WorldWideScience

Sample records for program curriculum sampler

  1. Paralegal Studies Program. Curriculum Utilization. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Doris D.

    A program developed a paralegal studies program for Delaware County Community College in the Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) metropolitan area. Activities included gathering of information on paralegal studies as it related to curriculum content; advisory group establishment; curriculum development; training/educational material development; and…

  2. 14 CFR 142.39 - Training program curriculum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program curriculum requirements... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES TRAINING CENTERS Aircrew Curriculum and Syllabus Requirements § 142.39 Training program curriculum requirements. Each training program curriculum...

  3. 14 CFR 91.1079 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 91.1079... Operations Program Management § 91.1079 Training program: Curriculum. (a) Each program manager must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum for each type of aircraft for each crewmember...

  4. 14 CFR 121.403 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 121.403...: Curriculum. (a) Each certificate holder must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum... airplane. The curriculum must include ground and flight training required by this subpart. (b) Each...

  5. 14 CFR 135.327 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 135.327... § 135.327 Training program: Curriculum. (a) Each certificate holder must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum for each type of aircraft for each crewmember required for that type...

  6. Linear Programming across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, S. Elizabeth; Kurz, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Linear programming (LP) is taught in different departments across college campuses with engineering and management curricula. Modeling an LP problem is taught in every linear programming class. As faculty teaching in Engineering and Management departments, the depth to which teachers should expect students to master this particular type of…

  7. Improving Quality of Elementary Music Programs through Common Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edele, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Developing a music program based on quality curriculum is the key to success. The purpose of my research was to explore whether teachers used curriculum for quality control in an Elementary music program. Using student questionnaires, teacher interviews, and teacher observations I found that the music curriculum in each school was different. There…

  8. Web-Based Engine for Program Curriculum Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamam, H.; Loucif, S.

    2009-01-01

    Educational institutions pay careful attention to the design of program curricula, which represent a framework to meet institutional goals and missions. Of course, the success of any institution depends highly on the quality of its program curriculum. The development of such a curriculum and, more importantly, the evaluation of its quality are…

  9. An alternative method for monitoring carbonyls, and the development of a 24-port fully automated carbonyl sampler for PAMS program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, S.S.; Ugarova, L. [Atmospheric Analysis and Consulting, Ventura, CA (United States); Fernandes, C.; Guyton, J.; Lee, C.P. [Arizona Dept. of Environmental Quality, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors have investigated the possibility of collecting different aldehydes and ketones on different sorbents such as silica gel, molecular sieve and charcoal followed by solvent extraction, DNPH derivatization and HPLC/UV analysis. Carbonyl collection efficiencies for these sorbents were calculated relative to a DNPH coated C{sub 18} sep-pak cartridge. From a limited number of laboratory experiments, at various concentrations, it appears that silica gel tubes can be used for sampling aldehydes (collection efficiencies {approximately} 1), whereas charcoal tubes are suitable for collecting ketones. Molecular sieve was found to be unsuitable for collecting most of the carbonyl studied. The authors also report the development of a fully automated 24-port carbonyl sampler specially designed for EPA`s PAMS program.

  10. A Differentiated Program: Significant Curriculum Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Juan A.

    1999-01-01

    This article describes a model for curricular adaptations for gifted students. A distinction is made between non-significant curriculum adaptations that can be easily made by the regular teacher and significant curriculum adaptations that involve deep changes in aims, content, and evaluation criteria. (Contains references.) (DB)

  11. Bilingual Vocational Training Program for Chinese Chefs. Curriculum Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    China Inst. in America, New York, NY.

    This manual was prepared by the staff of the China Institute's Bilingual Vocational Training Program, which has been in operation since 1975. The document includes a description of the training program for Chinese chefs and the curriculum guide used in the program. Following the introductory section, which describes the program objectives,…

  12. The curriculum success of business administration education programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, Monique; Van der Klink, Marcel; Boshuizen, Els

    2012-01-01

    Bijker, M. M., Van der Klink, M. R., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2011, 8 September). The curriculum success of business administration education programs. Presentation for the visit of KU Leuven, Open Universiteit, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  13. A BASIC Programming Curriculum for Enhancing Problem-Solving Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbaugh, Richard C.

    This curriculum is proposed to enhance problem-solving ability through learning to program in BASIC. Current research shows development of problem-solving skills from learning to program in BASIC. Successful treatments have been based on contemporary problem-solving theory, top-down, modular programing, and rigorous length and intensity. The…

  14. THE TRAVELLING SALESMAN PROBLEM IN THE ENGINEERING EDUCATION PROGRAMMING CURRICULUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeny Gayev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To make students familiar with the famous Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP and suggest the latter to become a common exercise in engineering programming curriculum provided the students master computer science in the easy programming environment MATLAB. Methods: easy programming in MATLAB makes true such modern educational approach as “discovery based” methodology. Results: a MATLAB TSP-program oriented to Ukrainian map is suggested that allows to pictorially demonstrate the process of optimal route search with an option to decelerate or accelerate the demonstration. The program is guessed to be useful both for learning the TSP as one of fundamental logistics problems and as an intriguing programming curriculum excersize. Several sub-programs according to key stone Computer Science Curriculum have also been suggested. This lies in line with recent “discovery based” learning methodology. Discussion: we explain how to create this program for visual discrete optimization, suggest required subprograms belonging to key stone programming algorithms including rather modern graphical user interface (GUI, how to use this MATLAB TSP-program for demonstration the drastical grows of solution time required. Conclusions: easy programming being realized in MATLAB makes dificult curriculum problems attractive to students; it focuses them to main problem’ features, laws and algorithms implementing the “discovery based” methodology in such a way.

  15. Curriculum Program for the Apache Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteriver Public Schools, AZ.

    These curriculum materials from the Whiteriver (Arizona) Elementary School consist of--(1) an English-Apache word list of some of the most commonly used words in Apache, 29p.; (2) a list of enclitics with approximate or suggested meanings and illustrations of usage, 5 p.; (3) an illustrated chart of Apache vowels and consonants, various written…

  16. Machine Operator Training Program and Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, David; And Others

    This curriculum contains materials for use in duplicating the 11-week course for machine operators that was implemented at New Hampshire Vocational-Technical College in Nashua, New Hampshire. Addressed in the course, which is designed to prepare entry-level employees, are the following topics: basic math, blueprint reading, layout tools and…

  17. Assistant Chef Program. Curriculum Outline, Orientation, Safety and Sanitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Augustine Coll., Chicago, IL.

    Instructor materials are provided for an assistant chef program intended for English as a second language (ESL) or bilingual (Spanish speaking) students. A curriculum outline includes a listing of the tasks to be mastered in the program. Other contents include key terms from the production and service area of food service in the areas of…

  18. Cybersecurity Curriculum Development: Introducing Specialties in a Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicak, Ali; Liu, Michelle; Murphy, Diane

    2015-01-01

    The cybersecurity curriculum has grown dramatically over the past decade: once it was just a couple of courses in a computer science graduate program. Today cybersecurity is introduced at the high school level, incorporated into undergraduate computer science and information systems programs, and has resulted in a variety of cybersecurity-specific…

  19. How Programming Fits with Technology Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoffrey A.; Rich, Peter; Leatham, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    Programming is a fundamental component of modern society. Programming and its applications influence much of how people work and interact. Because of people's reliance on programming in one or many of its applications, there is a need to teach students to be programming literate. Because the purpose of the International Technology and Engineering…

  20. Perceptual Skills Curriculum: Auditory-motor Skills, Program II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Jerome

    This curriculum is designed primarily for use in individualized classrooms where the teacher is working with an assistant, but it has also been proven effective in traditional classrooms and in remedial situations. Program II focuses on the basic abilities used in analyzing and organizing acoustical patterns, with special emphasis on verbal…

  1. Perceptual Skills Curriculum: General-motor Skills, Program III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Jerome

    This curriculum is designed primarily for use in individualized classrooms where the teacher is working with an assistant, but it has also been proven effective in traditional classrooms and in remedial situations. Program 3 focuses on a variety of gross-and fine-motor functions--basic abilities that affect the way the child physically interacts…

  2. Perceptual Skills Curriculum: Visual-motor Skills, Program 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Jerome

    This curriculum is designed primarily for use in individualized classrooms where the teacher is working with an assistant, but it has also been proven effective in traditional classrooms and in remedial situations. Program 1 focuses on the basic abilities children use to analyze and organize graphic and other spatial patterns--skills directly…

  3. The Checkerboard Cardiovascular Curriculum: A Culturally Oriented Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mary B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Pilot-testing of a cardiovascular health education curriculum with 218 American Indian and Hispanic fifth graders in rural New Mexico noted significant increases in knowledge about the cardiovascular system, exercise, nutrition, obesity, tobacco use, and habit change, suggesting that the culturally oriented program may help promote a healthy…

  4. Incorporating a Diabetes Certificate Program in a Pharmacy Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Sterrett, James; Croom, Meg; Phillips, Cynthia M.; Shrader, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine student competency and confidence in the provision of diabetes care and satisfaction with incorporation of the American Pharmacist Association/American Association of Diabetes Educators (APhA/AADE) diabetes certificate program into the required doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum.

  5. Curriculum and Practice of an Innovative Teacher Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Akesha; Shack, Kyle; Mehta, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    The MSUrbanSTEM fellowship program provides exemplary urban STEM teachers the opportunity to engage in transformative instructional and leadership experiences that support the advancement of their teaching practice. In this chapter, we provide a foundational examination of the development and implementation of a curriculum for this innovative…

  6. Mathematics Program for Grade 1, De Soto Parish Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Helen; And Others

    A program of mathematics instruction for grade one is provided in this curriculum guide. The teaching goal of each lesson is stated in the Purpose section. Visual aids and manipulative materials useful in developing each lesson are suggested and additional teaching aids are listed. Suggestions for teaching the lessons are separated into three…

  7. The Plato Program: An Innovative Information Skills Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, John

    2010-01-01

    The Plato Program is an innovative and dynamic subject that was introduced to explore "learning how to learn" in Year 7. In response to observations by staff that students lacked critical thinking and research skills, it has metamorphosed into a vehicle for the delivery of information literacy within the curriculum, with a particular…

  8. Integrating medical simulation programs into the Turkish undergraduate medical curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitapçıoğlu D

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilek Kitapçıoğlu, Mehmet Emin Aksoy Medical Education Department, Faculty of Medicine, Acibadem University, CASE - Center of Advanced Simulation and Education, Istanbul, TurkeyThe letter by Ah-kee and Khan1 arguing that a mandatory year for studying leadership management within an already overcrowded undergraduate curriculum is not realistic and feasible drew our attention. We strongly support this idea because of the difficulties we met during integration of simulation programs into the undergraduate curriculum in Turkey.View the original paper by Ah-kee and Khan.

