of hospital-based APA. The scores were compared by matched Student test. Of the 123 patients treated, 80 questionnaires (65%) were exploitable. Before the diagnosis of cancer, 40 patients (50%) were physically active, 20% after (n=16). The reasons for not practicing were: lack of interest/not the idea (42%), lack of time (34%), do not believe in profit (9%), too expensive (8%). Fifty-three patients (66%) were interested in the program. In 10 patients, the APA program significantly reduced the depression score (P=0.024) and a non-significant improvement in anxiety and fatigue. This study shows that patients treated with chemotherapy are unaware of the usefulness of APA and that medical information can improve adherence to such a program. The establishment of an intra-hospital APA program proved to be possible and relevant. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Adapting the Unique Minds Program: Exploring the Feasibility of a Multiple Family Intervention for Children with Learning Disabilities in the Context of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Larrosa, Silvia; González-Seijas, Rosa M; Carpenter, John S W

    2017-06-01

    The Unique Minds Program (Stern, Unique Minds Program, 1999) addresses the socio-emotional needs of children with learning disabilities (LD) and their families. Children and their parents work together in a multiple family group to learn more about LD and themselves as people with the capacity to solve problems in a collaborative way, including problems in family school relationships. This article reports the cultural adaptation of the program for use in Spain and findings from a feasibility study involving three multiple family groups and a total of 15 children and 15 mothers, using a pre-post design. This Spanish adaptation of the program is called "Mentes Únicas". Standardized outcome measures indicated an overall statistically significant decrease in children's self-rated maladjustment and relationship difficulties by the end of the program. Improvements were endorsed by most mothers, although they were not always recognized by the children's teachers. The program had a high level of acceptability: Mothers and children felt safe, understood, and helped throughout the sessions. The efficacy of the adapted intervention for the context of Spain remains to be tested in a more rigorous study. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  11. Facilitating mental health help-seeking by young adults with a dedicated online program: a feasibility study of Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauer, Sylvia D; Buhagiar, Kerrie; Blake, Victoria; Cotton, Sue; Sanci, Lena

    2017-07-09

    To explore the feasibility of a dedicated online youth mental health help-seeking intervention and to evaluate using a randomised controlled trial (RCT) study design in order to identify any modifications needed before commencement of the full-scale RCT. A pilot RCT with 1:1 randomisation to either the intervention or comparison arm. An online study conducted Australia-wide. 18-25 year olds living in Australia were recruited via social media. Link is a dedicated online mental health help-seeking navigation tool that matches user's mental health issues, severity and service-type preferences (online, phone and face-to-face) with appropriate youth-friendly services. The comparison arm was usual help-seeking strategies with a link to Google.com. The primary outcome was the number of acceptability and feasibility criteria successfully met. Intervention and study design acceptability and feasibility were assessed by nine criteria. Secondary outcomes, via online surveys (at baseline, 1 week and 1 month) measured service use, help-seeking intentions, psychological distress, barriers to help-seeking, attitudes towards mental health help-seeking, mental health literacy, satisfaction and trust. Fifty-one participants were randomised (intervention: n=24; comparison: n=27). Three out of four of the intervention and two out of five of the study design criteria were met. Unmet criteria could be addressed by modifications to the study design. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that Link was useful to participants and may have increased their positive experiences towards help-seeking. There were no observable differences between arms in any outcome measures and no harms were detected. Generally, the Link intervention and study design were acceptable and feasible with modifications suggested for the four out of nine unmet criteria. The main trial will hence have shorter surveys and a simpler recruitment process, use positive affect as the primary outcome and will not link to

  12. Feasibility of community-based screening for cardiovascular disease risk in an ethnic community: the South Asian Cardiovascular Health Assessment and Management Program (SA-CHAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Charlotte A; Nanji, Alykhan; Mawani, Shefina; Davachi, Shahnaz; Ross, Leanne; Vollman, Ardene; Aggarwal, Sandeep; King-Shier, Kathryn; Campbell, Norman

    2013-02-21

    South Asian Canadians experience disproportionately high rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The goal of this qualitative study was to determine the feasibility of implementing a sustainable, culturally adapted, community-based CVD risk factor screening program for this population. South Asians (≥ 45 years) in Calgary, Alberta underwent opportunistic cardiovascular risk factor screening by lay trained volunteers at local religious facilities. Those with elevated blood pressure (BP) or ≥ 1 risk factor underwent point of care cholesterol testing, 10-year CVD risk calculation, counseling, and referral to family physicians and local culturally tailored chronic disease management (CDM) programs. Participants were invited for re-screening and were surveyed about health system follow-up, satisfaction with the program and suggestions for improvement. Changes in risk factors from baseline were estimated using McNemar's test (proportions) and paired t-tests (continuous measures). Baseline assessment was completed for 238 participants (median age 64 years, 51% female). Mean TC, HDL and TC/HDL were 5.41 mmol/L, 1.12 mmol/L and 4.7, respectively. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures (mmHg) were 129 and 75 respectively. Blood pressure and TC/HDL ratios exceeded recommended targets in 36% and 58%, respectively, and 76% were at high risk for CVD. Ninety-nine participants (47% female) attended re-screening. 82% had accessed health care providers, 22% reported medication changes and 3.5% had attended the CDM programs. While BP remained unchanged, TC and TC/HDL decreased and HDL increased significantly (mean differences: -0.52 mmol/L, -1.04 and +0.07 mmol/L, respectively). Participants were very satisfied (80%) or satisfied (20%) with the project. Participants suggested screening sessions and CDM programs be more accessible by: delivering evening or weekends programs at more sites, providing transportation, offering multilingual programs/translation assistance, reducing

  13. Group cell phones are feasible and acceptable for promoting optimal breastfeeding practices in a women's microcredit program in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax, Valerie L; Ibrahim, Alawiyatu Usman; Negerie, Mekebeb; Yakubu, Danjuma; Leatherman, Sheila; Bentley, Margaret E

    2017-01-01

    As part of a breastfeeding promotion intervention trial in Nigeria, we provided one cell phone per group of 5-7 microcredit clients and instructed the group's cell phone recipient to share weekly breastfeeding voice and text messages with group members. We measured the feasibility and acceptability of using group cell phones by conducting semi-structured exit interviews with 195 microcredit clients whose babies were born during the intervention (target group), in-depth interviews with eight phone recipients and nine non-phone recipients, and 16 focus group discussions with other microcredit clients. Women in the target group said the group phone worked well or very well (64%). They were motivated to try the recommended practices because they trusted the information (58%) and had support from others (35%). Approximately 44% of target women reported that their groups met and shared messages at least once a week. Women in groups that met at least weekly had higher odds of exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months (OR 5.6, 95% CI 1.6, 19.7) than women in groups that never met. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions indicated that non-phone recipients had positive feelings towards phone recipients, the group phone met participants' needs, and messages were often shared outside the group. In conclusion, group cell phone messaging to promote breastfeeding among microcredit clients is feasible and acceptable and can be part of an effective behaviour change package. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Determination of the feasibility of cogeneration by means of the computer program HaWK-GASTEC 2. 1. Haalbaarheid warmte/kracht HaWK-GASTEC 2. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woutersen, G.; Kooiman, A.

    1994-08-01

    To estimate the energetic and financial feasibility of a cogeneration project is a difficult task, taking into account the annually changing energy prices and pricing structure. By means of the title program the right decision for investment can be made in a simple way. By means of basic data the most accurate configuration of the required cogeneration system can be produced. The annual costs and benefits can be calculated. Based on the results a financial-economical evaluation can be carried to determine the payback period of the project. Several energy price scenarios can be selected. The calculations are possible for the tariff structures that were valid in 1994. In this report several aspects of the computer program are illustrated, described and explained

  15. Feasibility of Using a Community-Supported Agriculture Program to Increase Access to and Intake of Vegetables among Federally Qualified Health Center Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Betty T; Higgins, Cesar E; Baron, Andrea; Ness, Sylvia J; Allan, Bryan; Barth, Elizabeth T; Smith, Teresa M; Pranian, Katy; Frank, Brian

    2017-11-21

    This study explored the feasibility of using a 23-week subsidized community-supported agriculture program to increase access to and intake of vegetables among Federally Qualified Health Center patients. Outcomes were measured using pre-post intervention surveys (n = 9). Process data were collected in post-intervention surveys and focus groups (n = 15). Most participants (77%) indicated that the program improved their health and all (100%) reported that they were eating a greater variety of vegetables because of their participation in the program. Three themes emerged from the focus groups: increased access to fresh and/or organic vegetables, improved diet quality, and the importance of social support during the program. Linking subsided community-supported agriculture programs with Federally Qualified Health Centers has the potential to increase access to and intake of vegetables among low-income patients. However, further research is needed with a larger sample size and a more robust study design. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Feasibility of the mobile mindfulness-based stress reduction for breast cancer (mMBSR(BC)) program for symptom improvement among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengacher, Cecile A; Reich, Richard R; Ramesar, Sophia; Alinat, Carissa B; Moscoso, Manolete; Cousin, Lakeshia; Marino, Victoria R; Elias, Maya N; Paterson, Carly L; Pleasant, Michelle L; Rodriguez, Carmen S; Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Kip, Kevin E; Meng, Hongdao; Park, Jong Y

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of delivering the mobile mindfulness-based stress reduction for breast cancer (mMBSR(BC)) program using an iPad and to evaluate its impact on symptom improvement. A single group, pre-posttest design was implemented among female stages 0-III breast cancer survivors (BCS) who completed treatment. Data were collected at baseline and week 6 on measures of psychological and physical symptoms and quality of life. The mMBSR(BC) program is a standardized, stress-reducing intervention that combines sitting and walking meditation, body scan, and yoga and is designed to deliver weekly 2-hour sessions for 6 weeks using an iPad. The mean age of the 15 enrolled BCS was 57 years; one participant was non-Hispanic black, and 14 were non-Hispanic white. Of the 13 who completed the study, there were significant improvements from baseline to 6 weeks post-mMBSR(BC) in psychological and physical symptoms of depression, state anxiety, stress, fear of recurrence, sleep quality, fatigue, and quality of life (P's < .05). Effect sizes for improvements of multiple symptoms ranged from medium to large. These results provide preliminary support that the mMBSR(BC) program may be feasible and acceptable, showing a clinical impact on decreasing psychological and physical symptoms. This mobile-based program offers a delivery of a standardized MBSR(BC) intervention to BCS that is convenient for their own schedule while decreasing symptom burden in the survivorship phase after treatment for breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Feasibility of a 6-Month Yoga Program to Improve the Physical and Psychosocial Status of Persons with Multiple Sclerosis and their Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Turhan; Ozdogar, Asiye Tuba; Yigit, Pinar; Hosgel, Ilknur; Mehdiyev, Zaur; Ertekin, Ozge; Ozakbas, Serkan

    2017-10-23

    To the best of our knowledge, there has been no study on yoga that includes both persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and their family members. Because yoga has therapeutic effects in both persons with MS and healthy persons, we hypothesized that it would be an effective method to improve not only the physical and psychosocial status but also the time persons with MS and their family members spend together. To examine the feasibility of a 6-month (long-term) yoga program to improve the physical and psychosocial status of persons with MS and their family members. Uncontrolled clinical trial. The protocol was developed at the Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, and School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey. Persons with MS and healthy family members. Walking, balance, fatigue, health-related quality of life, depression, pain, and kinesiophobia. Yoga training was given once a week (at least 1h) for 6 months. The same assessors who assessed at baseline also performed the same assessments immediately after the end of the training (i.e., after 6 months). In total, 44 participants (27 persons with MS and 17 healthy family members) participated in the study. Twelve persons with MS and three healthy family members completed the 6-month yoga intervention. The completion rate for persons with MS and healthy subjects was 44.4% and 17.6%, respectively. In persons with MS, the mental dimension of health-related quality of life, walking speed, fatigue, and depression levels significantly improved after the yoga program (p .05). This study suggests that a 6-month yoga program can improve the mental dimension of health-related quality of life, walking speed, fatigue, and depression in the persons with MS. However, the 6-month yoga program does not appear to be a feasible method to increase the time that persons with MS spend together with their family members. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Feasibility study of current pulse induced 2-bit/4-state multilevel programming in phase-change memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Fan, Xi; Chen, Houpeng; Wang, Yueqing; Liu, Bo; Song, Zhitang; Feng, Songlin

    2017-08-01

    In this brief, multilevel data storage for phase-change memory (PCM) has attracted more attention in the memory market to implement high capacity memory system and reduce cost-per-bit. In this work, we present a universal programing method of SET stair-case current pulse in PCM cells, which can exploit the optimum programing scheme to achieve 2-bit/ 4state resistance-level with equal logarithm interval. SET stair-case waveform can be optimized by TCAD real time simulation to realize multilevel data storage efficiently in an arbitrary phase change material. Experimental results from 1 k-bit PCM test-chip have validated the proposed multilevel programing scheme. This multilevel programming scheme has improved the information storage density, robustness of resistance-level, energy efficient and avoiding process complexity.

  19. Implementation of the fit body and soul, a church-based life style program for diabetes prevention in high-risk African Americans: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodani, S; Fields, J Z

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a behavioral faith-based diabetes prevention program called the Fit Body and Soul program in a semi-urban African-American church using a community-based participatory approach. The 12-session Fit Body and Soul program was modified from the group lifestyle balance intervention that was modified from the successful National Institute of Health (NIH) funded Diabetes Prevention Program. The Fit Body and Soul program was implemented in a semi-urban African-American church community. Based on the results of physical examinations and increased body mass index (BMI > or = 25), 40 adult members of the church were identified as being at high risk for diabetes. Four church ministers, after receiving Fit Body and Soul program training for 2 days, served as study interventionists. The primary objective was weight loss of at least 5% by the end of the 12-session Fit Body and Soul intervention. Screening of church participants was conducted at the Gospel Water Branch Baptist Church in Augusta, Georgia. A total of 40 individuals having a BMI > or = 25 were selected. Of the 40, a total of 35 (87.5%) attended at least 10 sessions and provided information required for the study. Of the 35, a total of 48% lost at least 5% of baseline weight, 26% lost 7% or more, and 14% lost >10% of baseline weight. This pilot trial suggests that carrying out a larger Fit Body and Soul study in a faith-based setting, using behavioral lifestyle interventions, in the context of a diabetes prevention program for African American communities is feasible, as is the possibility that subjects in that larger study will achieve a clinically significant degree of weight loss.

  20. The Feasibility of Embedding Data Collection into the Routine Service Delivery of a Multi-Component Program for High-Risk Young People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Knight

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is little evidence about how to improve outcomes for high-risk young people, of whom Indigenous young people are disproportionately represented, due to few evaluation studies of interventions. One way to increase the evidence is to have researchers and service providers collaborate to embed evaluation into the routine delivery of services, so program delivery and evaluation occur simultaneously. This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating best-evidence measures into the routine data collection processes of a service for high-risk young people, and identify the number and nature of risk factors experienced by participants. Methods: The youth service is a rural based NGO comprised of multiple program components: (i engagement activities; (ii case management; (iii diversionary activities; (iv personal development; and (v learning and skills. A best-evidence assessment tool was developed by staff and researchers and embedded into the service’s existing intake procedure. Assessment items were organised into demographic characteristics and four domains of risk: education and employment; health and wellbeing; substance use; and crime. Descriptive data are presented and summary risk variables were created for each domain of risk. A count of these summary variables represented the number of co-occurring risks experienced by each participant. The feasibility of this process was determined by the proportion of participants who completed the intake assessment and provided research consent. Results: This study shows 85% of participants completed the assessment tool demonstrating that data on participant risk factors can feasibly be collected by embedding a best-evidence assessment tool into the routine data collection processes of a service. The most prevalent risk factors were school absence, unemployment, suicide ideation, mental distress, substance use, low levels of physical activity, low health service utilisation

  1. Telemedicine delivery of patient education in remote Ontario communities: feasibility of an Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care (ACPAC-led inflammatory arthritis education program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warmington K

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Kelly Warmington,1 Carol Flewelling,2 Carol A Kennedy,3,4 Rachel Shupak,5 Angelo Papachristos,5 Caroline Jones,5 Denise Linton,3 Dorcas E Beaton,3,4,6–8 Sydney Lineker9 1Learning Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children, 2Telemedicine Program, 3Musculoskeletal Health & Outcomes Research, St. Michael’s Hospital, 4Institute for Work & Health, 5Martin Family Centre for Arthritis Care & Research, St. Michael’s Hospital, 6Graduate Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, 7Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science, 8Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, 9The Arthritis Society (Ontario Division, Toronto, ON, Canada Objective: Telemedicine-based approaches to health care service delivery improve access to care. It was recognized that adults with inflammatory arthritis (IA living in remote areas had limited access to patient education and could benefit from the 1-day Prescription for Education (RxEd program. The program was delivered by extended role practitioners with advanced training in arthritis care. Normally offered at one urban center, RxEd was adapted for videoconference delivery through two educator development workshops that addressed telemedicine and adult education best practices. This study explores the feasibility of and participant satisfaction with telemedicine delivery of the RxEd program in remote communities.Materials and methods: Participants included adults with IA attending the RxEd program at one of six rural sites. They completed post-course program evaluations and follow-up interviews. Educators provided post-course feedback to identify program improvements that were later implemented.Results: In total, 123 people (36 in-person and 87 remote, across 6 sites participated, attending one of three RxEd sessions. Remote participants were satisfied with the quality of the videoconference (% agree/strongly agree: could hear the presenter (92.9% and discussion

  2. Are Virtual Rehabilitation Technologies Feasible Models to Scale an Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Program? A Pilot Study Using the Kinect Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnett, Jeanna; Chokshi, Anang; Barrett, Mark; Komatireddy, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Background Falls in older adults are a significant public health issue. Interventions have been developed and proven effective to reduce falls in older adults, but these programs typically last several months and can be resource intensive. Virtual rehabilitation technologies may offer a solution to bring these programs to scale. Off-the-shelf and custom exergames have demonstrated to be a feasible adjunct to rehabilitation with older adults. However, it is not known if older adults will be able or willing to use a virtual rehabilitation technology to participate in an evidence-based fall prevention program. To have the greatest impact, virtual rehabilitation technologies need to be acceptable to older adults from different backgrounds and level of fall risk. If these technologies prove to be a feasible option, they offer a new distribution channel to disseminate fall prevention programs. Objective Stand Tall (ST) is a virtual translation of the Otago Exercise Program (OEP), an evidence-based fall prevention program. Stand Tall was developed using the Virtual Exercise Rehabilitation Assistant (VERA) software, which uses a Kinect camera and a laptop to deliver physical therapy exercise programs. Our purpose in this pilot study was to explore if ST could be a feasible platform to deliver the OEP to older adults from a variety of fall risk levels, education backgrounds, and self-described level of computer expertise. Methods Adults age 60 and over were recruited to participate in a one-time usability study. The study included orientation to the program, navigation to exercises, and completion of a series of strength and balance exercises. Quantitative analysis described participants and the user experience. Results A diverse group of individuals participated in the study. Twenty-one potential participants (14 women, 7 men) met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 69.2 (± 5.8) years, 38% had a high school education, 24% had a graduate degree, and 66% classified as

  3. Feasibility study of an interactive multimedia electronic problem solving treatment program for depression: a preliminary uncontrolled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Margit I; Buckey, Jay C; Hull, Jay G; Linardatos, Eftihia; Song, Sueyoung L; McLellan, Robert K; Hegel, Mark T

    2014-05-01

    Computer-based depression interventions lacking live therapist support have difficulty engaging users. This study evaluated the usability, acceptability, credibility, therapeutic alliance and efficacy of a stand-alone multimedia, interactive, computer-based Problem Solving Treatment program (ePST™) for depression. The program simulated live treatment from an expert PST therapist, and delivered 6 ePST™ sessions over 9weeks. Twenty-nine participants with moderate-severe symptoms received the intervention; 23 completed a minimally adequate dose of ePST™ (at least 4 sessions). Program usability, acceptability, credibility, and therapeutic alliance were assessed at treatment midpoint and endpoint. Depressive symptoms and health-related functioning were assessed at baseline, treatment midpoint (4weeks), and study endpoint (10weeks). Depression outcomes and therapeutic alliance ratings were also compared to previously published research on live PST and computer-based depression therapy. Participants rated the program as highly usable, acceptable, and credible, and reported a therapeutic alliance with the program comparable to that observed in live therapy. Depressive symptoms improved significantly over time. These findings also provide preliminary evidence that ePST™ may be effective as a depression treatment. Larger clinical trials with diverse samples are indicated. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Feasibility and impact of a dedicated multidisciplinary rehabilitation program on health-related quality of life in advanced head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passchier, Ellen; Stuiver, Martijn M; van der Molen, Lisette; Kerkhof, Stefanie I C; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2016-06-01

    In an observational prospective study, feasibility and outcomes of a dedicated multidisciplinary rehabilitation program (HNR) for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients were evaluated. HRQoL was assessed before and after HNR with EORTC C30 and H&N-35 QoL questionnaires in 52 consecutive patients. Initial HRQoL scores were compared with EORTC reference scores for HNC patients and post-HNR with those available for the general healthy population. Distress was assessed before and after HNR with the distress thermometer (DT). At completion of HNR with a mean duration of 7 months, overall HRQoL was significantly improved (p < 0.001). Role, Emotional, and Social function scales and most EORTC C30 and H&N35 symptom scale items showed a statistically significant (p < 0.01) and clinically relevant improvement. Mean distress score before HNR was above the cutoff value of 5, suggesting the need for referral to rehabilitation. After completing HNR, distress decreased significantly to 3.0 (p < 0.001). HRQoL pretreatment was poorer than that of the EORTC reference HNC population, whereas at the completion of the HNR program, the HRQoL was comparable to that of the general population reference level. We conclude that a dedicated multidisciplinary HNR program is feasible and suggest that it has a positive impact on HRQoL. The multidisciplinary approach may have added value over mono-disciplinary interventions. However, our results should be judged cautiously due to the observational nature of the study.

  5. Feasibility of web-based protocol in a 12 weeks home-based IMT program for individuals with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Svenningsen, Helle

    2016-01-01

    of a web-based protocol with feedback function using mechanical threshold loading (MTL) as a home-based IMT in individuals with COPD. Thirty-six individuals with inspiratory muscle weakness were randomly selected from a pulmonary rehabilitation program to perform 12 weeks of MTL with either a web...

  6. Feasibility of a Catch-Up HPV Vaccination Program among College Students Attending a Large Rural University in the South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Alice R.; Haithcox-Dennis, Melissa J.; Allsbrook, Ashley R.

    2012-01-01

    Our study explored the eligibility and willingness of students to participate in a university-wide catch-up Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program. A total of 1804 electronic surveys (82% response) assessing demographics, HPV knowledge, eligibility, and willingness were gathered. HPV knowledge was moderate, with just over a quarter (26%)…

  7. An Analysis of a Novel, Short-Term Therapeutic Psychoeducational Program for Children and Adolescents with Chronic Neurological Illness and Their Parents; Feasibility and Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonglim Joo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this intervention was to develop a therapeutic psycho-educational program that improves quality of life in children and adolescents who are experiencing chronic neurological illness, including epilepsy, and their parents, and to analyze the intervention's feasibility and efficacy and participants' satisfaction. Participants were eight children (n = 8 and adolescents and their parents; participating children were experiencing chronic neurological illness with psychological comorbidity; children with intellectual impairment were excluded (IQ < 80. The program was carried out weekly for four sessions. In each of the 4 weeks, children's session content addressed self, emotion, coping skills, and finishing up, respectively; and parents' session content targeted family dynamic and emotional intervention, coping skills, childcare and education, and finishing up, respectively. Clinical psychologists administered psychological assessments (viz., Child Behavior Checklist, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, Parenting Stress Index, Beck Depression Inventory, Children's Depression Inventory, and Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale at pre- and post-intervention, and administered satisfaction surveys following the intervention. Participants' opinions about the program's necessity, contents, and process, and participants' overall program satisfaction were analyzed. Parents and children reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. Externalizing behavioral problems, anxiety/depression, and emotional functioning from quality of life showed improvement after the intervention. Although not statistically significant, total child stress trended downward from pre- to post-intervention. A four-session structured therapeutic psycho-educational program for children and adolescents with chronic neurological illness and their parents was successfully implemented, showing good compliance and high satisfaction and efficacy.

  8. Feasibility and acceptability of the DSM-5 Field Trial procedures in the Johns Hopkins Community Psychiatry Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Diana E; Wilcox, Holly C; Miller, Leslie; Cullen, Bernadette; Gerring, Joan; Greiner, Lisa H; Newcomer, Alison; McKitty, Mellisha V; Regier, Darrel A; Narrow, William E

    2014-06-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) contains criteria for psychiatric diagnoses that reflect advances in the science and conceptualization of mental disorders and address the needs of clinicians. DSM-5 also recommends research on dimensional measures of cross-cutting symptoms and diagnostic severity, which are expected to better capture patients' experiences with mental disorders. Prior to its May 2013 release, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) conducted field trials to examine the feasibility, clinical utility, reliability, and where possible, the validity of proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and dimensional measures. The methods and measures proposed for the DSM-5 field trials were pilot tested in adult and child/adolescent clinical samples, with the goal to identify and correct design and procedural problems with the proposed methods before resources were expended for the larger DSM-5 Field Trials. Results allowed for the refinement of the protocols, procedures, and measures, which facilitated recruitment, implementation, and completion of the DSM-5 Field Trials. These results highlight the benefits of pilot studies in planning large multisite studies. Copyright © 2013, American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved.

  9. A feasibility study and pilot randomised trial of a tailored prevention program to reduce falls in older people with mild dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background People with dementia have a disproportionately high rate of falls and fractures and poorer outcomes, yet there is currently no evidence to guide falls prevention in this population. Methods A randomised trial design was used to test feasibility of study components and acceptability of a home hazard reduction and balance and strength exercise fall prevention program. The program was tailored to participant’s individual cognitive levels and implemented as a carer-supported intervention. Feasibility of recruitment, retention and implementation of intervention were recorded through observation and documented in field notes. Adherence, carer burden and use of task simplification strategies were also monitored. Outcome measures, collected at 12 weeks included physiological, fear of falling, cognitive and functional measures. Results Recruitment was achievable but may be more challenging in a multisite trial. Twenty two dyads of persons with mild dementia and their carers were randomised to intervention or usual care control group. Of 38 dyads referred to the study, there was a high rate of willingness to participate, with 6 (16%) declining and 10 (26%) not meeting inclusion criteria. The intervention was well received by participants and carers and adherence to both program components was very good. All participants implemented some home safety recommendations (range 19-80%) with half implementing 50% or more. At the end of 12 weeks, 72% of the intervention group were exercising. Both the rate of falling and the risk of a fall were lower in the intervention group but these findings were not significant (RR= 0.50 (95% CI 0.11-2.19). There were no differences in physiological outcome measures between the control and intervention groups. However results were influenced by the small study size and incomplete data primarily in the intervention group at follow up. Conclusions The pilot study was feasible and acceptable to people with mild dementia and their

  10. A feasibility study and pilot randomised trial of a tailored prevention program to reduce falls in older people with mild dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Jacqueline; Clemson, Lindy; Brodaty, Henry; Lord, Stephen; Taylor, Morag; Gitlin, Laura; Close, Jacqueline

    2013-09-03

    People with dementia have a disproportionately high rate of falls and fractures and poorer outcomes, yet there is currently no evidence to guide falls prevention in this population. A randomised trial design was used to test feasibility of study components and acceptability of a home hazard reduction and balance and strength exercise fall prevention program. The program was tailored to participant's individual cognitive levels and implemented as a carer-supported intervention. Feasibility of recruitment, retention and implementation of intervention were recorded through observation and documented in field notes. Adherence, carer burden and use of task simplification strategies were also monitored. Outcome measures, collected at 12 weeks included physiological, fear of falling, cognitive and functional measures. Recruitment was achievable but may be more challenging in a multisite trial. Twenty two dyads of persons with mild dementia and their carers were randomised to intervention or usual care control group. Of 38 dyads referred to the study, there was a high rate of willingness to participate, with 6 (16%) declining and 10 (26%) not meeting inclusion criteria. The intervention was well received by participants and carers and adherence to both program components was very good. All participants implemented some home safety recommendations (range 19-80%) with half implementing 50% or more. At the end of 12 weeks, 72% of the intervention group were exercising. Both the rate of falling and the risk of a fall were lower in the intervention group but these findings were not significant (RR= 0.50 (95% CI 0.11-2.19). There were no differences in physiological outcome measures between the control and intervention groups. However results were influenced by the small study size and incomplete data primarily in the intervention group at follow up. The pilot study was feasible and acceptable to people with mild dementia and their carers. The lessons learnt included

  11. Impact of a Telehealth Program With Voice Recognition Technology in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heesun; Park, Jun-Bean; Choi, Sae Won; Yoon, Yeonyee E; Park, Hyo Eun; Lee, Sang Eun; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Choi, Su-Yeon; Lee, Hae-Young; Choi, Jonghyuk; Lee, Young-Joon; Kim, Yong-Jin; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Choi, Jinwook; Sohn, Dae-Won

    2017-10-02

    Despite the advances in the diagnosis and treatment of heart failure (HF), the current hospital-oriented framework for HF management does not appear to be sufficient to maintain the stability of HF patients in the long term. The importance of self-care management is increasingly being emphasized as a promising long-term treatment strategy for patients with chronic HF. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a new information communication technology (ICT)-based telehealth program with voice recognition technology could improve clinical or laboratory outcomes in HF patients. In this prospective single-arm pilot study, we recruited 31 consecutive patients with chronic HF who were referred to our institute. An ICT-based telehealth program with voice recognition technology was developed and used by patients with HF for 12 weeks. Patients were educated on the use of this program via mobile phone, landline, or the Internet for the purpose of improving communication and data collection. Using these systems, we collected comprehensive data elements related to the risk of HF self-care management such as weight, diet, exercise, medication adherence, overall symptom change, and home blood pressure. The study endpoints were the changes observed in urine sodium concentration (uNa), Minnesota Living with Heart Failure (MLHFQ) scores, 6-min walk test, and N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) as surrogate markers for appropriate HF management. Among the 31 enrolled patients, 27 (87%) patients completed the study, and 10 (10/27, 37%) showed good adherence to ICT-based telehealth program with voice recognition technology, which was defined as the use of the program for 100 times or more during the study period. Nearly three-fourths of the patients had been hospitalized at least once because of HF before the enrollment (20/27, 74%); 14 patients had 1, 2 patients had 2, and 4 patients had 3 or more previous HF hospitalizations. In the total study

  12. A Study to Develop a Methodology Determining the Feasibility of Establishing a Blood Collection Program in an Army Healthcare Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    or skin? (If ear piercing c. Blood pressure medications, taken and/or acupuncture are commonly per- chronically and successfully, so that formed in the...munization programs. g. Infectious diseases: b. Skin allografts and tattoo. (Ear pierc- Hepatitis: Have you ever had hepatitis ing and acupuncture done under...malaria? have epilepsy ’? Have you had convul- When? Are you a visitor or immigrant sions or fainting spells? Last episode? to the USA? How long have you

  13. Feasibility study of red blood cell debulking by magnetic field-flow fractionation with step-programmed flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lee R; Williams, P Stephen; Nehl, Franziska; Abe, Koji; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-02-01

    Emerging applications of rare cell separation and analysis, such as separation of mature red blood cells from hematopoietic cell cultures, require efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. We have tested the feasibility of magnetic RBC separation as an alternative to centrifugal separation using an approach based on the mechanism of magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF). A specially designed permanent magnet assembly generated a quadrupole field having a maximum field of 1.68 T at the magnet pole tips, zero field at the aperture axis, and a nearly constant radial field gradient of 1.75 T/mm (with a negligible angular component) inside a cylindrical aperture of 1.9 mm (diameter) and 76 mm (length). The cell samples included high-spin hemoglobin RBCs obtained by chemical conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin (met RBC) or by exposure to anoxic conditions (deoxy RBC), low-spin hemoglobin obtained by exposure of RBC suspension to ambient air (oxy RBC), and mixtures of deoxy RBC and cells from a KG-1a white blood cell (WBC) line. The observation that met RBCs did not elute from the channel at the lower flow rate of 0.05 mL/min applied for 15 min but quickly eluted at the subsequent higher flow rate of 2.0 mL/min was in agreement with FFF theory. The well-defined experimental conditions (precise field and flow characteristics) and a well-established FFF theory verified by studies with model cell systems provided us with a strong basis for making predictions about potential practical applications of the magnetic RBC separation.

  14. “These classes have been my happy place”: Feasibility study of a self-care program in Native Hawaiian custodial grandparents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loriena Yancura

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Native Hawaiian custodial grandparents have a distinctive set of strengths and challenges that may lead them to benefit from a structured self-care program. The purpose of this paper is to describe a feasibility study with nine Native Hawaiian custodial grandparents who participated in a 6-week self-care intervention. Based on open-ended questions during the post-questionnaire and at the 6-month follow-up focus group, grandparent participants noted that their grandchildren needed education and clothing. Most grandparents did not endorse statements that their grandchildren had any mental or physical health conditions. Grandparents reflected that the intervention provided them with skills to help cope with raising grandchildren and helped them realize the importance of their health to providing care to their grandchildren. Based on the findings from this pilot study, the self-care approach may have benefits for Native Hawaiian custodial grandparents.

  15. Feasibility and efficacy of the Great Leaders Active StudentS (GLASS) program on children's physical activity and object control skill competency: A non-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Nicole; Sutherland, Rachel; Beauchamp, Mark R; Cohen, Kristen; Hulteen, Ryan M; Babic, Mark; Wolfenden, Luke; Lubans, David R

    2017-04-21

    This study aimed to assess the feasibility and efficacy of the Great Leaders Active StudentS (GLASS) program, a school-based peer-led physical activity and object control skill intervention. The study employed a quasi-experimental design. The study was conducted in two elementary schools, one intervention and one comparison, in Newcastle, New South Wales (NSW), Australia from April to June 2015 (N=224 students). Peer leaders (n=20) in the intervention school received training to deliver two 30-min object control skill sessions per week to students in Kindergarten, Grades 1 and 2 (5-8 years, n=83) over one school term (10 weeks). The primary outcome was pedometer assessed physical activity during school hours. Secondary outcomes included students' object control skill competency and peers' leadership self-efficacy and teacher ratings of peers' leadership skills. Almost all (19/20) GLASS sessions were delivered by peer leaders who reported high acceptability of the program. The treatment-by-time interaction for students' physical activity during school hours was not significant (p=0.313). The intervention effect on students' overall object control skills was statistically significant (mean difference 5.8 (95% CI 4.1, 7.4; pskills as well as teacher-rated peers' leadership behaviours. Future fully powered trials using peer leaders to deliver fundamental movement skill (FMS) programs are warranted. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radically open-dialectical behavior therapy for adult anorexia nervosa: feasibility and outcomes from an inpatient program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Thomas R; Gray, Katie L H; Hempel, Roelie J; Titley, Marian; Chen, Eunice Y; O'Mahen, Heather A

    2013-11-07

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a highly life-threatening disorder that is extremely difficult to treat. There is evidence that family-based therapies are effective for adolescent AN, but no treatment has been proven to be clearly effective for adult AN. The methodological challenges associated with studying the disorder have resulted in recommendations that new treatments undergo preliminary testing prior to being evaluated in a randomized clinical trial. The aim of this study was to provide preliminary evidence on the effectiveness of a treatment program based on a novel adaptation of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for adult Anorexia Nervosa (Radically Open-DBT; RO-DBT) that conceptualizes AN as a disorder of overcontrol. Forty-seven individuals diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa-restrictive type (AN-R; mean admission body mass index = 14.43) received the adapted DBT inpatient program (mean length of treatment = 21.7 weeks). Seventy-two percent completed the treatment program demonstrating substantial increases in body mass index (BMI; mean change in BMI = 3.57) corresponding to a large effect size (d = 1.91). Thirty-five percent of treatment completers were in full remission, and an additional 55% were in partial remission resulting in an overall response rate of 90%. These same individuals demonstrated significant and large improvements in eating-disorder related psychopathology symptoms (d = 1.17), eating disorder-related quality of life (d = 1.03), and reductions in psychological distress (d = 1.34). RO-DBT was associated with significant improvements in weight gain, reductions in eating disorder symptoms, decreases in eating-disorder related psychopathology and increases in eating disorder-related quality of life in a severely underweight sample. These findings provide preliminary support for RO-DBT in treating AN-R suggesting the importance of further evaluation examining long-term outcomes using randomized controlled trial

  17. Multimodal guided self-help exercise program to prevent speech, swallowing, and shoulder problems among head and neck cancer patients: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnossen, Ingrid C; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Rinkel, Rico N P M; Aalders, Ijke J; de Goede, Cees J T; de Bree, Remco; Doornaert, Patricia; Rietveld, Derek H F; Langendijk, Johannes A; Witte, Birgit I; Leemans, C Rene; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2014-03-06

    During a 6-week course of (chemo)radiation many head and neck cancer patients have to endure radiotherapy-induced toxicity, negatively affecting patients' quality of life. Pretreatment counseling combined with self-help exercises could be provided to inform patients and possibly prevent them from having speech, swallowing, and shoulder problems during and after treatment. Our goal was to investigate the feasibility of a multimodal guided self-help exercise program entitled Head Matters during (chemo)radiation in head and neck cancer patients. Head and neck cancer patients treated with primary (chemo)radiation or after surgery were asked to perform Head Matters at home. This prophylactic exercise program, offered in three different formats, aims to reduce the risk of developing speech, swallowing, shoulder problems, and a stiff neck. Weekly coaching was provided by a speech and swallowing therapist. Patients filled out a diary to keep track of their exercise activity. To gain insight into possible barriers and facilitators to exercise adherence, reports of weekly coaching sessions were analyzed by 2 coders independently. Of 41 eligible patients, 34 patients were willing to participate (83% uptake). Of participating patients, 21 patients completed the program (64% adherence rate). The majority of participants (58%) had a moderate to high level of exercise performance. Exercise performance level was not significantly associated with age (P=.50), gender (P=.42), tumor subsite (P=1.00) or tumor stage (P=.20), treatment modality (P=.72), or Head Matters format (Web-based or paper) (P=1.00). Based on patients' diaries and weekly coaching sessions, patients' perceived barriers to exercise were a decreased physical condition, treatment-related barriers, emotional problems, lack of motivation, social barriers, and technical problems. Patients' perceived facilitators included an increased physical condition, feeling motivated, and social and technical facilitators. Head

  18. Development of remedial process options: Phase II, Feasibility study: Installation Restoration Program, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronk, T.A.; Smuin, D.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Schlosser, R.M. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States))

    1991-11-01

    This technical memorandum develops process options which are appropriate for environmental restoration activities at Naval Air Station Fallon (NAS Fallon), Nevada. Introduction of contaminants to the environment has resulted from deliberate disposal activities (both through dumping and landfilling) and accidental spills and leaks associated with normal activities at NAS Fallon over its lifetime of operation. Environmental sampling results indicate that the vast majority of contaminants of concern are petroleum hydrocarbon related. These contaminants include JP-4, JP-5, leaded and unleaded gasoline, waste oils and lubricants, hydraulic fluids, and numerous solvents and cleaners. The principal exposure pathways of concern associated with NAS Fallon contaminants appear to be the surface flows and shallow drainage systems to which the base contributes. Available data indicate NAS Fallon IR Program sites are not contributing excessive contamination to surface flows emanating from the base. Contaminants appear to be contained in a relatively immobile state in the shallow subsurface with little or no contaminant migration off site.

