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Sample records for program department american

  1. INFORMATION: Special Report on "Selected Department of Energy Program Efforts to Implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-12-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was enacted on February 17, 2009, to jumpstart the economy by creating or saving millions of jobs, spurring technological advances in health and science, and investing in the Nation's energy future. The Department of Energy received over $32.7 billion in Recovery Act funding for various science, energy, and environmental programs and initiatives. As of November 2009, the Department had obligated $18.3 billion of the Recovery Act funding, but only $1.4 billion had been spent. The Department's Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Fossil Energy, Environmental Management, Science, and Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability received the majority of funding allocated to the Department, about $32.3 billion. Obligating these funds by the end of Fiscal Year 2010, as required by the Recovery Act, and overseeing their effective use in succeeding years, represents a massive workload increase for the Department's programs. The effort to date has strained existing resources. As has been widely acknowledged, any effort to disburse massive additional funding and to expeditiously initiate and complete projects increases the risk of fraud, waste and abuse. It is, therefore, important for the Department's program offices to assess and mitigate these risks to the maximum extent practicable. In this light, we initiated this review as an initial step in the Office of Inspector General's charge to determine whether the Department's major program offices had developed an effective approach for identifying and mitigating risks related to achieving the goals and objectives of the Recovery Act. The Department's program offices included in our review identified risks and planned mitigation strategies that, if successfully implemented and executed, should help achieve the goals and objectives of the Recovery Act. While each office identified risks unique to its respective

  2. Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -- Florida State Energy Program"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) provides grants to states, territories, and the District of Columbia to support their energy priorities through the State Energy Program (SEP). The SEP provides Federal financial assistance to carry out energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that meet each state's unique energy needs while also addressing national goals such as energy security. Federal funding is based on a grant formula that takes into account population and energy consumption. The SEP emphasizes the state's role as the decision maker and administrator for the program. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) expanded the SEP, authorizing $3.1 billion in grants. Based on existing grant formulas and after reviewing state-level plans, EERE made awards to states. The State of Florida's Energy Office (Florida) was allocated $126 million - a 90-fold increase over Florida's average annual SEP grant of $1.4 million. Per the Recovery Act, this funding must be obligated by September 30, 2010, and spent by April 30, 2012. As of March 10, 2010, Florida had expended $13.2 million of the SEP Recovery Act funds. Florida planned to use its grant funds to undertake activities that would preserve and create jobs; save energy; increase renewable energy sources; and, reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To accomplish Recovery Act objectives, states could either fund new or expand existing projects. As a condition of the awards, EERE required states to develop and implement sound internal controls over the use of Recovery Act funds. Based on the significant increase in funding from the Recovery Act, we initiated this review to determine whether Florida had internal controls in place to provide assurance that the goals of the SEP and Recovery Act will be met and accomplished efficiently and effectively. We identified weaknesses in the implementation of SEP Recovery Act projects that

  3. The ABCs of diabetes: diabetes self-management education program for African Americans affects A1C, lipid-lowering agent prescriptions, and emergency department visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Michelle; Bowling, Andrea; Copeland, James; Fokar, Ali; Pasquale, Patricia; Youssef, Gretchen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the feasibility and impact of a concise community-based program on diabetes self-management education (DSME), according to frequency of emergency department visits and knowledge of, prescriptions for, and control of A1C, blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. A free community-based DSME program was placed in a public library. Adults with diabetes (N, 360) consented to participate in this prospective nonrandomized cohort study with preintervention-postintervention design. The small-group interactive DSME (two 2.5-hour classes) focused on improving cardiovascular disease risk factors and facilitating communication with the primary care physician. An increase in knowledge of American Diabetes Association-recommended targets for A1C, blood pressure, and LDL cholesterol from baseline to postintervention was seen among participants. Significant clinical outcomes included reduction in self-reported emergency department visits and reduction in mean A1C. However, despite an increase in prescriptions written for lipid-lowering drugs, blood pressure and LDL cholesterol did not change. Participants who started on insulin were more likely to achieve or maintain A1C organizations such as public libraries offers an accessible and well-received location for offering DSME programs.

  4. Geomorphology in North American Geology Departments, 1971

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sidney E.; Malcolm, Marshall D.

    1972-01-01

    Presents results of a 1970-71 survey of 350 geomorphologists and geology departments to determine what sort of geomorphology is being taught in the colleges and universities of the United States and Canada. (PR)

  5. External quality control program: Experience in the department of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To share experiences and lessons learned from 2002 National External Quality Assessment Schemes for Leukocyte Immunophenotyping (UK NEQAS) and College of American Pathologists (CAP) proficiency testing (PT) panels received and tested as part of External Quality Control Program Setting: Department ...

  6. Timetabling an Academic Department with Linear Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezeau, Lawrence M.

    This paper describes an approach to faculty timetabling and course scheduling that uses computerized linear programming. After reviewing the literature on linear programming, the paper discusses the process whereby a timetable was created for a department at the University of New Brunswick. Faculty were surveyed with respect to course offerings…

  7. An Onboarding Program for the CT Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Brandi

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare organizations compete for employees in the same way television networks compete for new talent. Organizations also compete over experience, knowledge, and skills new employees bring with them. Organizations that can acclimate a new employee into the social and performance aspects of a new job the quickest create a substantial competitive advantage. Onboarding is the term used for orientation or organizational socialization where new employees acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, and behaviors to fit in with a new company. Computed tomography (CT) department specific onboarding programs increase the comfort level of new employees by informing them of the supervisor's and the department's expectations. Although this article discusses CT, specifically, an onboarding program could apply to all of imaging. With the high costs that employee turnover incurs, all departments should have an orientation program that helps retain employees as well as prepare new employees for employment. Current personnel are valuable resources for offering appropriate information for successful employment in specific departments. A structured, department specific onboarding program with the full participation and support of current staff will enhance staff retention.

  8. Developing Strong Geoscience Programs and Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, R.; Manduca, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    Strong geoscience programs are essential for preparing future geoscientists and developing a broad public understanding of our science. Faculty working as a department team can create stronger programs than individual faculty working alone. Workshops sponsored by Project Kaleidoscope (www.pkal.org) on departmental planning in the geosciences have emphasized the importance of designing programs in the context of both departmental and student goals. Well-articulated goals form a foundation for designing curriculum, courses, and other departmental activities. Course/skill matrices have emerged as particularly valuable tools for analyzing how individual courses combine in a curriculum to meet learning goals. Integrated programs where students have opportunities to learn and use skills in multiple contexts have been developed at several institutions. Departments are leveraging synergies between courses to more effectively reach departmental goals and capitalize on opportunities in the larger campus environment. A full departmental program extends beyond courses and curriculum. Studies in physics (National Task Force on Undergraduate Physics, Hilborne, 2002) indicate the importance of activities such as recruiting able students, mentoring students, providing courses appropriate for pre-service K-12 teachers, assisting with professional development for a diversity of careers, providing opportunities for undergraduates to participate in research, and making connections with the local industries and businesses that employ graduates. PKAL workshop participants have articulated a wide variety of approaches to undergraduate research opportunities within and outside of class based on their departmental goals, faculty goals, and resources. Similarly, departments have a wide variety of strategies for developing productive synergies with campus-wide programs including those emphasizing writing skills, quantitative skills, and environmental studies. Mentoring and advising

  9. Bringing American Popular Culture to the English Departments in Indonesia*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi N.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One outcome of the globalization process is the growing influence and dominance of American popular culture. The speed with which American music, films, and goods have flooded the markets worldwide is remarkably high, thanks to the advancement of telecommunication technologies and the Internet. Increased cultural transfer or, more precisely, internationalization of American culture has posed both fear and fascination to other cultures. How do people in the academia respond to this conundrum of cross-cultural contacts? What do we teach when we teach popular culture? What viable research in American popular culture is encouraged so as to result in impartially beneficial impacts for society at large? This paper is to argue that one can become an avid learner or critic of a certain culture when s/he finds meaningful connections between that culture and life itself. The teaching of American popular culture in the English Department, for instance, has to be locally contextualized, learner-participant oriented, and socially self-actualized. In this way, American Studies outside the U. S. may in turn become less centralized as the interchange of cross-cultural understanding takes place concurrently.

  10. DOE (Department of Energy) Epidemiologic Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Epidemiologic Research Program is to determine the human health effects resulting from the generation and use of energy, and of the operation of DOE facilities. The program is divided into seven general areas of activity; the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) which supports studies of survivors of the atomic weapons in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, mortality and morbidity studies of DOE workers, studies on internally deposited alpha emitters, medical/histologic studies, studies on the aspects of radiation damage, community health surveillance studies, and the development of computational techniques and of databases to make the results as widely useful as possible. Excluding the extensive literature from the RERF, the program has produced 340 publications in scientific journals, contributing significantly to improving the understanding of the health effects of ionizing radiation exposure. In addition, a large number of public presentations were made and are documented elsewhere in published proceedings or in books. The purpose of this bibliography is to present a guide to the research results obtained by scientists supported by the program. The bibliography, which includes doctoral theses, is classified by laboratory and by year and also summarizes the results from individual authors by journal.

  11. Latin American and Caribbean Environmental Economics Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Latin American and Caribbean Environmental Economics Program Phase III. A grant to improve a new generation of Latin American leaders' understanding of how to better manage natural resources will contribute to the region's economic and social development. Earlier IDRC grants helped the Latin American and ...

  12. 48 CFR 606.370 - Department of State standardization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... standardization program. 606.370 Section 606.370 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE... Department of State standardization program. (a) It is the Department's policy to promote full and open... standardization when only specified makes and models of equipment will satisfy the Department's needs and only one...

  13. 76 FR 5729 - Department of Defense Personnel Security Program (PSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 156 Department of Defense Personnel Security Program (PSP) AGENCY... for the Department of Defense (DoD) Personnel Security Program (PSP) in accordance with the provisions... Department of Defense Directive (DoDD) 5200.2, Personnel Security Program (PSP), codified at 32 CFR 156, was...

  14. Emergency Department utilization among Deaf American Sign Language users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael M; Winters, Paul C; Sen, Ananda; Zazove, Philip; Fiscella, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users comprise a linguistic minority population with poor health care access due to communication barriers and low health literacy. Potentially, these health care barriers could increase Emergency Department (ED) use. To compare ED use between deaf and non-deaf patients. A retrospective cohort from medical records. The sample was derived from 400 randomly selected charts (200 deaf ASL users and 200 hearing English speakers) from an outpatient primary care health center with a high volume of deaf patients. Abstracted data included patient demographics, insurance, health behavior, and ED use in the past 36 months. Deaf patients were more likely to be never smokers and be insured through Medicaid. In an adjusted analysis, deaf individuals were significantly more likely to use the ED (odds ratio [OR], 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-3.51) over the prior 36 months. Deaf American Sign Language users appear to be at greater odds for elevated ED utilization when compared to the general hearing population. Efforts to further understand the drivers for increased ED utilization among deaf ASL users are much needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Department of Energy: Photovoltaics program - FY 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The National Photovoltaic Program supports efforts to make PV an important part of the US economy through three main program elements: Research and Development, Technology Development, and Systems Engineering and Applications. (1) Research and Development activities generate new ideas, test the latest scientific theories, and push the limits of PV efficiencies in laboratory and prototype materials and devices. (2) Technology Development activities apply laboratory innovations to products to improve PV technology and the manufacturing techniques used to produce PV systems for the market. (3) Systems Engineering and Applications activities help improve PV systems and validate these improvements through tests, measurements, and deployment of prototypes. In addition, applications research validates, sales, maintenance, and financing mechanisms worldwide. (4) Environmental, Health, Safety and Resource Characterization activities help to define environmental, health and safety issues for those facilities engaged in the manufacture of PV products and organizations engaged in PV research and development. All PV Program activities are planned and executed in close collaboration and partnership with the U.S. PV industry. The overall PV Program is planned to be a balanced effort of research, manufacturing development, and market development. Critical to the success of this strategy is the National Photovoltaic Program`s effort to reduce the cost of electricity generated by photovoltaic. The program is doing this in three primary ways: by making devices more efficient, by making PV systems less expensive, and by validating the technology through measurements, tests, and prototypes.

  16. 76 FR 35221 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and..., concerning competitive cooperative agreement applications to establish Tribal Epidemiology Centers serving...

  17. Native American Training Program in Petroleum Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Winifred M.; Kokesh, Judith H.

    1999-04-27

    This report outlines a comprehensive training program for members of Native American tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The program has two components: short courses and internships. Programs are proposed for: (1) adult tribes representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings, setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry; (2) graduate and undergraduate college students who are tribal members and are studying in the appropriate fields; and (3) high school and middle school teachers, science teachers. Materials and program models already have been developed for some components of the projects. The plan is a coordinated, comprehensive effort to use existing resources to accomplish its goals. Partnerships will be established with the tribes, the BIA, tribal organizations, other government agencies, and the private sector to implement the program.

  18. Regional orientation program for the department of clinical neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Frankie W H

    2006-01-01

    A regional orientation program increases the efficient and effective use of resources such as classroom, equipment, and educator time. It provides consistent information to all new nurses and maintains standards of nursing practice throughout the Department of Clinical Neurosciences.

  19. Fission energy program of the U. S. Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    The document describes programs managed by the Program Director for Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy, and under the cognizance of the Committee on Science and Technology, United States House of Representatives. The major portion of the document is concerned with civilian nuclear power development, the policy for which has been established by the National Energy Plan of April 1977, but it also includes descriptions of the space applications and naval reactor programs.

  20. Department of Energy: Nuclear S&T workforce development programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Michelle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bala, Marsha [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Beierschmitt, Kelly [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Steele, Carolyn [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sattelberger, Alfred P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bruozas, Meridith A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories use their expertise in nuclear science and technology (S&T) to support a robust national nuclear S&T enterprise from the ground up. Traditional academic programs do not provide all the elements necessary to develop this expertise, so the DOE has initiated a number of supplemental programs to develop and support the nuclear S&T workforce pipeline. This document catalogs existing workforce development programs that are supported by a number of DOE offices (such as the Offices of Nuclear Energy, Science, Energy Efficiency, and Environmental Management), and by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Naval Reactor Program. Workforce development programs in nuclear S&T administered through the Department of Homeland Security, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Department of Defense are also included. The information about these programs, which is cataloged below, is drawn from the program websites. Some programs, such as the Minority Serving Institutes Partnership Programs (MSIPPs) are available through more than one DOE office, so they appear in more than one section of this document.

  1. 78 FR 15008 - Applications for New Awards; Native American Career and Technical Education Program (NACTEP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Native American Career and Technical Education Program (NACTEP); Correction AGENCY: Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice; correction. Catalog of...

  2. Reshaping Foreign Language Programs: Implications for Department Chairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay-Crosier, Raymond

    1987-01-01

    A chair of a university's department of Romance languages and literature addresses the status of two high priorities in the teaching of foreign languages: the integration of linguistics in the "new" curriculum; the continuing development of language teaching approaches in the classroom; and the commitment of foreign language programs in the…

  3. The American Geological Institute Minority Participation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. J.; Byerly, G. R.; Callahan, C. N.

    2001-12-01

    Since 1971, the American Geological Institute (AGI) Minority Participation Program (MPP) has supported scholarships for underrepresented minorities in the geosciences at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Some of our MPP scholars have gone on to hugely successful careers in the geosciences. MPP scholars include corporate leaders, university professors, a NASA scientist-astronaut and a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER awardee. Yet as ethnic minorities continue to be underrepresented in the geosciences, AGI plans to expand its efforts beyond its traditional undergraduate and graduate scholarships to include diversity programs for secondary school geoscience teacher internships, undergraduate research travel support, and doctoral research fellowships. Funding for the MPP has come from multiple sources, including industry, scientific societies, individuals, and during the last 10 years, the NSF. College-level students apply for the MPP awards or award renewals, and the MPP Advisory Committee selects scholarship recipients based upon student academic performance, financial need, and potential for success as a geoscience professional. Mentoring is a long-standing hallmark of the AGI MPP. Every AGI MPP scholar is assigned a professional geoscientist as a mentor. The mentor is responsible for regular personal contacts with MPP scholars. The MPP Advisory Committee aims to match the profession of the mentor with the scholar's academic interest. Throughout the year, mentors and scholars communicate about possible opportunities in the geosciences such as internships, participation in symposia, professional society meetings, and job openings. Mentors have also been active in helping younger students cope with the major changes involved in relocating to a new region of the country or a new college culture. We believe that AGI is well-positioned to advance diversity in the geosciences through its unique standing as the major professional organization in the

  4. Do Psychology Department Mission Statements Reflect the American Psychological Association Undergraduate Learning Goals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchal, Judith R.; Ruiz, Ana I.; You, Di

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the inclusion of the American Psychological Association's learning goals in the mission statements of undergraduate psychology programs across the US. We reviewed the mission statements available on websites for 1336 psychology programs listed in the Carnegie classification. Results of a content analysis revealed that of the…

  5. US Department of Energy fuel cell program for transportation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pandit G.

    1992-01-01

    Fuel cells of offer promise as the best future replacement for internal combustion engines in transportation applications. Fuel cells operate more efficiently than internal combustion engines, and are capable of running on non-petroleum fuels such as methanol, ethanol, natural gas or hydrogen. Fuel cells can also have a major impact on improving air quality. They virtually eliminate particulates, NO(x) and sulfur oxide emissions, and significantly reduce hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The U.S. Department of Energy program on fuel cells for transportation applications is structured to advance fuel cells technologies from the R&D phase, through engineering design and scale-tip, to demonstration in cars, trucks, buses and locomotives, in order to provide energy savings, fuel flexibility and air quality improvements. This paper describes the present status of the U.S. program.

  6. DOE (Department of Energy) Epidemiologic Research Program: Selected bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Epidemiologic Research Program is to determine the human health effects resulting from the generation and use of energy, and from the operation of DOE facilities. The program has been divided into seven general areas of activity: the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) which supports studies of survivors of the atomic weapons in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, mortality and morbidity studies of DOE workers, studies on internally deposited alpha emitters, medical/histologic studies, studies on the genetic aspects of radiation damage, community health surveillance studies, and the development of computational techniques and of databases to make the results as widely useful as possible. Excluding the extensive literature from the RERF, the program has produced 380 publications in scientific journals, contributing significantly to improving the understanding of the health effects of ionizing radiation exposure. In addition, a large number of public presentations were made and are documented elsewhere in published proceedings or in books. The purpose of this bibliograhpy is to present a guide to the research results obtained by scientists supported by the program. The bibliography, which includes doctoral theses, is classified by national laboratory and by year. Multi-authored studies are indicated only once, according to the main supporting laboratory.

  7. American Fisheries Act (AFA) Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Beginning January 1, 2000, all vessels and processors wishing to participate in the non-CDQ Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) pollock fishery are required to...

  8. Creating a Pipeline for African American Computing Science Faculty: An Innovative Faculty/Research Mentoring Program Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleston, LaVar J.; Gilbert, Juan E.; Escobar, Barbara; Jackson, Jerlando F. L.

    2014-01-01

    African Americans represent 1.3% of all computing sciences faculty in PhD-granting departments, underscoring the severe underrepresentation of Black/African American tenure-track faculty in computing (CRA, 2012). The Future Faculty/Research Scientist Mentoring (FFRM) program, funded by the National Science Foundation, was found to be an effective…

  9. Fire Protection Program fiscal year 1996, site support program plan Hanford Fire Department. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, D.E.

    1995-09-01

    The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, or interest of the US Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under a mutual aid agreement and contractual fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System). The fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, self-contained breathing apparatus maintenance, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education. This report gives a program overview, technical program baselines, and cost and schedule baseline.

  10. Department of Energy WindSentinel Loan Program Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sturges, Mark H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns two AXYS WindSentinel buoys that collect a comprehensive set of meteorological and oceanographic data to support resource characterization for wind energy offshore. The two buoys were delivered to DOE’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in September, 2014. After acceptance testing and initial performance testing and evaluation at PNNL’s Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Washington, the buoys have been deployed off the U.S. East Coast. One buoy was deployed approximately 42 km east of Virginia Beach, Virginia from December, 2014 through June, 2016. The second buoy was deployed approximately 5 km off Atlantic City, New Jersey in November, 2015. Data from the buoys are available to the public. Interested parties can create an account and log in to http://offshoreweb.pnnl.gov. In response to a number of inquiries and unsolicited proposals, DOE’s Wind Energy Technologies Office is implementing a program, to be managed by PNNL, to lend the buoys to qualified parties for the purpose of acquiring wind resource characterization data in areas of interest for offshore wind energy development. This document describes the buoys, the scope of the loans, the process of how borrowers will be selected, and the schedule for implementation of this program, including completing current deployments.

  11. Information resources for US Department of Energy pollution prevention programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, K.L.; Snowden-Swan, L.J.; Butner, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    In support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) pollution prevention efforts being conducted under the aegis of DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory was tasked with evaluating pollution prevention information resources. The goal of this activity was to improve the effectiveness of DOE`s pollution prevention activities through improved information flow, both within the complex, and more specifically, between DOE and other organizations that share similar pollution prevention challenges. This report presents our findings with respect to the role of information collection and dissemination within the complex, opportunities for teaming from successes of the private sector, and specific information needs of the DOE pollution prevention community. These findings were derived from a series of interviews with pollution prevention coordinators from across the DOE complex, review of DOE site and facility pollution prevention plans, and workshops with DOE information users as well as an information resources workshop that brought together information specialists from private industry, non-profit organizations, as well as state and regional pollution prevention assistance programs.

  12. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Department of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA) is a health care benefit program designed for the dependents of certain Veterans....

  13. Special Report "The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and the Department of Energy"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-03-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was signed into law on February 17, 2009, as a way to jumpstart the U.S. economy, create or save millions of jobs, spur technological advances in science and health, and invest in the Nation's energy future. This national effort will require an unprecedented level of transparency and accountability to ensure that U.S. citizens know where their tax dollars are going and how they are being spent. As part of the Recovery Act, the Department of Energy will receive more than $38 billion to support a number of science, energy, and environmental initiatives. Additionally, the Department's authority to make or guarantee energy-related loans has increased to about $127 billion. The Department plans to disburse the vast majority of the funds it receives through grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, and other financial instruments. The supplemental funding provided to the Department of Energy under the Recovery Act dwarfs the Department's annual budget of about $27 billion. The infusion of these funds and the corresponding increase in effort required to ensure that they are properly controlled and disbursed in a timely manner will, without doubt, strain existing resources. It will also have an equally challenging impact on the inherent risks associated with operating the Department's sizable portfolio of missions and activities and, this is complicated by the fact that, in many respects, the Recovery Act requirements represent a fundamental transformation of the Department's mission. If these challenges are to be met successfully, all levels of the Department's structure and its many constituents, including the existing contractor community; the national laboratory system; state and local governments; community action groups and literally thousands of other contract, grant, loan and cooperative agreement recipients throughout the Nation will have to strengthen existing or

  14. ERMAS: Beginning Reading Program for Mexican American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillerich, Robert L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the Experiment in Reading for Mexican American Students (ERMAS) a Title III, ESEA program in Spanish that is taught in a manner consistent with the program to be used for reading in English. While learning to read in Spanish, the child simultaneously learns to speak English through an aural-oral approach. (JF)

  15. American Sign Language: An Innovative Middle School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Karen

    2009-01-01

    American Sign Language (ASL) began at Seminole Middle School in August 2007 as part of the program, D.E.C.A.L (Division of Communication and Law), the brainchild of principal, Dr. Kris Black. Her goal was to offer a program that would entice advanced middle school students from around Broward County to Seminole and the hook she used to entice them…

  16. Latin American Knowledge Networking Program on Gender ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  17. Implant Education Programs in North American Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbree, Nancy S.; Chapman, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 52 dental schools found that dental implant techniques were taught in 34 pre- and 34 postdoctoral curricula, involving mostly prosthodontics and oral surgery departments, with periodontology departments lagging behind. Most predoctoral programs did not have research involvement. Cooperation among specialties is recommended over implant…

  18. 78 FR 53149 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Continued Approval of American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... Approval of American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (AOA/HFAP's.... SUMMARY: This final notice announces our decision to approve American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare... determined by CMS. The American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program's (AOA...

  19. Designing and implementing ethnic congregate nutrition programs for older Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, Marilyn T

    2008-01-01

    Montgomery County in Maryland is one of the most ethnically diverse regions in the United States. Since the 1970s, traditional American and Kosher meals have been offered at congregate sites in this County, but few seniors of varied ethnicity participated. This article describes creative approaches used in the County Senior Nutrition Program within the Older Americans Act from 1990 to 2007 to develop nutrition sites targeted to seniors in Korean, Vietnamese, and Chinese communities. The services provided are culturally sensitive, and the meals meet both nutritional and food safety standards. With secure funding, programs can be made available to other ethnic groups.

  20. Department

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-01-13

    Jan 13, 2016 ... language (SQL) it can handle spatial queries. The Postgresql/Postgis database was chosen for this ... Map window was developed to address the requirements for. GIS programming tools thus eliminating ..... users at the same time via a computer network. This functionality saves time in the entry of the ...

  1. Cost Management Competencies for Department of Defense Program Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Posner .................................................................................................... 22 Cadbury -Schweppes...Posner’s Problems and Skills .............................................................................. . 23 8. Cadbury -Schweppes Model...goals make organizational skills critical. Cadbury -Schweppes Cadbury -Schweppes conducted an extensive research program involving program manager

  2. Reasons for African American student attrition from school psychology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Sherrie L; Truscott, Stephen D

    2012-10-01

    This phenomenological study used a series of three in-depth interviews with seven African American participants, for a total of 21 interviews, to explore their experiences in the specialist and doctoral level school psychology programs they left prior to obtaining a professional entry-level degree. The study's purpose was to investigate what factors contributed to participants' attrition. Findings indicate that misalignment between participants' career aims and the practice of school psychology (as presented in the programs they left) contributed to attrition. Poor relationships with school psychology faculty and program cohort peers also played a role in participants' decisions to leave school psychology programs. Results offer a unique lens into racial issues in school psychology. Recommendations for faculty and others interested in preventing African Americans' attrition from school psychology graduate education are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Department of Energy. Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge (JIAC) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Jon [National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-05-05

    local large manufacturers (OEMs) who could provide pull to encourage SMMs (current and future suppliers) to participate. Central to this entire effort was the opportunity that this Final Report documents corresponding to the specific tasks associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded component of the InnoState Jobs Innovation Accelerator Challenge (JIAC) Program.

  4. An American Honors Program in the Arab Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yyelland, Byrad

    2012-01-01

    The first Western honors program to be established in the Arab Gulf is offered in Doha, Qatar, on a small satellite campus of an American university. Doha is the capital city of Qatar, a sovereign Arab state physically located on a small peninsula bordering Saudi Arabia in the south and jutting into the Persian Gulf. With a population of only 1.7…

  5. Reasons for African American Student Attrition from School Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Sherrie L.; Truscott, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study used a series of three in-depth interviews with seven African American participants, for a total of 21 interviews, to explore their experiences in the specialist and doctoral level school psychology programs they left prior to obtaining a professional entry-level degree. The study's purpose was to investigate what…

  6. American Indian Adoption Program: An Ethnic Approach to Child Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodluck, Charlotte Tsoi; Eckstein, Florence

    1978-01-01

    Sponsored by the Jewish Family and Children's Service of Phoenix, Arizona, the program places American Indian adoptees with their natural extended families or with families of the same tribe. Personal contacts, publicity, and national child welfare organizations help locate homes. Ensuring the child's tribal inheritance rights is yet to be…

  7. Department of Defense: Observations on the National Industrial Security Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barr, Ann C; Denomme, Thomas J; Booth, Brandon; Krump, John; Sloan, Karen; Slodkowski, Lillian; Sterling, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    .... In terms of facility oversight, DSS maintained files on contractor facilities security programs and their security violations, but it did not analyze this information to determine, for example...

  8. The US Army Medical Department Email Teleconsultation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappan, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    The US Army Surgeon General authorized the formation of an email based teleconsultation program in 2004 to support deployed healthcare providers in Iraq and Afghanistan. The program, which began its 12th year of operation in April 2015, was originally viewed as a temporary solution until a robust system was fielded. Although future of the program as a going concern has not been determined, there is the possibility it could be incorprated into the critical care consultation program managed at an Army Medical Center.

  9. Quantifying forest disturbance and regrowth in support of the North American Carbon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.; Goward, S. N.; Masek, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Forest disturbance and regrowth are assumed to be significant forces modulating North American carbon balance. Quantifying the carbon fluxes of forest changes requires the changes be assessed with appropriate spatial and temporal details. The Landsat imagery archive accumulated since 1972 provides a unique data source for carrying out this work over the last 30+ years. Through two NASA funded projects "North American Forest Disturbance and Regrowth since 1972 (NAFDR)" and "Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS)", Landsat images are being used to assess forest changes across the North American continent. In the NAFDR project, dense time series (quasi-2-year) of Landsat images are being compiled to quantify forest changes for statistically sampled locations selected to permit national estimates of disturbance and regrowth. In the LEDAPS project, wall-to-wall North American Landsat images acquired and orthorectified under the NASA Scientific Data Purchase program for the 1970s, 1990s and 2000 are being used to examine forest change for the entire North American continent between these 3 decades. The change products derived through the two projects will be cross-calibrated using field plot data collected through the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program. Results from the two projects should provide spatially and temporally comprehensive assessments of forest disturbance history of the North American continent, therefore allowing more accurate estimation of the carbon flux arising from such changes.

  10. Implementing US Department of Energy lessons learned programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The DOE Lessons Learned Handbook is a two-volume publication developed to supplement the DOE Lessons Learned Standard (DOE-STD-7501-95) with information that will organizations in developing or improving their lessons learned programs. Volume 1 includes greater detail than the Standard in areas such as identification and documentation of lessons learned; it also contains sections on specific processes such as training and performance measurement. Volume 2 (this document) contains examples of program documents developed by existing lessons learned programs as well as communications material, functional categories, transmittal documents, sources of professional and industry lessons learned, and frequently asked questions about the Lessons Learned List Service.

  11. 78 FR 71619 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Continued Approval of American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... Approval of American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program's Critical Access.... SUMMARY: This final notice announces our decision to approve the American Osteopathic Association...

  12. The Tripler Army Medical Center's LE3AN program: a six-month retrospective analysis of program effectiveness for African-American and European-American females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Mark; Earles, Jay; Folen, Raymond; Trammel, Rick; James, Larry

    2004-10-01

    This is a retrospective study that examines the effectiveness of the Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC) LE3AN Program for weight management among African-American and European American women. African-American and European-American active-duty females who enrolled in the TAMC LE3AN Program between July 1998 and December 2001, and completed six months of follow-up were included in the analysis. The results indicate that the program is associated with significant weight loss for participants, and that it is equally effective for African-American and European-American women. Weekly follow-up visits were correlated with greater weight loss.

  13. Federal High Performance Computing and Communications Program. The Department of Energy Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Energy Research.

    This report, profusely illustrated with color photographs and other graphics, elaborates on the Department of Energy (DOE) research program in High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC). The DOE is one of seven agency programs within the Federal Research and Development Program working on HPCC. The DOE HPCC program emphasizes research in…

  14. 75 FR 69693 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ...-0086] Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...-2182), Privacy Officer, National Protection and Programs Directorate, Department of Homeland Security... Privacy Act protections to all individuals where systems of records maintain information on U.S. citizens...

  15. A plan for the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Susan C.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.; Ellison, Laura E.; Lausen, Cori L.; Reichard, Jonathan D.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Ingersoll, Thomas E.; Coleman, Jeremy; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Sauer, John R.; Francis, Charles M.; Bayless, Mylea L.; Stanley, Thomas R.; Johnson, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) is to create a continent-wide program to monitor bats at local to rangewide scales that will provide reliable data to promote effective conservation decisionmaking and the long-term viability of bat populations across the continent. This is an international, multiagency program. Four approaches will be used to gather monitoring data to assess changes in bat distributions and abundances: winter hibernaculum counts, maternity colony counts, mobile acoustic surveys along road transects, and acoustic surveys at stationary points. These monitoring approaches are described along with methods for identifying species recorded by acoustic detectors. Other chapters describe the sampling design, the database management system (Bat Population Database), and statistical approaches that can be used to analyze data collected through this program.

  16. U.S. Department of Agriculture: Resolution of Discrimination Complaints Involving Farm Credit and Payment Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... These issues came to a head in 1997 when a group of African-American farmers consolidated their claims of racial discrimination in farm lending and benefit programs into one class action suit against USDA Pigford v. Glickman...

  17. Ethical Climate In Vocational Program Administrative Sciences Department: Student Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Kusumastuti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence of ethics course in the designed curriculum given, expected to shape morale and develop ethic awareness between student in their study environment. This thing will be a primary asset for graduate  candidates in the future. This research is an effort to make an image about study environment climate, that occur in Vocational Program generally, and in Administration Science particularly. The aim of this study is to describe students’ perceptions of their institution’s ethical environment. The Ethical Climate Questionnaires were completed by fifty two final-year vocational program students. The result showed that the type of consensual morality is the most dominant factor that forms ethical environment in campus.

  18. 2009 Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Program (DHAPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    officers. PASMO modified a proven behavior change communication methodology titled, Vive la Vida , to be used as the foundation for a troop-level...training program. Before launching the trainings, PASMO conducted one Vive la Vida session to test and validate with the ESAF. A group of trial ESAF...participants and the response was overwhelmingly positive. Vive la Vida is a series of four 3-hour meetings during which the troops gain

  19. Establishing Quantitative Software Metrics in Department of the Navy Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    In accomplishing this goal, a need exists for a formalized set of software quality metrics . This document establishes the validity of those necessary... quality metrics . In our approach, we collected the data of more than a dozen programs from previous tests, analyzed current states of the software ...measurable metrics of various categories from every software component. This document identifies software qualities and their indicators that affect DoD

  20. Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Program (DHAPP), 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    56 Tunisia 58 SOUTH REGION Botswana 61 Lesotho 65 Malawi 68 Mozambique 71 Namibia 75 South Africa 79 Swaziland 82 Zambia 85...AIDS Program since 2008. The Botswana Defense Force graciously volunteered to co-host the first conference with DHAPP. In May 2012, the Forças...designed to spur business investment, increase agricultural efficiency, improve trade, and recapitalize the nation’s banks. New mining projects have

  1. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) is a national accrediting agency of graduate education programs in audiology or speech-language pathology. The CAA currently accredits or or preaccredits 319 programs (247 in speech-language pathology and 72 in…

  2. 76 FR 16743 - Applications for New Awards; Program for North American Mobility in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... Applications for New Awards; Program for North American Mobility in Higher Education AGENCY: Office of... Focus Competition: Program for North American Mobility in Higher Education Notice inviting applications... Program for North American Mobility in Higher Education, CFDA number 84.116N, must be submitted...

  3. 78 FR 17677 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Application From the American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... the American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program for Continued CMS... application from the American Osteopathic Association/ Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (AOA/HFAP... program every 6 years or as determined by CMS. The American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities...

  4. An Investigation of Possible Discriminating Earned Value Variables in Department of Defense Major Acquisition Program Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    S-curve (CDF). ......................................................................24 Figure 6. CV% rate of change for EFV program...DFAR Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation DoD Department of Defense EAC Estimate at Completion EFV Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle EMD... EFV ) program. This is an attempt to compare the rates of change of the cost and schedule variance for all sampled programs. Figure 6. CV% rate

  5. Program Directors' Perceptions of Reasons Professional Master's Athletic Training Students Persist and Depart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Pitney, William A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Student retention is a key issue in higher education. With the increasing number of professional master's (PM) athletic training programs (ATPs), understanding student retention is necessary to maintain viable programs. Objective: Explore program directors' perceptions of the reasons athletic training students persist and depart from PM…

  6. Leadership strategies for department chairs and program directors: a case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Robert W; Haden, N Karl; Taylor, Robert L; Thomas, D Denee

    2002-04-01

    As a part of the 2000-01 American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Leadership Institute, the Leadership Institute Fellows conducted a faculty development workshop for department chairpersons and program directors during the 2001 ADEA Annual Session. A central premise of the workshop was that successful chairpersons and program directors are both effective leaders and effective managers and that leadership and management involve complementary activities. The workshop was case-based. The ADEA Leadership Institute Fellows developed the cases and led roundtable discussions of each case. A group facilitator led large group debriefings to apply management and leadership theory to each case. The purpose of this paper is to review leadership challenges and management concepts as they were applied in a case-based faculty development workshop. The program was structured to address leadership challenges relating to managing people, mission management, conflict recognition, and conflict management. The cases were developed to relate management theories to situations in academic administration. The situations were designed to encourage debate from numerous perspectives. Each case presented general dilemmas that could be addressed from the vantage point of the dean, chair, or individual faculty member. Reinforcing discussion followed and included identification of central issues, key management concepts, and action alternatives. Because of the breadth of possible discussion, group case analyses at the workshop and in the appended case reviews explore only one perspective. This overview article introduces concepts of leadership and management that provide the foundation for analysis of three case studies that follow. These cases address common leadership and management issues in academic dentistry through three typical cases: the frustrated faculty member (case 1), the misdirected faculty member (case 2), and the faculty member stuck in the middle (case 3).

  7. From Access to Excess: Changing Roles and Relationships for Distance Education, Continuing Education, and Academic Departments in American Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Judy Copeland

    2013-01-01

    In American universities, early distance education needed both continuing education and academic departments for establishing institutional cooperation, developing quality standards, adapting to change, and finding a funding model. Today, the Internet and the need for additional revenue are driving new distance education models.

  8. Disparities in emergency department visits in American children with asthma: 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Lamichhane, Rajan; Diggs, Leigh Ann

    2017-09-01

    This article was to examine the trends in emergency department (ED) visits for asthma among American children in 2006-2010 across sociodemographic factors, parental smoking status, and children's body weight status. We analyzed 5,535 children aged 2-17 years with current asthma in the Asthma Call-Back Survey in 2006-2010. Multivariate log binomial regression was used to examine the disparities of ED visits by demographics, socioeconomic status, parental smoking status, children's body weight status, and the level of asthma control. We controlled for average state-level air pollutants. Prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were reported. Minority children with current asthma had higher risks of ED visits compared with white children in 2009 and 2010, e.g., the PR (95% CI) for black children in 2009 was 3.64 (1.79, 7.41). Children who had current asthma and more highly educated parents experienced a higher risk of ED visits in 2007 (PRs [95% CI] = 2.15 [1.02, 4.53] and 2.97 [1.29, 6.83] for children with some college or college-graduated parents), but not significant in other years. Children with uncontrolled asthma were significantly more likely to visit the ED in 2008 (PRs [95% CI] = 2.79 [1.44, 5.41] and 6.96 [3.55, 13.64] for not-well-controlled and very poorly controlled children with asthma). Minority children with current asthma or children with uncontrolled asthma were more likely to visit EDs for asthma treatment. However, the disparities in ED visits across sociodemographics, health status, or asthma control vary in scale and significance across time. More research is needed to explain these differences.

  9. 10 CFR 431.20 - Department of Energy recognition of nationally recognized certification programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... certification programs. 431.20 Section 431.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY... Incorporated and Methods of Determining Efficiency § 431.20 Department of Energy recognition of nationally... similar procedures and methodologies for determining the energy efficiency of electric motors. It must...

  10. 77 FR 43578 - Applications for New Awards; American Overseas Research Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... higher education (IHEs) to establish or operate an AORC that promotes postgraduate research, exchanges... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information American Overseas Research Centers...

  11. Discovering the cosmos with small spacecraft the American explorer program

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Explorer was the original American space program and Explorer 1 its first satellite, launched in 1958. Sixty years later, it is the longest continuously running space program in the world, demonstrating to the world how we can explore the cosmos with small spacecraft. Almost a hundred Explorers have already been launched.  Explorers have made some of the fundamental discoveries of the Space Age.Explorer 1 discovered Earth’s radiation belts. Later Explorers surveyed the Sun, the X-ray and ultraviolet universes, black holes, magnetars and gamma ray bursts. An Explorer found the remnant of the Big Bang. One Explorer chased and was the first to intercept a comet. The program went through a period of few launches during the crisis of funding for space science in the 1980s. However, with the era of ‘faster, cheaper, better,’ the program was reinvented, and new exiting missions began to take shape, like Swift and the asteroid hunter WISE.  Discovering the Cosmos with Small Spacecraft gives an account of ...

  12. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Isotope Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carty, J.

    2004-10-05

    This presentation provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Isotopes Program. The charter of the Isotope Programs covers the production and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes, associated byproducts, surplus materials, and related isotope services.

  13. 75 FR 44929 - Request for Information Regarding Workplace Substance Abuse Programs for Department of Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... Department solicits comment and information on the addition of anabolic steroids and other drugs to its randomized drug testing program; the availability of analytical testing methods for anabolic steroids... contractor programs consider expanding randomized drug testing to include anabolic steroids, synthetic...

  14. Snakes. A Conservation Education Program of the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Kelly; Theiss, Nancy S.

    The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is charged with the responsibility to preserve, protect, and perpetuate the fish and wildlife in Kentucky. Involved in this broad program are a number of services, including the Wildlife Conservation Education Program. During the months of September through April, Conservation Club leaders…

  15. US Department of Energy Integrated Resource Planning Program: Accomplishments and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Mihlmester, P.E. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-12-17

    The US Department of Energy Integrated Resource Planning Program supports many activities and projects that enhance the process by which utilities assess demand and supply options and, subsequently, evaluate and select resources. The US Department of Energy program coordinates integrated resource planning in risk and regulatory analysis; utility and regional planning; evaluation and verification; information transfer/technological assistance; and demand-side management. Professional staff from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratories collaborate with peers and stakeholders, in particular, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, and conduct research and activities for the US Department of Energy. Twelve integrated resource planning activities and projects are summarized in this report. The summaries reflect the diversity of planning and research activities supported by the Department. The summaries also reflect the high levels of collaboration and teaming that are required by the Program and practiced by the researchers. It is concluded that the Program is achieving its objectives by encouraging innovation and improving planning and decision making. Furthermore, as the Department continues to implement planned improvements in the Program, the Department is effectively positioned to attain its ambitious goals.

  16. The implementation and assessment of a quality and safety culture education program in a large radiation oncology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Kristina D; Volz, Edna; Bellerive, Marc; Bergendahl, Howard W; Gabriel, Peter E; Maity, Amit; Hahn, Stephen M; Vapiwala, Neha

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology launched a national campaign to improve patient safety in radiation therapy. One recommendation included the expansion of educational programs dedicated to quality and safety. We subsequently implemented a quality and safety culture education program (Q-SCEP) in our large radiation oncology department. The purpose of this study is to describe the design, implementation, and impact of this Q-SCEP. In 2010, we instituted a comprehensive Q-SCEP, consisting of a longitudinal series of lectures, meetings, and interactive workshops. Participation was mandatory for all department members across all network locations. Electronic surveys were administered to assess employee engagement, knowledge retention, preferred learning styles, and the program's overall impact. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Survey on Patient Safety Culture was administered. Analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. Between 2010 and 2015, 100% of targeted staff participated in Q-SCEP. Thirty-three percent (132 of 400) and 30% (136 of 450) responded to surveys in 2012 and 2014, respectively. Mean scores improved from 73% to 89% (P safety culture education was critical to performing their jobs well. Full course compliance was achieved despite the sizable number of personnel and treatment centers. Periodic assessments demonstrated high knowledge retention, which significantly improved over time in nearly all department divisions. Additionally, our AHRQ patient safety grade remains high and continues to improve. These results will be used to further enhance ongoing internal safety initiatives and to inform future innovative efforts. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Implementation of an ergonomics program for the welding department inside a car assembly company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Caceres; Edwin, Troya

    2012-01-01

    The premise for this project is to implement an ergonomics program for the welding department of a car assembly company, considering that this area represents the highest occupational risk in relation to musculoskeletal injuries. The project also allows the demonstration of the different implementation processes of an ergonomics program; it also permits the determination of individual risks faced by workers of the welding department, and finally gives a chance of improving common injuries using the sentinel system. The main challenge is to reduce musculoskeletal injuries and absenteeism among welders through actions implemented by the ergonomics program.

  18. Perceptions of African American Faculty in Kinesiology-Based Programs at Predominantly White American Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Joe W., Jr.; Harrison, Louis, Jr.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of African American faculty on their organizational socialization in kinesiology-based (i.e., sport pedagogy, exercise physiology, motor behavior, sport management/history) programs at predominantly White American (1) institutions of higher education (PW-IHE). Participants were 9 African…

  19. Promoting Ocean Literacy through American Meteorological Society Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, Michael; Abshire, Wendy; Weinbeck, Robert; Geer, Ira; Mills, Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    American Meteorological Society Education Programs provide course materials, online and physical resources, educator instruction, and specialized training in ocean, weather, and climate sciences (https://www.ametsoc.org/ams/index.cfm/education-careers/education-program/k-12-teachers/). Ocean Science literacy efforts are supported through the Maury Project, DataStreme Ocean, and AMS Ocean Studies. The Maury Project is a summer professional development program held at the US Naval Academy designed to enhance effective teaching of the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics of oceanography. DataStreme Ocean is a semester-long course offered twice a year to participants nationwide. Created and sustained with major support from NOAA, DS Ocean explores key concepts in marine geology, physical and chemical oceanography, marine biology, and climate change. It utilizes electronically-transmitted text readings, investigations and current environmental data. AMS Ocean Studies provides complete packages for undergraduate courses. These include online textbooks, investigations manuals, RealTime Ocean Portal (course website), and course management system-compatible files. It can be offered in traditional lecture/laboratory, completely online, and hybrid learning environments. Assistance from AMS staff and other course users is available.