  9. Designing anatomy program in modern medical curriculum: matter of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grković, Ivica; Marinović Guić, Maja; Kosta, Vana; Poljicanin, Ana; Carić, Ana; Vilović, Katarina

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the structure of the anatomy program in the first year medical curriculum of University of Split School of Medicine by comparing it with the recommendations by the Educational Affairs Committee of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and the Terminologia Anatomica (TA); we also quantitatively evaluated the organization of teaching material in contemporary topographical anatomy textbooks and matched them with the AACA recommendations, TA, and the curriculum of the anatomy course taught at Medical School in Split, Croatia. TA, official recommendations of the AACA, 6 contemporary anatomy textbooks, and the structure of the anatomy course were analyzed for the proportion of the terms or text devoted to standard topographical regions of the body. The findings were correlated using Spearman rho test. The curriculum outline correlated both with the AACA recommendations (Spearman rho=0.83, P=0.015) and TA (Spearman rho=0.73, P=0.046). Textbooks contained 8 distinct sections, 7 allocated to topographic anatomy regions and 1 to general anatomy concepts and principles. The structure of all textbooks correlated significantly with the course curriculum. However, 4 out of 6 textbooks did not correlate with TA and only a single textbook showed significant correlation with the AACA recommendations. Anatomy textbooks vary in the amount of text dedicated to different parts of topographical anatomy and are not quite concordant with curriculum recommendations and standard anatomical terminology. Planning the structure of an anatomy course should not be based on a single book or recommendation but on evidence.

  10. Barber/Cosmetologist Curriculum. Program Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraine Park Technical Coll., Fond du Lac, WI.

    This guide provides the instructor with materials for a barber/cosmetologist program. Seventeen study guides are provided: anatomy and physiology; applied chemistry; chemical straightening/relaxing; chemical waving; electricity and light therapy; facial services; hair coloring and lightening (bleach); hair cutting; hair, skin, and nail disorders;…

  11. A Competence-Based Curriculum Design for Entrepreneurship Study Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska J.R. Siagian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is affected by global crisis. Increasing the number of entrepreneurs is one of many solutions to increase the economic growth in Indonesia. The number of entrepreneurs in Indonesia to leverage the economic growth is still limited. Entrepreneurs can be prepared through an Entrepreneurship Study Program. Entrepreneurship Study Program attempts to create qualified entrepreneurs who have relevant competences. In order to create a qualified entrepreneurs, the Entrepreneurial Studies Program requires a competency-based curriculum that will support the educational process and provide all the necessary to become future entrepreneurs who can survive through a global challenge. This research aims to design a competence-based curriculum for entrepreneurial study and uses Quality Function Deployment (QFD as the major tool to design the competence-based curriculum. From the QFD process, this research finds core and elective courses for the Entrepreneurship Study Program. The result shows the competences covered by the courses and sequence, credits, and teaching methods for each course. The competences prepared the potential entrepreneurs can be achieved through specific courses which can be acquired within 8 semesters.

  12. Curriculum Mapping: A Method to Assess and Refine Undergraduate Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner-Melito, Helen S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been increasing interest in program- and university-level assessment and aligning learning outcomes to program content. Curriculum mapping is a tool that creates a visual map of all courses in the curriculum and how they relate to curriculum learning outcomes. Assessment tools/activities are often included…

  13. Designing Anatomy Program in Modern Medical Curriculum: Matter of Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grković, Ivica; Marinović Guić, Maja; Košta, Vana; Poljičanin, Ana; Čarić, Ana; Vilović, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the structure of the anatomy program in the first year medical curriculum of University of Split School of Medicine by comparing it with the recommendations by the Educational Affairs Committee of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and the Terminologia Anatomica (TA); we also quantitatively evaluated the organization of teaching material in contemporary topographical anatomy textbooks and matched them with the AACA recommendations, TA, and the curriculum of the anatomy course taught at Medical School in Split, Croatia. Methods TA, official recommendations of the AACA, 6 contemporary anatomy textbooks, and the structure of the anatomy course were analyzed for the proportion of the terms or text devoted to standard topographical regions of the body. The findings were correlated using Spearman ρ test. Results The curriculum outline correlated both with the AACA recommendations (Spearman ρ = 0.83, P = 0.015) and TA (Spearman ρ = 0.73, P = 0.046). Textbooks contained 8 distinct sections, 7 allocated to topographic anatomy regions and 1 to general anatomy concepts and principles. The structure of all textbooks correlated significantly with the course curriculum. However, 4 out of 6 textbooks did not correlate with TA and only a single textbook showed significant correlation with the AACA recommendations. Conclusion Anatomy textbooks vary in the amount of text dedicated to different parts of topographical anatomy and are not quite concordant with curriculum recommendations and standard anatomical terminology. Planning the structure of an anatomy course should not be based on a single book or recommendation but on evidence. PMID:19260144

  14. Variability in Integrated Cardiothoracic Training Program Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Elizabeth H; Walters, Dustin M; Eilers, Amanda L; Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Goldstone, Andrew B; Gillaspie, Erin A; Fiedler, Amy; LaPar, Damien J

    2017-06-01

    Development of curricula that appropriately progress a resident from medical school graduate to fully trained cardiothoracic surgeon is a key challenge for integrated cardiothoracic training programs. This study examined variability and perceived challenges in integrated curricula. Responses to the 2016 TSDA/TSRA survey that accompanies the annual in-training exam taken by current cardiothoracic surgery residents were analyzed. Standard statistical methods were utilized to examine trends in participant responses. General surgery experience decreased with post-graduate year, whereas cardiac operative experience increased. Rotations in a wide variety of adjunct fields were common. The majority (87%) of respondents reported had dedicated cardiothoracic intensive care unit (ICU) rotations, and surgical ICU and cardiac care unit rotations were less common (68% and 42%, respectively). The most common surgical subspecialty rotations were vascular (94%) and acute care surgery (88%), with a wide range of clinical exposure (ie, 3-44 weeks for vascular). Importantly, 52% felt competition with general surgery residents for experience and 22.5% of general surgery rotations were at hospitals without general surgery residents. Perceived challenges included optimization of rotations (78%), faculty allowing residents to perform case components (60%), faculty teaching in the operating room (29%), and improving surgical experience on general surgery rotations (19%). Significant variation exists in integrated cardiothoracic surgery curricula. Optimization of rotations, access to surgical experience, and integration with general surgery appear to be the most significant perceived challenges. These data suggest that optimization of early clinical and surgical experience within institutions could improve trainee preparedness for senior cardiothoracic surgery training. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 77 FR 41191 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Effectiveness of the NIH Curriculum Supplements Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... NIH Curriculum Supplements Programs SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirements of section 3506(c)(2... review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: The Effectiveness of the NIH Curriculum Supplements... will attempt to assess customer demographics and their satisfaction with the NIH curriculum supplements...

  16. Marketing and Retailing. A Curriculum Guide for a Two-Year Postsecondary Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, R. Jean; Proffitt, Sally

    This manual was developed to provide a comprehensive curriculum guideline for postsecondary marketing and retailing programs. It contains competence-based materials and integrates the Interstate Distributive Education Curriculum Consortium (IDECC) Learning Activity Packages into the curriculum. The first of seven chapters in this manual presents…

  17. Curriculum in Psychiatry and Neurology for Pharmacy Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopheide, Julie A; Bostwick, Jolene R; Goldstone, Lisa W; Thomas, Kelan; Nemire, Ruth; Gable, Kelly N; Cates, Marshall; Caballero, Joshua; Smith, Tawny; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn

    2017-09-01

    Objective. To describe pharmacy curricula in psychiatry and neurology and to report on neuropsychiatric pharmacy specialists' views on optimal curriculum. Methods. Design and administer one electronic survey to accredited pharmacy programs asking them to report information on curricula in psychiatry and neurology for the 2014-2015 academic year. Design and administer a separate electronic survey to board certified pharmacists with an academic affiliation who are members of the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists (CPNP) asking about their teaching activities and their opinion on optimal curricula. Results. Fifty-six percent of pharmacy programs and 65% of CPNP members responded to the surveys. The program survey revealed greater than 80% of topics were taught by full-time faculty. Didactic lecturing, team-based learning, and case studies were the most common teaching methods. Programs dedicated the most didactics (3 to 5+ hours) to epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, substance use disorders, and pain. Autism, traumatic brain injury, personality, and eating disorders were either not taught or given ≤ 1 hour of didactics in most programs. Inpatient psychiatry had the most APPE placements with a mean of 19.6, range 0-83. APPE electives in psychiatry outnumbered those in neurology 5 to 1. CPNP member survey results showed 2 out of 3 members agreed that curriculum could be improved with additional APPEs in psychiatry and neurology. Conclusion. Didactic hour distribution in psychiatry and neurology could be improved to better align with board certification in psychiatric pharmacy (BCPP) recommendations and disorder prevalence and complexity. Specialists recommend an experiential component in neurology and psychiatry to combat stigma and improve pharmacist knowledge and skills.