  19. Feasibility of an online and a face-to-face version of a self-management program for young adults with a rheumatic disease: experiences of young adults and peer leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Based on the self-efficacy theory, an online and a face-to-face self-management programs ‘Challenge your Arthritis’ for young adults with a rheumatic disease have recently been developed. These two courses are led by young peer leaders. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of the online and face-to-face self-management program. Methods Feasibility was evaluated on items of perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, user-acceptance, and adherence to both programs in young adults and peer leaders. Additional analyses of interactions on the e-Health applications, discussion board and chat board, were conducted. Results Twenty-two young adults with a diagnosed rheumatic disease participated in the study: 12 young adults followed the online program and 10 followed the face-to-face program. Both programs appeared to be feasible, especially in dealing with problems in daily life, and the participants indicated the time investment as ‘worthwhile’. In using the online program, no technical problems occurred. Participants found the program easy to use, user friendly, and liked the ‘look and feel’ of the program. Conclusions Both the online and the face-to-face versions of a self-management program. ‘Challenge your arthritis’ were found to be feasible and well appreciated by young adults with a rheumatic disease. Because these programs are likely to be a practical aid to health practices, a randomized controlled study to investigate the effects on patient outcomes is planned. PMID:24666817

  20. A Feasibility and Efficacy Randomized Controlled Trial of an Online Preventative Program for Childhood Obesity: Protocol for the EMPOWER Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam; Sharma, Manoj

    2012-06-21

    The home and family environment is a highly influential psychosocial antecedent of pediatric obesity. Implementation of conventional family- and home-based childhood obesity interventions is challenging for parents, often requiring them to attend multiple educational sessions. Attrition rates for traditional interventions are frequently high due to competing demands for parents' time. Under such constraints, an Internet-based intervention has the potential to modify determinants of childhood obesity while making judicious use of parents' time. Theory-based interventions offer many advantages over atheoretical interventions, including reduced intervention dosage, increased likelihood of behavioral change, and efficient resource allocation. Social cognitive theory (SCT) is a robust theoretical framework for addressing childhood obesity. SCT is a behavior change model rooted in reciprocal determinism, a causal paradigm that states that human functioning is the product of a dynamic interplay of behavioral, personal, and environmental factors. To evaluate the efficacy of the Enabling Mothers to Prevent Childhood Obesity Through Web-Based Education and Reciprocal Determinism (EMPOWER) program, an Internet-based, theory-driven intervention for preventing childhood overweight and obesity. The project goal is supported by two specific aims: (1) modification of four obesogenic protective factors related to childhood obesity (minutes engaged in physical activity, servings of fruits and vegetables consumed, servings of sugar-sweetened and sugar-free beverages consumed, and minutes engaged in screen time), and (2) reification of five maternal-mediated constructs of SCT (environment, expectations, emotional coping, self-control, and self-efficacy). We will recruit mothers with children ages 4 to 6 years from childcare centers and randomly assign them to either the theory-based (experimental) or knowledge-based (control) arm of the trial. Data for the intervention will be

  1. Computerized cognitive stimulation and engagement programs in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: comparing feasibility, acceptability, and cognitive and psychosocial effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djabelkhir L

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Leila Djabelkhir,1,2 Ya-Huei Wu,1,2 Jean-Sébastien Vidal,1 Victoria Cristancho-Lacroix,1,2 Fabienne Marlats,1,2 Hermine Lenoir,1,2 Ariela Carno,1 Anne-Sophie Rigaud1,2 1Department of Clinical Gerontology, Broca Hospital, Public Assistance – Paris Hospitals (AP-HP, 2Research Team 4468, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Purpose: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI is associated with a higher risk of dementia and is becoming a topic of interest for pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. With advances in technology, computer-based cognitive exercises are increasingly integrated into traditional cognitive interventions, such as cognitive training. Another type of cognitive intervention involving technology use is cognitive engagement, consisting of involving participants in highly motivational and mentally challenging activities, such as learning to use a form of new digital technology. This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a computerized cognitive stimulation (CCS program and a computerized cognitive engagement (CCE program, and then compared their effects in older adults with MCI.Patients and methods: In this randomized study, data from 19 MCI patients were analyzed (n=9 in CCS and n=10 in CCE. The patients attended a group weekly session for a duration of 3 months. Assessments of cognitive and psychosocial variables were conducted at baseline (M0 and at the end of the programs (M3.Results: All of the participants attended the 12 sessions and showed a high level of motivation. Attrition rate was very low (one dropout at M3 assessment. At M3, the CCS participants displayed a significant improvement in part B of the Trail Making Test (TMT-B; p=0.03 and self-esteem (p=0.005, while the CCE participants showed a significant improvement in part A of the Trail Making Test (TMT-A; p=0.007 and a higher level of technology acceptance (p=0.006. The two groups did not differ significantly (p>0.05 in cognitive and

  2. Computerized cognitive stimulation and engagement programs in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: comparing feasibility, acceptability, and cognitive and psychosocial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djabelkhir, Leila; Wu, Ya-Huei; Vidal, Jean-Sébastien; Cristancho-Lacroix, Victoria; Marlats, Fabienne; Lenoir, Hermine; Carno, Ariela; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is associated with a higher risk of dementia and is becoming a topic of interest for pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. With advances in technology, computer-based cognitive exercises are increasingly integrated into traditional cognitive interventions, such as cognitive training. Another type of cognitive intervention involving technology use is cognitive engagement, consisting of involving participants in highly motivational and mentally challenging activities, such as learning to use a form of new digital technology. This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a computerized cognitive stimulation (CCS) program and a computerized cognitive engagement (CCE) program, and then compared their effects in older adults with MCI. In this randomized study, data from 19 MCI patients were analyzed (n=9 in CCS and n=10 in CCE). The patients attended a group weekly session for a duration of 3 months. Assessments of cognitive and psychosocial variables were conducted at baseline (M0) and at the end of the programs (M3). All of the participants attended the 12 sessions and showed a high level of motivation. Attrition rate was very low (one dropout at M3 assessment). At M3, the CCS participants displayed a significant improvement in part B of the Trail Making Test (TMT-B; p=0.03) and self-esteem (p=0.005), while the CCE participants showed a significant improvement in part A of the Trail Making Test (TMT-A; p=0.007) and a higher level of technology acceptance (p=0.006). The two groups did not differ significantly (p>0.05) in cognitive and psychosocial changes after the intervention. However, medium effect sizes (Cohen's d=0.56; 95% CI =-0.43:1.55) were found on the free recall, favoring the CCS group, as well as on TMT-A (d=0.51; 95% CI =-0.48:1.49) and technology acceptance (d=-0.65; 95% CI =-1.64:0.34), favoring the CCE group. Both interventions were highly feasible and acceptable and allowed improvement in

  3. Feasibility of neuromuscular training in patients with severe hip or knee OA: The individualized goal-based NEMEX-TJR training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Link Anne

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although improvements are achieved by general exercise, training to improve sensorimotor control may be needed for people with osteoarthritis (OA. The aim was to apply the principles of neuromuscular training, which have been successfully used in younger and middle-aged patients with knee injuries, to older patients with severe hip or knee OA. We hypothesized that the training program was feasible, determined as: 1 at most acceptable self-reported pain following training; 2 decreased or unchanged pain during the training period; 3 few joint specific adverse events related to training, and 4 achieved progression of training level during the training period. Methods Seventy-six patients, between 60 and 77 years, with severe hip (n = 38, 55% women or knee OA (n = 38, 61% women underwent an individualized, goal-based neuromuscular training program (NEMEX-TJR in groups for a median of 11 weeks (quartiles 7 to 15 prior to total joint replacement (TJR. Pain was self-reported immediately after each training session on a 0 to 10 cm, no pain to pain as bad as it could be, scale, where 0-2 indicates safe, > 2 to 5 acceptable and > 5 high risk pain. Joint specific adverse events were: not attending or ceasing training because of increased pain/problems in the index joint related to training, and self-reported pain > 5 after training. The level of difficulty of training was registered. Results Patients with severe OA of the hip or knee reported safe pain (median 2 cm after training. Self-reported pain was lower at training sessions 10 and 20 (p = 0.04 and unchanged at training sessions 5 and 15 (p = 0.170, p = 0.161 compared with training session 1. There were no joint specific adverse events in terms of not attending or ceasing training. Few patients (n = 17, 22% reported adverse events in terms of self-reported pain > 5 after one or more training sessions. Progression of training level was achieved over time (p Conclusions The NEMEX

  4. Utility of a Three-Dimensional Interactive Augmented Reality Program for Balance and Mobility Rehabilitation in the Elderly: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Dal Jae; Ku, Jeunghun; Kim, Yeun Joon; Cho, Sangwoo; Cho, Yun Kyung; Lim, Teo; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Youn Joo

    2015-06-01

    To improve lower extremity function and balance in elderly persons, we developed a novel, three-dimensional interactive augmented reality system (3D ARS). In this feasibility study, we assessed clinical and kinematic improvements, user participation, and the side effects of our system. Eighteen participants (age, 56-76 years) capable of walking independently and standing on one leg were recruited. The participants received 3D ARS training during 10 sessions (30-minute duration each) for 4 weeks. Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) scores were obtained before and after the exercises. Outcome performance variables, including response time and success rate, and kinematic variables, such as hip and knee joint angle, were evaluated after each session. Participants exhibited significant clinical improvements in lower extremity balance and mobility following the intervention, as shown by improved BBS and TUG scores (pincreased across sessions (p<0.001). All participants completed the program without experiencing any adverse effects. Substantial clinical and kinematic improvements were observed after applying a novel 3D ARS training program, suggesting that this system can enhance lower extremity function and facilitate assessments of lower extremity kinematic capacity.

  5. Community Stakeholders' Perceptions of Major Factors Influencing Childhood Obesity, the Feasibility of Programs Addressing Childhood Obesity, and Persisting Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganter, Claudia; Aftosmes-Tobio, Alyssa; Chuang, Emmeline; Blaine, Rachel E; Land, Thomas; Davison, Kirsten K

    2016-04-01

    Prior research has identified numerous factors contributing to increased rates of childhood obesity. However, few studies have focused explicitly on the experience of community stakeholders in low-income communities. This study sought to capture the perspectives of these on-the-ground experts regarding major factors contributing to childhood obesity as well as gaps in current prevention and control efforts. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 39 stakeholders from different community sectors (e.g., healthcare providers, childcare providers, teachers). Data were drawn from the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration project, a multi-level, multi-sector intervention designed to reduce childhood obesity being implemented in two low-income communities in Massachusetts. Interviews were conducted at baseline, transcribed, coded using grounded theory approach, and analyzed in NVivo 10.0. The vast majority of stakeholders had recently participated in obesity prevention strategies, and nearly all of them identified gaps in prevention efforts either within their organizations or in the broader community. In addition to factors previously identified in the literature, several themes emerged including the need to change policies to increase physical activity during school, offer healthier snacks in schools and afterschool programs, and increase communication and collaboration within the community in prevention efforts. Community stakeholders can impact the success of interventions by bridging the gap between science and lived experience. The results of this study can guide future research by highlighting the importance of including stakeholders' frontline experiences with target populations, and using information on identified gaps to augment intervention planning efforts.

  6. Adaptation and Feasibility Study of a Digital Health Program to Prevent Diabetes among Low-Income Patients: Results from a Partnership between a Digital Health Company and an Academic Research Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valy Fontil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The feasibility of digital health programs to prevent and manage diabetes in low-income patients has not been adequately explored. Methods. Researchers collaborated with a digital health company to adapt a diabetes prevention program for low-income prediabetes patients at a large safety net clinic. We conducted focus groups to assess patient perspectives, revised lessons for improved readability and cultural relevance to low-income and Hispanic patients, conducted a feasibility study of the adapted program in English and Spanish speaking cohorts, and implemented real-time adaptations to the program for commercial use and for a larger trial of in multiple safety net clinics. Results. The majority of focus group participants were receptive to the program. We modified the curriculum to a 5th-grade reading level and adapted content based on patient feedback. In the feasibility study, 54% of eligible contacted patients expressed interest in enrolling (n=23. Although some participants’ computer access and literacy made registration challenging, they were highly satisfied and engaged (80% logged in at least once/week. Conclusions. Underserved prediabetic patients displayed high engagement and satisfaction with a digital diabetes prevention program despite lower digital literacy skills. The collaboration between researchers and a digital health company enabled iterative improvements in technology implementation to address challenges in low-income populations.

  7. Feasibility, Patient Acceptability, and Preliminary Efficacy of a Culturally Informed, Health Promotion Program to Improve Glaucoma Medication Adherence Among African Americans: "Glaucoma Management Optimism for African Americans Living with Glaucoma" (GOAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreer, Laura E; Owsley, Cynthia; Campbell, Lisa; Gao, Liyan; Wood, Andy; Girkin, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    To examine the feasibility, patient acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of a culturally informed, health promotion program designed to improve glaucoma medication adherence among African American's (AA's) with glaucoma. A sample of 11 AA glaucoma patients (mean age 61 years; 73% women and 27% men) completed a culturally informed and individually tailored, health promotion program developed for AAs titled, "Glaucoma Management Optimism for African Americans Living with Glaucoma" (GOAL)©. The aim of the brief 4-week program is to enhance glaucoma medication adherence through a combination of education, motivational interviewing (MI), and problem-solving training (PST). Feasibility was assessed on the basis of patient satisfaction with the program, number of sessions completed, and length of sessions. Preliminary efficacy was evaluated using a pre-post design to determine whether the program improved objective glaucoma medication adherence via an electronic Travalert dosing aid as well as satisfaction with aspects of glaucoma treatment, health beliefs about medications, glaucoma symptoms, emotional well-being, and intraocular pressure. Overall patient satisfaction and acceptability was high for the program, interactions with the health educator, program materials, and the length of sessions. Feasibility was also supported given the need for the program, success in recruitment/retention, and ease of implementing the program with AA glaucoma patients in clinic and/or over the telephone. In terms of preliminary efficacy, patients showed significant pre-post improvements in objective medication adherence rates by 15% (p = 0.03), self-efficacy for glaucoma management (p = 0.02), ease of use in administering eye drops (p = 0.03), glaucoma treatment satisfaction (p = 0.05), beliefs about the necessity of taking glaucoma medications (p = 0.05), and functional visual ocular symptoms (p = 0.03). (GOAL)© holds great promise toward improving

  8. Acceptability and preliminary feasibility of an internet/CD-ROM-based education and decision program for early-stage prostate cancer patients: randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Michael A; Mohamed, Nihal E; Butz, Brian P; Bar-Chama, Natan; Stock, Richard; Cesaretti, Jamie; Hassan, Waleed; Samadi, David; Hall, Simon J

    2012-01-13

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer affecting men in the United States. Management options for localized disease exist, yet an evidence-based criterion standard for treatment still has to emerge. Although 5-year survival rates approach 98%, all treatment options carry the possibility for significant side effects, such as erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence. It is therefore recommended that patients be actively involved in the treatment decision process. We have developed an Internet/CD-ROM-based multimedia Prostate Interactive Educational System (PIES) to enhance patients' treatment decision making. PIES virtually mirrors a health center to provide patients with information about prostate cancer and its treatment through an intuitive interface, using videos, animations, graphics, and texts. (1) To examine the acceptability and feasibility of the PIES intervention and to report preliminary outcomes of the program in a pilot trial among patients with a new prostate cancer diagnosis, and (2) to explore the potential impact of tailoring PIES treatment information to participants' information-seeking styles on study outcomes. Participants (n = 72) were patients with newly diagnosed localized prostate cancer who had not made a treatment decision. Patients were randomly assigned to 3 experimental conditions: (1) control condition (providing information through standard National Cancer Institute brochures; 26%), and PIES (2) with tailoring (43%) and (3) without tailoring to a patient's information-seeking style (31%). Questionnaires were administrated before (t1) and immediately after the intervention (t2). Measurements include evaluation and acceptability of the PIES intervention, monitoring/blunting information-seeking style, psychological distress, and decision-related variables (eg, decisional confidence, feeling informed about prostate cancer and treatment, and treatment preference). The PIES program was well accepted by patients and did not interfere

  9. 7 CFR 1980.442 - Feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... management, nature and extent of market area, marketing plans for sale of projected output, extent of...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial Loan Program § 1980.442 Feasibility...) Management feasibility. Evidence that continuity and adequacy of management has been evaluated and documented...

  10. Feasibility of assessing the public health impacts of air pollution reduction programs on a local scale: New Haven accountability case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: New approaches on how to link health surveillance data with environmental and population exposure information are needed in order to examine the health benefits of risk management decisions. Objective: This study's objective was to examine the feasibility of conductin...

  11. A Chronosequence Feasibility Assessment of Emergency Fire Rehabilitation Records within the Intermountain Western United States - Final Report to the Joint Fire Science Program - Project 08-S-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Kevin C.; Pyke, David A.; Wirth, Troy A.; Pilliod, David S.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Chambers, Jeanne C.

    2009-01-01

    Department of the Interior (DOI) bureaus have invested heavily (for example, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) spent more than $60 million in fiscal year 2007) in seeding vegetation for emergency stabilization and burned area rehabilitation of non-forested arid lands over the past 10 years. The primary objectives of these seedings commonly are to (1) reduce the post-fire dominance of non-native annual grasses, such as cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) and red brome (Bromus rubens); (2) minimize the probability of recurrent fire; and (3) ultimately produce desirable vegetation characteristics (for example, ability to recover following disturbance [resilience], resistance to invasive species, and a capacity to support a diverse flora and fauna). Although these projects historically have been monitored to varying extents, land managers currently lack scientific evidence to verify whether seeding arid and semiarid lands achieves desired objectives. Given the amount of resources dedicated to post-fire seeding projects, a synthesis of information determining the factors that result in successful treatments is critically needed. Although results of recently established experiments and monitoring projects eventually will provide useful insights for the future direction of emergency stabilization and burned area rehabilitation programs, a chronosequence approach evaluating emergency stabilization and burned area rehabilitation treatments (both referenced hereafter as ESR treatments) over the past 30 years could provide a comprehensive assessment of treatment success across a range of regional environmental gradients. By randomly selecting a statistically robust sample from the population of historic ESR treatments in the Intermountain West, this chronosequence approach would have inference for most ecological sites in this region. The goal of this feasibility study was to compile and examine historic ESR records from BLM field offices across the Intermountain West to

  12. Feasibility and effectiveness of a targeted diabetes prevention program for 18 to 60-year-old South Asian migrants: design and methods of the DH!AAN study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlaar Everlina MA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Asian migrants are at particularly high risk of type 2 diabetes. Previous studies have shown that intensive lifestyle interventions may prevent the onset of diabetes. Such interventions have not been culturally adapted and evaluated among South Asians in industrialized countries. Therefore, we have set up a randomized controlled trial to study the effectiveness of a targeted lifestyle intervention for the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors among 18 to 60-year-old Hindustani Surinamese (South Asians in The Hague, the Netherlands. Here we present the study design and describe the characteristics of those recruited. Methods Between May 18, 2009 and October 11, 2010, we screened 2307 Hindustani Surinamese (18–60 years old living in The Hague. We sent invitations to participate to those who had an impaired fasting glucose of 5.6-6.9 mmol/l, an impaired glucose tolerance of 7.8-11.0 mmol/L, a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.0% or more and/or a value of 2.39 or more for the homeostasis model assessment of estimated insulin resistance. In total, 536 people (56.1% of those eligible participated. People with a higher level of education and a family history of type 2 diabetes were more likely to participate. The control and intervention groups were similar with regard to important background characteristics. The intervention group will receive a culturally targeted intervention consisting of dietary counseling using motivational interviewing and a supervised physical activity program. The control group will receive generic lifestyle advice. To determine the effectiveness, a physical examination (anthropometrics, cardiorespiratory test, lipid profile, and measures of oral glucose tolerance, glycated hemoglobin, and insulin and interview (physical activity, diet, quality of life, and intermediate outcomes were carried out at baseline and will be repeated at 1 year and 2 years. The process and the

  13. Installation restoration program, remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for Indian Mountain long range radar station. Final report, 29 March 1994-15 July 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-22

    The remedial investigation (RI)/feasibility study (FS) will investigate sources at both the Upper Camp and Lower Camp, as well as assess the potential for migration of contaminants from the sources. Media to be sampled include surface water, surface soil, subsurface soil, sediment, and groundwater. Field screening techniques will be used, as well as the services of offsite laboratory following completion of the RI, data will be evaluated, an RI/FS report and decision documents will be prepared.

  14. 12 CFR 618.8025 - Feasibility reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Feasibility reviews. 618.8025 Section 618.8025 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM GENERAL PROVISIONS Related Services § 618.8025 Feasibility reviews. (a) Prior to an association offering a related service program for the...

  15. Log sort yard economics, planning, and feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Rusty Dramm; Robert Govett; Ted Bilek; Gerry L. Jackson

    2004-01-01

    This publication discusses basic marketing and economic concepts, planning approach, and feasibility methodology for assessing log sort yard operations. Special attention is given to sorting small diameter and underutilized logs from forest restoration, fuels reduction, and thinning operations. A planned programming approach of objectively determining the feasibility...

  16. [Effectiveness and feasibility of a strategy for increasing participation in the Japanese Stomach Cancer Examination programs by incorporating serum pepsinogen tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, M; Kikuchi, S; Arisue, T; Fukao, A

    1998-04-01

    The number of people examined in "the Japanese Stomach Cancer Examination" programs under "Health Services Law for the Aged" has not increased, and a strategy is needed to increase participation in the programs. We have thought out a plan to persuade people to the programs by using serum pepsinogen tests without changing the framework of the programs. The plan is as follows: The subjects are those who undergo phlebotomy in "the General Health Examination" programs and who do not undergo the Stomach Examination programs. Serum pepsinogen levels are measured using the sera and those with high risk for stomach cancer are persuaded to attend "the Stomach Examination" programs. To estimate the effect of the plan, we asked several local governments to complete a questionnaire on the numbers of subjects. The ratio of the number of the subjects in the plan to the number of screenees in recent Stomach Examination programs was 0.61. An increase of about 15% was expected in screenees of the Stomach Examination Programs, if 40% of the subjects in the plan were diagnosed as high risk and 60% of the high risk subjects attended the Stomach Examination programs. From the economical stand point, it was expected that detection rate would increase and that the plan did not raise the cost for detecting a patient with stomach cancer. We also conducted a questionnaire survey of those who would be the subjects of the plan. Eighty-two percent of the subjects answered that they would attend the Stomach Examination programs, if they were told that their risk of stomach cancer was high by the serum pepsinogen tests. These results seem to suggest that more people would participate in cancer examination programs when informed that their risk for cancer is high as determined by blood tests.

  17. Installation Restoration Program Stage 2 remedial investigation/feasibility study for Bomarc Missile Accident Site, McGuire Air Force Base, New Jersey. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, P.; Collins, D.

    1992-05-26

    This document consists of the final RI/FS report for the BOMARC Missile Site, McGuire AFB, New Jersey. The BOMARC site became contaminated in 1960 as the result of a fire which partially consumed a nuclear warhead-equipped BOMARC missile. The purpose of the RI/FS report is to document the extent and magnitude of environmental contamination at the site, to assess risks to human health and the environment, to determine the need for site remediation, and to evaluate feasible remedial alternatives.

  18. Feasibility, Acceptability, and Initial Efficacy of a Knowledge-Contact Program to Reduce Mental Illness Stigma and Improve Mental Health Literacy in Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto-Foltz, Melissa D.; Logsdon, M. Cynthia; John A. Myers

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this school-based cluster-randomized trial was to determine the initial acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy of an existing community-based intervention, In Our Own Voice, in a sample of US adolescent girls aged 13–17 years (n=156). In Our Own Voice is a knowledge-contact intervention that provides knowledge about mental illness to improve mental health literacy and facilitates intergroup contact with persons with mental illness as a means to reduce mental illness stigma. T...

  19. Study protocol for the FITR Heart Study: Feasibility, safety, adherence, and efficacy of high intensity interval training in a hospital-initiated rehabilitation program for coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Taylor

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: This study aims to address the ongoing concerns regarding the practicality and safety of HIIT in CR programs. We anticipate study findings will lead to the development of a standardized protocol to facilitate CR programs to incorporate HIIT as a standard exercise option for appropriate patients.

  20. Feasibility of delivering evidence-based HIV/STI prevention programming to a community sample of African American teen girls via the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Carla Kmett; McCauley, Jenna L; Jones, Andrea M; Borkman, April L; Miller, Stephanie; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2013-10-01

    The current study examined the feasibility of an HIV/STI prevention intervention for African American female adolescents. The intervention SiHLEWeb is a web-based adaptation of the evidence-based intervention, Sistas, Informing, Healing, Living, and Empowering (SiHLE). Participants were 41 African American girls aged 13 to 18 years, recruited in collaboration with community partners (local high schools, Department of Juvenile Justice, child advocacy center, medical university). Results support the feasibility of recruitment, screening, and follow-up retention methods. The majority (63.4%) of recruited participants completed the intervention, taking an average of 4.5 (SD = 3.63) site visits. Completers of SiHLEWeb demonstrated increases in knowledge regarding HIV/STI risks and risk reduction behavior [t(18) = 4.74, p < .001], as well as significant increases in condom use self-efficacy [t(16) = 2.41, p = .03]. Findings provide preliminary support for the large-scale, randomized-controlled trial of the efficacy of SiHLEWeb to reduce high-risk sexual behavior among female African American adolescents.

  1. Design of the muscles in motion study: a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of an individually tailored home-based exercise training program for children and adolescents with juvenile dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habers Esther A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM is a rare, often chronic, systemic autoimmune disease of childhood, characterized by inflammation of the microvasculature of the skeletal muscle and skin. Prominent clinical features include significant exercise intolerance, muscle weakness, and fatigue. Despite pharmacological improvements, these clinical features continue to affect patients with JDM, even when the disease is in remission. Exercise training is increasingly utilized as a non-pharmacological intervention in the clinical management of (adult patients with chronic inflammatory conditions; however no randomized controlled trials (RCT have been performed in JDM. In the current study, the efficacy and feasibility of an exercise training program in patients with JDM will be examined. Methods/design Subjects (n = 30 will include 8–18 year olds diagnosed with JDM. The intervention consists of an individually tailored 12-weeks home-based exercise training program in which interval training on a treadmill is alternated with strength training during each session. The program is based on previous literature and designed with a defined frequency, intensity, time, and type of exercise (FITT principles. Primary outcome measures include aerobic exercise capacity, isometric muscle strength, and perception of fatigue. The study methodology has been conceived according to the standards of the CONSORT guidelines. The current study will be a multi-center (4 Dutch University Medical Centers RCT, with the control group also entering the training arm directly after completion of the initial protocol. Randomization is stratified according to age and gender. Discussion The current study will provide evidence on the efficacy and feasibility of an individually tailored 12-week home-based exercise training program in youth with JDM. Trial registration Medical Ethics Committee of the University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands: 11–336

  2. Final quality assurance project plan, installation restoration program remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This quality assurance project plan describes relevant quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures to be used by Analytical Resources, Inc. for the installation restoration program at Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska.

  3. Final quality assurance project plan, installation restoration program remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This quality assurance project plan describes relevant quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures to be used by Analytical Resources, Inc. for the installation restoration program at Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska.

  4. Effects and feasibility of a multi-disciplinary orientation program for newly registered cancer patients: design of a randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chan, Raymond; Webster, Joan; Bennett, Linda

    2009-01-01

    .... This study investigates the effects of an orientation program on levels of anxiety and self-efficacy amongst newly registered cancer patients who are about to undergo chemotherapy and/or radiation...

  5. A feasibility Study: The Succinct Solver v2.0, XSB Prolog v2.6, and Flow-Logic Based Program Analysis for Carmel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    We perform a direct comparison of the {Succinct Solver v2.0} and {XSB Prolog v2.6} based on experiments with {Control Flow Analyses} of scalable {Discretionary Ambient programs} and {Carmel programs}. To facilitate this comparison we expand ALFP clauses accepted by the Succinct Solver into more...... of the Succinct Solver is at worst a small constant factor worse than XSB Prolog. In optimum cases the Succinct Solver outperforms XSB Prolog by having a substantially lower asymptotic complexity....

  6. The effects of senior brain health exercise program on basic physical fitness, cognitive function and BDNF of elderly women - a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jung-Eun; Kang, Eun-Bum

    2016-06-01

    This study was to investigate the impacts of senior brain heath exercise (SBHE) program for 12 weeks to basic active physical fitness, cognitive function and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in elderly women. Subject of this study is total of 24 women in the age of 65-79 who can conduct normal daily activity and communication but have not participated in regular exercise in recent 6 months. The study groups were divided into an exercise group (EG, n=13) and a control group (CG, n=11). The exercise program was consisted of SBHE, and training frequency was 4 times weekly, of which training time was a total of 50 minutes each time in level of intensity of 9-14 by rating of perceived exertion (RPE). First, 12-week SBHE program has shown statistical increase in basic physical fitness in the EG comparing with the CG, such as lower body strength, upper body strength and aerobic endurance, but not in flexibility, agility and dynamic balance. Second, in the case of Mini-mental state examination Korean version (MMSE-K) and BDNF, it showed that there was a statistically significant increase in the EG comparing with the CG. In this study, 12-week SBHE program has resulted in positive effect on change of basic physical fitness (strength and aerobic endurance), cognitive function and BDNF. If above program adds movements that can enhance flexibility, dynamic balance and agility, this can be practical exercise program to help seniors maintain overall healthy lifestyle.

  7. Feasibility, acceptability, and initial efficacy of a knowledge-contact program to reduce mental illness stigma and improve mental health literacy in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Foltz, Melissa D; Logsdon, M Cynthia; Myers, John A

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this school-based cluster-randomized trial was to determine the initial acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy of an existing community-based intervention, In Our Own Voice, in a sample of US adolescent girls aged 13-17 years (n = 156). In Our Own Voice is a knowledge-contact intervention that provides knowledge about mental illness to improve mental health literacy and facilitates intergroup contact with persons with mental illness as a means to reduce mental illness stigma. This longitudinal study was set in two public high schools located in a southern urban community of the U.S. Outcomes included measures of mental illness stigma and mental health literacy. Findings support the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention for adolescents who enrolled in the study. Findings to support the efficacy of In Our Own Voice to reduce stigma and improve mental health literacy are mixed. The intervention did not reduce mental illness stigma or improve mental health literacy at one week follow up. The intervention did not reduce mental illness stigma at 4 and 8 weeks follow up. The intervention did improve mental health literacy at 4 and 8 weeks follow up. Previous studies have assessed the preliminary efficacy In Our Own Voice among young adults; rarely has In Our Own Voice been investigated longitudinally and with adolescents in the United States. This study provides initial data on the effects of In Our Own Voice for this population and can be used to further adapt the intervention for adolescents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Feasibility, Acceptability, and Initial Efficacy of a Knowledge-Contact Program to Reduce Mental Illness Stigma and Improve Mental Health Literacy in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Foltz, Melissa D.; Logsdon, M. Cynthia; Myers, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this school-based cluster-randomized trial was to determine the initial acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy of an existing community-based intervention, In Our Own Voice, in a sample of US adolescent girls aged 13–17 years (n=156). In Our Own Voice is a knowledge-contact intervention that provides knowledge about mental illness to improve mental health literacy and facilitates intergroup contact with persons with mental illness as a means to reduce mental illness stigma. This longitudinal study was set in two public high schools located in a southern urban community of the U.S. Outcomes included measures of mental illness stigma and mental health literacy. Findings support the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention for adolescents who enrolled in the study. Findings to support the efficacy of In Our Own Voice to reduce stigma and improve mental health literacy are mixed. The intervention did not reduce mental illness stigma or improve mental health literacy at one week follow up. The intervention did not reduce mental illness stigma at 4 and 8 weeks follow up. The intervention did improve mental health literacy at 4 and 8 weeks follow up. Previous studies have assessed the preliminary efficacy In Our Own Voice among young adults; rarely has In Our Own Voice been investigated longitudinally and with adolescents in the United States. This study provides initial data on the effects of In Our Own Voice for this population and can be used to further adapt the intervention for adolescents. PMID:21624729

  9. A Feasibility Assessment of Behavioral-based Interviewing to Improve Candidate Selection for a Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatem, Geneva; Kokas, Maria; Smith, Cathy L; DiGiovine, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    Traditional interviews for residency and fellowship training programs are an important component in the selection process, but can be of variable value due to a nonstandardized approach. We redesigned the candidate interview process for our large pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship program in the United States using a behavioral-based interview (BBI) structure. The primary goal of this approach was to standardize the assessment of candidates within noncognitive domains with the goal of selecting those with the best fit for our institution's fellowship program. Eight faculty members attended two BBI workshops. The first workshop identified our program's "best fit" criteria using the framework of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's six core competencies and additional behaviors that fit within our programs. BBI questions were then selected from a national database and refined based on the attributes deemed most important by our faculty. In the second workshop, faculty practiced the BBI format in mock interviews with third-year fellows. The interview process was further refined based on feedback from the interviewees, and then applied with fellowship candidates for the 2014 recruitment season. The 1-year pilot of behavioral-based interviewing allowed us to achieve consensus on the traits sought for our incoming fellows and to standardize the interview process for our program using the framework of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Although the effects of this change on the clinical performance of our fellows have not yet been assessed, this description of our development and implementation processes may be helpful for programs seeking to redesign their applicant interviews.

  10. Development and feasibility testing of an education program to improve knowledge and self-care among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robyn A; Fredericks, Bronwyn; Buitendyk, Natahlia J; Adams, Michael J; Howie-Esquivel, Jill; Dracup, Kathleen A; Berry, Narelle M; Atherton, John; Johnson, Stella

    2015-01-01

    There is a 70% higher age-adjusted incidence of heart failure (HF) among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, three times more hospitalisations and twice as many deaths as among non-Aboriginal people. There is a need to develop holistic yet individualised approaches in accord with the values of Aboriginal community health care to support patient education and self-care. The aim of this study was to re-design an existing HF educational resource (Fluid Watchers-Pacific Rim) to be culturally safe for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, working in collaboration with the local community, and to conduct feasibility testing. This study was conducted in two phases and utilised a mixed-methods approach (qualitative and quantitative). Phase 1 used action research methods to develop a culturally safe electronic resource to be provided to Aboriginal HF patients via a tablet computer. An HF expert panel adapted the existing resource to ensure it was evidence-based and contained appropriate language and images that reflects Aboriginal culture. A stakeholder group (which included Aboriginal workers and HF patients, as well as researchers and clinicians) then reviewed the resources, and changes were made accordingly. In Phase 2, the new resource was tested on a sample of Aboriginal HF patients to assess feasibility and acceptability. Patient knowledge, satisfaction and self-care behaviours were measured using a before and after design with validated questionnaires. As this was a pilot test to determine feasibility, no statistical comparisons were made. Phase 1: Throughout the process of resource development, two main themes emerged from the stakeholder consultation. These were the importance of identity, meaning that it was important to ensure that the resource accurately reflected the local community, with the appropriate clothing, skin tone and voice. The resource was adapted to reflect this, and members of the local community voiced the recordings for the

  11. Stepping to the Beat: Feasibility and Potential Efficacy of a Home-Based Auditory-Cued Step Training Program in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Wright

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHemiparesis after stroke typically results in a reduced walking speed, an asymmetrical gait pattern and a reduced ability to make gait adjustments. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of home-based training involving auditory cueing of stepping in place.MethodsTwelve community-dwelling participants with chronic hemiparesis completed two 3-week blocks of home-based stepping to music overlaid with an auditory metronome. Tempo of the metronome was increased 5% each week. One 3-week block used a regular metronome, whereas the other 3-week block had phase shift perturbations randomly inserted to cue stepping adjustments.ResultsAll participants reported that they enjoyed training, with 75% completing all training blocks. No adverse events were reported. Walking speed, Timed Up and Go (TUG time and Dynamic Gait Index (DGI scores (median [inter-quartile range] significantly improved between baseline (speed = 0.61 [0.32, 0.85] m⋅s−1; TUG = 20.0 [16.0, 39.9] s; DGI = 14.5 [11.3, 15.8] and post stepping training (speed = 0.76 [0.39, 1.03] m⋅s−1; TUG = 16.3 [13.3, 35.1] s; DGI = 16.0 [14.0, 19.0] and was maintained at follow-up (speed = 0.75 [0.41, 1.03] m⋅s−1; TUG = 16.5 [12.9, 34.1] s; DGI = 16.5 [13.5, 19.8].ConclusionThis pilot study suggests that auditory-cued stepping conducted at home was feasible and well-tolerated by participants post-stroke, with improvements in walking and functional mobility. No differences were detected between regular and phase-shift training with the metronome at each assessment point.