  20. Factors in adoption of a fire department wellness program: champ-and-chief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Hannah; Mabry, Linda; Elliot, Diane L; Kuehl, Kerry S; Favorite, Kim C

    2013-04-01

    To identify and evaluate determinants of fire departments' wellness program adoption. The Promoting Healthy Lifestyles: Alternative Models' Effects fire service wellness program was offered for free to all medium-sized fire departments in Oregon and Washington. An invitation to participate was mailed to key fire department decision makers (chief, union president, and wellness officer). These key decision makers from 12 sites that adopted the program and 24 matched nonadopting sites were interviewed and results were analyzed to define adoption determinants. Three adoption requirements were identified: (1) mailer connection, (2) local firefighter wellness champion, and (3) willing fire chief, whereas a fourth set of organizational factors had little or no impact on adoption including previous and ongoing wellness activities, financial pressures, and resistance to change. Findings identified determinants of medium-sized fire service wellness program adoption.

  1. Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1992-05-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics (to become the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering on July 1, 1992). As such, it is effectively used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia as well as those at other area colleges and universities. The expansion of support to educational programs in the mid-east region is a major objective. To assist in meeting this objective, the University of Virginia has been supported under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Program since 1978. Due to the success of the program, this proposal requests continued DOE support through August 1993.

  2. 76 FR 20962 - Applications for New Awards; Native American-Serving Nontribal Institutions Part F Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ..., people, or culture that is indigenous to the United States. As part of the application for a grant...: A grantee under the NASNTI Part F Program, the Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander...

  3. Position of the American Think Tanks on Iran's Nuclear Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Viktorovna Ivkina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the role of “analytical centers” in the US foreign policy agenda. From a variety of “think tanks” highlights those who have made the greatest impact on the foreign policy - the Heritage Foundation and the Center for American progress. They examine U.S. relations with other regions of the world. The marked correlation between the reports of these think tanks and the positions of the Democratic and Republican parties of the USA. Based on the publications of articles and reports from these centers, it is considered one of the directions of U.S. foreign policy. In the article there is the comparative analysis of the approaches of these centers to the problem of Iran's nuclear program. This question is particularly acute on the agenda in relations between Iran and the United States. In addition, in 2015, the negotiations between Iran and the Six mediators on the nuclear issue has entered a crucial stage, it makes this issue the most relevant. The author makes a conclusion about the extent of American influence of “think-tanks” on foreign policy decisions in general and on specific political situation.

  4. DOE standard: The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for radiobioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This technical standard describes the US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) for Radiobioassay, for use by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE Contractor radiobioassay programs. This standard is intended to be used in conjunction with the general administrative technical standard that describes the overall DOELAP accreditation process--DOE-STD-1111-98, Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program Administration. This technical standard pertains to radiobioassay service laboratories that provide either direct or indirect (in vivo or in vitro) radiobioassay measurements in support of internal dosimetry programs at DOE facilities or for DOE and DOE contractors. Similar technical standards have been developed for other DOELAP dosimetry programs. This program consists of providing an accreditation to DOE radiobioassay programs based on successful completion of a performance-testing process and an on-site evaluation by technical experts. This standard describes the technical requirements and processes specific to the DOELAP Radiobioassay Accreditation Program as required by 10 CFR 835 and as specified generically in DOE-STD-1111-98.

  5. Strategies for establishing a comprehensive quality and performance improvement program in a radiology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruskal, Jonathan B; Anderson, Stephan; Yam, Chun S; Sosna, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    To improve the safety and quality of the care that radiologists provide, and to allow radiologists and radiology personnel to remain competitive in an increasingly complex environment, it is essential that all imaging departments establish and maintain managed, comprehensive, and effective performance improvement programs. Although the structure and focus of these programs can vary, a number of common components exist, many of which are now widely mandated by organizations that regulate the field of radiology. Basic components include patient safety, process improvement, customer service, professional staff assessment, and education, each of which requires strategies for implementing continuous programs to monitor performance, analyzing and depicting data, implementing change, and meeting regulatory requirements. All of these components are part of a comprehensive quality management system in a large academic radiology department. For smaller departments or practices, the gradual introduction of one or more of these components is useful in ensuring the safety and quality of their services. (c) RSNA, 2009.

  6. Recent Enrollment Trends in American Soil Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Abit, Sergio; Brown, David; Dolliver, Holly; Hopkins, David; Lindbo, David; Manu, Andrew; Mbila, Monday; Parikh, Sanjai J.; Schulze, Darrell; Shaw, Joey; Weil, Ray; Weindorf, David

    2015-04-01

    Soil science student enrollment was on the decline in the United States from the early 1990s through the early 2000s. Overall undergraduate student enrollment in American colleges and universities rose by about 11% over the same time period. This fact created considerable consternation among the American soil science community. As we head into the International Year of Soil, it seemed to be a good time to revisit this issue and examine current enrollment trends. Fourteen universities that offer undergraduate and/or graduate programs in soil science were surveyed for their enrollments over the time period 2007-2014 (the last seven academic years). The 14 schools represent about 20% of the institutions that offer soil science degrees/programs in the United States. Thirteen institutions submitted undergraduate data and 10 submitted graduate data, which was analyzed by individual institution and in aggregate. Simple linear regression was used to find the slope of best-fit trend lines. For individual institutions, a slope of ≥ 0.5 (on average, the school gained 0.5 students per year or more) was considered to be growing enrollment, ≤ -0.5 was considered shrinking enrollment, and between -0.5 and 0.5 was considered to be stable enrollment. For aggregated data, the 0.5 slope standard was multiplied by the number of schools in the aggregated survey to determine whether enrollment was growing, shrinking, or stable. Over the period of the study, six of the 13 schools reporting undergraduate data showed enrollment gains, five of the 13 showed stable enrollments, one of the 13 showed declining enrollments, and one of the 13 discontinued their undergraduate degree program. The linear regression trend line for the undergraduate schools' composite data had a slope of 55.0 students/year (R2 = 0.96), indicating a strong overall trend of undergraduate enrollment growth at these schools. However, the largest school had also seen large growth in enrollment. To ensure that this one

  7. Do cultural differences influence batterer intervention program outcomes? A studywith Spanish and Latin American offenders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Viviana Vargas; Marisol Lila; Alba Catalá-Miñana

    2015-01-01

    ... convicted of intimate-partner violence at thebeginning of a batterer intervention program. Second, differences in the batterer intervention programoutcomes between Spanish and Latin American offenders were explored...

  8. Fire protection program fiscal year 1997 site support program plan - Hanford fire department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, D.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    The mission of the Hanford Fires Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford Site by providing fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating situations which could threaten the operations, employees, or interest of the US Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. this includes response to surrounding fire department districts under mutual aids agreements and contractual fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System) and various commercial entities operating on site. the fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing, and maintenance, respiratory protection services, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention and education.

  9. 76 FR 3120 - Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students; Overview... parental and community participation in language instruction educational programs. Projects funded under...

  10. U.S. Department of Energy student research participation programs. Underrepresented minorities in U.S. Department of Energy student research participation programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify those particular aspects of US Department of Energy (DOE) research participation programs for undergraduate and graduate students that are most associated with attracting and benefiting underrepresented minority students and encouraging them to pursue careers in science, engineering, and technology. A survey of selected former underrepresented minority participants, focus group analysis, and critical incident analysis serve as the data sources for this report. Data collected from underrepresented minority participants indicate that concerns expressed and suggestions made for conducting student research programs at DOE contractor facilities are not remarkably different from those made by all participants involved in such student research participation programs. With the exception of specific suggestions regarding recruitment, the findings summarized in this report can be interpreted to apply to all student research participants in DOE national laboratories. Clearly defined assignments, a close mentor-student association, good communication, and an opportunity to interact with other participants and staff are those characteristics that enhance any educational program and have positive impacts on career development.

  11. Beyond McPoetry: Contemporary American Poetry in the Institutionalized Creative Writing Program Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Julie LaRue

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the rise of the creative writing program in American higher education and considers its influence on contemporary American poetry. I investigate how the patronage of the university has impacted American poetry and reconfigured the contemporary literary landscape. Using Mark McGurl's (2009) groundbreaking research on…

  12. The African American Women's Summit: A Student Affairs Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nicole M.

    2017-01-01

    The African American Women's Summit (AAWS) is a professional development program in the United States created by and for African American women in student affairs. This article reviews the evolution and structure of the AAWS. A discussion, grounded in Black feminist thought, is included relative to the impact of the AAWS on African American women…

  13. Department of Energy programs and objectives: energy conservation in agricultural production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    This document describes the current Department of Energy agriculture research program as it relates to the research recommendations submitted by a 1976 workshop on energy conservation in agricultural production. In-depth discussions on fertilizers, irrigation, crop drying, fuel substitution, crop and animal production systems, greenhouses, materials handling, and transport systems are included. (MCW)

  14. 76 FR 55693 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection... contact: Emily Andrew (703-235-2182), Privacy Officer, National Protection and Programs Directorate... policy, DHS extends administrative Privacy Act protections to all individuals where systems of records...

  15. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs: Strategic Roadmap 2025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Strategic Roadmap 2025 outlines strategic target areas and tactical actions to ensure the Office remains aligned with its congressional mandates and DOE goals, and that it can be responsive to changing conditions in Indian Country and the nation.

  16. US Department of Energy Laboratory Accredition Program (DOELAP) for personnel dosimetry systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, F.M.; Carlson, R.D.; Loesch, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    Accreditation of personnel dosimetry systems is required for laboratories that conduct personnel dosimetry for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Accreditation is a two-step process which requires the participant to pass a proficiency test and an onsite assessment. The DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is a measurement quality assurance program for DOE laboratories. Currently, the DOELAP addresses only dosimetry systems used to assess the whole body dose to personnel. A pilot extremity DOELAP has been completed and routine testing is expected to begin in January 1994. It is expected that participation in the extremity program will be a regulatory requirement by January 1996.

  17. Environmental programs of the Department of Energy and Environment annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B

    1978-12-01

    Environmental Sciences is one of the four areas comprising the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It carries out a wide range of activities in atmospheric sciences, environmental chemistry, oceanographic sciences, and land and freshwater environmental sciences. In general, these programs are concerned with identification and measurement of pollutants introduced into the environment by energy-related activities and the evaluation and prediction of the effects or potential effects of these pollutants on the environment. This highlights report for Environmental Programs covers the year 1978 and describes the objectives and funding levels of each of the programs, major accomplishments during the year, planned future activities, and current publications.

  18. Modeling Activities in the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Sciences Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) conducts research pertinent to radiative forcing of climate change by atmospheric aerosols. The program consists of approximately 40 highly interactive peer-reviewed research projects that examine aerosol properties and processes and the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere. Principal components of the program are instrument development, laboratory experiments, field studies, theoretical investigations, and modeling. The objectives of the Program are to 1) improve the understanding of aerosol processes associated with light scattering and absorption properties and interactions with clouds that affect Earth's radiative balance and to 2) develop model-based representations of these processes that enable the effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system to be properly represented in global-scale numerical climate models. Although only a few of the research projects within ASP are explicitly identified as primarily modeling activities, modeling actually comprises a substantial component of a large fraction of ASP research projects. This document describes the modeling activities within the Program as a whole, the objectives and intended outcomes of these activities, and the linkages among the several modeling components and with global-scale modeling activities conducted under the support of the Department of Energy's Climate Sciences Program and other aerosol and climate research programs.

  19. A Qualitative Study of African American Women in Engineering Technology Programs in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakley, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of African American women in engineering technology programs in community colleges. There is a lack of representation of African American women in engineering technology programs throughout higher education, especially in community/technical colleges. There is also lack of representation of African American…

  20. LABORATORY ROYALTY USE PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OGEKA,G.J.; FOX,K.J.

    1999-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory was established in 1947 on the site of the former Army Camp Upton. Brookhaven is a multidisciplinary Laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. Associated Universities, Inc. managed the Laboratory, under contract with the US Department of Energy until April 30, 1998. On March 1, 1998, Brookhaven Science Associates LLC (BSA) was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy to manage the Laboratory. Brookhaven Science Associates has taken responsibility for all aspects of the existing Royalty Use Program from the prior contractor, AUI. This report is limited to FY 1998 activities of the Royalty Use Program that were funded by royalty income from prior fiscal years. Any FY 1998 royalty income allocated in FY 1998 shall be reported in the FY 1999 Royalty Use Program Report.

  1. Department of Energy Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences Division: High Performance Computing and Communications Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This document is intended to serve two purposes. Its first purpose is that of a program status report of the considerable progress that the Department of Energy (DOE) has made since 1993, the time of the last such report (DOE/ER-0536, The DOE Program in HPCC), toward achieving the goals of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The second purpose is that of a summary report of the many research programs administered by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Energy Research under the auspices of the HPCC Program and to provide, wherever relevant, easy access to pertinent information about MICS-Division activities via universal resource locators (URLs) on the World Wide Web (WWW).

  2. Department of Energy: MICS (Mathematical Information, and Computational Sciences Division). High performance computing and communications program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This document is intended to serve two purposes. Its first purpose is that of a program status report of the considerable progress that the Department of Energy (DOE) has made since 1993, the time of the last such report (DOE/ER-0536, {open_quotes}The DOE Program in HPCC{close_quotes}), toward achieving the goals of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The second purpose is that of a summary report of the many research programs administered by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Energy Research under the auspices of the HPCC Program and to provide, wherever relevant, easy access to pertinent information about MICS-Division activities via universal resource locators (URLs) on the World Wide Web (WWW). The information pointed to by the URL is updated frequently, and the interested reader is urged to access the WWW for the latest information.

  3. U.S. Department of Energy photovoltaic energy program contract summary, fiscal year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surek, T.; Hansen, A.

    2000-02-17

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R and D) activities under the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) and US Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program from October 1, 1998, through September 30, 1999 (FY 1999). The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to make PV a significant part of the domestic economy as an industry and an energy resource. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the US industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the US industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NCPV is part of the National PV Program and provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals.

  4. 20 CFR 1010.210 - In which Department job training programs do covered persons receive priority of service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In which Department job training programs do... job training programs do covered persons receive priority of service? (a) Priority of service applies to every qualified job training program funded, in whole or in part, by the Department, including: (1...

  5. [Development of an educational program starting from a process approach in a department of radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, E; Delgaudine, M; Coucke, P

    2014-01-01

    In order to be able to implement technological evolution and organizational changes on a regular and continuous manner, the radiotherapy department initiated in 2007 a comprehensive policy of operational risk management and overall quality program. The leadership in the department is convinced that the management of professional skills is mandatory to implement rapidly new treatment techniques while simultaneously assuring a high level of quality for patient care. The "process approach" is based on a comprehensive description of all the processes building up the organization in order to check how every single process contributes to patient satisfaction. This kind of approach allows an enhanced visibility on the functioning of the department, a better control on the inter-individual relations, both between different professional groups among caregivers and between those latter and the patients. This approach yields a view on the gain obtained with each single process and leads to identification of failures in safety barriers. The process approach identifies the required professional skills in order to guarantee a high quality of care. This has resulted in the development of a training program tailored to the needs of a radiotherapy department. This training program has recently been submitted and validated by the university authorities and is nowadays registered as a certificate at the university of Liège.

  6. Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. A. McCarthy; D. L. Williams; R. Reister

    2012-05-01

    The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is focused on the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. It encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper gives an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables.

  7. 77 FR 72832 - Applications for New Awards; Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... English Language Acquisition, Department of Education. Overview Information Native American and Alaska... English among English learners (ELs),\\1\\ and to promote parental and community participation in language... amended (ESEA), may support the teaching and studying of Native American languages, but must have, as a...

  8. FINAL REPORT FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS For Department of Energy Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe M. Aldrich

    2004-11-01

    The Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats was conducted in Arvada, CO, by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22750. Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the former radiation workers of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly Rocky Flats Plant) an opportunity to receive follow-up medical monitoring and a re-evaluation of their internal radiation dose. The former Rocky Flats radiation worker population is distinctive because it was a reasonably stable work force that received occupational exposures, at times substantial, over several decades. This report reflects the summation of health outcomes, statistical analyses, and dose assessment information on former Rocky Flats radiation workers to the date of study termination as of March 2004.

  9. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Las Vegas, Nevada, Roundtable Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-03-16

    LAS VEGAS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Las Vegas, Nevada DOE Tribal Roundtable convened on March 16th, at the Las Vegas Hilton. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy) and facilitated by JR Bluehouse, Program Manager, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). Mr. Bluehouse was assisted by Tamara, Underwood, Program Assistant, U.S. Institute.  Tribal leaders and representatives from multiple tribal governments and communities attended the roundtable. Tracey LeBeau, newly appointed Director of the Office of Indian Energy attended.    LaMont Jackson from DOE’s Office of Electricity attended. Also attending from the administration and federal agencies were Kim Teehee, Senior Policy Advisor for Native American Affairs, The White House; Charlie Galbraith, Associate Director of the Office of Public Engagement and Deputy Associate Director of the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs, The White House; Jodi Gillette, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy and Economic Development, the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

  10. Evaluation of the US Department of Energy Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (2010-2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rose, Erin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hawkins, Beth A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This report contains results from analysis conducted on each of the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) grants awarded to 16 organizations by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in 2010. The purpose of WIPP was to explore the potential adoptability or replicability of innovative processes or technologies for the enhancement of DOE’s Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). DOE initiated the WIPP grant to accelerate effective innovations in home energy efficiency and other WAP mission-related goals for income-qualifying households of low socioeconomic status. This study was performed alongside a broader, national evaluation of WAP conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for DOE.

  11. Perceptions of African American faculty in kinesiology-based programs at predominantly White American institutions of higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Joe W; Harrison, Louis; Hodge, Samuel R

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of African American faculty on their organizational socialization in kinesiology-based (i.e., sport pedagogy, exercise physiology, motor behavior, sport management/history) programs at predominantly White American institutions of higher education (PW-IHE). Participants were 9 African American tenure-track faculty members from various kinesiology-based programs at PW-IHE. Data were gathered via interviewing and analyzed within the framework of critical race theory (Ladson-Billings, 2000). Findings are presented using storytelling and thematic narratives. Interviews with the participants revealed four major recurring themes with regard to: (a) resources, opportunities, and power structures; (b) programmatic neglects and faculty mentoring needs; (c) social isolation, disengagement, and intellectual inferiority issues; and (d) double standards, marginalization, and scholarship biases. This study suggests that faculty and administrators at PW-IHE should develop sensitivity toward organizational socialization issues relevant to faculty of color.

  12. Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, Revised December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1993-12-01

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is a discretionary research and development tool critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the laboratory. It is also a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, within the overall mission of the Department of Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes research which was funded by this program during fiscal year 1993. The research fell in a number of broad technical and scientific categories: new directions for energy technologies; global change; radiation therapies and imaging; genetic studies; new directions for the development and utilization of BNL facilities; miscellaneous projects. Two million dollars in funding supported 28 projects which were spread throughout all BNL scientific departments.

  13. Assessing Capacity for Sustainability of Effective Programs and Policies in Local Health Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Rachel G; Duggan, Katie; Smith, Carson; Aisaka, Kristelle; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Brownson, Ross C

    2016-01-01

    Sustainability has been defined as the existence of structures and processes that allow a program to leverage resources to effectively implement and maintain evidence-based public health and is important in local health departments (LHDs) to retain the benefits of effective programs. Explore the applicability of the Program Sustainability Framework in high- and low-capacity LHDs as defined by national performance standards. Case study interviews from June to July 2013. Standard qualitative methodology was used to code transcripts; codes were developed inductively and deductively. Six geographically diverse LHD's (selected from 3 of high and 3 of low capacity) : 35 LHD practitioners. Thematic reports explored the 8 domains (Organizational Capacity, Program Adaptation, Program Evaluation, Communications, Strategic Planning, Funding Stability, Environmental Support, and Partnerships) of the Program Sustainability Framework. High-capacity LHDs described having environmental support, while low-capacity LHDs reported this was lacking. Both high- and low-capacity LHDs described limited funding; however, high-capacity LHDs reported greater funding flexibility. Partnerships were important to high- and low-capacity LHDs, and both described building partnerships to sustain programming. Regarding organizational capacity, high-capacity LHDs reported better access to and support for adequate staff and staff training when compared with low-capacity LHDs. While high-capacity LHDs described integration of program evaluation into implementation and sustainability, low-capacity LHDs reported limited capacity for measurement specifically and evaluation generally. When high-capacity LHDs described program adoption, they discussed an opportunity to adapt and evaluate. Low-capacity LHDs struggled with programs requiring adaptation. High-capacity LHDs described higher quality communication than low-capacity LHDs. High- and low-capacity LHDs described strategic planning, but high

  14. Online Learning and the Oral Tradition: An Examination of the Strengths and Challenges of an Online Native American Leadership Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Linda R.

    2011-01-01

    The Office of Indian Education (OIE) in the U.S. Department of Education funds competitive grants for Native American school leadership preparation programs in order to improve the education of disadvantaged students identified under the 2001 "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB) reauthorization of "Elementary and Secondary Education…

  15. Strategies for implementing health promotion programs in multiple American Indian communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerly, Catherine Carmel; Laing, Shannon S; Day, Anya-Victoria G; Blackinton, Paulina M; Pingatore, Noel L; Haverkate, Richard T; Heany, Julia F

    2009-04-01

    American Indians experience significant health disparities compared to the general U.S. population. The Steps to a Healthier Anishinaabe program adopted a unique framework to implement health promotion intervention activities in multiple American Indian communities in Michigan. By enabling each community to tailor interventions to their specific culture and health priorities, the program is characterized by a culturally competent and community-driven approach to decrease the impact of chronic diseases on the health of Michigan's American Indians. This article describes the community-based framework and argues that multisite, community-tailored health promotion programs are a promising approach to reducing health disparities in minority populations.

  16. Special Report on the "Department of Energy's Efforts to Meet Accountability and Performance Reporting Objectives of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was to jumpstart the U.S. economy, create or save millions of jobs, spur technological advances in health and science, and invest in the Nation's energy future. The Department of Energy will receive an unprecedented $38 billion in Recovery Act funding to support a variety of science, energy, and environmental initiatives. The Recovery Act requires transparency and accountability over these funds. To this end, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued guidance requiring the Department to compile and report a wide variety of funding, accounting, and performance information. The Department plans to leverage existing information systems to develop accounting and performance information that will be used by program managers and ultimately reported to Recovery.gov, the government-wide source of Recovery Act information, and to OMB. The Department's iManage iPortal, a system that aggregates information from a number of corporate systems, will serve as the main reporting gateway for accounting information. In addition, the Department plans to implement a methodology or system that will permit it to monitor information reported directly to OMB by prime funding recipients. Furthermore, performance measures or metrics that outline expected outcomes are being developed, with results ultimately to be reported in a recently developed Department-wide system. Because of the significance of funds provided and their importance to strengthening the Nation's economy, we initiated this review to determine whether the Department had taken the steps necessary to ensure that Recovery Act funds can be appropriately tracked and are transparent to the public, and whether the benefits of the expenditures can be properly measured and reported clearly, accurately, and in a timely manner. Although not yet fully mature, we found that the Department's efforts to develop, refine, and apply

  17. 77 FR 31361 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application by American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application by American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (AOA/HFAP) for Continuing CMS-Approval of its Ambulatory Surgery Center (ASC) Accreditation Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare and...

  18. 77 FR 59616 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Osteopathic Association/Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (AOA/HFAP) Application for Continuing CMS-Approval of Its Ambulatory Surgical Center (ASC) Accreditation Program AGENCY: Centers for...

  19. Telehealth-Enabled Emergency Medical Services Program Reduces Ambulance Transport to Urban Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Robert Langabeer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Emergency medical services (EMS agencies transport a significant majority of patients with low acuity and non-emergent conditions to local emergency departments (ED, affecting the entire emergency care system’s capacity and performance. Opportunities exist for alternative models that integrate technology, telehealth, and more appropriately aligned patient navigation. While a limited number of programs have evolved recently, no empirical evidence exists for their efficacy. This research describes the development and comparative effectiveness of one large urban program. Methods The Houston Fire Department initiated the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN program in 2014. ETHAN combines telehealth, social services, and alternative transportation to navigate primary care-related patients away from the ED where possible. Using a case-control study design, we describe the program and compare differences in effectiveness measures relative to the control group. Results During the first 12 months, 5,570 patients participated in the telehealth-enabled program, which were compared against the same size control group. We found a 56% absolute reduction in ambulance transports to the ED with the intervention compared to the control group (18% vs. 74%, P<.001. EMS productivity (median time from EMS notification to unit back in service was 44 minutes faster for the ETHAN group (39 vs. 83 minutes, median. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality or patient satisfaction. Conclusion We found that mobile technology-driven delivery models are effective at reducing unnecessary ED ambulance transports and increasing EMS unit productivity. This provides support for broader EMS mobile integrated health programs in other regions.

  20. 76 FR 39119 - Privacy Act of 1974; Notice of a Computer Matching Program Between the Department of Housing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Privacy Act of 1974; Notice of a Computer Matching Program Between the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the United States Department of Education (ED) AGENCY: Office of... Donna Robinson-Staton, Chief Privacy Officer, Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of the...

  1. Communicating risks from the environmental mangaement program of the United States Department of Energy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, M. E.; Stenner, R.; Picel, K.; McGinn, W.; Environmental Assessment; DOE; ORNL

    2000-01-01

    With the inception of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program, the need for better communication of the Department's environmental risks was highlighted. A number of database systems were used to describe the EM program's risk with limited success. Then in December 1997, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management charged the DOE operations and field offices and the Center for Risk Excellence (CRE) to work together to create 'Risk Profiles' or 'Risk Stories.' The purpose of the Profiles is to increase effective communication of risks at a national level for DOE sites by creating a common sense approach to describing risks. This paper describes the progress to date and looks at the plans for future activities. Abbreviations. BGRR: Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor; CERCLA: Comprehensive Response, Compensation and Liability Act; CRE: Center for Risk Excellence; DOE: U.S. Department of Energy; EM: environmental management; ORNL: Oak Ridge National Laboratory; PBSs: Project Baseline Summaries; PtC: Paths to Closure; RDSs: Risk Data Sheets; RH: relative hazard; SRS CAB: Savannah River Site Citizens Advisory Board; VOCs: volatile organic compounds.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Photovoltaic Energy Program Contract Summary: Fiscal Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surek, T.

    2001-02-21

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R and D) activities under the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program from October 1, 1999, through September 30, 2000 (FY 2000). The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to make PV a significant part of the domestic economy-as an industry and an energy resource. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the U.S. industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the U.S. industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NCPV is part of the National PV Program and provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals. This Contract Summary for fiscal year (FY) 2000 documents some 179 research projects supported by the PV Program, performed by 107 organizations in 32 states, including 69 projects performed by universities and 60 projects performed by our industry partners. Of the total FY 2000 PV Program budget of $65.9 million, the industry and university research efforts received $36.9 million, or nearly 56%. And, of this amount, more than 93% was for contractors selected on a competitive basis. Much of the funding to industry was matched by industry cost-sharing. Each individual effort described in this summary represents another step toward improving PV manufacturing, performance, cost, and applications, and another step toward accomplishing the DOE PV Program's overall mission.

  3. African American and Latino Enrollment Trends among Medicine, Law, Business, and Public Affairs Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, Rodolfo; Moghadam, Sepehr Hejazi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this Tomas Rivera Policy Institute (TRPI) report is twofold: to provide an analysis of the enrollment trends for African American and Latino students among graduate professional programs in the fields of medicine, business, law, and public affairs, and to present other relevant data pertaining to African American and Latino students…

  4. Long-Term Effects of the Strong African American Families Program on Youths' Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H.; Chen, Yi-Fu; Kogan, Steven M.; Murry, Velma McBride; Brown, Anita C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective:This report extends earlier accounts by addressing the effects of the Strong African American Families (SAAF) program across 65 months. Two hypotheses were tested: (a) Rural African American youths randomly assigned to participate in SAAF would demonstrate lower rates of alcohol use than would control youths more than 5 years later, and…

  5. NIJ's Program of Research on Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, Christine; Palmer, Jane; Brooks, Alison

    2013-06-01

    The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 (Public Law Number 109-162), at Title IX, Section 904(a) (codified at 42 U.S.C. § 3796gg-10 note) mandates that the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), in consultation with the U.S. Department of Justice's Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), conduct a national baseline study on violence against American Indian and Alaska Native (AI and AN) women living in tribal communities. As a result, NIJ has developed a comprehensive research program consisting of multiple projects that will be accomplished over an extended period of time to address this much needed research. The purpose of the research program is to: examine violence against AI and AN women (including domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and murder) and identify factors that place AI and AN women at risk for victimization; evaluate the effectiveness of federal, state, tribal, and local responses to violence against AI and AN women; and propose recommendations to improve effectiveness of these responses.

  6. TOWARDS DEVELOPING A SUSTAINABLE FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM: An Initiative of an American Medical School in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Boushra; Mansour, Nabil; Zaatari, Ghazi

    2015-01-01

    The American University of Beirut Faculty of Medicine (AUB-FM) strategy is to develop faculty members (fm) skills by sponsoring local and international scientific activities has been in place for over three decades, and remains dependent on individuals' efforts. In 2011-2012, Faculty Development Program (FDP) was introduced to develop faculty leadership, business skills in medicine, fulfill personal and professional goals, followed by a five-year plan to cover five themes: Management/Leadership, Marketing, Finance, Strategic Planning and Communications with the purpose of integrating these themes in medical practice. A survey was sent to all departments at AUB-FM in 2011 to assess needs and determine themes. Nine workshops were conducted, followed by post-workshop evaluation. 117 fm responded to needs assessment surveys. Respondents had on average 15 years in clinical practice, 50% with extensive to moderate administrative experience; 71% assumed administrative responsibilities at least once, 56% in leadership positions. Faculty attendance dropped midway from 69 to 19, although workshops were rated very good to excellent. Although faculty were interested in FDP, the drop in attendance might be attributed to: challenges to achieve personal and professional goals while struggling to fulfill their roles, satisfy promotion requirements and generate their income. FDP has to be aligned with FM strategic goals and faculty objectives, be complimentary to a faculty mentoring program, provide rewards, and be supported by a faculty progression tool.

  7. Availability of Insurance Linkage Programs in U.S. Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Kanak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As millions of uninsured citizens who use emergency department (ED services are now eligible for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, the ED is ideally situated to facilitate linkage to insurance. Forty percent of U.S. EDs report having an insurance linkage program. This is the first national study to examine the characteristics of EDs that offer or do not offer these programs. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of data from the National Survey for Preventive Health Services in U.S. EDs conducted in 2008-09. We compared EDs with and without insurance programs across demographic and operational factors using univariate analysis. We then tested our hypotheses using multivariable logistic regression. We also further examined program capacity and priority among the sub-group of EDs with no insurance linkage program. Results: After adjustment, ED-insurance linkage programs were more likely to be located in the West (RR= 2.06, 95% CI = 1.33 – 2.72. The proportion of uninsured patients in an ED, teaching hospital status, and public ownership status were not associated with insurance linkage availability. EDs with linkage programs also offer more preventive services (RR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.37–2.35 and have greater social worker availability (RR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.12–2.33 than those who do not. Four of five EDs with a patient mix of ≥25% uninsured and no insurance linkage program reported that they could not offer a program with existing staff and funding. Conclusion: Availability of insurance linkage programs in the ED is not associated with the proportion of uninsured patients served by an ED. Policy or hospital-based interventions to increase insurance linkage should first target the 27% of EDs with high rates of uninsured patients that lack adequate program capacity. Further research on barriers to implementation and cost effectiveness may help to facilitate increased adoption of insurance linkage programs. [West J

  8. Department of Energy`s Wire Development Workshop - Superconductivity program for electric systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The 1996 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on January 31--February 1 at the Crown Plaza Tampa Westshore in Tampa, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Tampa Electric Company and sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. Tampa Electric`s Greg Ramon began the meeting by giving a perspective on the changes now occurring in the utility sector. Major program wire development accomplishments during the past year were then highlighted, particularly the world record achievements at Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The meeting then focussed on three priority technical issues: thallium conductors; AC losses in HTS conductors; and coated conductors on textured substrates. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss and critique the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  9. Innovative grants program teams up Canadian and Latin American ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-24

    Jun 24, 2016 ... Eric Smith. Canadian and Latin American researchers are jointly pursuing knowledge in a variety of disciplines, generating ideas and building international networks. For example, in Colombia, researchers from Simon Fraser University and the Centro Internacional de Entrenamiento e Investigaciones ...

  10. Continuing Education Programs within the American Heart Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembright, Katherine A.

    1970-01-01

    Because it believes the nurse can and must be a participant in the co-professional health team (doctor, nurse), the American Heart Association has become increasingly concerned with planning and carrying out activities that contribute to the continuing education of nurses. (PT)

  11. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book: American Indian Religious Freedom Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-11-01

    This Reference Book contains a copy of the American Indian Religious Freedom Act and guidance for DOE compliance with the statute. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically.

  12. Resolving the impasse in American energy policy. The case for a transformational R and D strategy at the U.S. Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K. [National University of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy Centre on Asia and Globalisation, 469C Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 259772 (Singapore)

    2009-02-15

    From its inception in 1977, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been responsible for maintaining the nation's nuclear stockpile, leading the country in terms of basic research, setting national energy goals, and managing thousands of individual programs. Despite these gains, however, the DOE research and development (R and D) model does not appear to offer the nation an optimal strategy for assessing long-term energy challenges. American energy policy continues to face constraints related to three I's: inconsistency, incrementalism, and inadequacy. An overly rigid management structure and loss of mission within the DOE continues to plague its programs and create inconsistencies in terms of a national energy policy. Various layers of stove-piping within and between the DOE and national laboratories continue to fracture collaboration between institutions and engender only slow, incremental progress on energy problems. And funding for energy research and development continues to remain inadequate, compromising the country's ability to address energy challenges. To address these concerns, an R and D organization dedicated to transformative, creative research is proposed. (author)

  13. Evaluation Report on "The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-10-01

    Industry experts report that security challenges and threats are continually evolving as malicious activity has become more web-based and attackers are able to rapidly adapt their attack methods. In addition, the number of data breaches continues to rise. In an effort to mitigate and address threats and protect valuable information, the Department of Energy anticipated spending about $275 million in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 to implement cyber security measures necessary to protect its information technology resources. These systems and data are designed to support the Department's mission and business lines of energy security, nuclear security, scientific discovery and innovation, and environmental responsibility. The Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002 (FISMA) provides direction to agencies on the management and oversight of information security risks, including design and implementation of controls to protect Federal information and systems. As required by FISMA, the Office of Inspector General conducts an annual independent evaluation to determine whether the Department's unclassified cyber security program adequately protects its information systems and data. This memorandum and the attached report present the results of our evaluation for FY 2009. The Department continued to make incremental improvements in its unclassified cyber security program. Our evaluation disclosed that most sites had taken action to address weaknesses previously identified in our FY 2008 evaluation report. They improved certification and accreditation of systems; strengthened configuration management of networks and systems; performed independent assessments; and, developed and/or refined certain policies and procedures. In addition, the Department instituted a centralized incident response organization designed to eliminate duplicative efforts throughout the Department. As we have noted in previous reports, the Department continued to maintain strong network

  14. U.S. Department of Energy photovoltaic energy program overview, fiscal year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis-Taylor, P.; Moon, S.

    2000-02-28

    This ``annual report'' details the FY 1999 achievements of the US Department of Energy PV Program in the categories of Research and Development, Technology Development, and Systems Engineering and Applications. Highlights include development of a record-breaking concentrator solar cell that is 32.3% efficient; fabrication of a record CIGS (copper indium gallium diselenide) cell at 18.8% efficiency; sharing an R and D 100 award with Siemens Solar Industries and the California Energy Commission for development and deployment of commercial CIS thin-film modules; and support for the efforts of the PV Industry Roadmap Workshop.

  15. North American long-term soil productivity research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan E. Tiarks; Marilyn A. Buford; Robert F. Powers; Jerry F. Ragus; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Felix Ponder; Douglas M. Stone

    1997-01-01

    The National Long-term Soil Productivity research program was chartered to address National Forest Management Act concerns over possible losses n soil productivity on national forest lands. The program supports validation of soil quality monitoring standards and process-level productivity research. Summarized results are supplied to forests as collected. National...

  16. IMPLEMENTASI PROGRAM CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSR USED MOTORCYCLE DEPARTMENT DALAM MENINGKATKAN CITRA PT. SUMMIT OTO FINANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERRIANSYAH FIRDAUS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is a program that held by the company as a form of social or environmental responsibility. UMC Dept of PT Summit Oto Finance do the CSR programs to establish good relations with the public and dealers. CSR program is handled by some sections, namely UMC Dept. Head, UMC Staff, Branch Manager and Marketing Head.The purpose of this report is to investigate the preparation, implementation and evaluation of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR UMC Department to improve the image of PT Summit Oto Finance. The concept of this research is public relations, corporate social responsibility and corporate image. This study used a qualitative approach with case study method. The data obtained by using observation, library research and in-depth interviews of key informants. The results of this study discusses the UMC Dept. CSR program in improving the image of PT Summit Oto Finance are divided into three stages, namely the preparation and planning stages, stages of implementation and evaluation stages. These three stages are carried out by the HO (head office that UMC Dept. Head and Staff and from the branch are Branch Manager and Marketing Head. The conclusion of this report is the CSR program UMC held on July 22, 2014. The three stages are performed optimally for results that have been planned, namely to establish good relations with the community and dealers as well as increasing the image that has been built.   Tanggung Jawab Sosial Perusahaan (CSR adalah program yang diselenggarakan oleh perusahaan sebagai bentuk tanggung jawab sosial atau lingkungan. UMC Dept dari PT Summit Oto Finance melakukan program CSR untuk menjalin hubungan baik dengan masyarakat dan dealer. Program CSR ditangani oleh beberapa bagian, yaitu Kepala Dept UMC, Staf UMC, Branch Manager dan Marketing Head. Tujuan dari laporan ini adalah untuk mengetahui persiapan, pelaksanaan dan evaluasi Tanggung Jawab Sosial Perusahaan UMC untuk memperbaiki

  17. Independent oversight review of the Department of Energy Quality Assurance Program for suspect/counterfeit parts. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    To address the potential threat that suspect/counterfeit parts could pose to DOE workers and the public, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight initiated a number of activities beginning in mid-1995. Oversight placed increased emphasis on the field`s quality assurance-suspect/counterfeit parts programs during safety management evaluations, in keeping with the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) oversight responsibilities, which include oversight of the Department`s quality assurance (QA) programs. In addition, Oversight reviewed relevant policy documents and occurrence reports to determine the nature and magnitude of the problem within the Department. The results of that review, contained in an Office of Oversight report, Independent Oversight Analysis of Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Within the Department of Energy (November 1995), indicate a lack of consistency and comprehensiveness in the Department`s QA-suspect/counterfeit parts program. A detailed analysis of the causes and impacts of the problem was recommended. In response, this review was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the Department`s QA program for suspect/counterfeit parts. This study goes beyond merely assessing and reporting the status of the program, however. It is the authors intention to highlight the complex issues associated with suspect/counterfeit parts in the Department today and to present approaches that DOE managers might consider to address these issues.

  18. Department of Energy Small-Scale Hydropower Program: Feasibility assessment and technology development summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinehart, B.N.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes two subprograms under the US Department of Energy's Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program. These subprograms were part of the financial assistance activities and included the Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) feasibility assessments and the technology development projects. The other major subprograms included engineering research and development, legal and institutional aspects, and technology transfer. These other subprograms are covered in their respective summary reports. The problems of energy availability and increasing costs of energy led to a national effort to develop economical and environmental attractive alternative energy resources. One such alternative involved the utilization of existing dams with hydraulic heads of <65 ft and the capacity to generate hydroelectric power of 15 MW or less. Thus, the PRDA program was initiated along with the Technology Development program. The purpose of the PRDA feasibility studies was to encourage development of renewable hydroelectric resources by providing engineering, economic, environmental, safety, and institutional information. Fifty-five feasibility studies were completed under the PRDA. This report briefly summarizes each of those projects. Many of the PRDA projects went on to become technology development projects. 56 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Teaching methods and surgical training in North American graduate periodontics programs: exploring the landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiabi, Edmond; Taylor, K Lynn

    2010-06-01

    This project aimed at documenting the surgical training curricula offered by North American graduate periodontics programs. A survey consisting of questions on teaching methods employed and the content of the surgical training program was mailed to directors of all fifty-eight graduate periodontics programs in Canada and the United States. The chi-square test was used to assess whether the residents' clinical experience was significantly (Pperiodontal plastic procedures, hard tissue grafts, and implants. Furthermore, residents in programs offering a structured preclinical component performed significantly more procedures (P=0.012) using lasers than those in programs not offering a structured preclinical program. Devising new and innovative teaching methods is a clear avenue for future development in North American graduate periodontics programs.

  20. Community-based participatory research with Native American communities: the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird

    2010-11-01

    Health disparities among Native Americans persist despite efforts to translate evidence-based programs from research to practice. Few evidence-based, theory-driven prevention and management interventions have been successfully translated within Native American communities. The use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) has shown promise in this process. This article provides an overview of the use of CBPR with Native American communities and discusses the translation of the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program, using a CBPR approach, with an urban Native American community. This article highlights not only how the CBPR process facilitates the successful translation of the Stanford program but also how CBPR is used within this community to build community capacity.

  1. Do cultural differences influence batterer intervention program outcomes? A studywith Spanish and Latin American offenders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Vargas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed, first, if there were any differences in attitudes towards partner violence (i.e., perceivedseverity, victim blaming, and acceptability, responsibility attributions, sexism, and risk of recidivismbetween Latin American immigrants and Spanish offenders convicted of intimate-partner violence at thebeginning of a batterer intervention program. Second, differences in the batterer intervention programoutcomes between Spanish and Latin American offenders were explored. The sample consisted of 278batterers (211 Spanish and 67 Latin American who participated in a community-based battererintervention program. Results showed significant differences between Spanish and Latin Americanoffenders in perceived severity, victim blaming, violence against women acceptability, and benevolentsexism. Regarding batterer intervention program outcomes, results showed that despite initial differencesbetween Spanish and Latin American offenders, both groups benefit equally from the intervention.

  2. Ideological dimensions of community participation in Latin American health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, A

    1985-01-01

    A comparative analysis of community participation in urban and agricultural programs, and health programs in Latin America suggests that the promotion of community participation was based in all cases on two false assumptions: the belief that the traditional values of the poor were the main obstacle for development and for health improvement; and the idea that the poor were incapable of organizing themselves. A country by country examination indicates that health participation programs in Latin America, in spite of promotional efforts by international agencies, have not succeeded. Then, the article discusses the political objectives behind international support for these programs. It is argued that, through symbolic participation, international agencies had two purposes in mind: the legitimization of low quality care for the poor, also known as primary health; and the generation of much needed support from the masses for the liberal democracies and authoritarian regimes of the region.

  3. Cherokee Choices: a diabetes prevention program for American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachar, Jeffrey J; Lefler, Lisa J; Reed, Lori; McCoy, Tara; Bailey, Robin; Bell, Ronny

    2006-07-01

    In 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provided Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health 2010 (REACH 2010) funds to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to develop a community-based intervention to improve the health of this rural, mountainous community in North Carolina. During the first year of the Cherokee Choices program, team members conducted formative research, formed coalitions, and developed a culturally appropriate community action plan for the prevention of type 2 diabetes, particularly among children. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians has higher rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes than the U.S. and North Carolina general populations. The Cherokee Choices program includes three main components: elementary school mentoring, worksite wellness for adults, and church-based health promotion. A social marketing strategy, including television advertisements and a television documentary series, supports the three components. School policy was altered to allow Cherokee Choices to have class time and after-school time devoted to health promotion activities. School staff have shown an interest in improving their health through attendance at fitness sessions. The credibility of the program has been validated through multiple invitations to participate in school events. Participants in the worksite wellness program have met dietary and physical activity goals, had reductions in body fat, and expressed enthusiasm for the program. A subcoalition has been formed to expand the worksite wellness component and link prevention efforts to health care cost reduction. Participants in the church program have walked more than 31,600 miles collectively.

  4. Girl World: a primary prevention program for Mexican American girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia J; Bobo, Tess J; McLachlan, Kate; Avery, Shana; Burge, Sandra K

    2006-04-01

    Theories about women's health have not traditionally been extended to include the healthy development of young women. This article applies a women's health perspective to the implementation and evaluation processes of a gender-specific primary prevention program that worked with 9- to 14-year-old Hispanic girls in a low-income community. Although community-based after-school programs can be an important venue for education and girls' development, long-term effects are elusive to evaluate. The authors used ethnographic techniques to learn more about girls and their interactions with the program and to assess short-term program impact. Three themes were found: Program environment can contribute to girls' expression and behavior, issues of struggling families can slide girls into early adulthood, and mentoring can benefit both girls and adult women. Community-based primary prevention programs, although an essential part of a social safety net available to low-income girls, provide researchers with a unique set of evaluation challenges.