  18. Is there a Core Curriculum across Higher Education Doctoral Programs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney Freeman Jr.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently the study of higher education has been referred to as a multidisciplinary field. Consensus is continuing to evolve regarding both what is considered the appropriate coursework and the foundational knowledgebase of this field. The study of higher education is maturing and has the potential to transition from being seen as a field to being respected as an academic discipline. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the status of the core curriculum in higher education doctoral programs from the perspective of program directors with programs that required the completion of standardized coursework prior to beginning a dissertation. We used online survey analytic techniques to query program directors about their EdD and PhD programs in higher education, credit hours, and curricular content. Our study confirms previous work finding that there is common agreement in the subject matter areas of organization, leadership, administration, and history. What our work adds is that there is a growing consensus among higher education doctoral programs about the position of higher education law and finance in the curricular core. In addition, we find there is a growing interest in public policy and community colleges over time, with a majority of EdD programs including instruction in these areas. Nevertheless, majoritarian agreement does not meet at a level wherein consensus can be inferred, especially within PhD programs where requirements are more varied across programs. In addition, while there is an increasing trend in the inclusion of multiculturalism in higher education doctoral programming, multiculturalism is not currently part of higher education’s core. We conclude with research and practice implications for doctoral programs in higher education as a field of study.

  19. Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Program Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The National Science Foundation has awarded over 10 million in awards to four coalitions in the first round of full awards in the Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum program. Overall, more than 50 institutions, ranging from large universities to four-year and community colleges, are formally involved in these projects. Each of the projects will involve five years of curricular development and evaluation and dissemination of the results by the participating institutions, as described in the abstracts below. We encourage faculty who are interested in becoming involved in any of these projects to contact the appropriate coalition. In addition, we expect to begin offering an emphasis in 1997 under the Course and Curriculum Development program in which faculty can request funds to assist them in adapting and adopting at their own institutions curricular innovations that have been developed by these coalitions. Another round of proposals for full awards was accepted in June of 1995, and we expect to make one more award in the program during FY1996. We do not expect to accept proposals for either planning or full grants in this program in June of 1996. However, the regular Course and Curriculum Development program will continue to accept and fund proposals requesting support for smaller-scale changes in the chemistry curriculum. ChemLinks Coalition: Making Chemical Connections Brock Spencer Beloit College, Beloit, WI 53511 DUE 9455918: FY1995, 705,000; FY 1996, 655,000; FY1997, 655,000; FY1998, 350,00; FY1999, 350,000 The ChemLinks Coalition is undertaking a five-year project to change the way students learn chemistry, increase scientific literacy for all students taking chemistry, and promote the process of educational reform. In collaboration with the ModularChem Consortium, faculty are developing, testing, and disseminating modular course materials that use active and collaborative approaches to learning. These materials, focused on the first two

  20. Systematic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Progam Award and Course and Curriculum Development Program Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Eight awards in chemistry curriculum development for FY1996 have been announced. One award, to a consortium centered at the University of California-Los Angeles, represents the fifth award in the Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum program. Although no proposals will be accepted in this program for either planning or full grants for FY1997, it is anticipated that proposals will be accepted in June of 1997 for projects that would adapt and adopt materials developed by the five funded consortia: Molecular Science centered at the University of California-Los Angeles; ChemLinks centered at Beloit College; MolecularChem Consortium centered at the University of California-Berkeley; Workshop Chemistry centered at CUNY City College; and New Traditions centered at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Seven awards have been made in the Course and Curriculum Development program. This ongoing program continues to accept proposals in chemistry as usual. Systemic Changes in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum Program Award. Molecular Science. Orville L. Chapman University of California-Los Angeles DUE 9555605 FY96 725,000 FY97 575,000, FY98 575,000 FY99 275,000, FY00 275,000 The UCLA-CSUF-Community College Alliance (24 area community colleges that have worked together for more than 15 years) proposes a sweeping restructuring of the lower division chemistry curriculum and the auxiliary learning and assessment processes. In forming our new curriculum, we reject the positivist approach to science education in favor of a constructivist approach that emphasizes problem solving and exploratory learning. We make this change in order to focus on the developing key skills, traits, and abilities of our students. Our new curriculum, the Molecular Science Curriculum, cuts across departments and disciplines to embrace all activities that involve the study of atoms and molecules. In particular, environmental science, materials science, and molecular life science have

  1. A Curriculum Development Simulation in a Graduate Program

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Gail D.; Hagemeier, Nicholas E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To implement and evaluate a curriculum development seminar in which graduate students experienced circumstances that occur when faculty members develop and attempt to secure colleague approval for a curriculum.

  2. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Welding and Cutting Programs (Program CIP: 48.0508--Welder/Welding Technologist). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the welding and cutting programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and…

  3. Effecting Change in an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum: Librarians' Role in a Pediatric Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeblisky, Kathy; Birr, Rebecca A; Sjursen Guerrero, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Librarians for the joint Phoenix Children's Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency Program were asked to assist on the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Subcommittee for the program. Faculty was open to recommendations for revising and improving the curriculum and desired librarian assistance in completing the task. The annual program review and conference evaluations revealed a gap between the objectives of the EBM curriculum and the residents' perceived abilities to integrate knowledge into meaningful literature searches. This column demonstrates how librarians can collaborate with their residency programs to revise and improve processes to effect change in their program's EBM curriculum.

  4. DEVELOPING CURRICULUM OF BACHELOR IN ELT PROGRAM BASED ON THE INDONESIAN NATIONAL QUALIFICATION FRAMEWORK (KKNI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirudin Latif

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study is intended to develop curriculum of bachelor in ELT Program based on the Indonesian National Qualification Framework (KKNI. The procedure of the curriculum development is adapted from a guidance book of the curriculum development for higher education published by RISTEKDIKTI. The subjects of the study are the lecturers and students of English Department Muhammadiyah University of Metro, English teachers, headmaster, English course owners, heads of private and state institution, and heads of regency and city education office. The result of the study is the curriculum documents such as graduate profiles, learning outcomes, study materials, the structure of curriculum, the semesterly course distribution, course description, syllabus, and lesson plan. The curriculum has been being implemented for two semesters. The students give positive response on the implementation of the curriculum.

  5. Restructuring High School Science Curriculum: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Cathy Jean

    One rural Midwestern high school discovered a discrepancy among school, state, and national science skill attainment, verified by ACT scores. If students do not acquire vital science skills, they may not perform proficiently on science tests, thus impacting future college options. Inquiry based instruction and constructivism provided the basis for the theoretical framework. This study questioned associations between ACT scores, inquiry science technique usage, and ACT standard usage (Phase 1), and teachers' views on science instruction (Phase 2). This sequential explanatory mixed methods program evaluation included 469 ACT scores, surveys sent to 9 science teachers, and 8 interviews. Phase 1 used the inquiry science implementation scale survey and an ACT college readiness standards workbook to determine proportional associations between datasets. Descriptive statistics, one-sample t tests, and binomial tests were used to analyze Phase 1 data. Phase 2 interviews augmented Phase 1 data and were disassembled, reassembled, and interpreted for parallel viewpoints. Phase 1 data indicated that teachers use a slightly above average amount of inquiry and science ACT standards in the classroom; however, most science students did not test above the curriculum and there were inconsistencies in standards covered. Phase 2 data revealed teachers need time to collaborate and become skilled in inquiry methods to rectify the inconsistencies. The project was an evaluation report. This study will foster positive social change by giving the district a plan: adapt the science curriculum by integrating more ACT and inquiry standards and participate in more professional development that applies inquiry as a tool to increase science skill proficiency, thus generating locally competitive students for college and the workforce.

  6. Using Curriculum Mapping to Engage Faculty Members in the Analysis of a Pharmacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercaigne, Lavern; Davies, Neal M.; Davis, Christine; Renaud, Robert; Kristjanson, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To develop a curriculum mapping process that supports continuous analysis and evidence-based decisions in a pharmacy program. Design. A curriculum map based on the national educational outcomes for pharmacy programs was created using conceptual frameworks grounded in cognitive learning and skill acquisition. Assessment. The curriculum map was used to align the intended curriculum with the national educational outcomes and licensing examination blueprint. The leveling and sequencing of content showed longitudinal progression of student learning and performance. There was good concordance between the intended and learned curricula as validated by survey responses from employers and graduating students. Conclusion. The curriculum mapping process was efficient and effective in providing an evidence-based approach to the continuous quality improvement of a pharmacy program. PMID:25258444

  7. Integrating Clinical Experiences in a TESOL Teacher Education Program: Curriculum Mapping as Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baecher, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Across all certification areas, teacher education is being challenged to better integrate clinical experiences with coursework. This article describes the process of curriculum mapping and its impact on the organization of clinical experiences in a master's TESOL program over a 1-year redesign process. Although curriculum mapping has been employed…

  8. Agricultural Resources Materials for Agricultural Education Programs. Core Agricultural Education Curriculum, Central Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Office of Agricultural Communications and Education.

    This curriculum guide contains four units with relevant problem areas and is intended as a source unit for agricultural education. These problem areas have been selected as suggested areas of study to be included in a core curriculum for secondary students enrolled in an agricultural education program. Each problem area includes some or all of the…

  9. An improved bedload sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack Lewis

    1991-01-01

    Abstract - Improvements upon the Birkbeck bedload sampler (Reid et al., 1980) were implemented in the North Fork of Caspar Creek, a gravel-bedded stream draining 383 ha in northern coastal California. Bedload sediment falls through a slotted plate covering a .125-m3 steel box set within a formed concrete pit in the streambed. In the original Birkbeck design, a water-...

  10. Coalescent genealogy samplers: windows into population history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhner, Mary K

    2009-02-01

    Coalescent genealogy samplers attempt to estimate past qualities of a population, such as its size, growth rate, patterns of gene flow or time of divergence from another population, based on samples of molecular data. Genealogy samplers are increasingly popular because of their potential to disentangle complex population histories. In the last decade they have been widely applied to systems ranging from humans to viruses. Findings include detection of unexpected reproductive inequality in fish, new estimates of historical whale abundance, exoneration of humans for the prehistoric decline of bison and inference of a selective sweep on the human Y chromosome. This review summarizes available genealogy-sampler software, including data requirements and limitations on the use of each program.

  11. Position Paper: General Practice Residency and Advanced Education in General Dentistry Programs: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Harvey A.