  12. Feasibility, Acceptability and Preliminary Treatment Outcomes in a School-Based CBT Intervention Program for Adolescents with ASD and Anxiety in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drmic, Irene E.; Aljunied, Mariam; Reaven, Judy

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at high risk for anxiety difficulties and disorders. Clinic-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is effective; however, few published school-based CBT programs for youth with ASD exist. In this study, the Facing Your Fears CBT protocol was adapted for delivery and piloted within a school…

  13. The Supporting a Teen's Effective Entry to the Roadway (STEER) Program: Feasibility and Preliminary Support for a Psychosocial Intervention for Teenage Drivers with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Hulme, Kevin; Linke, Stuart; Nelson-Tuttle, Chris; Pariseau, Meaghan; Gangloff, Brian; Lewis, Kemper; Pelham, William E.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Gormley, Matthew; Gera, Shradha; Buck, Melina

    2011-01-01

    Teenage drivers with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at considerable risk for negative driving outcomes, including traffic citations, accidents, and injuries. Presently, no efficacious psychosocial interventions exist for teenage drivers with ADHD. The Supporting a Teen's Effective Entry to the Roadway (STEER) program is a…

  14. Field test of the feasibility and validity of using the Hoosier Assurance Plan Instrument for Adults in a state mental health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Frederick L; McGrew, John; Deliberty, Richard N

    2009-08-01

    The current paper reports on the feasibility of using the HAPI-A, an instrument designed to assess a person's level of functioning in the community: (1) to help determine eligibility to receive behavioral health services, (2) to assign reimbursement case rates; and (3) to provide data for a service provider report card. A 3-year field study of the use of the instrument across an entire state mental health system explored the effectiveness of methods to enhance data accuracy, including annual training and a professional clinical record audit, and the ability of the test to detect differences in improvement rates within risk-adjusted groupings. The combination of training and auditing produced statistically significant, cumulative reductions in data errors across all 3 years of the field test. The HAPI-A also was sensitive in detecting differences among service providers in outcome improvements for six of six risk-adjusted groups rated at the moderate level of impairment and for five of six groups rated at the mild level of impairment, but was inconsistent in detecting outcome differences for persons rated at the severe level of impairment.

  15. Feasibility and short-term impact of the "case study in-house group training program for family nursing" at medical facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Akemi; Tsumura, Akemi; Mine, Hiroko; Kimura, Chisato; Soeda, Akemi; Odatsu, Kazumi; Kiwado, Wataru

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and short-term impact of case study training in family nursing care targeting midlevel nursing professionals. The intervention group participated in four 90-minute case study training sessions over 6 months, while the control group participated in two 90-minute lectures. Using primary outcome variables as evaluation indexes, we measured the participants' total scores on the Family Importance in Nursing Care Scale and 4 subitems 3 times (before, immediately after and 1 month after training) from May 2014 to March 2015 and then conducted 2-way repeated-measure analysis of variance. We asked the participants and training planners/managers to provide feedback on their evaluation and then performed content analysis on their responses. Although the primary impact due to the different measurement times was significant, no significant difference was observed in the interaction between measurement time and training differences. Of the 4 subitems, significant interactions because of measurement time and training differences were observed only in Fam-B. Feedback data showed all participants felt that their understanding of the importance of family nursing care was strengthened, and participants in the intervention group specifically described how they were utilizing what they had learned from training in practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Synchronized personalized music audio-playlists to improve adherence to physical activity among patients participating in a structured exercise program: a proof-of-principle feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, David A; O'Sullivan, Mary; Oh, Paul I; Redelmeier, Donald A; Marzolini, Susan; Liu, Richard; Forhan, Mary; Silver, Michael; Goodman, Jack M; Bartel, Lee R

    2015-01-01

    Preference-based tempo-pace synchronized music has been shown to reduce perceived physical activity exertion and improve exercise performance. The extent to which such strategies can improve adherence to physical activity remains unknown. The objective of the study is to explore the feasibility and efficacy of tempo-pace synchronized preference-based music audio-playlists on adherence to physical activity among cardiovascular disease patients participating in a cardiac rehabilitation. Thirty-four cardiac rehabilitation patients were randomly allocated to one of two strategies: (1) no music usual-care control and (2) tempo-pace synchronized audio-devices with personalized music playlists + usual-care. All songs uploaded onto audio-playlist devices took into account patient personal music genre and artist preferences. However, actual song selection was restricted to music whose tempos approximated patients' prescribed exercise walking/running pace (steps per minute) to achieve tempo-pace synchrony. Patients allocated to audio-music playlists underwent further randomization in which half of the patients received songs that were sonically enhanced with rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) to accentuate tempo-pace synchrony, whereas the other half did not. RAS was achieved through blinded rhythmic sonic-enhancements undertaken manually to songs within individuals' music playlists. The primary outcome consisted of the weekly volume of physical activity undertaken over 3 months as determined by tri-axial accelerometers. Statistical methods employed an intention to treat and repeated-measures design. Patients randomized to personalized audio-playlists with tempo-pace synchrony achieved higher weekly volumes of physical activity than did their non-music usual-care comparators (475.6 min vs. 370.2 min, P  music usual-care controls, respectively, P  music with RAS utilized their audio-playlist devices more frequently than did non-RAS music counterparts ( P

  17. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be

  18. Feasibility of a randomised trial of a continuing medical education program in shared decision-making on the use of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections in primary care: the DECISION+ pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurier Claudine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The misuse and limited effectiveness of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs are well documented, and current approaches targeting physicians or patients to improve appropriate use have had limited effect. Shared decision-making could be a promising strategy to improve appropriate antibiotic use for ARIs, but very little is known about its implementation processes and outcomes in clinical settings. In this matter, pilot studies have played a key role in health science research over the past years in providing information for the planning, justification, and/or refinement of larger studies. The objective of our study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the study design, procedures, and intervention of the DECISION+ program, a continuing medical education program in shared decision-making among family physicians and their patients on the optimal use of antibiotics for treating ARIs in primary care. Methods A pilot clustered randomised trial was conducted. Family medicine groups (FMGs were randomly assigned, to either the DECISION+ program, which included three 3-hour workshops over a four- to six-month period, or a control group that had a delayed exposure to the program. Results Among 21 FMGs contacted, 5 (24% agreed to participate in the pilot study. A total of 39 family physicians (18 in the two experimental and 21 in the three control FMGs and their 544 patients consulting for an ARI were recruited. The proportion of recruited family physicians who participated in all three workshops was 46% (50% for the experimental group and 43% for the control group, and the overall mean level of satisfaction regarding the workshops was 94%. Conclusions This trial, while aiming to demonstrate the feasibility and acceptability of conducting a larger study, has identified important opportunities for improving the design of a definitive trial. This pilot trial is informative for researchers and clinicians

  19. Feasibility, Drug Safety, and Effectiveness of Etiological Treatment Programs for Chagas Disease in Honduras, Guatemala, and Bolivia: 10-Year Experience of Médecins Sans Frontières

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Oliver; Lima, M. Angeles; Ellman, Tom; Chambi, Wilma; Castillo, Sandra; Flevaud, Laurence; Roddy, Paul; Parreño, Fernando; Albajar Viñas, Pedro; Palma, Pedro Pablo

    2009-01-01

    Background Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) is a zoonotic or anthropozoonotic disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Predominantly affecting populations in poor areas of Latin America, medical care for this neglected disease is often lacking. Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) has provided diagnostic and treatment services for Chagas disease since 1999. This report describes 10 years of field experience in four MSF programs in Honduras, Guatemala, and Bolivia, focusing on feasibility protocols, safety of drug therapy, and treatment effectiveness. Methodology From 1999 to 2008, MSF provided free diagnosis, etiological treatment, and follow-up care for patients Bolivia (2002–2006); and Sucre, Bolivia (2005–2008). Essential program components guaranteeing feasibility of implementation were information, education, and communication (IEC) at the community and family level; vector control; health staff training; screening and diagnosis; treatment and compliance, including family-based strategies for early detection of adverse events; and logistics. Chagas disease diagnosis was confirmed by testing blood samples using two different diagnostic tests. T. cruzi-positive patients were treated with benznidazole as first-line treatment, with appropriate counseling, consent, and active participation from parents or guardians for daily administration of the drug, early detection of adverse events, and treatment withdrawal, when necessary. Weekly follow-up was conducted, with adverse events recorded to assess drug safety. Evaluations of serological conversion were carried out to measure treatment effectiveness. Vector control, entomological surveillance, and health education activities were carried out in all projects with close interaction with national and regional programs. Results Total numbers of children and adolescents tested for T. cruzi in Yoro, Olopa, Entre Ríos, and Sucre were 24,471, 8,927, 7,613, and 19,400, respectively

  20. Feasible mathematics II

    CERN Document Server

    Remmel, Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    Perspicuity is part of proof. If the process by means of which I get a result were not surveyable, I might indeed make a note that this number is what comes out - but what fact is this supposed to confirm for me? I don't know 'what is supposed to come out' . . . . 1 -L. Wittgenstein A feasible computation uses small resources on an abstract computa­ tion device, such as a 'lUring machine or boolean circuit. Feasible math­ ematics concerns the study of feasible computations, using combinatorics and logic, as well as the study of feasibly presented mathematical structures such as groups, algebras, and so on. This volume contains contributions to feasible mathematics in three areas: computational complexity theory, proof theory and algebra, with substantial overlap between different fields. In computational complexity theory, the polynomial time hierarchy is characterized without the introduction of runtime bounds by the closure of certain initial functions under safe composition, predicative recursion on nota...

  1. Energy Efficiency Study, Steam, Water, and Sewer Systems, Fort Greely, Alaska

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    This energy efficiency study of steam, potable water, and sanitary sewer systems was conducted and this report prepared under the Indefinite Delivery Architect-Engineer Contract for Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP...

  2. Hualapai Wind Project Feasibility Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Kevin [Hualapai Tribe; Randall, Mark [Daystar Consulting; Isham, Tom [Power Engineers; Horna, Marion J [MJH Power Consulting LLC; Koronkiewicz, T [SWCA Environmental, Inc.; Simon, Rich [V-Bar, LLC; Matthew, Rojas [Squire Sanders Dempsey; MacCourt, Doug C. [Ater Wynne, LLP; Burpo, Rob [First American Financial Advisors, Inc.

    2012-12-20

    The Hualapai Department of Planning and Economic Development, with funding assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy, Tribal Energy Program, with the aid of six consultants has completed the four key prerequisites as follows: 1. Identify the site area for development and its suitability for construction. 2. Determine the wind resource potential for the identified site area. 3. Determine the electrical transmission and interconnection feasibility to get the electrical power produced to the marketplace. 4. Complete an initial permitting and environmental assessment to determine the feasibility for getting the project permitted. Those studies indicated a suitable wind resource and favorable conditions for permitting and construction. The permitting and environmental study did not reveal any fatal flaws. A review of the best power sale opportunities indicate southern California has the highest potential for obtaining a PPA that may make the project viable. Based on these results, the recommendation is for the Hualapai Tribal Nation to move forward with attracting a qualified wind developer to work with the Tribe to move the project into the second phase - determining the reality factors for developing a wind project. a qualified developer will bid to a utility or negotiate a PPA to make the project viable for financing.

  3. Implementing a Mental Health Care Program and Home-Based Training for Mothers of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder in an Urban Population in Bangladesh: Protocol for a Feasibility Assessment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naheed, Aliya; Koly, Kamrun Nahar; Uddin Ahmed, Helal; Akhter, Shaheen; Uddin, M M Jalal; Smith Fawzi, Mary C; Chandir, Subhash; Mannan, Muzharul; Hossain, Saima; Nelson, Charles; Munir, Kerim

    2017-12-14

    Mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have reported a higher level of depression than mothers of children with other neurodevelopmental disorders in both developed and developing countries. Mothers are the lifetime caregivers of children with ASD, and a high burden of depression can negatively impact their ability to provide care. However, access to mental health services in primary care is limited, given the scarcity of qualified providers in Bangladesh. We aim to pilot the feasibility of integrating mental health services for the mothers of children with ASD attending schools offering ASD care and improve skills of mothers for child care through a home-based training program. The study will be conducted in two selected schools in Dhaka in Bangladesh that have been offering services for ASD for more than 10 years. A female psychologist will be deployed at the schools to offer nonpharmacological services for all mothers having a depressive episode. Referral for pharmacological treatment will be made at the discretion of supervising psychiatrists. An ASD special educator will provide training to the mothers for enhancing their child care skills at home on a monthly basis. The proposed intervention package will be implemented over a period of 4-6 months, and the feasibility of the intervention will be assessed through a pre- and postintervention evaluation by obtaining the perspectives of various stakeholders involved in the implementation of mental health services and maternal training. The primary outcome will include assessment of acceptability, adaptability, demand, practicality, implementation, and integration of the package intervention in the school settings. The secondary outcomes will include assessment of: 1) the prevalence of maternal depression; 2) children's behavioral, social, and communication skills; and 3) the intervention participation costs incurred by institutions and families. Between February and March 2017, 188 mothers of

  4. Feasibility studies and technological innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Frede Kloster; Lund, Henrik; Sukkumnoed, Decharut

    2004-01-01

    The chapter offers a tool to conduct feasibility studies and focuses on how to make feasibility studies in a situation with environmental concerns, in which technological innovation and institutional chnages are among the objectives.......The chapter offers a tool to conduct feasibility studies and focuses on how to make feasibility studies in a situation with environmental concerns, in which technological innovation and institutional chnages are among the objectives....

  5. Construction of power flow feasibility sets

    OpenAIRE

    Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Turitsyn, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    We develop a new approach for construction of convex analytically simple regions where the AC power flow equations are guaranteed to have a feasible solutions. Construction of these regions is based on efficient semidefinite programming techniques accelerated via sparsity exploiting algorithms. Resulting regions have a simple geometric shape in the space of power injections (polytope or ellipsoid) and can be efficiently used for assessment of system security in the presence of uncertainty. Ef...

  6. Feasibility analysis of uav in dengue control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Maria de Genaro Chiroli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There are intensifying actions to combat the mosquito Aedes which is admittedly responsible for the transmission of diseases: chikungunya, dengue and zika. Among these dengue is a recurring problem that affects the entire world, especially the tropical areas. It is considered one of the world’s greatest public health problems by the World Health Organization, which estimates that approximately 390 million people get infected by this disease each year worldwide. In Brazil, since the first report of the disease in 80’s, dengue has continually occurred, alternating epidemic periods with peaks of increasing disease. Therefore, this study aims to assess the feasibility of using unmanned aerial vehicle, popularly known as drone, in aid of the dengue control program executed in Maringá - PR. In conclusion the use of this aircraft is feasible, since it is an economically attractive investment due to its low cost against the annual investment with manpower.

  7. Feasibility of Exercise Training in Cancer Patients Scheduled for Elective Gastrointestinal Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, Karin; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; Schippers, Carlo C; Wanders, Lisa; Lemmens, Lidwien; Backx, Frank J G; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: This study examines the feasibility of a preoperative exercise program to improve the physical fitness of a patient before gastrointestinal surgery. METHODS: An outpatient exercise program was developed to increase preoperative aerobic capacity, peripheral muscle endurance and

  8. GINGER: A feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Virgilio, Angela D. V.; Belfi, Jacopo; Ni, Wei-Tou; Beverini, Nicolo; Carelli, Giorgio; Maccioni, Enrico; Porzio, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    GINGER (Gyroscopes IN General Relativity) is a proposal for an Earth-based experiment to measure the Lense-Thirring (LT) and de Sitter effects. GINGER is based on ring lasers, which are the most sensitive inertial sensors to measure the rotation rate of the Earth. We show that two ring lasers, one at maximum signal and the other horizontal, would be the simplest configuration able to retrieve the GR effects. Here, we discuss this configuration in detail showing that it would have the capability to test LT effect at 1%, provided the accuracy of the scale factor of the instrument at the level of 1 part in 1012 is reached. In principle, one single ring laser could do the test, but the combination of the two ring lasers gives the necessary redundancy and the possibility to verify that the systematics of the lasers are sufficiently small. The discussion can be generalised to seismology and geodesy and it is possible to say that signals 10-12 orders of magnitude below the Earth rotation rate can be studied; the proposed array can be seen as the basic element of multi-axial systems, and the generalisation to three dimensions is feasible adding one or two devices and monitoring the relative angles between different ring lasers. This simple array can be used to measure with very high precision the amplitude of angular rotation rate (the length of the day, LOD), its short term variations, and the angle between the angular rotation vector and the horizontal ring laser. Finally this experiment could be useful to probe gravity at fundamental level giving indications on violations of Einstein Equivalence Principle and Lorenz Invariance and possible chiral effects in the gravitational field.

  9. West Valley feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirro, J.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents the results of a technical assessment of decontamination alternative prepared for the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC). The purpose of the assessment is to determine the recommended method for decontamination of cell surfaces and decontamination and removal of fuel reprocessing cell equipment to permit manual entry into the cells for the installation of waste solidification equipment. The primary cells of interest are the PMC, GPC, and CPC because they offer the largest usable volume for the solidification program. The secondary cells include XC-1, XC-2, XC-3 and the PPC which may be needed to support the solidification program. Five decontamination assessments were evaluated (A-E). The assessments included the estimated cost, occupational exposure, duration, manpower, waste volume generated, and final cell radiation levels achieved with the alternative decontamination methods. The methods varied from thorough destructive decontamination to equipment removal without decontamination followed by cell wall and floor decontamination. The recommended method for the primary cells is to utilize the remote manipulators and cranes to the maximum extent possible to decontaminate equipment and cell surfaces remotely, and to remove the equipment for temporary on-site storage. The recommended method for secondary cell decontamination is to remotely decontaminate the cells to the maximum extent possible prior to manned entry for contact-removal of the fuel reprocessing equipment (Assessment D). Assessment A is expected to cost $8,713,500 in 1980 dollars (including a 25% contingency) and will result in an occupational exposure of 180.3 manRem. Assessment D is expected to cost $11,039,800 and will result in an occupational exposure of 259 manRems.

  10. Flathead Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belvin Pete: Ed McCarthy; Krista Gordon; Chris Bergen; Rhett Good

    2006-10-03

    The study shall assess the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on lands selected and owned by the Salish and Kootenai Tribes and shall examine the potential for the development of solar and biomass resources located on Tribal Lands.

  11. Feasibility study on the solidification of liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trussell, S. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Spence, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to help determine the feasibility of solidifying a liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this report is to facilitate a decision on the disposition of these wastes by identifying any waste constituents that might (1) compromise the strength or stability of the waste form or (2) be highly leachable. Furthermore, its goal is to identify ways to circumvent interferences and to decrease the leachability of the waste constituents. This study has sought to provide an understanding of inhibition of cement set by identifying the fundamental chemical mechanisms by which this inhibition takes place. From this fundamental information, it is possible to draw some conclusions about the potential effects of waste constituents, even in the absence of particular studies on specific compounds.

  12. Feasibility, Acceptability, and Preliminary Effects of the COPE Online Cognitive-Behavioral Skill-Building Program on Mental Health Outcomes and Academic Performance in Freshmen College Students: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Amaya, Megan; Szalacha, Laura A; Hoying, Jacqueline; Taylor, Tiffany; Bowersox, Kristen

    2015-08-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of mental health disorders in university students, few receive needed evidence-based treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and preliminary effects of a seven-session online cognitive-behavioral skill-building intervention (i.e., COPE, Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment) versus a comparison group on their anxiety, depressive symptoms, and grade performance. A randomized controlled pilot study was conducted from September 2012 to May 2013 with 121 college freshmen enrolled in a required one credit survey course. Although there were no significant differences in anxiety and depressive symptoms between the groups, only COPE students with an elevated level of anxiety at baseline had a significant decline in symptoms. Grade point average was higher in COPE versus comparison students. Evaluations indicated that COPE was a positive experience for students. COPE is a promising brief intervention that can be integrated effectively into a required freshman course. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Characterizing a Mississippian Carbonate Reservoir for CO2-EOR and Carbon Geosequestration: Applicability of Existing Rock Physics Models and Implications to Feasibility of a Time Lapse Monitoring Program in the Wellington Oil Field, Sumner County, Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueck, A. J.; Raef, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    This study will focus on characterizing subsurface rock formations of the Wellington Field, in Sumner County, Kansas, for both geosequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the saline Arbuckle formation and enhanced oil recovery of a depleting Mississippian oil reservoir. Multi-scale data including lithofacies core samples, X-ray diffraction, digital rock physics scans, scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, well log data including sonic and dipole sonic, and surface 3D seismic reflection data will be integrated to establish and/or validate a new or existing rock physics model that best represents our reservoir rock types and characteristics. We will acquire compressional wave velocity and shear wave velocity data from Mississippian and Arbuckle cores by running ultrasonic tests using an Ult 100 Ultrasonic System and a 12 ton hydraulic jack located in the geophysics lab in Thompson Hall at Kansas State University. The elastic constants Young's Modulus, Bulk Modulus, Shear (Rigidity) Modulus and Poisson's Ratio will be extracted from these velocity data. Ultrasonic velocities will also be compared to sonic and dipole sonic log data from the Wellington 1-32 well. These data will be integrated to validate a lithofacies classification statistical model, which will be and partially has been applied to the largely unknown saline Arbuckle formation, with hopes for a connection, perhaps via Poisson's ratio, allowing a time-lapse seismic feasibility assessment and potentially developing a transformation of compressional wave sonic velocities to shear wave sonic for all wells, where compressional wave sonic is available. We will also be testing our rock physics model by predicting effects of changing effective (brine + CO2 +hydrocarbon) fluid composition on seismic properties and the implications on feasibility of seismic monitoring. Lessons learned from characterizing the Mississippian are essential to understanding the potential of utilizing similar workflows for the

  14. Feasibility of Group Voice Therapy for Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searl, Jeff; Wilson, Kristel; Haring, Karen; Dietsch, Angela; Lyons, Kelly; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose was to demonstrate the feasibility of executing treatment tasks focused on increasing loudness in a group format for individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). A second purpose was to report preliminary pre-to-post treatment outcomes for individuals with PD immediately after they complete the group program. Methods:…

  15. Evaluating the Feasibility of Using Remote Technology for Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehring, Jenny L.; Hughes, Michelle L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of remote technology to provide cochlear implant services has gained popularity in recent years. This article contains a review of research evaluating the feasibility of remote service delivery for recipients of cochlear implants. To date, published studies have determined that speech-processor programming levels and other objective tests…

  16. Distance Learning Enrollments in Independent Institutions. Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

    This study investigated the feasibility of collecting enrollment data on distance learning programs sponsored by private institutions within and outside of Washington State. E-commerce developments have allowed in-state independent providers and out-of-state public institutions to serve residents of Washington State, and many nontraditional…

  17. Lower Sioux Wind Feasibility & Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkel, Darin

    2012-04-01

    This report describes the process and findings of a Wind Energy Feasibility Study (Study) conducted by the Lower Sioux Indian Community (Community). The Community is evaluating the development of a wind energy project located on tribal land. The project scope was to analyze the critical issues in determining advantages and disadvantages of wind development within the Community. This analysis addresses both of the Community's wind energy development objectives: the single turbine project and the Commerical-scale multiple turbine project. The main tasks of the feasibility study are: land use and contraint analysis; wind resource evaluation; utility interconnection analysis; and project structure and economics.

  18. Evaluating Por Nuestra Salud: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Brenda; Gonzales, Gustavo; Kernan, William

    2016-01-01

    This feasibility study evaluated the impact of a culturally consistent diabetes educational program, led by a Latino pastor, on Latino community diabetes knowledge levels. Latino adults were recruited from two churches serving Latino populations, one identified as intervention, the other as nonintervention. Both churches received the American Diabetes Association's booklets on diabetes education, "Four Steps to Control Your Diabetes for Life." The intervention group also received weekly reviews of the booklet's information from the church pastor, who was educated about diabetes by a Latino family nurse practitioner. Pre- and postintervention levels of diabetes knowledge were measured using the Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire. Mean changes in the Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ-24) survey from pretest to posttest indicated a significant increase in knowledge in both groups. Only the grades for the participants from the pastor-led group, however, moved from failure in knowledge to high levels of passing. One hundred percent of intervention group participants reported having read the literature. This pilot study supports the feasibility of a local Latino pastor, as a culturally consistent diabetes educator, to increase Latino parishioner's knowledge of diabetes. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  19. Feasibility Study for Paragon - Bisti Solar Ranch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benally, Thomas [Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO), Window Rock, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO) and Navajo Nation (NN) plan to develop renewable energy (RE) projects on the Paragon-Bisti Ranch (PBR) lands, set aside under the Navajo Hopi Land Settlement Act (NHLSA) for the benefit of Relocatees. This feasibility study (FS), which was funded under a grant from DOE’s Tribal Energy Program (TEP), was prepared in order to explore the development of the 22,000-acre PBR in northwestern New Mexico for solar energy facilities. Topics covered include: • Site Selection • Analysis of RE, and a Preliminary Design • Transmission, Interconnection Concerns and Export Markets • Financial and Economic Analysis • Environmental Study • Socioeconomic and Cultural Factors • Next Steps.

  20. Economic feasibility prediction of the commercial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yan; Karady, George G.; Winston, Anthony III. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Gilbert, Palomino; Hess, Robert; Pelley, Don [Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ 85072 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    This paper presents a prediction method and corresponding Visual Basic program to evaluate the economic feasibility of the commercial fuel cells in utility systems. The economic feasibility of a fuel cell is defined as having a net present value (NPV) greater than zero. The basic process of the method is to combine fuel cell specifications and real energy market data to calculate yearly earning and cost for obtaining the NPV of fuel cells. The Fuel Cell Analysis Software was developed using Visual Basic based on the proposed method. The investigation of a 250 kW molten carbonate fuel cell (FuelCell Energy DFC300A) predicted that, for application specifically in Arizona, United States, no profit would result from the installation of this fuel cell. The analysis results indicated that the efficiency, investment cost, and operation cost are three key factors affecting potential feasibility of the commercial fuel cells. (author)

  1. Economic feasibility prediction of the commercial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Yan [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)], E-mail: yan.ma@asu.edu; Karady, George G.; Winston, Anthony [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Gilbert, Palomino; Hess, Robert; Pelley, Don [Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ 85072 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    This paper presents a prediction method and corresponding Visual Basic program to evaluate the economic feasibility of the commercial fuel cells in utility systems. The economic feasibility of a fuel cell is defined as having a net present value (NPV) greater than zero. The basic process of the method is to combine fuel cell specifications and real energy market data to calculate yearly earning and cost for obtaining the NPV of fuel cells. The Fuel Cell Analysis Software was developed using Visual Basic based on the proposed method. The investigation of a 250 kW molten carbonate fuel cell (FuelCell Energy DFC300A) predicted that, for application specifically in Arizona, United States, no profit would result from the installation of this fuel cell. The analysis results indicated that the efficiency, investment cost, and operation cost are three key factors affecting potential feasibility of the commercial fuel cells.

  2. A Digital Library Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Henshaw

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the outcomes of a Digital Library Feasibility Study at the Wellcome Library. In particular, the study looked at the interoperability and integration between systems, including a back-end digital asset management (DAM system with attached storage, a front-end delivery system, the use of METS to manage delivery of content, a full-text database with search engine, and a workflow management system.

  3. NTRE extended life feasibility assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results of a feasibility analysis of a long life, reusable nuclear thermal rocket engine are presented in text and graph form. Two engine/reactor concepts are addressed: the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) design and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) concept. Engine design, integration, reliability, and safety are addressed by various members of the NTRE team from Aerojet Propulsion Division, Energopool (Russia), and Babcock & Wilcox.

  4. Manzanita Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trisha Frank

    2004-09-30

    The Manzanita Indian Reservation is located in southeastern San Diego County, California. The Tribe has long recognized that the Reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit. Manzanita has explored the wind resource potential on tribal land and developed a business plan by means of this wind energy feasibility project, which enables Manzanita to make informed decisions when considering the benefits and risks of encouraging large-scale wind power development on their lands. Technical consultant to the project has been SeaWest Consulting, LLC, an established wind power consulting company. The technical scope of the project covered the full range of feasibility assessment activities from site selection through completion of a business plan for implementation. The primary objectives of this feasibility study were to: (1) document the quality and suitability of the Manzanita Reservation as a site for installation and long-term operation of a commercially viable utility-scale wind power project; and, (2) develop a comprehensive and financeable business plan.

  5. Installation-restoration program (IRP) Stage 7, remedial investigation/feasibility study comprehensive CERCLA work plan for McClellan AFB/EM, McClellan AFB, California. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    In 1979, officials at McClellan Air Force Base (AFB) in California began to suspect that past waste disposal practices may be contaminating the ground water in the area. At least four areas of potential ground water contamination needing further investigation. A comprehensive program was developed to maintain drinking water quality and to remediate the contamination. Through the operation and maintenance of aircraft, McClellan AFB has been engaged in operations that involve the use, storage, and disposal of hazardous materials including: industrial solvents, caustic cleaners, electroplating chemicals, heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), low-level radioactive wastes, and a variety of fuel oils and lubricants. Hazardous substances have percolated into aquifers. Ground water testing identified the presence of volatile organic compounds in on- and off-base wells. Surface water drainage includes several creeks within the area watersheds. These creeks receive contaminants and toxic hazards from on base drainage and then in turn merge with several tributaries, and exit to the west.

  6. Adolescent Smoking Prevention: Feasibility and Effect of Participatory Video Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunhee; Kulbok, Pamela A; Keim-Malpass, Jessica; Drake, Emily; Kennedy, Michael J

    This study tested whether a youth participatory video production program for smoking prevention is feasible and effective. A participatory video production program was implemented in eight twice-weekly sessions at a youth summer camp in a community center in a low-income neighborhood. Twenty-three youths participated. Descriptive statistics and a qualitative analysis were conducted to test the feasibility of the program by assessing attendance rates, the time and resources required, reasons for participation, and program satisfaction using checklists and interviews. Smoking intention was measured via pre- and post-intervention surveys and a quantitative analysis utilizing a Wilcoxon Signed Rank test to detect differences in intention for non-smoking. Participants worked in groups to produce four video clips containing anti-smoking messages. Three main themes (active engagement, participation for community health, and personal growth and healthy development) emerged from the qualitative interview data. >75% of the participants considered the program excellent and stated that it met their expectations. Significant positive changes were also found from baseline to post-intervention in intention not to smoke. This study demonstrated the effect of a participatory digital media production approach and confirmed its feasibility for youth health promotion and health education. Participants' active involvement in producing anti-smoking videos for a community health-promotion campaign decreased their intention to smoke and empowered them as advocates for a non-smoking community. These findings confirm the feasibility and utility of digital media use and interactive technology for actively engaging young people in health promotion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Feasibility of Assessing 2 Cardiac Rehabilitation Quality Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L; Tan, Yongyao; Oh, Paul; Aggarwal, Sandeep; Unsworth, Karen; Suskin, Neville

    2016-01-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society initiated a pan-Canadian process for development of quality indicators (QIs) for cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Before implementation, the QIs underwent pilot testing to ensure they were acceptable and feasible for field implementation. The objectives of this test were to assess (1) the technical feasibility of measuring the QIs; (2) the workload required to measure the QIs; and (3) acceptability of measuring the QIs and issues with their implementation. The 2 indicators chosen for field testing were QI-1 (% of eligible inpatients referred) and 2b (median wait time from CR referral receipt to enrollment). The approach consisted of 3 steps: (1) data extraction to test technical feasibility; (2) completing a workload diary; and (3) providing input through a semistructured interview regarding acceptability and implementation issues. Three academic CR sites were selected to undertake the field test. QI-1 ranged from 51.0% to 68.4%, and QI-2b was reported as 27 days (median) by one site, and 22 days (mean) by another. It was not considered feasible for CR programs to assess all potentially CR-eligible inpatients for CR referral exclusions. Compilation required 4.2 hours for QI-1 and 1.8 hours for QI-2b. QI assessment was acceptable to the programs, but changes in practice would be needed at each site to implement the QIs. CR programs may require enhancement of information-tracking processes to enable QI measurement. It was recommended that the QIs be implemented, but should undergo minor revisions to enhance feasibility.

  8. Astronaut Rescue Air Pack (ARAP) and Emergency Egress Air Pack (EEAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, W. L.; Clew, R. D.; Waddell, H. M., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Two designs for a lightweight, low profile, mobile rescue apparatus providing a 15-minute air supply and self-contained two-way communications assembly are described. Units are designed for astronaut use in hazardous environments.

  9. Limited Energy Study, EEAP - DACA01-94-D-0037, for Fort Monmouth. Book 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    rate, suggests an ASHRAE definition for a loose to medium type construction for this building during winter conditions. Summer conditions at this rate...Goreniment As (no I .w Z i7 s auantAr thpoerl. indicate byf ( o rYPD NME ’ YPD NMEmua, 11 01tfemnt. enter actua nuantAy PC- tYPED AU)CE AN ’m etvid b...reflect that the Leaving Air rather than cooling medium temp. Please Temperatures for the MCA system and the clarify. See Comment 8 above. DX/Misc

  10. DPC loading feasibility study report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dafoe, R.E.; Lopez, D.A.; Williams, K.L.

    1997-11-01

    Disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a ``Settlement Agreement`` between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. This study investigates the feasibility of using the Dry Transfer Cell facility to package waste into Dual Purpose Canisters for interim storage at the adjacent Dry Storage System comprised of an interim storage pad with NUHOMS{reg_sign} storage modules. The wastes would then be road-ready for eventual disposal in a permanent repository. The operating period for these activities is expected to be from 2015 to 2035.

  11. Evaluating the Feasibility of Using Remote Technology for Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Goehring, Jenny L.; Hughes, Michelle L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of remote technology to provide cochlear implant services has gained popularity in recent years. This article contains a review of research evaluating the feasibility of remote service delivery for recipients of cochlear implants. To date, published studies have determined that speech-processor programming levels and other objective tests (electrode impedance and electrically evoked compound action potentials) are equivalent to those obtained in the face-to-face condition. Despite the...

  12. Feasibility Analysis For Heating Tribal Buildings with Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Clairmont; Micky Bourdon; Tom Roche; Colene Frye

    2009-03-03

    This report provides a feasibility study for the heating of Tribal buildings using woody biomass. The study was conducted for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation in western Montana. S&K Holding Company and TP Roche Company completed the study and worked together to provide the final report. This project was funded by the DOE's Tribal Energy Program.

  13. SYNCHEM feasibility report: Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    Several Czech and US companies have entered into a development agreement for the purposes of determining the technical and economic feasibility and overall financeability of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) regional energy facility to be located adjacent to the Chemopetrol refinery in Litvinov, Czech Republic. The Project would use a feedstock comprised of coal supplied by Doly a upravny Komorany s.p. (DUK) coal mining company and mined from the Most/Litvinov area together with high sulfur residual oils from the Chemopetrol refinery. When gasified together with oxygen from an Air Products air separation plant, and based on an average yearly consumption of 2,100K metric tons per year of coal (as delivered) and 630K tonnes per year of oil, approximately 11 million normal cubic meters per day of syngas will be produced. At its current projected design capacity, when combusted in two General Electric advanced technology Frame 9FA gas turbines, the Project will produce approximately 690MW of electric power; 250 metric tons/hour of steam for process; and 135 thermal equivalent MW of district heat. The Feasibility Phase efforts described in this report indicate the real possibility for a successful and profitable IGCC Project for the Czech Republic. It is therefore incumbent upon all the Project Participants to review and evaluate the information contained herein such that a go/no-go decision can be reached by early next year.

  14. Feasibility of Simulated Annealing Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Vo, Nghia T; Moser, Herbert O

    2014-01-01

    Simulated annealing tomography (SAT) is a simple iterative image reconstruction technique which can yield a superior reconstruction compared with filtered back-projection (FBP). However, the very high computational cost of iteratively calculating discrete Radon transform (DRT) has limited the feasibility of this technique. In this paper, we propose an approach based on the pre-calculated intersection lengths array (PILA) which helps to remove the step of computing DRT in the simulated annealing procedure and speed up SAT by over 300 times. The enhancement of convergence speed of the reconstruction process using the best of multiple-estimate (BoME) strategy is introduced. The performance of SAT under different conditions and in comparison with other methods is demonstrated by numerical experiments.

  15. A NONLINEAR FEASIBILITY PROBLEM HEURISTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Drumond Ventura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we consider a region S ⊂ given by a finite number of nonlinear smooth convex inequalities and having nonempty interior. We assume a point x 0 is given, which is close in certain norm to the analytic center of S, and that a new nonlinear smooth convex inequality is added to those defining S (perturbed region. It is constructively shown how to obtain a shift of the right-hand side of this inequality such that the point x 0 is still close (in the same norm to the analytic center of this shifted region. Starting from this point and using the theoretical results shown, we develop a heuristic that allows us to obtain the approximate analytic center of the perturbed region. Then, we present a procedure to solve the problem of nonlinear feasibility. The procedure was implemented and we performed some numerical tests for the quadratic (random case.

  16. Feasibility Study on HYSOL CSP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Henrik; Skytte, Klaus; Pérez, Cristian Hernán Cabrera

    2016-01-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plants utilize thermal conversion of direct solar irradiation. A trough or tower configuration focuses solar radiation and heats up oil or molten salt that subsequently in high temperature heat exchangers generate steam for power generation. High temperature molten...... salt can be stored and the stored heat can thus increase the load factor and the usability for a CSP plant, e.g. to cover evening peak demand. In the HYSOL concept (HYbrid SOLar) such configuration is extended further to include a gas turbine fuelled by upgraded biogas or natural gas. The optimised...... integrated HYSOL concept, therefore, becomes a fully dispatchable (offering firm power) and fully renewable energy source (RES) based power supply alternative, offering CO2-free electricity in regions with sufficient solar resources. The economic feasibility of HYSOL configurations is addressed in this paper...

  17. Feasibility of global energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhardt, H. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    The feasibility of a global energy system was examined. The capacity of the global energy system was established from the expected demand and the most desirable structure and associated technologies were studied from a scientific, economic , social and ecological perspective. Design guidelines were established, which included considerations such as protection of the ecosystem, transgenerational impacts, transnational aspects, rationing of energy, and population planning by limiting the size of families to no more than two offsprings. Direct solar energy technology showed the most promising characteristics as a viable option for either heat or electricity. It was concluded that a decentralized energy system, using a mix of local small scale and large scale power generators connected to a global energy and information network could provide adequately for the energy needs of all human populations. Contrary to conventional wisdom, this model found that the limiting factor for global human development is not energy, but food. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  18. IPNS upgrade: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Many of Argonne National Laboratory`s (ANL`s) scientific staff members were very active in R&D work related to accelerator-based spoliation sources in the 1970s and early 1980s. In 1984, the Seitz/Eastman Panel of the National Academy of Sciences reviewed U.S. materials science research facilities. One of the recommendations of this panel was that the United States build a reactor-based steady-state source, the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Subsequently, R&D activities related to the design of an accelerator-based source assumed a lower priority. The resumption of pulsed-source studies in this country started simultaneously with design activities in Europe aimed at the European Spallation Source (ESS). The European Community funded a workshop in September 1991 to define the parameters of the ESS. Participants in this workshop included both accelerator builders and neutron source users. A consortium of European countries has proposed to build a 5-MW pulsed source, and a feasibility study is currently under way. Soon after the birth of the ESS, a small group at ANL set about bringing themselves up to date on pulsed-source information since 1984 and studied the feasibility of upgrading ANL`s Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) to 1 MW by means of a rapidly cycling synchrotron that could be housed, along with its support facilities, in existing buildings. In early 1993, the Kohn panel recommended that (1) design and construction of the ANS should be completed according to the proposed project schedule and (2) development of competitive proposals for cost-effective design and construction of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source should be authorized immediately.