  5. Family eating and physical activity practices among African American, Filipino American, and Hispanic American families: Implications for developing obesity prevention programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Sobong Porter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity among children and adults is well-documented as an escalating problem. The purpose of this study is to determine the blood pressure, self-esteem, and eating and physical activity practices among African Americans, Filipino Americans, and Hispanic Americans; and project implications for development of childhood obesity prevention programs. This descriptive study was conducted in a convenience sample of 110 mothers recruited in health clinics and community centers located in Southeast Florida: 19% African Americans, 26% Filipino Americans, and 55% Hispanic Americans. The data, collected via self-administered questionnaires and a guided interview (Family Eating and Activity Habits Questionnaire, Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale, Background Information Questionnaire, were analyzed via descriptive and inferential statistics with findings significant at p < .05. Results revealed differences and similarities in eating and activity practices between Filipinos and Blacks or Hispanics. Blood pressure and self-esteem did not differ by ethnicity; however, overweight mothers tended to have overweight children. The results point clearly to the importance of the mothers’ role modeling in eating and physical activity practices of families, reflecting the influence of mothers’ behaviors in children’s healthy behaviors, albeit family health. Given that mothers own physical exercise and eating habits could influence their children’s physical activity levels and food choices, a parental advice strategy could be disseminated directly to parents by health professionals. Study findings may raise public awareness of the increasing prevalence and consequences of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents, particularly among vulnerable ethnic groups. The findings provide a database for nurse practitioners and other health service providers for the development of culturally sensitive focused public health education programs to prevent

  6. The Nature and Predictive Validity of a Benchmark Assessment Program in an American Indian School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Beverly J. R.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored the nature of a benchmark assessment program and how well the benchmark assessments predicted End-of-Grade (EOG) and End-of-Course (EOC) test scores in an American Indian school district. Five major themes were identified and used to develop a Dimensions of Benchmark Assessment Program Effectiveness model:…

  7. The Relationship between Racial Identity and Acculturative Stress among African American Students in Counselor Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tiffany A.; Owens, Delila; Queener, John E.; Reynolds, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined racial identity and acculturative stress among 116 African American counselor education graduate students in Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) accredited programs. Results indicated that racial identity and acculturative stress remain viable variables to take into…

  8. What Motivational Factors Influence African American Males to Enter a Doctorial Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the motivational factors that influence African American men to enter a doctoral program by identifying the motivational factors that influenced them to enter a doctorial program. The findings were compared to Dr. Gloria J. Hill's dissertation study (2005), "What Motivational Factors Influence…

  9. Parent training in head start: a comparison of program response among African American, Asian American, Caucasian, and Hispanic mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M J; Webster-Stratton, C; Beauchaine, T P

    2001-12-01

    The effectiveness of the Incredible Years Parenting Program was evaluated in a low-income sample of Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, and Asian mothers whose children were enrolled in Head Start. Data from two prior intervention studies [Webster-Stratton (1998) Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 66(5), 715-730; Webster-Stratton et al. (in press) Journal of Clinical Child Psychology] were combined, yielding a sample of 634 families (370 Caucasian, 120 African American, 73 Asian, 71 Hispanic) across 23 Head Start centers. Centers were matched and assigned randomly to either an experimental condition (8-12 weeks of weekly 2-hr parenting classes), or a control condition (the regular Head Start Program without parenting groups). Families in both conditions were assessed using home observations of parent-child interactions and parent reports of parenting style and discipline strategies and child behavior problems in the fall (baseline) and spring (postintervention) of the children's Head Start year. Families were reassessed 1 year later. Following treatment, intervention mothers were observed to be more positive, less critical, more consistent, and more competent in their parenting than were control mothers. Additionally, children of intervention parents were observed to exhibit fewer behavior problems than were control children. Differences in treatment response across ethnic groups were few, and did not exceed the number expected by chance. Parents from all groups reported high satisfaction levels following the parenting program. Results indicate that the Incredible Years Program is accepted by and effective with diverse populations.

  10. Help Wanted: American Drone Program Needs Multifaceted Support to be Effective

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, S

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. drone program in Pakistan faces strong resistance in Pakistan. Because the program solely seeks to eliminate terrorist groups and leaders through bombing campaigns, with no built in social support, the local population’s anti-American sentiment has reached the highest level in history. This angry mood against U.S. drone programs is spreading throughout the Islamic world. To counter this anti-American sentiment, and increase the drone program’s effectiveness, the U.S. must invest in m...

  11. The quest for quality blood banking program in the new millennium the American way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Un

    2002-08-01

    For an industry to succeed and satisfy its customers, "QUALITY" must be a primary goal. Quality has been central to blood banking from its inception, with the evolution of a Quality Program since the opening of the first blood bank in U.S. at the Cook County Hospital in 1937. Over the ensuing decades, continuous scientific progress in blood preservation, filters, viral and blood group testing, crossmatching, automation, and computerization including bar coding, etc. has contributed to the quality and safety of the blood products and transfusion service. However, with the advent of the AIDS era, an increasingly sensitized and informed public is continuously demanding that the highest level of quality be achieved and maintained in all processes involved in providing all blood products. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) introduced the concept of a "zero risk blood supply" as the industry goal. Furthermore, the cost containment and resource-constrained environment have changed the complexity of the quality practice. Both regulatory agencies such as the FDA, the Health Care Financing Administration [HCFA, which was recently renamed as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in July, 2001], and the State Department of Health, and accrediting agencies, such as the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB), the College of American Pathologists (CAP), and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), require blood banks and transfusion services to establish and follow a Quality Control and Quality Assurance Program for their licensing, certification and accreditation. Every laboratory has to comply with the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA '88) quality requirements being implemented by the CMS. The FDA guidelines assist facilities in compliance with Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP). The AABB's Quality System Essentials (QSE) are based on these specifications and provide additional guidance in

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Searing, J.M.

    1997-12-01

    New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  13. Fossil Energy Research and Development Program of the U. S. Department of Energy, FY 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) focuses energy Research and Development efforts on new and promising ways to provide for our future energy needs. This document focuses on DOE's programs and projects related to the nation's Fossil Energy resources: coal, oil, natural gas and oil shale. Fossil Energy programs have grown rapidly from about $58 million in FY 1973 to the $802 million requested for FY 1979. As those programs have matured, there have been significant shifts in emphasis. For example, by FY 1979, gasification technologies will have matured sufficiently to enter the demonstration phase. Then we will have to make critical decisions as to which candidate processes to pursue and to encourage industry's active participation as early as possible. We will present the rationale for those changes and others at the beginning of each section describing a particular grouping of similar projects, e.g., coal liquefaction. We will then discuss each project and present its current status along with past and future milestones. Emphasis is on projects with early payoff potential, particularly the direct utilization of coal. However, this near-term emphasis will not overshadow the need for a stong technological base for development of longer-term promising technologies and the need for a strong environmental concern.

  14. Environmental Assessment of the US Department of Energy Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M.K.; Bernard, M.J. III; Walsh, R.F

    1980-11-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) focuses on the long-term (1985-2000) impacts of the US Department of Energy (DOE) electric and hybrid vehicle (EHV) program. This program has been designed to accelerate the development of EHVs and to demonstrate their commercial feasibility as required by the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976 (P.L. 94-413), as amended (P.L. 95-238). The overall goal of the program is the commercialization of: (1) electric vehicles (EVs) acceptable to broad segments of the personal and commercial vehicle markets, (2) hybrid vehicles (HVs) with range capabilities comparable to those of conventional vehicles (CVs), and (3) advanced EHVs completely competitive with CVs with respect to both cost and performance. Five major EHV projects have been established by DOE: market demonstration, vehicle evaluation and improvement, electric vehicle commercialization, hybrid vehicle commercialization, and advanced vehicle development. Conclusions are made as to the effects of EV and HV commercialization on the: consumption and importation of raw materials; petroleum and total energy consumption; ecosystems impact from the time of obtaining raw material through vehicle use and materials recycling; environmental impacts on air and water quality, land use, and noise; health and safety aspects; and socio-economic factors. (LCL)

  15. The U.S. Department of Energy Wind Turbine Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, H.; Laxson, A.; Smith, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The development of technologically-advanced wind turbines continues to be a high priority of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a range of projects that assist the wind industry to design, develop, and test new wind turbines. The overall goal is to develop turbines that can compete with conventional electric generation with a cost of energy (COE) of 5 cents/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s and with a cost of energy of 4 cents/kWh or less at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be supported through the DOE Turbine Development Program. The Turbine Development Program uses a two-path approach. The first path assists US industry to develop and integrate innovative technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near-term (mid-1990s). The second path assists industry to develop a new generation of turbines for the year 2000. This paper describes present and planned projects under the Turbine Development Program.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  17. Strategic Planning for Recruitment and Retention of Older African Americans in Health Promotion Research Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreer, Laura E; Weston, June; Owsley, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to 1) describe a strategic plan for recruitment and retention used in conducting eye health education research with African-Americans living in urban and rural areas of Alabama and 2) characterize recruitment and retention patterns for this community-based project. We evaluated an eye health education program tailored specifically to older African Americans. InCHARGE© was designed to promote eye disease prevention by conveying the personal benefits of annual, dilated, comprehensive eye care and teaching strategies to minimize barriers to regular eye care. The InCHARGE© program or a social contact control program was delivered at 20 senior centers in predominately African American urban and rural communities. From pooled data across three studies, 380 African Americans completed a questionnaire about knowledge and attitudes/beliefs about eye disease and eye care before the program and by telephone at either 3 or 6 months after the presentation. The project consisted of 4 phases and a total of 10 strategic objectives for recruitment as well as retention of older African Americans that were implemented in a systematic fashion. Overall, retention rates for follow-up at either 3 or 6 months were 75% and 66% respectively. African Americans from rural areas were more likely to be lost to follow-up compared to those from urban areas. We discuss the benefits of utilizing a strategic plan that serves to address problems with underrepresentation of minorities in clinical research.

  18. American Indian Access to Department of Defense Facilities: Source Documents and Bibliography (Legacy Resource Management Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Their Predeces- sors. Ballena Press Anthropological Papers No. 11. Blackburn, Thomas C. 1974 Ceremonial Integration and Social Interaction in Aboriginal...California. In Lowell J. Bean and Thomas F. King, eds., ?Antap: California Inaran Political and Economic Organization. Ballena Press Anthropological...and Melissa Rempe 1978 Tomol: Chumash Watercraft as Described in the Ethnographic Notes of John P. Harrington. Ballena Press Anthropological Papers No

  19. An Analysis of Writing Coach Programs on American Daily Newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakaniemi, Ray

    A survey of 239 newspapers was conducted to explore the use of writing coach programs at these papers. The coaches' backgrounds, newsroom factors, specific writing problems, budgetary considerations, and implications for journalism education were all explored, as were the perceptions of editors supervising the writing coaches. Of the 239 papers…

  20. The need for a North American coordinated bird monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan Bart; Ralph C. John

    2005-01-01

    Bird monitoring is at a crossroads. While monitoring programs have existed in North America for nearly a century, recent political, biological, sociological, and economic changes necessitate a new and more efficient approach. Fortunately we now have tools available to meet the demands, including powerful coalitions of the willing within agencies, organizations, and...

  1. Feasibility of a computer-assisted alcohol SBIRT program in an urban emergency department: patient and research staff perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Mary K; Bijur, Polly E; Rosenbloom, David; Bernstein, Steven L; Gallagher, E John

    2013-01-01

    ...) program to identify at-risk alcohol users among adult emergency department (ED) patients. The study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of implementing a computerized screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment...

  2. Michigan Department of Transportation state planning and research part II program : research and implementation manual [revised June 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Research and Implementation Manual describes the administrative processes used by : Research Administration to develop and implement the Michigan Department of Transportation : (MDOT) research program. Contents of this manual include a discussion...

  3. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2002-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from

  4. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program; 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2003-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year

  5. A system-wide solution to antidote stocking in emergency departments: the Nova Scotia antidote program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nancy G; Bona, D Ruth; Hurley, Theresa A

    2017-09-20

    Inadequate stocking of essential antidotes in hospitals is an internationally documented problem. A concrete and sustainable system-wide solution for easy access to antidotes in emergency departments (EDs) was developed and implemented in Nova Scotia, Canada. Antidote stocking guidelines and a systemwide antidote management strategy were established. A standardized collection of antidotes housed in highly visible containers in provincial EDs was implemented for timely access. Antidote-specific online administration guidelines were developed. Using the poison centre for surveillance, the antidote program maintained a database of antidote utilization patterns; 11 years of data were available for analysis. 2/2 (100%) tertiary care, 9/9 (100%) regional EDs, and 21/25 (84%) community EDs in Nova Scotia stock antidote kits, for an overall compliance rate of 32/36 (89%). A total of 678 antidotes (excluding N-acetylcysteine) were used for 520 patients. The distribution of antidote use by hospital type was 99/678 (14.6%) at community hospitals, 379/678 (55.9%) at regional hospitals, and 200/678 (29.5%) at tertiary care hospitals. The five most commonly used antidotes were: naloxone 143/678 (21.1%), fomepizole 111/678 (16.4%), glucagon 94/678 (13.9%), calcium 70/678 (10.3%), and sodium bicarbonate 67/678 (9.9%). Of the 520 patients in whom antidotes were used, death occurred in 3% (15/520), major outcomes in 35% (183/520), and moderate outcomes in 39% (205/520). The Nova Scotia Antidote Program demonstrates that a solution to inadequate antidote stocking is achievable and requires a system-wide approach with ongoing maintenance and surveillance. The frequency and distribution of antidote usage documented in this program supports the need for enhancement of emergency preparedness. The poison centre and hospital pharmacies are crucial to surveillance and maintenance of this program.

  6. Emergency department tobacco cessation program: staff participation and intervention success among patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Marna Rayl; Weinstock, Michael; Fenimore, Deborah Gaston; Sierzega, Gina M

    2008-08-01

    The emergency department (ED) is often the primary source of healthcare for uninsured and underinsured patients. To evaluate ED staff attitudes toward and participation in referring patients to a tobacco cessation program, and to assess the program's effectiveness. A nonvalidated survey on smoking cessation and preventative services for ED patients was mailed to ED staff at a suburban hospital. After survey completion, ED staff was encouraged to refer smokers with diagnoses substantially worsened by tobacco use to a brief intervention delivered in the ED. An incentive was provided to staff beginning in the second month of the 3-month period. Referred patients were briefly counseled by a hospital social worker or an ED physician or nurse. Follow-up telephone interviews with patients occurred 1 to 3 months postintervention. Of the 70 ED staff contacted, 63 (90%) responded to the survey. Most staff members (81%) agreed that they should facilitate clinical prevention. Fewer staff (60%) were comfortable advising patients to quit tobacco use (Pstaff should assist patients in tobacco cessation (PStaff referrals increased with program incentives (P=.008), with a total of 150 interventions occurring in the 3-month span. Of the 36 patients (24%) reached for follow-up, 13 (36%) attempted to quit and 6 (17%) succeeded. Overall, 45% of the patients reached for follow-up either cut down or quit tobacco use. Staff members' attitudes toward tobacco cessation are not a firm barrier to the successful implementation of an ED tobacco cessation program. In addition, the ED provides an important opportunity to encourage patients to quit or cut down tobacco use.

  7. 48 CFR 1052.219-73 - Department of the Treasury Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... as defined in 13 CFR parts 121, 124, and 126. Developmental assistance is technical, managerial... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1052.219-73 Department of the Treasury Mentor-Protégé Program. As described in DTAR 1019...

  8. 77 FR 16250 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment; Office of Native American Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... Native American, Alaska Native, and native Hawaiian communities, as funded by Indian Housing Block Grants...: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public and Indian Housing, HUD. ACTION: Notice of proposed..., Departmental Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW...

  9. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the results from the analysis of the 43rd set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIII) that were received on or before December 1, 1995. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 2 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

  10. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenlaw, P.D.

    1998-01-01

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 4 days after the reporting deadline via the Internet at www.eml.doe.gov. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 47th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVII) that were received on or before December 1, 1997.

  11. A Preventive Intervention Program for Urban African American Youth Attending an Alternative Education Program: Background, Implementation, and Feasibility

    OpenAIRE

    Carswell, Steven B.; Hanlon, Thomas E.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Watts, Amy M.; Pothong, Pattarapan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents background, implementation, and feasibility findings associated with planning and conducting an after-school intervention program in an alternative education setting designed to prevent the initiation and escalation of violence and substance abuse among urban African American youth at high risk for life-long problem behaviors. Evolving from earlier preventive interventions implemented in clinic and school settings, the program, entitled The Village Model of Care, consisted...

  12. Prescription monitoring programs and emergency department visits involving opioids, 2004–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Brandon C.; Bachhuber, Marcus A.; Mitra, Nandita; Starrels, Joanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) implementation and emergency department (ED) visits involving opioid analgesics. Methods Rates of ED visits involving opioid analgesics per 100,000 residents were estimated from the Drug Abuse Warning Network dataset for 11 geographically diverse metropolitan areas in the United States on a quarterly basis from 2004 to 2011. Generalized estimating equations assessed whether implementation of a prescriber-accessible PDMP was associated with a difference in ED visits involving opioid analgesics. Models were adjusted for calendar quarter, metropolitan area, metropolitan area-specific linear time trends, and unemployment rate. Results Rates of ED visits involving opioid analgesics increased in all metropolitan areas. PDMP implementation was not associated with a difference in ED visits involving opioid analgesics (mean difference of 0.8 visits [95% CI: −3.7 to 5.2] per 100,000 residents per quarter). Conclusions During 2004–2011, PDMP implementation was not associated with a change in opioid-related morbidity, as measured by emergency department visits involving opioid analgesics. Urgent investigation is needed to determine the optimal PDMP structure and capabilities to improve opioid analgesic safety. PMID:26454836

  13. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovrak, Jon (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Ford, WA); Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2004-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and

  14. Do cultural differences influence batterer intervention program outcomes? A studywith Spanish and Latin American offenders

    OpenAIRE

    Viviana Vargas; Marisol Lila; Alba Catalá-Miñana

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed, first, if there were any differences in attitudes towards partner violence (i.e., perceivedseverity, victim blaming, and acceptability), responsibility attributions, sexism, and risk of recidivismbetween Latin American immigrants and Spanish offenders convicted of intimate-partner violence at thebeginning of a batterer intervention program. Second, differences in the batterer intervention programoutcomes between Spanish and Latin American offenders were explored. The samp...

  15. A Preventive Intervention Program for Urban African American Youth Attending an Alternative Education Program: Background, Implementation, and Feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, Steven B.; Hanlon, Thomas E.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Watts, Amy M.; Pothong, Pattarapan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents background, implementation, and feasibility findings associated with planning and conducting an after-school intervention program in an alternative education setting designed to prevent the initiation and escalation of violence and substance abuse among urban African American youth at high risk for life-long problem behaviors.…

  16. Malabar Reading Program for Mexican-American Children, Los Angeles, California. Elementary Program in Compensatory Education, 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    This program attempted to raise the reading levels of Mexican-American children (prekindergarten through grade three) through individualized instruction, self-instruction, curriculum change, parent participation, and cultural activities. It was assumed that children would become capable of self-regulating learning behavior only when they had…

  17. Structured Annual Faculty Review Program Accelerates Professional Development and Promotion: Long-Term Experience of the Duke University Medical Center's Pathology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robboy, Stanley J; McLendon, Roger

    2017-01-01

    This retrospective observational study on faculty development analyzes the Duke University Pathology Department's 18-year experience with a structured mentoring program involving 51 junior faculty members. The majority had MD degrees only (55%). The percentage of young women faculty hires before 1998 was 25%, increasing to 72% after 2005. Diversity also broadened from 9% with varied heritages before 1998 to 37% since then. The mentoring process pivoted on an annual review process. The reviews generally helped candidates focus much earlier, identified impediments they individually felt, and provided new avenues to gain a national reputation for academic excellence. National committee membership effectively helped gain national exposure. Thirty-eight percent of the mentees served on College of American Pathologists (CAP) committees, exponential multiples of any other national society. Some used CAP resources to develop major programs, some becoming nationally and internationally recognized for their academic activities. Several faculty gained national recognition as thought leaders for publishing about work initiated to serve administrative needs in the Department. The review process identified the need for more protected time for research, issues with time constraints, and avoiding exploitation when collaborating with other departments. This review identified a rigorous faculty mentoring and review process that included annual career counseling, goal-oriented academic careers, monitored advancement to promotion, higher salaries, and national recognition. All contributed to high faculty satisfaction and low faculty turnover. We conclude that a rigorous annual faculty review program and its natural sequence, promotion, can greatly foster faculty satisfaction.

  18. Motivating Young Native American Students to Pursue STEM Learning Through a Culturally Relevant Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Sally; Andrade, Rosi; Page, Melissa

    2016-12-01

    Data indicate that females and ethnic/race minority groups are underrepresented in the science and engineering workforce calling for innovative strategies to engage and retain them in science education and careers. This study reports on the development, delivery, and outcomes of a culturally driven science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) program, iSTEM, aimed at increasing engagement in STEM learning among Native American 3rd-8th grade students. A culturally relevant theoretical framework, Funds of Knowledge, informs the iSTEM program, a program based on the contention that the synergistic effect of a hybrid program combining two strategic approaches (1) in-school mentoring and (2) out-of-school informal science education experiences would foster engagement and interest in STEM learning. Students are paired with one of three types of mentors: Native American community members, university students, and STEM professionals. The iSTEM program is theme based with all program activities specifically relevant to Native people living in southern Arizona. Student mentees and mentors complete interactive flash STEM activities at lunch hour and attend approximately six field trips per year. Data from the iSTEM program indicate that the program has been successful in engaging Native American students in iSTEM as well as increasing their interest in STEM and their science beliefs.

  19. Joint environmental assessment 1997--2001 of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Top Virus Control Program for Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The DOE, Naval Petroleum reserves in California (NPRC), proposes to sign an Amendment to the Cooperative Agreement and Supplement with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to extend the term of the Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) in California. This program involves Malathion spraying on NPRC lands to control the beet leafhopper, over a five year period from 1997 through 2001. It is expected that approximately 330 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 (NPR-1) and approximately 9,603 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 2 (NPR-2) will be treated with Malathion annually by CDFA during the course of this program. The actual acreage subject to treatment can vary from year to year. Pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, the potential impacts of the proposed action were analyzed in a Joint Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1011) with the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) acting as lead agency, in consultation with the CDFA, and the DOE acting as a cooperating agency. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the conduct of the Curly Top Virus Control Program in California is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is consequently issuing a FONSI.

  20. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs. Status 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE`s nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ``Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers`` and PNL-6577 ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.`` The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility.

  1. Expanding The INSPIRED COPD Outreach ProgramTM to the emergency department: a feasibility assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillis D

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Darcy Gillis,1 Jillian Demmons,1 Graeme Rocker1,2 1Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Nova Scotia Health Authority, Halifax, NS, Canada; 2Division of Respirology, Nova Scotia Health Authority, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada Background: The Halifax-based INSPIRED COPD Outreach Program™ is a facility-to-community home-based novel clinical initiative that through improved care transitions, self-management, and engagement in advance care planning has demonstrated a significant (60%–80% reduction in health care utilization with substantial cost aversion. By assessing the feasibility of expanding INSPIRED into the emergency department (ED we anticipated extending reach and potential for positive impact of INSPIRED to those with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD who avoid hospital admission.Methods: Patients were eligible for the INSPIRED-ED study if >40 years of age, diagnosed with AECOPD and discharged from the ED, willing to be referred, community dwelling with at least one of: previous use of the ED services, admission to Intermediate Care Unit/Intensive Care Unit, or admission to hospital with AECOPD in the past year. We set feasibility objectives for referral rates, completion of action plans, advance care planning participation, and reduction in ED visit frequency.Results: Referral rates were 0.5/week. Among eligible patients (n=174 33 (19% were referred of whom 15 (M=4, F=11 enrolled in INSPIRED-ED. Mean (SD age was 68 (7 years, post-bronchdilator FEV1 44.2 (15.5 % predicted, and Medical Research Council (MRC dyspnea score 3.8 (0.41. We met feasibility objectives for action plan and advance care planning completion. Frequency of subsequent ED visits fell by 54%. Mean (SD Care Transition Measure (CTM-3 improved from 8.6 (2.0 to 11.3 (1.3, P=0.0004, and of 14 patients responding 12 (86% found the program very helpful. An additional 34

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2011 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satypal, S.

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes the comments provided by peer reviewers on hydrogen and fuel cell projects presented at the FY 2011 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), held May 9-13, 2011 in Arlington, Virginia

  3. 45 CFR 287.155 - What reports must a grantee file with the Department about its NEW Program operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... policies. (c) The report form and instructions are distributed through ACF's program instruction system. (d... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What reports must a grantee file with the... FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE NATIVE EMPLOYMENT WORKS (NEW) PROGRAM Data Collection...

  4. 75 FR 7648 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Department of Veterans Affairs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    .../Veterans Benefits Administration (VA/ VBA))--Match Number 1309 AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA... announces a renewal of an existing computer matching program that we are currently conducting with VA/VBA... Matching Program, SSA With the Department of Veterans Affairs/Veterans Benefits Administration (VA/VBA) A...

  5. Program Sustainability: Hearing Loss and Tinnitus Prevention in American Indian Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William Hal; Sobel, Judith L; Griest, Susan E; Howarth, Linda C; Becker, Thomas M

    2017-03-01

    An important goal of any health promotion effort is to have it maintained in delivery and effectiveness over time. The purpose of this study was to establish a community-based noise-induced hearing loss and tinnitus prevention program in three different types of American Indian communities and evaluate them for evidence of long-term sustainability. The target population was fourth- and fifth-grade students from three different models of American Indian communities. The evidenced-based Dangerous Decibels ® program was adapted to include local media, classroom education, family and community outreach, and web-based activities. Sustainability was attempted by promoting funding stability, political support, partnerships, organizational capacity, program adaptation, program evaluation, communications, public health impacts, and strategic planning. Currently, there is evidence suggesting that the hearing health promotion program is self-sustaining in all three American Indian communities. The intervention was effective at changing knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors in the target population, but program adoption and self-sustenance faced challenges that required patience, persistence, and creativity by the program team. Components of the intervention continue to be delivered by local members of each community. Critical factors that led to self-sustaining programs included approval of community leaders and engagement of community members in the design, administration, and evaluation of the effort; use of a well-developed, evidence-based intervention; and high-level training of local participants who could confidently and effectively continue delivering the program following a gradual transition to independence. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Technology transfer for the US Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program: Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneau, C.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

    1988-10-01

    This document contains the appendices to Technology Transfer Recommendations for the US Department of Energy's Storage Program (PNL-6484, Vol. 1). These appendices are a list of projects, publications, and presentations connected with the Energy Storage (STOR) program. In Volume 1, the technology transfer activities of the STOR program are examined and mechanisms for increasing the effectiveness of those activities are recommended.

  7. Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Annual report, August 31, 1991--August 29, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1992-05-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics (to become the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering on July 1, 1992). As such, it is effectively used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia as well as those at other area colleges and universities. The expansion of support to educational programs in the mid-east region is a major objective. To assist in meeting this objective, the University of Virginia has been supported under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Program since 1978. Due to the success of the program, this proposal requests continued DOE support through August 1993.

  8. 20 CFR 632.88 - General responsibilities of the Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... 632.88 Section 632.88 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management § 632.88... Indian and Native American employment and training programs, for the selection, administration...

  9. Residency program characteristics that are associated with pass rate of the American Board of Pediatrics certifying exam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsawarungruangkit A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amporn Atsawarungruangkit Department of Family Medicine, Rajavithi Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand Background: The US is home to almost 200 pediatrics residency programs; despite this, there is little information about the relationship between program characteristics and performance in the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP certifying exam. Objective: To evaluate the relationship between pass rate of the ABP certifying exam with the characteristics of categorical pediatrics residency programs. Methods: This retrospective, cross-sectional study used publicly available data from the ABP website and the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database. All programs that reported pass rates were included. The analysis, comprising univariate and multivariate linear regression, involved determining how 69 factors (eg, general information, number of faculty and trainees, work schedule, educational environment related to the pass rate. Results: Of 199 programs, 194 reported pass rates. The univariate analysis revealed 20 program characteristics with P-values <0.10. However, in the multivariate analysis, pass rate was significantly associated with only three program characteristics: ratio of full-time equivalent paid faculty to positions, percentage of US medical graduates, and average hours per week of regularly scheduled lectures or conferences. Conclusion: Unlike in previous studies, location and program size were not significantly associated with the pass rate in this multivariate analysis. The finding regarding the ratio of full-time equivalent paid faculty to positions highlighted the benefits of a well-supervised training environment, while that regarding the percentage of US medical graduates indicated the necessity of high competition in residency programs. Finally, longer hours per week of regularly scheduled lectures or conferences were associated with better academic outcomes, both statistically and intuitively. Keywords: ABP, pediatrics

  10. Institutional support for diverse populations: perceptions of Hispanic and african american students and program faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Mary Lou; Cason, Carolyn L; Baxley, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Using the Adapted Model of Institutional Support as a framework, data were collected from 90 minority students, 80 faculty members, and 31 administrators from schools of nursing in Texas to determine perceived barriers and needed supports for program completion. Findings illustrate similar and differing perceptions of Hispanic and African American students, faculty, and program administrators. The data provide a baseline for making improvements and establishing "best practices" for minority recruitment and retention.

  11. American Organization of Nurse Executives Care Innovation and Transformation program: improving care and practice environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlies, Amanda Stefancyk

    2014-09-01

    The American Organization of Nurse Executives conducted an evaluation of the hospitals participating in the Care Innovation and Transformation (CIT) program. A total of 24 hospitals participated in the 2-year CIT program from 2012 to 2013. Reported outcomes include increased patient satisfaction, decreased falls, and reductions in nurse turnover and overtime. Nurses reported statistically significant improvements in 4 domains of the principles and elements of a healthful practice environment developed by the Nursing Organizations Alliance.

  12. "Khmer Pride": Being and Becoming Khmer-American in an Urban Migrant Education Program

    OpenAIRE

    McGinnis, Theresa Ann

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the ways an urban migrant education program becomes a space where middle school Khmer students can explore who they are as Khmer youth living in an urban American context. I discuss how the youth are able to take a transformative, interactional stance to the literacy and sign-making practices within the program. I argue that the Khmer youth’s identities are reflected within these literacy and expressive practices. Further, I suggest the experiences of these Khmer middl...

  13. Online smoking cessation program for Korean Americans: Randomized trial to test effects of incentives for program completion and interim surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Joel M; McDonnell, Diana D; Kazinets, Gene; Lee, Hyun-Ju

    2016-05-01

    Smoking is prevalent among Korean American men. Quitting is Winning, an Internet-based, cognitive-behavioral smoking cessation program, was developed using community-based participatory research principles. A randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate whether participants were more likely to complete the program and quit smoking at 6-months of follow-up with additional reinforcement. The main outcomes were the proportion of participants who completed the online program and the proportion who quit smoking for at least 30days, 26weeks after enrollment, among those randomized into the high-reinforcement (HR) condition compared with those in the low-reinforcement (LR) condition. The study achieved a final enrollment of 403 participants including 56 women. Program completion was greater for the HR as compared to the LR condition (17% vs. 10%, p=.035). There was no significant difference in 30-day smoking cessation (intent-to-treat [ITT]) between the HR and LR conditions (9% vs. 8%, ns). Smoking cessation was greater among program completers as compared to those who did not complete the program (28% vs. 5%, psurveys and financial incentives for interim survey completion and program completion significantly increased the likelihood of program completion. Moreover, program completers were significantly more likely to quit smoking. Although smoking cessation rates did not significantly differ between the HR and LR conditions, the results suggest that future studies should explore the efficacy of larger financial incentives for program completion (Clinical Trial #NCT02584127). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM1: Experimental Results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Craig [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guala, Michele [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing nonproprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for opensource research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL). Reference Model 1 (RM1) is a 1:40 geometric scale dual-rotor axial flow horizontal axis device with counter-rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.5m. Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM1. Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2.425m3s-1, resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1.05ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec ≈ 3.0x105. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing turbulence performance models and their ability to accurately predict device performance metrics, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to predict turbulent inflow environments, reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order turbulent statistics, as well as device performance metrics.

  15. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM1: Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Craig [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guala, Michele [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing non-proprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for open-source research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL). Reference Model 1 (RM2) is a 1:40 geometric scale dual-rotor axial flow horizontal axis device with counter-rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.5m. Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM1. Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2.425m3s-1, resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1.05ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec ≈ 3.0x105. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing turbulence performance models and their ability to accurately predict device performance metrics, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to predict turbulent inflow environments, reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order turbulent statistics, as well as device performance metrics.

  16. Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Studies Program Network of Dedicated Enrollment Sites: Implications for Surgical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaeen, Faisal G; Reda, Domenic J; Gelijns, Annetine C; Cornwell, Lorraine; Omer, Shuab; Al Jurdi, Rayan; Kougias, Panos; Anaya, Daniel; Berger, David H; Huang, Grant D

    2014-06-01

    Surgical clinical trials have played a critical role in shaping clinical practice, yet their launch and conduct remain challenging. Innovative approaches to carrying out such studies can not only help transform how trials produce definitive evidence but also move the field toward increased participation in trials. To review a recently launched pilot program aimed at enhancing patient enrollment and improving surgical trial operations at individual sites and nationally. After a solicitation to create a national network focused on making the conduct of clinical trials more efficient, 10 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) sites were selected. These sites, collectively called the Cooperative Studies Program (CSP) Network of Dedicated Enrollment Sites (NODES), were evaluated with regard to their previous participation in CSP multisite trials, the strength of the local clinical research environment, and presentation of innovative plans to coordinate and enhance the operations of local CSP studies and share best practices with other centers. Node accountability was also emphasized and involved metrics that tracked productivity and efficiency. Building from available CSP experience in a range of clinical trials, including ones involving surgical interventions, NODES provides VA surgeons with resources for facilitating timely study initiation, determining patient availability, and addressing enrollment barriers. Such resources are particularly important for surgical studies, which often face challenges in patient recruitment and retention. In addition, NODES can maintain qualified and trained personnel at sites to support surgeons with limited time to fulfill the numerous administrative and regulatory responsibilities that often fall to the investigators. The VA's approach to enhancing trial efficiency may reinvigorate interest in surgical trials by offering a redesigned cooperative framework that builds on a core of high-yield sites and could mitigate traditional

  17. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management Program Update, April-June 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-04-01

    Welcome to the April-June 2009 issue of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update. This publication is designed to provide a status of activities within LM. The Legacy Management goals are: (1) Protect human health and the environment through effective and efficient long-term surveillance and maintenance - This goal highlights DOE's responsibility to ensure long-term protection of people, the environment, and the integrity of engineered remedies and monitoring systems. (2) Preserve, protect, and make accessible legacy records and information - This goal recognizes LM's commitment to successfully manage records, information, and archives of legacy sites under its authority. (3) Support an effective and efficient work force structured to accomplish Departmental missions and assure continuity of contractor worker pension and medical benefits - This goal recognizes DOE's commitment to its contracted work force and the consistent management of pension and health benefits. As sites continue to close, DOE faces the challenges of managing pension plan and health benefits liability. (4) Manage legacy land and assets, emphasizing protective real and personal property reuse and disposition - This goal recognizes a DOE need for local collaborative management of legacy assets, including coordinating land use planning, personal property disposition to community reuse organizations, and protecting heritage resources (natural, cultural, and historical). (5) Improve program effectiveness through sound management - This goal recognizes that LM's goals cannot be attained efficiently unless the federal and contractor work force is motivated to meet requirements and work toward continuous performance improvement.

  18. Admission and Graduation Requirements for Special Education Doctoral Programs at 20 Top American Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of the admissions and graduation requirements guidelines of the special education doctoral programs at 20 top American universities was conducted. Admission requirements typically include an application fee, previous coursework GPA, previous field experience, GRE scores, TOEFL scores, professional writing sample(s), and…

  19. Addressing Career Success Issues of African Americans in the Workplace: An Undergraduate Business Program Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Belinda Johnson

    2009-01-01

    Career success as measured by the objective, traditional criteria of the composite of high number of promotions, high annual compensation, and high organizational level in corporate America has eluded the majority of African Americans. This article describes an undergraduate business program career success intervention designed to assist African…

  20. Effect of the Bienestar Health Program on Physical Fitness in Low-Income Mexican American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Roberto P.; Hernandez, Arthur E.; Yin, Zenong; Garcia, Oralia A.; Hernandez, Irene

    2005-01-01

    Once considered an adult onset disease, type 2 diabetes is increasingly being diagnosed in low-income Mexican American children. Studies have suggested that most of those so diagnosed were overweight, reported low levels of physical activity, and were generally unaware of their disease. The Bienestar Health Program was designed to reduce risk…

  1. An Evaluation of Sisters of Nia: A Cultural Program for African American Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgrave, Faye Z.; Reed, Melba C.; Plybon, Laura E.; Butler, Deborah S.; Allison, Kevin W.; Davis, Trina

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated the effectiveness of a cultural intervention for increasing cultural values and beliefs. Fifty-nine African American girls in early adolescence participated in a 15-session cultural program or in an activity comparison group. Measures of ethnic identity, gender roles, and relational aggression were administered…

  2. African American Men, Identity, and Participation in Adult Basic Education and Literacy Programs. Research Brief #6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayton, Brendaly; Prins, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Although the national graduation rate for African American males is only 47% (Schott Foundation for Public Education, 2010), few studies have explored their experiences in adult basic and literacy education (ABEL) programs. This study draws on prior research to explore the relationship between literacy and identity and its potential for…

  3. Gerontological Training Programs Offered by Latin American Universities: Number, Characteristics, and Disciplinary Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Giuliani, María Florencia; Serrat, Rodrigo; Curcio, Carmen-Lucía; Lopes, Alexandra; Maldonado, María de la Luz Martínez; Oliveira, Rita da Cássia

    2017-01-01

    One of the challenges of population aging is to ensure that there are enough trained professionals to meet the changing, specific needs of aging populations. The aim of this study was to describe the number, geographical distribution, and general characteristics of gerontological training programs offered by Latin American universities and to…

  4. Intervention with African American Premature Infants: Four-Month Results of an Early Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teti, Douglas M.; Black, Maureen M.; Viscardi, Rose; Glass, Penny; O'Connell, Melissa A.; Baker, Linda; Cusson, Regina; Reiner Hess, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the efficacy of an early intervention program targeting African American mothers and their premature, low birth weight infants at 3 to 4 months' corrected age from four neonatal intensive care units, 173 families are recruited (84 intervention, 89 control). The 8-session, 20-week intervention consists of a psychoeducational…

  5. Interagency Review of the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-04-29

    This report presents the findings of the Interagency Requirements Review of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) Program. The review was requested by Admiral Watkins to help determine the FY 1993 funding levels necessary to meet all legal requirements. The review was undertaken by analysts from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and Army Corps of Engineers, reporting to an Interagency Group (IAG) of senior Administration officials concerned with environmental cleanup issues. The purpose of the study was to determine the level of finding needed in FY 1993 for each ERWM Field Office to comply with all Federal, State, and local government legal requirements; all DOE Orders that establish standards for environment, safety and health (ES and H) management; and for prudent investments in other discretionary and management activities such as upgrading administrative buildings, information systems, etc. The study also reviewed the cost estimates supporting the ERWM proposed budget, including direct costs (labor, equipment) and indirect costs (administrative, landlord services, contractor overhead). The study did not analyze whether the Federal/State legal requirements and DOE Orders were necessary or whether the proposed clean-up remedies represent the most cost effective alternatives available.

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Program of International Technical Cooperation for Research Reactor Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, D.; Manning, M.; Ellis, R.; Apt, K.; Flaim, S.; Sylvester, K.

    2004-10-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has initiated collaborations with the national nuclear authorities of Egypt, Peru, and Romania for the purpose of advancing the commercial potential and utilization of their respective research reactors. Under its Office of International Safeguards ''Sister Laboratory'' program, DOE/NNSA has undertaken numerous technical collaborations over the past decade intended to promote peaceful applications of nuclear technology. Among these has been technical assistance in research reactor applications, such as neutron activation analysis, nuclear analysis, reactor physics, and medical radioisotope production. The current collaborations are intended to provide the subject countries with a methodology for greater commercialization of research reactor products and services. Our primary goal is the transfer of knowledge, both in administrative and technical issues, needed for the establishment of an effective business plan and utilization strategy for the continued operation of the countries' research reactors. Technical consultation, cooperation, and the information transfer provided are related to: identification, evaluation, and assessment of current research reactor capabilities for products and services; identification of opportunities for technical upgrades for new or expanded products and services; advice and consultation on research reactor upgrades and technical modifications; characterization of markets for reactor products and services; identification of competition and estimation of potential for market penetration; integration of technical constraints; estimation of cash flow streams; and case studies.

  7. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - 12189

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Christopher [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC; Kothari, Vijendra [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia; Starr, Ken [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado; Gillespie, Joey [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado; Widdop, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado; none,

    2012-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established in 1974 to address residual radiological contamination at sites where work was performed for the Manhattan Engineer District and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Initially, FUSRAP activities began with a records search for sites that had the potential to contain residual radiological contamination; 46 sites were identified that were eligible for and required remediation. Remedial action began in 1979. In 1997, Congress assigned responsibility for the remediation of FUSRAP sites to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). DOE retains responsibility for determining if sites are eligible for FUSRAP remediation and for providing long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) of remediated FUSRAP sites. DOE LTS&M activities are designed to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment and to preserve knowledge regarding FUSRAP sites. Additional elements include eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS&M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close coordination with USACE and regulators to ensure there is no loss of protectiveness when sites transition to DOE for LTS&M.

  8. Primary Health Care and partnerships: collaboration of a community agency, health department, and university nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, L G

    1998-03-01

    Health care reform proposals emphasize health care that is essential, practical, scientifically sound, coordinated, accessible, appropriately delivered, and affordable. One route to achievement of improved health outcomes within these parameters is the formation of partnerships. Partnerships adopting the philosophy and five principles of Primary Health Care (PHC) focus on health promotion and prevention of illness and disability, maximum community participation, accessibility to health and health services, interdisciplinary and intersectoral collaboration, and use of appropriate technologies such as resources and strategies. A community service agency serving a multicultural population initiated a partnership with a health department and a university undergraduate nursing program. The result was a preschool health fair and there were benefits for each partner-benefits which could not have been realized without the collaboration. The health fair partnership planning, implementation, and evaluation process was guided by a framework shaped by the philosophy and five principles of PHC. The educational process described can be applied to other learning experiences where the goal is to help students understand and apply the concepts of PHC, develop myriad nursing competencies, and form collaborative relationships with the community and health agencies. Community health care dilemmas and nursing education challenges can be successfully addressed when various disciplines and sectors form effective partnerships.

  9. Predictors of Repeated Visits to a Pediatric Emergency Department Crisis Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, P; Thibedeau, N; Barrowman, N; Gray, C; Kennedy, A; Leon, S L; Polihronis, C; Cappelli, M

    2017-03-01

    Despite documented increases in emergency department (ED) mental health (MH) presentations, there are inconsistent findings on the characteristics of patients with repeat presentations to pediatric EDs (PEDs) for MH concerns. Our study sought to explore the characteristics of MH patients with repeat PED visits and determine predictors of return visits, of earlier repeat visits, and of more frequent repeat visits. We examined data collected prospectively in a clinical database looking at MH presentations to a crisis intervention program housed within a PED from October 2006 to December 2011. Predictive models based on demographic and clinical variables were constructed using logistic, Cox, and negative binomial regression. A total of 4,080 presentations to the PED were made by the 2,900 children and youth. Repeat visits accounted for almost half (45.8%) of all presentations. Multivariable analysis identified five variables that independently predicted greater odds of having repeat presentations, greater risk of earlier repeat presentations, and greater risk of frequent repeat presentations. The five variables were: female, living in the metropolitan community close to the PED, being in the care of child protective services, taking psychotropic medications, and presenting with an actionable need in the area of mood disturbances. Repeat visits account for a large portion of all MH presentations to the PED. Furthermore, several patient characteristics are significant predictors of repeat PED use and of repeating use sooner and more frequently. Further research is needed to examine interventions targeting this patient group to ensure appropriate MH patient management.