    1983-01-01

    A comparison of curricula for the two kinds of postdoctoral dental education programs examines clinical curriculum, program design, hospital-based and non-hospital-based programs, patient population, needs for such specialization, program length, and suggested changes and additions. (MSE)

  12. Perspectives of Residents of Mashhad School of Dentistry about the Curriculum of Residency Program

    OpenAIRE

    Javad Sarabadani; Maryam Amirchaghmaghi; Yadolah Zarezadeh; Eshagh Yara; Hosein Souratgar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study was carried out to analyze the viewpoint of the residents of school of dentistry about the curriculum presented in the residency program to students of Mashhad School of Dentistry. Methods: To evaluate the perspectives of residents of dental school about the curriculum and regulations of residency program, a questionnaire was designed whose validity and reliability were confirmed by the authorities of School of Dentistry and test-retest reliability, respectively. ...

  13. Curriculum design and German student exchange for Sino-German Bachelor program majored in optoelectronics engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jihong; Fuhrmann, Thomas; Xu, Boqing; Schreiner, Rupert; Jia, Hongzhi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Ning; Seebauer, Gudrun; Zhu, Jiyan

    2017-08-01

    Different higher education backgrounds in China and Germany led to challenges in the curriculum design at the beginning of our cooperative bachelor program in Optoelectronics Engineering. We see challenges in different subject requirements from both sides and in the German language requirements for Chinese students. The curriculum was optimized according to the ASIIN criteria, which makes it acceptable and understandable by both countries. German students are integrated into the Chinese class and get the same lectures like their Chinese colleagues. Intercultural and curriculum challenges are successfully solved. The results are summarized to provide an example for other similar international programs.

  14. BIM and Sustainability Education: Incorporating Instructional Needs into Curriculum Planning in CEM Programs Accredited by ACCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxiao Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Higher education ought to support the identification of training needs for industrial building information modelling (BIM curriculum development and sustainability education in the fields of civil engineering and management (CEM. This paper proposes a framework based on a four-phase step-by-step quality function deployment (QFD application for CEM curriculum planning and quality management. The framework attempts to respond to requests collected from 17 professionals and professors in order to integrate BIM into the higher education curriculum in China with a specific focus on construction management programs accredited by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE. The entropy method and a K1–K6 scale adapted from Bloom’s revised cognitive process were employed to evaluate the CEM curriculum in QFD. The proposed framework was successfully applied to CEM curriculum planning, which included two curriculums of the four main knowledge areas provided by the Chinese CEM guidelines: construction cost and flow construction. Two curriculum areas showed that content should focus on knowledge such as (a Program evaluation and review technique(PERT planning; (b construction optimization in flow construction; (c principles of bill of quantities and (d construction consumption in construction costs. As for teaching quality management in China, the higher education curriculum should focus on three aspects to promote curriculum integration: (a pedagogical design; (b teaching resource and material and (c curriculum assessment. This research sheds light on the pedagogical shift to a similar context that has established guidelines accredited by the ACCE, with respect to reviewing curriculum planning from a knowledge system perspective in order to meet industrial demands at the operational level.

  15. Information to Include in Curriculum Vitae | Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applicants are encouraged to use their current curriculum vitae and to add any necessary information. Please include your name and a page number on each page of the curriculum vitae. Some of the information requested below will not be applicable to all individuals. Please do not print or type your information on this page. Personal Information Name (First middle last) Gender (optional) Race (optional) Date of birth Place of birth (city,

  16. Designing a tool for curriculum leadership development in postgraduate programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Avizhgan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leadership in the area of curriculum development is increasingly important as we look for ways to improve our programmes and practices. In curriculum studies, leadership has received little attention. Considering the lack of an evaluation tool with objective criteria in postgraduate curriculum leadership process, this study aimed to design a specific tool and determine the validity and reliability of the tool. Method: This study is a methodological research.  At first, domains and items of the tool were determined through expert interviews and literature review. Then, using Delphi technique, 54 important criteria were developed. A panel of experts was used to confirm content and face validity. Reliability was determined by a descriptive study in which 30 faculties from two of Isfahan universities and was estimated by internal consistency. The data were analyzed by SPSS software, using Pearson Correlation Coefficient and reliability analysis. Results: At first, considering the definition of curriculum leadership determined the domains and items of the tool and they were developed primary tool. Expert’s faculties’ views were used in deferent stages of development and psychometry. The tool internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha coefficient times was 96.5. This was determined for each domain separately. Conclution: Applying this instrument can improve the effectiveness of curriculum leadership. Identifying the characteristics of successful and effective leaders, and utilizing this knowledge in developing and implementing curriculum might help us to have better respond to the changing needs of our students, teachers and schools of tomorrow.

  17. Summary of Curriculum Units: Health and Biomedical Science Program of Study Integrated Curriculum Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Successful Linked Learning pathways depend on curricula and instruction that challenge students to reach high academic standards through relevant and engaging content. These pathways offer an "integrated curriculum" that connects challenging, college-preparatory material to career-based technical concepts and applications. Teachers in…

  18. Design and Curriculum Considerations for a Computer Graphics Program in the Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Ruedy W.

    This history and state-of-the-art review of computer graphics describes computer graphics programs and proposed programs at Sheridan College (Canada), the Rhode Island School of Design, the University of Oregon, Northern Illinois University, and Ohio State University. These programs are discussed in terms of their philosophy, curriculum, student…

  19. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early…

  20. Career Preparation Program Curriculum Guide for: Hospitality/Tourism Industry (Food Services).

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria. Curriculum Development Branch.

    This curriculum outline provides secondary and postsecondary instructors with detailed information on student learning outcomes for completion of the food services program requirements in the hospitality/tourism industry. A program overview discusses the aims of education; secondary school philosophy; and career preparation programs and their…

  1. Import Auto Technician; Curriculum Guide for the Development of an Import Automobile Technology Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Los Angeles Coll., CA.

    In this curriculum guide, courses in a three-phase community college program for training import automobile technicians are provided. Following an introducation to the guide, the background of the development of the program, the program, the instruction, support for instruction, and the import automobile industry are discussed. Sample options for…

  2. Reinforcing Alcohol Prevention (RAP) Program: A Secondary School Curriculum to Combat Underage Drinking and Impaired Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Kelli England; Sabo, Cynthia Shier

    2010-01-01

    The Reinforcing Alcohol Prevention (RAP) Program is an alcohol prevention curriculum developed in partnership with secondary schools to serve their need for a brief, evidence-based, and straightforward program that aligned with state learning objectives. Program components included an educational lesson, video, and interactive activities delivered…

  3. Obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound curriculum and competency assessment in residency training programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuhamad, Alfred; Minton, Katherine K; Benson, Carol B

    2018-01-01

    in Medicine assembled a multisociety task force to develop a consensus-based, standardized curriculum and competency assessment tools for obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound training in residency programs. The curriculum and competency assessment tools were developed based on existing national...... and international guidelines for the performance of obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound examinations and thus are intended to represent the minimum requirement for such training. By expert consensus, the curriculum was developed for each year of training, criteria for each competency assessment image were...... that the criteria set forth in this document will evolve with time. The task force also encourages use of ultrasound simulation in residency training and expects that simulation will play a significant part in the curriculum and the competency assessment process. Incorporating this training curriculum...

  4. Adoption of oral health curriculum by physician assistant education programs in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelier, Margaret H; Glicken, Anita Duhl; Surdu, Simona

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe inclusion of didactic and clinical instruction in oral health in physician assistant (PA) education programs in 2014. A previous study in 2008 found that PA education program directors generally understood the importance of teaching about the linkage of oral health with systemic health; yet, few programs had actually integrated oral health instruction into the PA curriculum. This study was undertaken to ascertain the number of PA programs teaching oral health topics and to evaluate the content of instruction and implementation strategies. The study used a Web-based survey using a skip logic design that branched respondents based on inclusion or the absence of an oral health curriculum in the PA education program. The questions included predefined response options with the opportunity for narrative responses and comments. Analysis of survey data was completed using SPSS (IBM) and SAS (SAS Institute, Inc) and consisted mainly of frequencies and cross tabulations. There was greater inclusion of oral health curriculum in 2014 than in 2008 with most PA programs now providing didactic and clinical training in oral health. Stakeholders' efforts to engage PA program faculty with integration of oral health subject matter into core curriculum have resulted in wider availability of training for PA students in oral health promotion and prevention services. Efforts to equip PA faculty to teach oral health topics and clinical skills should continue as past efforts have resulted in wider integration of oral health subject matter into core PA curriculum.

  5. Implementing a robotics curriculum at an academic general surgery training program: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Sasaki, Jennifer; Rogers, Ann M; Pauli, Eric M; Haluck, Randy S; Estes, Stephanie J; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2016-09-01

    The robotic surgical platform is being utilized by a growing number of hospitals across the country, including academic medical centers. Training programs are tasked with teaching their residents how to utilize this technology. To this end, we have developed and implemented a robotic surgical curriculum, and share our initial experience here. Our curriculum was implemented for all General Surgical residents for the academic year 2014-2015. The curriculum consisted of online training, readings, bedside training, console simulation, participating in ten cases as bedside first assistant, and operating at the console. 20 surgical residents were included. Residents were provided the curriculum and notified the department upon completion. Bedside assistance and operative console training were completed in the operating room through a mix of biliary, foregut, and colorectal cases. During the fiscal years of 2014 and 2015, there were 164 and 263 robot-assisted surgeries performed within the General Surgery Department, respectively. All 20 residents completed the online and bedside instruction portions of the curriculum. Of the 20 residents trained, 13/20 (65 %) sat at the Surgeon console during at least one case. Utilizing this curriculum, we have trained and incorporated residents into robot-assisted cases in an efficient manner. A successful curriculum must be based on didactic learning, reading, bedside training, simulation, and training in the operating room. Each program must examine their caseload and resident class to ensure proper exposure to this platform.

  6. Retained gas sampler visualization guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekarriz, A.

    1994-09-01

    In a series of experiments performed in Phase II of the retained gas sampler visualization task, the effect of sampler tip geometry on waste sampling process has been investigated. From flow visualizations, which were captured on video, it is clear that disturbances on the surrounding fluid and the fluid entering the sampler were reduced as the tip changed from a flat to a sharper truncated cone shape. It has been shown, throughout this report, that deformation and disturbance of the waste is dominated by shape of the sampler tip, which moves the stagnation point, and not by viscosity of the fluid or sampling rate.