  19. World Ships - Architectures & Feasibility Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, A. M.; Pak, M.; Putz, D.; Buhler, C.; Reiss, P.

    A world ship is a concept for manned interstellar flight. It is a huge, self-contained and self-sustained interstellar vehicle. It travels at a fraction of a per cent of the speed of light and needs several centuries to reach its target star system. The well- known world ship concept by Alan Bond and Anthony Martin was intended to show its principal feasibility. However, several important issues haven't been addressed so far: the relationship between crew size and robustness of knowledge transfer, reliability, and alternative mission architectures. This paper addresses these gaps. Furthermore, it gives an update on target star system choice, and develops possible mission architectures. The derived conclusions are: a large population size leads to robust knowledge transfer and cultural adaptation. These processes can be improved by new technologies. World ship reliability depends on the availability of an automatic repair system, as in the case of the Daedalus probe. Star systems with habitable planets are probably farther away than systems with enough resources to construct space colonies. Therefore, missions to habitable planets have longer trip times and have a higher risk of mission failure. On the other hand, the risk of constructing colonies is higher than to establish an initial settlement on a habitable planet. Mission architectures with precursor probes have the potential to significantly reduce trip and colonization risk without being significantly more costly than architectures without. In summary world ships remain an interesting concept, although they require a space colony-based civilization within our own solar system before becoming feasible.

  20. The Army Collegiate Commissioning Program--A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Gannon 1,208 62 5.13 Gettysburg 1,115 84 7.53 Indiana St. 3,952 316 8.0 Lafayette 1,489 77 5.17 LaSalle 2,322 97 4.18 Lehigh 3,140 84 2.68 Penn St...Headquartes,•T~nedT ýea - m~ay-aining and Doctrine Command, December 15, 1975), Ibid. pp. 5-26. ’Yearbook of Higher Education 1.9-4 (Chicago. Marquis ...Space Digest, 53s4, April, 1970, p. 65. Yearbook of Higher Education 1974-7j. Chicago, Marquis Academic Yedia--19747. 2. Government Documents

  1. Feasibility of School-Based Smoking Cessation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Amaya; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study surveyed Australian adolescents about smoking cessation behavior, analyzing previous quitting experience and intentions to quit. Previous quitters and those who intended to quit were significantly more likely to consider cessation assistance options acceptable than nonquitters and nonintenders. Saving money was an important variable in…

  2. Feasibility Report for the Prominence-Corona Interface Proposed Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mouradian, Zadig

    1994-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking CNRS as follows: Investigate the solar prominence - corona interface including space-time distribution measurements of differential emission and temperature...

  3. The Leadership Evaluation and Analysis Program (LEAP). Economic Feasibility Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    Iv y war uded t o imIIp I e ni t anid t it r- t hetr dove 1 ep t heI FEA P’ Wh i 1 te ne sy t e111, t i COI t Ve i 1. led t’enem I - ana 111 s Is was...i - t I ilt, rs .The dLi tl awot, Me ana V. ed t" 101101iat tl des5 ’ *i pt ioens et 1-EAV app I i ca t i ens , p ired i I V i0 eteuane ntem and’ the...AIMD Intermediate 3-M data feedback report. San Dieqo, Ca.: February 1979. Freud , S. Collected papers. New York: Basic Books, 1959. (Originally

  4. Focused Feasibility Study Final Quality Assurance Program Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    8217 0.007’ Diquat 0.028 0.022 Endothall 0.18 0.16 Endrn 0.0022 0.00021 0.0022 Epichlorohydrin 02 Ethylene dibromide 02 0.00005’ Glyphosate 0.7d 0.7...probable human carcinogens : benz(a)anthracene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, chrysene. dlbenz(a~h)anthracene, and indenopyrene. ,.Public

  5. Feasibility of Exercise Training in Cancer Patients Scheduled for Elective Gastrointestinal Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, Karin; Trappenburg, Jaap C.A.; Schippers, Carlo C.; Wanders, Lisa; Lemmens, Lidwien; Backx, Frank J.G.; Hillegersberg, van Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study examines the feasibility of a preoperative exercise program to improve the physical fitness of a patient before gastrointestinal surgery. Methods: An outpatient exercise program was developed to increase preoperative aerobic capacity, peripheral muscle endurance and

  6. Feasibility, Safety, and Compliance in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Physical Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. McGinley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Both efficacy and clinical feasibility deserve consideration in translation of research outcomes. This study evaluated the feasibility of rehabilitation programs within the context of a large randomized controlled trial of physical therapy. Ambulant participants with Parkinson's disease (PD (n=210 were randomized into three groups: (1 progressive strength training (PST; (2 movement strategy training (MST; or (3 control (“life skills”. PST and MST included fall prevention education. Feasibility was evaluated in terms of safety, retention, adherence, and compliance measures. Time to first fall during the intervention phase did not differ across groups, and adverse effects were minimal. Retention was high; only eight participants withdrew during or after the intervention phase. Strong adherence (attendance >80% did not differ between groups (P=.435. Compliance in the therapy groups was high. All three programs proved feasible, suggesting they may be safely implemented for people with PD in community-based clinical practice.

  7. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doss, E.D. (ed.) (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sikes, W.C. (ed.) (Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States))

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  8. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  9. Incorporating health literacy in education for socially disadvantaged adults: an Australian feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscat, Danielle M; Smith, Sian; Dhillon, Haryana M; Morony, Suzanne; Davis, Esther L; Luxford, Karen; Shepherd, Heather L; Hayen, Andrew; Comings, John; Nutbeam, Don; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2016-06-04

    Adult education institutions have been identified as potential settings to improve health literacy and address the health inequalities that stem from limited health literacy. However, few health literacy interventions have been tested in this setting. Feasibility study for an RCT of the UK Skilled for Health Program adapted for implementation in Australian adult education settings. Implementation at two sites with mixed methods evaluation to examine feasibility, test for change in participants' health literacy and pilot test health literacy measures. Twenty-two socially disadvantaged adults with low literacy participated in the program and received 80-90 hours of health literacy instruction. The program received institutional support from Australia's largest provider of vocational education and training and was feasible to implement (100 % participation; >90 % completion; high teacher satisfaction). Quantitative results showed improvements in participants' health literacy skills and confidence, with no change on a generic measure of health literacy. Qualitative analysis identified positive student and teacher engagement with course content and self-reported improvements in health knowledge, attitudes, and communication with healthcare professionals. Positive feasibility results support a larger RCT of the health literacy program. However, there is a need to identify better, multi-dimensional measures of health literacy in order to be able to quantify change in a larger trial. This feasibility study represents the first step in providing the high quality evidence needed to understand the way in which health literacy can be improved and health inequalities reduced through Australian adult education programs.

  10. Patient-specific academic detailing for smoking cessation: feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Margaret; Gagnon, Antony; Levine, Mitchell; Thabane, Lehana; Rodriguez, Christine; Dolovich, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    To describe and to determine the feasibility of a patient-specific academic detailing (PAD) smoking cessation (SC) program in a primary care setting. Descriptive cohort feasibility study. Hamilton, Ont. Pharmacists, physicians, nurse practitioners, and their patients. Integrated pharmacists received basic academic detailing training and education on SC and then delivered PAD to prescribers using structured verbal education and written materials. Data were collected using structured forms. Five main feasibility criteria were generated based on Canadian academic detailing programs: PAD coordinator time to train pharmacists less than 40 hours; median time of SC education per pharmacist less than 20 hours; median time per PAD session less than 60 minutes for initial visit; percentage of prescribers receiving PAD within 3 months greater than 50%; and number of new SC referrals to pharmacists at 6 months more than 10 patients per 1.0 full-time equivalent (FTE) pharmacist (total of approximately 30 patients). Eight pharmacists (5.8 FTE) received basic academic detailing training and education on SC PAD. Forty-eight physicians and 9 nurse practitioners consented to participate in the study. The mean PAD coordinator training time was 29.1 hours. The median time for SC education was 3.1 hours. The median times for PAD sessions were 15 and 25 minutes for an initial visit and follow-up visit, respectively. The numbers of prescribers who had received PAD at 3 and 6 months were 50 of 64 (78.1%) and 57 of 64 (89.1%), respectively. The numbers of new SC referrals at 3 and 6 months were 11 patients per FTE pharmacist (total of 66 patients) and 34 patients per FTE pharmacist (total of 200 patients), respectively. This study met the predetermined feasibility criteria with respect to the management, resources, process, and scientific components. Further study is warranted to determine whether PAD is more effective than conventional academic detailing.

  11. Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

    2005-07-31

    The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

  12. Effectiveness and feasibility of telepsychiatry in resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness and feasibility of telepsychiatry in resource constrained environments? A systematic review of the evidence. J Chipps, P Brysiewicz, M Mars. Abstract. Objective: A review of systematic reviews of the effectiveness and feasibility of videoconference-based telepsychiatry services for resource constrained ...

  13. Biological feasibility of measles eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2011-12-01

    Because of the success of global measles control programs, the World Health Organization (WHO), along with its partner agencies, is once again considering the possibility of setting a target date for measles eradication. Measles would be the fourth viral agent to be eradicated joining the successful programs to eradicate smallpox and rinderpest virus, and the continuing effort to eradicate polio virus. A description of the recent progress toward measles eradication was recently published as a supplement in the Journal of Infectious Diseases (15 July, 2011, 204 (Suppl. 1)) and the reader is referred to this document for a detailed summary of the global status of measles control. This review will focus on the biologic and virologic aspects of measles eradication. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Algae biodiesel - a feasibility report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yihe; Gregor, Chapin; Liang, Yuanjie; Tang, Dawei; Tweed, Caitlin

    2012-04-23

    Algae biofuels have been studied numerous times including the Aquatic Species program in 1978 in the U.S., smaller laboratory research projects and private programs. Using Molina Grima 2003 and Department of Energy figures, captial costs and operating costs of the closed systems and open systems were estimated. Cost per gallon of conservative estimates yielded $1,292.05 and $114.94 for closed and open ponds respectively. Contingency scenarios were generated in which cost per gallon of closed system biofuels would reach $17.54 under the generous conditions of 60% yield, 50% reduction in the capital costs and 50% hexane recovery. Price per gallon of open system produced fuel could reach $1.94 under generous assumptions of 30% yield and $0.2/kg CO2. Current subsidies could allow biodiesel to be produced economically under the generous conditions specified by the model.

  15. Algae biodiesel - a feasibility report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Algae biofuels have been studied numerous times including the Aquatic Species program in 1978 in the U.S., smaller laboratory research projects and private programs. Results Using Molina Grima 2003 and Department of Energy figures, captial costs and operating costs of the closed systems and open systems were estimated. Cost per gallon of conservative estimates yielded $1,292.05 and $114.94 for closed and open ponds respectively. Contingency scenarios were generated in which cost per gallon of closed system biofuels would reach $17.54 under the generous conditions of 60% yield, 50% reduction in the capital costs and 50% hexane recovery. Price per gallon of open system produced fuel could reach $1.94 under generous assumptions of 30% yield and $0.2/kg CO2. Conclusions Current subsidies could allow biodiesel to be produced economically under the generous conditions specified by the model. PMID:22540986

  16. Dual-Doppler Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    When two or more Doppler weather radar systems are monitoring the same region, the Doppler velocities can be combined to form a three-dimensional (3-D) wind vector field thus providing for a more intuitive analysis of the wind field. A real-time display of the 3-D winds can assist forecasters in predicting the onset of convection and severe weather. The data can also be used to initialize local numerical weather prediction models. Two operational Doppler Radar systems are in the vicinity of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS); these systems are operated by the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) and the National Weather Service Melbourne, Fla. (NWS MLB). Dual-Doppler applications were considered by the 45 SW in choosing the site for the new radar. Accordingly, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), NWS MLB and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to investigate the feasibility of establishing dual-Doppler capability using the two existing systems. This study investigated technical, hardware, and software requirements necessary to enable the establishment of a dual-Doppler capability. Review of the available literature pertaining to the dual-Doppler technique and consultation with experts revealed that the physical locations and resulting beam crossing angles of the 45 SW and NWS MLB radars make them ideally suited for a dual-Doppler capability. The dual-Doppler equations were derived to facilitate complete understanding of dual-Doppler synthesis; to determine the technical information requirements; and to determine the components of wind velocity from the equation of continuity and radial velocity data collected by the two Doppler radars. Analysis confirmed the suitability of the existing systems to provide the desired capability. In addition, it is possible that both 45 SW radar data and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data from Orlando International Airport could be used to alleviate any

  17. Optimization and Feasibility Analysis of PV/Wind/ Battery Hybrid Energy Conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Doaa M. Atia; Faten H. Fahmy; Ninet M. Ahmed; Hassen T. Dorrah

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the optimum design for renewable energy system powered an aquaculture pond was determined. Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewable (HOMER) software program, which is developed by U.S National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is used for analyzing the feasibility of the stand alone and hybrid system in this study. HOMER program determines whether renewable energy resources satisfy hourly electric demand or not. The program calculates energy balance for every 8760 hou...

  18. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for adolescents with anxiety disorders: A feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stjerneklar, Silke; Hougaard, Esben; Nielsen, Amalie D.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a well-documented effective method for the treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. While internet based CBT (ICBT) programs for adults have been widely investigated, research on ICBT programs for anxiety disorders in youth...... of their primary anxiety disorder). Conclusion: Results from this study indicate that a translated and revised version of the Chilled Out program could be a feasible psychological intervention for Danish adolescents with anxiety disorders....

  19. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish Tagging System; Annual Report 1994-1996.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downing, Sandra L.; Frost, Deborah A.; Jonasson, Bruce F.; Nunnallee, Edmund P.; Peterson, Bradley W.; Prentice, Earl F.; Snell, Glen A.

    1998-11-01

    A multiyear program to evaluate the technical and biological feasibility of a new identification system for salmonids established between the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in 1983.

  20. Self-perceptions and social–emotional classroom engagement following structured physical activity among preschoolers: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridoula Vazou

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of providing structured PA program to preschoolers. Moreover, these initial findings suggest that purposely designed, structured PA may help advance the social–emotional engagement and perceived competence of preschool children.

  1. Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spain, Stephen

    2012-03-15

    HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide

  2. WERF MACT Feasibility Study Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Bonnema; D. Moser; J. Riedesel; K. Kooda; K. Liekhus; K. Rebish; S. Poling

    1998-11-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the technical feasibility of upgrading the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to meet the offgas emission limits proposed in the Maximum Achievable Control Technologies (MACT)rule. Four practicable offgas treatment processes were identified, which, if installed, would enable the WERF to meet the anticipated MACT emission limits for dioxins and furans (D/F), hydrochloric acid (HCI), and mercury (Hg). Due to the three-year time restraint for MACT compliance, any technology chosen for the upgrade must be performed within the general plant project funding limit of $5 M. The option selected consists of a partial-quench evaporative cooler with dry sorbent injection for HCI removal followed by a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed for Hg control. The planning cost estimate for implementing the option is $4.17 M (with 24% contingency). The total estimated cost includes capital costs, design and construction costs, and project management costs. Capital costs include the purchase of a new offgas evaporative cooler, a dry sorbent injection system with reagent storage, a new fabric filter baghouse, a fixed carbon bed absorber, and two offgas induced draft exhaust fans. It is estimated that 21 months will be required to complete the recommended modification to the WERF. The partial-quench cooler is designed to rapidly cool the offgas exiting the secondary combustion chamber to minimize D/F formation. Dry sorbent injection of an alkali reagent into the offgas is recommended. The alkali reacts with the HCI to form a salt, which is captured with the fly ash in the baghouse. A design HCI removal efficiency of 97.2% allows for the feeding 20 lbs/hr of chlorine to the WERF incinerator. The sorbent feed rate can be adjusted to achieve the desired HCI removal efficiency. A fixed bed of sulfur-impregnated carbon was conservatively sized for a total Hg removal capacity when

  3. Ecological Feasibility Studies in Restoration Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfensperger, Kristine N.; Engelhardt, Katharina A. M.; Seagle, Steven W.

    2007-06-01

    The restoration of degraded systems is essential for maintaining the provision of valuable ecosystem services, including the maintenance of aesthetic values. However, restoration projects often fail to reach desired goals for a variety of ecologic, financial, and social reasons. Feasibility studies that evaluate whether a restoration effort should even be attempted can enhance restoration success by highlighting potential pitfalls and gaps in knowledge before the design phase of a restoration. Feasibility studies also can bring stakeholders together before a restoration project is designed to discuss potential disagreements. For these reasons, a feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of restoring a tidal freshwater marsh in the Potomac River near Alexandria, Virginia. The study focused on science rather than engineering questions, and thus differed in approach from other feasibility studies that are mostly engineering driven. The authors report the framework they used to conduct a feasibility study to inform other potential restoration projects with similar goals. The seven steps of the framework encompass (1) initiation of a feasibility study, (2) compilation of existing data, (3) collection of current site information, (4) examination of case studies, (5) synthesis of information in a handbook, (6) meeting with selected stakeholders, and (7) evaluation of meeting outcomes. By conducting a feasibility study using the seven-step framework, the authors set the stage for conducting future compliance studies and enhancing the chance of a successful restoration.

  4. Pascua Yaqui Tribe Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvayo, Maria

    2014-05-30

    In 2012, PYT was awarded a grant from the Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program to conduct a Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study that would define the technical and economic viability of renewable energy on tribal lands. Red Mountain Energy Partners (RMEP) was hired by PYT to complete the study. Through this study, Red Mountain concluded that there are viable opportunities for solar at Tortuga Ranch, the Casino del Sol and a third site near the Justice Center on Camino de Oeste.

  5. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Assistant Tool Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Melissa D.; Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land D.

    2013-09-01

    An effort to determine the feasibility of a software tool to assist in Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been completed. This new and unique approach to FMEA uses model based systems engineering concepts to recommend failure modes, causes, and effects to the user after they have made several selections from pick lists about a component's functions and inputs/outputs. Recommendations are made based on a library using common failure modes identified over the course of several major human spaceflight programs. However, the tool could be adapted for use in a wide range of applications from NASA to the energy industry.

  6. Three Affliated Tribes Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belvin Pete; Kent Good; Krista Gordon; Ed McCarthy,

    2006-05-26

    The Three Affliated Tribes on the Fort Berthold Reservation studied the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on land selected and owned by the Tribes and examined the potential for the development of renewable energy resources on Tribal Lands.

  7. 25 CFR 41.7 - Feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... right to a formal review of the feasibility study, including a hearing upon reasonable notice within..., linguistics, or cultural differences; (4) Isolation; (5) Presence of alternate education sources; (6) Proposed...

  8. The feasibility Problem in Theorizing Social Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Huzum

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available G. A. Cohen and Andrew Mason have recently argued, against many contemporary philosophers, that feasibility is not a legitimate constraint in theorizing about social justice. Their main argument is that principles of justice are logically independent of issues of feasibility and, consequently, feasibility has no bearing on the correctness of these principles. This article is a critical examination of three attempts to show that Cohen and Mason’s argument is unsound. The examined attempts are those of Harry Brighouse, Collin Farrelly, and David Miller. I argue that all these arguments are based on false, unjustified or implausible, premises and/or assumptions. Consequently, they cannot discredit the soundness of Cohen and Mason’s argument and of the thesis that feasibility is not, in fact, a legitimate constraint in theorizing about social justice.

  9. White Earth Biomass/Biogas Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triplett, Michael

    2015-03-12

    The White Earth Nation examined the feasibility of cost savings and fossil energy reduction through the installation of biogas/biomass boiler at the tribal casino. The study rejected biogas options due to availability and site constraints, but found a favorable environment for technical and financial feasibility of installing a 5 MMBtu hot water boiler system to offset 60-70 percent of current fuel oil and propane usage.

  10. Heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) for high-speed aircraft propulsion. Phase 2 (feasibility) final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Silverstein, C.C. [CCS Associates, Bethel Park, PA (United States)

    1994-03-25

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos), and CCS Associates are conducting the Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC) for High-Speed Aircraft Propulsion program to determine the advantages and demonstrate the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This innovative approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from adjacent external surfaces. HPRC is viewed as an alternative (or complementary) cooling technique to the use of pumped cryogenic or endothermic fuels to provide regenerative fuel or air cooling of the hot surfaces. The HPRC program has been conducted through two phases, an applications phase and a feasibility phase. The applications program (Phase 1) included concept and assessment analyses using hypersonic engine data obtained from US engine company contacts. The applications phase culminated with planning for experimental verification of the HPRC concept to be pursued in a feasibility program. The feasibility program (Phase 2), recently completed and summarized in this report, involved both analytical and experimental studies.

  11. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  12. Woodbridge Research Facility Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study; Focused Feasibility Study for Operable Unit One

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Patricia

    1997-01-01

    ...). A Focused Feasibility Study,, has been conducted to identify and screen remedial alternatives for OUl, to address, contaminated groundwater, surface soil, subsurface soil, and sediment detected...

  13. Northern New Mexico regional airport market feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1998-06-01

    This report is about the market for airline travel in northern New Mexico. Interest in developing a northern New Mexico regional airport has periodically surfaced for a number of years. The New Mexico State Legislature passed a memorial during the 1998 Second Session calling for the conduct of a study to determine the feasibility of building a new regional airport in NNM. This report is a study of the passenger market feasibility of such an airport. In addition to commercial passenger market feasibility, there are other feasibility issues dealing with siting, environmental impact, noise, economic impact, intermodal transportation integration, region-wide transportation services, airport engineering requirements, and others. These other feasibility issues are not analyzed in any depth in this report although none were discovered to be show-stoppers as a by-product of the authors doing research on the passenger market itself. Preceding the need for a detailed study of these other issues is the determination of the basic market need for an airport with regular commercial airline service in the first place. This report is restricted to an in-depth look at the market for commercial passenger air service in NNM. 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Adding self-management of chronic conditions to fall prevention: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzer, Birgit Maria; Waters, Debra Lynn; Robertson, Linda; Hale, Beatrice; Hale, Leigh Anne

    2017-03-01

    Assess feasibility and impact of adding a long-term condition self-management program (Living a Healthy Life, LHL) into Steady as You Go (SAYGO) fall prevention exercise classes. Four-day LHL leader training workshop to deliver six weekly program. Focus groups explored feasibility and acceptability. Chronic disease self-efficacy, balance confidence, health behaviours and status were measured at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months. Four leaders and 17 participants volunteered. Focus groups revealed that becoming a leader was considered stressful. Participants valued discussions about managing health, strategies for better communication with doctors, keeping track of medications, action plans and nutrition labels. Between 6-week and 12-month follow-up, self-rated health increased. Although participants valued LHL information, the low participation rates, time commitment and stress of becoming a leader and leading classes suggest that adding LHL to other fall prevention programs will need further consideration around integration of the programs. © 2016 AJA Inc.

  15. Feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of preoperative therapeutic exercise in patients with cancer: A pragmatic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, H.; Groot, J.F. de; Hulzebos, H.J.; Knikker, R. de; Kerkkamp, H.E.M.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study is to determine the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an individually designed preoperative therapeutic exercise program (PreTEP), in patients recently diagnosed with cancer and awaiting elective surgery. The purpose is to improve their physical fitness levels

  16. Feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of preoperative therapeutic exercise in patients with cancer: a pragmatic study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, H.; Groot, J.F. de; Hulzebos, H.J.; Knikker, R. de; Kerkkamp, H.E.M.; Meeteren, N.L. van

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study is to determine the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an individually designed preoperative therapeutic exercise program (PreTEP), in patients recently diagnosed with cancer and awaiting elective surgery. The purpose is to improve their physical fitness levels

  17. Feasibility of delivering HPV vaccine to girls aged 10 to 15 years in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This strategy combined the delivery of the vaccine with the distribution of deworming medication and vitamin A through an existing Child Days Plus program. Methods: A qualitative study that explored the feasibility of the two delivery strategies from the perspective of health workers, district leaders, and staff of the Uganda ...

  18. Adult Role Models: Feasibility, Acceptability, and Initial Outcomes for Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarossi, Lisa; Silver, Ellen Johnson; Dean, Randa; Perez, Amanda; Rivera, Angelic

    2014-01-01

    The authors present the feasibility and acceptability of a parent sexuality education program led by peer educators in community settings. They also report the results of an outcome evaluation with 71 parents who were randomized to the intervention or a control group and surveyed one month prior to and six months after the four-week intervention.…

  19. Exploring Employment Opportunities for the Elderly in Child Care Services: A Feasibility Study. Report No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, J. Ronald; Grossman, Christopher H.

    Elderly and working families with young children have been strongly affected by social changes, particularly in the areas of low-cost quality child care and meaningful opportunities for the elderly. The feasibility of an intergenerational program in which non-center-based, low-cost child care could be provided while expanding employment and…

  20. Feasibility Analyses of Integrated Broiler Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Komalasari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The major obstacles in the development of broiler raising is the expensive price of feed and the fluctuative price of DOCs. The cheap price of imported leg quarters reduces the competitiveness of the local broilers. Therefore, an effort to increase production efficiency is needed through integration between broiler raising and corn farmers and feed producers (integrated farming. The purpose of this study is to analyze the feasibility of integrating broiler raising with corn cultivation and feed production. Besides that, a simulation was conducted to analyze the effects of DOC price changes, broiler price and production capacity. The analyses showed that integrated farming and a mere combination between broiler raising and feed factory of a 10,000 bird capacity is not financially feasible. Increasing the production to 25,000 broiler chickens will make the integrated farming financially feasible. Unintegrated broiler raising is relatively sensitive to broiler price decreases and DOC price increases compared to integrated farming.

  1. Feasibility and Stability in Normative Political Philosophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2006-01-01

    Arguments from stability for liberal nationalism rely on considerations about conditions for the feasibility or stability of liberal political ideals and factual claims about the circumstances under which these conditions are fulfilled in order to argue for nationalist conclusions. Such reliance ...

  2. 7 CFR 1781.18 - Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Feasibility. 1781.18 Section 1781.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT (RCD) LOANS AND WATERSHED (WS) LOANS AND ADVANCES § 1781.18...

  3. Bioventing feasibility test to aid remediation strategy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pearce, K

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A case study is presented where the feasibility of bioventing was assessed for the remediation of a petroleum-contaminated site. This was achieved through the determination of the radius of influence of a single vent well, the soil gas permeability...

  4. Sweet Potato Ketchup: Feasibility, Acceptability, and Production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ketchup sauce is increasingly a popular condiment used as a flavouring ingredient in fast-food businesses in East African urban areas. It is one of a myriad of products that can be made using sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) roots. We assessed the feasibility, consumer acceptability, and cost of production for a ketchup ...

  5. Characterizing CDMA downlink feasibility via effective interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endrayanto, A.I.; van den Berg, Hans Leo; Boucherie, Richardus J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper models and analyses downlink power assignment feasibility in Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) mobile networks. By discretizing the area into small segments, the power requirements are characterized via a matrix representation that separates user and system characteristics. We obtain a

  6. Updating the OMERACT Filter: Discrimination and Feasibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, George; Beaton, Dorcas E.; Tugwell, Peter; Boers, Maarten; Kirwan, John R.; Bingham, Clifton O.; Boonen, Annelies; Brooks, Peter; Conaghan, Philip G.; D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Dougados, Maxime; Furst, Daniel E.; Gossec, Laure; Guillemin, Francis; Helliwell, Philip; Hewlett, Sarah; Kvien, Tore K.; Landewé, Robert B.; March, Lyn; Mease, Philip J.; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Simon, Lee; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Strand, Vibeke; van der Heijde, Désirée M.

    2014-01-01

    The "Discrimination" part of the OMERACT Filter asks whether a measure discriminates between situations that are of interest. "Feasibility" in the OMERACT Filter encompasses the practical considerations of using an instrument, including its ease of use, time to complete, monetary costs, and

  7. Effectiveness and feasibility of telepsychiatry in resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    known as videoconferencing, to provide psychiatric clinical services from a distance.22 Videoconferencing. Effectiveness and feasibility of telepsychiatry in resource constrained environments? A systematic review of the evidence. J Chipps1, P Brysiewicz2, M Mars1. 1Department of TeleHealth, University of KwaZulu-Natal, ...

  8. Technical feasibility study on polycarbonate solar panels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hackmann, M.M.; Meuwissen, M.H.H.; Bots, T.L.; Buijs, J.A.H.M.; Broek, K.M.; Kinderman, R.; Tanck, O.B.F.; Schuurmans, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a technical feasibility study on the application of polycarbonate (PC) plates in a superstrate photovoltaic module design. The lamination process was performed in a conventional laminator apparatus using low temperature curing (100°C) ethylene-vinyl-acetate (EVA) as the potting

  9. Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooney, Tim [Antares Group Inc.

    2013-10-30

    The Gila River Indian Community (GRIC or the Community) contracted the ANTARES Group, Inc. (“ANTARES”) to assess the feasibility of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations. A solar energy project could provide a number of benefits to the Community in terms of potential future energy savings, increased employment, environmental benefits from renewable energy generation and usage, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The study addresses a number of facets of a solar project’s overall feasibility, including: Technical appropriateness; Solar resource characteristics and expected system performance; Levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) economic assessment. The Gila River Indian Community (GRIC or the Community) contracted the ANTARES Group, Inc. (“ANTARES”) to prepare a biomass resource assessment study and evaluate the feasibility of a bioenergy project on Community land. A biomass project could provide a number of benefits to the Community in terms of increased employment, environmental benefits from renewable energy generation and usage, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The study addresses a number of facets of a biomass project’s overall feasibility, including: Resource analysis and costs; Identification of potential bioenergy projects; Technical and economic (levelized cost of energy) modeling for selected project configuration.

  10. The feasibility of a brain tumour website

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, K; Jakobsen, J; Juhler, M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with a high-grade glioma (HGG) and their caregivers have imminent and changing informational and supportive care needs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of a Danish brain tumour website (BTW) in patients with HGG and their caregivers. We...

  11. Tuttle Creek Hydroelectric Project feasibility assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-03-01

    The results are presented of a feasibility assessment study to determine if hydroelectric generation could be developed economically at the Corps of Engineers' Tuttle Creek Dam, an existing flood control structure on the Big Blue River near Manhattan, Kansas. The studies and investigations included site reconnaissance, system load characteristics, site hydrology, conceptual project arrangements and layouts, power studies, estimates of construction costs, development of capital costs, economic feasibility, development of a design and construction schedule and preliminary environmental review of the proposed Project. The dependable capacity of the Project as delivered into the existing transmission and distribution network is 12,290 kW and the average annual energy is 56,690 MWh. For the scheduled on-line date of July 1984, the Project is estimated to have a Total Investment Cost of $19,662,000 (equal to $1333/kW installed at that time frame) with an estimated annual cost for the first year of operation of $2,696,000, assuming REA financing at 9.5% interest rate. The Project is considered technically feasible and without any major environmental issues. It shows economic feasibility providing satisfactory financing terms are available. (LCL)

  12. Nutritional status, complementary feeding practices and feasible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-03

    Feb 3, 2012 ... Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of underweight and wasting, feeding patterns, water use and sanitation patterns in children aged 6-23 months in returnee villages in northern Uganda, and then to identify feasible strategies to promote nutrition. Perceived understanding of the ...

  13. How to Train an Injured Brain? A Pilot Feasibility Study of Home-Based Computerized Cognitive Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhelst, Helena; Vander Linden, Catharine; Vingerhoets, Guy; Caeyenberghs, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Computerized cognitive training programs have previously shown to be effective in improving cognitive abilities in patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI). These studies often focused on a single cognitive function or required expensive hardware, making it difficult to be used in a home-based environment. This pilot feasibility study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a newly developed, home-based, computerized cognitive training program for adolescents who suffered from TBI. Additionally, feasibility of study design, procedures, and measurements were examined. Case series, longitudinal, pilot, feasibility intervention study with one baseline and two follow-up assessments. Nine feasibility outcome measures and criteria for success were defined, including accessibility, training motivation/user experience, technical smoothness, training compliance, participation willingness, participation rates, loss to follow-up, assessment timescale, and assessment procedures. Five adolescent patients (four boys, mean age = 16 years 7 months, standard deviation = 9 months) with moderate to severe TBI in the chronic stage were recruited and received 8 weeks of cognitive training with BrainGames. Effect sizes (Cohen's d) were calculated to determine possible training-related effects. The new cognitive training intervention, BrainGames, and study design and procedures proved to be feasible; all nine feasibility outcome criteria were met during this pilot feasibility study. Estimates of effect sizes showed small to very large effects on cognitive measures and questionnaires, which were retained after 6 months. Our pilot study shows that a longitudinal intervention study comprising our novel, computerized cognitive training program and two follow-up assessments is feasible in adolescents suffering from TBI in the chronic stage. Future studies with larger sample sizes will evaluate training-related effects on cognitive functions and underlying brain structures.

  14. Economic and technical feasibility study of compressed air storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-01

    The results of a study of the economic and technical feasibility of compressed air energy storage (CAES) are presented. The study, which concentrated primarily on the application of underground air storage with combustion turbines, consisted of two phases. In the first phase a general assessment of the technical alternatives, economic characteristics and the institutional constraints associated with underground storage of compressed air for utility peaking application was carried out. The goal of this assessment was to identify potential barrier problems and to define the incentive for the implementation of compressed air storage. In the second phase, the general conclusions of the assessment were tested by carrying out the conceptual design of a CAES plant at two specific sites, and a program of further work indicated by the assessment study was formulated. The conceptual design of a CAES plant employing storage in an aquifer and that of a plant employing storage in a conventionally excavated cavern employing a water leg to maintain constant pressure are shown. Recommendations for further work, as well as directions of future turbo-machinery development, are made. It is concluded that compressed air storage is technically feasible for off-peak energy storage, and, depending on site conditions, CAES plants may be favored over simple cycle turbine plants to meet peak demands. (LCL)

  15. Feasibility of Central Meditation and Imagery Therapy for Dementia Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Felipe A.; Nazarian, Nora; Lavretsky, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Family dementia caregivers are at high risk of depression and burnout. We aimed to assess the feasibility of Central Meditation and Imagery Therapy for Caregivers (CMIT-C), a novel 8-week group meditation and guided imagery group therapy program, for dementia caregivers reporting stress due to caregiving responsibilities. Methods 12 family dementia caregivers enrolled in CMIT-C. Primary outcomes included depression and anxiety, and secondary included insomnia, quality of life, and mindfulness. Changes over the study and three month follow-up were analyzed with non-parametric related samples tests. Correlations of feeling state changes from meditation diaries at 1 week were made with symptom changes post meditation training. Results 10 participants completed the study. Completers came to an average of 7 ± 1 sessions out of a possible 8, and turned in home practice logs 90 ± 10% of the time. Anxiety, depression and insomnia symptoms decreased, and mindfulness ratings improved with large effects (all p meditation practice was associated with subsequent home meditation practice, anxiety change at eight weeks, and endpoint satisfaction with CMIT-C. Conclusions CMIT-C is a feasible intervention for dementia caregivers. Results suggest that this therapeutic technique can reduce symptoms of anxiety, depression, and insomnia, and increase levels of mindfulness. Early response to meditation practice predicted those with the greatest short-term benefits, and this may inform future studies of meditation. Larger, controlled efficacy studies of CMIT-C for dementia caregivers are warranted. PMID:24477920

  16. Using Facebook in a Healthy Lifestyle Intervention: Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jiying; Robbins, Lorraine B; Zhang, Nanhua; Kerver, Jean M; Lyons, Haley; Wieber, Nicole; Zhang, Mi

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot quasi-experimental study was to examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of using Facebook in a 10-week lifestyle intervention with Head Start caregiver-preschooler dyads to improve healthy behaviors and reduce body mass index. Sixty-nine dyads participated with 39 in the intervention group. Average preschooler attendance rate for the Head Start center-based program was 77%, and caregiver participation rate was 87%. About 94% of the caregivers were satisfied with the program, and 97% would recommend the program to others and/or participate again. The intervention decreased preschoolers' body mass index z score (Cohen's d = -.30) and screen time ( d = -.21), and increased their fruit and vegetable intake ( d = .40) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity ( d = .42). The intervention increased caregivers' fruit and vegetable intake ( d = .40). The intervention is feasible, and preliminary efficacy is encouraging, but further investigation using a rigorous study design is warranted.

  17. Targeting core groups for gonorrhoea control: feasibility and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Katia; Alary, Michel

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to outline why core groups should be targeted in Neisseria gonorrhoeae control and suggest several important and timely interventions to target core groups while highly resistant strains are spreading. Core group definition, feasibility and impact of gonorrhoea core group interventions as well as gonorrhoea resistance development have been reviewed in the paper. Core group interventions have proven effective in gonorrhoea control in the past but are compromised by the spread of highly resistant strains. Worldwide functional Gonorrhoea Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, better screening and better treatment programmes are needed. Prevention through condom promotion aimed at core groups remains essential. More specific treatment guidance for low-income and middle-income countries without resistance data is required in the meantime to achieve a better use of antibiotics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Feasibility Study: Potential Enhancements for the LLNL Renewables Website

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearns, F; Krawchuk, M; Moritz, M; Stephens, S; Goldstein, N

    2008-01-25

    This feasibility study investigates additional improvements/extensions to the LLNL Renewables Website. Currently, the Renewables Website focuses on wind energy in California. Future enhancements will include other renewable energy sources. The extensions described below are focused along two separate yet related avenues: (1) Forecasting wildfire risk in the regions of California where new development may occur, as a part of the 'Million Solar Roofs' program. (2) Gaining a better understanding of the ecological components and potential of biofuels from forests in California. These two avenues are further described in the report. Following is a technical description of the Center for Fire Research and Outreach computing and web service capabilities.