  10. [Screening program for tuberculosis among international exchange students in the Department of Isère].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albahary, M-V; Blanc-Jouvan, F; Recule, C; Dubey, C; Pavese, P

    2017-11-09

    France is a low-incidence country for tuberculosis (TB). Consequently screening is focused on high-risk populations, in particular migrants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of TB among international exchange students in the Department of Isère and the screening programs used. We carried out an organizational audit based on interviews with physicians involved in the management of TB in Isère. We conducted a retrospective descriptive study based on a case series of foreign students treated for TB from 2003 to 2013 inclusively. Forty-six international exchange students were treated for active TB during this time, representing an average incidence of 284/100,000. Two thirds of our studied population were Africans, 72% were asymptomatic at the time of screening. A quarter of our cohort developed TB after the initial screening. Thirty-one cases were confirmed bacteriologically, mainly through bronchoscopy. Outcome (radiological and clinical) on quadruple therapy was satisfactory in all patients. Two patients relapsed, one of them with multi-drug resistant TB. Our work confirms that international exchange students are a population at high risk of TB and that screening of this population is essential. The significant number of active TB cases diagnosed after the initial screening stresses the importance of diagnosis and follow up of patients with latent TB infection. Copyright © 2017 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litynski, J.; Plasynski, S.; Spangler, L.; Finley, R.; Steadman, E.; Ball, D.; Nemeth, K.J.; McPherson, B.; Myer, L.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has formed a nationwide network of seven regional partnerships to help determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change. The Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) are tasked with determining the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for carbon capture, transport, and storage in their areas of the country and parts of Canada. The seven partnerships include more than 350 state agencies, universities, national laboratories, private companies, and environmental organizations, spanning 42 states, two Indian nations, and four Canadian provinces. The Regional Partnerships initiative is being implemented in three phases: ???Characterization Phase (2003-2005): The objective was to collect data on CO2 sources and sinks and develop the human capital to support and enable future carbon sequestration field tests and deployments. The completion of this Phase was marked by release of the Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada-Version 1 which included a common methodology for capacity assessment and reported over 3,000GT of storage capacity in saline formations, depleted oil and gas fields, and coal seams.???Validation Phase (2005-2009): The objective is to plan and implement small-scale (1??million tons of CO2) Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects, which will demonstrate that large volumes of CO2 can be injected safely, permanently, and economically into geologic formations representative of large storage capacity. Even though the RCSP Program is being implemented in three phases, it should be viewed as an integrated whole, with many of the goals and objectives transitioning from one phase to the next. Accomplishments and results from the Characterization Phase have helped to refine goals and activities in the Validation and Deployment Phases. The RCSP Program encourages and requires open information sharing among

  12. Indiana Department of Transportation research program peer exchange, June 17-20, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    This report summarizes the outcomes of a Peer Exchange conducted at : the request of the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) on June 17-20, 2002. Peer : exchanges are required of State Departments of Transportation as a condition of receipt ...

  13. Supporting medical education research quality: the Association of American Medical Colleges' Medical Education Research Certificate program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppen, Larry D; Yoder, Ernie; Frye, Ann; Perkowski, Linda C; Mavis, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The quality of the medical education research (MER) reported in the literature has been frequently criticized. Numerous reasons have been provided for these shortcomings, including the level of research training and experience of many medical school faculty. The faculty development required to improve MER can take various forms. This article describes the Medical Education Research Certificate (MERC) program, a national faculty development program that focuses exclusively on MER. Sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges and led by a committee of established medical education researchers from across the United States, the MERC program is built on a set of 11 interactive workshops offered at various times and places across the United States. MERC participants can customize the program by selecting six workshops from this set to fulfill requirements for certification. This article describes the history, operations, current organization, and evaluation of the program. Key elements of the program's success include alignment of program content and focus with needs identified by prospective users, flexibility in program organization and logistics to fit participant schedules, an emphasis on practical application of MER principles in the context of the participants' activities and interests, consistency in program content and format to ensure standards of quality, and a sustainable financial model. The relationship between the national MERC program and local faculty development initiatives is also described. The success of the MERC program suggests that it may be a possible model for nationally disseminated faculty development programs in other domains.

  14. The perspectives and experiences of African American students in an informal science program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulls, Domonique L.

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields are the fastest growing sectors of the economy, nationally and globally. In order for the United States (U.S.) to maintain its competitiveness, it is important to address STEM experiences at the precollege level. In early years, science education serves as a foundation and pipeline for students to pursue STEM in college and beyond. Alternative approaches to instruction in formal classrooms have been introduced to engage more students in science. One alternative is informal science education. Informal science education is an avenue used to promote science education literacy. Because it is less regulated than science teaching in formal classroom settings, it allows for the incorporation of culture into science instruction. Culturally relevant science teaching is one way to relate science to African American students, a population that continually underperforms in K-12 science education. This study explores the science perspectives and experiences of African American middle school students participating in an informal science program. The research is framed by the tenets of culturally relevant pedagogy and shaped by the following questions: (1) What specific aspects of the Carver Program make it unique to African American students? (2) How is culturally relevant pedagogy incorporated into the informal science program? (3) How does the incorporation of culturally relevant pedagogy into the informal science program influence African American students' perceptions about science? The findings to the previously stated questions add to the limited research on African American students in informal science learning environments and contribute to the growing research on culturally relevant science. This study is unique in that it explores the cultural components of an informal science program.

  15. Evaluation of a Health Professionals' Training Program to Conduct Research in New York City's Asian American Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pao San Lucy; Sim, Shao-Chee; Pong, Perry; Islam, Nadia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Li, Shijian; Tsang, Thomas; Rey, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Background: Because health disparities among Asian Americans are understudied, a partnership program between the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center and the Center for the Study of Asian American Health was created to increase awareness and interest in Asian American research. Purpose: To evaluate the process, outcome, and impact of a health…

  16. 1994 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  17. The 1993 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  18. Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluations of the Enhanced Logo-autobiography Program for Korean-American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Kyung Mi; Bernstein, Kunsook

    2017-12-01

    This study extends Bernstein et al.'s (2016) investigation of the effects of the Enhanced Logo-autobiography Program on Korean-American women's depressive symptoms, coping strategies, purpose in life, and posttraumatic growth by analyzing quantitative and qualitative data. This study's participants significantly improved on quantitative measures of depression, coping strategies, purpose in life, and post-traumatic growth at eight weeks post-intervention and follow-up. The qualitative content analysis revealed 17 themes with five essential themes. The program's activity to promote purpose in life through posttraumatic growth facilitated participants' recovery from traumatic experiences. Standardized guidelines are needed to conduct this program in Korean community centers.

  19. The Mokihana Program: The effectiveness of an integrated department of education and department of health school-based behavioral health approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klontz, Bradley T; Bivens, Alex; Michels, Stanton; DeLeon, Patrick H; Tom, Lyndsey

    2015-05-01

    As a result of difficulties with access to care and resulting low levels of service utilization, the mental health problems of children often go undiagnosed and untreated. One of the most promising approaches to increasing access to care is the delivery of mental health services in school settings, where almost all of the children in a community can be accessed. However, as a result of competing needs, cultures, and objectives, integrating mental health services into schools can be challenging. In the wake of a devastating hurricane in 1992 and efforts to identify and treat children with posttraumatic stress, many of these barriers were overcome on the island of Kauai, Hawaii and led to the development of the Mokihana Program, an integrated Department of Education and Hawaii Department of Health initiative for providing school-based behavioral health services. This study examined the effectiveness of the Mokihana Program in the treatment of 123 elementary age children and 56 adolescents by comparing teacher ratings of behavior problems and adaptive skills at intake and at 1-year follow-up. It was hypothesized that symptom severity would decrease from pretreatment to follow-up. Findings showed statistically significant improvements across a wide spectrum of behavioral problems and adaptive functioning. The authors explore the challenges and opportunities in sustaining and replicating this type of departmental integration in the service of children and youth. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Help Wanted: American Drone Program Needs Multifaceted Support to be Effective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hall

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. drone program in Pakistan faces strong resistance in Pakistan. Because the program solely seeks to eliminate terrorist groups and leaders through bombing campaigns, with no built in social support, the local population’s anti-American sentiment has reached the highest level in history. This angry mood against U.S. drone programs is spreading throughout the Islamic world. To counter this anti-American sentiment, and increase the drone program’s effectiveness, the U.S. must invest in multifaceted, socio-economic support efforts to educate the population and rebuild the gratuity, trust, and commitment of Pakistan’s people to the “War on Terror.”

  1. Community-based breast cancer intervention program for older African American women in beauty salons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, D A

    1995-01-01

    African American women are at high risk for morbidity and mortality from breast cancer. African American women ages 50 and older have been a difficult group to reach through conventional breast cancer intervention programs. Cultural and health beliefs that differ from mainstream society are reported to be factors contributing to the low rates of breast screening among this group. In addition to these attitudinal factors, older African American women are disproportionately represented among uninsured and under-insured Americans. As a result, cost becomes a barrier to mammography screening for many of these women. This project proposes to increase breast cancer screening awareness and provide a referral or free breast screening, or both, for African American women ages 50 and older. This information will be offered in the culturally familiar setting of local beauty salons. The culturally sensitive educational pamphlets developed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and video developed by the NCI-funded project, Cancer Prevention Research Unit, will be used to promote mammography, clinical breast examinations, and breast self-examination. Providers staffing a mobile mammography van provided by Dr. Anitha Mitchell of the Association of Black Women Physicians through a grant from the Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will perform mammograms for women on site during scheduled intervals. A followup telephone survey will be conducted.

  2. ROLE OF MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN MORAL DEVELOPMENT OF AMERICAN SCHOOLCHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Lukianchuk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to analyze the role of multicultural education programs in moral development of schoolchildren in the USA. It is noted that one of the top priority tasks of school is the development of such traditional American values as freedom, democracy, racial and national tolerance and others. For this purpose some changes in educational programs are being made. It is highlighted that implementation of courses and programs of multicultural education has become an important part of the educational process. These programs are of interdisciplinary character and they are integrated into educational programs of moral and social disciplines. According to their aims and priorities all courses and programs of multicultural education are divided into three groups: content-oriented, person-oriented, and socially-oriented. The analysis of the results of their implementation makes it possible for the author to conclude that integration of the programs of multicultural education into the educational process makes great contribution to the moral development of American schoolchildren.

  3. Perceptions, Knowledge, Incentives, and Barriers of Brain Donation among African American Elders Enrolled in an Alzheimer's Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Susan; Cantwell, Nicole; Islam, Fareesa; Horvath, Kathy; Jefferson, Angela L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To learn about African American older adults' knowledge and perceptions of brain donation, factors that relate to participating or not participating in a brain donation research program, and methods to increase African American brain donation commitment rates in the context of an Alzheimer's disease (AD) research program. Design and…

  4. The Impact of Oakland Freedom School's Summer Youth Program on the Psychosocial Development of African American Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation considers the program outcomes of one community youth project, Leadership Excellence Inc., Oakland Freedom Schools. Oakland Freedom Schools are culturally relevant 6-week summer Language Arts enrichment programs for primarily inner-city African American youth aged 5 to 14 years. In this study, 79 African American youth…

  5. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM2: Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Craig [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guala, Michele [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL)

    2014-08-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing non-proprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for open-source research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN - SAFL) . Reference Model 2 (RM2) is a 1:15 geometric scale dual - rotor cross flow vertical axis device with counter - rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.43m and rotor height, hT = 0.323 m. RM2 is a river turbine designed for a site modeled after a reach in the lower Mississippi River near Baton Rouge, Louisiana (Barone et al. 2014) . Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM2 . Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2. 35m3s-1 , resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1. 2 ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec = 6 .1x104. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and their ability to accurately simulate turbulent inflow environments, device performance metrics, and to reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order

  6. Efficacy of a hyperglycemia treatment program in a Vascular Surgery Department supervised by Endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caimari, Francisca; González, Cintia; Ramos, Analía; Chico, Ana; Cubero, José M; Pérez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the strategy and efficacy of a hyperglycemia treatment program supervised by Endocrinology. All patients with type 2 diabetes hospitalized at the vascular surgery department over a 12 month period were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical characteristics and hyperglycemia treatment during hospitalization, at discharge and 2-6 month after discharge were collected. Glycemic control was assessed using capillary blood glucose profiles and HbA1c at admission and 2-6 months post-discharge. A total of 140 hospitalizations of 123 patients were included. The protocol to choose the insulin regimen was applied in 96.4% of patients (22.8% correction dose, 23.6% basal-correction dose and 50% basal-bolus-correction dose [BBC]). Patients with BBC had higher HbA1c (7.7±1.5% vs. 6.7 ±0.8%; P<.001) and mean glycemia on the first day of hospitalization (184.4±59.2 vs. 140.5±31.4mg/dl; P<.001). Mean blood glucose was reduced to 162.1±41.8mg/dl in the middle and 160.8±43.3mg/dl in the last 24h of hospitalization in patients with BBC (P=.007), but did not change in the remaining patients. In 22.1% patients with treatment changes performed at discharge, HbA1c decreased from 8.2±1.6 to 6.8±1.6% at 2-6 months post-discharge (P=.019). The hyperglycemia treatment protocol applied by an endocrinologist in the hospital, allows the identification of the appropriate therapy and the improvement of the glycemic control during hospitalization and discharge, supporting its efficacy in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. An Examination of Self-Esteem and Empowerment of African American Female Youth in an After School Program

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor Unroe; Rosemary V. Barnett; Caroline Payne-Purvis

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated self-esteem and empowerment in three African American female cohort groups in an after school program. A sample of 136 students in the after school program comprised the three one-year female and male cohort groups. For this study, 71 African American females in the female cohort groups were analyzed. Social Cognitive Theory and Resiliency Theory were used to explore factors potentially influencing self-esteem and empowerment of an at-risk African American female popul...

  8. SENTRY antimicrobial surveillance program report: latin american and brazilian results for 1997 through 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio S. Sader

    Full Text Available The alarming emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance among common bacteria threatens the effectiveness of therapy for many infections. Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance is essential to identify the major problems and guide adequate control measures. Several resistance surveillance programs have been implemented in North America and Europe in the last decade; however, very few programs have assessed antimicrobial resistance in Latin American countries. The SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program was initiated in 1997 and represents the most comprehensive surveillance program in place at the present time worldwide. The SENTRY Program collects consecutive isolates from clinically documented infections in more than 80 medical centers worldwide (10 in Latin America. The isolates are collected according to the type of infection (objectives and susceptibility tested in a central microbiology laboratory by reference broth microdilution methods according to NCCLS guidelines. The Program also incorporated molecular typing (ribotyping and PFGE and resistance mechanism analysis of selected isolates. In this report we present a very broad analysis of the data generated by testing almost 20,000 bacterial isolates against more than 30 antimicrobial agents. The susceptibility results (MIC50, MIC90 and % susceptible are presented in 11 tables according to the organism and site of infection. The data from Brazil, as well as the data from isolates collected in 2001, are analyzed separately. This report allows the evaluation of the activities numerous antimicrobial agents against clinical isolates collected in Latin American countries.

  9. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: American Academy for Liberal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The American Academy for Liberal Education (AALE) was founded in 1992 for "the purpose of supporting and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts teaching and learning through accreditation." AALE's current scope of recognition is for the accreditation and pre-accreditation (Candidacy for Accreditation) of institutions of higher…

  10. Motorcycle Safety Education Programs: Report of a Survey of State Departments of Education and of Colleges and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association, Washington, DC.

    A survey of State departments of education and colleges and universities, conducted by the Motorcycle Industry Council Safety and Education Foundation, revealed the need for more teacher education programs, instructional materials, and organized workshops that promote motorcycle safety education. The primary interest indicated by State departments…

  11. 77 FR 32709 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Department of Homeland Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/ Department of Homeland Security (DHS))--Match Number 1010 AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of a renewal of...

  12. 78 FR 51264 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Department of the Treasury...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/ Department of the Treasury/Internal Revenue Service (IRS))--Match Number 1016 AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION...

  13. 78 FR 47336 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program Between the Department of Housing and Urban...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... of 1996 (25 U.S.C. 4101 et seq.); and the Quality Housing and Work Responsibility Act of 1998 (42 U.S...-administered programs involving rental housing assistance to disclose to HUD their social security numbers... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  14. 76 FR 579 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program Between the Department of Housing and Urban...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996 (25 U.S.C. 4101 et seq.); and the Quality Housing and Work... older) in HUD-administered programs involving rental housing assistance to disclose to HUD their social... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  15. The Analysis of Teaching Effectiveness Evaluation Programs in Geography Departments in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Teaching evaluation systems are an important part of the total evaluation of faculty in geography departments in the United States. As demands for accountability for teaching effectiveness continue to emerge from many groups, it has become increasingly important for geography departments to develop systems that not only provide teaching…

  16. 78 FR 31955 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection... extends administrative Privacy Act protections to all individuals when systems of records maintain...: Department of Homeland Security, Privacy Office. ACTION: Notice of Privacy Act System of Records. SUMMARY: In...

  17. An Overview and Funding History of Select Department of Justice (DOJ) Grant Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    James, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    ...), and the Office of Violence Against Women, provide grant funds to state, local, and tribal governments for crime prevention and intervention programs as well as funding for criminal justice system improvement programs...

  18. Evaluating department of transportation's research program : a methodology and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    An effective research program within a transportation organization can be a valuable asset to accomplish the goals of the overall : mission. Determining whether a research program is pursuing relevant research projects and obtaining results for the s...

  19. Care and Respect for Elders in Emergencies program: a preliminary report of a volunteer approach to enhance care in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanon, Martine; Baumlin, Kevin M; Kaplan, Shari Sirkin; Grudzen, Corita R

    2014-02-01

    Older adults who present to an emergency department (ED) generally have more-complex medical conditions with complicated care needs and are at high risk for preventable adverse outcomes during their ED visit. The Care and Respect for Elders with Emergencies (CARE) volunteer initiative is a geriatric-focused volunteer program developed to help prevent avoidable complications such as falls, delirium and use of restraints, and functional decline in vulnerable elders in the ED. The CARE program consists of bedside volunteer interventions ranging from conversation to various short activities designed to engage and reorient high-risk, older, unaccompanied individuals in the ED. This article describes the development and characteristics of the CARE program, the services provided, the experiences of the elderly patients and their volunteers, and the growth of the program over time. CARE volunteers provide elders with the additional attention needed in an often chaotic, unfamiliar environment by enhancing their care, improving satisfaction, and preventing potential decline. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Developing a Leadership Development Program for the Veterans Benefits Administration within the Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    8 VBA Budget ................................................................................................................ 8... VBA Leadership and Personnel .................................................................................. 9 Employee Promotion within VBA ...14 VBA Goals and Key Programs

  1. Report on the American Association of Medical Physics Undergraduate Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilowitz, Jennifer B; Avery, Stephen; Gueye, Paul; Sandison, George A

    2013-01-07

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) sponsors two summer undergraduate research programs to attract top performing undergraduate students into graduate studies in medical physics: the Summer Undergraduate Fellowship Program (SUFP) and the Minority Undergraduate Summer Experience (MUSE). Undergraduate research experience (URE) is an effective tool to encourage students to pursue graduate degrees. The SUFP and MUSE are the only medical physics URE programs. From 2001 to 2012, 148 fellowships have been awarded and a total of $608,000 has been dispersed to fellows. This paper reports on the history, participation, and status of the programs. A review of surveys of past fellows is presented. Overall, the fellows and mentors are very satisfied with the program. The efficacy of the programs is assessed by four metrics: entry into a medical physics graduate program, board certification, publications, and AAPM involvement. Sixty-five percent of past fellow respondents decided to pursue a graduate degree in medical physics as a result of their participation in the program. Seventy percent of respondents are currently involved in some educational or professional aspect of medical physics. Suggestions for future enhancements to better track and maintain contact with past fellows, expand funding sources, and potentially combine the programs are presented.

  2. Bootstrapping a Sustainable North American PEM Fuel Cell Industry: Could a Federal Acquisition Program Make a Difference?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, David L [ORNL; Duleep, Dr. K. G. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company

    2008-10-01

    The North American Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell industry may be at a critical juncture. A large-scale market for automotive fuel cells appears to be several years away and in any case will require a long-term, coordinated commitment by government and industry to insure the co-evolution of hydrogen infrastructure and fuel cell vehicles (Greene et al., 2008). The market for non-automotive PEM fuel cells, on the other hand, may be much closer to commercial viability (Stone, 2006). Cost targets are less demanding and manufacturers appear to be close, perhaps within a factor of two, of meeting them. Hydrogen supply is a significant obstacle to market acceptance but may not be as great a barrier as it is for hydrogen-powered vehicles due to the smaller quantities of hydrogen required. PEM fuel cells appear to be potentially competitive in two markets: (1) Backup power (BuP) supply, and (2) electrically-powered MHE (Mahadevan et al., 2007a, 2007b). There are several Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) of PEM fuel cell systems for these applications but production levels have been quite low (on the order of 100-200 per year) and cumulative production experience is also limited (on the order of 1,000 units to date). As a consequence, costs remain above target levels and PEM fuel cell OEMs are not yet competitive in these markets. If cost targets can be reached and acceptable solutions to hydrogen supply found, a sustainable North American PEM fuel cell industry could be established. If not, the industry and its North American supply chain could disappear within a year or two. The Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested a rapid assessment of the potential for a government acquisition program to bootstrap the market for non-automotive PEM fuel cells by driving down costs via economies of scale and learning-by-doing. The six week study included in-depth interviews of three manufacturers

  3. "Khmer Pride": Being and Becoming Khmer-American in an Urban Migrant Education Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Ann McGinnis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the ways an urban migrant education program becomes a space where middle school Khmer students can explore who they are as Khmer youth living in an urban American context. I discuss how the youth are able to take a transformative, interactional stance to the literacy and sign-making practices within the program. I argue that the Khmer youth’s identities are reflected within these literacy and expressive practices. Further, I suggest the experiences of these Khmer middle school children of agricultural workers provide rich examples of how immigrant youth draw on a variety of cultural resources (from urban American culture and from their own Khmer cultural inheritance in constructing layered identities.

  4. The IGNITE (investigation to guide new insight into translational effectiveness trial: Protocol for a translational study of an evidenced-based wellness program in fire departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKinnon David P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worksites are important locations for interventions to promote health. However, occupational programs with documented efficacy often are not used, and those being implemented have not been studied. The research in this report was funded through the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act Challenge Topic 'Pathways for Translational Research,' to define and prioritize determinants that enable and hinder translation of evidenced-based health interventions in well-defined settings. Methods The IGNITE (investigation to guide new insights for translational effectiveness trial is a prospective cohort study of a worksite wellness and injury reduction program from adoption to final outcomes among 12 fire departments. It will employ a mixed methods strategy to define a translational model. We will assess decision to adopt, installation, use, and outcomes (reach, individual outcomes, and economic effects using onsite measurements, surveys, focus groups, and key informant interviews. Quantitative data will be used to define the model and conduct mediation analysis of each translational phase. Qualitative data will expand on, challenge, and confirm survey findings and allow a more thorough understanding and convergent validity by overcoming biases in qualitative and quantitative methods used alone. Discussion Findings will inform worksite wellness in fire departments. The resultant prioritized influences and model of effective translation can be validated and manipulated in these and other settings to more efficiently move science to service.

  5. Innovation in the web marketing programs of American convention and visitor bureaus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zach, Florian; Gretzel, Ulrike; Xiang, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    , and continuity of innovation in Web marketing efforts and the perceived contribution of this investment to the overall success of the bureau's Web marketing program. The findings indicate that American convention and visitor bureaus have invested substantially in their websites and continue redesigning them...... as new technology and Web marketing trends emerge. However, it appears that there is a substantial gap between bureau investments in innovative website features and related activities and their perceived contribution to overall Web marketing success....

  6. Medical Services: Department of Defense Veterinary/Medical Laboratory Food Safety and Quality Assurance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-01

    See notes 7 & 8) 0 per ml (See note 7) 0 per ml (See note 7) Buttermilk and acidophilus milk ≤10 per gram Cottage cheese ≤10 per gram ≤10 per gram...Department of Agriculture , Agricultural Marketing Service, Dairy Division, Room 2750–South, P.O. Box 96456, Washington, DC 20090–6456. DLAR 4155.26/AR...Code USDA U.S. Department of Agriculture USDC U.S. Department of Commerce USPHS U.S. Public Health Service Section II Terms Aerobic plate count Method

  7. Increasing the Number of Certified Registered Nurses in an Emergency Department: A Cohort Program Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, Paula M; Maliszewski, Barbara; Toledo, RaniMaria; Borries, Kimberly; Baptiste, Diana-Lyn

    2016-01-01

    Nationally, hospital emergency departments are met with challenges because of increasing patient demands, overcrowding, and the need to protect patient safety. It is imperative that frontline emergency department nurses are prepared to meet the complex needs of diverse patient populations by having appropriate continuing education, training, and institutional resources. Professional certification is associated with improved patient safety, higher organizational performance scores, professional growth, and credibility among nurses. The purpose of this article is to describe the process and outcome of a nursing professional development-practitioner-led intervention to promote professional certification among nurses in an urban adult emergency department while reducing overall cost of institutional support for certification preparation.

  8. Journey Toward High Reliability: A Comprehensive Safety Program to Improve Quality of Care and Safety Culture in a Large, Multisite Radiation Oncology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Kristina Demas; Volz, Edna; Maity, Amit; Gabriel, Peter E; Solberg, Timothy D; Bergendahl, Howard W; Hahn, Stephen M

    2016-05-01

    High-reliability organizations (HROs) focus on continuous identification and improvement of safety issues. We sought to advance a large, multisite radiation oncology department toward high reliability through the implementation of a comprehensive safety culture (SC) program at the University of Pennsylvania Department of Radiation Oncology. In 2011, with guidance from safety literature and experts in HROs, we designed an SC framework to reduce radiation errors. All state-reported medical events (SRMEs) from 2009 to 2016 were retrospectively reviewed and plotted on a control chart. Changes in SC grade were assessed using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey. Outcomes measured included the number of radiation treatment fractions and days between SRMEs, as well as SC grade. Multifaceted safety initiatives were implemented at our main academic center and across all network sites. Postintervention results demonstrate increased staff fundamental safety knowledge, enhanced peer review with an electronic system, and special cause variation of SRMEs on control chart analysis. From 2009 to 2016, the number of days and fractions between SRMEs significantly increased, from a mean of 174 to 541 days (P patient SC grade over time. Our journey toward becoming an HRO has led to the development of a robust SC through a comprehensive safety framework. Our multifaceted initiatives, focusing on culture and system changes, can be successfully implemented in a large academic radiation oncology department to yield measurable improvements in SC and outcomes. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spent 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society of Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objects were the following: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  10. The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program: Overview of Phase I Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mearns, L. O.; Arritt, R.; Biner, S.; Bukovsky, Melissa; McGinnis, Seth; Sain, Steve; Caya, Daniel; Correia Jr., James; Flory, Dave; Gutowski, William; Takle, Gene; Jones, Richard; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Moufouma-Okia, Wilfran; McDaniel, Larry; Nunes, A.; Qian, Yun; Roads, J.; Sloan, Lisa; Snyder, Mark A.

    2012-09-20

    The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program is an international effort designed to systematically investigate the uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate and produce high resolution climate change scenarios using multiple regional climate models (RCMs) nested within atmosphere ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) forced with the A2 SRES scenario, with a common domain covering the conterminous US, northern Mexico, and most of Canada. The program also includes an evaluation component (Phase I) wherein the participating RCMs are nested within 25 years of NCEP/DOE global reanalysis II. The grid spacing of the RCM simulations is 50 km.

  11. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center.

  12. African American perspectives: A qualitative study of an informal science enrichment program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jamila Rashida

    The purposes of this study were to determine what program characteristics African American parents consider when they enroll their children into an informal science education enrichment program, the parents' evaluation of a program called Jordan Academy in which they enrolled their children, and the alignment of the parents' perspectives with Black Cultural Ethos (BCE). BCE refers to nine dimensions posited by Wade Boykin, a psychologist, as comprising African American culture. Participants were parents of students that attended Jordan Academy, an informal science enrichment program designed for third through sixth grade students from underserved populations. Qualitative methodologies were utilized to perform a thorough assessment of parents' perspectives. Data sources included classroom observations, student surveys, academy curriculum, photos and video-taped class sessions. Data included teachers and parents' responses to semi-structured, audio recorded interviews and students' written responses to open-ended items on the program's evaluation instrument. The data were analyzed for themes and the findings compared to Black Cultural Ethos. Findings revealed that the participants believed that informal science education offered their children opportunities not realized in the formal school setting - a means of impacting their children holistically. The parents expressed the academic, cultural, and personal development of their children in their characterizations of the ideal informal science education experience and in their evaluations of Jordan Academy. Overall, the parents' views emphasized the BCE values of harmony, affect, verve, movement, orality and communalism. The study has important implications for practices within and research on informal science education.

  13. Factors related to sexual behaviors and sexual education programs for Asian-American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Me; Florez, Elizabeth; Tariman, Joseph; McCarter, Sarah; Riesche, Laren

    2015-08-01

    To understand the influential factors related to sexual behaviors among Asian-American adolescents and to evaluate common factors across successful sexual education programs for this population. Despite a rapid increase in cases of STIs/HIV among Asian-American populations, there remains a need for a comprehensive understanding of the influential factors related to risky sexual behaviors for this population. An integrative literature review was conducted. Peer-reviewed articles and government resources were analyzed. Five influential factors were identified: family-centered cultural values, parental relationship, acculturation, gender roles, and lack of knowledge and information about sex and STIs. Only two sexual educational programs met the inclusion criteria and provided evidence towards effectiveness: Safer Choices and Seattle Social Development Project. The findings of this study indicate an urgent need for culturally sensitive sexual education programs that incorporate the identified influential factors, especially cultural values in order to reduce risky sexual behaviors among Asian-American adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Alcohol use and adherence to prescribed therapy among under-served Latino and African-American patients using emergency department services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Bazargan, Mohsen; Hardin, Eugene; Bing, Eric G

    2005-01-01

    Non-adherence to prescribed therapy is a factor that results in many patients attending emergency departments. However, increasingly, we recognize that patients who seek health care from inner-city emergency departments are among those experiencing health disparities. For these marginalized patients, emergency departments can play an important role in complementing the process of individualized care to achieve successful health outcomes. Research that examines socio-psychological characteristics and correlates of healthcare utilization of emergency department service users among under-served minority patients is needed for redirecting appropriate care among this segment of our population. This study examines the prevalence and correlates of adherence to prescribed therapy among patients presenting to an inner-city emergency department for a medical emergency or trauma injury. Specific attention is paid to the role of alcohol. A cross-sectional face-to-face survey was conducted among a consecutive sample of 412 Hispanic and African Americans aged 18 years and older who sought care at an inner-city emergency department facility. Among patients who use medication (N=145), 32% reported low adherence. More than 24% scored positive for alcohol problems based on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Results of multivariate regression analysis showed that those emergency department patients who: 1) identified themselves as Hispanic, 2) reported excessive use of alcohol, 3) reported a higher number of depressive symptoms, and 4) reported a higher number of alcohol related consequences were less likely to adhere to prescribed therapy. Future investigation regarding factors related to adherence to prescribed medication among emergency department patients should take into consideration the role of alcohol and depression in this process. Further research is also needed to factor in patient's ethnicity in the context of treatment adherence.

  15. Compilation of the research performed through the department of defense legacy resource management program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains five separate documents covering the work on Atlantic white-cedar between Alligator River NWR and the United States Air Force Dare County...

  16. A Case Study of the Diversity Culture of an American University Athletic Department: Perceptions of Senior Level Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, John N.; Cunningham, George B.

    2012-01-01

    The topic of diversity has received considerable attention from scholars who study sport within the context of higher education in the USA. But despite this interest in the topic, an in-depth focus on how college and university athletic departments effectively manage diversity is missing from the literature. Therefore, we conducted an intrinsic…

  17. A clinical student exchange program organized by cardiothoracic department: feedback of participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirilomis, Theodor; Schoendube, Friedrich A

    2013-03-29

    The development of a student exchange program was an essential part of the cooperation between the Medical Schools of the University of Goettingen (Germany) and the University of Thrace in Alexandroupolis (Greece). The student exchange program started in 2008 and was performed once a year. The experiences of this program and the feedback of participants are presented. Although organized by the Dept. of Thoracic, Cardiac, and Vascular Surgery, the approach of the program was multidisciplinary. Participants also attended Continuous Medical Education activities primary addressed to physicians. At the end of the program, the participants evaluated the program anonymously. The educational units were rated via a 4-grade system. Additionally, it was possible to comment both positive and negative aspects of the program. Twenty-nine educational units were evaluated. The practical teaching units yielded a better result than the classical teaching units (93% of practical units were evaluated as "very good" vs. 74% of lectures/seminars). The Continuous Medical Education activities were evaluated less favorable (only 61% were evaluated as "very good"). The student exchange program enhanced effective teaching and learning. Courses supporting practical medical skills were extremely positive evaluated. Continuous Medical Education activities are not suitable for students and therefore, we do not include such an event anymore. Additionally, the program created an excellent forum for contact and communication between the students of the two universities.

  18. Fission energy program of the US Department of Energy, FY 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, Robert L.

    1980-03-01

    Information is presented concerning the National Energy Plan and fission energy policy; fission energy program management; converter reactor systems; breeder reactor systems; and special nuclear evaluations and systems.

  19. American Samoa Commercial Fisheries BioSampling (CFBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — There was a fairly short-lived market sampling program created by the American Samoa Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources (DMWR) staff back in the mid to late...

  20. A Facebook-Based Obesity Prevention Program for Korean American Adolescents: Usability Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bu Kyung; Nahm, Eun-Shim; Rogers, Valerie E; Choi, Mona; Friedmann, Erika; Wilson, Marisa; Koru, Gunes

    Adolescent obesity is one of the most serious global public health challenges. Social networking sites are currently popular among adolescents. Therefore, the obesity prevention program for Korean American adolescents was developed on the most popular social networking site, Facebook. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usability of a culturally tailored Facebook-based obesity prevention program for Korean American adolescents (Healthy Teens). An explorative descriptive design of usability testing was used. Usability testing employing one-on-one observation, the think-aloud method, audio taping, screen activity capture, and surveys was performed. Twenty participants were recruited from two Korean language schools (mean age, 15.40 ± 1.50 years). Recruitment and user testing was performed between February and April 2014. Content analysis, using the inductive coding approach, was performed by three coders to analyze transcriptions. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze quantitative data including demographic characteristics, perceived usability, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors. Testing revealed several usability issues in content, appearance, and navigation. Participants' comments regarding content were positive. Although the Facebook platform provided limited flexibility with respect to building the site, participants described the program's appearance as appropriate. Most participants did not experience difficulty in navigating the program. Our preliminary findings indicated that participants perceived the Healthy Teens program as usable and useful. This program could be used as a robust platform for the delivery of health education to adolescents. Further research is required to assess the effects of Facebook-based programs on adolescent obesity prevention. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric: a phase 1 report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Mehul V; Dillon, Peter W; Bruny, Jennifer L; Ko, Clifford Y; Hall, Bruce L; Moss, R Lawrence; Oldham, Keith T; Richards, Karen E; Vinocur, Charles D; Ziegler, Moritz M

    2011-01-01

    There has been a long-standing desire to implement a multi-institutional, multispecialty program to address surgical quality improvement for children. This report documents results of the initial phase of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric. From October 2008 to December 2009, patients from 4 pediatric referral centers were sampled using American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program methodology tailored to children. A total of 7,287 patients were sampled, representing general/thoracic surgery (n = 2,237; 30.7%), otolaryngology (n = 1,687; 23.2%), orthopaedic surgery (n = 1,367; 18.8%), urology (n = 893; 12.3%), neurosurgery (n = 697; 9.6%), and plastic surgery (n = 406; 5.6%). Overall mortality rate detected was 0.3% and 287 (3.9%) patients had postoperative occurrences. After accounting for demographic, preoperative, and operative factors, occurrences were 4 times more likely in those undergoing inpatient versus outpatient procedures (odds ratio [OR] = 4.71; 95% CI, 3.01-7.35). Other factors associated with higher likelihood of postoperative occurrences included nutritional/immune history, such as preoperative weight loss/chronic steroid use (OR = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.03-2.15), as well as physiologic compromise, such as sepsis/inotrope use before surgery (OR = 1.68; 95% CI, 1.10-1.95). Operative factors associated with occurrences included multiple procedures under the same anesthetic (OR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.21-2.06) and American Society of Anesthesiologists classification category 4/5 versus 1 (OR = 5.74; 95% CI, 2.94-11.24). Specialty complication rates varied from 1.5% for otolaryngology to 9.0% for neurosurgery (p Pediatric has the potential to identify outcomes of children's surgical care that can be targeted for quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2010 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, R. U.; Benneche, P. E.; Hosticka, B.

    1998-09-30

    The objective of the DOE supported Reactor Sharing Program is to increase the availability of university nuclear reactor facilities to non-reactor-owning educational institutions. The educational and research programs of these users institutions is enhanced by the use of the nuclear facilities.

  3. 1997 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives of the program are as follows: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program description is as follows: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  4. The good lives model (GLM): an evaluation of GLM operationalization in North American treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Gwenda M; Ward, Tony; Levenson, Jill S

    2014-02-01

    The good lives model (GLM) has become an increasingly popular theoretical framework underpinning sex offender treatment programs, and preliminary research suggests that the GLM may enhance the efficacy of programs that adhere to the Risk, Need, and Responsivity (RNR) principles. However, this potential rests on the appropriate operationalization of the GLM in practice. Operationalized appropriately, the GLM aims to facilitate risk reduction alongside equipping clients with the tools to live personally meaningful and fulfilling lives. However, misguided operationalization of the GLM could result in ineffective treatment and ultimately higher rates of reoffending. This article presents findings from a multisite study exploring how the GLM has been operationalized and the degree to which the GLM has been integrated in a sample of 13 North American treatment programs. A comprehensive coding protocol was developed that included items related to program aims and client induction/orientation, assessment, intervention planning, intervention content, and intervention delivery. Each site was visited and items were rated through a review of program documentation, interviews with program directors/managers, and observations of treatment groups. Findings from inductive (how the GLM was operationalized) and deductive (the extent to which the GLM was integrated) analyses are presented and GLM consistent and inconsistent practices are highlighted. The article concludes with suggestions for ways in which program responsiveness to the GLM could be enhanced.

  5. Weatherization Works II - Summary of Findings from the ARRA Period Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carroll, David [APPRISE, Inc.. Princeton, NJ (United States); Rose, Erin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hawkins, Beth A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pigg, Scott [Energy Center of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Dalhoff, Greg [Dalhoff & Associates. Verona, WI (United STates); Blasnik, Michael [Blasnik & Associates, Boston, MA (United States); Eisenberg, Joel Fred [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cowan, Claire [Energy Center of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Conlon, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report presents a summary of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Program. This evaluation focused on the WAP Program Year 2010. The ARRA evaluation produced fourteen separate reports, including this summary. Three separate reports address the energy savings, energy cost savings, and cost effectiveness of WAP across four housing types: single family, mobile home, and large multifamily. Other reports address the environmental emissions benefits attributable to WAP, and characterize the program. Special studies were conducted to: estimate the impacts of weatherization and healthy homes interventions on asthma-related Medicaid claims in a small cohort in Washington State; assess how weatherization recipients communicate their weatherization experiences to those in their social network, and assess processes implemented to defer homes for weatherization. Small studies addressed energy use in refrigerators, WAP as implemented in the U.S. territories for the first time, and weatherization s impacts on air conditioning energy savings. The national occupant survey was mined for additional insights on the impacts of weatherization on household budgets and energy behaviors post-weatherization. Lastly, the results of a survey of weatherization training centers are summarized.

  6. The Department of Defense FY 2000 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program: Program Solicitation 00.1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ... (NIMA), and U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM), hereafter referred to as DoD Components, invite small business firms to submit proposals under this solicitation for the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program...

  7. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Tulsa, Oklahoma, Roundtable Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-04-14

    TULSA EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Tulsa, Oklahoma DOE Tribal Roundtable convened on April 14th, at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Policy and Programs and facilitated by Debra Drecksel, Senior Program Manager, Senior Facilitator, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute) and Brian Manwaring, Program Manager, U.S. Institute. They were assisted by Lindsey Sexton, Program Associate, U.S. Institute.  Tribal leaders and representatives from multiple tribal communities attended the roundtable. David Conrad, Director of Tribal and Intergovernmental Affairs, DOE Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs represented DOE at the meeting.  

  8. Workforce development for comparative effectiveness research: training programs funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geonnotti, Kristin L; Rich, Eugene C; Esposito, Dominick

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a midstream assessment of the comparative effectiveness research (CER) training programs funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) by examining program characteristics, planned curriculum development activities and core competencies. We examined all 43 training projects funded by the US$46 million ARRA CER investment, collecting data from key informant discussions and a technical expert panel. The majority of projects leveraged institutional resources to provide an individualized combination of didactic and experiential learning supported by strong mentorship. Core competencies included skills in statistical modeling, evidence synthesis (systematic reviews and meta-analysis) and general research design skills. ARRA-supported CER training programs enhanced workforce capacity by developing curricula and preparing CER researchers to apply emerging methods and utilize new CER infrastructure.

  9. The Dangerous Decline in the Department of Defense’s Vaccine Program for Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    of Defense (DOD) responded by partitioning its bio­ defense and infectious­disease vaccine ac­ quisition programs, with biodefense vac­ cines ...US mili­ tary infectious­disease vaccine program has taken a backseat to countering the bio­ terrorism threat since the mid­1990s. Begin­ ning with...its stand­up of the Joint Program Office for Biological Defense in 1993 and formalized requirements for biodefense vac­ cines in 1995, the DOD—with a

  10. Text Messaging Based Obesity Prevention Program for Parents of Pre-Adolescent African American Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chishinga Callender

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available African American girls are at a greater risk of obesity than their nonminority peers. Parents have the primary control over the home environment and play an important role in the child obesity prevention. Obesity prevention programs to help parents develop an obesity-preventive home environment are needed. The purpose of this study was to collect formative research from parents of 8–10-year old African American girls about perceptions, expectations, and content for a text messaging based program. Mothers (n = 30 participated in surveys and interviews to inform message development and content. A professional expert panel (n = 10 reviewed draft text messages via a survey. All the mothers reported owning a cellphone with an unlimited texting plan, and they used their cellphones for texting (90.0% and accessing the Internet (100.0%. The majority were interested in receiving text messages about healthy eating and physical activity (86.7%. Interviews confirmed survey findings. One hundred and seven text messages promoting an obesity-preventive home environment were developed. The expert panel and parents reported positive reactions to draft text messages. This research provides evidence that mobile health (mHealth interventions appeal to parents of African American girls and they have ready access to the technology with which to support this approach.

  11. Developing a monitoring and evaluating capability for the U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Assistance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licina, Derek Joseph; Schor, Kenneth

    2007-04-01

    The Department of Defense spends more than $50 million dollars a year on humanitarian assistance (HA) projects. Although the projects are perceived as beneficial, demonstrating sustainable long-term impact is not possible. A seven-step monitoring and evaluation (M&E) process was adapted for this study that combined different steps within a logical framework approach. A retrospective analysis found that M&E is not part of the HA program (HAP) process from nomination through completion and beyond. To address this M&E deficiency, a comprehensive logframe matrix composed of 5 goals, 14 objectives, 100 activities, and many indicators was created. Incorporating this proposed Department of Defense HAP logframe matrix into existing project nomination and After-Action Report (AAR) processes would enable HAP managers to prioritize limited resources, demonstrate sustainable program impact, and align individual HA projects with the overarching national defense strategy and overall U.S. government foreign policy.

  12. Emergency department patient characteristics: Potential impact on emergency medicine residency programs in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshove-Bolk, J.; Mencl, F.; Rijswijck, B.T. van; Weiss, I.M.; Simons, M.P.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We set out to study emergency department patient characteristics at a busy level-2 trauma center, to gain insight into the practise of emergency medicine, which is not yet recognized as a specialty in the Netherlands. METHODS: From May 27 to July 4 2001, the following data were recorded

  13. Weight Loss Goals among African American Women with Type 2 Diabetes in a Behavioral Weight Control Program

    OpenAIRE

    White, D.B.; Bursac, Z.; DiLillo, V.; West, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    African American women with type 2 diabetes experience limited weight loss in behavioral weight control programs. Some research suggests overly ambitious weight loss expectations may negatively affect weight losses achieved but it is unknown whether they affect weight loss among African American women. The current study examined personal weight loss goals and expected satisfaction with a reasonable weight loss among African American women with type 2 diabetes starting a behavioral obesity tre...

  14. A National Study of American Indian and Alaska Native Substance Abuse Treatment: Provider and Program Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckmann, Traci; Moore, Laurie A; Croy, Calvin D; Novins, Douglas K; Aarons, Gregory

    2016-09-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIANs) experience major disparities in accessing quality care for mental health and substance use disorders. There are long-standing concerns about access to and quality of care for AIANs in rural and urban areas including the influence of staff and organizational factors, and attitudes toward evidence-based treatment for addiction. We conducted the first national survey of programs serving AIAN communities and examined workforce and programmatic differences between clinics located in urban/suburban (n=50) and rural (n=142) communities. We explored the correlates of openness toward using evidence-based treatments (EBTs). Programs located in rural areas were significantly less likely to have nurses, traditional healing consultants, or ceremonial providers on staff, to consult outside evaluators, to use strategic planning to improve program quality, to offer pharmacotherapies, pipe ceremonies, and cultural activities among their services, and to participate in research or program evaluation studies. They were significantly more likely to employ elders among their traditional healers, offer AA-open group recovery services, and collect data on treatment outcomes. Greater openness toward EBTs was related to a larger clinical staff, having addiction providers, being led by directors who perceived a gap in access to EBTs, and working with key stakeholders to improve access to services. Programs that provided early intervention services (American Society of Addiction Medicine level 0.5) reported less openness. This research provides baseline workforce and program level data that can be used to better understand changes in access and quality for AIAN over time. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Overcoming Resistance to Change: An Analysis to the Department of Defense's Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Irene

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate the impact of change on organizations, in the absence of a preparedness program and to develop strategies for overcoming resistance to change, in the midst...

  16. Defense Acquisitions: Department of Defense Actions on Program Manager Empowerment and Accountability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    .... In addition, as part of a new strategy for program manager empowerment and accountability, DOD plans a variety of actions to enhance development opportunities, provide more incentives, and arrange...