  7. Life imitating art: depictions of the hidden curriculum in medical television programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, Agatha; Clarkin, Chantalle; Bould, M Dylan; Writer, Hilary; Doja, Asif

    2015-09-26

    The hidden curriculum represents influences occurring within the culture of medicine that indirectly alter medical professionals' interactions, beliefs and clinical practices throughout their training. One approach to increase medical student awareness of the hidden curriculum is to provide them with readily available examples of how it is enacted in medicine; as such the purpose of this study was to examine depictions of the hidden curriculum in popular medical television programs. One full season of ER, Grey's Anatomy and Scrubs were selected for review. A summative content analysis was performed to ascertain the presence of depictions of the hidden curriculum, as well as to record the type, frequency and quality of examples. A second reviewer also viewed a random selection of episodes from each series to establish coding reliability. The most prevalent themes across all television programs were: the hierarchical nature of medicine; challenges during transitional stages in medicine; the importance of role modeling; patient dehumanization; faking or overstating one's capabilities; unprofessionalism; the loss of idealism; and difficulties with work-life balance. The hidden curriculum is frequently depicted in popular medical television shows. These examples of the hidden curriculum could serve as a valuable teaching resource in undergraduate medical programs.

  8. Implementation of a Professional Society Core Curriculum and Integrated Maintenance of Certification Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, W Graham; Poston, Jason T; Michaud, Gaetane C; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Luks, Andrew M; Boyer, Debra; Moore, Paul E; McSparron, Jakob I; Hayes, Margaret M; Balachandran, Jay S; Wang, Tisha S; Larsson, Eileen; Siegel-Gasiewski, Jennifer; Kantz, Alan; Beck, James M; Thomson, Carey C

    2017-04-01

    Medical professional societies exist to foster collaboration, guide career development, and provide continuing medical education opportunities. Maintenance of certification is a process by which physicians complete formal educational activities approved by certifying organizations. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) established an innovative maintenance of certification program in 2012 as a means to formalize and expand continuing medical education offerings. This program is unique as it includes explicit opportunities for collaboration and career development in addition to providing continuing medical education and maintenance of certification credit to society members. In describing the development of this program referred to as the "Core Curriculum," the authors highlight the ATS process for content design, stages of curriculum development, and outcomes data with an eye toward assisting other societies that seek to program similar content. The curriculum development process described is generalizable and positively influences individual practitioners and professional societies in general, and as a result, provides a useful model for other professional societies to follow.

  9. A gas sampler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Privalov, N.I.; Romanchuk, A.L.; Zrelyy, N.D.

    1982-01-01

    An addition is proposed to USSR inventor's certificate number 458730. In order to increase the reliability of testing the composition of the atmosphere through multiple sampling from several points, the proposed sampler is equipped with a sampling device made in the form of a body with branch pipes for collecting and outletting the samples, and with a spring loaded rod, positioned inside it, and a bushing, installed with the capability of axial movement. The output opening is connected to the pipeline using a tube.

  10. Isokinetic sampler; Amostrador isocinetico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Luis Cesar C. de; Santos, Antonio Carlos dos [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barrio, Lara B.A. del [AZ Armaturen do Brasil Ltda., Itatiba, SP (Brazil); Silva, Claudio B. da C. e; Silva, Ricardo R. da [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2005-07-01

    The Center of Research Leopoldo A. Miguez de Melo - CENPES - in association with AZ Armaturen Company do Brasil and TRANSPETRO developed and tested an Isokinetic sampler. This work presents the sampling principles and the results and performance of the tests realized in the 'Sitio de Testes de Atalaia' and in one of the terminals of bunker transfer of TRANSPETRO - 'Terminal Aquaviario da Baia de Guanabara'. In the 'Sitio de Testes' the products used were oil and water with BSW from 5% to 97% and in the terminal were tested samplings of bunker with ranges viscosities between (MF 180 to 380). (author)

  11. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Physical Therapist Assistant (CIP: 51.0806--Physical Therapy Assistant). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the physical therapy assistant program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and section…

  12. Development of a Program to Enhance Curriculum and Learning Management Competency of Private Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichpongsapak, Ratthasart; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sri-ampai, Anan

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this research were: (1) to study the factors and indicators to enhance curriculum and learning management competency of private primary school teachers; (2) to study current situations and desirable situations and techniques; (3) to develop a program; and (4) to study the effects of a program. The study comprised 4 phases: Phase…

  13. Improving International Marketing Programs to Reflect Global Complexity and Risk: Curriculum Drivers and Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    This article looks at the curriculum redesign of a master's-level program in international marketing from a UK perspective. In order to ensure that the program would be more fit-for-purpose for future managers working under conditions of complexity, uncertainty, and within regimes often very different from the home market, the team began the…

  14. The Rise of International Relations Programs in the Brazilian Federal Universities: Curriculum Specificities and Current Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Marcos Alan S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this reflection is to study the new international relations (IR) programs introduced by Brazilian federal universities, looking comparatively at their curriculum specificities and current challenges. In recent years, Brazil has seen an increase of IR programs launched in several regions. Since 2003, the Ministry of Education is in the…

  15. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Fashion Marketing Technology (Program CIP: 08.0101--Apparel and Accessories Mkt. Op., Gen.). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the fashion marketing technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies,…

  16. Health systems engineering fellowship: curriculum and program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Bradley V; Shiner, Brian; Cully, Jeffrey A; Gilman, Stuart C; Benneyan, James C; Eisenhauer, William

    2015-01-01

    Industrial engineering and related disciplines have been used widely in improvement efforts in many industries. These approaches have been less commonly attempted in health care. One factor limiting application is the limited workforce resulting from a lack of specific education and professional development in health systems engineering (HSE). The authors describe the development of an HSE fellowship within the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration (VA). This fellowship includes a novel curriculum based on specifically established competencies for HSE. A 1-year HSE curriculum was developed and delivered to fellows at several VA engineering resource centers over several years. On graduation, a majority of the fellows accepted positions in the health care field. Challenges faced in developing the fellowship are discussed. Advanced educational opportunities in applied HSE have the potential to develop the workforce capacity needed to improve the quality of health care. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  17. Perspectives of Residents of Mashhad School of Dentistry about the Curriculum of Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sarabadani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was carried out to analyze the viewpoint of the residents of school of dentistry about the curriculum presented in the residency program to students of Mashhad School of Dentistry. Methods: To evaluate the perspectives of residents of dental school about the curriculum and regulations of residency program, a questionnaire was designed whose validity and reliability were confirmed by the authorities of School of Dentistry and test-retest reliability, respectively. The questionnaire was distributed among 100 residents and 80 of them completed the questionnaires. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 11.5. Results: A total of 43% of residents were informed of the curriculum (e.g. academic leave, transfer, removal of semester, etc.. As for the ability to write research proposal, 42.7% of residents were reported to have a favorable status, i.e. they were able to write more than 80% of their proposal. From among the residents, 30.4% had specialized English language certificate. Most of them (77% were satisfied with the professional staff, faculty members, of the faculty. Many students liked to participate in the teaching method courses of the residency program. Conclusion: Residents maintained that the curriculum in such domains as educational and research issues and special capabilities had some weak points. Thus, appropriate strategies are recommended to be applied to revise the curriculum using the residents’ views on these programs.

  18. The ethics curriculum for doctor of nursing practice programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Anne Griswold; Smith, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    Ethical questions dealt with by nurses who have Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degrees include traditional bioethical questions, but also business and legal ethics. Doctorally prepared nurses are increasingly in positions to make ethical decisions rather than to respond to decisions made by others. The traditional master's-degree advanced practice nursing curriculum does not address the extended expertise and decision-making skills needed by DNP practitioners as they face these new types of ethical dilemmas. We propose that a curricular framework that addresses clinical, research, business, and legal ethics is needed by all DNP students.

  19. Psychological Counseling and Guidance Programs Perception of Hidden Curriculum (Inonu University Example: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal DURUHAN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Inonu University Faculty of Educations Psychological Counseling and Guidance Programs Hidden Curriculum, third grade students’ views and conducted observations are intended to be studied. The method of qualitative research ‘Case Study’ is designed. The studies work group consists of 18 third grade Inonu University Psychological Counseling and Guidance Program students. The research data was obtained using observation and half structured interaction technique and the data was analyzed using a descriptive and content method. Due to some findings in the research, in accordance to the physical areas Hidden Curriculum show that leaning towards more interaction is not supported by educational effort; about interaction between the teacher and the student; the teachers implication of class rules, the way of teaching, participation, homework leading to the evaluation method and the Hidden Curriculums expectations to be reached according to the results and from these results a variety changing recommendations were reached.

  20. Implementation of curriculum guidelines for pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics in FNP graduate programs: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, N S; Possidente, C J; Muskus, C

    2001-01-01

    Model Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics Curriculum Guidelines were developed by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties and published in 1998. To date, no publication of evaluation of adoption or adherence to these guidelines is available. The purpose of this survey was to determine how family nurse practitioner programs incorporate the guidelines into their curriculum. A mailed self-report questionnaire to 193 schools yielded a 41% response rate. Eighty-five percent (n = 68) of the programs have not yet fully integrated the guidelines into their curriculum. Difficulties addressing the extensive content within a 3-credit course and the challenges of teaching students with varied clinical backgrounds and knowledge levels were frequently cited. Although further study of achievement of the guidelines is necessary, an increase in credit allocation, consideration of a conceptual approach to the topic, and use of varied teaching strategies may make achievement of the guidelines more realistic.