  19. Feasibility Study of 8-Bit Microcontroller Applications for Ethernet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Gulbinovič

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility study of 8-bit microcontroller applications for Ethernet is presented. Designed device is based on ATmega32 microcontroller and 10 Mbps Ethernet controller ENC28J60. Device is simulated as mass queuing theoretical model with ticket booking counter. Practical explorations are accomplished and characteristics are determined. Practical results are compared to theoretical ones. Program code and device packet processing speed optimization are discussed. Microcontroller packet processing speed and packet latency depend on packet size. For ICMP protocol packet processing speed varies 1.4–2.1 Mbps, latency – 0.8–8.4 ms. UDP protocol packet processing speed varies 1.3–1.8 Mbps, latency – 1.1–9.6 ms. Packet processing speed depends on compilation settings and program code compression level. Best results are reached on optimization le­vel ‑O3, then speed increased ~3% but program code size increased 68% comparing to –Os optimization level.Article in Lithuanian

  20. A pregnancy and postpartum lifestyle intervention in women with gestational diabetes mellitus reduces diabetes risk factors: a feasibility randomized control trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferrara, Assiamira; Hedderson, Monique M; Albright, Cheryl L; Ehrlich, Samantha F; Quesenberry, Jr, Charles P; Peng, Tiffany; Feng, Juanran; Ching, Jenny; Crites, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    To pilot, among women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), the feasibility of a prenatal/postpartum intervention to modify diet and physical activity similar to the Diabetes Prevention Program...

  1. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-07-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  2. Grid-connected ICES preliminary feasibility analysis and evaluation. Final report. Volume I. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-30

    A group of hospitals, clinics, research facilities, and medical education facilities, known as the HEAL Complex, was chosen as the site (in New Orleans) for the demonstration of a Grid-Connected Integrated Community Energy System (ICES). The contract work included a preliminary energy supply/demand assessment of the Demonstration Community, a preliminary feasibility analysis and conceptual design of a candidate Demonstration System, preliminary assessment of institutional factors, preparation of a detailed work management plan for subsequent phases of the demonstration program, firming-up of commitments from participating parties, and reporting thereon. This Phase I study has indicated that a central ICES plant producing steam, chilled water, and by-product electricity to serve the HEAL Complex is technically and economically feasible to the extent that Phase II, Detailed Feasibility and Preliminary Design, should be implemented. (MCW)

  3. Feasibility of Progressive Strength Training Implemented in the Acute Ward after Hip Fracture Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Lise; Bandholm, Thomas; Palm, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Patients with a hip fracture lose more than 50% knee-extension strength in the fractured limb within one week of surgery. Hence, immediate progressive strength training following hip fracture surgery may be rational, but the feasibility unknown. OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility...... of in-hospital progressive strength training implemented in the acute ward following hip fracture surgery, based on pre-specified criteria for feasibility. DESIGN, SETTING AND PATIENTS: A prospective cohort study conducted in an acute orthopedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. A consecutive...... sample of 36 patients, 18 with a cervical and 18 with a trochanteric hip fracture (27 women and 9 men, mean (SD) age of 79.4 (8.3) years) were included between June and December 2012. INTERVENTION: A daily (on weekdays) program of progressive knee-extension strength training for the fractured limb, using...

  4. A Feasibility Study of Virtual Reality-Based Coping Skills Training for Nicotine Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordnick, Patrick S; Traylor, Amy C; Carter, Brian L; Graap, Ken M

    2012-05-01

    Virtual reality (VR)-based cue reactivity has been successfully used for the assessment of drug craving. Going beyond assessment of cue reactivity, a novel VR-based treatment approach for smoking cessation was developed and tested for feasibility. In a randomized experiment, 10-week treatment feasibility trial, 46 nicotine-dependent adults, completed the10-week program. Virtual reality skills training (VRST) combined with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) was compared to NRT alone. Participants were assessed for smoking behavior and coping skills during, at end of treatment, and at posttreatment follow-up. Smoking rates and craving for nicotine were significantly lower for the VRST group compared to NRT-only group at the end of treatment. Self-confidence and coping skills were also significantly higher for the VRST group, and number of cigarettes smoked was significantly lower, compared to the control group at follow-up. Feasibility of VRST was supported in the current study.

  5. Feasible Path Planning for Autonomous Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Trieu Minh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to find feasible path planning algorithms for nonholonomic vehicles including flatness, polynomial, and symmetric polynomial trajectories subject to the real vehicle dynamical constraints. Performances of these path planning methods are simulated and compared to evaluate the more realistic and smoother generated trajectories. Results show that the symmetric polynomial algorithm provides the smoothest trajectory. Therefore, this algorithm is recommended for the development of an automatic control for autonomous vehicles.

  6. Estimation of Feasibility for Business Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Milašinović, Boris; Kalpić, Damir; Fertalj, Krešimir

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the architecture of a system called Business Information System Feasibility. The purpose of the system is to establish a base for an impartial and computer-aided decision-making tool for choice of information system software and / or its provider, for evaluation of computerization projects and for validation of existing information systems. In the paper we present the system model, the implemented features and the algorithm used for calculation of product scores feasibili...

  7. Feasibility of Magnetostrictive Sensor Inspection of Containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwun, H.

    1999-03-01

    This report describes the results of a study on the feasibility of using guided waves for long-range global inspection of containment metallic pressure boundaries (i.e., steel containments and liners of reinforced concrete containments) in nuclear power plants. Of particular concern in this study was the potential of the guided-wave approach for remotely inspecting the regions that are inaccessible; for example, regions where the metallic pressure boundary is backed by concrete on one or both sides. The study includes a literature review on long-range guided-wave inspection techniques, a modeling study of the behavior of guided waves in plates with different boundary conditions (e.g., freestanding and backed by concrete on one or both sides), and an experimental investigation of the feasibility of a guided-wave technique called ''magnetostrictive sensor (MsS)'' for (1) generating and detecting guided waves in plates and (2) detecting a defect over a long range. Results of the study showed (1) that it is feasible to achieve long-range global inspection of plates, including regions that are inaccessible, using low-frequency guided waves and (2) that the MsS technique is well suited for this application. Recommendations are made to further test and develop the MsS technique for practical implementation for containment inspection in nuclear power plants.

  8. Gasohol: economic feasibility study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, M. L.; Hammaker, G. S.; Buzenberg, R. J.; Wagner, J. P.

    1978-07-01

    This report was prepared by Development Planning and Research Associates, Inc. under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Center of the University of Nebraska in cooperation with the Agricultural Products Industrial Utilization Committee and the State of Nebraska. Funding for this study was provided to the Energy Research and Development Center by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Old West Regional Commission. The primary objective of the study was to: determine the fiscal and market conditions under which the production of gasohol would be profitable for private producers. For purposes of this study, gasohol is a motor fuel consisting of 10 percent agriculturally-derived anhydrous ethanol and 90 percent unleaded gasoline. The study assumes that gasohol can be a fuel substitute for gasoline; indeed, the cost of gasoline will significantly influence that for gasohol. Gasoline prices are determined by factors external to ethanol; thus, the economic feasibility study of gasohol is in large part an economic feasibility study of fuel-grade ethanol production. More specifically, the study examined the following: the technical aspects of distributing, marketing, and using gasohol; the costs of the distribution and marketing of ethanol and gasohol; the energy balance of ethanol production; the cost of producing ethanol; the factors influencing ehtanol plant size and location; and the conditions that would make ethanol economicaly feasible for private producers.

  9. Integrating Cost-effective Rollover Protective Structure Installation in High School Agricultural Mechanics: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Joan; Vincent, Stacy; Watson, Jennifer; Westneat, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This study with three Appalachian county agricultural education programs examined the feasibility, effectiveness, and impact of integrating a cost-effective rollover protective structure (CROPS) project into high school agricultural mechanics classes. The project aimed to (1) reduce the exposure to tractor overturn hazards in three rural counties through the installation of CROPS on seven tractors within the Cumberland Plateau in the east region; (2) increase awareness in the targeted rural communities of cost-effective ROPS designs developed by the National Institution for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to encourage ROPS installations that decrease the costs of a retrofit; (3) test the feasibility of integration of CROPS construction and installations procedures into the required agricultural mechanics classes in these agricultural education programs; and (4) explore barriers to the implementation of this project in high school agricultural education programs. Eighty-two rural students and three agricultural educators participated in assembly and installation instruction. Data included hazard exposure demographic data, knowledge and awareness of CROPS plans, and pre-post knowledge of construction and assessment of final CROPS installation. Findings demonstrated the feasibility and utility of a CROPS education program in a professionally supervised secondary educational setting. The project promoted farm safety and awareness of availability and interest in the NIOSH Cost-effective ROPS plans. Seven CROPS were constructed and installed. New curriculum and knowledge measures also resulted from the work. Lessons learned and recommendations for a phase 2 implementation and further research are included.

  10. The Feasibility of Financial Incentives to Increase Exercise Among Canadian Cardiac Rehabilitation Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Marc S; Goodman, Jack M; Alter, David A; Oh, Paul I; Leahey, Tricia M; Faulkner, Guy E J

    2016-01-01

    To examine the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of financial incentives for exercise self-monitoring in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). A 12-week, 2 parallel-arm, single-blind feasibility study design was employed. A volunteer sample of CR program graduates was randomly assigned to an exercise self-monitoring intervention only (control; n = 14; mean age ± SD, 62.7 ± 14.6 years), or an exercise self-monitoring plus incentives approach (incentive; n = 13; mean age ± SD, 63.6 ± 11.8 years). Control group participants received a "home-based" exercise self-monitoring program following CR program completion (exercise diaries could be submitted online or by mail). Incentive group participants received the "home-based" program, plus voucher-based incentives for exercise diary submissions ($2 per day). A range of feasibility outcomes is presented, including recruitment and retention rates, and intervention acceptability. Data for the proposed primary outcome of a definitive trial, aerobic fitness, are also reported. Seventy-four CR graduates were potentially eligible to participate, 27 were enrolled (36.5% recruitment rate; twice the expected rate), and 5 were lost to followup (80% retention). Intervention acceptability was high with three-quarters of participants indicating that they would likely sign up for an incentive program at baseline. While group differences in exercise self-monitoring (the incentive "target") were not observed, modest but nonsignificant changes in aerobic fitness were noted with fitness increasing by 0.23 mL·kg-·min- among incentive participants and decreasing by 0.68 mL·kg-·min- among controls. This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of studying incentives in a CR context, and the potential for incentives to be readily accepted in the broader context of the Canadian health care system.

  11. A Regularized Algorithm for the Proximal Split Feasibility Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangsong Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The proximal split feasibility problem has been studied. A regularized method has been presented for solving the proximal split feasibility problem. Strong convergence theorem is given.

  12. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in internal medicine residency – a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Gulati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ultrasound has become indispensable in medicine for diagnosis and therapeutics. In Internal Medicine Residency Training Program (IMRTP, there is a deficiency of a structured, competency-based musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS training despite its growing popularity. Methods: We conducted a feasibility study for incorporating MSKUS in IMRTP and competency assessment. We recruited internal medicine residents from all training levels. Rheumatology attending with expertise in MSKUS supervised curriculum-design and patient-based assessment. A structured curriculum was developed for knee MSKUS, including training material and a pre- and post-test. An Observed Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE was used for competency assessment. Attending evaluations and participant feedbacks were collected. Results: Fifteen residents participated and 12 completed the OSCE. The pre–post tests showed a statistically significant increase (p<0.001 for all subcomponents (anatomy, pathology, and biophysics. The residents scored high on the OSCE [8.8±1.1 (range 7–10]. Attending evaluations for cognitive and technical skills were rated ‘Excellent’ (66% and ‘Good’ (87%, respectively. The training program was perceived very valuable with regard to time and resources spent by residents and faculty, although some felt a need for more patient assessments. Discussion: The competency assessed with our OSCE and highly positive feedback reflects this preliminary study's importance and sets the platform for future studies of formal ultrasound training in internal medicine.

  13. Mid-Columbia Coho Salmon Reintroduction Feasibility Project : Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State) Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

    1999-01-01

    Before the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) decides whether to fund a program to reintroduce coho salmon to mid-Columbia River basin tributaries, research is needed to determine the ecological risks and biological feasibility of such an effort. Since the early 1900s, the native stock of coho has been decimated in the tributaries of the middle reach of the Columbia River. The four Columbia River Treaty Tribes identified coho reintroduction in the mid-Columbia as a priority in the Tribal Restoration Plan. It is a comprehensive plan put forward by the Tribes to restore the Columbia River fisheries. In 1996, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) recommended the tribal mid-Columbia reintroduction project for funding by BPA. It was identified as one of fifteen high-priority supplementation projects for the Columbia River basin, and was incorporated into the NPPC`s Fish and Wildlife Program. The release of coho from lower Columbia hatcheries into mid-Columbia tributaries is also recognized in the Columbia River Fish Management Plan.

  14. Mineral Carbonation Feasibility, an Economic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, L. C.; Kemache, N.; Cecchi, E.; Mercier, G.; Blais, J. F.; Kentish, S.

    2016-12-01

    Mineral Carbonation (MC) is one of the ways proposed to mitigate Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Although it intends to transform CO2 into a stable and inert carbonate by reacting it with any divalent containing material, MC is still globally seen as an unrealistic methodology to reduce CO2, mostly because carbonation was seen as a sequestration technique only (after CO2 capture). Nevertheless, recent studies considered and showed the feasibility of an integrated capture/storage approach. Thus, MC can be adapted to flue gas or other industrial gas streams more or less concentrated in CO2. Furthermore, carbonation can be applied to various problematics and offers the advantage to be feasible with a broad range of feedstock such as alkaline industrial or mining residues. Using an economic approach where by-product valorization is favored, interesting approaches were identified. More specifically, the particular case of the Québec province shows that different synergies between wastes and industries can be elaborated. The results indicate that MC can be seen as a practical approach to both reduce CO2 emissions and enhance waste remediation. For instance, the feasibility to export significant amounts of serpentinite mining residue to distant industrial sites using the St Lawrence maritime route was demonstrated. Here the applicability stands on the high value of the generated by-products. On the other hand, steel slags or waste concrete need more local applications due to their limited reaction efficiencies and the lower price of calcium carbonates. While transportation is a major factor for the OPEX cost, the profitability relies on the by-products potential sale. Indeed, the production of low carbon footprint materials from the reaction product will also expand the offer of CO2 utilization avenues. The presentation highlights the results of research made in the lab and using economic modeling to draw a portrait of the opportunities and challenges identified with

  15. Feasibility analysis of recycling radioactive scrap steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, F. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Woodland, WA (United States); Balhiser, B. [MSE, Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Cignetti, N. [Cignetti Associates, North Canton, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to: (1) establish a conceptual design that integrates commercial steel mill technology with radioactive scrap metal (RSM) processing to produce carbon and stainless steel sheet and plate at a grade suitable for fabricating into radioactive waste containers; (2) determine the economic feasibility of building a micro-mill in the Western US to process 30,000 tons of RSM per year from both DOE and the nuclear utilities; and (3) provide recommendations for implementation. For purposes of defining the project, it is divided into phases: economic feasibility and conceptual design; preliminary design; detail design; construction; and operation. This study comprises the bulk of Phase 1. It is divided into four sections. Section 1 provides the reader with a complete overview extracting pertinent data, recommendations and conclusions from the remainder of the report. Section 2 defines the variables that impact the design requirements. These data form the baseline to create a preliminary conceptual design that is technically sound, economically viable, and capitalizes on economies of scale. Priorities governing the design activities are: (1) minimizing worker exposure to radionuclide hazards, (2) maximizing worker safety, (3) minimizing environmental contamination, (4) minimizing secondary wastes, and (5) establishing engineering controls to insure that the plant will be granted a license in the state selected for operation. Section 3 provides details of the preliminary conceptual design that was selected. The cost of project construction is estimated and the personnel needed to support the steel-making operation and radiological and environmental control are identified. Section 4 identifies the operational costs and supports the economic feasibility analysis. A detailed discussion of the resulting conclusions and recommendations is included in this section.

  16. Feasibility Study of Thin Film Thermocouple Piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Historically, thermopile detectors, generators, and refrigerators based on bulk materials have been used to measure temperature, generate power for spacecraft, and cool sensors for scientific investigations. New potential uses of small, low-power, thin film thermopiles are in the area of microelectromechanical systems since power requirements decrease as electrical and mechanical machines shrink in size. In this research activity, thin film thermopile devices are fabricated utilizing radio frequency sputter coating and photoresist lift-off techniques. Electrical characterizations are performed on two designs in order to investigate the feasibility of generating small amounts of power, utilizing any available waste heat as the energy source.

  17. A feasibility study of nuclear superfluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, B.; Kay, I. W.; Neuberger, J. W.

    A theory of nuclear superfluorescence (SF) based on the Haake-Reibold model for the atomic case is presented. Certain modifications of the model make it possible to take into account some effects that are more important in nuclear than in atomic SF: attenuation, competing transitions, finite pumping times, and both homogeneous and inhomogeneous line broadening. Results of some explicit calculations illustrate the influence of these effects on the radiated pulse. Similar calculations are used to examine the feasibility of observing SF using the 58.6 keV transition in Co-60.

  18. From Virtual Creatures to Feasible Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faina, Andres; Souto, Daniel; Orjales, Félix

    with the main objective of obtaining feasible and manufacturable robots. To this end, a modular architecture has been defined and implemented [2], which faces real hardware issues and promotes the evolvability of the robotic structures by considering heterogeneous modules with a large number of connection faces...... per module. These modules constitute the building blocks the EDHMoR system uses to design the robots. Moreover, an evaluation methodology is proposed as a key element of EDMHoR, which is based on modifications in the environment that can produce more useful and realistic robots without limiting...

  19. Feasibility of central meditation and imagery therapy for dementia caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Felipe A; Nazarian, Nora; Lavretsky, Helen

    2014-08-01

    Family dementia caregivers are at high risk of depression and burnout. We assessed the feasibility of Central Meditation and Imagery Therapy for Caregivers (CMIT-C), a novel 8-week group meditation and guided imagery group therapy program, for dementia caregivers reporting stress because of caregiving responsibilities. Twelve family dementia caregivers enrolled in CMIT-C. Primary outcomes included depression and anxiety, and secondary outcomes included insomnia, quality of life, and mindfulness. Changes over the study and 3 month follow-up were analyzed with non-parametric related samples tests. Correlations of feeling state changes from meditation diaries at 1 week were made with symptom changes post meditation training. Ten participants completed the study. Completers came to an average of 7 ± 1 sessions out of a possible 8 sessions, and turned in home practice logs of 90 ± 10% of the time. Anxiety, depression, and insomnia symptoms decreased, and mindfulness ratings improved with large effects (all p meditation practice was associated with subsequent home meditation practice, anxiety change at 8 weeks, and endpoint satisfaction with CMIT-C. Central Meditation and Imagery Therapy for Caregivers is a feasible intervention for dementia caregivers. Results suggest that this therapeutic technique can reduce symptoms of anxiety, depression, and insomnia, and increase levels of mindfulness. Early response to meditation practice predicted those with the greatest short-term benefits, and this may inform future studies of meditation. Larger controlled efficacy studies of CMIT-C for dementia caregivers are warranted. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. World Languages and Cultures Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklarz, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to conduct a comprehensive review of the research and best practices of exemplary elementary school World Language and Culture Programs. Specifically, (1) to assess the degree to which various program designs had most closely met the measurable goals of the American Council of Teachers of a Foreign Language, commonly…

  1. 12 CFR 618.8020 - Feasibility requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) An analysis of how the program relates to or promotes the institution's business plan and strategic... plan; (2) An analysis of the expected financial returns of the program which, at a minimum, must include an evaluation of market, pricing, competition issues, and expected profitability. This analysis...

  2. Feasibility of Parent-to-Parent Support in Recently Diagnosed Childhood Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Channon, Susan; Lowes, Lesley; Gregory, John W; Grey, Laura; Sullivan-Bolyai, S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop and test the feasibility of a parent-to-parent support intervention for parents whose child has recently been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in the United Kingdom. Methods The research team conducted a formative evaluation, working with parents to design an individual-level parent-to-parent support intervention. Issues of recruitment, uptake, attrition, pattern of contact, and intervention acceptability were assessed. Results A US program was a...

  3. Promoting physical activity after stroke via self-management: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Elisabeth; Dean, Catherine M; Ada, Louise; Stanton, Rosalyn; Brauer, Sandy; Kuys, Suzanne; Waddington, Gordon

    2017-07-01

    Many people with mild disability after stroke are physically inactive despite the risk of recurrent stroke. A self-management program may be one strategy to increase physical activity in stroke survivors. To investigate the feasibility of a self-management program, and determine whether self-management can increase daily physical activity levels and self-efficacy for exercise, decrease cardiovascular risk, and improve walking ability, participation, and quality of life in people with mild disability after stroke. A Phase I, single-group, pre-post intervention study was carried out with twenty stroke survivors who had mild disability and were discharged directly home from acute stroke units. A self-management program was delivered via five home-based sessions over 3 months, incorporating: education, goal setting, barrier identification, self-monitoring, and feedback. Feasibility of the intervention was determined by examining adherence, duration, usefulness, and safety. Clinical outcomes were amount of physical activity (duration of moderate physical activity in min/day and counts of physical activity in steps/day), self-efficacy, cardiovascular risk, walking ability, participation, and quality of life. The intervention was feasible with 96% of sessions being delivered, each taking less than an hour (41 min, SD 12). Participants perceived the self-management program to be useful and there were few adverse events. At 3 months, participants completed 27 min/day (95% CI 4-49) more moderate physical activity than at baseline and 16 min/day (95% CI -10 to 42) at 6 months. Self-management appears to be feasible and has the potential to increase physical activity in people with mild disability after stroke. A Phase II randomized trial is warranted.

  4. Normalization and feasibility of speech understanding tests for Dutch speaking toddlers

    OpenAIRE

    van Wieringen, Astrid; Wouters, Jan

    2005-01-01

    As a result of newborn hearing screening programs, hearing impairment is often identified early in life and proper intervention (hearing aids, cochlear implant) will enable children to develop expressive and receptive skills as young as possible. The goals of this study are to obtain normative data on speech tests that are suitable for evaluation of young hearing-impaired Dutch speaking children in Flanders and the Netherlands and to determine the youngest age at which these tests are feasibl...

  5. The feasibility of training with FES-assisted cycling: Psychological, physical and physiological consideration

    OpenAIRE

    Fattal, Charles; Sijobert, Benoît; Daubigney, Anne; Lucas, Brigitte; Azevedo Coste, Christine

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Objective The literature contains considerable data showing that such programs are crucial to reduce the consequences of physical inactivity of people with SCI. The objective of the study was to assess the physical, psychological, functional and financial feasibility of training a paraplegic subject on a FES-assisted recumbent bike – initially fixed on a stationary stand and then over open terrain. At the end of a 12-month training, the patient was invited to participa...

  6. Fighting Hepatitis B in North Korea: Feasibility of a Bi-modal Prevention Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Unnewehr, Markus; Stich, August

    2016-01-01

    In North Korea, the prevalence of hepatitis B is high due to natural factors, gaps in vaccination, and the lack of antiviral treatment. Aid projects are urgently needed, however impeded by North Korea's political and economical situation and isolation. The feasibility of a joint North Korean and German humanitarian hepatitis B prevention program was assessed. Part 1: Hepatitis B vaccination catch-up campaign. Part 2: Implementation of endoscopic ligation of esophageal varices (EVL) by trainin...

  7. Feasibility and benefits of pulsar planet characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekola Novakova, J.; Petrasek, T.

    2017-09-01

    Planet orbiting neutron stars seem to be rare, but all the more interesting for science due to their origins. Characterizing the composition of pulsar planets could elucidate processes involved in supernova fallback disks, accretion of companion star material, potential survival of planetary cores in the post-MS phase of their stars, and more. However, the small size and unusual spectral distribution of neutron stars make any spectroscopic measurements very difficult if not impossible in the near future. We set to estimate the feasibility of spectroscopy of planets orbiting specifically pulsars, and to review other possible methods of characterization of the planets, such as emissions caused by aurorae. We conclude that spectroscopic characterization of pulsar planets is unlikely to be achieved in the near future, though not entirely impossible, but possible auroral emissions and thermal emissions present more feasible means of at least roughly characterizing planets in pulsar systems. Moreover, they could in theory reveal planets around young pulsars where there is too much timing noise compared to "recycled" millisecond pulsars. While researching pulsar planetary systems could hardly be further from the popular search for "Earth 2.0", it could yield extremely valuable data for planetary science, radio astronomy, astrophysics and other fields, and it could help us answer some fundamental questions about exoplanetary origins and evolutions. For these reasons, we think it worthwhile to pursue this topic.

  8. Feasibility Assessment of Cesium Removal using Microaglae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ilgook; Ryu, Byung-Gon; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Jong-Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this work is to assess the feasibility of selected one of microalgae in the uptake of Cs+. The obtained results showed the maximum Cs+ removal by D. armatus SCK was 280μM indicating 70% removal efficiency. Also, D. armatus SCK could uptake Cs+ in the presence of K+, is particularly known to be transported into cells as an analog of Cs+ in freshwater condition. Recently, increased attention has been directed on the use of biological technologies for the removal of radionuclides as the cheap and eco-friendly alternative to the non-biological methods. Metal including radioactive compounds uptake by microorganisms can be occurred by metabolism –independent and/or -dependent processes. One involves biosorption based on the ability of microbial cells to bind dissolved metals; on the other involves bioaccumulation, which depends on the metabolic ability of cells to transport metals into the cytoplasm. The purpose of this work is to investigate the feasibility of microalgae in bioaccumulation system to remove cesium from solution. The effect of different environmental parameters on cesium removal was also examined.

  9. Hoopa Valley Small Scale Hydroelectric Feasibility Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Miller

    2009-03-22

    This study considered assessing the feasibility of developing small scale hydro-electric power from seven major tributaries within the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation of Northern California (http://www.hoopa-nsn.gov/). This study pursued the assessment of seven major tributaries of the Reservation that flow into the Trinity River. The feasibility of hydropower on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation has real potential for development and many alternative options for project locations, designs, operations and financing. In order to realize this opportunity further will require at least 2-3 years of intense data collection focusing on stream flow measurements at multiple locations in order to quantify real power potential. This also includes on the ground stream gradient surveys, road access planning and grid connectivity to PG&E for sale of electricity. Imperative to this effort is the need for negotiations between the Hoopa Tribal Council and PG&E to take place in order to finalize the power rate the Tribe will receive through any wholesale agreement that utilizes the alternative energy generated on the Reservation.

  10. NASA CPAS Drogue Textile Riser Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Elsa J.; Petersen, Michael L.; Anderson, Brian; Johnson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Steel cable was chosen for the lower end of the drogue and main parachute risers on NASA's Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) to protect the risers from extreme temperatures and abrasion should they contact the crew module during deployment, as was done for Apollo. Due to the weight and deployment complexity inherent in steel, there was significant interest in the possibility of substituting textile for steel for the drogue and main parachute risers. However, textile risers could be damaged when subjected to high temperature and abrasion. Investigations were consequently performed by a subset of the authors to determine whether sacrificial, non-load-bearing textile riser covers could be developed to mitigate the thermal and abrasion concerns. Multiple material combinations were tested, resulting in a cover design capable of protecting the riser against severe riser/crew module contact interactions. A feasibility study was then conducted to evaluate the performance of the textile drogue riser cover in relevant abrasive environments. This paper describes the testing performed and documents the results of this feasibility study.

  11. [Hand allograft in agenesic newborn: feasibility study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazarian, A; Abrahamyan, D O

    2007-10-01

    Would a newborn with a single hand benefit from hand allograft? Transantebrachial aplasia is the chosen clinical form of agenesia in our interrogation. The feasibility study presents several aspects: 1) ethical and psychological aspects. Is this a desired surgery for agenesic population? Which are the functional, psychological and social situations of agenesic patient? Is the hand transplantation in newborn ethically acceptable? What is the parents' attitude toward agenesia? Can we envisage organ donation in neonatal period? 2) immunological aspects. The non-vital character of this condition and its' good functional tolerance cannot make accepting the risk of adverse effects of hand allotransplantation. Hence, one may consider this surgery only without immunosuppression. Can the peculiarities of the neonate "immature" immune system represent an opportunity of easier tolerance obtaining, avoiding immunosuppression? 3) anatomical and technical aspects. The proximal tissues at the level of amputation are all hypoplastic in agenesic patients. Can we efficaciously suture those structures with donor eutrophic tissues? 4) cognitive aspects. Is a neonate born with only one hand is able to use two? A feasibility study on such a subject needs to take into account all these aspects. This research is useful because, even if hand allograft in agenesic newborn will never be done, the provided information will allow to progress in the vaster domain of composite tissue allotransplantation in perinatology.

  12. Feasibility of a web-based gatekeeper training: implications for suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Paige G; Moore, J Taylor; Putter, Stefanie E; Chen, Peter Y; Cigularov, Konstantin P; Baker, Aaron; Quinnett, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Web-based training programs have advantages such as increased scheduling flexibility and decreased training costs. Yet the feasibility of applying them to injury prevention programs such as suicide prevention gatekeeper training has not been empirically verified. Two studies were conducted to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a web-based version of the Question, Persuade, and Refer (QPR) gatekeeper training program. Results of Study 1 revealed that participants in a web-based training demonstrated significant gains in knowledge of suicide prevention, self-efficacy for suicide prevention, and behavioral intentions to engage in suicide prevention, as compared to those in a control group. Results of Study 2 further showed that the web-based training may be as effective as the face-to-face QPR training across pre- (T1) and post training (T2); however, knowledge, self-efficacy, and behavioral intentions in both groups generally declined from T2 to 6-months after the training. Overall, these results provide initial evidence to support the feasibility of adopting web-based media to deliver gatekeeper training. Moreover, the present findings suggest the need to understand how to maintain gatekeepers' knowledge, confidence, motivation, and skills after training. © 2014 The American Association of Suicidology.

  13. Enhancing hope among early female survivors of childhood cancer via the internet: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Mary Ann; Conte, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to establish the feasibility of delivering the Hope Intervention Program (HIP) using a Web-based design among 6 female survivors of childhood cancer. The HIP is an 8-week program to foster and promote hope. Each session of the HIP has specific focus, goals, and activities that offer opportunities for participants to share and discuss issues of importance to them. The HIP was delivered online with the use of educational software that included Web cameras and voice and text chat capabilities. Feasibility was evaluated by examining how easily and effectively the software and hardware technology could be used to deliver the HIP and if meaningful dialogue and interactions among the study participants and the nurse interventionist could occur online. The evaluation of this study suggested that using a Web-based approach was effective in the delivery of the intervention, as evidenced by participants' evaluation of the program and their descriptive comments that reflect that the online sessions promoted intimate, meaningful human-to-human interactions to foster hope and build a trusting relationship among and between group members. The results of this study suggest that Web-based psychosocial nursing interventions for survivors of childhood survivors are feasible for nurse researchers to conduct.

  14. Feasibility and acceptability of a multiple risk factor intervention: The Step Up randomized pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Julie

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions are needed which can successfully modify more than one disease risk factor at a time, but much remains to be learned about the acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness of multiple risk factor (MRF interventions. To address these issues and inform future intervention development, we conducted a randomized pilot trial (n = 52. This study was designed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the Step Up program, a MRF cognitive-behavioral program designed to improve participants' mental and physical well-being by reducing depressive symptoms, promoting smoking cessation, and increasing physical activity. Methods Participants were recruited from a large health care organization and randomized to receive usual care treatment for depression, smoking, and physical activity promotion or the phone-based Step Up counseling program plus usual care. Participants were assessed at baseline, three and six months. Results The intervention was acceptable to participants and feasible to offer within a healthcare system. The pilot also offered important insights into the optimal design of a MRF program. While not powered to detect clinically significant outcomes, changes in target behaviors indicated positive trends at six month follow-up and statistically significant improvement was also observed for depression. Significantly more experimental participants reported a clinically significant improvement (50% reduction in their baseline depression score at four months (54% vs. 26%, OR = 3.35, 95% CI [1.01- 12.10], p = 0.05 and 6 months (52% vs. 13%, OR = 7.27, 95% CI [1.85 - 37.30], p = 0.004 Conclusions Overall, results suggest the Step Up program warrants additional research, although some program enhancements may be beneficial. Key lessons learned from this research are shared to promote the understanding of others working in this field. Trial registration The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00644995.

  15. The DUPIC fuel development program in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, M. S.; Park, H. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    This study describes the DUPIC fuel development program in KAERI as follows; Burning spent PWR fuel again in CANDU by DUPIC, Compatibility with existing CANDU system, Feasibility of DUPIC fuel fabrication, Waste reduction, Safeguard ability, Economics of DUPIC fuel cycle, The DUPIC fuel development program, and International prospective. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Self-Employment Training Programs: Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Melissa, Ed.; And Others

    This self-employment training program case study booklet has been developed for general use in exploring the feasibility of this kind of development tool. The case studies describe a number of comprehensive, self-employment training and assistance programs, from the local to the national level. Chapter II includes information on the training plan,…

  17. Market Aspects of an Interior Design Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Judy E.

    A project was conducted to evaluate a proposed interior design program in order to determine the marketability (job availability in the field of interior design and home furnishings merchandising) and the feasibility (educational requirements for entrance into the interior design and home furnishings merchandising job market) of the program. To…

  18. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce A. Wright

    2012-03-27

    Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski

  19. Mindfulness in Motion for People with Multiple Sclerosis: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Rachel M; Klatt, Maryanna D

    2017-01-01

    Mindfulness in Motion is an 8-week mindfulness-based intervention that uses yoga movement, mindfulness meditation, and relaxing music. This study examined the feasibility of using Mindfulness in Motion in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and the effect of this program on stress, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and quality of life in people with MS. Twenty-two people with MS completed the 8-week mindfulness program as well as assessments 1 week before and after the intervention. Pre/post comparison of four self-reported questionnaires-the Mental Health Inventory, 36-item Short Form Health Status Survey, Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, and Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire-showed significant improvement in physical functioning, vitality, and mental health. Specifically, improvements were seen in anxiety, depression, and positive affect; cognitive, psychosocial, and overall functioning regarding fatigue; and mindfulness in the areas of observing, acting with awareness, nonjudgment, and nonreactivity. Due to the uncertainty in disease progression associated with MS, and the multiplicity of mental and physical symptoms associated with it, programming that addresses anxiety, depression, and fatigue is a key area of future research in MS disease management. Mindfulness in Motion proved to be a feasible program yielding positive results, supporting the need for research to determine the extent to which the program can improve quality-of-life outcomes for people with MS.

  20. Battery energy storage market feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, S. [Frost and Sullivan, Mountain View, CA (United States); Akhil, A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energy Storage Systems Analysis and Development Dept.

    1997-07-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage Systems Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) contracted Frost and Sullivan to conduct a market feasibility study of energy storage systems. The study was designed specifically to quantify the energy storage market for utility applications. This study was based on the SNL Opportunities Analysis performed earlier. Many of the groups surveyed, which included electricity providers, battery energy storage vendors, regulators, consultants, and technology advocates, viewed energy storage as an important enabling technology to enable increased use of renewable energy and as a means to solve power quality and asset utilization issues. There are two versions of the document available, an expanded version (approximately 200 pages, SAND97-1275/2) and a short version (approximately 25 pages, SAND97-1275/1).

  1. Feasibility of abdominoplasty with Cesarean section [Retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thabet WN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of the International Journal of Women’s Health have been alerted by Dr Nadine Sherif, the corresponding author, to unacceptable levels of duplication with a previously published paper: Ali A, Essam A. Abdominoplasty Combined with Cesarean Delivery: Evaluation of the Practice. Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. 2011;35(1:80–86.It is worth noting that this paper was peer-reviewed by two peer-reviewers and the Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Women’s Health before publication. The paper concerned is: Thabet WN, Hossny AS, Sherif NA. Feasibility of abdominoplasty with Cesarean section. International Journal of Women’s Health. 2012;4:115–121.

  2. Algorithms for the quasiconvex feasibility problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Censor, Yair; Segal, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    We study the behavior of subgradient projections algorithms for the quasiconvex feasibility problem of finding a point x*[set membership, variant]Rn that satisfies the inequalities f1(x*)[less-than-or-equals, slant]0,f2(x*)[less-than-or-equals, slant]0,...,fm(x*)[less-than-or-equals, slant]0, where all functions are continuous and quasiconvex. We consider the consistent case when the solution set is nonempty. Since the Fenchel-Moreau subdifferential might be empty we look at different notions of the subdifferential and determine their suitability for our problem. We also determine conditions on the functions, that are needed for convergence of our algorithms. The quasiconvex functions on the left-hand side of the inequalities need not be differentiable but have to satisfy a Lipschitz or a Holder condition.

  3. Feasibility Study for BioLEIR

    CERN Document Server

    Ghithan, S.; Schuh, S.

    2017-01-01

    The biomedical community asked CERN to investigate the possibility to transform the Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR) accelerator into a multidisciplinary, biomedical research facil- ity (BioLEIR) that could provide ample, high-quality beams of a range of light ions suitable for clinically oriented fundamental research on cell cultures and for radiation instrumenta- tion development. BioLEIR would be operated when LEIR is not providing heavy ions for the CERN physics programme. The study group was mandated to write a Feasibility Study Report, using high-level engineering estimates based on previous experience, with the aim to: – collect the requirements for such a facility from the biomedical community in close collaboration with the International Strategy Committee for CERN Medical Applica- tions; – determine a coherent set of beam parameters, based on the requirements; – explore whether the beam requirements can be met throughout the facility, from the source to the biomedical end-stations; – perf...

  4. Lunar Wireless Power Transfer Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freid, Sheldon [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Popovic, Zoya [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Beckett, David R. [Independent Consultant; Anderson, Scott R. [Independent Consultant; Mann, Diana [Independent Consultant; Walker, Stuart [Independent Consultant

    2008-03-01

    This study examines the feasibility of a multi-kilowatt wireless radio frequency (RF) power system to transfer power between lunar base facilities. Initial analyses, show that wireless power transfer (WPT) systems can be more efficient and less expensive than traditional wired approaches for certain lunar and terrestrial applications. The study includes evaluations of the fundamental limitations of lunar WPT systems, the interrelationships of possible operational parameters, and a baseline design approach for a notionial system that could be used in the near future to power remote facilities at a lunar base. Our notional system includes state-of-the-art photovoltaics (PVs), high-efficiency microwave transmitters, low-mass large-aperture high-power transmit antennas, high-efficiency large-area rectenna receiving arrays, and reconfigurable DC combining circuitry.