  17. Development and initial results of a mandatory department of surgery faculty mentoring pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Petrusa, Emil; Hodin, Richard A

    2016-09-01

    Mentoring of junior faculty by senior faculty is an important part of promotion and/or tenure and enhanced job satisfaction. This study reports the development and results to date of a faculty mentorship program in surgery. We implemented a departmental faculty mentoring program in July 2014 that consisted of both structured and informal meetings between junior faculty mentees and assigned senior faculty mentors. All senior faculty mentors attended a brief mentor training session. We then developed an evidence-based mentorship instrument that featured standardized metrics of academic success. This instrument was completed by each mentee, and then reviewed at the junior faculty's annual career conference with their division chief. A survey was distributed in July 2015 to assess junior faculty satisfaction with the new mentorship program. Junior or senior faculty consisted of six of three women and 16 of 11 men, respectively. Junior faculty members were aged 40 ± 3 y and had been an attending for 4 ± 2 y. Mentorship meetings occurred approximately three times during the year (range = 0-10). Total meeting time with senior mentors per meeting was a mean of 40 min (range = 0-300 min). Over 75% of junior faculty members were very or somewhat satisfied with the mentorship program and would like to continue in the program. The best aspect of the program was the opportunity to meet with an accomplished surgeon outside their division. Opportunities to improve the program included better matching of mentor to mentee by disease or research focus. Interestingly, almost the entire junior faculty members tended to have at least two other mentors besides the mentor assigned to them in this program. In terms of program outcomes, junior faculty members agreed that the mentorship program improved their overall career plans and enhanced their involvement in professional organizations but has not yet helped with academic productivity, home and/or work balance, and overall

  18. US Department of Energy High School Student Supercomputing Honors Program: A follow-up assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The US DOE High School Student Supercomputing Honors Program was designed to recognize high school students with superior skills in mathematics and computer science and to provide them with formal training and experience with advanced computer equipment. This document reports on the participants who attended the first such program, which was held at the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during August 1985.

  19. Efforts and Programs of the Department of Defense Relating to the Prevention, Mitigation, and Treatment of Blast Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Regeneration of Orthopedic Tissues for Military Applications: This project tests LifeCell’s hybrid ACL ( anterior cruciate ligament ) graft using a...of prosthetic technology and improvement in occupational and physical therapies . These efforts will leverage the three DoD Amputee Centers as...events. Extremity • Rehabilitation – Therapy : Conduct more physical and occupational therapy research. Efforts and Programs of the Department of

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2017 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-18

    The fiscal year 2017 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June June 5-9, 2017, in Washington, D.C. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  1. Department of Energy Nuclear Material Protection, Control, and Accounting Program at the Mangyshlak Atomic Energy Complex, Aktau, Republic of Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, R.; Berry, R.B.; Eras, A. [and others

    1998-08-01

    As part of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Nuclear Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program, the US Department of Energy and Mangyshlak Atomic Energy Complex (MAEC), Aktau, Republic of Kazakstan have cooperated to enhance existing MAEC MPC and A features at the BN-350 liquid-metal fast-breeder reactor. This paper describes the methodology of the enhancement activities and provides representative examples of the MPC and A augmentation implemented at the MAEC.

  2. Department of Defense (DOD) renewables and energy efficiency planning (REEP) program manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeth, R.J.; Fournier, D.; Debaillie, L.; Edgar, L.; Stroot, P.; Beasley, R.; Edgar, D.; McMillen, L.; Marren, M.

    1995-08-01

    The Renewables and Energy Efficiency Planning (REEP) program was developed at the US Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). This program allows for the analysis of 78 energy and water conservation opportunities at 239 major DOD installations. REEP uses a series of algorithms in conjunction with installation specific data to estimate the energy and water conservation potential for entire installations. The program provides the energy, financial, pollution, and social benefits of conservation initiatives. The open architecture of the program allows for simple modification of energy and water conservation variables, and installation database values to allow for individualized analysis. The program is essentially a high-level screening tool that can be used to help identify and focus preliminary conservation studies. The REEP program requires an IBM PC or compatible with a 80386 or 80486 microprocessor. It also requires approximately 4 megabytes of disk space and at least 8 megabytes of RAM. The system was developed for a Windows environment and requires Microsoft Windows 3.1{trademark} or higher to run properly.

  3. The 1995 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives of this program are: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, or industry.

  4. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 or 11 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members were appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow devoted approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program consisted of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topic.

  5. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goglia, G. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives of this program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to simulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as research fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The fellows will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of general interest or that are directly relevant to the fellows' research project. The lecturers and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, the educational community, or industry.

  6. Hampton University/American Society for Engineering Education/NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 or 11 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society of Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university will be faculty members appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA-Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of general interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research project. The lecturers and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education or industry.

  7. 1996 NASA-Hampton University American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives were: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, or industry.

  8. 1998 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, William P. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The program objectives include: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  9. 1999 NASA - ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program or summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  10. 2001 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler); Hathaway, Roger A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises these programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4 To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellow's research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders wil be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education and industry.

  11. Development and Implementation of an AIDS Prevention Program for African-American Women at a Child Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moten-Tolson, Paula

    This program was designed to provide Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) prevention education for African-American women of child bearing age at a child care center which serves low income high risk families. The primary goal was to reduce the risk of African-American women at the child care center for contracting the Human Immunodeficiency…

  12. Predictors of HIV/AIDS Programming in African American Churches: Implications for HIV Prevention, Testing, and Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jennifer M.; Hanlon, Alexandra; Brawner, Bridgette M.

    2017-01-01

    Using data from the National Congregational Study, we examined predictors of having an HIV/AIDS program in predominately African American churches across the United States. We conducted regression analyses of Wave II data (N = 1,506) isolating the sample to churches with a predominately African American membership. The dependent variable asked…

  13. Native American Education Program Title IV Indian Education Act, 1978-1979. Final Evaluation Report, Function No. 5004-94701.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Ruddie A.; And Others

    Operating within the New York City Public School System for the past four years, this program offers direct services to Native American students and their parents by providing: (1) instruction in Native American history and cultural activities; (2) academic tutoring; (3) school/neighborhood liaisons; and (4) a resource center for information about…

  14. Conceptualizing a Mentoring Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Students in the STEM Fields: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windchief, Sweeney; Brown, Blakely

    2017-01-01

    In order to address the disparity of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) doctorates in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), culturally congruent mentorship program development is needed. Because traditional Western academic paradigms are typically constrained to a non-Indigenous perspective, the authors question how American Indian…

  15. Study of author’s applied physical training program for military officers-graduates of reserve officers’ departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Yavorskyy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to test effectiveness of applied physical training program for military officers, called up to military service after graduation from reserve officers’ departments. Material: the research was conducted on the base of Educational center 184 from June 2014 to December 2015. In the research 80 military officers participated (n=30 - graduates of military higher educational establishments; n=26, n=24 - graduates of reserve officers’ departments of 22-27 years’ age. Results: we fulfilled analysis of military officers’ physical fitness by exercises, which characterize general physical fitness and military applied skills (100 meters’ run, chin ups, 3000 meters’ run, passing obstacles course, grenade throws for distance and for accuracy, 5 km march-rush. We worked out the program, the essence of which implies ensuring of physical fitness and acceleration of reserve officers-graduates’ adaptation to professional (combat functioning. Conclusions: it was proved that implementation of the author’s program influenced positively on perfection of general physical qualities and military applied skills of military officers-graduated of reserve officers’ departments (р-0.05-0.001.

  16. A community-based wellness program to reduce depression in African Americans: results from a pilot intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidis, Christina; McKeever, Corliss; Meucci, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    African Americans are less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to find antidepressants acceptable or seek care for depression. To develop and pilot test a culturally tailored, community-based, psychoeducational wellness and exercise promotion program to reduce depressive symptoms in African Americans. Participants were African Americans with moderate depressive symptoms who were interested in exercise but were not exercising regularly. They attended a 6-week psychoeducational group program during which they set personal activity goals and learned depression self-management skills. We conducted pre- and postintervention surveys and postintervention feedback sessions. Twenty-one African Americans participated in the intervention. The program had excellent attendance and satisfaction. We found a large reduction in depressive symptoms, with mean Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scores dropping from 14.8 to 7.1 (p programs to address depression.

  17. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2000 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2001-03-01

    The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were done to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear 200,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Monitoring and evaluation is preformed by the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program. From 1988 to 1998, the principle sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The most recent information from the monitoring program also suggests that the hatchery and net pen rearing programs have been beneficial to enhancing the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake.

  18. Quality assurance programs developed and implemented by the US Department of Energy`s Analytical Services Program for environmental restoration and waste management activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillian, D.; Bottrell, D. [Dept. of Energy, Germntown, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) has been tasked with addressing environmental contamination and waste problems facing the Department. A key element of any environmental restoration or waste management program is environmental data. An effective and efficient sampling and analysis program is required to generate credible environmental data. The bases for DOE`s EM Analytical Services Program (ASP) are contained in the charter and commitments in Secretary of Energy Notice SEN-13-89, EM program policies and requirements, and commitments to Congress and the Office of Inspector General (IG). The Congressional commitment by DOE to develop and implement an ASP was in response to concerns raised by the Chairman of the Congressional Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources Subcommittee, and the Chairman of the Congressional Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, regarding the production of analytical data. The development and implementation of an ASP also satisfies the IG`s audit report recommendations on environmental analytical support, including development and implementation of a national strategy for acquisition of quality sampling and analytical services. These recommendations were endorsed in Departmental positions, which further emphasize the importance of the ASP to EM`s programs. In September 1990, EM formed the Laboratory Management Division (LMD) in the Office of Technology Development to provide the programmatic direction needed to establish and operate an EM-wide ASP program. In January 1992, LMD issued the {open_quotes}Analytical Services Program Five-Year Plan.{close_quotes} This document described LMD`s strategy to ensure the production of timely, cost-effective, and credible environmental data. This presentation describes the overall LMD Analytical Services Program and, specifically, the various QA programs.

  19. Annual highlights, Environmental Programs of the Department of Energy and Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    Brief summaries are presented of some 35 individual programs covering a wide range of activities in the atmospheric, oceanographic, and terrestrial ecology areas. In general, these programs are involved with the study of pollutants resulting from the production of energy and their effects or potential effects on the environment. Programs include meteorology and plume dispersion, with emphasis on tracing plumes from the tall stacks of fossil-fuel burning power plants, and implementation of MAP3S (the Multistate Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study), including both field and modeling studies related to atmospheric pollutants in the Northeastern United States, the meteorology of the coastal land-sea interface, the development of long-distance tracer systems for following movements of air masses, the measurement of a series of pollutants at ambient levels in real time, and laboratory and field studies on the collection and behavior of aerosol particulates, including work on the speciation and quantification of sulfate particulates. The objective of programs in oceanographic sciences is to assess the potential impact of energy-related activities (reactor releases, oil spills, etc.) on the Northeast coastal zone and its biota. A capability for the study of environmental virology has been established. Another major program is the study of the effects of acid rain on forest ecosystems and on selected crops.

  20. Department of Energy Site Operator Program. Final report, October 1, 1991--September 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    York Technical College is a two-year public institution accredited by the Commission of Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. York Technical College has been involved with electric vehicles since the late 1980`s. The four major objectives of the Site Operator Program were (1) field test and evaluate electric and hybrid vehicles and related components; (2) define and develop a national infrastructure system including electric charging systems, service/training education programs, utility system impacts and safety standards; (3) increase public awareness regarding environmental benefits, reduced dependency on foreign oil, technology development, and economic impacts; (4) assist local, state and federal agencies and fleet operators in developing electric and hybrid vehicle programs. The primary thrusts of the electric vehicle program at York Technical College, supporting the objectives of the Site Operator program were: (1) public awareness, (2) public education, (3) EV maintenance curriculum development and maintenance training, (4) field data collection, (5) vehicle modification and upgrade, (6) establish electric vehicle partnerships.

  1. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P.

    1996-07-01

    This report presents the results from the analysis of the 44th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIV) that were received on or before June 3, 1996. The QAP is designed to test the quality of environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by it`s contractors. Since 1976, samples have been prepared and analyzed by the Environmental measurements Laboratory.

  2. University of Florida--US Department of Energy 1994-1995 reactor sharing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1996-06-01

    The grant support of $24,250 (1994-95?) was well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of UFTR Reactor. All users and uses were screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research was not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. Over 12 years, the program has been a key catalyst for renewing utilization of UFTR both by external users around the State of Florida and the Southeast and by various faculty members within the University of Florida. Tables provide basic information about the 1994-95 program and utilization of UFTR.

  3. U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office quality assurance program document. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    Mission of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) is to protect human health and the environment by opening and operating the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for safe disposal of TRU waste, and establishing an effective system for management of TRU waste from generation to disposal. To help in fulfilling this mission and to ensure that risks and environmental impacts are identified and minimized, and that safety, reliability, and performance are optimized, CAO`s policy is to establish and maintain an effective quality assurance (QA) program that supports compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations, and DOE orders and requirements. This document establishes QA program requirements for all programs, projects, and activities sponsored by CAO.

  4. Federal workers' compensation programs: Department of Defense and Veterans Health Administration experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Timothy M; Grizzell, Tifani L; Hodgson, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this article is to introduce the reader to this special supplement to the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine regarding Federal Workers' Compensation Programs. The short history of both the VHA and DoD Federal Workers' Compensation Programs are provided and a short synopsis of each author's article is provided. The lessons learned from the articles in the supplement are summarized in this article and 6 key findings are highlighted. Cooperation between human resources workers' compensation personnel, safety and occupational health personnel is a must for successful management of the WC program. Information and data sharing are critical for root cause and injury prevention, case management, and cost containment efforts. Enhancing efforts in these areas will save an estimated $100 million through cost avoidance efforts.

  5. Correlates of adherence to a physical activity program in young African-American girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Christian R; Ludwig, David A; Howe, Cheryl A; Ferguson-Smith, Ayanay; Barbeau, Paule

    2007-03-01

    The goal was to identify correlates of adherence to a structured physical activity (PA) program. Subjects were 136 8- to 12-year-old African-American girls. Potential correlates at baseline were: 1) fitness index (FI: % body fat from DXA and cardiovascular fitness from treadmill test), and 2) self-esteem, anxiety, attitude to school and teachers, relationship with parents, and interpersonal relations (Behavioral Assessment System for Children). The 10-month PA program included 80 minutes of PA offered 5 days/wk. Regression tree classification was used to model attendance. Six splits occurred (34% total variance explained). Less anxious subjects attended more often than highly anxious subjects (3 days/wk vs. 1.5 days/wk) did. Subjects with a healthier FI attended more often than those with a less healthy FI (3 days/wk vs. 0.5 days/wk) did. Younger subjects attended more often than older ones (3 days/wk vs. 2.5 days/wk) did. The next two splits were again with anxiety (3.5 days/wk vs. 3 days/wk) and FI (3 days/wk vs. 2.5 days/wk). Finally, subjects with higher levels of self-esteem attended more often than those with lower levels (3.5 days/wk vs. 2 days/wk) did. Subjects who were self-confident, younger, fitter, and less anxious were more likely to participate regularly. This suggests that children who may be more likely to benefit from a PA program are less likely to participate. To enhance participation in PA programs, especially in older African-American girls: 1) psychological concerns should be identified and addressed before enrollment, and 2) programs should be designed to be appealing to children of all fitness levels.

  6. Using formative research to develop a worksite health promotion program for African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunker, Christie; Cox, Tiffany L; Wingo, Brooks C; Knight, Bern'Nadette; Jefferson, Wendy K; Ard, Jamy D

    2008-01-01

    To describe the development of a culturally appropriate worksite health promotion program (WHPP) designed to promote increased physical activity and improved nutrition in a high risk group of African American women. The program was based on EatRight, which is a lifestyle-oriented weight control program that focuses on food volume, rather than calories. Formative research included four nominal group technique (NGT) sessions conducted with 14 African American women from the selected worksite to gather input on job factors that affected their weight and daily life factors that affected their amount of physical activity. Their responses were used to adapt existing EatRight materials to target areas of special need for this unique group. Themes emerged from the NGT sessions that indicated stress at work and an environment of unhealthy eating, in addition to social eating and lack of social support for healthy eating added to unhealthy eating patterns at work. In response to physical activity, the primary themes included lack of time to exercise, stress of multiple family roles and responsibilities, and perceived physical barriers to physical activity. Based on the NGT themes, EatRight materials were adapted and additional topics (e.g., increasing social support, overcoming limitations, and time management) were included to develop a WHPP that addressed issues that the participants identified as relevant for their work and home lives. Conducting the NGT sessions and EatRight classes in the work environment, we were able to provide a convenient, familiar environment which fostered social support among participants. We believe that a culturally appropriate modification of EatRight holds great promise in addressing health disparities seen among African American women by offering education on lifestyle changes that will decrease weight through nutrition and physical activity.

  7. The Myth of Jointness in Department of Defense Requirements and Major Acquisition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    for a commercial off-the-shelf solution to meet their FCA program requirement. The Air Force, new into the game and their LCA program still in the...Away’ from Issuing First LCA Solicitation,” Insidedefense.com, December 9, 2005, under “Inside the Air Force,” http://insidedefense.com/Inside-the...Air-Force/Inside-the-Air-Force-12/09/2005/air-force-likely-several-years-away-from-issuing-first- lca - solicitation/menu-id-151.html (accessed February 9

  8. New technologies and surgical innovation: five years of a local health technology assessment program in a surgical department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Paule; Austen, Lea; Kortbeek, John B; Lafrenière, René

    2012-06-01

    There is pressure for surgical departments to introduce new and innovative health technologies in an evidence-based manner while ensuring that they are safe and effective and can be managed with available resources. A local health technology assessment (HTA) program was developed to systematically integrate research evidence with local operational management information and to make recommendations for subsequent decision by the departmental executive committee about whether and under what conditions the technology will be used. The authors present a retrospective analysis of the outcomes of this program as used by the Department of Surgery & Surgical Services in the Calgary Health Region over a 5-year period from December 2005 to December 2010. Of the 68 technologies requested, 15 applications were incomplete and dropped, 12 were approved, 3 were approved for a single case on an urgent/emergent basis, 21 were approved for "clinical audit" for a restricted number of cases with outcomes review, 14 were approved for research use only, and 3 were referred to additional review bodies. Subsequent outcome reports resulted in at least 5 technologies being dropped for failure to perform. Decisions based on local HTA program recommendations were rarely "yes" or "no." Rather, many technologies were given restricted approval with full approval contingent on satisfying certain conditions such as clinical outcomes review, training protocol development, or funding. Thus, innovation could be supported while ensuring safety and effectiveness. This local HTA program can be adapted to a variety of settings and can help bridge the gap between evidence and practice.

  9. Position of the American Dietetic Association: child and adolescent nutrition assistance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, Jamie; Bayerl, Cynthia Taft

    2010-05-01

    t is the position of the American Dietetic Association that children and adolescents should have access to an adequate supply of healthful and safe foods that promote optimal physical, cognitive, and social growth and development. Nutrition assistance programs, such as food assistance and meal service programs and nutrition education initiatives, play a vital role in meeting this critical need. Nutrition assistance programs create a safety net that ensures that children and adolescents at risk for poor nutritional intakes have access to a safe, adequate, and nutritious food supply. Federally funded nutrition assistance programs help ensure that children and adolescents receive meals that provide adequate energy and nutrients to meet their growth and development needs; children and adolescents have access to adequate food supplies; and women, infants, and children who have nutritional or medical risk factors, such as iron-deficiency anemia or overweight, receive supplemental nutritious foods as well as nutrition education. In addition, federally funded nutrition assistance programs serve as a means to combat hunger and food insecurity and as a vehicle for nutrition education and promotion of physical activity designed to prevent or reduce obesity and chronic disease. It is important that continued funding be provided for these programs that have been consistently shown to have a positive influence on child and adolescent well-being. Registered dietitians and dietetic technicians, registered, are uniquely qualified to design, implement, and evaluate nutrition assistance programs for children and adolescents. Registered dietitians and dietetic technicians, registered, are the only food and nutrition practitioners with adequate training in food science, nutrition, and food systems to implement research and surveillance programs to monitor, evaluate, and improve the nutritional status of children and adolescents.

  10. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Pala, California, Roundtable Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-03-23

    The Pala, California, DOE Tribal Roundtable convened at 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 23, at the Pala Resort. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy). Tracey LeBeau, Director of the DOE Office of Indian Energy and Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director-Policy of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, attended. Tribal leaders and representatives from five tribal communities also attended. There were thirteen participants. The meeting was facilitated by Debra Drecksel, Senior Program Manager, Senior Facilitator, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). She was assisted by Lindsey Sexton, Program Associate, U.S. Institute.   

  11. Differences between African-American and Caucasian students on enrollment influences and barriers in kinesiology-based allied health education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J P; Cobler, D C; Lam, Eddie T C; Zhang, James; Chitiyo, George

    2012-06-01

    Kinesiology departments have recently started to offer allied health education programs to attract additional students to teacher education units (9). Although allied health professions offer increased work opportunities, insufficient enrollment and training of minority students in these academic fields contribute to underrepresentation in the workforce (3). To improve workforce diversity, kinesiology departments must understand how enrollment influences and barriers differ by race among prospective students. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify differences in allied health education enrollment influences and enrollment barriers between minority and Caucasian students. Participants (n = 601) consisted of students enrolled in kinesiology-based allied health education programs. Multivariate ANOVA was used to compare group differences in enrollment decision making. "Personal influence," "career opportunity," and "physical self-efficacy" were all significantly stronger enrollment influences among African-American students than among Caucasian students, and "social influence," "experiential opportunity," "academic preparation," and "physical self-efficacy" were all perceived as significantly greater barriers compared with Caucasian students. Findings support the need to recruit African-American students through sport and physical education settings and to market program-based experiential opportunities.

  12. Department of the Navy. FY 1994/FY 1995 Biennial Budget Estimates. Military Construction Program. FY 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    CONTRACT COST ..... ................ - - - 2,920 SUPERVISION. INSPECTION & OVERHEAD ( 6.0%) . - - - ISO TOTAL REQUEST. ................. - - - 3.100...3,570CONTINGENCY ( 5.0%) . . . . . . . . . . . ISO TOTAL CONTRACT COST . .. .. .. .. .. . .. - - - 3.700 SUPERVISION. INSPECTION & OVERHEAD ( 6.0%) . - - - 220...NAVAL HOSPITAL, BACHELOR ENLISTED QUARTERS CAMP LEJEUNE. NORTH CAROLINA 5. PROGRAM ELEMENT 6. CATEGORY CODE 7. PROJECT NUMBER S. PROJECT COST ( 50001

  13. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT FOR 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J

    2008-08-26

    The DOE-EM Office of Engineering and Technology is responsible for implementing EM's international cooperative program. The Office of Engineering and Technology's international efforts are aimed at supporting EM's mission of risk reduction and accelerated cleanup of the environmental legacy of the nation's nuclear weapons program and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. To do this, EM pursues collaborations with government organizations, educational institutions, and private industry to identify and develop technologies that can address the site cleanup needs of DOE. The Office of Engineering and Technology has developed a Technology Roadmap and a Multi-year Program Plan to identify technology needs and identify areas for focused research and development to support DOE-EM's environmental cleanup and waste management objectives. The international cooperative program is an important element of the technology development roadmap, leveraging of world-wide expertise in the advancement and deployment of remediation and treatment technologies. Introductory briefings aimed at furthering familiarity with the DOE-EM mission, and the vital role that technology development plays within it, were presented at two international meetings. The Office of Engineering and Technology currently works with the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and SIA Radon Institute in Russia, the International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) in Ukraine and the Nuclear Engineering and Technology Institute (NETEC) in South Korea through cooperative bilateral arrangements to support EM's accelerated cleanup and closure mission.

  14. Research in the Real World: Studying Chicago Police Department's Crisis Intervention Team Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Amy C.

    2010-01-01

    Police agencies across the country are struggling to respond to significant number of persons with serious mental illness, who are landing on their doorsteps with sometimes tragic consequences. Arguably, the most widely adopted approach, the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) model, is a specialized police-based program designed to improve officers'…

  15. 78 FR 49337 - Direct Grant Programs and Definitions That Apply to Department Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ..., such as professional development for teachers or engaging parents and family members in the school... prohibit conflicts of interest. The continued applicability of these requirements in parts 74 and 80 of... use them when doing so would conflict with required program evaluations. We decline to replace these...

  16. 2010 Department of Defense (DoD) Chemical and Biological Defense Program (CBDP) Portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    26 FW OT&E MBU-25/26 FW When integrated with antigravity (anti-G) equipment, the MBU-25 and MBU-26 each provide simultaneous CB protection and anti...Analysis of Materiel Approaches anti-G .............. Antigravity APB .................Acquisition Program Baseline APG

  17. Program Directors' Perceptions of Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Student Decisions to Persist and Depart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Hertel, Jay; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Wathington, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recent literature has focused on reasons for athletic training student persistence and departure. However, accredited professional bachelor's athletic training program (ATP) directors' opinions regarding student retention have yet to be studied, to our knowledge. Objective: To determine reasons for athletic training student persistence…

  18. The Department of Defense Statement on the Science and Technology Program,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-05

    transportation and disposal operations. Binary facility design as veill as maintenance and surveillance of the existing stockpile is continuing. E...the Defense Science Board, chaired by Dr. John S. Foster, examined the High Energy Laser Program. While im- pressed with technological progress to

  19. [Effectiveness of a home hospitalization program for patients with urinary tract infection after discharge from an emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soledad Gallardo, María; Antón, Ane; Pulido Herrero, Esther; Itziar Larruscain, Miren; Guinea Suárez, Rocío; García Gutiérrez, Susana; Sandoval Negral, Julio César

    2017-10-01

    To compare outcomes of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients referred to a home hospitalization program or admitted to a conventional ward after initial management in the emergency department. Prospective, quasi-experimental study of patients with UTIs attended in 3 hospital emergency departments in the public health system of the Basque Country, Spain, between January 2012 and June 2013. Patients were assigned to 2 groups according to site of treatment (home or hospital ward) after discharge from the emergency department. We collected sociodemographic data, history of kidney or urologic symptoms, concomitant diseases, risk for complicated UTI, presentation on admission to the emergency department, diagnostic findings, and prescribed treatments. The main outcome was poor clinical course (local complications during hospital or home care, recurrence, or readmission related to UTI. Multivariate logistic modeling was used to analyze factors related to poor clinical course. Home hospitalization was the main independent variable of interest. Patients referred to home hospitalization were more often women (70.6% vs 57.1% men, P=.04). Fewer cases of prior admission were recorded in the group treated at home (2.4% vs 9.5% of hospitalized patients, P=.03). Likewise, fewer home-hospitalization patients had risk factors for complicated UTI (58.7% vs 83.3% in the hospitalized group, Phome hospitalization (0.8% vs 8.3% in hospitalized patients, P=.007). The frequency of poor clinical course was similar in home-hospitalized and ward-admitted patients. The clinical course of UTI is similar whether patients are hospitalized after emergency department management or discharged to a home hospitalization program.

  20. 2000 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, William P. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler); Hathaway, Roger A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend ten weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend ten weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry. A list of the abstracts of the presentations is provided.

  1. The first 50 years: A review of the Department of Energy domestic safeguards and security program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmond, W.J.; Zack, N.R.; Tape, J.W.

    1997-12-01

    World War II not only brought the United States rapidly into the nuclear age, but it also brought a new term, {open_quotes}safeguards.{close_quotes} By that time, physical security was an already established activity that dealt with the protection of possessions such as property, vehicles, and other valuables. A secret nuclear project under a stadium at the University of Chicago would add a new dimension to physical security. Similarly, a community known only by its post office box at a location 27 miles from Santa Fe, New Mexico (PO Box 1663) would initiate new programs to protect information and technology while their programs changed the science and warfare around the world. The Manhattan Project and what was to become the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (now Los Alamos National Laboratory) would extend the applications of physical security and, soon to be implemented, safeguards to produce important technical advances for the protection, accounting, control, and nonproliferation of fissile nuclear materials. Security for nuclear materials and weapons information began as a foremost consideration with the start of the nuclear programs in the early 1940s. In the 1960s, the Atoms for Peace Program promoted the peaceful use of nuclear energy and made the US a supplier of nuclear materials and peaceful-use nuclear technology to other states. This program also changed the focus on nuclear materials from that of worldwide control to inspection by an independent agency, the proposed International Atomic Energy Agency. At this same time the nuclear weapons states increased from three to five. Other nations worked to obtain a nuclear weapons capability, resulting in increasing concerns about nuclear proliferation.

  2. Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

    1996-03-31

    This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

  3. Tailoring cancer education and support programs for low-income, primarily African American cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michelle Y; Pollack, Lori A; Evans, Mary B; Smith, Judith Lee; Kratt, Polly; Prayor-Patterson, Heather; Watson, Christopher D; Dignan, Mark; Cheney, Lydia C; Pisu, Maria; Liwo, Amandiy; Hullett, Sandral

    2011-01-01

    to identify the information and stress-management topics of most interest to low-income, predominantly African American cancer survivors. descriptive, cross sectional. outpatient oncology clinic in a public hospital in Birmingham, Alabama. 25 patients with cancer; 12 were men, 22 were African Americans, and 16 had a 12th-grade education or less. patients ranked potential topics to be included in an educational curriculum. quantitative rankings of information and stress-management priorities. learning about cancer, understanding cancer treatments, relieving cancer pain, and keeping well in mind and body were the most highly ranked topics among those offered within the American Cancer Society's I Can Cope curriculum, which also included supportive topics such as mobilizing social support. The preferred stress-management topics were humor therapy, music therapy, meditation, and relaxation; lower-ranked topics included pet therapy and art as therapy. cancer survivors appear most interested in topics specific to their illness and treatment versus supportive topics. Stress management also received high rankings. nurses have a key role in providing patient education and support. Tailoring education programs may better target specific needs and improve the quality of cancer care of underserved patients.

  4. Third annual US Department of Energy review of laboratory programs for women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, L.; Engle, J.; Hassil, C. [eds.] [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Third Annual DOE Review of Laboratory Programs for Women was held May 11-13, 1993 at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). The participants and organizers are men and women dedicted to highlighting programs that encourage women at all academic levels to consider career options in science, mathematics, and engineering. Cohosted by ORISE and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the review was organized by an Oversight Committee whose goal was to develop an agenda and bring together concerned, skilled, and committed parties to discuss issues, make recommendations, and set objectives for the entire DOE community. Reports from each of six working groups are presented, including recommendations, objectives, descriptions, participants, and references.

  5. Participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1997-03-01

    The objective of the DOE supported Reactor Sharing Program is to increase the availability of university nuclear reactor facilities to non-reactor-owning educational institutions. The educational and research programs of these user institutions is enhanced by the use of the nuclear facilities. Several methods have been used by the UVA Reactor Facility to achieve this objective. First, many college and secondary school groups toured the Reactor Facility and viewed the UVAR reactor and associated experimental facilities. Second, advanced undergraduate and graduate classes from area colleges and universities visited the facility to perform experiments in nuclear engineering and physics which would not be possible at the user institution. Third, irradiation and analysis services at the Facility have been made available for research by faculty and students from user institutions. Fourth, some institutions have received activated material from UVA for use at their institutions. These areas are discussed here.

  6. Education and the energy crisis: policies and actions for the Department of Energy. [Options and alternatives, DOE Education Programs Div

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-22

    This report is the result of a study carried out to determine options and alternatives for the Education Programs Division (EPD) of the Department of Energy. In the conduct of this study, numerous individuals from various concerned institutions were interviewed. While the project scope clearly precluded contact with every involved or potentially involved party, a concerted effort was made to obtain a representative sampling of the opinions and views of relevant government, academic and private sector agencies and organizations. A listing of those contacted, excluding the Department of Energy, is provided. In addition to interviews, an extensive range of literature was drawn upon including memoranda, brochures, program statements, school-enrollment data, speeches and the like. It was determined during this study that a wide range of public and private institutions are actively involved in the energy-education field. Oil companies, utilities, public interest groups, schools, agencies at every level of government, and others are formulating and delivering education which is enormously varied. It was concluded, however, that the public is not being reached, partially because current efforts are unfocused and partially because the public has become inured to problems and resistant to many of the traditional means of education. The study found that within this crowded and varied energy education field the Department of Energy is well placed to begin to provide direction and focus to the widespread activity now occurring.

  7. Final report. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, John A

    2003-01-21

    Activities supported at the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory under the U.S. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program are reported for Grant DE FG02-95NE38121 (September 16, 1995 through May 31, 2002). These activities fell under four subcategories: support for research at thesis and post-doctoral levels, support for college-level laboratory exercises, support for reactor tours/lectures on nuclear energy, and support for science fair participants.

  8. Department of Defense Review of the Foreign Comparative Testing Program FY2005-FY2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    superior navigation capability; however, the GPS signal from the satellites is of very low power and is vulnerable to jamming. The FCT project...1553 Databus – Canada – 2006 The B-2 EHF Satellite Communications (SATCOM) Integration Program Office at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, is...The 508th Fighter Support Group, Hill AFB, Utah, is evaluating an advanced umbilical connector developed by EDO MBM Technology, Ltd. of the

  9. Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Program (DHAPP): 2010 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    behavior change communication methodology titled, Vive la Vida , to be used as the foundation for a troop-level training program. Vive la Vida is a series...were counseled, tested, and received their results. Care Three (3) military clinics at la gendarmerie nationale, Camp General Gnassengbé Eyadéma...Country Ongoing Assistance DHAPP has been collaborating with the US Security Cooperation Office at the US Embassy in La Paz and has identified an

  10. Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Program: Annual Report 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-12

    Introduction vi Military International HIV/AIDS viii Training Program Seroprevalence and Behavioral xii Epidemiology Risk Survey...THE WAR AGAINST HIV/AIDS Introduction The US Government has a long history and extensive network of international collaboration and partnerships in... malaria , HTC, full blood count, chemistry analysis, baseline CD4 testing, and CD4s for patient monitoring. The lab services have benefited all

  11. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, DECEMBER 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OGEKA,G.J.

    1998-12-31

    In FY 1998, the BNL LDBD Program funded 20 projects, 4 of which were new starts, at a total cost of $2,563,681. The small number of new starts was a consequence of severe financial problems that developed between FY 1997 and 1998. Emphasis was given to complete funding for approved multi-year proposals. Following is a table which lists all of the FY 1998 funded projects and gives a history of funding for each by year. Several of these projects have already experienced varying degrees of success as indicated in the individual Project Program Summaries which follow. A total of 17 informal publications (abstracts, presentations, BNL reports and workshop papers) were reported and an additional 13 formal (full length) papers were either published, are in press or being prepared for publication. The investigators on five projects have filed for a patent. Seven of the projects reported that proposals/grants had either been funded or were submitted for funding. In conclusion, a significant measure of success is already attributable to the FY 1998 LDBD Program in the short period of time involved. The Laboratory has experienced a significant scientific gain by these achievements.

  12. United States Food and Drug Administration and Department of Defense shelf-life extension program of pharmaceutical products: progress and promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saeed R; Kona, Ravikanth; Faustino, Patrick J; Gupta, Abhay; Taylor, Jeb S; Porter, Donna A; Khan, Mansoor

    2014-05-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD)-United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shelf-life extension program (SLEP) was established in 1986 through an intra-agency agreement between the DoD and the FDA to extend the shelf life of product nearing expiry. During the early stages of development, special attention was paid to program operation, labeling requirements, and the cost benefits associated with this program. In addition to the substantial cost benefits, the program also provides the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research with significant scientific understanding and pharmaceutical resource. As a result of this unique resource, numerous regulatory research opportunities to improve public health present themselves from this distinctive scientific database, which includes examples of products shelf life, their long-term stability issues, and various physical and chemical tests to identify such failures. The database also serves as a scientific resource for mechanistic understanding and identification of test failures leading to the development of new formulations or more robust packaging. It has been recognized that SLEP is very important in maintaining both national security and public welfare by confirming that the stockpiled pharmaceutical products meet quality standards after the "expiration date" assigned by the sponsor. SLEP research is an example of regulatory science that is needed to best ensure product performance past the original shelf life. The objective of this article is to provide a brief history and background and most importantly the public health benefits of the SLEP. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  13. Final Report: High Energy Physics Program (HEP), Physics Department, Princeton University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callan, Curtis G. [Princeton University; Gubser, Steven S. [Princeton University; Marlow, Daniel R. [Princeton University; McDonald, Kirk T. [Princeton University; Meyers, Peter D. [Princeton University; Olsen, James D. [Princeton University; Smith, Arthur J.S. [Princeton University; Steinhardt, Paul J. [Princeton University; Tully, Christopher G. [Princeton University; Stickland, David P. [Princeton University

    2013-04-30

    The activities of the Princeton Elementary particles group funded through Department of Energy Grant# DEFG02-91 ER40671 during the period October 1, 1991 through January 31, 2013 are summarized. These activities include experiments performed at Brookhaven National Lab; the CERN Lab in Geneva, Switzerland; Fermilab; KEK in Tsukuba City, Japan; the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; as well as extensive experimental and the- oretical studies conducted on the campus of Princeton University. Funded senior personnel include: Curtis Callan, Stephen Gubser, Valerie Halyo, Daniel Marlow, Kirk McDonald, Pe- ter Meyers, James Olsen, Pierre Pirou e, Eric Prebys, A.J. Stewart Smith, Frank Shoemaker (deceased), Paul Steinhardt, David Stickland, Christopher Tully, and Liantao Wang.

  14. The prevalence of the term subluxation in North American English-Language Doctor of chiropractic programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirtz Timothy A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subluxation construct has been a divisive term in the chiropractic profession. There is a paucity of evidence to document the subluxation. Some authors have questioned the propriety of continuing to use the term. Aim The purpose of this study is to examine current North American English language chiropractic college academic catalogs and determine the prevalence of the term subluxation in the respective chiropractic program curricula. Methods Sixteen current English-language North American chiropractic college academic catalogs were studied. The term subluxation was searched for in each of the catalogs. Categories were developed for the usage of the term. These included "total times mentioned", "subluxation mentioned in a course description", "subluxation mentioned in a course title", "subluxation mentioned in a technique course description", and "subluxation mentioned in a philosophy course description." The prevalence of the "subluxation mentioned in a course description" was compared to the total programmatic curriculum. Results Palmer College in Florida devoted 22.72% of its curriculum to courses mentioning the subluxation followed by Life University (Marietta, GA and Sherman College with 16.44% and 12.80% respectively. As per specific coursework or subjects, an average of 5.22 courses or subjects have descriptions mentioning the term subluxation. Three schools made no mention of the term subluxation in their academic catalogs; they were National University of Health Sciences, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, and Southern California University of Health Sciences. Conclusion Despite the controversies and paucity of evidence the term subluxation is still found often within the chiropractic curricula of most North American chiropractic programs. Future research should determine if changes in accreditation standards and research on evidence based practice will affect this prevalence.

  15. Position of the American Dietetic Association, American Society for Nutrition, and Society for Nutrition Education: Food and nutrition programs for community-residing older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Barbara J; Wellman, Nancy S; Russell, Carlene

    2010-03-01

    Given the federal cost-containment policy to rebalance long-term care away from nursing homes to home- and community-based services, it is the position of the American Dietetic Association, the American Society for Nutrition, and the Society for Nutrition Education that all older adults should have access to food and nutrition programs that ensure the availability of safe, adequate food to promote optimal nutritional status. Appropriate food and nutrition programs include adequately funded food assistance and meal programs, nutrition education, screening, assessment, counseling, therapy, monitoring, evaluation, and outcomes documentation to ensure more healthful aging. The growing number of older adults, the health care focus on prevention, and the global economic situation accentuate the fundamental need for these programs. Yet far too often food and nutrition programs are disregarded or taken for granted. Growing older generally increases nutritional risk. Illnesses and chronic diseases; physical, cognitive, and social challenges; racial, ethnic, and linguistic differences; and low socioeconomic status can further complicate a situation. The beneficial effects of nutrition for health promotion, risk reduction, and disease management need emphasis. Although many older adults are enjoying longer and more healthful lives in their own homes, others, especially those with health disparities and poor nutritional status, would benefit from greater access to food and nutrition programs and services. Food and nutrition practitioners can play a major role in promoting universal access and integrating food and nutrition programs and nutrition services into home- and community-based services.

  16. Benchmarking Prehospital and Emergency Department Care for Argentine Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: For the South American Guideline Adherence Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilala, Monica S.; Lujan, Silvia B.; Qiu, Qian; Petroni, Gustavo J.; Ballarini, Nicolás M.; Guadagnoli, Nahuel; Depetris, María Alejandra; Faguaga, Gabriela A.; Baggio, Gloria M.; Busso, Leonardo O.; García, Mirta E.; González Carrillo, Osvaldo R.; Medici, Paula L.; Sáenz, Silvia S.; Vanella, Elida E.; Fabio, Anthony; Bell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is little information on the type of early care provided to children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in low middle income countries. We benchmarked early prehospital [PH] and emergency department [ED] pediatric TBI care in Argentina. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from patients previously enrolled in a prospective seven center study of children with TBI. Eligible participants were patients 0–18 years, and had diagnosis of TBI (admission Glasgow Coma scale score [GCS] 0). Outcomes were transport type, transport time, PH and ED adherence to best practice, and discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) and Pediatric Overall Performance category Scale (POPC). Results Of the 366 children, mean age was 8.7 (5.0) years, 58% were male, 90% had isolated TBI and 45.4% were transported by private vehicle. 50 (34.7%) of the 144 children with severe TBI (39.3% of all TBI patients) were transported by private vehicle. Most (267; 73%) patients received initial TBI care at an index hospital prior to study center admission, including children with severe (81.9%) TBI. Transport times were shorter for those patients who were directly transported by ambulance to study center than for the whole cohort (1.4 vs.5.5 hours). Ambulance blood pressure data were recorded in 30.9%. ED guideline adherence rate was higher than PH guideline adherence rate (84.8% vs. 26.4%). For patients directly transferred from scene to study trauma centers, longer transport time was associated with worse discharge outcome (PCPC aOR 1.10 [1.04, 1.18] and (POPC aOR 1.10 [1.04, 1.18]). There was no relationship between PH or ED TBI guideline adherence rate and discharge POPC and PCPC. Conclusion This study benchmarks early pediatric TBI care in Argentina and shows that many critically injured children with TBI do not receive timely or best practice PH care, that PH guideline adherence rate is low and that longer transport time was associated with poor

  17. Benchmarking Prehospital and Emergency Department Care for Argentine Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: For the South American Guideline Adherence Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica S Vavilala

    Full Text Available There is little information on the type of early care provided to children with traumatic brain injury (TBI in low middle income countries. We benchmarked early prehospital [PH] and emergency department [ED] pediatric TBI care in Argentina.We conducted a secondary analysis of data from patients previously enrolled in a prospective seven center study of children with TBI. Eligible participants were patients 0-18 years, and had diagnosis of TBI (admission Glasgow Coma scale score [GCS] 0. Outcomes were transport type, transport time, PH and ED adherence to best practice, and discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC and Pediatric Overall Performance category Scale (POPC.Of the 366 children, mean age was 8.7 (5.0 years, 58% were male, 90% had isolated TBI and 45.4% were transported by private vehicle. 50 (34.7% of the 144 children with severe TBI (39.3% of all TBI patients were transported by private vehicle. Most (267; 73% patients received initial TBI care at an index hospital prior to study center admission, including children with severe (81.9% TBI. Transport times were shorter for those patients who were directly transported by ambulance to study center than for the whole cohort (1.4 vs.5.5 hours. Ambulance blood pressure data were recorded in 30.9%. ED guideline adherence rate was higher than PH guideline adherence rate (84.8% vs. 26.4%. For patients directly transferred from scene to study trauma centers, longer transport time was associated with worse discharge outcome (PCPC aOR 1.10 [1.04, 1.18] and (POPC aOR 1.10 [1.04, 1.18]. There was no relationship between PH or ED TBI guideline adherence rate and discharge POPC and PCPC.This study benchmarks early pediatric TBI care in Argentina and shows that many critically injured children with TBI do not receive timely or best practice PH care, that PH guideline adherence rate is low and that longer transport time was associated with poor discharge outcomes for patients with

  18. Program report for FY 1984 and 1985 Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division of the Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, J.B.; MacCracken, M.C.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gresho, P.M.; Luther, F.M.

    1986-08-01

    This annual report for the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division (G-Division) summarizes the activities and highlights of the past three years, with emphasis on significant research findings in two major program areas: the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), with its recent involvement in assessing the effects of the Chernobyl reactor accident, and new findings on the environmental consequences of nuclear war. The technical highlights of the many other research projects are also briefly reported, along with the Division's organization, budget, and publications.

  19. The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program: Overview of Climate Change Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearns, L. O.