  1. CURRICULUM IN EDUCATION AND CHARACTER BUILDING PROGRAM IN NEW ZEALAND PRIMARY SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Masita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most leading country at the quality education, New Zealand’s students consistently achieve high rank at the Programme for International Students Assessment (PISA for years. The paper will explore what curriculum in education used at primary school level in New Zealand is about. The focus is on the children’s character building program of the curriculum as a fundamental basis in teaching. The discussion will be followed by examples of how those programs are implemented in primary high schools both inside and outside the classrooms. It is hoped that we can learn from this curriculum system for the better quality of Indonesian educational system. Reconstructions in every single part of education will give great contribution to achieve the aims of creating qualified Indonesian people; to able to compete in this global world and have responsibility of their morals and behaviors. Introduction

  2. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Horticulture Technology Cluster (Program CIP: 01.0601--Horticulture Serv. Op. & Mgmt., Gen.) (Program CIP: 01.0605--Landscaping Op. & Mgmt.). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the horticulture technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a framework of programs and courses, description of the programs, and suggested course sequences for…

  3. Application of an interactive computer program to manage a problem-based dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Colman; Comfort, Margaret B; Luo, Yan; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Clark, Christopher D

    2006-04-01

    Managing the change from traditional to problem-based learning (PBL) curricula is complex because PBL employs problem cases as the vehicle for learning. Each problem case covers a wide range of different learning issues across many disciplines and is coordinated by different facilitators drawn from the school's multidisciplinary pool. The objective of this project was to adapt an interactive computer program to manage a problem-based dental curriculum. Through application of a commercial database software--CATs (Curriculum Analysis Tools)--an electronic database for all modules of a five-year problem-based program was developed. This involved inputting basic information on each problem case relating to competencies covered, key words (learning objectives), participating faculty, independent study, and homework assignments, as well as inputting information on contact hours. General reports were generated to provide an overview of the curriculum. In addition, competency, key word, manpower, and clock-hour reports at three levels (individual PBL course component, yearly, and the entire curriculum) were produced. Implications and uses of such reports are discussed. The adaptation of electronic technology for managing dental curricula for use in a PBL curriculum has implications for all those involved in managing new-style PBL dental curricula and those who have concerns about managing the PBL process.

  4. Program evaluation of an integrated basic science medical curriculum in Shiraz Medical School, using CIPP evaluation model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    AZADEH ROOHOLAMINI; MITRA AMINI; LEILA BAZRAFKAN; MOHAMMAD REZA DEHGHANI; ZOHREH ESMAEILZADEH; PARISA NABEIEI; RITA REZAEE; JAVAD KOJURI

    2017-01-01

    ...) for undergraduate medical education. The purpose of this study was to provide the required data for the program evaluation of this curriculum for undergraduate medical students, using CIPP program evaluation model. Methods...

  5. A Review of a Dental Record Audit Program within a Predoctoral Dental Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Henrietta; Gardner, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Record maintenance with periodic record audits, conducted by student peer auditors, became part of the curriculum of the University of Iowa College of Dentistry. A review to determine whether the quality of record keeping in the dental clinics had improved as a result of the audit program is reported. (MLW)

  6. Competency Based Curriculum. Revised Delivery Systems for Culinary Arts Program. Project Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokane Community Coll., WA.

    Developed through a grant that enabled faculty members to work together to define goals and set objectives, this curriculum guide contains course objectives for the culinary arts program at Spokane Community College in Washington. Objectives are provided for the following courses: culinary techniques and skill development (two levels),…

  7. Competency Based Education Curriculum for the Orientation and Safety Program of the Oil and Gas Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Career Center, Clarksburg, WV.

    This competency-based education curriculum for teaching the orientation and safety program for the oil and gas industry in West Virginia is organized into seven units. These units cover the following topics: introduction to oil and gas, first aid, site preparation, drilling operations, equipment familiarity, well completion, and preparation for…

  8. Searching for the Core of Journalism Education: Program Directors Disagree on Curriculum Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Robin; Davenport, Lucinda D.

    2012-01-01

    To carry out their mission of preparing students to be successful journalism professionals, educators make important decisions on the core curriculum: the common courses that all journalism students must take to graduate, no matter their area of emphasis or academic constraints. This national study of U.S. journalism program directors shows they…

  9. Research-Informed Curriculum Design for a Master's-Level Program in Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Yongmei; Richardson, Diane; Duan, Yanqing; Philpott, Elly; Ong, Vincent; Owen, David

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the application of Research-Informed Curriculum Design (RICD) for the development and implementation of an MSc Program in Project Management. The research focused on contemporary issues in project management and provided an analysis of project management approaches, tools, and techniques currently used in organizations.…

  10. The Professional Values of Program Directors and Head Athletic Trainers: The Impact of the Hidden Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Kimberly S.; Schlabach, Gretchen A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Athletic training education programs (ATEPs) promote the development of foundational behaviors of professional practice. Situated in the context of professional values, ATEPs are challenged to identify outcome measures for these behaviors. These values are tacitly reflected as part of the hidden curriculum. Objective: To ascertain the…

  11. The Hidden Curriculum of a Teacher Induction Program: Ontario Teacher Educators' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Sarah Elizabeth; Solomon, R. Patrick; Singer, Jordan; Portelli, John P.; Mujuwamariya, Donatille

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the hidden curriculum of Ontario's New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP). The study involved interviews with 47 teacher educators from eight faculties of education. Responses revealed concerns about (a) who chooses the mentors, (b) the probationary status of new teachers, and (c) the evaluation of new teachers' competence.…

  12. Program Accreditation and the Graduate Reference Curriculum in Systems Engineering (GRCSE (trademark))

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    variables , and discrete mathematics. The curriculum for programs containing the modifier ―computer‖ in the title must include discrete mathematics...Engineer consultant to Lockheed Martin, IBM, and EDO Ceramics, for ASSETT. Dr. Squires holds INCOSE CSEP, CSEP-Acquisition certifications

  13. Program Evaluation of the "PREPaRE" School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Amanda B.; Serwacki, Michelle L.; Brock, Stephen E.; Savage, Todd A.; Woitaszewski, Scott A.; Louvar Reeves, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    This study details a program evaluation of the "PREPaRE School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum" ("PREPaRE"), conducted in the United States and Canada between 2009 and 2011. Significant improvements in crisis prevention and intervention attitudes and knowledge were shown among 875 "Crisis Prevention…

  14. Curriculum Planning for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Assistant Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mary Ann

    This project was conducted to develop a curriculum for dental auxiliary training in the dental specialty field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Research was conducted to identify the major functions performed by an oral surgery assistant and then to organize these functions into an educational program that would provide adequate didactic and…

  15. Curriculum-Integrated Information Literacy (CIIL) in a Community College Nursing Program: A Practical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a strategy to integrate information literacy into the curriculum of a nursing program in a community college. The model is articulated in four explained phases: preparatory, planning, implementation, and evaluation. It describes a collaborative process encouraging librarians to work with nursing faculty, driving students to…

  16. Developing a Comprehensive Learning Community Program: Implementing a Learning Community Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Jamie L.; Redington, Lyn

    2016-01-01

    This is the second of a three-part series which will share information about how a mid-size, comprehensive university developed a learning community program, including a residential curriculum. Through intentional collaboration and partnerships, the team, comprised of faculty and staff throughout the university, developed a "multi-year plan…

  17. A Model for Infusing Energy Concepts into Vocational Education Programs. Solar Energy Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delta Vocational Technical School, Marked Tree, AR.

    This solar energy curriculum guide is designed to assist teachers in infusing energy concepts into vocational education programs. It consists of 31 competency-based instructional units organized into 10 sections. Covered in the sections are the following topics: related instructions (history and development; human relations; general safety;…

  18. Acute pain management curriculum for emergency medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motov, Sergey M; Marshall, John P

    2011-10-01

    Pain is the most common reason people visit emergency departments (EDs); this implies that emergency physicians (EPs) should be experts in managing acute painful conditions. The current trend in the literature, however, demonstrates that EPs possess inadequate knowledge and lack formal training in acute pain management. The purpose of this article is to create a formal educational curriculum that would assist emergency medicine (EM) residents in proper assessment and treatment of acute pain, as well as in providing a solid theoretical and practical knowledge base for managing acute pain in the ED. The authors propose a series of lectures, case-oriented study groups, practical small group sessions, and class-specific didactics with the goal of enhancing the theoretical and practical knowledge of acute pain management in the ED. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  19. The Maps in Medicine program: An evaluation of the development and implementation of life sciences curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Jennifer

    There has been a downward trend in both science proficiency and interest in science in the United States, especially among minority students and students of a disadvantaged background. This has led to a downturn in the number of individuals within these groups considering a career in the sciences or a related field. Studies have identified many potential causes for this problem including the current structure of science curriculum, lack of teacher preparedness, and the lack of quality education and support for those students currently underrepresented in the sciences. Among the solutions to this problem include redesigning the science curriculum, offering high-quality professional development opportunities to teachers, and creating programs to give support to individuals currently underrepresented in the sciences, so that they may have a better chance of pursuing and obtaining a science career. The Maps in Medicine program (MiM) has been designed to incorporate all of the aforementioned solutions and apply them to the current science education problem. The Maps in Medicine (MiM) program was established at the University of Missouri -- Columbia, and is funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Newly developed MiM curricula and student activities are intended to promote positive attitude changes in those students who are currently underrepresented in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields, with the program also providing professional development to high school science teachers. It was important to determine if the MiM program's solution to the science education problem has been successful, and so the program evaluation piece was integral. A mixed-methods approach was used to evaluate the MiM program. Formative evaluation results indicated a positive response from teachers and students regarding curriculum and professional development, and student activities. These results have also lead to the identification of appropriate improvements

  20. The Hidden Ethics Curriculum in Two Canadian Psychiatry Residency Programs: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mona; Forlini, Cynthia; Lenton, Keith; Duchen, Raquel; Lohfeld, Lynne

    2016-08-01

    The authors describe the hidden ethics curriculum in two postgraduate psychiatry programs. Researchers investigated the formal, informal, and hidden ethics curricula at two demographically different postgraduate psychiatry programs in Canada. Using a case study design, they compared three sources: individual interviews with residents and with faculty and a semi-structured review of program documents. They identified the formal, informal, and hidden curricula at each program for six ethics topics and grouped the topics under two thematic areas. They tested the applicability of the themes against the specific examples under each topic. Results pertaining to one of the themes and its three topics are reported here. Divergences occurred between the curricula for each topic. The nature of these divergences differed according to local program characteristics. Yet, in both programs, choices for action in ethically challenging situations were mediated by a minimum standard of ethics that led individuals to avoid trouble even if this meant their behavior fell short of the accepted ideal. Effective ethics education in postgraduate psychiatry training will require addressing the hidden curriculum. In addition to profession-wide efforts to articulate high-level values, program-specific action on locally relevant issues constitutes a necessary mechanism for handling the impact of the hidden curriculum.