  5. The feasibility of harmonizing gluten ELISA measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzychon, Malgorzata; Brohée, Marcel; Cordeiro, Fernando; Haraszi, Reka; Ulberth, Franz; O'Connor, Gavin

    2017-11-01

    Many publications have highlighted that routine ELISA methods do not give rise to equivalent gluten content measurement results. In this study, we assess this variation between results and its likely impact on the enforcement of the EU gluten-free legislation. This study systematically examines the feasibility of harmonizing gluten ELISA assays by the introduction of: a common extraction procedure; a common calibrator, such as a pure gluten extract and an incurred matrix material. The comparability of measurements is limited by a weak correlation between kit results caused by differences in the selectivity of the methods. This lack of correlation produces bias that cannot be corrected by using reference materials alone. The use of a common calibrator reduced the between-assay variability to some extent, but variation due to differences in selectivity of the assays was unaffected. Consensus on robust markers and their conversion to "gluten content" are required. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Feasibility of Jet Shape Measurements at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffas, Sean; STAR Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    One of the current main questions in nuclear physics is determining the properties of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). One method of studying the properties of the QGP used at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is measuring the jet shapes, defined as the fractional transverse momentum radial distribution, in a heavy ion collision at a center of mass energy of 2.76 TeV. By comparing how these jets change in the presence of the QGP we can find out more about its properties. This method would be useful to measure the QGP's properties at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at a center of mass energy of 200 GeV. Therefore simulations have been run at RHIC energies and STAR detector specifications to see if jet shape measurements would be feasible.

  7. Feasibility study on ABWR full MOX core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Makoto; Nagano, Mamoru; Sakurai, Shungo [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels will be utilized as reload fuels in some existing commercial boiling water reactors (BWRs) in Japan around the year 2000. The first step MOX fuel is expected to have an average discharge exposure of 33 GWd/t and to be loaded within one-third of all fuel rods in a core. On the other hand, it becomes necessary to minimize the number of MOX fuels and plants utilizing MOX fuel, mainly because of fuel economy, handling, and site inspection costs. Under these situations, it is important to develop higher burnup MOX fuel containing more plutonium and a core with a larger amount of MOX fuel. The purpose of this study is to clarify the feasibility of high-burnup MOX fuel and core through the evaluation of nuclear characteristics.

  8. Development of Model for Providing Feasible Scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Dhika

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current work focuses on the development of a model to determine a feasible scholarship recipient on the basis of the naiv¨e Bayes’ method using very simple and limited attributes. Those attributes are the applicants academic year, represented by their semester, academic performance, represented by their GPa, socioeconomic ability, which represented the economic capability to attend a higher education institution, and their level of social involvement. To establish and evaluate the model performance, empirical data are collected, and the data of 100 students are divided into 80 student data for the model training and the remaining of 20 student data are for the model testing. The results suggest that the model is capable to provide recommendations for the potential scholarship recipient at the level of accuracy of 95%.

  9. Feasibility of laparoscopy for small bowel obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Sol Angelo A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherential pathology is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction. Laparoscopy in small bowel obstruction does not have a clear role yet; surely it doesn't always represent only a therapeutic act, but it is always a diagnostic act, which doesn't interfere with abdominal wall integrity. Methods We performed a review without any language restrictions considering international literature indexed from 1980 to 2007 in Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library. We analyzed the reference lists of the key manuscripts. We also added a review based on international non-indexed sources. Results The feasibility of diagnostic laparoscopy is high (60–100%, while that of therapeutic laparoscopy is low (40–88%. The frequency of laparotomic conversions is variable ranging from 0 to 52%, depending on patient selection and surgical skill. The first cause of laparotomic conversion is a difficult exposition and treatment of band adhesions. The incidence of laparotomic conversions is major in patients with anterior peritoneal band adhesions. Other main causes for laparotomic conversion are the presence of bowel necrosis and accidental enterotomies. The predictive factors for successful laparoscopic adhesiolysis are: number of previous laparotomies ≤ 2, non-median previous laparotomy, appendectomy as previous surgical treatment causing adherences, unique band adhesion as phatogenetic mechanism of small bowel obstruction, early laparoscopic management within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms, no signs of peritonitis on physical examination, experience of the surgeon. Conclusion Laparoscopic adhesiolysis in small bowel obstruction is feasible but can be convenient only if performed by skilled surgeons in selected patients. The laparoscopic adhesiolysis for small bowel obstruction is satisfactorily carried out when early indicated in patients with a low number of laparotomies resulting in a short hospital stay and a lower postoperative

  10. Exoskeleton for Soldier Enhancement Systems Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, J.F.

    2000-09-28

    The development of a successful exoskeleton for human performance augmentation (EHPA) will require a multi-disciplinary systems approach based upon sound biomechanics, power generation and actuation systems, controls technology, and operator interfaces. The ability to integrate key components into a system that enhances performance without impeding operator mobility is essential. The purpose of this study and report are to address the issue of feasibility of building a fieldable EHPA. Previous efforts, while demonstrating progress and enhancing knowledge, have not approached the level required for a fully functional, fieldable system. It is doubtless that the technologies required for a successful exoskeleton have advanced, and some of them significantly. The question to be addressed in this report is have they advanced to the point of making a system feasible in the next three to five years? In this study, the key technologies required to successfully build an exoskeleton have been examined. The primary focus has been on the key technologies of power sources, actuators, and controls. Power sources, including internal combustion engines, fuel cells, batteries, super capacitors, and hybrid sources have been investigated and compared with respect to the exoskeleton application. Both conventional and non-conventional actuator technologies that could impact EHPA have been assessed. In addition to the current state of the art of actuators, the potential for near-term improvements using non-conventional actuators has also been addressed. Controls strategies, and their implication to the design approach, and the exoskeleton to soldier interface have also been investigated. In addition to these key subsystems and technologies, this report addresses technical concepts and issues relating to an integrated design. A recommended approach, based on the results of the study is also presented.

  11. Bin Set 1 Calcine Retrieval Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. D. Adams; S. M. Berry; K. J. Galloway; T. A. Langenwalter; D. A. Lopez; C. M. Noakes; H. K. Peterson; M. I. Pope; R. J. Turk

    1999-10-01

    At the Department of Energy's Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as an interim waste management measure, both mixed high-level liquid waste and sodium bearing waste have been solidified by a calculation process and are stored in the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities. This calcined product will eventually be treated to allow final disposal in a national geologic repository. The Calcine Solids Storage Facilities comprise seven ''bit sets.'' Bin Set 1, the first to be constructed, was completed in 1959, and has been in service since 1963. It is the only bin set that does not meet current safe-shutdown earthquake seismic criteria. In addition, it is the only bin set that lacks built-in features to aid in calcine retrieval. One option to alleviate the seismic compliance issue is to transport the calcine from Bin Set 1 to another bin set which has the required capacity and which is seismically qualified. This report studies the feasibility of retrieving the calcine from Bi n Set 1 and transporting it into Bin Set 6 which is located approximately 650 feet away. Because Bin Set 1 was not designed for calcine retrieval, and because of the high radiation levels and potential contamination spread from the calcined material, this is a challenging engineering task. This report presents preconceptual design studies for remotely-operated, low-density, pneumatic vacuum retrieval and transport systems and equipment that are based on past work performed by the Raytheon Engineers and Constructors architectural engineering firm. The designs presented are considered feasible; however, future development work will be needed in several areas during the subsequent conceptual design phase.

  12. Feasibility of repeated 24-h dietary recalls combined with a food-recording booklet, using EPIC-Soft, among preschoolers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Ellen; Amiano, P.; Ege, Majken

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objectives:This study evaluates the feasibility among preschoolers of the 2 Ã 24-h dietary recalls (24-HDRs) method combined with a food-recording booklet (FRB), using EPIC-Soft pc-program for the 24-HDR (the software developed to conduct 24-HDRs in the European Prospective Investigati...

  13. Feasibility of high-density climate reconstruction based on Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) collected tree-ring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Justin DeRose; Shih-Yu Wang; John D. Shaw

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a novel tree-ring dataset, with unparalleled spatial density, for use as a climate proxy. Ancillary Douglas fir and pinyon pine tree-ring data collected by the U.S. Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (FIA data) were subjected to a series of tests to determine their feasibility as climate proxies. First, temporal coherence between...

  14. Feasibility of Using Video to Teach a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skill to Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Jennifer; Dimeff, Linda A.; Koerner, Kelly; Linehan, Marsha M.; Taylor, Laura; Miller, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the feasibility of using a psychoeducational video recording to teach a behavioral skill from the Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993a, 1993b) skills training program to individuals meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder. A video presenting a DBT emotion-regulation skill was developed and the extent to…

  15. BioEnergy Feasibility in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Wim

    2015-04-01

    The BioEnergy Atlas for South Africa is the result of a project funded by the South African Department of Science and Technology, and executed by SAEON/ NRF with the assistance of a number of collaborators in academia, research institutions, and government. Now nearing completion, the Atlas provides an important input to policy and decision support in the country, significantly strengthens the availability of information resources on the topic, and provides a platform whereby current and future contributions on the subject can be managed, preserved, and disseminated. Bioenergy assessments have been characterized in the past by poor availability and quality of data, an over-emphasis on potentials and availability studies instead of feasibility assessment, and lack of comprehensive evaluation in competition with alternatives - both in respect of competing bioenergy resources and other renewable and non-renewable options. The BioEnergy Atlas in its current edition addresses some of these deficiencies, and identifies specific areas of interest where future research and effort can be directed. One can qualify the potentials and feasible options for BioEnergy exploitation in South Africa as follows: (1) Availability is not a fixed quantum. Availability of biomass and resulting energy products are sensitive to both the exclusionary measures one applies (food security, environmental, social and economic impacts) and the price at which final products will be competitive. (2) Availability is low. Even without allowing for feasibility and final product costs, the availability of biomass is low: biomass productivity in South Africa is not high by global standards due to rainfall constraints, and most arable land is used productively for food and agribusiness-related activities. This constrains the feasibility of purposely cultivated bioenergy crops. (3) Waste streams are important. There are significant waste streams from domestic solid waste and sewage, some agricultural

  16. Solving Linear Fractional Multilevel Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifali Bhargava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The linear fractional multilevel programming (LFMP problem has been studied and it has been proved that an optimal solution to this problem occurs at a boundary feasible extreme point. Hence the Kth-best algorithm can be proposed to solve the problem. This property can be applied to quasiconcave multilevel problems provided that the first (n - 1 level objective functions are explicitly quasimonotonic, otherwise it cannot be proved that there exists a boundary feasible extreme point that solves the LFMP problem. (original abstract

  17. Key feasibility considerations when conducting vaccine clinical trials in Asia–Pacific countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansang EZ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Elvira Zenaida Lansang,1 Kenneth Tan,2 Saumya Nayak,1 Ken J Lee,1 Karen Wai1 1Feasibility and Site Identification – Asia, Quintiles East Asia Pte Ltd, Singapore; 2National University of Singapore, Singapore Introduction: Conducting clinical trial feasibility is an important first step in initiating a clinical trial. A robust feasibility process ensures that a realistic capability assessment is made before conducting a trial. A retrospective analysis of vaccine clinical trials was performed to understand changes which could affect feasibility recommendations. Methods: Feasibilities conducted by Quintiles between January 2011 and August 2012 were reviewed. Vaccine studies only involving Asia–Pacific countries were selected, and common study parameters were identified. Information from Quintiles’ database was retrieved to examine changes in parameters over time. Results: A total of six vaccine studies were identified within the 1.7-year period. Two studies were excluded because they did not contain feasibility information or had involved sites that were sponsor selected. Four studies were analyzed. Three cases required healthy volunteers, while one case involved a specific patient population. Age requirement and seasonality of disease mainly influenced recommendations for Study 1. Sponsor’s marketing strategy influenced the recommendations for Study 2. Study 3 showed the effect of a country’s immunization program and reimbursement of vaccines on a study’s success. In contrast to the other studies, Study 4 demonstrated the impact of eligibility criteria in recruitment recommendations for a vaccine trial requiring specific patient pools. Conclusion: Feasibility recommendations for vaccine trials are largely based on (1 eligibility criteria; (2 cultural beliefs; (3 country’s past recruitment performance; (4 use of advertising; (5 site’s access to subject populations; (6 cooperation with local health professionals and government; (7

  18. Tobacco prevention and reduction with nursing students: A non-randomized controlled feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Anneke; Schulze, Katrin; Rustler, Christa; Scheifhacken, Sabine; Schweizer, Ines; Bonse-Rohmann, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Prevalence of tobacco use among nurses and nursing students is disproportionally high in Germany. However, from a public health perspective they are considered to be an important group for delivering smoking cessation interventions. As delivery of tobacco-related treatment depends on own smoking status, smoking prevention and cessation among the nursing professions is indicative for improving nurse and public health. To evaluate the feasibility and effects of a comprehensive tobacco prevention and reduction program on psychosocial and environmental factors related to smoking behavior of nursing students. Between 2014 and 2015, a non-randomized, controlled feasibility study was conducted in 12 schools of nursing with 397 nursing students in Germany. Students in the intervention group received a program (ASTRA) consisting of an introductory session, steering committee workshop, stress prevention lessons, evidence-based smoking cessation intervention, and action project. Six months after baseline assessment, change in smoking-related protective and risk factors was determined. Secondary endpoints included smoking behavior. The program was implemented in total in 5 of 7 intervention schools. About one third of smoking nursing students participated in a cessation intervention. The program seems to do better than a minimal intervention booklet in four primary outcomes: perceived descriptive, subjective, and injunctive norms towards smoking and nursing as well as perceived social support. As anticipated, there was no change in smoking behavior. The applied approach is feasible and able to improve important smoking-related norm perceptions of student nurses and perception of social support. However, additional context measures to influence the settings of nursing education currently rather supporting smoking seem to be necessary in order to promote smoking cessation among nursing students and to scale up implementation of the program. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  19. SERI Wind Energy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noun, R. J.

    1983-06-01

    The SERI Wind Energy Program manages the areas or innovative research, wind systems analysis, and environmental compatibility for the U.S. Department of Energy. Since 1978, SERI wind program staff have conducted in-house aerodynamic and engineering analyses of novel concepts for wind energy conversion and have managed over 20 subcontracts to determine technical feasibility; the most promising of these concepts is the passive blade cyclic pitch control project. In the area of systems analysis, the SERI program has analyzed the impact of intermittent generation on the reliability of electric utility systems using standard utility planning models. SERI has also conducted methodology assessments. Environmental issues related to television interference and acoustic noise from large wind turbines have been addressed. SERI has identified the causes, effects, and potential control of acoustic noise emissions from large wind turbines.

  20. 75 FR 29920 - Value-Added Producer Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... activities including the development of feasibility studies, business plans, and marketing strategies. The... for the program with minimal disruptions in ongoing farming activities. The comment period for the... items such as work plans, budgets, feasibility studies, and business plans, and how applications that...

  1. Fiscal 1997 survey report on the jointly executed/promoted basic survey project (the jointly executed activity Japan Program). Feasibility survey for CO2 reduction by deregulating heavy traffic at specified crossings in Bangkok, Thailand; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (kyodo jisshi suishin kiso chosa jigyo (kyodo jisshi katsudo Japan program)). Taikoku Bangkok no tokutei kosaten ni okeru kotsu jutai kanwa ni yoru CO2 sakugen kanosei chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The monetary crisis in Thailand with the baht drop in July 1997 as a beginning rapidly worsened the Thai economy. With it, the number of automobiles sold sharply declined, and automobile manufacturers were also heavily damaged as seen in the temporary discontinued production, etc. Under such economic situation, a discussion was made on execution of the project with the Thai Automotive Industry Association (TAIA), a partner at the Thai side. As a result, agreement was made on the positioning of the project, role sharing, and selection of measures against heavy traffic as follows: Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA) conducts a feasibility study, proposal of a construction plan and confirmation of effects, and bears the costs. TAIA bears the execution and cost of construction (Due to the worsened Thai economy, JAMA paid almost all the construction expenses). In the light of the economic situation in Thailand, `improvement of the signal control system` was selected as an execution candidate, which has the highest cost effect among the measures against heavy traffic. In the future, the application, registration and execution are done for joint activities for the project. 49 figs., 59 tabs.

  2. Feasibility study of medical isotope production at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, C.D.; Miller, D.L.; Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Regulatory Assessment Dept.] [and others

    1995-12-01

    In late 1994, Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, (SNL/NM), was instructed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP) to examine the feasibility of producing medically useful radioisotopes using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) would be expected to supply the targets to be irradiated in the ACRR. The intent of DOE would be to provide a capability to satisfy the North American health care system demand for {sup 99}Mo, the parent of {sup 99m}Tc, in the event of an interruption in the current Canadian supply. {sup 99m}Tc is used in 70 to 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures in the US. The goal of the SNL/NM study effort is to determine the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and staffing necessary to meet the North American need for {sup 99}Mo and to identify and examine all issues with potential for environmental impact.

  3. The Feasibility of First Step to Success with Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Andy J; Small, Jason; Feil, Edward; Seeley, John; Walker, Hill; Golly, Annemieke

    2013-07-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine feasibility of the preschool version of the First Step to Success (FSS) intervention. Toward this end, the following four research questions were addressed: (1) To what extent was the intervention implemented with integrity? (2) To what extent do teachers and parents perceive the intervention to be socially valid? (3) To what extent were teachers and parents satisfied with the intervention? and (4) To what extent was the intervention effective in reducing problem behavior and improving social skills? Twelve students participated in the study. Treatment integrity, social validity, and satisfaction results were analyzed at the aggregate level, and a reliable change index was calculated at the case level for primary outcome measures to assess the potential efficacy of the intervention. Fidelity data suggest the preschool version of the intervention can be implemented with acceptable integrity by coaches and teachers in preschool settings. Social validity outcomes suggest parents' perceptions of the program's goals, procedures, and outcomes were extremely favorable, and social validity from the teacher perspective was acceptable. The results provide initial evidence that participating in the preschool version of the FSS intervention improves children's social skills and decreases problem behavior.

  4. Fort Yukon, Chalkyitsik, & Venetie Biomass Boiler Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Koontz, ME William A. Wall, PhD

    2009-03-31

    The Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments (CATG) is a consortium of ten Gwich'in and Koyukon Athabascan tribes settled in 10 remote villages and are linked by the Yukon River System. The CATG mission is to maintain the Yukon Flats region as Indian Country by asserting traditional rights and taking responsibility for developing tribal technical capacity to manage the land and resources. It is the intent of CATG to explore and develop all opportunities for a renewable and self-sufficient energy program for each of the villages. CATG envisions utilization of forest resources both for construction and energy as one of the best long-term strategies for integrating the economic goals for the region as well as supporting the cultural and social issues. The intent for this feasibility project is to focus specifically on biomass utilization for heat, first, and for future electrical generation within the region, second. An initial determination has already been made regarding the importance of wood energy as a primary source of renewable energy to displace diesel fuel in the Yukon Flats region. A desktop study of other potential renewable resources was conducted in 2006.

  5. Feasibility Study on the Development of Proton Accelerator II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whang, Ki Woong [Korea Accelerator and Plasma Research Association, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    Present status and research trend of KOMAC (Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex)-grade accelerator construction in Europe, Japan, America, and Russia are surveyed in view of basic nuclear technology study in 2nd feasibility study on the KOMAC. KOMAC can be applied to study the increasing of nuclear reactor safety, the Proto-plant of transmutation technology for low cost nuclear fuel, the nuclear data production, the life science, mechanical dynamics, the structure probe, the radioisotope production, the cancer therapy, and the defense industry etc. And also KOMAC structure selection is investigated in point of utilization aims referred from various proposal of LANL and ORNL in USA, Neutron Science Research program in Japan, Energy Amplifier in Europe, and Institute of Theoretical and Experimental physics in Russia. As a result of meeting, study team is approached to the conclusion the KOMAC should be constructed to get the nuclear transmutation technology and the world leadership in future nuclear industry. Member`s opinion of study team agreed new nuclear technology, such as Accelerator Driven Energy Amplifier will be possible to sustain a survival of human being in post 21c. 7 tabs., 10 figs. (author)

  6. Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.W.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

  7. Feasibility of Biomass Biodrying for Gasification Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, Arash

    and the pilot-scale continuous system was designed in 2010 to demonstrate the feasibility of mixed sludge biodrying for efficient combustion in biomass boilers. Mixed sludge was biodried in the reactor to 45% moisture level, which was the suitable level for boiler application. Techno-economic analysis also revealed the potential economic benefits for pulp and paper mills. However, considerable uncertainties existed in terms of feasibility of the biodrying technology for other types of biomass that are usually used in the gasification process, mainly because of low nutrient level of typical lignocellulosic biomass used as feedstock. Furthermore, the technology had not been shown to be economically viable in conjunction with gasification process at pulp and paper mills. In this work the feasibility of low-nutrient biomass biodrying was tested by experiments and techno-economic model was developed to identify the performance of biodrying process for commercial-scale application. In the economic analysis, a comprehensive approach for biodrying cost assessment was introduced that is based on the well-known approach widely used in the process industry and few sources of benefits were identified.

  8. Feasibility of a rural palliative supportive service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesut, B; Hooper, B P; Robinson, C A; Bottorff, J L; Sawatzky, R; Dalhuisen, M

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare models for the delivery of palliative care to rural populations encounter common challenges: service gaps, the cost of the service in relation to the population, sustainability, and difficulty in demonstrating improvements in outcomes. Although it is widely agreed that a community capacity-building approach to rural palliative care is essential, how that approach can be achieved, evaluated and sustained remains in question. The purpose of this community-based research project is to test the feasibility and identify potential outcomes of implementing a rural palliative supportive service (RPaSS) for older adults living with life-limiting chronic illness and their family caregiver in the community. This paper reports on the feasibility aspects of the study. RPaSS is being conducted in two co-located rural communities with populations of approximately 10 000 and no specialized palliative services. Participants living with life-limiting chronic illness and their family caregivers are visited bi-weekly in the home by a nurse coordinator who facilitates symptom management, teaching, referrals, psychosocial and spiritual support, advance care planning, community support for practical tasks, and telephone-based support for individuals who must commute outside of the rural community for care. Mixed-method collection strategies are used to collect data on visit patterns; healthcare utilization; family caregiver needs; and participant needs, functional performance and quality of life. A community-based advisory committee worked with the investigative team over a 1-year period to plan RPaSS, negotiating the best fit between research methods and the needs of the community. Recruitment took longer than anticipated with service capacity being reached at 8 months. Estimated service capacity of one nurse coordinator, based on bi-weekly visits, is 25 participants and their family caregivers. A total of 393 in-person visits and 53 telephone visits were conducted between

  9. A magnetotelluric feasibility study of the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, O.; Weckmann, U.

    2016-12-01

    The Alps are a famous and extensive mountain range system in central Europe. The mountains were formed as the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collided and they have been a prime target for geological and geophysical investigations since the beginning of modern geosciences. Consequently, the Alps have been investigated with active and passive seismological methods and extensive sets of potential field data exist. Hardly anything is known, however, about the deep electrical conductivity structure, as it has been notoriously difficult to acquire magnetotelluric (MT) data in the Alps. The Alps are densely populated and a lot of infrastructure for tourism has been built over the years. MT measurements, which rely on natural variations of the electromagnetic background fields, are severely hampered by this man-made noise. Here, we report on a feasibility study to acquire MT data in the Alps, where all stations are deployed outside the valleys, on high mountain ranges and alpine pastures. Overall we recorded MT data at 7 stations, along an approximately north-south profile centred on Mayrhofen in the Austrian Alps. The average station spacing was 5 kilometers. The data were processed using robust remote-reference processing and the results clearly show that MT measurements are feasible. We used Mare2DEM for 2D inversion to include a somewhat realistic topography. The 2D section indicates moderate resistivity for the top 2 - 5 km, consistent with the regional geology, which suggests (meta-) sedimentary sequences. From depths of 5 km and below resistivities exceed 5,000 Ohmm. This means we can sense very deep with MT but also, that we should be cautious with an interpretation of this short profile. The data also clearly indicate 3D effects. We therefore propose to deploy an array of stations covering the entire Alps in USArray style, e.g. with a station spacing of approximately 50 km, to derive a 3D model of the deep electrical resistivity structure of the Alps. Such a

  10. The feasibility and acceptability of virtual environments in the treatment of childhood social anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Nina; Beidel, Deborah C.; Spitalnick, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Objective Two significant challenges for the dissemination of social skills training programs are the need to assure generalizability and provide sufficient practice opportunities. In the case of social anxiety disorder, virtual environments may provide one strategy to address these issues. This study evaluated the utility of an interactive virtual school environment for the treatment of social anxiety disorder in preadolescent children. Method Eleven children with a primary diagnosis of social anxiety disorder between 8 to 12 years old participated in this initial feasibility trial. All children were treated with Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children, an empirically supported treatment for children with social anxiety disorder. However, the in vivo peer generalization sessions and standard parent-assisted homework assignments were substituted by practice in a virtual environment. Results Overall, the virtual environment programs were acceptable, feasible, and credible treatment components. Both children and clinicians were satisfied with using the virtual environment technology, and children believed it was a high quality program overall. Additionally, parents were satisfied with the virtual environment augmented treatment and indicated that they would recommend the program to family and friends. Conclusion Virtual environments are viewed as acceptable and credible by potential recipients. Furthermore, they are easy to implement by even novice users and appear to be useful adjunctive elements for the treatment of childhood social anxiety disorder. PMID:24144182

  11. Swallowing rehabilitation of dysphagic tracheostomized patients under mechanical ventilation in intensive care units: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Katia Alonso; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro; Chiari, Brasília Maria; Rosseti, Heloísa Baccaro; Lorenzon, Paula; Gonçalves, Maria Inês Rebelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of the early implementation of a swallowing rehabilitation program in tracheostomized patients under mechanical ventilation with dysphagia. This prospective study was conducted in the intensive care units of a university hospital. We included hemodynamically stable patients under mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours following 48 hours of tracheostomy and with an appropriate level of consciousness. The exclusion criteria were previous surgery in the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx and/or esophagus, the presence of degenerative diseases or a past history of oropharyngeal dysphagia. All patients were submitted to a swallowing rehabilitation program. An oropharyngeal structural score, a swallowing functional score and an otorhinolaryngological structural and functional score were determined before and after swallowing therapy. We included 14 patients. The mean duration of the rehabilitation program was 12.4 ± 9.4 days, with 5.0 ± 5.2 days under mechanical ventilation. Eleven patients could receive oral feeding while still in the intensive care unit after 4 (2 - 13) days of therapy. All scores significantly improved after therapy. In this small group of patients, we demonstrated that the early implementation of a swallowing rehabilitation program is feasible even in patients under mechanical ventilation.

  12. The feasibility and acceptability of virtual environments in the treatment of childhood social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Nina Wong; Beidel, Deborah C; Spitalnick, Josh S

    2014-01-01

    Two significant challenges for the dissemination of social skills training programs are the need to assure generalizability and provide sufficient practice opportunities. In the case of social anxiety disorder, virtual environments may provide one strategy to address these issues. This study evaluated the utility of an interactive virtual school environment for the treatment of social anxiety disorder in preadolescent children. Eleven children with a primary diagnosis of social anxiety disorder between 8 to 12 years old participated in this initial feasibility trial. All children were treated with Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children, an empirically supported treatment for children with social anxiety disorder. However, the in vivo peer generalization sessions and standard parent-assisted homework assignments were substituted by practice in a virtual environment. Overall, the virtual environment programs were acceptable, feasible, and credible treatment components. Both children and clinicians were satisfied with using the virtual environment technology, and children believed it was a high-quality program overall. In addition, parents were satisfied with the virtual environment augmented treatment and indicated that they would recommend the program to family and friends. Findings indicate that the virtual environments are viewed as acceptable and credible by potential recipients. Furthermore, they are easy to implement by even novice users and appear to be useful adjunctive elements for the treatment of childhood social anxiety disorder.

  13. Evaluation of the Health Rocks! Program: The Association of Youth Engagement with Program Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This evaluation research examined the relationship between program process and program outcome, specifically, youth engagement in the national 4-H Council Health Rocks! program and their program outcomes.  Based on program evaluation surveys completed after the program by participants, youths’ engagement in the program was associated with their gains in knowledge and skills about substance use, and personal assets related to avoiding risks.  When youth participants find a program interesting, are actively engaged in the program, and find the program staff friendly, they benefit more from the program.  Findings underscore the importance of engaging curriculum and friendly staff to the success of extension or afterschool youth programs. The evaluation method may offer an example of balancing rigor of evaluation design and feasibility of implementing an evaluation.

  14. Sedimentary Geothermal Feasibility Study: October 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustine, Chad [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zerpa, Luis [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this project is to analyze the feasibility of commercial geothermal projects using numerical reservoir simulation, considering a sedimentary reservoir with low permeability that requires productivity enhancement. A commercial thermal reservoir simulator (STARS, from Computer Modeling Group, CMG) is used in this work for numerical modeling. In the first stage of this project (FY14), a hypothetical numerical reservoir model was developed, and validated against an analytical solution. The following model parameters were considered to obtain an acceptable match between the numerical and analytical solutions: grid block size, time step and reservoir areal dimensions; the latter related to boundary effects on the numerical solution. Systematic model runs showed that insufficient grid sizing generates numerical dispersion that causes the numerical model to underestimate the thermal breakthrough time compared to the analytic model. As grid sizing is decreased, the model results converge on a solution. Likewise, insufficient reservoir model area introduces boundary effects in the numerical solution that cause the model results to differ from the analytical solution.

  15. BIOMASS-TO-ENERGY FEASIBILITY STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecil T. Massie

    2002-09-03

    The purpose of this study was to assess the economic and technical feasibility of producing electricity and thermal energy from biomass by gasification. For an economic model we chose a large barley malting facility operated by Rahr Malting Co. in Shakopee, Minnesota. This plant provides an excellent backdrop for this study because it has both large electrical loads and thermal loads that allowed us to consider a wide range of sizes and technical options. In the end, eleven scenarios were considered ranging from 3.1 megawatts (MWe) to 19.8 MWe. By locating the gasification and generation at an agricultural product processing plant with large electrical and thermal loads, the expectation was that some of the limitations of stand-alone biomass power plants would be overcome. In addition, since the process itself created significant volumes of low value biomass, the hope was that most of the biomass gathering and transport issues would be handled as well. The development of low-BTU gas turbines is expected to fill a niche between the upper limit of multiple spark ignited engine set systems around 5 MWe and the minimum reasonable scale for steam turbine systems around 10 MWe.

  16. Feasibility of spirometry testing in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampschmidt, Jordan C; Brooks, Edward G; Cherry, Debra C; Guajardo, Jesus R; Wood, Pamela R

    2016-03-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of obtaining acceptable and reproducible spirometry data in preschool aged children (3-5 years) by technicians without prior experience with spirometry. Two technicians were trained to perform spirometry testing (ndd Easy on-PC) and to administer standardized questionnaires. Preschool aged children were enrolled from two Head Start centers and a local primary care clinic. Subjects were trained in proper spirometry technique and tested until at least two acceptable efforts were obtained or the subject no longer produced acceptable efforts. 200 subjects were enrolled: mean age 4.0 years (± 0.7 SD); age distribution: 51 (25.5%) 3 years old, 103 (51.5%) 4 years old, and 46 (23%) 5 years old. Fifty-six percent male and 75% Hispanic. One hundred thirty (65%) subjects produced at least one acceptable effort on their first visit: 23 (45%) for 3 years old, 67 (65%) for 4 years old, and 40 (87%) for 5 years old. The number of acceptable efforts correlated with age (r = 0.29, P spirometry results from the preschool aged children; the number of acceptable efforts correlated significantly with age. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Feasibility study of the AOSTA experimental campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carta M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of the nuclear waste is one of the most important nuclear issues. The high radiotoxicity of the spent fuel is due to plutonium and some minor actinides (MAs such as neptunium, americium and curium, above all. One way to reduce their hazard is to destroy by fission MAs in appropriate nuclear reactors. To allow the MAs destruction an important effort have been done on the nuclear data due to the poor knowledge in this field. In the framework of one of the NEA Expert Group on Integral Experiments for Minor Actinide Management an analysis of the feasibility of MAs irradiation campaign in the TAPIRO fast research reactor is carried out. This paper provides preliminary results obtained by calculations modelling the irradiation, in different TAPIRO irradiation channels, of some CEA samples coming from the French experimental campaign OSMOSE, loaded with different contents of MAs, in order to access, through particular peak spectrometry, to their capture cross section. On the basis of neutron transport calculation results, obtained by both deterministic and Monte Carlo methods, an estimate of the irradiated samples counting levels from the AOSTA (Activation of OSMOSE Samples in TAPIRO experimental campaign is provided.

  18. Pinellas Plant feasibility study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Pinellas Plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. In September 1990, the Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS) entered into an agreement with DOE to independently examine environmental monitoring data from the plant and health data from Pinellas County to determine if an epidemiological study is technically feasible to measure possible off-site health effects from ionizing radiation. Through normal plant operations, some radioactive materials have been released to the environment. Eighty percent of the total plant releases of 107,707 curies occurred in the early years of plant operation (1957--1960). The primary materials released were tritium gas, tritium oxide and krypton-85. Environmental monitoring for radioactive releases from the plant has been done regularly since 1975. The US Public Health Service Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in assisting HRS, has determined that sufficient radiological data exist by which a dose reconstruction can be done. A dose reconstruction can provide an estimate of how much radiological exposure someone living in the vicinity of the Pinellas Plant may have suffered from environmental releases.

  19. FEASIBILITY OF INVESTMENT IN CHERRY ORCHARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei ZBANCĂ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to correctly determine the investments required to establish cherry orchard, as well as to point out the best option to ensure the quality, productivity and competitiveness of the relevant products. The feasibility of investments for planting cherry orchards is considered according to the following method: preparation of investment budgets for planting and maintenance of cherry orchards before fructification for three technologies of fruit cultivation (traditional, intensive and super-intensive, the budget for the cherry orchard during the fructification period, and the comparison of the obtained results of calculation. The traditional orchard technology is more extensive, easier to implement, needs least investments per hectare and has lower economic effects, the intensive technology needs large investments per hectare and, therefore, allows obtaining more advantageous economic results, while the super-intensive technology is the most expensive, implies the greatest investments per hectare, and allows obtaining the best economic results. Given the above-listed findings, it may be concluded that intensive orchards allow obtaining cherrys of homogenous quality, have a high productivity per hectare and at lower costs.

  20. Feasibility of an optical fiber clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinova, Ekaterina; Babb, James F.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2017-09-01

    We explore the feasibility of a fiber clock, i.e., a compact, high-precision, optical lattice atomic clock based on atoms trapped inside a hollow-core optical fiber. Such a setup offers an intriguing potential both for a substantially increased number of interrogated atoms (and thereby an improved clock stability) and for miniaturization. We evaluate the sensitivity of the 1S0-3P0 clock transition in Hg and other divalent atoms to the fiber inner core surface at nonzero temperatures. The Casimir-Polder interaction induced 1S0-3P0 transition frequency shift is calculated for the atom inside the hollow capillary as a function of atomic position, capillary material, and geometric parameters. For Hg atoms on the axis of a silica capillary with inner radius ≥15 μ m and optimally chosen thickness d ˜1 μ m , the atom-surface interaction induced 1S0-3P0 clock transition frequency shift can be kept on the level δ ν /νHg˜10-19 . We also estimate the atom loss and heating due to collisions with the buffer gas, lattice intensity noise induced heating, spontaneous photon scattering heating, and residual birefringence induced frequency shifts.

  1. Feasibility of a peat biogasification process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buivid, M. G.; Wise, D. L.; Rader, A. M.; McCarty, P. L.; Owen, W. F.

    1980-07-01

    The feasibility of a two-stage biogasification process for the conversion of peat reserves, the energy content of which in the United States is greater than that of uranium, shale oil or petroleum and natural gas combined, into pipeline-quality methane is investigated. Samples of wet-harvested reed-sedge peat were pretreated in alkaline and nonalkaline conditions in the presence and absence of oxidation in order to determine the most favorable conditions for the conversion of cellulosic and lignaceous fractions to water-soluble, fermentable compounds, and the resulting products were subjected to anaerobic fermentation to methane. Conversion efficiencies obtained reveal that up to 26% of the initial heat content of peat was converted to methane when alkaline heat pretreatment was employed. Analysis of the process parameters by a computer model to determine equipment sizes, mass and energy balances and costs indicates that for a 79,200 GJ/day plant the total capital requirement would be $323,000,000, annual operating costs would be $44,000,000 and average SNG cost would be $3.16/GJ, assuming a 90% stream factor with a delivered peat slurry costing $0.0033/kg.

  2. [Home telemonitoring of CPAP: a feasibility study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraysse, J L; Delavillemarque, N; Gasparutto, B; Leophonte, P; Leseux, L; Humeau, M P; Racineux, J L; Muir, J F; Didier, A

    2012-01-01

    The most commonly used treatment for the sleep apnoea syndrome (SAS) is the application of constant positive airway pressure (CPAP) during sleep. Compliance is an essential element in the efficiency of CPAP. This is dependent on the quality of the management of care and on the education of the patients. With the emergence of telemedicine, telemonitoring of CPAP has been developed in France. This study will be observational and multicentered. The main aim is to evaluate the feasibility of CPAP telemonitoring in SAS patients (n=90). During the installation of the equipment, the patients will be instructed how to connect the CPAP Secure Digital card to a data transmitting box every week for two months. The actual number and frequency of remote-monitoring box connections will be recorded. The data transmission will be made to the study coordinator, the home care provider SADIR, by the way of a telemedicine platform, located in France. This study will allow measurement of the adherence of the patients to their CPAP treatment by telemonitoring using this new tool of data transmission and the impact of this on CPAP compliance. Copyright © 2011 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Methylphenidate protocol: feasibility in a pediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTraglia, J

    1991-12-01

    This report examines the feasibility of double blind individual trials of methylphenidate versus placebo in a general pediatric practice to assess benefit of this medication in the treatment of attention deficit disorder. Children presenting with the diagnosis of attention deficit disorder were enrolled in a three-week protocol. The first week was a baseline week during which teachers and parents completed the Connors rating scales. During the second and third weeks of each trial, placebo or methylphenidate was given for a week each in an unknown order to parents, teachers or the investigator. Respective Connors rating scales were also completed for each of these weeks. At the end of the third week, the three parent questionnaires and the three teacher questionnaires were returned to the investigator for scoring and disclosure about findings. During a pilot period, 53% of the trials were improperly completed. Reasons for this were addressed and with simple measures the rate of successful completion was raised to 83%. During the study phase, 43% of the children were found to be hyperactive but they did not benefit from medication. In six trials there was disagreement between teachers and parents. The completed trials and many of the incompleted trials were helpful in the assessment of the children with attention deficit disorder and their response to medication. It is felt that this approach is suitable for a private general pediatric practice.