    2012-12-01

    The North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) is an international program that is serving the climate scenario needs of the United States, Canada, and northern Mexico. We are systematically investigating the uncertainties in regional scale projections of future climate and producing high resolution climate change scenarios using multiple regional climate models (RCMs) and multiple global model responses by nesting the RCMs within atmosphere ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) forced with a medium-high emissions scenario, over a domain covering the conterminous US, northern Mexico, and most of Canada. The project also includes a validation component through nesting the participating RCMs within the NCEP reanalysis R2. The basic spatial resolution of the RCM simulations is 50 km. This program includes six different RCMs that have been used in various intercomparison programs in Europe and the United States. Four different AOGCMs provide boundary conditions to drive the RCMS for 30 years in the current climate and 30 years for the mid 21st century. The resulting climate model simulations form the basis for multiple high resolution climate scenarios that can be used in climate change impacts and adaptation assessments over North America. All 12 sets of current and future simulations have been completed. Measures of uncertainty across the multiple simulations are being developed by geophysical statisticians. In this overview talk, results from the various climate change experiments for various subregions, along with measures of uncertainty, will be presented

  20. Black Teachers Matter: Qualitative Study of Factors Influencing African American Candidates Success in a Teacher Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkins, Elizabeth; Thomas, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the perspectives and experiences of ten African American students at a predominantly White institution to understand why students persisted or discontinued in the teacher preparation program. Findings indicate three predominant factors influence Black candidates' decision to complete or leave the program: the role…

  1. Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Challenge Home Program Certification of Production Builders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrigan, P.; Loomis, H.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America Program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three Cold Climate production builders in three separate US cities. BSC worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Therefore, the resulting design packages do vary from builder to builder. BSC provided support through this research project on the design, construction and performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: 1. Adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor; 2. Increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense(R) Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

  2. Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Challenge Home Program Certification of Production Builders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrigan, P. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Loomis, H. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three cold climate production builders in three U.S. cities and worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Also, BSC provided support through performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor; and increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense® Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

  3. Promoting cognitive and ego development of African-American rural youth: a program of deliberate psychological education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faubert; Locke; Sprinthall; Howland

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a role-taking, action learning program on the cognitive and ego development of African-American rural high school students. The program employed instruction in scientific problem-solving in relation to past and current contributions of African-American scientists. There were two experimental and two comparison groups during the one semester program. The main effects were assessed in two related domains: (1) concrete to abstract thinking (a Piagetian measure); and (2) self-concept development (Loevinger's Ego Stages). The results indicated statistically significant gains in both abstract thinking and ego stage. Implications for school curriculum modification are also detailed.

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, 2013 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-10-01

    The fiscal year (FY) 2013 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from May 13-16, 2013, at the Crystal City Marriott and Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE).

  5. Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  6. Progress Report on BSST-Led US Department of Energy Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, D. T.; Lagrandeur, J. W.

    2010-09-01

    As global consumption of energy continues to increase at an exponential rate, the need to find technologies that can help reduce this rate of consumption, particularly in passenger vehicles, is imperative. This paper provides a progress report on the BSST-led US Department of Energy-sponsored automotive thermoelectric waste heat recovery project, which has transitioned from phase 3 and is completing phase 4. Thermoelectric generator (TEG) development will be discussed, including modeling and thermal cycling of subassemblies. The design includes the division of the TEG into different temperature zones, where the subassembly materials and aspect ratios are optimized to match the temperature gradients for the particular zone. Test results for a phase 3 quarter-scale device of the phase 4 high-temperature TEG will be discussed, where power outputs of up to 125 W were achieved on a 600°C hot-air test bench. The design of the TEG, which uses high-power-density segmented thermoelectric elements, has evolved from a planar design in phase 3 to a cylindrical design in phase 4. The culmination of phase 4 includes testing of the generator on a dynamometer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with a high-performance production engine.

  7. The U.S. Department of Energy pollution prevention program: Applications for small business

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betsch, M.D.

    1997-05-14

    This report shows the benefits small businesses can realize by instituting cost-effective pollution prevention improvements. It is a series of pollution prevention assessments that were conducted at small businesses in Richland, Washington. It describes a technology transfer test of US Department of Energy (USDOE) pollution prevention methods to small businesses through eleven pollution prevention assessments conducted at small businesses in the city of Richland. The assessment method tested was first developed at the USDOE Hanford Site, located in Richland, Washington. Two pilot studies were initially conducted to determine the usefulness of the assessment method for small businesses. Then, four additional pollution prevention assessments were conducted using a refined process. In order to determine the assessment method`s usefulness by different practitioners, a number of the assessments contained in this report were conducted by the undergraduate and graduate students at Washington State University at Tri-Cities as part of their class projects. These students were trained in the pollution prevention assessment process by the author of this report and conducted five small business assessments using the same methods and materials as in the remainder of the study.

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program: Annual report to the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1994-12-01

    Project program summaries are presented for: effect of bacterial spore protein on mutagenesis; cellular toxicity of coaine and cocaethylene; calcinfication in marine alga (global carbon cycling); advanced permanent magnet materials; a high flux neutron source; genetics of drug addiction; microdialysis; analysis of powder diffraction data; accelerator technology; nucleic acids and proteins and their interactions, by small-angle XRD; enhancement of microplanar beam radiation therapy of gliosarcoma; relaxographic and functional MRI; low-temperature infrared laser absorption spectroscopy; photodesorption of H{sub 2}; helical magnet for RHIC; novel microporous solids; chemistry and physics of stratospheric aerosols (ozone depletion); rf source for linear colliders; resonance Raman detection of VOCs; synthesis of plant fatty acids with unusual double bond positions; outer surface proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete; multiwire proportional chambers for collider muons; self-organized criticality; PCR-SSCP detection of genetic changes at single cell level; proton facility for cancer therapy; and visible free-electron laser experiment.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Region 6 Radiological Assistance Program response plan. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowski, F.M.

    1998-02-01

    Upon request, the DOE, through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), makes available and will provide radiological advice, monitoring, and assessment activities during radiological incidents where the release of radioactive materials is suspected or has occurred. Assistance will end when the need for such assistance is over, or if there are other resources available to adequately address the incident. The implementation of the RAP is usually accomplished through the recommendation of the DOE Regional Coordinating Office`s (RCO) on duty Regional Response Coordinator (RRC) with the approval of the Regional Coordinating Office Director (RCOD). The DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is the designated RCO for DOE Region 6 RAP. The purpose of this document is: to describe the mechanism for responding to any organization or private citizen requesting assistance to radiological incidents; to coordinate radiological assistance among participating federal agencies, states, and tribes in DOE Region 6; and to describe the RAP Scaled Response concept of operations.

  10. Impact of a logistics management program on admitted patient boarders within an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy-Rodriguez, Mary Anne; Freer, Chris; Pontiggia, Laura; Wilson, Rula; Metraux, Steve; Lord, Lyndsey

    2014-03-01

    ED crowding is a public health issue, and hospitals across the country must pursue aggressive strategies to improve patient flow to help solve this growing problem. The logistics management program (LMP) is an expansion of the bed management process to include a systematic approach to patient flow management throughout the facility and a clinical liaison or field agent to drive throughput at all points of care. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an LMP on ED length of stay (ED evaluation times and ED placement times), as well as inpatient length of stay (IPLOS). This is a quasi-experimental study of 28,684 ED admissions in a suburban, tertiary medical center before and after implementing an LMP (2008 vs 2009). The median ED evaluation time was 219 minutes (interquartile range [IQR], 178 minutes) in 2008 versus 207 minutes (IQR, 171 minutes) in 2009 (P < .001). The median ED placement time was 219 minutes (IQR, 259 minutes) in 2008 versus 193 minutes (IQR, 158 minutes) in 2009 (P < .001). The median IPLOS was 3.93 days (IQR, 4.9 days) in 2008 versus 3.83 days (IQR, 4.7 days) in 2009 (P < .001), which represents a reduction of 1,483 inpatient days in 2009. The results provide strong evidence to support the impact of an LMP on decreasing ED evaluation times, ED placement times, and IPLOS. Further exploration is needed to examine the program as a best practice, as well as its applicability for other facilities. Copyright © 2014 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. How can the postgraduate training program in pathology departments in India be improved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivayogi R Bhusnurmath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There exists a wide variation in the competence of the postgraduate residents trained in pathology in different institutions across India. This results in strong disparities in the clinical diagnostic skills, teaching skills, research capabilities and the managerial skills of the graduates. The end users of this training, namely the community, clinicians and health care institutions would benefit from a more uniform and better trained pathologist. The article reviews the reasons for the variation in the quality of the training programs. The main deficiencies include, lack of well-defined criteria for recruitment of residents, training facilities, faculty resources, curriculum with well-defined learning objectives and competencies, hands-on experiences in diagnostic and research activities, diagnostic specimens and medical autopsies, exposure to molecular pathology, pathology informatics, electron microscopy, research experiences, communication skills, professional behavior and bioethics, business practices in pathology and quality assurance. There is also a lack of defined career tracks in various disciplines in laboratory medicine, standard protocols for evaluation and regional and national oversight of the programs. The steps for rectification should include defining the competencies and learning objectives, development of the curriculum including teaching methods, facilities and evaluation strategies, communication skills, professional behavior skills, teaching skills, legal aspects of practicing pathology and the various career pathways to subspecialties in pathology. The training should include defined exposure to molecular pathology, electron microscopy, quality control and assurance, laboratory accreditation, business aspects of pathology practice, review of literature, evidence-based medicine, medical autopsy and medical informatics. Efforts should be made to share human and laboratory resources between regional cooperation. The

  12. Radiological accidents potentially important to human health risk in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Nabelssi, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Jackson, R. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Human health risks as a consequence of potential radiological releases resulting from plausible accident scenarios constitute an important consideration in the US Department of Energy (DOE) national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes. As part of this program, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) is currently preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that evaluates the risks that could result from managing five different waste types. This paper (1) briefly reviews the overall approach used to assess process and facility accidents for the EM PEIS; (2) summarizes the key inventory, storage, and treatment characteristics of the various DOE waste types important to the selection of accidents; (3) discusses in detail the key assumptions in modeling risk-dominant accidents; and (4) relates comparative source term results and sensitivities.

  13. U.S. Department of Energy Illness, and Injury Surveillance Program, Worker Health At A Glance, 1995-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Illness and Injury Surveillance Program (IISP) has monitored the health of contractor workers at selected DOE sites since 1990. For the first time, the IISP has sufficient data to describe, in a collective manner, the health trends occurring among workers at a number of DOE sites during a 10-year period. This brief report and the more detailed Worker Health Summary assess illness and injury trends of DOE workers according to gender, age, occupational group, and program office over the 10-year period, 1995 through 2004. During this time, over 137,000 individual contractor workers were employed at the 15 DOE sites participating in the IISP.

  14. Applied Analysis in American Science of International Relations. Interview with Professor Bear F. Braumoeller, Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Political Science, Ohio State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Andreevich Degterev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bear F. Braumoeller (Ph. D., University of Michigan, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Political Science of Ohio State University, is a leading American experts both in international relations, especially international security, and statistical methodology. His book-length systemic theory of international relations is a winner of the 2014 International Studies Association Best Book Award and the 2014 J. David Singer Book Award. In his interview he is talking about contemporary methods of applied research of international relations and its efficiency. As recent LaCour-Green scandal demonstrates, political science in general and international studies in particulary are becoming more about science. Dr. B. Braumoeller touches on the issue of efficient IR research methodology and speaks about the role of quantative methods in IR and especially about statistics. He speeks about the evolution of quantitative methodology in American IR science. Some decennies ago, a few pioneers in the field (David Singer, Bruce Russett, Karl Deutsch, Dina Zinnes published their papers in fairly obscure journals and now the IR journals are dominated by quantitative studies. But for better quantitative studies, a better formal theory of IR is needed. He discusses also epistemological aspects of quantitative studies. Though the mainstream formal modeling in IR is traditionally associated with neorealist and neoliberal approaches, agent-based modeling (ABM could be brought to bear very effectively on constructivist questions.

  15. The United States Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program Validation Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litynski, John T; Plasynski, Sean; McIlvried, Howard G; Mahoney, Christopher; Srivastava, Rameshwar D

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the Validation Phase (Phase II) of the Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships initiative. In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon sequestration in different regions of the nation. The objectives of the Characterization Phase (Phase I) were to characterize the geologic and terrestrial opportunities for carbon sequestration; to identify CO(2) point sources within the territories of the individual partnerships; to assess the transportation infrastructure needed for future deployment; to evaluate CO(2) capture technologies for existing and future power plants; and to identify the most promising sequestration opportunities that would need to be validated through a series of field projects. The Characterization Phase was highly successful, with the following achievements: established a national network of companies and professionals working to support sequestration deployment; created regional and national carbon sequestration atlases for the United States and portions of Canada; evaluated available and developing technologies for the capture of CO(2) from point sources; developed an improved understanding of the permitting requirements that future sequestration activities will need to address as well as defined the gap in permitting requirements for large scale deployment of these technologies; created a raised awareness of, and support for, carbon sequestration as a greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation option, both within industry and among the general public; identified the most promising carbon sequestration opportunities for future field tests; and established protocols for project implementation, accounting, and management. Economic evaluation was started and is continuing and will be a factor in project selection. During the

  16. Adapting the I-PASS Handoff Program for Emergency Department Inter-Shift Handoffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Heilman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Academic emergency department (ED handoffs are high-risk transfer of care events. Emergency medicine residents are inadequately trained to handle these vital transitions. We aimed to explore what modifications the I-PASS (illness severity, patient summary, action list, situation awareness and contingency plans, and synthesis by receiver handoff system requires to be effectively modified for use in ED inter-shift handoffs. METHODS: This mixed-method needs assessment conducted at an academic ED explored the suitability of the I-PASS system for ED handoffs. We conducted a literature review, focus groups, and then a survey. We sought to identify the distinctive elements of ED handoffs and discern how these could be incorporated into the I-PASS system. RESULTS: Focus group participants agreed the patient summary should be adapted to include anticipated disposition of patient. Participants generally endorsed the order and content of the other elements of the I-PASS tool. The survey yielded several wording changes to reflect contextual differences. Themes from all qualitative sources converged to suggest changes for brevity and clarity. Most participants agreed that the I-PASS tool would be well suited to the ED setting. CONCLUSION: With modifications for context, brevity, and clarity, the I-PASS system may be well suited for application to the ED setting. This study provides qualitative data in support of using the I-PASS tool and concrete suggestions for how to modify the I-PASS tool for the ED. Implementation and outcome research is needed to investigate if the I-PASS tool is feasible and improves patient outcomes in the ED environment.

  17. [Cooperative program for domestic accidents of children in the department of Doubs. Epidemiological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudier, F; Marchais, M; Bourderont, D; Pierot, G; Pinochet, C; Laroze, M

    1988-01-01

    This work presents the results of a survey carried out among 818 families in the department of the Doubs. Each family had a child between one and 6 years of age. Its aim was to come as close as possible to exploring morbidity in accidents by questioning parents about the accidents which took place a month before the investigation, and to study the influence of certain psychosocial factors on this pathology, for example the attitude of parents confronted with risks. The annual accident morbidity rate was 1,056 accidents per 1,000 children. In other words, each child has, on the average, one accident per year. Even though no significant difference between town and country has been noted, serious accidents occurred more frequently in rural areas. This may be explained by the way dangerous products are stored (medicines, household cleaning and agricultural products), looser parental surveillance (predominance at games outside home), as well as the fact that children are more often in the kitchen when they are indoors, which is potentially the most dangerous room. Classical notions of disturbing events occurring prior to the accident (divorce, moving, a.s.o.) and children who are "repeat offenders" have also been noticed. The examination of parental attitude in dealing with the possibility of accidents (instructive, lax or repressive) did not allow us to demonstrate in any significant way the influence of these attitudes on accidental morbidity. On the other hand the so-called "instructive" parents are the ones who best put away the poisonous products. There is therefore, an encouraging connection between attitude and behavior.

  18. A culturally appropriate program that works: Native Americans in Marine and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergun, J. R.

    2001-05-01

    For more than ten years, the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University has carried out the Native Americans in Marine and Space Sciences (NAMSS) Program. Its long-term goal is to increase the number of American Indian and Native Alaskan undergraduates in science who complete degrees, continue to graduate school and enter the professional scientific work force. Ninety-eight percent of NAMSS students have earned BS degrees and almost forty percent have continued in graduate school. These are impressive results considering the high national drop-out rate for Native American studentsaround 70% according to the Chronicle of Higher Education (26 May 1993, page A29). Most often, Native students wishing to earn degrees in science find few programs that fit with their traditional sense of place and community. Most programs are narrowly focused and do not support or nurture Native views of interrelationship of all things. While Western science's recent ecological systems thinking approach more closely resembles the traditional Native view, Traditional Ecological Knowledge is often perceived as anecdotal or storytelling and not real science. This is a problem for Native students who are strongly underrepresented in the U.S. scientific community as a whole and nearly absent from the marine sciences. Undergraduates from this group are without scientific career models or mentors from their ethnic group and experience difficulty establishing contacts with majority scientists. They have limited access to opportunities to explore career possibilities in the sciences through research participation. Once on campus they have difficulty establishing a sense of belonging in the University community and do not have an organized way to enter into the scientific activities that initially attracted them. Representation of Native Americans in the ranks of U.S. scientists will not be increased without special efforts to retain them as undergraduates and to recruit

  19. American Studies in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Luca

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available American Studies at the University of BucharestThe idea of teaching American Studies and founding a program in American Studies was first voiced in the long meetings of faculty and students held at the University of Bucharest soon after the collapse of the communist regime. The proposal was one of many that reflected the spirit of reform and hope for radical changes at the outset of Romania’s transition to democracy. The absence of institutional structures other than English departments and t...

  20. Group Peer Mentoring: An Answer to the Faculty Mentoring Problem? A Successful Program at a Large Academic Department of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda H; Evans, Arthur T

    2015-01-01

    To address a dearth of mentoring and to avoid the pitfalls of dyadic mentoring, the authors implemented and evaluated a novel collaborative group peer mentoring program in a large academic department of medicine. The mentoring program aimed to facilitate faculty in their career planning, and targeted either early-career or midcareer faculty in 5 cohorts over 4 years, from 2010 to 2014. Each cohort of 9-12 faculty participated in a yearlong program with foundations in adult learning, relationship formation, mindfulness, and culture change. Participants convened for an entire day, once a month. Sessions incorporated facilitated stepwise and values-based career planning, skill development, and reflective practice. Early-career faculty participated in an integrated writing program and midcareer faculty in leadership development. Overall attendance of the 51 participants was 96%, and only 3 of 51 faculty who completed the program left the medical school during the 4 years. All faculty completed a written detailed structured academic development plan. Participants experienced an enhanced, inclusive, and appreciative culture; clarified their own career goals, values, strengths and priorities; enhanced their enthusiasm for collaboration; and developed skills. The program results highlight the need for faculty to personally experience the power of forming deep relationships with their peers for fostering successful career development and vitality. The outcomes of faculty humanity, vitality, professionalism, relationships, appreciation of diversity, and creativity are essential to the multiple missions of academic medicine. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  1. The role of culture in substance abuse treatment programs for American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legha, Rupinder Kaur; Novins, Douglas

    2012-07-01

    Culture figures prominently in discussions regarding the etiology of alcohol and substance abuse in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities, and a substantial body of literature suggests that it is critical to developing meaningful treatment interventions. However, no study has characterized how programs integrate culture into their services. Furthermore, reports regarding the associated challenges are limited. Twenty key informant interviews with administrators and 15 focus groups with clinicians were conducted in 18 alcohol and substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities. Transcripts were coded to identify relevant themes. Substance abuse treatment programs for AI/AN communities are integrating culture into their services in two discrete ways: by implementing specific cultural practices and by adapting Western treatment models. More important, however, are the fundamental principles that shape these programs and their interactions with the people and communities they serve. These foundational beliefs and values, defined in this study as the core cultural constructs that validate and incorporate AI/AN experience and world view, include an emphasis on community and family, meaningful relationships with and respect for clients, a homelike atmosphere within the program setting, and an “open door” policy for clients. The primary challenges for integrating these cultural practices include AI/AN communities' cultural diversity and limited socioeconomic resources to design and implement these practices. The prominence of foundational beliefs and values is striking and suggests a broader definition of culture when designing services. This definition of foundational beliefs and values should help other diverse communities culturally adapt their substance abuse interventions in more meaningful ways.

  2. Summary of the 2006 College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytology Proficiency Testing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Joel S; Hughes, Jonathan H; Fatheree, Lisa A; Schwartz, Mary R; Souers, Rhona J; Soures, Rhona J; Wilbur, David C

    2008-05-01

    Creating a tool that assesses professional proficiency in gynecologic cytology is challenging. A valid proficiency test (PT) must reflect practice conditions, evaluate locator and interpretive skills, and discriminate between those practitioners who are competent and those who need more education. The College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytology Proficiency Testing Program (PAPPT) was approved to enroll participants in a nationwide PT program in 2006. Report results from the 2006 PAPPT program. Summarize PT results by pass/fail rate, participant type, and slide-set modules. Nine thousand sixty-nine participants showed initial PT failure rates of 5%, 16%, and 6% for cytotechnologists, primary screening pathologists, and secondary screening pathologist, respectively. The overall initial test failure rate was 6%. After 3 retests, 9029 (99.6%) of the participants were able to achieve compliance with the PT requirement. No participant "tested out"; however, 40 individuals "dropped out" of the testing sequence (8 cytotechnologists, 9 primary screening pathologists, 23 secondary screening pathologists). Initial failure rates by slide-set modules were 6% conventional, 6% ThinPrep, 6% SurePath, and 5% mixture of all 3 slide types. A total of 99.6% of individuals enrolled in the 2006 PAPPT program achieved satisfactory results. The data confirm that cytotechnologists have higher initial pass rates than pathologists and pathologists who are secondary screeners perform better than those who are primary screeners. There was no difference identified in overall pass rates between the slide-set modules. Further analysis of data should help define the results and ongoing challenges of providing a nationwide federally mandated proficiency testing program in gynecologic cytology.

  3. Impact of coffee crop renewal program on small producers in department Cundinamarca (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guarín N. Carlos Andrés

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The modernization of crops through renewal is a vital option for the restoration of the productivity and competitiveness of the coffee crop. The Federación Nacional de Cafeteros (National Federation of Coffee is banking on a strategy that promotes renewal by providing resources to stimulate growers. As a result of the implementation of the program, it is hoped that it will reverse the aging process of coffee crops, consolidate a productive and competitive market, provide appropriate ages and densities and promote the use of coffee rust resistant varieties. Similarly, it is expected that small producers, who constitute the majority of farmers and who presumably suffer major limitations to independent renewal, will be the main beneficiaries.

  4. The Colombian conflict: a description of a mental health program in the Department of Tolima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grais Rebecca F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colombia has been seriously affected by an internal armed conflict for more than 40 years affecting mainly the civilian population, who is forced to displace, suffers kidnapping, extortion, threats and assassinations. Between 2005 and 2008, Médecins Sans Frontières-France provided psychological care and treatment in the region of Tolima, a strategic place in the armed conflict. The mental health program was based on a short-term multi-faceted treatment developed according to the psychological and psychosomatic needs of the population. Here we describe the population attending during 2005-2008, in both urban and rural settings, as well as the psychological treatment provided during this period and its outcomes. We observed differences between the urban and rural settings in the traumatic events reported, the clinical expression of the disorders, the disorders diagnosed, and their severity. Although the duration of the treatment was limited due to security reasons and access difficulties, patient condition at last visit improved in most of the patients. These descriptive results suggest that further studies should be conducted to examine the role of short-term psychotherapy, adapted specifically to the context, can be a useful tool to provide psychological care to population affected by an armed conflict.

  5. Projects from Federal Region IX: Department of Energy Appropriate Energy Technology Program. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, C.W.; Clark, H.R.; Kay, J.; Lucarelli, F.B.; Rizer, S.

    1980-01-01

    Details and progress of appropriate energy technology programs in Region IX are presented. In Arizona, the projects are Solar Hot Water for the Prescott Adult Center and Solar Prototype House for a Residential Community. In California, the projects are Solar AquaDome Demonstration Project; Solar Powered Liquid Circulating Pump; Appropriate Energy Technology Resource Center; Digester for Wastewater Grown Aquatic Plants; Performance Characteristics of an Anaerobic Wastewater Lagoon Primary Treatment System; Appropriate Energy/Energy Conservation Demonstration Project; Solar Energy for Composting Toilets; Dry Creek Rancheria Solar Demonstration Projects; Demonstration for Energy Retrofit Analysis and Implementation; and Active Solar Space Heating System for the Integral Urban House. In Hawaii, the projects are: Java Plum Electric; Low-Cost Pond Digesters for Hawaiian Pig Farm Energy Needs; Solar Beeswax Melter; Methane Gas Plant for Operating Boilers and Generating Steam; and Solar Water Heating in Sugarcane Seed-Treatment Plants. A Wind-Powered Lighted Navigation Buoys Project for Guam is also described. A revised description of the Biogas Energy for Hawaiian Small Farms and Homesteads is given in an appendix.

  6. Effect of NICU Department Orientation Program on Mother’s Anxiety: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Valizadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neonatal intensive care unit induces the high level of anxiety for mothers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of NICU orientation program on the anxiety of mothers who had preterm newborns hospitalized in NICU. Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial (three parallel groups. Participants included 99 mothers with preterm newborns hospitalized in NICU of Al- Zahra hospital, affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Mothers were randomly assigned to one of three groups (film, booklet, and control. Mothers completed the State- Trait Anxiety Inventory before entering to the NICU, and then mothers in the experiment groups became familiar with the NICU environment through watching a film or reading booklet. After the first NICU visit, all mothers completed the STAI and Cattell's Anxiety Questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS ver. 13 software. Results: There was no significant difference between three groups regarding state- trait anxiety before the intervention. After the first NICU visit, a significant reduction in maternal state anxiety was seen in the both experiment groups. There was no statistical significant difference regarding trait anxiety. Data obtained from Cattell's anxiety questionnaire after intervention, showed significant difference in state anxiety between groups. Conclusion: Employing film and booklet orientation strategy after preterm delivery can reduce the mother’s anxiety and beneficent for the mother, baby, family and health care system.

  7. A framework for conducting a national study of substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska native communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novins, Douglas K; Moore, Laurie A; Beals, Janette; Aarons, Gregory A; Rieckmann, Traci; Kaufman, Carol E

    2012-09-01

    Because of their broad geographic distribution, diverse ownership and operation, and funding instability, it is a challenge to develop a framework for studying substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities at a national level. This is further complicated by the historic reluctance of American Indian and Alaska Native communities to participate in research. We developed a framework for studying these substance abuse treatment programs (n ≈ 293) at a national level as part of a study of attitudes toward, and use of, evidence-based treatments among substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities with the goal of assuring participation of a broad array of programs and the communities that they serve. Because of the complexities of identifying specific substance abuse treatment programs, the sampling framework divides these programs into strata based on the American Indian and Alaska Native communities that they serve: (1) the 20 largest tribes (by population); (2) urban AI/AN clinics; (3) Alaska Native Health Corporations; (4) other Tribes; and (5) other regional programs unaffiliated with a specific AI/AN community. In addition, the recruitment framework was designed to be sensitive to likely concerns about participating in research. This systematic approach for studying substance abuse and other clinical programs serving AI/AN communities assures the participation of diverse AI/AN programs and communities and may be useful in designing similar national studies.

  8. Promoting positive youth development by examining the career and educational aspirations of African American males: implications for designing educational programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Felecia A; Lewis, Rhonda K; Sly, Jamilia R; Carmack, Chakema; Roberts, Shani R; Basore, Polly

    2011-01-01

    African American males experience poor academic performance, high absenteeism at school, and are at increased risk of being involved in violence than other racial groups. Given that the educational outlook for African American males appears bleak, it is important to assess the aspirations of these adolescent males in order to find the gap between aspirations and educational attainment. In order to promote positive development within this population, it is essential that factors that affect African American males be identified. A survey was administered to male students attending elementary, middle, and high schools in a local school district. A cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the career and educational aspirations of African American males. A total of 473 males were surveyed: 45% African American, 22% Caucasian, 13% biracial, and 19% Other (including Asian American, Hispanic, Native American). The results revealed that African American males aspired to attend college at the same rate as other ethnic groups. Also, African American males were more likely to aspire to be professional athletes than males from other ethnic groups. Important factors to consider when designing a program are discussed as well as future research and limitations.

  9. Beyond Body Mass Index: Are Weight-loss Programs the Best Way to Improve the Health of African American Women?

    OpenAIRE

    Dodgen, Leilani; Spence-Almaguer, Emily

    2017-01-01

    African American women have higher prevalence (82%) of overweight (body mass index [BMI] 25?29) and obesity (BMI ?30) than white women (63.2%) or Hispanic women (77.2%), and weight-loss programs yield minimal results in this population. We examine the concept of BMI as a measure of health for African American women and suggests a more holistic, multifaceted approach to preventing chronic disease.

  10. NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Fall 2008, Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-09-01

    As part of its Native American outreach, DOE?s Wind Powering America program produces a newsletter to present Native American wind information, including projects, interviews with pioneers, issues, WPA activities, and related events. This issue features an interview with Dave Danz, a tribal planner for the Grand Portage Band of Chippewa in northeastern Minnesota, and a feature on the new turbine that powers the KILI radio station on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

  11. Implementing a physical activity program for underserved African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Barbara; Schuessler, Jennifer; Hendricks, Constance Smith; Grandjean, Peter

    2010-12-01

    To develop solutions to the public health challenges of inactivity, obesity, and cardiovascular disease in minority women, community/education partnerships bring together different groups, each contributing their unique strengths and sharing responsibilities. This paper describes how an academic/community partnership resulted in the development of a gym to promote physical activity for underserved African-American women. For over 10 years, Auburn University School of Nursing (AUSON) has partnered with the Auburn Housing Authority Community. Based on feedback from community focus groups, the physical activity project was started at a local gym. With participation from various groups, a fully functioning gym is in place. Women from the community have made fitness gains and serve as role models for their families and the community. Lessons learned in establishing the program include the need to provide for accessibility and flexibility and the importance of giving encouragement and promoting ownership.

  12. Considering Weight Loss Programs and Public Health Partnerships in American Evangelical Protestant Churches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D Gibbes

    2017-07-15

    The obesity epidemic is a critical public health threat facing the USA. With the advent of American Evangelical Protestant (AEP) weight loss guides and narratives, AEP churches could potentially aid public health agencies in combatting obesity, and some scholars have called for investment in partnerships between public health agencies and religious institutions. This paper examines the theological and social underpinnings of AEP weight loss programs and considers the potential benefits and risks of public health partnerships with AEP churches to combat obesity. While AEP churches may be successful at empowering people to lose weight, AEP weight loss also carries several risks. These risks include reinforcing gendered bodily norms, stigmatizing both overweight bodies and unhealthy behaviors deemed to be sinful (for example, overeating), and failing to acknowledge social factors that promote obesity. These risks must be assessed and minimized to create appropriate public health weight loss partnerships with AEP communities.

  13. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Society for Nutrition Education, and American School Food Service Association--Nutrition services: an essential component of comprehensive school health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Marilyn; Safaii, SeAnne; Beall, Deborah Lane

    2003-04-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), the Society for Nutrition Education (SNE), and the American School Food Service Association (ASFSA) that comprehensive nutrition services must be provided to all of the nation's preschool through grade twelve students. These nutrition services shall be integrated with a coordinated, comprehensive school health program and implemented through a school nutrition policy. The policy should link comprehensive, sequential nutrition education; access to and promotion of child nutrition programs providing nutritious meals and snacks in the school environment; and family, community, and health services' partnerships supporting positive health outcomes for all children. Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions and is directly attributed to physical inactivity and diet. Schools can play a key role in reversing this trend through coordinated nutrition services that promote policies linking comprehensive, sequential nutrition education programs, access to and marketing of child nutrition programs, a school environment that models healthy food choices, and community partnerships. This position paper provides information and resources for nutrition professionals to use in developing and supporting comprehensive school health programs. J Am Diet Assoc. 2003;103:505-514.

  14. The State of Sleep Medicine Education in North American Psychiatry Residency Training Programs in 2013: Chief Resident's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Imran S; Dickmann, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Thomas D; Thuras, Paul D; Feinstein, Robert E; Douglass, Alan B; Lee, Elliott Kyung

    2017-08-31

    To assess the current state of sleep medicine educational resources and training offered by North American psychiatry residency programs. In June 2013, a 9-item peer-reviewed Sleep Medicine Training Survey was administered to 39 chief residents of psychiatry residency training programs during a meeting in New York. Thirty-four percent of the participating programs offered an elective rotation in sleep medicine. A variety of innovative approaches for teaching sleep medicine were noted. The majority of the chief residents felt comfortable screening patients for obstructive sleep apnea (72%), half felt comfortable screening for restless legs syndrome (53%), and fewer than half were comfortable screening for other sleep disorders (47%). This is the first report in the last decade to provide any analysis of current sleep medicine training in North American psychiatry residency training programs. These data indicate that sleep medicine education in psychiatry residency programs is possibly in decline.

  15. Assessment of the US Department of Energy's Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Grant Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenahan, Tim [APPRISE, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States); Bausch, Daniel [APPRISE, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States); Carroll, David [APPRISE, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States); Tonn, Bruce Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rose, Erin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hawkins, Beth A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) grant program that was administered by the US Department of Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Office. Grants totaling $90 million were awarded to 101 local weatherization agencies located in 27 states. More than 15,000 housing units were touched by the SERC program. Close to 29,000 SERC technologies were installed and/or services delivered. The report summarizes the results of site visits to 27 agencies in which the following 14 technologies were observed: solar photovoltaic panels, solar hot water heaters, solar thermal air panels for space heating, tankless water heaters, heat pump water heaters, geothermal heat pumps, super-evaporative cooling systems, combination boilers and indirect water heaters, small-scale residential wind systems, cool roofs, masonry spray foam insulation, attic radiant barriers, mini-split heat pumps, and in-home energy monitors. The evaluation found that the national weatherization network is capable of installing and delivering a wide range of new and innovative technologies, but the usability and adoptability of some technologies may prove impractical for the weatherization network and the demographic for which it serves.

  16. Regional estimates of ecological services derived from U.S. Department of Agriculture conservation programs in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Stephen P.; Baldwin, Michael J.; Barrow, Wylie C.; Waddle, Hardin; Keeland, Bobby D.; Walls, Susan C.; James, Dale; Moorman, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV) is the Nation?s largest floodplain and this once predominantly forested ecosystem provided significant habitat for a diverse flora and fauna, sequestered carbon in trees and soil, and stored floodwater, sediments, and nutrients within the floodplain. This landscape has been substantially altered by the conversion of nearly 75% of the riparian forests, predominantly to agricultural cropland, with significant loss and degradation of important ecosystem services. Large-scale efforts have been employed to restore the forest and wetland resources and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) and Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) represent some of the most extensive restoration programs in the MAV. The objective of the WRP is to restore and protect the functions and values of wetlands in agricultural landscapes with an emphasis on habitat for migratory birds and wetland-dependent wildlife, protection and improvement of water quality, flood attenuation, ground water recharge, protection of native flora and fauna, and educational and scientific scholarship.

  17. A Case Study of Mentor-to-mentee Program to Help African American Males Graduate from High School

    OpenAIRE

    Peter P. KIRIAKIDIS; Mary E. JENKINS-WILLIAMS

    2015-01-01

    The problem at the research site, which was one high school within a school district located in northeastern U.S., was that the dropout rate of African American high school males was very high. A mentor-to-mentee program had been implemented to help students graduate from high school at the research site. The experiences of young African American males who participated in a mentor-to-mentee program and graduated from high school had not been examined via a case study. The research questions w...

  18. Translation of a Ski School Sun Safety Program to North American Ski and Snowboard Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkosz, B.J.; Buller, D.B.; Andersen, P.A.; Scott, M.D.; Liu, X.; Cutter, G.R.; Dignan, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Unprotected and excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the primary risk factor for skin cancer. Promoting sun safety practices to children and adolescents who recreate outdoors has the potential to reduce skin cancer occurrence later in life. Go Sun Smart (GSS), a sun safety program for employees and guests of ski areas was distributed to determine if an enhanced disseminations strategy was more effective than a basic dissemination strategy at reaching parents at ski and snowboard schools. On-site observations of GSS use and surveys of 909 parents/caregivers with children enrolled in ski and snowboard schools were conducted and analyzed using techniques for clustered designs. No differences were identified by dissemination strategy. Greater implementation of GSS was associated with greater parental recall of materials but not greater sun protection practices. Greater recall of messages, regardless of level of implementation, resulted in greater sun protection practices for children. GSS effectiveness trial’s favorable findings may have been successfully translated to ski and snowboard school across the North American ski industry. Ski areas that used more of the program materials appeared to reach parents with sun safety advice and thus convinced them to take more precautions for their children. Sun safety need not be at odds with children’s outdoor recreation activities. PMID:25761916

  19. Retrospective North American CFL Experience Curve Analysis and Correlation to Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Sarah J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Retrospective experience curves are a useful tool for understanding historic technology development, and can contribute to investment program analysis and future cost estimation efforts. This work documents our development of an analysis approach for deriving retrospective experience curves with a variable learning rate, and its application to develop an experience curve for compact fluorescent lamps for the global and North American markets over the years 1990-2007. Uncertainties and assumptions involved in interpreting data for our experience curve development are discussed, including the processing and transformation of empirical data, the selection of system boundaries, and the identification of historical changes in the learning rate over the course of 15 years. In the results that follow, we find that that the learning rate has changed at least once from 1990-2007. We also explore if, and to what degree, public deployment programs may have contributed to an increased technology learning rate in North America. We observe correlations between the changes in the learning rate and the initiation of new policies, abrupt technological advances, including improvements to ballast technology, and economic and political events such as trade tariffs and electricity prices. Finally, we discuss how the findings of this work (1) support the use of segmented experience curves for retrospective and prospective analysis and (2) may imply that investments in technological research and development have contributed to a change in market adoption and penetration.

  20. A weight-loss intervention program designed for Mexican-American women: Cultural adaptations and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Nangel M.; Stevens, Victor J.; Vega-López, Sonia; Kauffman, Tia; Calderón, Mariana Rosales; Cervantes, María Antonieta

    2013-01-01

    Background This study assessed the feasibility of a culturally-appropriate weight-loss intervention targeting obese Spanish-speaking Mexican women. Methods This 12-month weight-loss program was based on behavioral interventions previously used successfully with English-speaking participants. Cultural adaptations included: female interventionists, minimal written materials, emphasis on group activities, focus on Mexican traditions and beliefs, and skill-building approach to food measurement. All sessions were conducted in Spanish. The study had few exclusionary criteria, which allowed participation of women with a wide range of literacy levels. Results Recruitment exceeded expectations, with 47 participants enrolling in the program. Not counting participants who became pregnant during the study, attendance at 6 and 12 months was 62% and 50% respectively. Mean weight loss at 6 and 12 months was 5.3 kg and 7.2 kg, respectively, with a mean reduction in BMI of 4.0 kg/m2 and 5.5 kg/m2 from baseline to 6 and 12 months, respectively. Discussion This pilot study shows that it is feasible to develop and implement culturally-appropriate behavioral lifestyle interventions for obesity treatment in Mexican-American women. PMID:22460538

  1. A weight-loss intervention program designed for Mexican-American women: cultural adaptations and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Nangel M; Stevens, Victor J; Vega-López, Sonia; Kauffman, Tia L; Calderón, Mariana Rosales; Cervantes, María Antonieta

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the feasibility of a culturally-appropriate weight-loss intervention targeting obese Spanish-speaking Mexican women. This 12-month weight-loss program was based on behavioral interventions previously used successfully with English-speaking participants. Cultural adaptations included: female interventionists, minimal written materials, emphasis on group activities, focus on Mexican traditions and beliefs, and skill-building approach to food measurement. All sessions were conducted in Spanish. The study had few exclusionary criteria, which allowed participation of women with a wide range of literacy levels. Recruitment exceeded expectations, with 47 participants enrolling in the program. Not counting participants who became pregnant during the study, attendance at 6 and 12 months was 62 and 50 % respectively. Mean weight loss at 6 and 12 months was 5.3 and 7.2 kg, respectively, with a mean reduction in BMI of 4.0 and 5.5 kg/m(2) from baseline to 6 and 12 months, respectively. This pilot study shows that it is feasible to develop and implement culturally-appropriate behavioral lifestyle interventions for obesity treatment in Mexican-American women.

  2. Activities of the Department of Energy in energy education. A description of programs for schools of the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    The various programs of the DOE, ERDA, FEA, and AEC for energy education in schools are described. Areas of special emphasis are training, curriculum development, educational special events, facilities support, and the Energy Extension Service. 1 figure, 13 tables. (RWR)

  3. Patient perspectives on an opioid overdose education and naloxone distribution program in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Elizabeth M; Nevedal, Andrea; Lewis, Eleanor T; McCaa, Matthew D; Cochran, Michael F; Konicki, P Eric; Davis, Corey S; Wilder, Christine

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to prevent opioid overdose mortality among Veterans, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities began implementing opioid overdose education and naloxone distribution (OEND) in 2013 and a national program began in 2014. VA is the first national health care system to implement OEND. The goal of this study is to examine patient perceptions of OEND training and naloxone kits. Four focus groups were conducted between December 2014 and February 2015 with 21 patients trained in OEND. Participants were recruited from a VA residential facility in California with a substance use disorder treatment program (mandatory OEND training) and a homeless program (optional OEND training). Data were analyzed using matrices and open and closed coding approaches to identify participants' perspectives on OEND training including benefits, concerns, differing opinions, and suggestions for improvement. Veterans thought OEND training was interesting, novel, and empowering, and that naloxone kits will save lives. Some veterans expressed concern about using syringes in the kits. A few patients who never used opioids were not interested in receiving kits. Veterans had differing opinions about legal and liability issues, whether naloxone kits might contribute to relapse, and whether and how to involve family in training. Some veterans expressed uncertainty about the effects of naloxone. Suggested improvements included active learning approaches, enhanced training materials, and increased advertisement. OEND training was generally well received among study participants, including those with no indication for a naloxone kit. Patients described a need for OEND and believed it could save lives. Patient feedback on OEND training benefits, concerns, opinions, and suggestions provides important insights to inform future OEND training programs both within VA and in other health care settings. Training is critical to maximizing the potential for OEND to save lives, and this study

  4. Advanced energy design and operation technologies research: Recommendations for a US Department of Energy multiyear program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambley, M.R.; Crawley, D.B.; Hostetler, D.D.; Stratton, R.C.; Addision, M.S.; Deringer, J.J.; Hall, J.D.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1988-12-01

    This document describes recommendations for a multiyear plan developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Advanced Energy Design and Operation Technologies (AEDOT) project. The plan is an outgrowth of earlier planning activities conducted for DOE as part of design process research under the Building System Integration Program (BSIP). The proposed research will produce intelligent computer-based design and operation technologies for commercial buildings. In this document, the concept is explained, the need for these new computer-based environments is discussed, the benefits are described, and a plan for developing the AEDOT technologies is presented for the 9-year period beginning FY 1989. 45 refs., 37 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Text Messaging to Improve Hypertension Medication Adherence in African Americans From Primary Care and Emergency Department Settings: Results From Two Randomized Feasibility Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buis, Lorraine; Hirzel, Lindsey; Dawood, Rachelle M; Dawood, Katee L; Nichols, Lauren P; Artinian, Nancy T; Schwiebert, Loren; Yarandi, Hossein N; Roberson, Dana N; Plegue, Melissa A; Mango, LynnMarie C; Levy, Phillip D

    2017-02-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is an important problem in the United States, with an estimated 78 million Americans aged 20 years and older suffering from this condition. Health disparities related to HTN are common in the United States, with African Americans suffering from greater prevalence of the condition than whites, as well as greater severity, earlier onset, and more complications. Medication adherence is an important component of HTN management, but adherence is often poor, and simply forgetting to take medications is often cited as a reason. Mobile health (mHealth) strategies have the potential to be a low-cost and effective method for improving medication adherence that also has broad reach. Our goal was to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary clinical effectiveness of BPMED, an intervention designed to improve medication adherence among African Americans with uncontrolled HTN, through fully automated text messaging support. We conducted two parallel, unblinded randomized controlled pilot trials with African-American patients who had uncontrolled HTN, recruited from primary care and emergency department (ED) settings. In each trial, participants were randomized to receive either usual care or the BPMED intervention for one month. Data were collected in-person at baseline and one-month follow-up, assessing the effect on medication adherence, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), medication adherence self-efficacy, and participant satisfaction. Data for both randomized controlled pilot trials were analyzed separately and combined. A total of 58 primary care and 65 ED participants were recruited with retention rates of 91% (53/58) and 88% (57/65), respectively. BPMED participants consistently showed numerically greater, yet nonsignificant, improvements in measures of medication adherence (mean change 0.9, SD 2.0 vs mean change 0.5, SD 1.5, P=.26), SBP (mean change -12.6, SD 24.0 vs mean change -11.3, SD 25.5 mm Hg, P=.78), and DBP

  6. 76 FR 34732 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... and Programs Directorate--002 Chemical Facility Anti- Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety Program... Programs Directorate--002 Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety Program System of...--002 Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Personnel Surety Program System of Records.'' On...

  7. The American Meteorological Society Education Program Model for Climate Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbeck, R. S.; Moran, J. M.; Geer, I. W.; Hopkins, E. J.