  1. Introduction to SamplerCompare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine B. Thompson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available SamplerCompare is an R package for comparing the performance of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC samplers. It samples from a collection of distributions with a collection of MCMC methods over a range of tuning parameters. Then, using log density evaluations per uncorrelated observation as a figure of merit, it generates a grid of plots showing the results of the simulation. It comes with a collection of predefined distributions and samplers and provides R and C interfaces for defining additional ones. It also provides the means to import simulation data generated by external systems. This document provides background on the package and demonstrates the basics of running simulations, visualizing results, and defining distributions and samplers in R.

  2. Rapid Health Care Improvement Science Curriculum Integration Across Programs in a School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Brant J; Potter, Mertie; Pomerleau, Mimi; Phillips, Andrew; O'Donnell, Mimi; Cowley, Connie; Sipe, Margie

    This article describes the systematic efforts undertaken by a school of nursing in the Northeastern United States to foster innovation in health professions education. We present an application of modified team coaching and plan-do-study-act improvement methods in an educational context to rapidly integrate a quality and safety curriculum across programs. We discuss applications in generalist, advanced practice, doctoral, residency, and advanced fellowship programs and provide examples of each.

  3. Validation of parachlorobenzotrifluoride, benzotrifluoride, and monochlorotoluene on diffusive samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, C; Harper, M

    2000-01-01

    Three solvents (OXSOL 10, monochlorotoluene or mixed isomers of 1- chloro-2-methyl benzene and 1-chloro-4-methyl benzene; OXSOL 100, parachlorobenzotrifluoride or 1-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl) benzene; and OXSOL 2000, benzotrifluoride or trifluoromethyl benzene) produced by Occidental Chemical Corporation (Niagara Falls, NY) were considered as candidates for SKC, Inc.'s on-going diffusive sampler validation program. The 575-series diffusive sampler contains coconut-shell charcoal (575-001) or Anasorb 747 (575-002). Both samplers were used in this study. Desorption efficiency was tested at loadings equivalent to eight-hour time-weighted average (TWA) exposures to 0.01-2 times the Occidental Chemical Corporation in-house limit values (respectively: 50 ppm, 25 ppm, and 100 ppm,. All results met the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) criteria of > 75 percent, and, except for the lower loadings of parachlorobenzotrifluoride, the results were in the range of 90-110 percent. The calculated uptake rates were verified for different periods of exposure, up to eight hours, and found to be within 5 percent of the calculated for all three compounds on both samplers. A detailed comparison of the results from different time periods indicated no significant reverse diffusion effects for any combination of sampler and analyte. Samplers exposed to standard atmospheres of each compound were stored for three weeks at ambient temperatures and reanalyzed with results between 94 and 107 percent of expected. Based on full validation of samplers for the lower homologue (benzene), the bi-level theory of sample validation as endorsed by international validation protocols establishes this as a complete validation of the featured samplers for sampling vapors of these chemicals in air.

  4. Teaching Adaptability of Object-Oriented Programming Language Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of object-oriented programming languages includes update of their own versions, update of development environments, and reform of new languages upon old languages. In this paper, the evolution analysis of object-oriented programming languages is presented in term of the characters and development. The notion of adaptive teaching upon…

  5. Curriculum development for a national cardiotocography education program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thellesen, Line; Hedegaard, Morten; Bergholt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define learning objectives for a national cardiotocography (CTG) education program based on expert consensus. DESIGN: A three-round Delphi survey. POPULATION AND SETTING: One midwife and one obstetrician from each maternity unit in Denmark were appointed based on CTG teaching experi...... on CTG learning objectives was achieved using the Delphi methodology. This was an initial step in developing a valid CTG education program. A prioritized list of objectives will clarify which topics to emphasize in a CTG education program.......OBJECTIVE: To define learning objectives for a national cardiotocography (CTG) education program based on expert consensus. DESIGN: A three-round Delphi survey. POPULATION AND SETTING: One midwife and one obstetrician from each maternity unit in Denmark were appointed based on CTG teaching...

  6. Integrating a Supplemental Vocabulary Instruction Program into an EFL Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    ヒューバート, ラッセル ポール; ゴーベル, ピーター

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a supplemental vocabulary instruction program piloted in the KSU Faculty of Cultural Studies during the 2011 academic year. The program was created to enhance the depth of vocabulary knowledge and active usage of English vocabulary of first-year students (N=230). Initial student vocabulary knowledge levels were evaluated by a Vocabulary Levels Test (VLT) examination at the beginning of the academic year. A vocabulary textbook series was selected for the required reading...

  7. An Evaluation of the "Computer Technology and Programming" Curriculum in the Vocational Higher Education System in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiguzel, Oktay C.; Cardak, Cigdem S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the "Computer Technology and Programming" curriculum offered at vocational colleges with a focus on the goals of the curriculum and student thoughts. Document analysis and semi-structured interviews were conducted to gather the data. Results revealed that there were mainly four problematic issues…

  8. "It's Not Always What It Seems": Exploring the Hidden Curriculum within a Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Rachel Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, naturalistic study was to explore the ways in which hidden curriculum might influence doctoral student success. Two questions guided the study: (a) How do doctoral students experience the hidden curriculum? (b) What forms of hidden curricula can be identified in a PhD program? Data were collected from twelve…

  9. Development of Curriculum Content for a Unique Career Ladder Multi-Entry/Multi-Exit Nursing Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosbach, Ellen M.

    A project was undertaken to develop the curriculum content for a unique career ladder multi-entry/multi-exit nursing program that would provide training for nurse aides, practical nurses, and registered nurses. The major objectives of the project were to conduct a review of the literature on curriculum materials presently in use, to develop 11…

  10. Challenges of Globalization: Morocco and Tunisia. Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2001 (Morocco and Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This publication contains a collection of curriculum projects developed by educators who were participants in the 2001 Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program in Morocco and Tunisia. The 13 curriculum projects in the publication are entitled: "Women in Morocco, Artists and Artisans" (Virginia da Costa); "Cultures of…

  11. An Undergraduate Information Security Program: More than a Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Belle; Imboden, Thomas; Martin, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an information security program at a large Midwestern university. The initial work is briefly summarized and improvements that have occurred over time are described. Current activities and future plans are discussed. This paper offers insight and lessons learned for organizations that have or are…

  12. Advancing Teacher Education and Curriculum Development through Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Joan A., Ed.; Milby, Tammy M., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The number of English language students in American schools has dramatically increased in recent years, creating a greater awareness of cross-cultural issues and considerations in education. Globalization as well as an increase in international exchange student programs has proven that pre-service teachers can benefit from traveling abroad and…

  13. A Retrospective Program Evaluation of a Domestic Violence Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakaryan, Hasmik

    2013-01-01

    Domestic Violence (DV) continues to be a worldwide public health problem. Research in the area indicates that domestic violence has damaging, long-term serious mental, emotional, as well as physiological consequences both for the partners of the perpetrators and for their children. Even though various programs focused on treatments of the damaging…

  14. Implementation a Medical Simulation Curriculum in Emergency Medicine Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein Jahanshir

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Applying simulation in medical education is becoming more and more popular. The use of simulation in medical training has led to effective learning and safer care for patients. Nowadays educators have confronted with the challenge of respecting patient safety or bedside teaching. There is widespread evidence, supported by robust research, systematic reviews and meta-analysis, on how much effective simulation is. Simulation supports the acquisition of procedural, technical and non-technical skills through repetitive practice with feedbacks. Our plan was to induct simulation in emergency medicine residency program in order to ameliorate our defects in clinical bedside training. Our residents believed that simulation could be effective in their real medical practice. They mentioned that facilitators’ expertise and good medical knowledge, was the strongest point of the program and lack of proper facilities was the weakest.

  15. Obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound curriculum and competency assessment in residency training programs: consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhamad, Alfred; Minton, Katherine K; Benson, Carol B; Chudleigh, Trish; Crites, Lori; Doubilet, Peter M; Driggers, Rita; Lee, Wesley; Mann, Karen V; Perez, James J; Rose, Nancy C; Simpson, Lynn L; Tabor, Ann; Benacerraf, Beryl R

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has become integral to the practice of obstetrics and gynecology. With increasing educational demands and limited hours in residency programs, dedicated time for training and achieving competency in ultrasound has diminished substantially. The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine assembled a multisociety task force to develop a consensus-based, standardized curriculum and competency assessment tools for obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound training in residency programs. The curriculum and competency assessment tools were developed based on existing national and international guidelines for the performance of obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound examinations and thus are intended to represent the minimum requirement for such training. By expert consensus, the curriculum was developed for each year of training, criteria for each competency assessment image were generated, the pass score was established at, or close to, 75% for each, and obtaining a set of 5 ultrasound images with pass score in each was deemed necessary for attaining each competency. Given the current lack of substantial data on competency assessment in ultrasound training, the task force expects that the criteria set forth in this document will evolve with time. The task force also encourages use of ultrasound simulation in residency training and expects that simulation will play a significant part in the curriculum and the competency assessment process. Incorporating this training curriculum and the competency assessment tools may promote consistency in training and competency assessment, thus enhancing the performance and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound examination in obstetrics and gynecology. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, Elsevier Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. THE 2013 CURRICULUM BASED SYLLABUS FOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL’S ENGLISH EXTRACURRICULAR PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Masrur Mustolih; Hermayawati Hermayawati

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed at designing syllabus for English extracurricular in SMAN 1 Seyegan based on the 2013 Curriculum. This was Research and Development (R&D) study using ADDIE model. There were five stages in conducting the research; (1) Analysis; (2) Design; (3) Development; (4) Implementation; (5) Evaluation. This study involved 15 students of ten graders who registered to English extracurricular program. To gain the Needs Analysis (NA), the researcher used observation, questionn...