  4. Integer programming, lattices, and results in fixed dimension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Aardal (Karen); F. Eisenbrand

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe review and describe several results regarding integer programming problems in fixed dimension. First, we describe various lattice basis reduction algorithms that are used as auxiliary algorithms when solving integer feasibility and optimization problems. Next, we review three

  5. A Mars Exploration Discovery Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Paige, D. A.

    2000-07-01

    The Mars Exploration Program should consider following the Discovery Program model. In the Discovery Program a team of scientists led by a PI develop the science goals of their mission, decide what payload achieves the necessary measurements most effectively, and then choose a spacecraft with the capabilities needed to carry the payload to the desired target body. The primary constraints associated with the Discovery missions are time and money. The proposer must convince reviewers that their mission has scientific merit and is feasible. Every Announcement of Opportunity has resulted in a collection of creative ideas that fit within advertised constraints. Following this model, a "Mars Discovery Program" would issue an Announcement of Opportunity for each launch opportunity with schedule constraints dictated by the launch window and fiscal constraints in accord with the program budget. All else would be left to the proposer to choose, based on the science the team wants to accomplish, consistent with the program theme of "Life, Climate and Resources". A proposer could propose a lander, an orbiter, a fleet of SCOUT vehicles or penetrators, an airplane, a balloon mission, a large rover, a small rover, etc. depending on what made the most sense for the science investigation and payload. As in the Discovery program, overall feasibility relative to cost, schedule and technology readiness would be evaluated and be part of the selection process.

  6. Feasibility of progressive sit-to-stand training among older hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Petersen, Janne; Bean, Jonathan F

    2015-01-01

    and dose for older patients. Therefore, our aim was to test the feasibility of a progression model for loaded sit-to-stand training among older hospitalized patients. Methods. This is a prospective cohort study conducted as a feasibility study prior to a full-scale trial. We included twenty-four older...... patients (≥65 yrs) acutely admitted from their own home to the medical services of the hospital. We developed an 8-level progression model for loaded sit-to-stands, which we named STAND. We used STAND as a model to describe how to perform the sit-to-stand exercise as a strength training exercise aimed......Background. In older patients, hospitalization is associated with a decline in functional performance and loss of muscle strength. Loss of muscle strength and functional performance can be prevented by systematic strength training, but details are lacking regarding the optimal exercise program...

  7. The feasibility of local participation in Measuring, Reporting and Verification (PMRV) for REDD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissière, Manuel; Herold, Martin; Atmadja, Stibniati; Sheil, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    The studies in this PLOS ONE collection investigated the feasibility of community participation in Measuring, Reporting and Verifying (Participatory MRV-PMRV) initiatives in the context of national programs to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+). While such participation is desirable, its feasibility has been uncertain. This collection builds the empirical foundations for putting PMRV into practice. The authors of this article identified five crucial considerations: (1) clarify the stakeholders, (2) understand their motivation to participate, (3) integrate knowledge and information from multiple disciplines and sources, (4) convey knowledge and information across multiple levels of governance, and (5) clarify and enable the links to REDD+ safeguards. We conclude that local communities and other local actors can play a major role in achieving REDD+ MRV, however, this requires attention to their needs and motivations. Future activities should include assessment of past PMRV experiences, costs and benefits, operationalization of reporting and verification, formalization of PMRV and full scale testing on the ground.

  8. SRB/SLEEC (Solid Rocket Booster/Shingle Lap Extendible Exit Cone) feasibility study, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary design and analysis was completed for a SLEEC (Shingle Lap Extendible Exit Cone) which could be incorporated on the Space Transportation System (STS) Solid Rocket Booster (SRB). Studies were completed which predicted weights and performance increases and development plans were prepared for the full-scale bench and static test of SLEEC. In conjunction with the design studies, a series of supporting analyses were performed to assure the validity and feasibility of performance, fabrication, cost, and reliability for the selected design. The feasibility and required amounts of bench, static firing, and flight tests considered necessary for the successful incorporation of SLEEC on the Shuttle SRBs were determined. Preliminary plans were completed which define both a follow on study effort and a development program.

  9. Feasibility of congestion pricing as an energy conservation measure. Final report, June 1992-August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacir, K.; Memmott, J.L.; Ruffley, R.

    1994-08-01

    This report is a feasibility study on the potential of congestion pricing as an energy conservation measure. Although congestion pricing entails many different strategies or schemes, this report primarily focuses on road pricing for highway type facilities. This report evaluates existing and planned toll roads for their involvement with automated vehicle identification and electronic toll collection as for these two technologies are viewed as a vital element in any congestion pricing program or scheme. The economic feasibility of congestion pricing is evaluated. Case studies are made in Singapore, Hong Konk, and Oslo, Norway. The impact on fuel consumption is made using a freeway simulation model. The analysis of fuel consumption focuses on using the HOV lane as a congestion priced facility. Issues associated with congestion pricing are discussed. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are made on the potential congestion pricing holds towards reducing fuel consumption.

  10. Progressive strength training to prevent LYmphoedema in the first year after breast CAncer - the LYCA feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Gunn; Lanng, Charlotte; Kroman, Niels

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lymphoedema is a common late effect after breast cancer (BC) that has no effective cure once chronic. Accumulating evidence supports progressive strength training (PRT) as a safe exercise modality in relation to the onset and exacerbation of lymphoedema. In the 'preventive intervention...... against LYmphoedema after breast CAncer' (LYCA) feasibility study we examined the feasibility of a program of PRT in the first year after BC to inform a planned randomised controlled trial (RCT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: LYCA was a one-group prospective pilot trial inviting women operated with axillary lymph...

  11. Exercise-based rehabilitation after hospital discharge for survivors of critical illness with intensive care unit?acquired weakness: A pilot feasibility trial ? ??

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Bronwen; Thompson, April; Douiri, Abdel; Moxham, John; Hart, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate feasibility of exercise-based rehabilitation delivered after hospital discharge in patients with intensive care unit?acquired weakness (ICU-AW). Materials and methods Twenty adult patients, mechanically ventilated for more than 48 hours, with ICU-AW diagnosis at ICU discharge were included in a pilot feasibility randomized controlled trial receiving a 16-session exercise-based rehabilitation program. Twenty-one patients without ICU-AW participa...

  12. Inspiratory muscle training is feasible and safe for patients with acute spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Tony; Stiller, Kathy

    2018-02-05

    Objective To investigate the feasibility and safety and, to a lesser extent efficacy, of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) for patients with acute complete cervical or thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Prospective, observational pilot study comprising a series of case reports. Setting Tertiary care, public hospital. Participants Seven adult subjects with an acute complete cervical or thoracic SCI. Interventions Participants received IMT as soon as their respiratory condition was stable. A high-resistance, low-repetition program of IMT using a POWERbreathe KH1 device was instituted. Training comprised 3-6 sets of 6 breaths, commenced at 50% maximum inspiratory pressure with the training load progressively increased. Outcome measures Feasibility (number of sessions when the criteria to participate in IMT were met/not met), safety (symptoms and physiological stability) before, during and after IMT sessions and efficacy (lung function) were measured. Results There were 50 sessions in total where participants met the criteria to receive IMT, with a mean (range) of 7.1 (3-11) IMT sessions per participant delivered over 10.7 (4-17) days. IMT was feasible, with all 50 planned sessions of IMT able to be delivered, and safe, with stable physiological parameters and no adverse symptoms or events recorded before, during or after IMT. Maximal inspiratory pressure increased for four participants and forced vital capacity increased for three participants over the duration of their IMT sessions. Conclusion A high-resistance, low-repetition program of IMT was feasible and safe in adults with an acute complete cervical or thoracic SCI whose respiratory status was stable. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN 12614000975695).

  13. Feasibility of Handcycle Training During Inpatient Rehabilitation in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooijen, Carla F; van den Brand, Ilse L; Ter Horst, Paul; Wynants, Mia; Valent, Linda J; Stam, Henk J; van den Berg-Emons, Rita J

    2015-09-01

    To assess the feasibility of a handcycle training program during inpatient rehabilitation and the changes in physical capacity in persons with subacute spinal cord injury (SCI). Before-after trial. Rehabilitation centers. Persons with subacute SCI in regular rehabilitation (N=45). A structured handcycle interval training program during the last 8 weeks of inpatient rehabilitation. Training was scheduled 3 times per week (24 sessions total), with an intended frequency of ≥2 times per week. Intended intensity was a Borg score of 4 to 7 on a 10-point scale. Feasibility was assessed, and participant satisfaction was evaluated (n=30). A maximal handcycling test was performed 8 weeks prior to discharge and at discharge to determine peak power output and peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) (n=23). Of the participants, 91% completed the handcycle training, and no adverse events were reported. Mean training frequency was 1.8±0.5 times per week, and mean Borg score was 6.2±1.4. Persons with complete lesions demonstrated lower training feasibility. Most participants were satisfied with the handcycle training. Peak power output and VO2peak improved significantly after the training period (Prehabilitation in persons with SCI was feasible except for the training frequency. Persons with complete lesions likely need extra attention to benefit optimally from handcycling training. Because the improvements in physical capacity were larger than those known to occur in persons with paraplegia receiving regular rehabilitation, the results suggest that the addition of handcycle training may result in larger increases in physical capacity compared with regular rehabilitation only. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Liaison concatenation–A method to obtain feasible assembly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Selection of optimized assembly sequence from the available feasible assembly sequences is significantly essential to achieve cost-effective manufacturing process. To achieve this, at the outset, generation of feasible assembly sequences with topological, geometrical, precedence and stability conditions should be ...

  15. Liaison concatenation – A method to obtain feasible assembly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MS received 31 December 2013; revised 28 February 2015; accepted 10 July 2015. Abstract. Selection of optimized assembly sequence from the available feasible assembly sequences is sig- nificantly essential to achieve cost-effective manufacturing process. To achieve this, at the outset, generation of feasible assembly ...

  16. Feasibility Study on Solar District Heating in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Junpeng; Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    This paper analyzes the feasibility of developing solar district heating (SDH) in China from the perspective of incentive policy, selections of technical route, regional adaptability and economic feasibility for clean heating. Based on the analyzation, this proposes a road map for the development...

  17. Feasibility of progressive strength training shortly after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jan; Kristensen, Morten T

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of a 6-wk progressive strength-training programme commenced shortly after hip fracture surgery in community-dwelling patients.......To investigate the feasibility of a 6-wk progressive strength-training programme commenced shortly after hip fracture surgery in community-dwelling patients....

  18. A feasible central limit theory for realised volatility under leverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, Neil

    In this note we show that the feasible central limit theory for realised volatility and realised covariation recently developed by Barndor-Nielsen and Shephard applies under arbitrary diusion based leverage eects. Results from a simulation experiment suggest that the feasible version of the limit...

  19. Feasibility of lunar Helium-3 mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschneider, Andreas; Van Overstraeten, Dmitry; Van der Reijnst, Roy; Van Hoorn, Niels; Lamers, Marvin; Hubert, Laurent; Dijk, Bert; Blangé, Joey; Hogeveen, Joel; De Boer, Lennaert; Noomen, Ron

    With fossil fuels running out and global energy demand increasing, the need for alternative energy sources is apparent. Nuclear fusion using Helium-3 may be a solution. Helium-3 is a rare isotope on Earth, but it is abundant on the Moon. Throughout the space community lunar Helium-3 is often cited as a major reason to return to the Moon. Despite the potential of lunar Helium-3 mining, little research has been conducted on a full end-to-end mission. This abstract presents the results of a feasibility study conducted by students from Delft University of Technology. The goal of the study was to assess whether a continuous end-to-end mission to mine Helium-3 on the Moon and return it to Earth is a viable option for the future energy market. The set requirements for the representative end-to-end mission were to provide 10% of the global energy demand in the year 2040. The mission elements have been selected with multiple trade-offs among both conservative and novel concepts. A mission architecture with multiple decoupled elements for each transportation segment (LEO, transfer, lunar surface) was found to be the best option. It was found that the most critical element is the lunar mining operation itself. To supply 10% of the global energy demand in 2040, 200 tons of Helium-3 would be required per year. The resulting regolith mining rate would be 630 tons per second, based on an optimistic concentration of 20 ppb Helium-3 in lunar regolith. Between 1,700 to 2,000 Helium-3 mining vehicles would be required, if using University of Wisconsin’s Mark III miner. The required heating power, if mining both day and night, would add up to 39 GW. The resulting power system mass for the lunar operations would be in the order of 60,000 to 200,000 tons. A fleet of three lunar ascent/descent vehicles and 22 continuous-thrust vehicles for orbit transfer would be required. The costs of the mission elements have been spread out over expected lifetimes. The resulting profits from Helium

  20. Mechanics Based Tomography: A Preliminary Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Mei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a non-destructive approach to sense inclusion objects embedded in a solid medium remotely from force sensors applied to the medium and boundary displacements that could be measured via a digital image correlation system using a set of cameras. We provide a rationale and strategy to uniquely identify the heterogeneous sample composition based on stiffness (here, shear modulus maps. The feasibility of this inversion scheme is tested with simulated experiments that could have clinical relevance in diagnostic imaging (e.g., tumor detection or could be applied to engineering materials. No assumptions are made on the shape or stiffness quantity of the inclusions. We observe that the novel inversion method using solely boundary displacements and force measurements performs well in recovering the heterogeneous material/tissue composition that consists of one and two stiff inclusions embedded in a softer background material. Furthermore, the target shear modulus value for the stiffer inclusion region is underestimated and the inclusion size is overestimated when incomplete boundary displacements on some part of the boundary are utilized. For displacements measured on the entire boundary, the shear modulus reconstruction improves significantly. Additionally, we observe that with increasing number of displacement data sets utilized in solving the inverse problem, the quality of the mapped shear moduli improves. We also analyze the sensitivity of the shear modulus maps on the noise level varied between 0.1% and 5% white Gaussian noise in the boundary displacements, force and corresponding displacement indentation. Finally, a sensitivity analysis of the recovered shear moduli to the depth, stiffness and the shape of the stiff inclusion is performed. We conclude that this approach has potential as a novel imaging modality and refer to it as Mechanics Based Tomography (MBT.

  1. Mechanics Based Tomography: A Preliminary Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yue; Wang, Sicheng; Shen, Xin; Rabke, Stephen; Goenezen, Sevan

    2017-05-09

    We present a non-destructive approach to sense inclusion objects embedded in a solid medium remotely from force sensors applied to the medium and boundary displacements that could be measured via a digital image correlation system using a set of cameras. We provide a rationale and strategy to uniquely identify the heterogeneous sample composition based on stiffness (here, shear modulus) maps. The feasibility of this inversion scheme is tested with simulated experiments that could have clinical relevance in diagnostic imaging (e.g., tumor detection) or could be applied to engineering materials. No assumptions are made on the shape or stiffness quantity of the inclusions. We observe that the novel inversion method using solely boundary displacements and force measurements performs well in recovering the heterogeneous material/tissue composition that consists of one and two stiff inclusions embedded in a softer background material. Furthermore, the target shear modulus value for the stiffer inclusion region is underestimated and the inclusion size is overestimated when incomplete boundary displacements on some part of the boundary are utilized. For displacements measured on the entire boundary, the shear modulus reconstruction improves significantly. Additionally, we observe that with increasing number of displacement data sets utilized in solving the inverse problem, the quality of the mapped shear moduli improves. We also analyze the sensitivity of the shear modulus maps on the noise level varied between 0.1% and 5% white Gaussian noise in the boundary displacements, force and corresponding displacement indentation. Finally, a sensitivity analysis of the recovered shear moduli to the depth, stiffness and the shape of the stiff inclusion is performed. We conclude that this approach has potential as a novel imaging modality and refer to it as Mechanics Based Tomography (MBT).

  2. Is vaccination against transmissible spongiform encephalopathy feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, T; Chabalgoity, J A; Goni, F

    2007-04-01

    Prion diseases are a unique category of illness, affecting both animals and humans, where the underlying pathogenesis is related to a conformation change of the cellular form of a normal, self-protein called a prion protein (PrP(c) [C for cellular]) to a pathological and infectious conformation known as scrapie form (PrPsc [Sc for scrapie]). Currently, all prion diseases are without effective treatment and are universally fatal. The emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has highlighted the need to develop possible therapies. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), which has similarities to prion diseases, both passive and active immunisation have been shown to be highly effective at preventing disease and cognitive deficits in model animals. In a human trial of active vaccination in AD, despite indications of cognitive benefits in patients with an adequate humoral response, 6% of patients developed significant complications related to excessive cell-mediated immunity. This experience highlights that immunotherapies designed to be directed against a self-antigen have to finely balance an effective humoral immune response with potential autoimmune toxicity. Many prion diseases have the gut as a portal of infectious agent entry. This makes mucosal immunisation a potentially very attractive method to partially or completely prevent prion entry across the gut barrier and to also produce a modulated immune response that is unlikely to be associated with any toxicity. The authors' recent results using an attenuated Salmonella vaccine strain expressing the prion protein show that mucosal vaccination can partially protect against prion infection from a peripheral source, suggesting the feasibility of this approach.

  3. Feasibility of endometrial assessment after thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonkallio, Sari J; Liakka, Annikki K; Martikainen, Hannu K; Santala, Markku J

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of endometrial assessment after endometrial thermal ablation. Prospective observational study. A total of 57 women (age 47-52 years), who had undergone endometrial thermal ablation as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) 3-10 years (mean 6 years) earlier, were examined with transvaginal ultrasound and saline sonohysterography. Endometrial samples were collected with a Pipelle device. Visualisation of endometrium, access to uterine cavity, change in cavity length, success in outpatient endometrial sampling and success in sonohysterography were evaluated. Endometrial thickness was 4.5mm in amenorrhoeic women (n=17), 5.6mm in eumenorrhoeic women (n=37) and 6.6mm in hypermenorrhoeic women (n=3). An endometrial sample was successfully taken in 44 (77%) women, and in 13 (23%) women endometrial sample taking failed. The length of the uterine cavity compared to the length measured before endometrial thermal ablation was 0.5-5 cm (mean 2 cm) shorter in 34 women, unchanged in four women and longer in five women. The uterine cavity distended regularly in only nine (16%) women. In 14 (25%) women the cavity distended irregularly or only partly, and in 24 (42%) women the uterine cavity did not distend at all, but appeared as a narrow tube. In 10 (18%) women the sonohysterography catheter did not enter the uterine cavity at all. Endometrial assessment is compromised after previous endometrial thermal ablation. Both endometrial sampling and sonohysterography fail quite often, causing problems in diagnosis of abnormal bleeding. Intrauterine adhesions may also decrease the reliability of the endometrial sampling.

  4. Economic feasibility of thermal energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habeebullah, B.A. [Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2007-07-01

    This paper investigates the economic feasibility of both building an ice thermal storage and structure a time of rate tariff for the unique air conditioning (A/C) plant of the Grand Holy Mosque of Makkah, Saudi Arabia. The features of the building are unique where the air-conditioned 39,300 m{sup 2} zone is open to the atmosphere and the worshippers fully occupy the building five times a day, in addition hundreds of thousands of worshippers attend the blessed weekend's prayer at noontime, which escalates the peak electricity load. For economic analysis, the objective function is the daily electricity bill that includes the operation cost and the capital investment of the ice storage system. The operation cost is function of the energy imported for operating the plant in which the tariff structure, number of operating hours and the ambient temperature are parameters. The capital recovery factor is calculated for 10% interest rate and payback period of 10 years. Full and partial load storage scenarios are considered. The results showed that with the current fixed electricity rate (0.07 $/kWh), there is no gain in introducing ice storage systems for both storage schemes. Combining energy storage and an incentive time structured rate showed reasonable daily bill savings. For base tariff of 0.07 $/kWh during daytime operation and 0.016 $/kWh for off-peak period, savings were achieved for full load storage scenario. Different tariff structure is discussed and the break-even nighttime rate was determined (varies between 0.008 and 0.03 $/kWh). Partial load storage scenario showed to be unattractive where the savings for the base structured tariff was insignificant. (author)

  5. Analysis of the feasibility to integrate the semi-arid family agriculture in the National Program for Production and Use of Biodiesel: Ceara case, Brazil; Analise da viabilidade para insercao da agricultura familiar do semiarido no Programa Nacional de Producao e Uso de Biodiesel: o caso do Ceara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siniscalchi, Carina Renno

    2010-03-15

    In 2004, it was established the National Program for Production and Use of Biodiesel (PNPB) which encourages the participation of family farming in the biodiesel production chain, boosting rural development and social inclusion of these workers. From 2008 on, the PNPB decided that it would be mandatory the add 2% of biodiesel into diesel, named B2, and from 2010 on, the obligation of B5 was imposed. However, after two years of mandatory mixing, over 80% of the raw material for biodiesel production comes from large producers of soybeans in the Midwest. Thus, the focus of this study was to identify the main constraints and opportunities for family farming to participate in the program, based on the analysis of design parameters and guiding PNPB and the main stages of the agricultural seeds in the semi-arid. The study focused on Ceara as it is the state that greatly encourages the participation of small farmers through subsidies associated with the adoption of agro-ecological farming practices (author)

  6. Extreme Programming: Maestro Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Fox, Jason; Rabe, Kenneth; Shu, I-Hsiang; Powell, Mark

    2009-01-01

    "Extreme Programming: Maestro Style" is the name of a computer programming methodology that has evolved as a custom version of a methodology, called extreme programming that has been practiced in the software industry since the late 1990s. The name of this version reflects its origin in the work of the Maestro team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that develops software for Mars exploration missions. Extreme programming is oriented toward agile development of software resting on values of simplicity, communication, testing, and aggressiveness. Extreme programming involves use of methods of rapidly building and disseminating institutional knowledge among members of a computer-programming team to give all the members a shared view that matches the view of the customers for whom the software system is to be developed. Extreme programming includes frequent planning by programmers in collaboration with customers, continually examining and rewriting code in striving for the simplest workable software designs, a system metaphor (basically, an abstraction of the system that provides easy-to-remember software-naming conventions and insight into the architecture of the system), programmers working in pairs, adherence to a set of coding standards, collaboration of customers and programmers, frequent verbal communication, frequent releases of software in small increments of development, repeated testing of the developmental software by both programmers and customers, and continuous interaction between the team and the customers. The environment in which the Maestro team works requires the team to quickly adapt to changing needs of its customers. In addition, the team cannot afford to accept unnecessary development risk. Extreme programming enables the Maestro team to remain agile and provide high-quality software and service to its customers. However, several factors in the Maestro environment have made it necessary to modify some of the conventional extreme-programming

  7. Computer-based treatment for anxiety and depression: is it feasible? Is it effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, Judith G

    2004-05-01

    The rise of consumerism, escalating levels of technological change and increasing demand for better dissemination of psychological treatments signal a transformation in the treatment of mental health problems. Soon health care consumers will have a choice as to whether they wish to consult a clinician in his/her rooms in order to receive a diagnosis, treatment and support, or instead to receive these services electronically, or a combination of both. Some of the online services currently available include structured therapy programs, psychological treatment by email, real-time online counselling, professionally assisted chat rooms, self-help groups, health information and educational modules. This paper reviews the use of computer programs in mental health care and, in particular, for the treatment of anxiety and depression. Issues of feasibility, ethics, and effectiveness are discussed and the future of computer-based treatment programs in mental health is considered.

  8. The requirements and feasibility of business planning in the office of space and terrestrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J. S.; Miller, B. P.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of applying strategic business planning techniques which are developed and used in the private sector to the planning of certain projects within the NASA Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications was assessed. The methods of strategic business planning that are currently in use in the private sector are examined. The typical contents of a private sector strategic business plan and the techniques commonly used to develop the contents of the plan are described, along with modifications needed to apply these concepts to public sector projects. The current long-range planning process in the Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications is reviewed and program initiatives that might be candidates for the use of strategic business planning techniques are identified. In order to more fully illustrate the information requirements of a strategic business plan for a NASA program, a sample business plan is prepared for a hypothetical Operational Earth Resources Satellite program.

  9. Walking is a Feasible Physical Activity for People with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Susan V; Hale, Leigh A; Stebbings, Simon; Gray, Andrew R; Smith, Catherine M; Treharne, Gareth J

    2016-03-01

    Exercise has been recognized as important in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Walking is a low-cost and low-impact activity, requiring little supervision. It requires no specialist training, is suited to a variety of environments and is inherently a clinically meaningful measure of independence. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a designed walking programme for people with RA successfully facilitated regular physical activity in participants, without detriment to pain levels. Thirty-three people with RA were recruited from Dunedin Hospital rheumatology outpatient clinics and enrolled in a walking randomized controlled trial (RCT) feasibility study. Participants were randomly allocated to the walking intervention (n = 11) or control (n = 22) groups. Control participants received a nutrition education session, and the walking intervention group received instructions on a walking route with three loops, to be completed 3-4 times per week. The walking route shape was designed so that the length of the walk could be tailored by participants. Both groups were assessed at baseline and six weeks later. The primary outcome measures were feasibility, acceptability and safety. The principal secondary outcome was change in walking speed after the intervention. Additional outcome measures were a step-up test, activity limitations (on the Health Assessment Questionnaire), global well-being (on the European Quality of Life Questionnaire), self-efficacy for managing arthritis symptoms, self-efficacy for physical activity, daily pedometer readings and a daily visual analogue scale for pain. Participants successfully completed the walk for the suggested frequency, indicating feasibility and acceptability. There were no reported adverse effects of participation and the walking intervention group did not have higher daily pain levels than the control group, indicating safety. The walking intervention group showed a pattern of improvements in

  10. BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

    2010-08-31

    This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

  11. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Whole-systems Ayurvedic Medicine and Yoga Therapy for Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Jennifer; Thomson, Cynthia; Howerter, Amy

    2014-01-01

    To develop and test the feasibility of a whole-systems lifestyle intervention for obesity treatment based on the practices of Ayurvedic medicine/ Yoga therapy. A pre-post weight loss intervention pilot study using conventional and Ayurvedic diagnosis inclusion criteria, tailored treatment within a standardized treatment algorithm, and standardized data collection instruments for collecting Ayurvedic outcomes. A convenience sample of overweight/obese adult community members from Tucson, Arizona interested in a "holistic weight loss program" and meeting predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A comprehensive diet, activity, and lifestyle modification program based on principles of Ayurvedic medicine/yoga therapy with significant self-monitoring of lifestyle behaviors. The 3-month program was designed to change eating and activity patterns and to improve self-efficacy, quality of life, well-being, vitality, and self-awareness around food choices, stress management, and barriers to weight loss. Changes in body weight, body mass index; body fat percentage, fat/lean mass, waist/hip circumference and ratio, and blood pressure. Diet and exercise self-efficacy scales; perceived stress scale; visual analog scales (VAS) of energy, appetite, stress, quality of life, well-being, and program satisfaction at all time points. Twenty-two adults attended an in-person Ayurvedic screening; 17 initiated the intervention, and 12 completed the 3-month intervention. Twelve completed follow-up at 6 months and 11 completed follow-up at 9 months. Mean weight loss at 3 months was 3.54 kg (SD 4.76); 6 months: 4.63 kg, (SD 6.23) and 9 months: 5.9 kg (SD 8.52). Self-report of program satisfaction was more than 90% at all time points. An Ayurveda-/yoga-based lifestyle modification program is an acceptable and feasible approach to weight management. Data collection, including self-monitoring and conventional and Ayurvedic outcomes, did not unduly burden participants, with attrition similar to

  12. Feasibility Study on Lunar and Mars Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hidehiko; Takazawa, Yoshisada; Kaneko, Yutaka; Kawazoe, Takeshi; Takano, Yutaka; Namura, Eijiro

    1996-10-01

    This technical memorandum summarizes the results of an in-house study on lunar and Mars drone explorations - observation, landing and mobile explorations and sample returns for lunar and Mars respectively. So far, lunar and planet explorations have been primarily performed by the United States and the Soviet Union. ISAS and ESA have also contributed to some extent. The main purpose has been scientific exploration. There are some arguments that lunar and planet explorations should be performed for scientific purposes and the exploitation of them is not necessary. However, most scientific research involve the existence and survival of humankind, so it is not the fact that they cannot be organized from the side of exploitation. Especially, if NASDA makes approaches to lunar and Mars exploration, it should inevitably embrace exploitation plans. In this preface we provide the outline of lunar and Mars exploitation scenarios set up as a premise of the review on lunar and Mars unmanned exploration plans. Various reviews have been performed on whether the Moon or Mars would allow for human activities or survival. Among them, He mill, the solar powered satellite material mill and construction project of relay station to Mars as well as Mars teraforming plan have important issues. These projects have not yet become feasible because their expected investments are too large to make them practical. However, the present time seems the most appropriate to get with lunar and Mars exploitation projects under international cooperation since the realization of a space station is imminent and the international cooperation is being created with the participation of Russia. The international space station project will be continued until the year 2015. The post project has not yet been decided. Therefore, we expect that Japan would propose two successive projects, one is to construct an orbital service station combining manned abilities of the station and orbital service system and the

  13. Ambulatory surveillance of patients referred for cardiac rehabilitation following cardiac hospitalization: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, David A; Habot, Juda; Grace, Sherry L; Fair, Terry; Kiernan, David; Clark, Wendy; Fell, David

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to examine the feasibility of implementing an ambulatory surveillance system for monitoring patients referred to cardiac rehabilitation following cardiac hospitalizations. This study consists of 1208 consecutive referrals to cardiac rehabilitation between October 2007 and April 2008. Patient attendance at cardiac rehabilitation, waiting times for cardiac rehabilitation, and adverse events while waiting for cardiac rehabilitation were tracked by telephone surveillance by a nurse. Among the 1208 consecutive patients referred, only 44.7% attended cardiac rehabilitation; 36.4% of referred patients were known not to have attended any cardiac rehabilitation, while an additional 18.9% of referred patients were lost to follow-up. Among the 456 referred patients who attended the cardiac rehabilitation program, 19 (4.2%) experienced an adverse event while in the queue (13 of which were for cardiovascular hospitalizations with no deaths), with mean waiting times of 20 days and 24 days among those without and with adverse events, respectively. Among the 440 referred patients who were known not to have attended any cardiac rehabilitation program, 114 (25.9%) had adverse clinical events while in the queue; 46 of these events required cardiac hospitalization and 8 patients died. Ambulatory surveillance for cardiac rehabilitation referrals is feasible. The high adverse event rates in the queue, particularly among patients who are referred but who do not attend cardiac rehabilitation programs, underscores the importance of ambulatory referral surveillance systems for cardiac rehabilitation following cardiac hospitalizations. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 80-100 HP Stirling engine feasibility study. Progress report No. 15, July--September 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postma, N.D.

    1976-01-01

    Ford Motor Company has sponsored research and development of a 170-hp swashplate-type of Stirling engine suitable for application to a passenger car having a curb weight in the neighborhood of 4600 lb. The success of this application program has justified the need for investigating the application of the Stirling engine to passenger vehicles of smaller size and lighter weight. Progress is reported on a program which has as its objectives two tasks. Task I provides for preparation of a report containing an evaluation and presentation of the results of Contractor-financed testing of a Torino passenger car powered by a 170-hp Stirling cycle engine. Task II provides for the conduct of a feasibility study to evaluate the potential of a Stirling cycle engine for significant improvement in emissions and fuel economy over the present day internal combustion engine, and to develop a concept of an 80- to 100-hp engine design suitable for use in a passenger car in the 2500 to 3000 pound weight class. The ultimate objective of this and ensuing programs is to develop an engine design feasible for high volume production.

  15. Comprehensive Renewable Energy Feasibility Study for Sealaska Corporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Lynette; John Wade: Larry Coupe

    2006-06-30

    The purposes of this project were: (1) to conduct a comprehensive feasibility study to determine the potential sustainability of wind and/or small hydroelectric power plants on Southeast Alaska native village lands, and (2) to provide the villages with an understanding of the requirements, costs, and benefits of developing and operating wind or small hydroelectric power plants. The program was sponsored by the Tribal Energy program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy. The Contractor was Sealaska Corporation, the Regional Native Corporation for Southeast Alaska that includes 12 village/urban corporations. Most villages are isolated from any central electric transmission and use diesel-electric systems for power generation, making them prime candidates for deploying renewable energy sources. Wind Energy - A database was assembled for all of the candidate sites in SE Alaska, including location, demographics, electricity supply and demand, existing and planned transmission interties with central generation, topographical maps, macro wind data, and contact personnel. Field trips were conducted at the five candidate villages that were deemed most likely to have viable wind resources. Meetings were held with local village and utility leaders and the requirements, costs, and benefits of having local renewable energy facilities were discussed. Two sites were selected for anemometry based on their needs and the probability of having viable wind resources – Yakutat and Hoonah. Anemometry was installed at both sites and at least one year of wind resource data was collected from the sites. This data was compared to long-term data from the closest weather stations. Reports were prepared by meteorologist John Wade that contains the details of the measured wind resources and energy production projections. Preliminary financial analysis of hypothetical wind power stations were prepared to gauge the economic viability of installing such

  16. The Feasibility of a Culturally Informed Group Therapy for Patients With Schizophrenia and Their Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maura, Jessica; Weisman de Mamani, Amy

    2017-06-29

    Research suggests that group-based psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia provide benefits to patients and family members alike. However, few existing treatments consider cultural factors that may enhance their efficacy with diverse populations. The current study examined the feasibility of a culturally informed group therapy for schizophrenia (CIGT-S), which incorporates collectivistic principles and spiritual coping into the treatment protocol. The feasibility of the group protocol was tested by examining differences in patient symptom severity and patient and family member depression, anxiety, and stress after completion of the group program. Within-groups analyses were conducted comparing baseline data to group termination data from 12 patients and 11 family members. Additionally, between-groups analyses were conducted comparing waitlist termination data from 20 patients and 13 family members to group termination data from 12 patients and 11 family members. Finally, we examined participant satisfaction with the group protocol, including qualitative reports on components of the protocol that participants deemed most valuable. Results indicated that patients demonstrated lower levels of symptom severity upon completion of the CIGT-S program; however, no other significant effects were found. Results examining overall patient and family member satisfaction with the treatment protocol indicated that patients and family members both reported being highly satisfied by the treatment program. This was also represented in participant's open-ended responses to our satisfaction questionnaire. These findings indicate that CIGT-S may represent a feasible, cost-effective approach that can be flexibly used with patients and family members of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. A Mindfulness-Based Lifestyle Intervention for Obese, Inactive Endometrial Cancer Survivors: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Alexander R; Focht, Brian C; Cohn, David E; Buckworth, Janet; Klatt, Maryanna D

    2017-09-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) to address self-regulation and lifestyle behaviors (diet, physical activity) may benefit endometrial cancer survivors (ECS), who are at increased risk for morbidity and mortality associated with obesity. However, the acceptability of mindfulness training and whether it can augment behavior change in ECS is unknown. We aimed to examine; 1) the feasibility of the Mindfulness in Motion + Diet (MIM+D) intervention and 2) the preliminary efficacy of MIM+D for improving mindfulness, diet, PA and health-related quality of life (HRQL). ECS (Mage=62.4, ±5yrs from diagnosis) completed assessments at baseline, 8 and 14 weeks. Feasibility was determined by intervention completion surveys, attendance and adherence data. We used repeated measures ANOVA's (SPSS 22.0) and effect size estimates (Cohen's d) to examine changes in mindfulness, diet, PA, and HRQL over time. Thirteen ECS (76%) completed the MIM+D program and attendance (≥6/8 sessions) was 90%. Women reported favorably on the overall quality (mean of 4.75/5) and benefits of the MIM+D program; however, would have preferred receiving MIM+D closer to diagnosis. Intention to treat analyses found MIM+D did not significantly improve any outcomes. However, an intervention completers analysis showed significant change in mindfulness (p=.0039) and small to moderate estimates for change in fruits and vegetable intake (d=.23), MVPA (d=.45), RAND SF-36: MCS (d=.46), and sleep quality (d=.68). Integrating mindfulness training into behavioral interventions is feasible and ECS that adhere to these lifestyle programs may benefit. However, to future research should examine the-long term effects of mindfulness-based behavioral lifestyle interventions.

  18. Therapeutic Argentine tango dancing for people living with Parkinson’s disease: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Blandy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Individuals living with Parkinson’s disease (PD can experience a range of movement disorders. Therapeutic dance is enjoyable and thought to improve mobility, balance and well being in some people with PD. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a 4 week Argentine tango dance program for people with PD. Methods: Six community dwelling individuals with mild-moderate PD were recruited from Parkinson’s support groups, movement disorder clinics and the Parkinson’s disease Association in Australia. To minimise falls risk, participants were required to be less than 75 years of age and physically independent (Hoehn and Yahr stages I-III. They were also required to speak English. Participants attended a 1 hour dance class at a dance studio twice per week for 4 weeks. A professional dance instructor led and choreographed the classes. Physiotherapists were present to assist participants during the class and served as dance partners as necessary. The primary outcome was feasibility which was determined by measures of recruitment, adherence, attrition, safety (falls, near misses and adverse events and resource requirements. Secondary measures included the Beck Depression Inventory and the Euroqol-5D, administered at baseline and post intervention. Therapy outcomes pre and post-intervention were analysed descriptively as medians and inter-quartile ranges and using Wilcoxon matched pair signed-rank tests.Results: The Argentine tango dance intervention was shown to be safe, with no adverse events. Adherence to the dance program was 89%. Depression scores improved after intervention (p=0.04. Some challenges were associated with the need to quickly recruitment participants and supplying physiotherapists to act as dance partners. Conclusion: The program was shown to be feasible and safe for people with mild to moderately severe PD.