    2007-12-01

    A guiding principle of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Education Program is that public scientific literacy is most effectively achieved through systemic change in the classroom. The AMS, partnering with NOAA, NSF, NASA, the US Navy, and SUNY Brockport, aims for greater public scientific literacy through its successful distance learning programs that convey to pre-college teachers and undergraduates the fundamentals of meteorology, oceanography, and hydrology. The AMS DataStreme teacher-enhancement courses (Atmosphere, Water in the Earth System, and Ocean) have changed the way thousands of pre-college teachers teach and hundreds of thousands of students learn. Furthermore, teachers trained in this program are positioned to contribute to local and statewide curriculum reform. The AMS Online Weather Studies and Online Ocean Studies courses are providing tens of thousands of college undergraduates with engaging and highly motivational learning experiences. DataStreme courses are offered locally and feature mentoring of teacher participants whereas Online undergraduate courses are licensed by AMS for offering by colleges and universities. Integrated components of the AMS model are course website, investigations manual, and customized textbook. A portion of twice-weekly investigations is written to a near real-time situation and posted on the course website. Through its extensive experience with the DataStreme/Online programs, the AMS Education Program is now uniquely poised to assume a national leadership role in climate education by applying its proven teaching/learning model to climate education at the pre-college and undergraduate levels. The AMS model is ideally suited for delivering to teachers and students nationwide the basic understandings and enduring ideas of climate science and the role of the individual and society in climate variability and change. The AMS teaching/learning model incorporates an Earth system perspective, is problem focused, and

  8. Practice characteristics of Emergency Department extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) programs in the United States: The current state of the art of Emergency Department extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ED ECMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonna, Joseph E; Johnson, Nicholas J; Greenwood, John; Gaieski, David F; Shinar, Zachary; Bellezo, Joseph M; Becker, Lance; Shah, Atman P; Youngquist, Scott T; Mallin, Michael P; Fair, James Franklin; Gunnerson, Kyle J; Weng, Cindy; McKellar, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    To characterize the current scope and practices of centers performing extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) on the undifferentiated patient with cardiac arrest in the emergency department. We contacted all US centers in January 2016 that had submitted adult eCPR cases to the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) registry and surveyed them, querying for programs that had performed eCPR in the Emergency Department (ED ECMO). Our objective was to characterize the following domains of ED ECMO practice: program characteristics, patient selection, devices and techniques, and personnel. Among 99 centers queried, 70 responded. Among these, 36 centers performed ED ECMO. Nearly 93% of programs are based at academic/teaching hospitals. 65% of programs are less than 5 years old, and 60% of programs perform ≤3 cases per year. Most programs (90%) had inpatient eCPR or salvage ECMO programs prior to starting ED ECMO programs. The majority of programs do not have formal inclusion and exclusion criteria. Most programs preferentially obtain vascular access via the percutaneous route (70%) and many (40%) use mechanical CPR during cannulation. The most commonly used console is the Maquet Rotaflow(®). Cannulation is most often performed by cardiothoracic (CT) surgery, and nearly all programs (>85%) involve CT surgeons, perfusionists, and pharmacists. Over a third of centers that submitted adult eCPR cases to ELSO have performed ED ECMO. These programs are largely based at academic hospitals, new, and have low volumes. They do not have many formal inclusion or exclusion criteria, and devices and techniques are variable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The American Indian Summer Institute in Earth System Science (AISESS) at UC Irvine: A Two-Week Residential Summer Program for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. R.; Polequaptewa, N.; Leon, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Native Americans remain severely underrepresented in the geosciences, despite a clear need for qualified geoscience professionals within Tribal communities to address critical issues such as natural resource and land management, water and air pollution, and climate change. In addition to the need for geoscience professionals within Tribal communities, increased participation of Native Americans in the geosciences would enhance the overall diversity of perspectives represented within the Earth science community and lead to improved Earth science literacy within Native communities. To address this need, the Department of Earth System Science and the American Indian Resource Program at the University California have organized a two-week residential American Indian Summer Institute in Earth System Science (AISESS) for high-school students (grades 9-12) from throughout the nation. The format of the AISESS program is based on the highly-successful framework of a previous NSF Funded American Indian Summer Institute in Computer Science (AISICS) at UC Irvine and involves key senior personnel from the AISICS program. The AISESS program, however, incorporates a week of camping on the La Jolla Band of Luiseño Indians reservation in Northern San Diego County, California. Following the week of camping and field projects, the students spend a week on the campus of UC Irvine participating in Earth System Science lectures, laboratory activities, and tours. The science curriculum is closely woven together with cultural activities, native studies, and communication skills programs The program culminates with a closing ceremony during which students present poster projects on environmental issues relevant to their tribal communities. The inaugural AISESS program took place from July 15th-28th, 2012. We received over 100 applications from Native American high school students from across the nation. We accepted 40 students for the first year, of which 34 attended the program. The

  10. A contractor report to the Department of Energy on environmental management baseline programs and integration opportunities (discussion draft)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    In July 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM) chartered a government contractor led effort to develop a suite of technically defensible, integrated alternatives which meet the EM mission. The contractor team was challenged to ``think outside-the-box`` for solutions that cross traditional site boundaries and enable the programs to get the job done at an earlier date and at a lower cost. This report documents baseline programs current plans for material disposition and presents the opportunities for additional acceleration of cleanup and cost savings. A graphical depiction of the disposition of EM-owned waste and material from current state to final disposition is shown as disposition maps in Attachments 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. These disposition maps detail the material disposition at eleven major DOE sites as planned in the current discussion draft plan, Accelerating Cleanup: Focus on 2006. Maps reflecting material disposition at additional sites will be added in the future. Opportunities to further accelerate the cleanup of DOE-EM sites and reduce the overall cost of cleanup are depicted in the alternative disposition maps shown in Attachments 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12. These integration opportunities bring nation-wide resources to bear on common problems facing the DOE sites.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM RESEARCH PROJECTS TO IMPROVE DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISIONING OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Ann Marie

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes fourteen basic science projects aimed at solving decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) problems within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Funded by the Environmental Science Management Program (EMSP), these research projects address D&D problems where basic science is needed to expand knowledge and develop solutions to help DOE meet its cleanup milestones. EMSP uses directed solicitations targeted at identified Environmental Management (EM) needs to ensure that research results are directly applicable to DOE's EM problems. The program then helps transition the projects from basic to applied research by identifying end-users and coordinating proof-of-principle field tests. EMSP recently funded fourteen D&D research projects through the directed solicitation process. These research projects will be discussed, including description, current status, and potential impact. Through targeted research and proof-of-principle tests, it is hoped that EMSP's fourteen D&D basic research projects will directly impact and provide solutions to DOE's D&D problems.

  12. The Impact of a Culturally Enhanced Drug Prevention Program on Drug and Alcohol Refusal Efficacy among Urban African American Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgrave, Faye Z.; Reed, Melba C.; Plybon, Laura E.; Corneille, Maya

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the utility of the Specific Event Drug and Alcohol Refusal Efficacy scale (SEDARE) as an outcome of a culturally enhanced drug abuse prevention program for urban African-American girls in early adolescence. The SEDARE captures the perceived likelihood that youth will use drugs and alcohol in specific situations. Ninety-two…

  13. A Parent Education Program for Parents of Chinese American Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs): A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsu-Min

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of a parent education program on decreasing parenting stress and increasing parental confidence and quality of life in parents of Chinese American children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). A pre-, posttest group design was used in this study. A total of nine families of Chinese American…

  14. The Effects of a Mentoring Program on African American Collegiate Football Students at a Predominately White Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemond, LaNise D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this interpretivist qualitative study is to discover and explore what factors influence African American collegiate football student athletes with regard to their experiences that participated in a mentoring program at a predominately white institution. The grounded theory methodology was used for this study. Ten African American…

  15. Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive Behavior Therapy Guided Self-Help Program for Mexican American Women with Binge Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Munyi; Cachelin, Fary; Uribe, Luz; Striegel, Ruth H.; Thompson, Douglas; Wilson, G. Terence

    2012-01-01

    Data on the compatibility of evidence-based treatment in ethnic minority groups are limited. This study utilized focus group interviews to elicit Mexican American women's (N = 12) feedback on a cognitive behavior therapy guided self-help program for binge eating disorders. Findings revealed 6 themes to be considered during the cultural adaptation…

  16. Realizing the American Dream: A Parent Education Program Designed to Increase Latino Family Engagement in Children's Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Joan M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Grounded in Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler's parent involvement process model, the Realizing the American Dream (RAD) parent education program targets Latino parents' involvement beliefs and knowledge to enhance their involvement behaviors. Comparison of more than 2,000 parents' self-reported beliefs, knowledge, and behavior before and after RAD…

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2012 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: May 14-18, 2012, Arlington, VA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-09-01

    This document summarizes the comments provided by peer reviewers on hydrogen and fuel cell projects presented at the fiscal year (FY) 2012 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), held May 14-18, 2012, in Arlington, VA.

  18. 7 CFR Exhibit E to Subpart E of... - List of Regional Offices, Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP), U.S. Department...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Compliance Programs (OFCCP), U.S. Department of Labor (USDL) E Exhibit E to Subpart E of Part 1901... REGULATIONS PROGRAM-RELATED INSTRUCTIONS Civil Rights Compliance Requirements Pt. 1901, Subpt. E, Exh. E Exhibit E to Subpart E of Part 1901—List of Regional Offices, Office of Federal Contract Compliance...

  19. U.S. Department of Energy, Illness and Injury Surveillance Program, Worker Health Summary, 1995-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Illness and Injury Surveillance Program has created an opportunity to assess illness and injury rates and patterns among workers at participating sites for well over a decade. The Worker Health Summary introduces an additional perspective on worker health with the introduction of analyses comparing the experience of sites in different program offices and a focus on time trends covering a decade of worker illness and injury experience. These analyses by program office suggest that illness and injury patterns among National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) workers diverge in many ways from those seen among Environmental Management (EM) and Science workers for reasons not yet understood. These differences will receive further investigation in future special focus studies, as will other findings of interest. With the time depth now available in our data, the Worker Health Summary reveals an additional nuance in worker health trends: changing health patterns in a specialized and skilled but aging work force. Older workers are becoming an increasing percentage of the work force, and their absence rates for diseases such as diabetes and hypertension are increasing as well. The impact of these emerging health issues, if properly addressed, can be managed to maintain or even enhance worker health and productivity. Prevention strategies designed to reduce the toll of these health conditions appear warranted, and this report gives us an indication of where to focus them. The analyses that follow reflect the Illness and Injury Surveillance Program’s continued commitment to apply a public health perspective in protecting the health of DOE’s work force.

  20. Advancing understanding of the sustainability of lay health advisor (LHA) programs for African-American women in community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Rachel C; Charles, Thana-Ashley; Dunston, Sheba King; Jandorf, Lina; Erwin, Deborah O

    2017-09-01

    Lay health advisor (LHA) programs have made strong contributions towards the elimination of health disparities and are increasingly being implemented to promote health and prevent disease. Developed in collaboration with African-American survivors, the National Witness Project (NWP) is an evidence-based, community-led LHA program that improves cancer screening among African-American women. NWP has been successfully disseminated, replicated, and implemented nationally in over 40 sites in 22 states in diverse community settings, reaching over 15,000 women annually. We sought to advance understanding of barriers and facilitators to the long-term implementation and sustainability of LHA programs in community settings from the viewpoint of the LHAs, as well as the broader impact of the program on African-American communities and LHAs. In the context of a mixed-methods study, in-depth telephone interviews were conducted among 76 African-American LHAs at eight NWP sites at baseline and 12-18 months later, between 2010 and 2013. Qualitative data provides insight into inner and outer contextual factors (e.g., community partnerships, site leadership, funding), implementation processes (e.g., training), as well as characteristics of the intervention (e.g., perceived need and fit in African-American community) and LHAs (e.g., motivations, burnout) that are perceived to impact the continued implementation and sustainability of NWP. Factors at the contextual levels and related to motivations of LHAs are critical to the sustainability of LHA programs. We discuss how findings are used to inform (1) the development of the LHA Sustainability Framework and (2) strategies to support the continued implementation and sustainability of evidence-based LHA interventions in community settings.

  1. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FOR FISCAL YEAR 1999. THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, DECEMBER 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAUL,P.; FOX,K.J.

    2000-07-01

    In FY 1999, the BNL LDRD Program funded 33 projects, 25 of which were new starts, at a total cost of $4,525,584. A table is presented which lists all of the FY 1999 funded projects and gives a history of funding for each by year. Several of these projects have already experienced varying degrees of success as indicated in the individual Project Program Summaries which are given. A total of 29 informal publications (abstracts, presentations, reports and workshop papers) were reported and an additional 23 formal (full length) papers were either published, are in press or being prepared for publication. The investigators on five projects have filed for patents. Seven of the projects reported that proposals/grants had either been funded or were submitted for funding. The complete summary of follow-on activities is as follows: Information Publications--29, Formal Papers--23, Grants/Proposals/Follow-on Funding--7. In conclusion, a significant measure of success is already attributable to the FY 1999 LDRD Program in the short period of time involved. The Laboratory has experienced a significant scientific gain by these achievements.

  2. Nutrition and health education intervention for whole grain foods in the Georgia older Americans nutrition programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jeanna; Johnson, Mary Ann; Fischer, Joan G; Hargrove, James L

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a nutrition education intervention on improving the intake and behaviors related to whole grain foods in congregate meal recipients in senior centers in north Georgia. Participants were a convenience sample and completed a pretest, an educational intervention, and a post-test (N = 84, mean age = 77 years, 88% female, 76% Caucasian, and 24% African American). At the pre-test, most participants agreed that eating more whole grain foods would help reduce their risk of cancer (69%), heart disease (76%), type 2 diabetes (65%), and bowel disorders (82%), but consumption of 11 whole grain foods was low (10.5 times/week). Following the intervention, participants were more likely to suggest one or more correct ways to identify whole grain foods (45 vs. 62%, Pwhole grain bread, cereal, and crackers (5.8 vs. 6.9 times/week, P whole grain foods was high, the intakes were low. As a first step, this intervention improved several aspects of the consumption of whole grain foods; however, additional interventions that target the individual and the congregate meal program are needed to increase intakes to the recommended three servings daily.

  3. An Examination of Self-Esteem and Empowerment of African American Female Youth in an After School Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Unroe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated self-esteem and empowerment in three African American female cohort groups in an after school program. A sample of 136 students in the after school program comprised the three one-year female and male cohort groups. For this study, 71 African American females in the female cohort groups were analyzed. Social Cognitive Theory and Resiliency Theory were used to explore factors potentially influencing self-esteem and empowerment of an at-risk African American female population, with the after school program serving as a protective factor. Participants completed the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Developmental Assets Profile (DAP, but only DAP empowerment items were analyzed. No significant differences were found in self-esteem levels for the three separate female cohort groups. However, evidence was found for a positive correlation between self-esteem and empowerment. Study conclusions identify implications for after school program staff as they identify needs and conduct youth programs accordingly.

  4. Health professions career awareness program for seventh- and eighth-grade African-American students: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Joseph A; Sloan, Patricia E; Hardney, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory, cross-sectional study was designed to gauge the interest and health career choices of African-American students before high school and to determine their level of satisfaction with a health career awareness program. Over a three-year period, 133 seventh-grade students (47%) and eighth-grade students (53%) enrolled in a Southside Chicago Catholic school were recruited; 98% were African-American. The students participated in a career awareness program, which consisted of lectures, video presentation, interactive discussion, and college campus visits. Each student completed a questionnaire that sought demographic information, health career choice, career preference, and level of satisfaction with the awareness program implemented. For career choice, 39% of the students selected "doctor" and dentist, 28% selected occupational therapy, 15% selected social work, 11% selected nursing, and 7% selected health information administration. The majority of the students (51%) were "very satisfied" and 49% were "satisfied" with the program that was implemented. We found no discernable difference in the health career interest and career choice of the study participants over the three-year period. Our findings reconfirmed a continuing limited level of awareness about allied health professions among African-American students before high school. Follow-up studies should expand the scope and contents of the awareness program to include other health professions, field trips, and mentoring by health care providers or health professional students.

  5. The risk stratification and prognostic evaluation of soluble programmed death-1 on patients with sepsis in emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongzhen; Jia, Yumei; Li, Chunsheng; Fang, Yingying; Shao, Rui

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of soluble programmed death-1 (sPD-1) for risk stratification and prediction of 28-day mortality in patients with sepsis, we compared serum sPD-1 with procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), and the Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis (MEDS) score. A total of 60 healthy volunteers and 595 emergency department (ED) patients were recruited for this prospective cohort study. According to the severity of their condition on ED arrival, the patients were allocated to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome group (130 cases), sepsis group (276 cases), severe sepsis group (121 cases), and septic shock group (68 cases). In addition, all patients with sepsis were also divided into the survivor group (349 cases) and nonsurvivor group (116 cases) according to the 28-day outcomes. When the severity of sepsis increased, the levels of sPD-1 gradually increased. The levels of sPD-1, PCT, CRP and the MEDS score were also higher in the nonsurvivor group compared to the survivor group. Logistic regression suggested that sPD-1, PCT, and the MEDS score were independent risk factors for 28-day mortality of patients with sepsis. Area under the curve (AUC) of sPD-1, PCT and the MEDS score for 28-day mortality was 0.725, 0.693, and 0.767, respectively, and the AUC was improved when all 3 factors were combined (0.843). Serum sPD-1 is positively correlated with the severity of sepsis, and it is valuable for risk stratification of patients and prediction of 28-day mortality. Combining sPD-1 with PCT and the MEDS score improves the prognostic evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Customer Service Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Use of computer program STRCMACS has enabled Illinois Bell Telephone, a subsidiary of American Telephone and Telegraph to cut software development costs about 10 percent by reducing program maintenance and by allowing the department to bring other software into operation more quickly. It has also been useful in company training of programming staff.

  7. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B.; Goldstein, Stanley H.

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JCS. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  8. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  9. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1988, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1988 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and in 1964 nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers.

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1989, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The 1989 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers.

  11. Abstracts of reports published in the environmental programs of the Department of Energy and Environment, January-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-05-01

    This 1978 Annual Abstracts represents the publishing experience over the past year of the three divisions and one group that make up the Environmental Sciences area of the Department of Energy and Environment. The abstracts are grouped according to the organization of the authors under the Atmospheric Sciences, Environmental Chemistry, and Oceanographic Sciences Division and the Land and Fresh Water Environmental Sciences Group. The range of interests and the interdisciplinary nature of the activities within Environmental Programs are demonstrated by these abstracts. Most of these activities relate in some way to the environmental effects or potential effects of energy generation. The major areas involved include: coastal meteorology; physical, biological, and chemical oceanography of the coastal shelf; analysis of marine, fresh water, and terrestrial ecosystems; effects of acid rain and other pollutants on aquatic and terrestrial systems; Multistate Power Production Pollution Study (MAP3S), including transport and transformation experiments, data management, and modeling and analysis; atmospheric diagnostics including the study of the chemistry of pollutants in plumes and ambient atmosphere; basic and applied studies of atmospheric aerosol generation, composition, and behavior; and development of atmospheric tracer systems and real-time instrumentation.

  12. The University of Minnesota Morris (UMM) STEP Program: an initiative to encourage the participation of Native Americans in the sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of the UMM STEP program is to increase the number of graduates in STEM fields through innovative curricular, recruiting and mentoring strategies. A unique focus of the UMM STEP program is increasing the number of Native American science majors. The STEP program fosters a summer research environment where peer interaction and mentoring creates a web of support. To do so we will establish a supportive and fulfilling pipeline that: 1) Identifies Native American students and involves them in research while they are high school; 2) Mentors and prepares participants for university academics the summer before their freshman year; 3) Provides a complete tuition waiver, mentoring and a support network throughout their undergraduate career; and 4) Involves participants in an active and dynamic summer undergraduate research environment where under-represented individuals are in the majority. The third and fourth components of this pipeline are in very good shape. The Morris campus was originally established as an Indian School in 1887. When the federal government deeded the Indian school campus to the University of Minnesota a stipulation was that Native American students attend the college for free. At present, 196 Native Americans are enrolled at UMM (50 are STEM majors). The UMM STEP research experience provides the unique opportunity to interact with a scientific community that both breaks down a number of traditional barriers and aids in the maturation of these students as scientists. In Summer 2008, 4 students were involved in summer research and in 2009 seven Native American students participated. Early efforts of the UMM STEP program are encouraging. UMM Admissions staff used the UMM STEP program to recruit Native American students and the P.I. phoned “uncommitted admits”, visited reservations and hosted reservation student visits. The result was an increase in freshman Native American Science majors from 7 in Fall 2007, 15 in fall 2008 and 20 in fall

  13. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Stratified Random Surveys (StRS) of Coral Demography (Adult and Juvenile Corals) across American Samoa since 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data described here result from benthic coral demographic surveys for two life stages (juveniles, adults) across American Samoa in 2015. Juvenile colony surveys...

  14. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Benthic Cover Derived from Analysis of Benthic Images Collected during Stratified Random Surveys (StRS) across American Samoa in 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data described here result from benthic photo-quadrat surveys conducted along transects at stratified random sites across American Samoa in 2015 as a part of...

  15. Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 2009 United States Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mohit [Seeo, Incorporated, Hayward, CA (United States); Grape, Ulrik [Seeo, Incorporated, Hayward, CA (United States)

    2014-07-29

    The purpose of this project was for Seeo to deliver the first ever large-scale or grid-scale prototype of a new class of advanced lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. The technology combines unprecedented energy density, lifetime, safety, and cost. The goal was to demonstrate Seeo’s entirely new class of lithium-based batteries based on Seeo’s proprietary nanostructured polymer electrolyte. This technology can enable the widespread deployment in Smart Grid applications and was demonstrated through the development and testing of a 10 kilowatt-hour (kWh) prototype battery system. This development effort, supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) enabled Seeo to pursue and validate the transformational performance advantages of its technology for use in grid-tied energy storage applications. The focus of this project and Seeo’s goal as demonstrated through the efforts made under this project is to address the utility market needs for energy storage systems applications, especially for residential and commercial customers tied to solar photovoltaic installations. In addition to grid energy storage opportunities Seeo’s technology has been tested with automotive drive cycles and is seen as equally applicable for battery packs for electric vehicles. The goals of the project were outlined and achieved through a series of specific tasks, which encompassed materials development, scaling up of cells, demonstrating the performance of the cells, designing, building and demonstrating a pack prototype, and providing an economic and environmental assessment. Nearly all of the tasks were achieved over the duration of the program, with only the full demonstration of the battery system and a complete economic and environmental analysis not able to be fully completed. A timeline over the duration of the program is shown in figure 1.

  16. Preliminary Audit Report on "Management Controls over the Commonwealth of Virginia's Efforts to Implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Weatherization Assistance Program"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-05-01

    The Department of Energy's (Department) Weatherization Assistance Program received $5 billion under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to improve the energy efficiency of homes, multi-family rental units and mobile homes owned or occupied by low-income persons. Subsequently, the Department awarded a three-year Weatherization Assistance Program grant for $94 million to the Commonwealth of Virginia (Virginia). This grant provided more than a ten-fold increase in funds available to Virginia for weatherization over that authorized in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009. Corresponding to the increase in funding, the Recovery Act increased the limit on the average amount spent to weatherize a home (unit) from $2,500 to $6,500. Virginia's Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) administers the Recovery Act grant through 22 local community action agencies. These agencies (sub-grantees) are responsible for determining applicant eligibility, weatherizing homes, and conducting home assessments and inspections. Typical weatherization services include installing insulation; sealing ducts; tuning and repairing furnaces; and, mitigating heat loss through windows, doors and other infiltration points. Virginia plans to use its Recovery Act Weatherization funding to weatherize about 9,193 units over the life of the grant - a significant increase over the 1,475 housing units that were planned to be completed in FY 2009. Given the significant increase in funding and the demands associated with weatherizing thousands of homes, we initiated this audit to determine if Virginia had adequate safeguards in place to ensure that the Weatherization Program was managed efficiently and effectively. The State of Virginia's DHCD had not implemented financial and reporting controls needed to ensure Weatherization Program funds are spent effectively and efficiently. Specifically, DHCD had not: (1) Performed on-site financial monitoring of any of its sub

  17. Usages of Computers and Smartphones to Develop Dementia Care Education Program for Asian American Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Ah; Nguyen, Hannah; Park, Joan; Tran, Linh; Nguyen, Trang; Huynh, Yen

    2017-10-01

    Families of ethnic minority persons with dementia often seek help at later stages of the disease. Little is known about the effectiveness of various methods in supporting ethnic minority dementia patients' caregivers. The objective of the study was to identify smartphone and computer usage among family caregivers of dementia patients (i.e., Korean and Vietnamese Americans) to develop dementia-care education programs for them. Participants were asked various questions related to their computer or smartphone usage in conjunction with needs-assessment interviews. Flyers were distributed at two ethnic minority community centers in Southern California. Snowball recruitment was also utilized to reach out to the families of dementia patients dwelling in the community. Thirty-five family caregivers, including 20 Vietnamese and 15 Korean individuals, participated in this survey. Thirty participants (30 of 35, 85.7%) were computer users. Among those, 76.7% (23 of 30) reported daily usage and 53% (16 of 30) claimed to use social media. A majority of the participants (31 of 35, 88.6%) reported that they owned smartphones. More than half of smartphone users (18 of 29, 62%) claimed to use social media applications. Many participants claimed that they could not attend in-class education due to caregiving and/or transportation issues. Most family caregivers of dementia patients use smartphones more often than computers, and more than half of those caregivers communicate with others through social media apps. A smartphone-app-based caregiver intervention may serve as a more effective approach compared to the conventional in-class method. Multiple modalities for the development of caregiver interventions should be considered.

  18. A 25-year analysis of the American College of Gastroenterology Research Grant Program:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Seth D.; Dellon, Evan S.; Bright, Stephanie D.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) has awarded research grants for 25 years. We assessed the characteristics of grant recipients, their current academic status, and the likelihood of publication resulting from the grant. Methods Demographic data, year and amount of award, title of project, and recipient’s institution were extracted from ACG databases. Using ACG reports and medical literature search engines, we assessed publication based on grant-funded research, as well as career publication record. We also determined the current position of awardees. Similar analysis was performed for recipients of junior investigator awards. Results A total of 396 clinical research awards totaling $5,374,497 ($6,867,937 in 2008 dollars) were awarded to 341 recipients in the 25 years between 1983 and 2008. The most commonly funded areas of research were endoscopy (22% of awards) and motility/functional disorders (21%). At least one peer-reviewed publication based on grant-funded research occurred in 255 of the awards (69%). Higher award value was associated with subsequent publication. Of 341 past awardees, 195 (62%) are currently in academic positions. Factors associated with staying in academics included higher award value (pacademics. Overall, the mean cost in grant dollars per published paper based on the research was $14,875. Conclusion The majority of ACG grant recipients published the results of their research and remained in academics. Higher amount of award, holding an advanced degree, and publication were associated with careers in academics. The ACG research grant award program is an important engine of investigation, publications, and academic career development in the field of gastroenterology. PMID:19319125

  19. The North American Bird Banding Program: Into the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, P.A.; Francis, C.M.; Blancher, P.; DeSante, D.F.; Robbins, C.S.; Smith, G.; Cannell, P.

    1998-01-01

    The authors examined the legal, scientific, and philosophical underpinnings of the North American Bird Banding Program [BBP], with emphasis on the U.S. Bird Banding Laboratory [BBL], but also considering the Canadian Bird Banding Office [BBO]. In this report, we review the value of banding data, enumerate and expand on tile principles under which any modern BBP should operate, and from them derive our recommendations. These are cast into a Mission Statement, a Role and Function Statement, and a series of specific recommendations addressing five areas: (1) permitting procedures and practices; (2) operational issues; (3) data management; (4) BBL organization and staffing; and (5) implementation. Our major tenets and recommendations are as follows: banding provides valuable data for numerous scientific, management, and educational purposes, and its benefits far outweigh necessary biological and fiscal costs, especially those incurred by the BBL and BBO; because of the value of banding data for management of avian resources, including both game and nongame birds, government support of the program is fully justified and appropriate; all banding data, if collected to appropriate standards, are potentially valuable; there are many ways to increase the value of banding data such as by endorsing, promoting, and applying competence and/or training standards for permit issuance; promoting bander participation in well-designed projects; and by encouraging the use of banding data for meta-analytical approaches; the BBL should apply, promote, and encourage such standards, participation, and approaches; the BBP should be driven by the needs of users, including scientists and managers; all exchange of data and most communication between banders and the BBL should become electronic in the near future; the computer system at the BBL should be modernized to one designed for a true client-server relationship and storage of data in on-line relational databases; the BBL should continue

  20. When Aspiration Meets Opportunity: Examining Transitional Experiences of African American Males in College Readiness Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baber, Lorenzo DuBois

    2014-01-01

    The lack of postsecondary success for African American males has garnered significant attention from academic scholars and public policy leaders. While this scholarship provides a strong portrait on issues related to African American males, there are still significant gaps to be addressed. Most notably, current research tends to focus on students…

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: establishing a comprehensive program model for hybrid cardiac catheterization laboratories in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiser, Bernadette; Dutra-Brice, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Aortic valve disease, especially aortic stenosis, becomes progressively debilitating and carries a high mortality risk if it is categorized as severe and symptomatic (J Thorac Cardiovas Surg. 2012;144(3):e29-e84). In the past, the only treatment for aortic stenosis was surgical aortic valve replacement. Surgical treatment may require several hours of cardioplegia, and if the patient has comorbidities, such as renal failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, their operative mortality percentage increases.In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedure for patients who were deemed high risk or inoperative for the routine surgical aortic valve replacement surgery. More than 20, 000 TAVRs have been performed in patients worldwide since 2002 when Dr Alain Cribier performed the first-in-man TAVR (Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2012;105(3):145-152). The Edwards Lifesciences SAPIEN XT valve and the Medtronic CoreValve are commercially available.The clinical findings and economic statistic have supported the expansion of the TAVR procedure. However, there has been considerable controversy over where the procedure is to occur and who is directly responsible for directing the TAVR care. This debate has identified barriers to the implementation of a TAVR program. The operating rooms and a cardiac catheterization laboratory are underprepared for the hybrid valve replacement therapy. Because of the barriers identified, the Department of Veterans Affairs determined a need for a systematic approach to review the programs that applied for this structural heart disease program. A centralized team was developed to ensure room readiness and staff competency. The use of the Health Failure Mode and Effects Analysis can define high-risk clinical processes and conduct a hazard analysis. Worksheets can show potential failure modes and their probabilities, along with actions and outcome measures, team collaboration

  2. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1985. [Space Stations and Their Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, R. G. (Editor); Williams, C. E. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Research Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and the Johnson Space Center. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The faculty fellows spent the time at JSC engaged in research projects commensurate with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with NASA/JSC colleagues. This document is a compilation of the final reports of their research during the summer of 1985.

  3. Role of performance measures in reengineering U.S. Department of Energy`s management of environmental management programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, K.S.; Harroun, W.P.

    1996-06-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) contributed to America`s defense up to the end of the Cold War. It is one of several large US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear industrial facilities, currently undergoing cleanup and closure. The Site was constructed in a sparsely populated area along the Rocky Mountain Foothills, near Denver, in 1952. In the 45 years since, Denver has grown to a major metropolitan area. Over 2 million people live within the Site`s 50-mile radius. The Site is directly upstream of water supplies that serve over 300,000 people. As a result, accelerated cleanup, consolidation, reuse, and closure of the Site are the current essentials. The Site has had three management and operating (M and O) contractors since inception. In keeping with the shift in the Site`s paradigm from one of weapon-parts production program to cleanup and closure project, DOE changed its contracting philosophy for the Site from the M and O type of contract to a Performance-based Incentive Fee Integrating Management contract (PBIF IMC). Doe selected the Site`s fourth contractor as an IMC contractor in July 1995. Kaiser-Hill Company L.L.C. was awarded the contract and assumed IMC responsibility for the Site on July 1, 1995. Integral to this contract is the establishment and implementation of a performance measures system. Performance measures are the bases for incentives that motivate the IMC and the subcontractors working at Rocky Flats. This paper provides an overview of Performance Measures system practiced at Rocky Flats from July 1995 to December 1995. Also described are the developments in reengineering during the July 1995--March 1996 interval.

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports 1 through 12.

  5. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1992, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters Washington, DC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document contains reports 13 through 24.

  6. Partnering with education and job and training programs for sustainable tobacco control among Baltimore african american young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine Clegg; Bone, Lee; Clay, Eric A; Owings, Kerry; Thames, Sean; Stillman, Frances

    2009-01-01

    Young adults are generally overlooked in tobacco control initiatives, even though they are critical to sustained success. African American young adults who are not in higher education or working are particularly vulnerable to harmful tobacco use, given high smoking rates and limited access to cessation services. Guided by community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, we sought to identify program and community-level strategies to reduce tobacco use among African American young adults in Baltimore. We describe the challenges and opportunities for integrating effective tobacco control into community-based education and job training programs for unemployed young adults. As part of a longstanding community-research partnership in Baltimore, we conducted fourteen semistructured key informant interviews with leaders from city government and education and job training programs for young adults. The research design, data collection, analysis, and dissemination all included dialogue between and active contribution by both research and community partners. Interview data were structured into opportunities (mindset for change and desire for bonds with a trusted adult), challenges (culture of fatalism, tobacco as a stress reliever, and culture of tobacco use among young adults), and possible tobacco control solutions (tobacco education designed with and for program staff and participants and integration of tobacco issues into holistic program goals and policies). The emergent themes enhance our understanding of how tobacco is situated in the lives of unemployed young adults and the potential for building sustainable, community-based public health solutions.

  7. Commentary: Building the evidence base in support of the American Board of Medical Specialties maintenance of certification program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Richard E; Weiss, Kevin B

    2011-01-01

    In this issue, Lipner and colleagues describe research supporting the value of the examinations used in the maintenance of certification (MOC) programs of the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Surgery. The authors of this commentary review the contribution of this research and previous investigations that underscore the value of this component of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) MOC program. In addition, they point out that the MOC examination is one element of a comprehensive approach to physician lifelong learning, assessment, and quality improvement. The ABMS MOC program requires diplomates of the ABMS member boards to engage in continuous professional development in the six domains of competence and performance previously defined by the ABMS and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Although evidence and a sound rationale exist to support educational and assessment methods that target all six domains, it will be important to continue to build the body of evidence demonstrating the value of MOC to the public and to the profession.

  8. Fit body and soul: a church-based behavioral lifestyle program for diabetes prevention in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodani, Sunita; Kramer, M Kaye; Williams, Lovoria; Crawford, Stacey; Kriska, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Faith-based initiatives for lifestyle change show promise in helping to promote healthy behaviors in African American communities. It has been suggested that faith communities and programs within faith communities can influence health care practices and health care planning especially in high risk, minority populations. African American individuals are more likely to attend and participate in faith-based services than Whites from similar backgrounds. Our proposed intervention, Fit Body and Soul, has been adopted and modified from the proven diabetes prevention program (DPP) lifestyle intervention program, and uses the church-community experiences of the "Body and Soul" study as a faith-based effort. The intervention has been developed keeping in mind the church mission and goal of being spiritually healthy and has adopted bible scripture to develop a 12-session intervention. In this article, we present the development of the church-based Fit Body and Soul behavioral lifestyle intervention using community-based participatory research in partnership with African American churches.

  9. The impact of participation in the GEMscholar Program: the persistence of Native American undergraduate students in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurn-Birkhimer, S.; Geier, S.; Filley, T. R.

    2009-12-01

    The GEMscholar (Geology, Environmental Science and Meteorology scholars) program seeks to increase the number of Native American students pursuing graduate degrees in the geosciences. Drawing on research from Native American student education models to address three key themes of mentoring, culturally relevant valuations of geosciences and possible career paths, and connections to community and family the GEMscholar program was designed to provide research opportunities and a support network for the participants. The GEMscholars work on projects that directly link to their local ecosystems and permit them to engage in long term monitoring and cohesive interaction among each successive year’s participants. Over the past 4 years, the research has been focused on the invasion of the European earthworm on the Red Lake Reservation (Red Lake, MN). This research was specifically chosen because of its cultural relevance and its ability to yield locally important findings. In depth interviews with select GEMscholar participants will be used to discover the types of supports that lead to persistence to graduation and the types of obstacles that lead to attrition for these Native American students. Specifically of interest are cultural factors that influence the students’ education and career goals formation and the role of the GEMscholars program in reaching their identified goals.

  10. Evaluation of American Board of Orthodontics certification protocols in postgraduate orthodontic programs in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyun; Putrus, Raphael R; Pruzansky, Dawn P; Grubb, John

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the board certification protocols that hospital and university-based postgraduate orthodontic programs have in place to prepare residents for the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) certification examination. An electronic survey was sent to the program directors of each of the 72 postgraduate orthodontic programs in the United States and Canada. The survey consisted of 49 questions about demographics, resident case assignment protocols, and ABO examination preparation methods. The response rate was 81%. Most programs were 30 to 36 months in length (72.7%). Many residents had a case load of 51 to 75 during their first year (50.9%), with an average maximum case load of 70 to 109. There was a positive correlation with both the number of cases that first-year residents start and the length of the program (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.379; P Certification Examination applications have increased. Most program directors (89.1%) believe that their program length is sufficient for board preparation. Subjects tested in the written examination are integrated into the didactic curriculum and strengthened with ongoing literature reviews, with a passing rate over 90%. Clinical examination preparation varies, with most programs requiring a mock board examination for graduation. Total participation in both the Initial Certification Examination and banking has increased since 2010; better follow-up protocols are needed to track residents after graduation. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 75 FR 3746 - Draft Program Comment for the Department of the Navy for the Disposition of Historic Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... to compiling histories of these eligible vessels when preparing entries in the Dictionary of American... sixty-day period. All written comments should be mailed to the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC...

  12. The United States Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program: a collaborative approach to carbon management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litynski, John T; Klara, Scott M; McIlvried, Howard G; Srivastava, Rameshwar D

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) concept, which is a first attempt to bring the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) carbon sequestration program activities into the "real world" by using a geographically-disposed-system type approach for the U.S. Each regional partnership is unique and covers a unique section of the U.S. and is tasked with determining how the research and development activities of DOE's carbon sequestration program can best be implemented in their region of the country. Although there is no universal agreement on the cause, it is generally understood that global warming is occurring, and many climate scientists believe that this is due, in part, to the buildup of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in the atmosphere. This is evident from the finding presented in the National Academy of Science Report to the President on Climate Change which stated "Greenhouse gases are accumulating in Earth's atmosphere as a result of human activities, causing surface air temperatures and subsurface ocean temperatures to rise. Temperatures are, in fact, rising. The changes observed over the last several decades are likely mostly due to human activities, ...". In the United States, emissions of CO(2) originate mainly from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production, transportation, and other industrial processes. Roughly one third of U.S. anthropogenic CO(2) emissions come from power plants. Reduction of CO(2) emissions through sequestration of carbon either in geologic formations or in terrestrial ecosystems can be part of the solution to the problem of global warming. However, a number of steps must be accomplished before sequestration can become a reality. Cost effective capture and separation technology must be developed, tested, and demonstrated; a database of potential sequestration sites must be established; and techniques must be developed to measure, monitor, and verify the sequestered CO(2). Geographical differences in

  13. ReCAP: Feasibility and Effectiveness of a Pilot Program to Facilitate Quality Improvement Learning in Oncology: Experience of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Arif H; Quinn, Doris; Gilligan, Timothy D; Davis, Barbara Corning; Dalby, Carole K; Bretsch, Jennifer; McNiff, Kristen K; Jacobson, Joseph O; Kamal, Arif H; Quinn, Doris; Gilligan, Timothy D; Corning Davis, Barbara; Dalby, Carole K; Bretsch, Jennifer; McNiff, Kristen K; Jacobson, Joseph O

    2016-02-01

    Studies have demonstrated that structured training programs can improve health professionals' skills in performing clinical care or research. We sought to develop and test a novel quality training program (QTP) tailored to oncology clinicians. The American Society of Clinical Oncology QTP consisted of three in-person learning sessions and four phases: prework, planning, implementation, and sustain and spread. We measured two primary outcomes: program feasibility and effectiveness. Feasibility was evaluated by recording participation. Effectiveness was measured using the Kirkpatrick model, which evaluates four outcomes: reaction, learning, behavior, and results. We collected qualitative feedback through a focus group of participants and mixed quantitative–qualitative results from a 6-month follow-up evaluation survey. Results are presented using descriptive statistics. We received feedback from of 80% of participants who took part in 92% of in-person program days. QTP deliverables were completed by 100% of teams; none withdrew from the program. Regarding reaction, 100% of respondents expressed interest in actively contributing to future QTP courses. For learning, most teams continued to use the core methodology tools (eg, project charter, aims statements) after the program. Regarding behavior, when asked about intention to serve as a local quality improvement leader, a majority said they “definitely will” serve as: team leader on a specific project (75%), project champion or sponsor (75%), or teacher or trainer for others (64%). In evaluating outcomes, 50% reported applying learned methodology to new projects at their local institution. We demonstrate one of the first feasible and effective training programs to facilitate quality improvement learning for oncology clinicians. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  14. Weight loss programs for urban-based, postpartum African-American women: perceived barriers and preferred components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setse, Rosanna; Grogan, Ruby; Cooper, Lisa A; Strobino, Donna; Powe, Neil R; Nicholson, Wanda

    2008-01-01

    There are currently 1.85 million reproductive-aged women in the United States with diabetes or glucose intolerance. While it is known that postpartum weight retention can lead to obesity and diabetes, particularly among African-American women, little is known about African-American women's preferences for postpartum weight loss programs. Our objective was to explore urban-based African-American women's attitudes toward weight gain, perceived barriers to postpartum weight loss, and preferences for weight intervention strategies. Focus groups of pregnant African-American women (n = 22) were conducted by a race-concordant moderator. Open-ended questions were posed to stimulate discussions which were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcriptions were independently reviewed by two investigators who extracted quotations and coded each statement to identify major themes. The median age of participants was 26 years. Median pre-pregnancy or first trimester body-mass index was 31 kg/m(2). Fifty-seven percent of the women were multiparous and 68% were Medicaid recipients. We identified 16 themes with the majority of participant comments focused on: (1) effect of postpartum depression on motivation to lose weight; (2) strong desire to lose weight; (3) knowledge of adverse effects of obesity; (4) costs of weight loss programs; (5) negative impact of media coverage of successful celebrity postpartum weight loss; (6) limitations of childcare on ability to exercise; and (7) family-centered lifestyle behaviors that promote unhealthy eating. Weight loss interventions for African-American women with postpartum obesity should address psychological effects of childbearing, affordability, and perceptions of body image. Interventions should incorporate family-centered approaches and weight loss maintenance strategies.

  15. Outdoor Programs and Academic Departments Working Together: Examining the Benefits of Offering For-Credit Recreation Hard Skills Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poff, Raymond A.; Calvin, David A.; Stuessy, Thomas L.

    The relationship between Indiana University Outdoor Adventures (IUOA) and the Indiana University Department of Recreation and Park Administration began in the early 1980s with the department providing IUOA with lists of potential graduate-assistant employees. If a graduate assistant was hired, IUOA paid the student a stipend and the department…

  16. Using CORE Model-Based Systems Engineering Software to Support Program Management in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Biomass Project: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, C.; Sandor, D.; Simpkins, P.

    2006-11-01

    This paper describes how a model-based systems engineering software, CORE, is helping the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Biomass Program assist with bringing biomass-derived biofuels to the market. This software tool provides information to guide informed decision-making as biomass-to-biofuels systems are advanced from concept to commercial adoption. It facilitates management and communication of program status by automatically generating custom reports, Gantt charts, and tables using the widely available programs of Microsoft Word, Project and Excel.

  17. A Descriptive Survey of Anesthesiology Residency Simulation Programs: How Are Programs Preparing Residents for the New American Board of Anesthesiology APPLIED Certification Examination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, Robert S; Chen, Fei; Arora, Harendra; Martinelli, Susan M; Zvara, David A; Stiegler, Marjorie P

    2017-09-01

    Anesthesiology residency programs may need new simulation-based programs to prepare residents for the new Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) component of the American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA) Primary Certification process. The design of such programs may require significant resources, including faculty time, expertise, and funding, as are currently needed for structured oral examination (SOE) preparation. This survey analyzed the current state of US-based anesthesiology residency programs regarding simulation-based educational programming for SOE and OSCE preparation. An online survey was distributed to every anesthesiology residency program director in the United States. The survey included 15 to 46 questions, depending on each respondent's answers. The survey queried current practices and future plans regarding resident preparation specifically for the ABA APPLIED examination, with emphasis on the OSCE. Descriptive statistics were summarized. χ and Fisher exact tests were used to test the differences in proportions across groups. Spearman rank correlation was used to examine the association between ordinal variables. The responding 66 programs (49%) were a representative sample of all anesthesiology residencies (N = 136) in terms of geographical location (χ P = .58). There was a low response rate from small programs that have 12 or fewer clinical anesthesia residents. Ninety-one percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 84%-95%) of responders agreed that it is the responsibility of the program to specifically prepare residents for primary certification, and most agreed that it is important to practice SOEs (94%; 95% CI, 88%-97%) and OSCEs (89%; 95% CI, 83%-94%). While 100% of respondents reported providing mock SOEs, only 31% (95% CI, 24%-40%) of respondents provided mock OSCE experiences. Of those without an OSCE program, 75% (95% CI, 64%-83%) reported plans to start one. The most common reasons for not having an OSCE program already in place

  18. Are MS in Economics Programs in Departments That Also Have a PhD Program in Economics Different from Their Counterparts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkman, Martin I.; Marjadi, Riza; McCoy, James P.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first article that compares terminal master's degree programs in economics from universities that have a PhD program in economics with those that do not offer PhD programs in economics. The authors compare these differences based on surveys in 2002 and 2012. They examine differences in general program characteristics, department…

  19. Factors related to rapidity of housing placement in Housing and Urban Development-Department of Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing program of 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; O'Connell, Maria; Kasprow, Wesley J; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    The Housing and Urban Development-Department of Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program is the largest supported housing program in the country for homeless veterans who are seeking rapid entry into permanent independent housing. This study examined factors related to how rapidly clients were housed in the early years of the program and how long they stayed in the program. Mental health, substance abuse, work/income, criminal history, and site were examined as predictors of process times. Regression analyses based on 627 HUD-VASH clients who entered the program between 1992 and 2003 showed that client characteristics were not rate-limiting factors for obtaining HUD-VASH housing; i.e., clients who had greater substance abuse problems or more extensive criminal histories did not take longer to obtain housing. The large differences associated with site of entry partly reflected a curvilinear relationship between the duration of operation of the HUD-VASH program and process times; i.e., at relatively younger and older programs, clients entered housing slightly faster than at programs in the middle range. Lastly, HUD-VASH clients whose case managers reported good therapeutic alliances stayed in the program longer. These findings have implications for the continued expansion of the HUD-VASH program.

  20. Cardiovascular Disease Performance Measures in the Outpatient Setting in India: Insights From the American College of Cardiology’s PINNACLE India Quality Improvement Program (PIQIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ankur; Pokharel, Yashashwi; Hira, Ravi S; Risch, Samantha; Vicera, Veronique; Li, Qiong; Kalra, Ram N; Kerkar, Prafulla G; Kumar, Ganesh; Maddox, Thomas M; Oetgen, William J; Glusenkamp, Nathan; Turakhia, Mintu P; Virani, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    Background India has a growing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet data on the quality of outpatient care for patients with coronary artery disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation in India are very limited. We collected data on performance measures for 68 196 unique patients from 10 Indian cardiology outpatient departments from January 1, 2011, to February 5, 2014, in the American College of Cardiology’s PINNACLE (Practice Innovation and Clinical Excellence) India Quality Improvement Program (PIQIP). PIQIP is India’s first national outpatient CVD quality-improvement program. Methods and Results In the PIQIP registry, we estimated the prevalence of CVD risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and current tobacco use) and CVD among outpatients. We examined adherence with performance measures established by the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, and the American Medical Association Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement for coronary artery disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. There were a total of 68 196 patients (155 953 patient encounters), with a mean age of 50.6 years (SD 18.2 years). Hypertension was present in 29.7% of patients, followed by diabetes (14.9%), current tobacco use (7.6%), and dyslipidemia (6.5%). Coronary artery disease was present in 14.8%, heart failure was noted in 4.0%, and atrial fibrillation was present in 0.5% of patients. Among eligible patients, the reported use of medications was as follows: aspirin in 48.6%, clopidogrel in 37.1%, and statin-based lipid-lowering therapy in 50.6% of patients with coronary artery disease; RAAS (renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system) antagonist in 61.9% and beta-blockers in 58.1% of patients with heart failure; and oral anticoagulants in 37.0% of patients with atrial fibrillation. Conclusions This pilot study, initiated to improve outpatient CVD care in India, presents our preliminary results and barriers to data

  1. The Linguistic Gains and Acculturation of American High School Students on Exchange Programs in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovitt, Ashli

    2013-01-01

    There has been a sharp rise in study abroad participation over the last few decades (Institute for International Education, 2011), which can largely be explained by the rise of short-term study abroad programs. While there is much to be gained from participation in such programs, mid-length and year programs may offer the greatest benefits for…

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The basic objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. The final reports on the research projects are presented. This volume, 2, contains sections 15 through 30.

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1987, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 Johnson Space Center (JCS) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of ASEE. The basic objectives of the program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1987.

  4. Multivitamin-mineral supplements in the Older Americans Act Nutrition Program: not a one-size-fits-all quick fix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Melissa Ventura; Wellman, Nancy S

    2008-07-01

    We challenge the suggestion of Congress that the Older Americans Act (OAA) Nutrition Program should provide multivitamin-mineral supplements (MVMs) in addition to meals. MVMs are not a quick fix for poor diets. They do not contain calories, protein, essential fatty acids, or fiber, nor do they adequately address nutritional gaps of some vitamins and minerals. Older adults with chronic health conditions who take multiple medications are at greater risk than the general healthy population for nutrient-drug interactions and toxicity. The OAA Nutrition Program is not an appropriate venue to indiscriminately distribute MVMs, because there is insufficient evidence of their benefits and safety. The program's limited funds and efforts should instead be directed to nutrient-dense healthy meals, quality food service, and greater accessibility to individualized nutrition services.

  5. Automatic failure in gynecologic cytology proficiency testing. Results from the College of American Pathologists proficiency testing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Ann T; Crothers, Barbara A; Bentz, Joel S; Souers, Rhona J; Fatheree, Lisa A; Wilbur, David C

    2009-11-01

    Automatic failure in gynecologic cytology proficiency testing occurs when a high-grade lesion or carcinoma (HSIL+, Category D) is misinterpreted as negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (Category B). To document the automatic failure rate in 2006 and 2007 from the College of American Pathologists proficiency testing program (PAP PT) and compare them to projected values from 2004. Identify automatic failures from PAP PT in 2006 and 2007 and compare the rates of failure regarding participant and preparation type to validated slides in the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in 2004. There were 65 264 participant responses for HSIL+ slides included in this analysis from 2006 and 2007. Overall, 1% (666 of 65 264) of the HSIL+ responses were classified as negative, resulting in automatic failure for the participant. There were significantly fewer automatic failures in 2007 as compared with either 2006 or projected from 2004 data (P < .001). Conventional preparations had a lower automatic failure rate than liquid-based preparations but only for 2006. Both pathologists and cytotechnologists interpreting liquid-based preparations faired better than projected from 2004 data. The automatic failure rate in PAP PT is lower than expected based on 2004 data from the College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program. Automatic failures are a relatively small component (1% or less) of proficiency testing failures. The rate of automatic failure decreased from 2006 to 2007 and may be due to loss of poor performers in the testing pool, the test-taking environment, or removal of less robust slides from the program.

  6. Enhancing emergency medicine initiatives with a quality improvement program: lessons learned in the emergency department of Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azazh, Aklilu; Brown, Lori Di Prete; Ayele, Roman Aydiko; Teklu, Sisay; W/Tsadik, Assefu; Tefera, Muluwork; Bacha, Tigist; Geremew, Haymanot; Tefera, Girma; Busse, Heidi

    2014-07-01

    A Twinning Partnership between the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW) and Addis Ababa University (AAU) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia was formed to strengthen the development of emergency medical services at AAU's Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital (TASHI) through medical education and exchanges. The Twinning philosophy which emphasizes collaboration and joint learning was an ideal program in which QI program was incorporated to maximize success, promote sustainability, and reinforce basic principles for effective healthcare service delivery. This article describes the QI methodology, capacity building strategy, implementation approach, and lessons learned. QI initiative at TASH ED started during EM fellowship in 2010 when Priority problems in the department were identified, and root cause analysis and possible strategies for improvement were devised. Then Baseline and sensitization was undertaken which was followed by Quality Improvement Projects cycles. The Federal Ministry of health key performance indicators (KPI) were used as standard and measurement tool when it was relevant. The findings were analyzed and trends presented to the ED staff and other stakeholders. In the past four years Since QI initiatives started in TASH EM department different achievements have been registered. The main developments were capacity building with QI training of EM fellows, EM residents and EM and critical care nurses. QI Training was also conducted to Tikur Anbessa Hospital and college of health sciences leadership. In addition, various QI projects have been designed and started, while some are finalized and the rest are on implementation. The QI experience in the department suggests that a QI program can effectively support, complement, and enhance health system strengthening partnerships, and that establishment of a QI program at the department level is feasible and beneficial, enhancing the adoption and sustainability of health care improvements such as marked improvements in

  7. American Society for Engineering Education/NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    A program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators is described. The program involves participation in cooperative research and study. Results of the program evaluation are summarized. The research fellows indicated satisfaction with the program. Benefits of the program cited include: (1) enhancement of professional abilities; (2) contact with professionals in a chosen area of research; (3) familiarity with research facilities; and (4) development of new research techniques and their adaptation to an academic setting. Abstracts of each of the research projects undertaken are presented.

  8. Program Update for GRAV-D (Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum): Recent Airborne Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, V. A.; Diehl, T. M.; Roman, D. R.; Smith, D. A.

    2009-05-01

    The mission of NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is to "define, maintain and provide access to the National Spatial Reference System" (NSRS). NAVD 88 (North American Vertical Datum of 1988) provides the vertical reference for the NSRS. However, comparisons of NAVD 88 with the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite gravity data have demonstrated significant problems with the vertical reference, with an average difference between the two of 0.98 m and std dev of 0.37m. As repairing NAVD 88 through a massive leveling effort is impractical, our approach will be to establish a gravimetric geoid as the vertical reference. The linchpin in NGS's effort is the Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV- D) program, which will ultimately incorporate satellite, airborne and terrestrial gravity data to build the 1-2 cm geoid that the U.S. surveying public is demanding. The program involves both an airborne component, for measuring a "baseline" gravity field, and a relative and absolute terrestrial program, for monitoring time variations of the gravity field. The GRAV-D aerogravity program commenced with a survey based from Anchorage, AK in the summer of 2008, additionally in support of NOAA's Hydropalooza program. Starting in October, the GRAV-D team has undertaken a concerted effort to survey Puerto Rico/US Virgin Islands, and then the Gulf Coast for the US Army Corps of Engineers. Gulf operations were from New Orleans, Lake Charles, and Austin, TX. This survey provides a continuous airborne field measurement at 10 km line spacing from the GA/AL state line to the Mexican border. We will present the results of these data collection efforts and outline the plans for the GRAV- D program during the remainder of 2009.

  9. Effects of contact-based mental illness stigma reduction programs: age, gender, and Asian, Latino, and White American differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eunice C; Collins, Rebecca L; Cerully, Jennifer L; Yu, Jennifer W; Seelam, Rachana

    2017-12-02

    Mental illness stigma disproportionately affects help seeking among youth, men, and ethnic minorities. As part of a comprehensive statewide initiative to reduce mental illness stigma and discrimination in California, a broad set of contact-based educational programs were widely disseminated. This study examined whether the effects of contact-based educational programs varied depending on the age, gender, and race-ethnicity of participants. Participants (N = 4122) attended a contact-based educational program that was delivered as part of the statewide initiative to reduce mental illness stigma and discrimination. Self-administered surveys assessing beliefs, attitudes, and intentions toward mental illnesses and treatment were conducted immediately before and after participation in contact-based educational programs. Participant age, gender, and race-ethnicity significantly moderated pre-post changes in mental illness stigma. Although all groups exhibited significant pre-post changes across most of the stigma domains assessed, young adults, females, and Asian and Latino American participants reported larger improvements compared to older adults, males, and Whites, respectively. Findings suggest that contact-based educational programs can achieve immediate reductions in mental illness stigma across a variety of sociodemographic groups and may particularly benefit young adults and racial-ethnic minorities. Further research is needed to assess whether contact-based educational programs can sustain longer-term changes and aid in the reduction of disparities in mental illness stigma and treatment.

  10. The Adults in the Making Program: Long-Term Protective Stabilizing Effects on Alcohol Use and Substance Use Problems for Rural African American Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H.; Yu, Tianyi; Chen, Yi-fu; Kogan, Steven M.; Smith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This report addresses the long-term efficacy of the Adults in the Making (AIM) prevention program on deterring the escalation of alcohol use and development of substance use problems, particularly among rural African American emerging adults confronting high levels of contextual risk. Method: African American youths (M age, pretest =…

  11. Review and assessment of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene travel awards program, 1991-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duc, James W; Deacetis, Judy

    2011-09-01

    During 1991-2010, 456 persons from 62 countries were provided financial support to attend the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Winners came from 17 African, 16 Asia-Pacific, 14 Latin American and Caribbean, and 13 European and Middle Eastern countries, and from Canada and the United States. Virtually equal numbers of awards were offered to women and men. Winners were selected from U.S. academic centers (30%), foreign universities (26%), international centers, institutes or research units (30%), and approximately 5% from U.S. government agencies. Almost all winners (73 of 76, 96%) had scientific publications subsequent to receiving the travel award. Less than 10% of award winners continued their membership in the Society after their one-year complementary membership. Winners indicated that the travel awards program facilitated international exchange and fostered collaborations between Society members and international scientists.

  12. Department of Energy Review of Laboratory Programs for Women Points-of-Contact Committee: Comparative Report, June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLane, V.; Layne, A.

    1995-06-01

    A survey of the DOE facilities was undertaken by the Points-of-Contact for the DOE Review of Laboratory Programs for Women in order to gather data to be used as a baseline against which to measure future progress. We plan to look at current programs already in place and evaluate them with a view to deciding which programs are most effective, and selecting model programs suitable for implementation at other facilities. The survey focused on four areas: 1) statistical data, 2) laboratory policy, 3) formal and informal programs which affect the quality of life in the work environment, and career development and advancement, and 4) educational programs. Although this report focuses on women, the problems discussed affect all DOE facility employees.

  13. Climate change and local public health in the United States: preparedness, programs and perceptions of local public health department directors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward W Maibach

    Full Text Available While climate change is inherently a global problem, its public health impacts will be experienced most acutely at the local and regional level, with some jurisdictions likely to be more burdened than others. The public health infrastructure in the U.S. is organized largely as an interlocking set of public agencies at the federal, state and local level, with lead responsibility for each city or county often residing at the local level. To understand how directors of local public health departments view and are responding to climate change as a public health issue, we conducted a telephone survey with 133 randomly selected local health department directors, representing a 61% response rate. A majority of respondents perceived climate change to be a problem in their jurisdiction, a problem they viewed as likely to become more common or severe over the next 20 years. Only a small minority of respondents, however, had yet made climate change adaptation or prevention a top priority for their health department. This discrepancy between problem recognition and programmatic responses may be due, in part, to several factors: most respondents felt personnel in their health department--and other key stakeholders in their community--had a lack of knowledge about climate change; relatively few respondents felt their own health department, their state health department, or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had the necessary expertise to help them create an effective mitigation or adaptation plan for their jurisdiction; and most respondents felt that their health department needed additional funding, staff and staff training to respond effectively to climate change. These data make clear that climate change adaptation and prevention are not currently major activities at most health departments, and that most, if not all, local health departments will require assistance in making this transition. We conclude by making the case that, through their

  14. A content analysis of health and physical activity messages marketed to African American children during after-school television programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outley, Corliss Wilson; Taddese, Abdissa

    2006-04-01

    To examine the number of food advertisements African American children are exposed to during children's television programming aired on predominantly African American and general television stations. A content analysis was conducted to identify and analyze the health-related content (HRC) and physical activity-related content (PARC) of food advertisements shown during children's television programming. Three sets of television advertisements from 3 stations (Black Entertainment Television, The WB [Warner Bros], and Disney Channel) served as the sample during a 1-week period in July 2005 (July 11-15), from 3 pm to 9 pm. In total, 1098 advertisements were recorded, with 256 food and beverage commercials used for this study. Results indicate that 36.3% of all commercials were based on fast food restaurants, 31.3% were for drinks, 16.8% were for candy, 13.7% were for cereals, and 2.0% were for snacks (percentages do not total 100 because of rounding). Compared with The WB and Disney Channel, Black Entertainment Television had significantly (P=.001) more food and beverage advertisements. Few HRC or PARC advertisements were shown. Of 256 food and beverage commercials, only 8.2% contained HRC and 9.4% had PARC. Also, the HRC and PARC scenes contained messages that were implied vs explicitly talking about the health or physical benefits of the product. African American children are overexposed to numerous types of food and beverage advertisements. These advertisements do not provide an adequate level of positive HRC and PARC messages. Consequently, the messages that are portrayed may undermine efforts to teach African American children about the importance of healthy living and physical activity.

  15. Mexican American women's perspectives on a culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy guided self-help program for binge eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Munyi; Cachelin, Fary M; Gutierrez, Guadalupe; Wang, Sherry; Phimphasone, Phoutdavone

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) among Latinas is comparable to those of the general population; however, few interventions and treatment trial research have focused on this group. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for binge eating related disorders. CBT-based guided self-help (CBTgsh)-a low-cost minimal intervention-has also been shown effective in improving binge eating related symptom, but the effectiveness of the CBTgsh among ethnic minority women is not well understood. Cultural adaptation of evidence-based treatments can be an important step for promoting treatment accessibility and engagement among underserved groups. This qualitative study was part of a larger investigation that examined the feasibility and efficacy of a culturally adapted CBTgsh program among Mexican American women with binge eating disorders. Posttreatment focus groups were conducted with 12 Mexican American women with BN or BED who participated in the intervention. Data were analyzed with the grounded theory methodology (Corbin & Strauss, 2008). Three themes emerged from the data: (a) eating behavior and body ideals are socially and culturally constructed, (b) multifaceted support system is crucial to Mexican American women's treatment engagement and success, and (c) the culturally adapted CBTgsh program is feasible and relevant to Mexican American women's experience, but it can be strengthened with increased family and peer involvement. The findings provide suggestions for further adaptation and refinement of the CBTgsh, and implications for future research as well as early intervention for disordered eating in organized care settings. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. 78 FR 12032 - U.S. Department of Agriculture Multi-Family Housing Program 2013 Industry Forums-Open...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ..., parental status, religion, sexual orientation, political beliefs, genetic information reprisal, or because... Housing Service (RHS) staff Enhance RHS' awareness of issues that impact the Multi- Family Housing Program...

  17. The Crisis among Contemporary American Adolescents: A Call for the Integration of Research, Policies, and Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Richard M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Points out the growing crisis among American adolescents, with approximately half of adolescents at moderate or greater risk for engaging in unsafe sexual behaviors, teenage pregnancy, and teenage child-bearing; drug and alcohol use and abuse; school underachievement, failure, and dropout; and delinquency and crime. Calls for increased research on…

  18. A Community Health Advisor Program to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk among Rural African-American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, C. E.; Littleton, M. A.; Greene, P. G.; Pulley, L.; Brownstein, J. N.; Sanderson, B. K.; Stalker, V. G.; Matson-Koffman, D.; Struempler, B.; Raczynski, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The Uniontown, Alabama Community Health Project trained and facilitated Community Health Advisors (CHAs) in conducting a theory-based intervention designed to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) among rural African-American women. The multiphased project included formative evaluation and community organization, CHA recruitment and…

  19. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Tracey R.; Hanson, Jessica D.; Griese, Emily R.; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program…

  20. Too Smart to Fail: Perceptions of Asian American Students' Experiences in a Collegiate Honors Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henfield, Malik S.; Woo, Hongryun; Lin, Yi-Chun; Rausch, Meredith A.

    2014-01-01

    There is a considerable history of misunderstandings associated with Asian American in education. Although many educators and scholars have begun to pay more attention to unique issues associated with this population, studies exploring these students' experiences as honors students in collegiate contexts are scant in the educational literature.…

  1. Dissemination of an effective weight management program for Mexican American children in schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rates of child obesity are epidemic in the United States, and Mexican American children are at particular risk. We have found an intensive, multi-component, school-based, weight management intervention to be efficacious at reducing standardized body mass index (zBMI) in overweight children. Our ...

  2. 76 FR 66929 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities for Approval of Deeming Authority for Rural... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for recognition as a... of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF's) request for deeming authority for RHCs. This notice also...

  3. A Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Program for American Indians with Metabolic Syndrome: The Balance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Elisa T.; Jobe, Jared B.; Yeh, Jeunliang; Ali, Tauqeer; Rhoades, Everett R.; Knehans, Allen W.; Willis, Diane J.; Johnson, Melanie R.; Zhang, Ying; Poolaw, Bryce; Rogers, Billy

    2012-01-01

    The Balance Study is a randomized controlled trial designed to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in 200 American Indian (AI) participants with metabolic syndrome who reside in southwestern Oklahoma. Major risk factors targeted include weight, diet, and physical activity. Participants are assigned randomly to one of two groups, a guided or a…

  4. Promoting healthful diets and exercise: efficacy of a 12-week after-school program in urban African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Hermann-J; Gretebeck, Randall J; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Jiménez, Linda

    2005-03-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a unique extracurricular after-school initiative designed to promote healthy diets and exercise in urban African Americans. The Students and Parents Actively Involved in Being Fit after-school program was offered for 12 weeks to students and their parents/guardians at an urban middle school. Specific aims of the intervention were to increase participants' vegetable and fruit intake by using established 5 A Day for Better Health educational resource materials/activities and to affect their health-related fitness through dance, games, and fitness activities. Fifty-six children and 25 parents/guardians completed a standard battery of evaluations before and after the program. Pre-post pairwise t test revealed that both children and their parents/guardians showed an increase in fruit consumption and a reduction in diastolic blood pressure (P potato consumption while parents/guardians showed a decrease in body fat, body mass index, and endurance walk/run time (P <.05). Overall, findings indicate that children tended to gain more diet-related benefits while parents/guardians tended to derive more fitness-related benefits. After-school programs like the Students and Parents Actively Involved in Being Fit initiative can potentially contribute to improved health levels in urban African Americans.

  5. William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. Final Regulations. Federal Register, Department of Education, 34 CFR Part 685

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this regulatory action is to amend the regulations governing the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program (§ 685.200 of title 34 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)). These regulations strengthen and improve administration of the Federal Direct PLUS Loan Program authorized under title IV of the Higher Education…

  6. African Americans & Hispanics among Physics & Astronomy Faculty: Results from the 2012 Survey of Physics & Astronomy Degree-Granting Departments. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivie, Rachel; Anderson, Garrett; White, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The United States is becoming more and more diverse, but the representation of some minority groups in physics and astronomy lags behind. Although 13% of the US population is African American or black, and 17% is Hispanic (US Census), the representation of these two groups in physics and astronomy is much lower. For this reason, African Americans…

  7. Portrayals of Eating and Drinking in Popular American TV Programs: A Comparison of Scripted and Unscripted Shows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moon J; Gispanski, Lauren

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated portrayals of eating and drinking behaviors in popular American TV programs and compared scripted and unscripted (i.e., reality) shows. Through a content analysis of 95 episodes, the prevalence and nature of food/alcohol consumption that accompanied depictions of eating and drinking behaviors in 461 scenes were measured. Various foods were portrayed, but only 9% of foods portrayed were healthy (e.g., low in calories/fat content, such as fruits, vegetables, etc.). Approximately half of eating or drinking scenes either were accompanied by alcohol or contained solely alcoholic beverages. Significant differences between the scripted and unscripted shows were also found.

  8. Dietary Improvements among African American Youth: Results of an Interactive Nutrition Promotion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemond, Tiara N.; Blake, Christine E.; Jenkins, Kelli A.; Buff, Scotty M.; Moore, Justin B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Junior Doctors of Healthq (JDOH) program was developed from a collaboration between a large medical university, school district, and community organization to address obesity-related behaviors in children through education, skill building, and mentoring. Purpose: Evaluate the impact of the JDOH program on self-efficacy for and…

  9. Fostering internationalization: an American-Danish semester-long undergraduate nursing student exchange program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baernholdt, M; Drake, E; Maron, F; Neymark, K

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes the development, implementation and evaluation of a semester-long exchange program between two Bachelor of Science in Nursing programs in the USA and Denmark. Nurses globally need to provide culturally sensitive care for an ethnically diverse population. Competencies on how to do so should start in basic nursing programs. A useful strategy is through immersion into another culture through an exchange program. Little is known about successful strategies for two-way or 360° exchange programs between schools from different countries. Guided by experiential learning theory, we developed an exchange program with the objective of enhancing nursing students' cultural competence through knowledge building, attitudes and behaviour development. Lessons learned and implications for educational institutions and policy are discussed. In internationalization of nursing education, an awareness of underlying cultural values regarding nursing competence and taking appropriate action are important for success. Other areas for a successful exchange program include matching of courses or content across schools, clear objectives and evaluation plans. Finally, flexibility and open communication are key components when setting up a 360° exchange program. © 2013 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  10. 75 FR 31338 - Promoting Postbaccalaureate Opportunities for Hispanic Americans (PPOHA) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... ``Hispanic-serving institution'' for purposes of the PPOHA Program, Congress adopted the definition of that... definition of a ``Hispanic-serving institution'' in section 502 of the HEA also applies to the PPOHA Program... needy students, as defined in section 502(b) of the HEA (section 502(a)(2)(A)(i) of the HEA; 20 U.S.C...

  11. Randomized controlled study of a retiree health promotion program. The Bank of American Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J P; Richardson, N; Beck, R; Kerr, C; Harrington, H; Parcell, C L; Fries, J F

    1992-06-01

    The initial results of a 12-month controlled trial of a health promotion program in 5686 Bank of America retirees, randomized into full program, questionnaire only, and insurance claims only groups, were analyzed to determine whether the health promotion program was effective. Comparisons were between program and questionnaire only groups for self-reported health habit changes, health risk scores, medical care utilization, and days confined to home, and between all groups for insurance claims data. The intervention, or full program, included health habit questionnaires administered every 6 months, individualized time-oriented health risk appraisals, personal recommendation letters, self-management materials, and a health promotion book. Twelve-month changes in health habits, health status, and economic variables favored the full program group in 31 of 32 comparisons and were statistically significant at the .05 level in two-tailed tests in 19 comparisons and at the .01 level in two-tailed tests in 13 comparisons. Over 12 months, overall computed health risk scores decreased by 4.3% in the full program experimental group and increased by 7.2% in the questionnaire only control group. Total direct and indirect costs decreased by 11% in the experimental group and increased by 6.3% in the questionnaire only control group. Analysis of claims data confirmed these trends. A low-cost health promotion program for retirees was effective in changing health behaviors and has potential to decrease health care utilization.

  12. "Embarrassingly White": Faculty Racial Disparities in American Recreation, Park, and Tourism Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowatt, Rasul A.; Johnson, Corey W.; Roberts, Nina S.; Kivel, B. Dana

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment and retention of faculty and students of color is a long-standing challenge in academic programs focusing on leisure studies, parks, recreation, and tourism. However, when confronting the predominantly white composition of educational programs, many evade or, at most, acknowledge the situation as a "deficit." Few offer…

  13. Developing an Organizational Understanding of Faculty Mentoring Programs in Academic Medicine in Major American Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer Zellers, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and contextual factors associated with faculty mentoring programs in academic medicine within major research institutions in the United States, and explores the usefulness of organizational behavior theory in understanding these relationships. To date, many formal faculty mentoring programs are in operation…

  14. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program - 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2000 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and 1964 nationally, are to (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with her/his interests and background, and worked in collabroation with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 2000.

  15. Outcomes of a multi-community hypertension implementation study: the American Heart Association's Check. Change. Control. program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Monique L; Peragallo Urrutia, Rachel; O'Brien, Emily C; Allen LaPointe, Nancy M; Christian, Alexander J; Kaltenbach, Lisa A; Webb, Laura E; Alexander, Angel M; Saha Chaudhuri, Paramita; Crawford, Juliana; Wayte, Patrick; Peterson, Eric D

    2017-05-01

    Single-site, intensive, community-based blood pressure (BP) intervention programs have led to BP improvements. The authors examined the American Heart Association's Check. Change. (CCC) program (4069 patients/18 cities) to determine whether BP interventions can effectively be scaled to multiple communities, using a simplified template and local customization. Effectiveness was evaluated at each site via site percent enrollment goals, participant engagement, and BP change from first to last measurement. High-enrolling sites frequently recruited at senior residential institutions and service organizations held hypertension management classes and utilized established and new community partners. High-engagement sites regularly held hypertension education classes and followed up with participants. Top-performing sites commonly distributed BP cuffs, checked BP at engagement activities, and trained volunteers. CCC demonstrated that simplified community-based hypertension intervention programs may lead to BP improvements, but there was high outcomes variability among programs. Several factors were associated with BP improvement that may guide future program development. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. "No practical capabilities": American biological and chemical warfare programs during the Korean war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Conrad C

    2002-01-01

    Much controversy still surrounds accusations that American forces in the Far East during the Korean War used biological warfare against North Korea and China. An analysis of recently declassified documents reveals that, although the United States attempted to accelerate its development and acquisition of such weapons during that period, its efforts to create a viable biological warfare capability were unsuccessful. Plans to similarly expand chemical warfare stocks and capabilities were also frustrated. Technological difficulties, personnel shortages, bureaucratic battles between the armed services, and policy limitations combined to hold back advances in American chemical and biological warfare. In light of the recent fears of terrorist attacks with such weapons, this analysis highlights the great difficulties involved in developing, acquiring, and delivering such capabilities.

  17. The Military Origins of Federal Social Welfare Programs: Early British and Colonial American Precedents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Captain William Turner, laid her case before the Court : Whereas your poor petitioners husband Voluntarily & freely offered him selfe unto & now Is In...hear pension cases , in essence declaring the pension act of 1792 unconstitutional. This is the first instance in American history of a federal court ...one’s arguments." Further, "historians must not misrepresent evidence or the sources of evidence, must be free of the offense of plagiarism , and must not

  18. A Commentary on: "A History of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 1998-2008".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Antone L

    2015-04-01

    This commentary provides a very brief overview of the book "A History of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 1998-2008" ( http://lowdose.energy.gov ). The book summarizes and evaluates the research progress, publications and impact of the U.S. Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research Program over its first 10 years. The purpose of this book was to summarize the impact of the program's research on the current thinking and low-dose paradigms associated with the radiation biology field and to help stimulate research on the potential adverse and/or protective health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. In addition, this book provides a summary of the data generated in the low dose program and a scientific background for anyone interested in conducting future research on the effects of low-dose or low-dose-rate radiation exposure. This book's exhaustive list of publications coupled with discussions of major observations should provide a significant resource for future research in the low-dose and dose-rate region. However, because of space limitations, only a limited number of critical references are mentioned. Finally, this history book provides a list of major advancements that were accomplished by the program in the field of radiation biology, and these bulleted highlights can be found in last part of chapters 4-10.

  19. U.S. Department of Energy's EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge, Mid-Program Review: Employees Plug In

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-12-01

    This Program Review takes an unprecedented look at the state of workplace charging in the United States -- a report made possible by U.S. Department of Energy leadership and valuable support from our partners as they share their progress in developing robust workplace charging programs. Through the Workplace Charging Challenge, more than 250 participants are accelerating the development the nation's worksite PEV charging infrastructure and are supporting cleaner, more convenient transportation options within their communities. Challenge partners are currently providing access to PEV charging stations at more than 440 worksites across the country and are influencing countless other organizations to do the same.

  20. Assessment of a Culturally-Tailored Sexual Health Education Program for African American Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Zellner Lawrence

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available African American youth are affected disproportionately by sexually transmitted infections (STIs, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, and teenage pregnancy when compared to other racial groups. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the To Help Young People Establish (2 HYPE Abstinence Club, a behavioral intervention designed to promote delayed sexual activity among African American youth ages 12–18 in Atlanta, Georgia. The intervention included 20 h of curriculum and creative arts instruction. Pre- and post-intervention survey data collected from 2008–2010 were analyzed to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. Intervention (n = 651 and comparison (n = 112 groups were compared through analysis of variance and multivariate logistic regression models. There was a statistically significant increase in intervention youth who were thinking about being abstinent (p = 0.0005. Those who had not been engaged in sexual activity were two times more likely to plan abstinence compared to participants that had been previously sexually active previously (odds ratio 2.41; 95% confidence interval 1.62, 3.60. Significant results hold implications for subsequent community-based participatory research and practice that broadens the understanding of the relevance of marriage, as just one among other life success milestones that may hold more importance to African American youth in positioning the value of delayed and responsible sexual activity towards effective STIs, HIV/AIDS, and teen pregnancy risk reduction interventions.

  1. The History of the US Department of Defense Programs for the Testing, Evaluation, and Storage of Tactical Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Projects Agency, US Department of Defense. Bovey RW, Dowler CC, and Diaz -Colon JD (1969): Response of Tropical Vegetation to Herbicides. Weed...Thomas TJ, Brown DP, Harrington J, Stanford T, Taft L, Vigon BW (1978): Land Based Environmental Monitoring at Johnston Island – Disposal of

  2. 78 FR 71591 - Privacy Act of 1974; Computer Matching Program between the U.S. Department of Education (ED) and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ...) (recipient agency) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) (source agency). After the ED and VA Data..., the Computer Matching and Privacy Protection Act of 1988, 54 FR 25818 (June 19, 1989), and OMB... published in the Federal Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF). To use PDF you must have...

  3. Recreation Hard Skills Courses for Credit: A Collaborative Effort between the Academic Department and the Outings Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, David M.; Stuessy, Thomas L.; Poff, Raymond A.

    At Indiana University, the Department of Recreation and Park Administration and Indiana University Outdoor Adventures (IUOA) work together to offer university students for-credit courses in recreation skills. Since 1997, graduate students trained and directed by IUOA have taught 1-credit courses in specific outdoor skills, based on nationally…

  4. 76 FR 56781 - Privacy Act of 1974; Notice of a Computer Matching Program Between the Department of Housing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Social Security Administration (SSA): Matching Tenant Data in... Quality Housing and Work Responsibility Act (QHWRA) of 1998. On March 11, 2009, Section 239 of HUD's 2009... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  5. 78 FR 49444 - Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Council for Native American Farming and Ranching AGENCY: Office of Tribal Relations... Council for Native American Farming and Ranching (CNAFR) a public advisory committee of the Office of... maximizing the number of new farming and ranching opportunities created through the farm loan program through...

  6. Analysis of Florida Department Of Transportation Transit Corridor Program/Projects: Technical Memorandum Number Three - General Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    CUTR interviewed FDOT personnel at both the Central Office and Distict Offices and agency personnel to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the overall Transit Corridor Program, including the results of specific projects, as well as the FDOT proce...

  7. A cluster randomized controlled trial to increase breast cancer screening among African American women: the black cosmetologists promoting health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Georgia Robins; Ko, Celine M; Wu, Phillis; Alisangco, Jennifer; Castañeda, Sheila F; Kelly, Colleen

    2011-08-01

    African American women have disproportionately higher rates of breast cancer mortality than all other ethnic groups, thus highlighting the importance of promoting early detection. African American women (N = 984) from San Diego, California, participated in a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of breast cancer education sessions offered in beauty salons. Cosmetologists received ongoing support, training, and additional culturally aligned educational materials to help them engage their clients in dialogues about the importance of breast cancer early detection. Posters and literature about breast cancer early detection were displayed throughout the salons and cosmetologists used synthetic breast models to show their clients how breast cancer lumps might feel. Participants in the control group received a comparable diabetes education program. Baseline and 6-month follow-up surveys were administered to evaluate changes in women's breast cancer knowledge, attitudes, and screening behaviors. This intervention was well received by the participants and their cosmetologists and did not interfere with or prolong the client's salon visit. Women in the intervention group reported significantly higher rates of mammography compared to women in the control group. Training a single educator proved sufficient to permeate the entire salon with the health message, and salon clients agreed that cosmetologists could become effective health educators. Cosmetologists are in an ideal position to increase African American women's breast cancer knowledge and adherence to breast cancer screening guidelines.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2016 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 6-10, 2016, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil

    2016-10-01

    The fiscal year 2016 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 6-10, 2015, in Washington, D.C.. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2015 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 8-12, 2015, Arlington, Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-10-01

    The fiscal year 2015 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  10. Translating current dietary guidelines into a culturally tailored nutrition education program for Korean American immigrants with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hee-Jung; Han, Hae-Ra; Lee, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jiyun; Kim, Kim B; Nguyen, Tam; Kim, Miyong T

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the process of translating evidence-based dietary guidelines into a tailored nutrition education program for Korean American immigrants (KAI) with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a research process involving researchers and communities to build a collaborative partnership. The study was conducted at a community-based organization. In a total of 79 KAI (intervention, n = 40; control, n = 39) with uncontrolled type 2 DM (A1C ≥ 7.5%), 44.3% were female and the mean age was 56. 5 ± 7.9 years. A culturally tailored nutrition education was developed by identifying community needs and evaluating research evidence. The efficacy and acceptability of the program was assessed. In translating dietary guidelines into a culturally relevant nutrition education, culturally tailored dietary recommendations and education instruments were used. While dietary guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) were used to frame nutrition recommendations, additional content was adopted from the Korean Diabetes Association (KDA) guidelines. Culturally relevant intervention materials, such as Korean food models and an individually tailored serving table, were utilized to solidify nutritional concepts as well as to facilitate meal planning. Evaluation of the education revealed significantly increased DM-specific nutrition knowledge in the intervention group. The participants' satisfaction with the education was 9.7 on a 0 to 10-point scale. The systematic translation approach was useful for producing a culturally tailored nutrition education program for KAI. The program was effective in improving the participants' DM-specific nutrition knowledge and yielded a high level of satisfaction. Future research is warranted to determine the effect of a culturally tailored nutrition education on other clinical outcomes.

  11. Beliefs and perceived norms concerning smoking cessation program recruitment among African American teen smokers: what appeals to youth and what turns them away.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ronald J; Meshack, Angela; Kelder, Steven H; Springer, Andrew; Agurcia, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative approach was used to investigate the beliefs and perceived norms about participation in smoking cessation programs among a sample of African American alternative school students (N = 53), aged 14 to 18 years old, in the United States who were current smokers. The authors found that the majority of participants felt that smoking cessation programs were not effective, caused smoking, or lacked activities. Both boys and girls believed that communication sources that provided direct messages in real situations were the best motivators or incentives for African American youth recruitment into smoking cessation programs. These findings support research that African Americans are more attentive to communications that involve direct personal stimuli. In addition, African Americans place heavy emphasis on source and message style to determine credibility of the intervention strategy.

  12. Multibeam collection for KM0506: Multibeam data collected aboard Kilo Moana from 2005-04-04 to 2005-04-26, departing from Pago Pago, American Samoa and returning to Pago Pago, American Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  13. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. The objectives are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science members; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. The study program consists of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the research topics.

  14. 20 CFR 632.254 - Program startup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program startup. 632.254 Section 632.254 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.254 Program startup...

  15. Cost-effectiveness of the strong African American families-teen program: 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingels, Justin B; Corso, Phaedra S; Kogan, Steve M; Brody, Gene H

    2013-12-01

    Alcohol use poses a major threat to the health and well being of rural African American adolescents by negatively impacting academic performance, health, and safety. However, rigorous economic evaluations of prevention programs targeting this population are scarce. Cost-effectiveness analyses were conducted of SAAF-T relative to an attention-control intervention (ACI), as part of a randomized prevention trial. Outcomes of interest were the number of alcohol use and binge drinking episodes prevented, one year following the intervention. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves (CEACs) were used to determine the cost-effectiveness of SAAF-T compared to the ACI intervention. For the 473 participating youth completing baseline and follow-up assessments, the incremental per participant costs were $168, while the incremental per participant effects were 3.39 episodes of alcohol use prevented and 1.36 episodes of binge drinking prevented. Compared to the ACI intervention, the SAAF-T program cost $50 per reduction in an alcohol use episode and $123 per reduced episode of binge drinking. For the CEACs, at thresholds of $100 and $440, SAAF-T has at least a 90% probability of being cost-effective, relative to the ACI, for reductions in alcohol use and binge drinking episodes, respectively. The SAAF-T intervention provides a potentially cost-effective means for reducing the African American youths' alcohol use and binge drinking episodes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Breast cancer knowledge, attitudes, and screening behaviors among African American women: the Black cosmetologists promoting health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Georgia R; Ko, Celine M; Cohn, Jennifer A; White, Monique; Weldon, Rai-nesha; Wu, Phillis

    2007-04-17

    . The Health Belief Model postulates that access to such information is an essential element in the progression toward engaging in screening behaviors. Data from this study reflect a continuing need for increased breast cancer education for African American women. In light of the considerable mainstream information available related to breast cancer, these data reinforce the need for more breast cancer education programs that are clearly intended to attract the attention of African American women.

  17. Breast cancer knowledge, attitudes, and screening behaviors among African American women: the Black cosmetologists promoting health program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weldon Rai-nesha

    2007-04-01

    demonstrated a lack of basic knowledge about breast cancer. The Health Belief Model postulates that access to such information is an essential element in the progression toward engaging in screening behaviors. Conclusion Data from this study reflect a continuing need for increased breast cancer education for African American women. In light of the considerable mainstream information available related to breast cancer, these data reinforce the need for more breast cancer education programs that are clearly intended to attract the attention of African American women.

  18. Unsatisfactory reporting rates: 2006 practices of participants in the college of american pathologists interlaboratory comparison program in gynecologic cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Ann T; Clayton, Amy C; Zaleski, Sue; Henry, Michael R; Schwartz, Mary R; Eversole, Galen M; Tench, William D; Fatheree, Lisa A; Souers, Rhona J; Wilbur, David C

    2009-12-01

    -Minimum cellular criteria for satisfactory Papanicolaou tests were established with the Bethesda System in 2001, and unsatisfactory rates are used as a quality-reporting measure. -To evaluate practices and unsatisfactory rates from laboratories responding to the 2007 College of American Pathologists supplemental questionnaire survey. -In 2007, a supplemental questionnaire was mailed to 1621 laboratories enrolled in the 2006 College of American Pathologists Interlaboratory Comparison Program in Gynecologic Cytology (PAP Education), requesting data from the 2006 calendar year. Unsatisfactory rates, reasons for unsatisfactory specimens, laboratory size, and specimen preparation type were analyzed. -A total of 42% of the laboratories responded to the survey. Most of those laboratories (637 of 674; 94.5%) used the Bethesda System minimum cellularity criteria. Of those laboratories responding, 79% (527 of 667) used the Bethesda System criteria for atrophic or postirradiation specimens. Unsatisfactory rates have increased since 1996. SurePath preparations were associated with the lowest unsatisfactory rate (50th percentile, 0.30; 95th percentile, 1.3), conventional Papanicolaou tests had the highest 95th percentile rates (50th percentile, 1.0; 95th percentile, 5.90), and ThinPrep specimens had the highest median percentile (50th percentile, 1.1; 95th percentile, 3.4). The most-common reason for unsatisfactory Papanicolaou tests was too few squamous cells. Air-drying artifact was the least-common reason for unsatisfactory reporting for liquid-based preparations. -Use of the Bethesda System criteria for unsatisfactory specimens is widespread. Unsatisfactory rates have increased since 1996; however, the median rates are 1.1% or less for all preparations. Results from the College of American Pathologists PAP Education supplemental questionnaire continue to provide valuable benchmarking data for cytologic quality-improvement programs in laboratories.

  19. Promoting Employee Health Through an American Cancer Society Program, The CEOs Challenge, Washington State, 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jeffrey R; Parrish, Amanda T; Kohn, Marlana; Hammerback, Kristen; McMillan, Becca; Hannon, Peggy A

    2015-12-17

    Evidence-based practices in the workplace can increase levels of healthy eating, cancer screening, physical activity, and tobacco cessation but are underused, even in large workplaces. This report summarizes an evaluation of the first year of The CEOs Challenge, a program developed by the American Cancer Society to promote implementation and maintenance of health-promoting, evidence-based workplace practices by large companies. Use of 17 evidence-based practices by 17 companies in the Washington State Chapter of the American Cancer Society's CEOs Against Cancer network was assessed via survey and scored from 0 to 100. Companies received a written report of their baseline performance, followed by at least quarterly consultations with American Cancer Society staff members trained to assist in implementation of these practices. Follow-up performance was measured at 1 year. At baseline, implementation scores were 54.8 for cancer screening, 46.5 for healthy eating, 59.8 for physical activity, and 68.2 for tobacco cessation. At follow-up, scores increased by 19.6 for cancer screening, 19.4 for healthy eating, 16.0 for physical activity, and 9.4 points for tobacco cessation. The CEOs Challenge is a promising approach to chronic disease prevention via the workplace. It brings together one of the nation's largest health-promoting voluntary agencies with the nation's largest employers to promote evidence-based practices targeted at the most common causes of disease and death. The program increased the adoption of these practices and was well-accepted.

  20. What's in a name? US academic radiology departments: investigation of the frequency of and associated factors in nontraditional department titles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Grant R; Mullins, Mark E; Chen, Zhengjia; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this project was to survey the department titles of US academic radiology programs and to assess the frequency of nontraditional titles. A secondary aim was to evaluate whether there were any similarities among departments that were not traditionally titled Department of Radiology with respect to factors such as department size, affiliation, research emphasis, and geography. Departments were identified on the basis of the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database Access System, the Association of American Medical Colleges list of US medical schools, and the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiology Departments member roster. A total of 212 departments were evaluated, and the title of each department was obtained. Additionally, the size of the faculty, the number of diagnostic radiology residents (if applicable), whether the department offered fellowship positions, the number of nuclear medicine residents (if applicable), geographic region, and National Institutes of Health funding ranking for fiscal year 2009 (if applicable) were obtained for each program. Two hundred twelve programs were evaluated, from which 196 departments were ultimately included in the analysis. Of these, 159 (81%) had the title Department of Radiology. Twenty-two other titles were identified among the remaining 37 departments. Common words included in these titles were imaging, science or sciences, and services. There were no significant differences between the departments titled Department of Radiology and the departments with other names with respect to size, research affiliation, residency and fellowship size, or geography. Although only 19% of the departments analyzed had titles other than Department of Radiology, several trends were noted. With the expanding scope of radiology to include modalities not associated with ionizing radiation, such as ultrasound, MR, and molecular imaging, along with the growing importance of defining radiologists' role in the health