  19. Therapeutic Argentine Tango Dancing for People with Mild Parkinson's Disease: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandy, Laura M; Beevers, Winifred A; Fitzmaurice, Kerry; Morris, Meg E

    2015-01-01

    Individuals living with Parkinson's disease (PD) can experience a range of movement disorders that affect mobility and balance and increase the risk of falls. Low health-related quality of life, depression, and anxiety are more common in people with PD than age-matched comparisons. Therapeutic dance is a form of physical activity believed to facilitate movement and therapy uptake. As well as being enjoyable, dancing is thought to improve mobility, balance, and well-being in some people living with PD. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a 4-week Argentine tango dance program for people with PD. Six community dwelling individuals with mild to moderate PD were recruited from Parkinson's support groups, movement disorder clinics, and the PD association in Australia. To minimize falls risk, participants were required to be tango dance classes. Physiotherapists were present to assist participants during the class and served as dance partners as necessary. The primary outcome was feasibility, which was determined by measures of recruitment, adherence, attrition, safety (falls, near misses and adverse events), and resource requirements. Secondary measures included the Beck Depression Inventory and the Euroqol-5D, administered at baseline and post intervention. Therapy outcomes pre- and post-intervention were analyzed descriptively as medians and interquartile ranges and using Wilcoxon matched pair signed-rank tests. The Argentine tango dance intervention was shown to be safe, with no adverse events. Adherence to the dance program was 89%. Depression scores improved after intervention (p = 0.04). Some challenges were associated with the need to quickly recruit participants and physiotherapists to act as dance partners during classes and to monitor participants. The 4-week, twice weekly Argentine tango dancing program was shown to be feasible and safe for people with mild-to-moderately severe PD.

  20. Fernald Environmental Management Project remedial investigation and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, J.C.

    1993-04-15

    Environmental restoration involves the cleanup and restoration of US Department of Energy (DOE) sites and facilities contaminated with hazardous substances during past production or disposal activities. An important element of the environmental restoration process is the remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS), which is designed to determine the extent of contamination and to identify alternatives for cleanup. The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management is responsible for policy direction and oversight of DOE`s environmental restoration program. The objective of the audit was to determine whether DOE and its contractors had developed effective management control systems to ensure that maximum benefits were obtained from the funds spent on the RI/FS at the Fernald Environmental Management Project. Although DOE had improved the Fernald RI/FS project over the previous 18 months, the project at Fernald was not planned and controlled cost effectively. This condition occurred because (1) DOE and its contractors lacked experience in the RI/FS process, (2) DOE and its contractors had not communicated effectively with one another and outside regulators, and (3) DOE had not placed enough emphasis on management control systems. As a result, after about 6 years and the expenditure of over $100 million on the RI/FS project at Fernald, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had made no decisions as to future land use, cleanup methods, disposal sites, or the level of environmental protection needed for the site. For each year that the completion of the RI/FS and cleanup is unnecessarily delayed, DOE will be required to spend about $149 million to support site infrastructure costs. Finally, DOE was planning for the possible construction of waste storage buildings, estimated to cost $2.6 billion, when the need for the buildings had not been validated .

  1. Fernald Environmental Management Project remedial investigation and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, J.C.

    1993-04-15

    Environmental restoration involves the cleanup and restoration of US Department of Energy (DOE) sites and facilities contaminated with hazardous substances during past production or disposal activities. An important element of the environmental restoration process is the remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS), which is designed to determine the extent of contamination and to identify alternatives for cleanup. The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management is responsible for policy direction and oversight of DOE's environmental restoration program. The objective of the audit was to determine whether DOE and its contractors had developed effective management control systems to ensure that maximum benefits were obtained from the funds spent on the RI/FS at the Fernald Environmental Management Project. Although DOE had improved the Fernald RI/FS project over the previous 18 months, the project at Fernald was not planned and controlled cost effectively. This condition occurred because (1) DOE and its contractors lacked experience in the RI/FS process, (2) DOE and its contractors had not communicated effectively with one another and outside regulators, and (3) DOE had not placed enough emphasis on management control systems. As a result, after about 6 years and the expenditure of over $100 million on the RI/FS project at Fernald, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had made no decisions as to future land use, cleanup methods, disposal sites, or the level of environmental protection needed for the site. For each year that the completion of the RI/FS and cleanup is unnecessarily delayed, DOE will be required to spend about $149 million to support site infrastructure costs. Finally, DOE was planning for the possible construction of waste storage buildings, estimated to cost $2.6 billion, when the need for the buildings had not been validated .

  2. Feasibility and Safety of Intradialysis Yoga and Education in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdee, Gurjeet S; Rothman, Russell L; Sohl, Stephanie J; Wertenbaker, Dolphi; Wheeler, Amy; Bossart, Chase; Balasire, Oluwaseyi; Ikizler, T Alp

    2015-09-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis are much more sedentary than healthy individuals. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of a 12-week intradialysis yoga intervention versus a kidney education intervention on the promotion of physical activity. We randomized participants by dialysis shift to either 12-week intradialysis yoga or an educational intervention. Intradialysis yoga was provided by yoga teachers to participants while receiving hemodialysis. Participants receiving the 12-week educational intervention received a modification of a previously developed comprehensive educational program for patients with kidney disease (Kidney School). The primary outcome for this study was feasibility based on recruitment and adherence to the interventions and safety of intradialysis yoga. Secondary outcomes were to determine the feasibility of administering questionnaires at baseline and 12 weeks including the Kidney Disease-Related Quality of Life-36. Among 56 eligible patients who approached for the study, 31 (55%) were interested and consented to participation, with 18 assigned to intradialysis yoga and 13 to the educational program. A total of 5 participants withdrew from the pilot study, all from the intradialysis yoga group. Two of these participants reported no further interest in participation. Three withdrawn participants switched dialysis times and therefore could no longer receive intradialysis yoga. As a result, 13 of 18 (72%) and 13 of 13 (100%) participants completed 12-week intradialysis yoga and educational programs, respectively. There were no adverse events related to intradialysis yoga. Intervention participants practiced yoga for a median of 21 sessions (70% participation frequency), with 60% of participants practicing at least 2 times a week. Participants in the educational program completed a median of 30 sessions (83% participation frequency). Of participants who completed the study (n = 26

  3. Report on the feasibility study for improving electric motor service centers in Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, J.S.; Jallouk, P.A.; Staunton, R.H.

    1999-12-10

    On March 3 and 4, 1998, a visit was made to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by two officials from Ghana: Mr. I.K. Mintah, Acting Executive Director, Technical Wing, Ministry of Mines and Energy (MOME) and Dr. A.K. Ofosu-Ahenkorah, Coordinator, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program, MOME. As a result of this visit, Dr. John S. Hsu of ORNL was invited by MOME to visit the Republic of Ghana in order to study the feasibility of improving electric motor service centers in Ghana.

  4. Feasibility Studies and Design of High-Speed Railway (TGV) Projects in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ricardo; Abreu, Rui

    Portugal is starting a large program of high-speed train routes connecting the main cities in the country and these cities to central Europe throughout Spain. The country has a very wide range of lithological types and the main routes cross some important hilly zones. These facts, together with the severe geometric restrictions associated with the High-Speed Trains, attach an important role to Engineering Geology both at the Feasibility stage and at the Design stage of the projects. The paper illustrates this important role with examples of studies currently under way in Portugal.

  5. Feasibility and Safety of Intra-Dialysis Yoga and Education in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdee, Gurjeet S.; Rothman, Russell L.; Sohl, Stephanie J.; Wertenbaker, Dolphi; Wheeler, Amy; Bossart, Chase; Balasire, Oluwaseyi; Ikizler, T. Alp

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis are much more sedentary than healthy individuals. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of a 12-week intra-dialysis yoga intervention versus a kidney education intervention on the promotion of physical activity. Design and Methods We randomized participants by dialysis shift to either 12-week intra-dialysis yoga or an educational intervention. Intra-dialysis yoga was provided by yoga teachers to participants while receiving hemodialysis. Participants receiving the 12-week educational intervention received a modification of a previously developed comprehensive educational program for patients with kidney disease (“Kidney School”). The primary outcome for this study was feasibility based on recruitment and adherence to the interventions, and safety of intra-dialysis yoga. Secondary outcomes were to determine the feasibility of administering questionnaires at baseline and 12-weeks including the Kidney Disease-Related Quality of Life-36. Results Among 56 eligible patients approached for the study, 55% (n=31) were interested and consented to participation with 18 assigned to intra-dialysis yoga and 13 to the educational program. A total of 5 participants withdrew from the pilot study, all from the intra-dialysis yoga group. Two of these participants reported no further interest in participation. Three withdrawn participants switched dialysis times and therefore could no longer receive intra-dialysis yoga. As a result, 72% (13 of 18) and 100% (13 of 13) of participants completed 12-week intra-dialysis yoga and educational programs, respectively. There were no adverse events related to intra-dialysis yoga. Intervention participants practiced yoga a median of 21 sessions (70% participation frequency), with 60% of participants practicing at least 2 times a week. Participants in the educational program completed a median of 30 sessions (83% participation frequency

  6. Feasibility of graphene CRLH metamaterial waveguides and leaky wave antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Derrick A.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); NG NEXT Nanophotonics and Plasmonics Laboratory, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States); Williams, Benjamin S., E-mail: bswilliams@ucla.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI), University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    The feasibility of composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial waveguides based upon graphene plasmons is demonstrated via numerical simulation. Designs are presented that operate in the terahertz frequency range along with their various dimensions. Dispersion relations, radiative and free-carrier losses, and free-carrier based tunability are characterized. Finally, the radiative characteristics are evaluated, along with its feasibility for use as a leaky-wave antenna. While CRLH waveguides are feasible in the terahertz range, their ultimate utility will require precise nanofabrication, and excellent quality graphene to mitigate free-carrier losses.

  7. Feasibility of graphene CRLH metamaterial waveguides and leaky wave antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Derrick A.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2016-07-01

    The feasibility of composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial waveguides based upon graphene plasmons is demonstrated via numerical simulation. Designs are presented that operate in the terahertz frequency range along with their various dimensions. Dispersion relations, radiative and free-carrier losses, and free-carrier based tunability are characterized. Finally, the radiative characteristics are evaluated, along with its feasibility for use as a leaky-wave antenna. While CRLH waveguides are feasible in the terahertz range, their ultimate utility will require precise nanofabrication, and excellent quality graphene to mitigate free-carrier losses.

  8. Music imagery for adults with acute leukemia in protective environments: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Debra S; Azzouz, Faouzi; Sledge, Renata; Rutledge, Cheryl; Hincher, Katie; Monahan, Patrick O; Cripe, Larry D

    2008-05-01

    Patients receiving intensive chemotherapy can experience increased distressed related to both the cancer diagnosis and treatment isolation. If not addressed, distress can lead to anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and possible benefits of a music imagery intervention for patients hospitalized in a protective environment for the treatment of acute leukemia or high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Adults receiving intensive myelosuppressive chemotherapy in a protective environment were randomized to standard care or standard care plus music imagery. The music imagery sessions occurred twice weekly for up to eight sessions. Patients were encouraged to use the music imagery daily. The principal criteria of feasibility were rate of consent, rate of completion of scheduled sessions, and rate of questionnaire completion. Forty-nine out of 78 patients consented, a 63% consent rate. Seventy-two percent of all scheduled music imagery sessions were completed. The rate of questionnaire completion was 60% with missing data because of illness severity and early discharge. The principal outcomes of benefit (e.g., efficacy) were positive and negative affects, fatigue, and anxiety. Both groups improved over time on all outcomes (all p anxiety at discharge than individuals with low baseline negative affect who did not receive the intervention. Music imagery is feasible for adults with acute leukemia in protected environments. Patients with lower initial distress may benefit from a music imagery program in terms of reduced anxiety at discharge.

  9. A Feasibility Study to Evaluate Wind Energy Potential on the Navajo Nation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry Battiest

    2012-11-30

    The project, A Feasibility Study to Evaluate Wind Energy Potential on the Navajo Nation, is funded under a solicitation issued by the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program. Funding provided by the grant allowed the Navajo Nation to measure wind potential at two sites, one located within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation and the other off-reservation during the project period (September 5, 2005 - September 30, 2009). The recipient for the grant award is the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA). The grant allowed the Navajo Nation and NTUA manage the wind feasibility from initial site selection through the decision-making process to commit to a site for wind generation development. The grant activities help to develop human capacity at NTUA and help NTUA to engage in renewable energy generation activities, including not only wind but also solar and biomass. The final report also includes information about development activities regarding the sited included in the grant-funded feasibility study.

  10. Alcohol and substance screening and brief intervention for detainees kept in police custody. A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chariot, Patrick; Lepresle, Aude; Lefèvre, Thomas; Boraud, Cyril; Barthès, Agnès; Tedlaouti, Menouar

    2014-01-01

    Screening and brief intervention programs related to addictive disorders have proven effective in a variety of environments. Both the feasibility and outcome of brief interventions performed in police custody by forensic physicians are unknown. Our objectives were to characterize addictive behaviors in detainees and to evaluate the feasibility of a brief intervention at the time of the medical examination in police custody. This prospective study included 1000 detainees in police custody who were examined by a physician for the assessment of fitness for detention. We used a standardized questionnaire and collected data concerning individual characteristics, addictive disorders, and reported assaults or observed injuries. 944 men and 56 women (94-6%) were studied. We found an addictive disorder in 708 of 1000 cases (71%), with the use of tobacco (62%), alcohol (36%), cannabis (35%), opiates (5%), and cocaine (4%) being the most common. A brief intervention was performed in 544 of these 708 cases (77%). A total of 139 of the 708 individuals (20%) expressed a willingness to change and 14 of 708 (2%) requested some information on treatment options. The main reasons why brief interventions were not performed were aggressive behaviors, drowsiness, or fanciful statements by the detainee. Brief interventions and screening for addictive behaviors in police custody are feasible in the majority of cases. The frequent link between addictive behaviors and the suspected crimes highlights the value of such interventions, which could be incorporated into the public health mission of the physician in police custody. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Feasibility of a Secure Wireless Sensing Smartwatch Application for the Self-Management of Pediatric Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Anahita; Buonocore, Chris M; Hashemzadeh, Sepideh; Hojaiji, Hannaneh; Kalantarian, Haik; Sideris, Costas; Bui, Alex A T; King, Christine E; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2017-08-03

    To address the need for asthma self-management in pediatrics, the authors present the feasibility of a mobile health (mHealth) platform built on their prior work in an asthmatic adult and child. Real-time asthma attack risk was assessed through physiological and environmental sensors. Data were sent to a cloud via a smartwatch application (app) using Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant cryptography and combined with online source data. A risk level (high, medium or low) was determined using a random forest classifier and then sent to the app to be visualized as animated dragon graphics for easy interpretation by children. The feasibility of the system was first tested on an adult with moderate asthma, then usability was examined on a child with mild asthma over several weeks. It was found during feasibility testing that the system is able to assess asthma risk with 80.10 ± 14.13% accuracy. During usability testing, it was able to continuously collect sensor data, and the child was able to wear, easily understand and enjoy the use of the system. If tested in more individuals, this system may lead to an effective self-management program that can reduce hospitalization in those who suffer from asthma.

  12. Demonstration of the economic feasibility of plant tissue culture for jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) and Euphorbia spp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sluis, C.

    1980-09-01

    The economic feasibility of plant tissue culture was demonstrated as applied to two plants: jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) and Euphorbia spp. The gopher weed (Euphorbia lathyris) was selected as the species of Euphorbia to research due to the interest in this plant as a potential source of hydrocarbon-like compounds. High yield female selections of jojoba were chosen from native stands and were researched to determine the economic feasibility of mass producing these plants via a tissue culture micropropagation program. The female jojoba selection was successfully mass produced through tissue culture. Modifications in initiation techniques, as well as in multiplication media and rooting parameters, were necessary to apply the tissue culture system, which had been developed for juvenile seedling tissue, to mature jojobas. Since prior attempts at transfer of tissue cultured plantlets were unsuccessful, transfer research was a major part of the project and has resulted in a system for transfer of rooted jojoba plantlets to soil. Euphorbia lathyris was successfully cultured using shoot tip cultures. Media and procedures were established for culture initiation, multiplication of shoots, callus induction and growth, and root initiation. Well-developed root systems were not attained and root initiation percentages should be increased if the system is to become commercially feasible.

  13. Feasibility and Acceptability of Delivering a Postpartum Weight Loss Intervention via Facebook: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Molly E; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Oleski, Jessica; Xiao, Rui S; Mulcahy, Julie A; May, Christine N; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a Facebook-delivered postpartum weight loss intervention. Overweight and obese postpartum women received a 12-week weight loss intervention via Facebook. Feasibility outcomes were recruitment, retention, engagement, and acceptability. Weight loss was an exploratory outcome. Participants (n = 19) were 3.5 (SD 2.2) months postpartum with a baseline body mass index of 30.1 (SD 4.2) kg/m 2 . Retention was 95%. Forty-two percent of participants visibly engaged on the last day of the intervention, and 100% in the last 4 weeks; 88% were likely or very likely to participate again and 82% were likely or very likely to recommend the program to a postpartum friend. Average 12-week weight loss was 4.8% (SD 4.2%); 58% lost ≥5%. Findings suggested that this Facebook-delivered intervention is feasible and acceptable and supports research to test efficacy for weight loss. Research is needed to determine how best to engage participants in social network-delivered weight loss interventions. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Conductive Education as a Method of Stroke Rehabilitation: A Single Blinded Randomised Controlled Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Bek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conductive Education for stroke survivors has shown promise but randomised evidence is unavailable. This study assessed the feasibility of a definitive randomised controlled trial to evaluate efficacy. Methods. Adult stroke survivors were recruited through local community notices. Those completing the baseline assessment were randomised using an online program and group allocation was independent. Intervention group participants received 10 weekly 1.5-hour sessions of Conductive Education at the National Institute of Conductive Education in Birmingham, UK. The control group participants attended two group meetings. The study evaluated the feasibility of recruitment procedures, delivery of the intervention, retention of participants, and appropriateness of outcome measures and data collection methods. Independent assessments included the Barthel Index, the Stroke Impact Scale, the Timed Up and Go test, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results. Eighty-two patients were enrolled; 77 completed the baseline assessment (46 men, mean age 62.1 yrs. and were randomised. 70 commenced the intervention (n=37 or an equivalent waiting period (n=33. 32/37 completed the 10-week training and 32/33 the waiting period. There were no missing items from completed questionnaires and no adverse events. Discussion. Recruitment, intervention, and assessment methods worked well. Transport issues for intervention and assessment appointments require review. Conclusion. A definitive trial is feasible. This trial is registered with ISRCTN84064492.

  15. Program specialization

    CERN Document Server

    Marlet, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the principles and techniques of program specialization - a general method to make programs faster (and possibly smaller) when some inputs can be known in advance. As an illustration, it describes the architecture of Tempo, an offline program specializer for C that can also specialize code at runtime, and provides figures for concrete applications in various domains. Technical details address issues related to program analysis precision, value reification, incomplete program specialization, strategies to exploit specialized program, incremental specialization, and data speci

  16. Feasibility of Using Plastic Pipe for Ethanol Low Stress Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    This USDOT PHMSA sponsored research project addressed and successfully determined the initial feasibility of using new materials, both polymeric and composites, as low-cost alternatives to specially designed metallic gathering pipelines. The project ...

  17. Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and CA

    2014-10-01

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding to complete the Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study project. The main goal of the project was to complete an alternative energy feasibility study. This study was completed to evaluate “the potential for development of a variety of renewable energy projects and to conduct an alternative energy feasibility study that determines which alternative energy resources have the greatest economic opportunity for the Tribe, while respecting cultural and environmental values” (Baker-Tilly, 2014). The study concluded that distributed generation solar projects are the best option for renewable energy development and asset ownership for the Washoe Tribe. Concentrating solar projects, utility scale wind projects, geothermal, and biomass resource projects were also evaluated during the study and it was determined that these alternatives would not be feasible at this time.

  18. Feasibility of Creating a Comprehensive Real Property Database for Colombia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Demarest, Geoffrey B

    2002-01-01

    The Defense Intelligence Agency asked the Foreign Military Studies Office (FMSO) to determine the feasibility of producing a digital database of Colombian real property, and to express the usefulness of such a database...

  19. A feasibility study of bridge deck deicing using geothermal energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of a ground-coupled system that utilizes heat energy harvested from the ground for : deicing of bridge decks. Heat exchange is performed using circulation loops integrated into the deep foundations suppo...

  20. Feasibility Study for Battle Mountain Renewable Energy Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Donna

    2014-09-30

    The Feasibility Study for the Battle Mountain Renewable Energy Park project (“Feasibility Study”) will assess the feasibility, benefits and impacts of a 5 Mega Watt (MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) generating system (the “Solar Project” or “Energy Park”) on the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians of Nevada Battle Mountain Colony in Battle Mountain, Nevada (NV). The Energy Park will provide power for export to utility off-takers and job training and employment for Tribal members and revenue for the Tribe. This Feasibility Study will be a collaborative effort between the Tribal government, consultants, Tribal members and stakeholders and will allow the Tribe to make informed decisions regarding the Solar Project.

  1. Canton hydroelectric project: feasibility study. Final report, appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-01

    These appendices contain legal, environmental, regulatory, technical and economic information used in evaluating the feasibility of redeveloping the hydroelectric power generating facilities at the Upper and Lower Dams of the Farmington River at Collinsville, CT. (LCL)

  2. Final Report: Feasibility Study of Biomass in Snohomish County, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daryl Williams (Tulalip Tribes); Ray Clark (Clark Group)

    2005-01-31

    This report and its attachments summarizes the results of a unique tribal-farmer cooperative study to evaluate the feasibility of building one or more regional anaerobic digestion systems in Snohomish County, Washington.

  3. Is community-based electrocardiography education feasible in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... phase TB CBL, although several factors determine its feasibility. Availability of human and other resources and curriculum time significantly impact CB ECG learning. Solutions necessitate additional locationspecific research. Keywords: Electrocardiography, ECG, Training, Education, Medical curriculum, Undergraduate ...

  4. Wind Resource and Feasibility Assessment Report for the Lummi Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DNV Renewables (USA) Inc.; J.C. Brennan & Associates, Inc.; Hamer Environmental L.P.

    2012-08-31

    This report summarizes the wind resource on the Lummi Indian Reservation (Washington State) and presents the methodology, assumptions, and final results of the wind energy development feasibility assessment, which included an assessment of biological impacts and noise impacts.

  5. The feasibility of implementing a communication skills training course in pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Lauren; Figueiredo, Lisa; Roth, Michael; Levy, Adam

    Communication skills are a competency highlighted by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education; yet, little is known about the frequency with which trainees receive formal training or what programs are willing to invest. We sought to answer this question and designed a program to address identified barriers. We surveyed pediatric fellowship program directors from all disciplines and, separately, pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship program directors to determine current use of formal communication skills training. At our institution, we piloted a standardized patient (SP)-based communication skills training program for pediatric hematology/oncology fellows. Twenty-seven pediatric hematology/oncology program directors and 44 pediatric program directors participated in the survey, of which 56% and 48%, respectively, reported having an established, formal communication skills training course. Multiple barriers to implementation of a communication skills course were identified, most notably time and cost. In the pilot program, 13 pediatric hematology/oncology fellows have participated, and 9 have completed all 3 years of training. Precourse assessment demonstrated fellows had limited comfort in various areas of communication. Following course completion, there was a significant increase in self-reported comfort and/or skill level in such areas of communication, including discussing a new diagnosis (p =.0004), telling a patient they are going to die (p =.005), discussing recurrent disease (p communicating a poor prognosis (p =.002), or responding to anger (p ≤.001). We have designed a concise communication skills training program, which addresses identified barriers and can feasibly be implemented in pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship.

  6. How much will older adults exercise? A feasibility study of aerobic training combined with resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falck, Ryan S; Davis, Jennifer C; Milosevic, Elizabeth; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Both aerobic training (AT) and resistance training (RT) have multidimensional health benefits for older adults including increased life expectancy and decreased risk of chronic diseases. However, the volume (i.e., frequency*time) of AT combined with RT in which untrained older adults can feasibly and safely participate remains unclear. Thus, our primary objective was to investigate the feasibility and safety of a high-volume exercise program consisting of twice weekly AT combined with twice weekly RT (i.e., four times weekly exercise) on a group of untrained older adults. In addition, we investigated the effects of the program on physical function, aerobic capacity, muscular strength, and explored factors related to participant adherence. We recruited eight inactive older adults (65+ years) to participate in a 6-week, single-group pre-post exercise intervention, consisting of 2 days/week of AT plus 2 days/week of progressive RT for 6 weeks. We recorded program attendance and monitored for adverse events during the course of the program. Participants were tested at both baseline and follow-up on the following: (1) physical function (i.e., timed-up-and-go test (TUG) and short physical performance battery (SPPB)), (2) aerobic capacity (VO2max) using the modified Bruce protocol; and (3) muscular strength on the leg press and lat pull-down. Post intervention, we performed qualitative semi-structured interviews of all participants regarding their experiences in the exercise program. We used these responses to examine themes that may affect continued program adherence to a high-volume exercise program. We recorded an average attendance rate of 83.3% with the lowest attendance for one session being five out of eight participants; no significant adverse events occurred. Significant improvements were observed for SPPB score (1.6; 95% CI: [0.3, 2.9]), VO2max (8.8 ml/kg/min; 95% CI: [2.8, 14.8]), and lat pull-down strength (11.8 lbs; 95% CI: [3.3, 20.2]). Qualitative

  7. The feasibility of immediately loading dental implants in edentulous jaws

    OpenAIRE

    Henningsen, Anders; Smeets, Ralf; Wahidi, Aria; Kluwe, Lan; Kornmann, Frank; Heiland, Max; Gerlach, Till

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Immediate loading of dental implants has been proved to be feasible in partially edentulous jaws. The purpose of this retrospective investigation was to assess the feasibility of immediately loading dental implants in fully edentulous jaws. Methods A total of 24 patients aged between 53 and 89 years received a total of 154 implants in their edentulous maxillae or mandibles. Among the implants, 45 were set in fresh extracted sockets and 109 in consolidated alveolar bones. The implants ...

  8. Ute Mountain Ute Tribe Community-Scale Solar Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Jim [Parametrix; Knight, Tawnie [Ute Mountain Ute Tribe

    2014-01-30

    Parametrix Inc. conducted a feasibility study for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe to determine whether or not a community-scale solar farm would be feasible for the community. The important part of the study was to find where the best fit for the solar farm could be. In the end, a 3MW community-scale solar farm was found best fit with the location of two hayfield sites.

  9. The efficacy and feasibility of aquatic physiotherapy for people with Parkinson's disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrens, Aan Fleur; Soh, Sze-Ee; Morgan, Prue Elizabeth

    2017-08-09

    To critically evaluate the literature regarding the efficacy and feasibility of aquatic physiotherapy in people with Parkinson's disease. Relevant studies were identified through searches in nine health-related databases. Two independent reviewers assessed study quality using either the PEDro scale or a customised tool for safety and feasibility. Database searches yielded 88 articles, of which 10 met the inclusion criteria. Studies varied greatly in methodology, quality, interventions and outcome measures. Study quality was generally low in items reporting on safety precautions, adverse events, attrition, and adherence. Results suggest that aquatic physiotherapy may have a positive effect on motor symptoms, quality of life and balance. Aquatic physiotherapy may improve aspects of motor performance, quality of life and balance in people with Parkinson's disease, however, it remains unclear whether it is a safe and feasible treatment modality. The development of standardised outcome measures for people with Parkinson's disease (unified Parkinson's disease rating scale and Parkinson's disease questionnaire-39) would aid study comparability and validate study outcomes. As safety criteria was grossly underreported, guidelines for mandatory reporting of safety criteria are essential to make conclusions regarding the feasibility of aquatic physiotherapy for people with Parkinson's disease. Implications for Rehabilitation Aquatic physiotherapy may be a beneficial treatment modality for people with Parkinson's disease. A minimum data set that includes the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale and Parkinson's disease questionnaire 39 is required to aid future meta-analysis and to allow more definitive conclusions to be made regarding aquatic physiotherapy for people with Parkinson's disease. People with Parkinson's disease are a vulnerable population, where safety within an aquatic physiotherapy program needs to be well documented and addressed.

  10. Computing with words to feasibility study of software projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieta Peña Abreu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper proposes a method to analyze the technical, commercial and social feasibility of software projects in environments of uncertainty. It allows working with multiple experts and multiple criteria and facilitates decision-making. Method: The proposal contains two phases, first the necessary information is collected and in second place projects are evaluated using 2-tuple linguistic representation model. The experts are selected by analyzing their curricular synthesis. The evaluation criteria are defined using the technique Focus Group and weighted in the interval (0,1 according to their importance. three domains are offered to express the preferences: numeric, interval-valued and linguistic. For aggregation extended arithmetic mean and weighted average extended are used, preventing the loss of information. A 2-tuple (feasibility, precision is obtained as a result for each project. Results: The evaluation of P1 project was a very high feasibility with -0,33 of precision. The P2 project obtained a high feasibility with 0,38 of precision and P3 project achieved a medium feasibility with -0,21 of precision. Conclusions: This method is favorable for software projects feasibility analysis with presence of multiple experts and criteria, in environments of uncertainty. It tries heterogeneous assessments without loss of information. Their results are consistent and useful for decision makers.

  11. e-Therapy to reduce emotional distress in women undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART): a feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Angelique J C M; Nelen, Willianne L D M; IntHout, Joanna; Kremer, Jan A M; Verhaak, Christianne M

    2016-05-01

    Is it feasible to evaluate a personalized e-therapy program (Internet based) for women during fertility treatment aimed to reduce the chance of having clinically relevant symptoms of anxiety and/or depression after unsuccessful assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment within a randomized controlled trial (RCT)? The evaluation of a personalized e-therapy program is feasible, reflected by good acceptability and integration within current guidelines, but adjustments to the e-therapy program and study design of the RCT have to be made to enhance demand, practicality and efficacy. Internet-based interventions are promising in reducing psychological distress, especially when treatment is personalized to specific risk profiles of patients. However in fertility care, the beneficial effects of personalized e-therapy on psychological distress and its implementation in daily clinical care still have to be evaluated. To evaluate the feasibility of a personalized e-therapy program, we conducted a two-arm, parallel group, single-blind feasibility randomized controlled trial with a 1:1 allocation. Feasibility was assessed in terms of demand, acceptability, practicality, implementation, integration and limited efficacy. Women were included between 1 February 2011 and 1 June 2013. Women in the control group received care as usual, whereas women in the intervention group received in addition to their usual care access to a personalized e-therapy program. Women were monitored until 3 months after the start of their first ART cycle. In a university hospital in the Netherlands women who were screened as at risk for emotional adjustment problems and intended to start their first ART cycle were invited, and of them 120 were randomized. Of these women, 48% in the intervention group were compliant to the intervention. Outcome measures associated with the feasibility to analyse this e-therapy program within an RCT were assessed. It is feasible to evaluate a personalized e

  12. Feasibility of providing interventions for injection drug users in pharmacy settings: a case study among San Francisco pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Valerie J; Lutnick, Alexandra; Kral, Alex H

    2014-01-01

    In addition to syringe exchange programs, pharmacies are important venues where injection drug users (IDUs) can access non-prescription syringes and other prevention interventions. This study assessed the feasibility of providing a range of interventions for IDUs in pharmacy settings. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 23 participants (policy makers, owner/managers, dispensing pharmacists, and pharmacy staff) from independent and chain/retail pharmacies in San Francisco, California, USA. The highest level of support was for a coupon syringe program and educational materials. Several overarching themes illustrate challenges to implementing pharmacy-based preventive interventions: time, space, sufficient staff, pharmacist training, legal considerations, pharmacist attitudes toward IDUs, and cost and reimbursement issues. This study provides concrete examples of the types of preventive services that pharmacists support and consider feasible, and illustrates that pharmacists welcome the opportunity to broaden their role as critical partners in public health matters related to injection drug use.

  13. Understanding Physical Activity Motivation and Behaviour Through Self-Determination and Servant Leadership Theories in a Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Samantha M; Wharf Higgins, Joan; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2017-09-27

    Despite its well-established benefits, physical activity (PA) engagement is low in the adult population; evidence suggests that this is especially a concern for women > 60 years. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the feasibility of a six-week randomized control trial of Self-Determination Theory-based dance and walking programs for older women. Primary outcomes were feasibility measures: recruitment, retention, and satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included self-reported PA, behavioural regulations, and psychological needs. Thirty-five women completed the study (M = 62.8 ± 4.8 years), representing 39% recruitment and 95% retention rate. Both programs were highly attended. Exploratory effect sizes for secondary measures were promising. Emergent themes highlighted the importance of servant leadership concepts in the group setting for motivating PA. Our findings provide support for expanding this trial to a full-scale study.

  14. PSP Program close out documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andringa, K.; Hootman, H.E.; Ferrara, A.S.; Smith, P.K.; Congdon, J.W.; Randolph, H.W.; Young, R.H.; Driggers, F.E.; Topp, S.V.

    1985-12-31

    In December 1982 DOE-SR directed SRL to study the feasibility and impact of a program to lower the U-236 content of the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) stockpile used as fuel for the SRP reactors. In response to this request SRL assessed four technologies, Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS), Molecular Laser Isotope Separation (MLIS), Gas Centrifuge, and the Plasma Separation Process (PSP) for this purpose with the assistance of the Engineering Department. In April 1983 cost/benefit analyses for these processes, high spot cost estimates for production facilities, and process uncertainties were submitted to DOE-SR with a recommendation to proceed with the conceptual design and supporting development programs for a facility based on the use of the PSP process. The current program status for the PSP development program at SRL and the design and documentation of a production facility at SRP, referred to as the Fuel Improvement Demonstration Facility (FIDF), is described in this report.

  15. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  16. Assessing the Productivity of Human Service Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rex S.

    2003-01-01

    Applied an alternative strategy for assessing the extent of change clients undergo as a result of receiving human services. Used the approach in a survey of parents of 61 young children in an art program. Findings show the feasibility of the service productivity approach. Psychometric properties of the approach were promising. (SLD)

  17. Crime Laboratory Proficiency Testing Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Joseph L.; And Others

    A three-year research effort was conducted to design a crime laboratory proficiency testing program encompassing the United States. The objectives were to: (1) determine the feasibility of preparation and distribution of different classes of physical evidence; (2) assess the accuracy of criminalistics laboratories in the processing of selected…

  18. Stroke experiences in weblogs: a feasibility study of sex differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Sukjin; Gordon, Andrew S; Wienberg, Christopher; Sood, Sara O; Morley, Stephanie; Burke, Deborah M

    2014-03-19

    Research on cerebral stroke symptoms using hospital records has reported that women experience more nontraditional symptoms of stroke (eg, mental status change, pain) than men do. This is an important issue because nontraditional symptoms may delay the decision to get medical assistance and increase the difficulty of correct diagnosis. In the present study, we investigate sex differences in the stroke experience as described in stories on weblogs. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the Internet as a source of data for basic research on stroke experiences. Stroke experiences described in blogs were identified by using StoryUpgrade, a program that searches blog posts using a fictional prototype story. In this study, the prototype story was a description of a stroke experience. Retrieved stories coded by the researchers as relevant were used to update the search query and retrieve more stories using relevance feedback. Stories were coded for first- or third-person narrator, traditional and nontraditional patient symptoms, type of stroke, patient sex and age, delay before seeking medical assistance, and delay at hospital and in treatment. There were 191 relevant stroke stories of which 174 stories reported symptoms (52.3% female and 47.7% male patients). There were no sex differences for each traditional or nontraditional stroke symptom by chi-square analysis (all Ps>.05). Type of narrator, however, affected report of traditional and nontraditional symptoms. Female first-person narrators (ie, the patient) were more likely to report mental status change (56.3%, 27/48) than male first-person narrators (36.4%, 16/44), a marginally significant effect by logistic regression (P=.056), whereas reports of third-person narrators did not differ for women (27.9%, 12/43) and men (28.2%, 11/39) patients. There were more reports of at least 1 nontraditional symptom in the 92 first-person reports (44.6%, 41/92) than in the 82 third-person reports (25

  19. A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Group Intervention for Hypersexual Disorder: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Jonas; Kaldo, Viktor; Arver, Stefan; Dhejne, Cecilia; Öberg, Katarina Görts

    2017-07-01

    The proposed criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition for hypersexual disorder (HD) included symptoms reported by patients seeking help for excessive and out-of-control non-paraphilic sexual behavior, including sexual behaviors in response to dysphoric mood states, impulsivity, and risk taking. Although no prior studies of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of HD have been performed, CBT has been found effective for dysphoric mood states and impulsivity. To investigate the feasibility of a CBT manual developed for HD explored through symptom decrease, treatment attendance, and clients' treatment satisfaction. Ten men with a diagnosis of HD took part in the CBT group program. Measurements were taken before, during, and at the end of treatment and 3 and 6 months after treatment. The primary outcome was the Hypersexual Disorder: Current Assessment Scale (HD:CAS) score that measured the severity of problematic hypersexual symptoms and secondary outcomes were the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory (HDSI) score, the proportion of attended sessions, and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8) score. Main results were significant decreases of HD symptoms from before to after treatment on HD:CAS and HDSI scores and a decrease in the number of problematic sexual behaviors during the course of therapy. A high attendance rate of 93% and a high treatment satisfaction score on CSQ-8 also were found. The CBT program seemed to ameliorate the symptoms of HD and therefore might be a feasible treatment option. This study provides data from a CBT program for the treatment of the specific proposed criteria of HD. Because of the small sample and lack of a control group, the results can be considered only preliminary. Although participants reported decreased HD symptoms after attending the CBT program, future studies should evaluate the treatment program with a larger sample and a randomized controlled procedure

  20. Feasibility of neuromuscular training in patients with severe hip or knee OA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Link, Anne; Roos, Ewa M

    2010-01-01

    with knee injuries, to older patients with severe hip or knee OA. We hypothesized that the training program was feasible, determined as: 1) at most acceptable self-reported pain following training; 2) decreased or unchanged pain during the training period; 3) few joint specific adverse events related...... were: not attending or ceasing training because of increased pain/problems in the index joint related to training, and self-reported pain > 5 after training. The level of difficulty of training was registered. RESULTS: Patients with severe OA of the hip or knee reported safe pain (median 2 cm) after...... to training, and 4) achieved progression of training level during the training period. METHODS: Seventy-six patients, between 60 and 77 years, with severe hip (n = 38, 55% women) or knee OA (n = 38, 61% women) underwent an individualized, goal-based neuromuscular training program (NEMEX-TJR) in groups...