  17. Curriculum Evaluation and Employers Opinions: the case study of Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakhon Lalognam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were: 1 to evaluate the Educational Technology Program (Continuing Program in Bachelor Degree curriculum which is revised in 2007 by applying CIPP model for evaluation. 2 to study the opinions of the employers about the ideal characteristics and actual characteristics of graduates. 3 to study the opinions for the requirements of the Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program and knowledge implementation in work of graduates. 4 to make the suggestions and guidelines to improve the Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program to achieve potentiality and responsive for the requirements of learners and employers. The sample of this research were 310 persons ; consisted of graduates in the Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program in academic year 2006 - 2010, the committee of the Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program , instructors and employers by using Multi-stage Random Sampling and Simple Random Sampling. The instruments of this research were the 5 levels rating scale questionnaire and the structured interview type. They consisted of 3 sets: 1 for graduates, 2 for the committee of the Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program and 3 for instructors and employers. The research found that: 1. The results of evaluation on the Educational Technology Program in Bachelor Degree (Continuing Program which is revised in 2007 were: 1.1 The opinions of graduates to curriculum in all of aspects were average at the uncertain level which the context aspect was at the high level, input aspect was at the uncertain level, process aspect was at the uncertain level and product aspect was at the high level. 1.2 The opinions of the curriculum committee and instructors to curriculum in all of aspects were average at the high level which the context aspect was at the high level, input aspect was at the

  18. [Curriculum analysis and comparison between strategies or programs for early child development in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-López, Guillermo; Guadarrama-Orozco, Jessica Haydee; Rizzoli-Córdoba, Antonio; Narcizo-Cenobio, Francisco Javier; Medrano-Loera, Gerónimo; Villagrán, Daniel Aceves; O'Shea Cuevas, Gabriel; Muñoz Hernández, Onofre

    Most of the strategies or programs that support early child development in Mexico are independent efforts that vary in scale, services offered and means of providing them. For the evaluation of the quality of these programs, an important aspect is the curriculum content. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the curriculum content of the different strategies or programs focused on the promotion and intervention of early child development, which are offered by the Federal Government in Health and Education sectors in Mexico. We conducted a review of the curriculum content of the strategies and programs. The qualitative phase consisted of a comparative analysis where 75 indicators proposed by the Inter-American Development Bank were identified. The quantitative phase consisted of a descriptive analysis of the indicators. Finally, the analyses were compared to establish the performance of each one. Six strategies or programs were identified. In the analysis of the presence of indicators, the Oportunidades de Aprendizaje (Learning Opportunities, LO) strategy showed a larger number of indicators. In the amplitude analysis, both PEI-CONAFE and LO were the best balanced. Finally, in-depth analysis of the indicators LO and Skills for life were the best balanced while PEI-CONAFE was the best balanced in the social-emotional area, CeNSIA program for language and LO for cognitive development area. LO strategy showed the closest level of contents established by the Inter-American Development Bank. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Integrating the Jewish Dietary Laws into a dietetics program. Kashruth in a dietetics curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natow, A B; Heslin, J A; Raven, B C

    1975-07-01

    A clinical and community dietetics program integrates Kashruth, the Jewish Dietary Laws, into its curriculum. Simply defined, kosher means fit for consumption. Emblems used throughout the United States and Canada to indicate a program of rabbinic endoresment and supervision of canned, boxed, and bottled products are included. An existing kosher unit is described, and guidelines for establishing a kosher food science laboratory unit are offered. Suggestions for instituting kosher foodservice in health care facilities are given. Therapeutic applications of Kashruth are suggested, and approved therapeutic food products are listed.

  20. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Radiologic Technology (Radiography) (CIP: 51.0907--Medical Radiologic Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the radiologic technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies for the program,…

  1. Curriculum, curriculum development, curriculum studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... see curriculum studies as a dumping ground and others make no theoretical contribution to the discipline. The article concludes by suggesting ways which would encourage the intellectual advancement of curriculum studies through rigorous disciplinarity. Keywords: curriculum; curriculum development; curriculum studies ...

  2. An alternative approach for assessment of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry matrix effects using auto-sampler programmed co-injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Caitlyn A; Stockham, Peter C; Nash, Christine M; Martin, Sheridan M; Kostakis, Chris; Lenehan, Claire E

    2016-03-01

    We report the use of auto-sampler programmable functions to co-inject analyte standard solution and matrix extract to assess ion enhancement and suppression (matrix effects) in LC-MS. This is effectively an automated post-extraction addition (APEA) procedure, emulating the manual post-extraction addition (PEA) approach widely adopted for assessment of matrix effects. To verify that APEA was comparable to the conventional PEA approach, matrix effects were determined using both methods for a selection of 31 illicit and pharmaceutical drugs in 10 different human urine extracts. Matrix effects measured using APEA were statistically indistinguishable from manual PEA methodology for 27 of the 31 drugs. Of the four drugs that showed significant differences using the two methods, three differed by less than 2 %, which is within the expected accuracy limits required for matrix effect determinations. The remaining analyte, trimeprazine, was found to degrade in the spiked PEA matrix extract, accounting for the difference between matrix effects measured by the PEA and APEA approaches. APEA enables a single matrix extract to be assessed at multiple analyte concentrations, resulting in a considerable reduction in sample preparation time. In addition, APEA can reduce the quantity of analyte-free sample matrix required for matrix effect assessment, which is an important consideration in certain analytical and bioanalytical fields. This work shows that APEA may be considered as an acceptable alternative to PEA for the assessment of matrix effects in LC-MS method validation and may be applicable to a variety of matrices such as environmental samples.

  3. Increasing diversity in international education: Programming for non-traditional students through an alternative curriculum model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Clothey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at an alternative curriculum model for study abroad designed specifically to address some of the needs of non-traditional students enrolled in an online education program. In order to meet the needs of non-traditional students and provide quality international programming for them, it is necessary first to understand their restraints to studying abroad, and then to design alternative educational models that can address these challenges. The paper describes the challenges of balancing the need to create quality international learning opportunities for education students, with the limitations faced by non-traditional online adult learners who have families and full-time jobs. It is based on an action research case study of two study abroad programs implemented for online students at a northeastern four-year research-one institution of higher education.

  4. Teaching and learning curriculum programs: recommendations for postgraduate pharmacy experiences in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric A; Brown, Bonnie; Gettig, Jacob; Martello, Jay L; McClendon, Katie S; Smith, Kelly M; Teeters, Janet; Ulbrich, Timothy R; Wegrzyn, Nicole; Bradley-Baker, Lynette R

    2014-08-01

    Recommendations for the development and support of teaching and learning curriculum (TLC) experiences within postgraduate pharmacy training programs are discussed. Recent attention has turned toward meeting teaching- and learning-related educational outcomes through a programmatic process during the first or second year of postgraduate education. These programs are usually coordinated by schools and colleges of pharmacy and often referred to as "teaching certificate programs," though no national standards or regulation of these programs currently exists. In an effort to describe the landscape of these programs and to develop a framework for their basic design and content, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Pharmacy Practice Section's Task Force on Student Engagement and Involvement, with input from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, reviewed evidence from the literature and conference proceedings and considered author experience and expertise over a two-year period. The members of the task force created and reached consensus on a policy statement and 12 recommendations to guide the development of best practices of TLC programs. The recommendations address topics such as the value of TLC programs, program content, teaching and learning experiences, feedback for participants, the development of a teaching portfolio, the provision of adequate resources for TLC programs, programmatic assessment and improvement, program transparency, and accreditation. TLC programs provide postgraduate participants with valuable knowledge and skills in teaching applicable to the practitioner and academician. Postgraduate programs should be transparent to candidates and seek to ensure the best experiences for participants through systematic program implementation and assessments. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Diesel Equipment Technology (CIP: 47.0605--Diesel Engine Mechanic & Repairer). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the diesel equipment technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies,…

  6. The Challenge of an Interdisciplinary Curriculum: A Cultural Analysis of a Doctoral-Degree Program in Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Karri

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on data collected through 45 interviews with faculty, doctoral students, and administrators affiliated with an interdisciplinary neuroscience program, I examine the structure of the interdisciplinary graduate curriculum. The data presented here highlight the challenge of such programs. I review the purpose, organization, and content of the…

  7. Peer mentoring program in an interprofessional and interdisciplinary curriculum in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Camila Aparecida Machado; de França Carvalho, Carolina Prado; Céspedes, Isabel Cristina; de Oliveira, Flávia; Le Sueur-Maluf, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    The Federal University of São Paulo, Baixada Santista Campus was founded in 2006 with five degree-granting programs in physical education, physiotherapy, nutrition, psychology, and occupational therapy. The guiding principle behind the programs' educational mission was centered on the development of health care professionals capable of working in interdisciplinary teams with an emphasis on holistic patient care. This pedagogical structure required peer-mentoring programs in order to integrate different areas of knowledge and to improve learning strategies among new generations of students. The authors' objective in the present report is to discuss the strategies and activities of the peer-mentoring program in histophysiology and gross anatomy in an interdisciplinary and interprofessional curriculum. Evaluations by students, mentors and professors are presented, along with a statistical analysis of variance comparing student performance in the module assessments according to their participation in the peer-mentoring activities. The results demonstrated that students who participated in peer-mentoring activities enjoyed a higher rate of academic success than those who did not participate. In addition, student and mentor evaluations of the peer mentoring program were highly positive. The program enabled mentors to gain a deeper knowledge of the subjects addressed in the learning modules, as well as to develop intrinsic teaching skills during their time as mentors. In short, the authors believe that the peer-mentoring program has been validated for its effectiveness in raising student academic performance. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  8. ExperienceSampler: An Open-Source Scaffold for Building Smartphone Apps for Experience Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Sabrina; Page-Gould, Elizabeth

    2017-06-15

    Experience sampling methods allow researchers to examine phenomena in daily life and provide various advantages that complement traditional laboratory methods. However, existing experience sampling methods may be costly, require constant Internet connectivity, may not be designed specifically for experience sampling studies, or require a custom solution from a computer programming consultant. In this article, we present ExperienceSampler, an open-source scaffold for creating experience-sampling smartphone apps designed for Android and iOS devices. We designed ExperienceSampler to address the common barriers to using experience sampling methods. First, there is no cost to the user. Second, ExperienceSampler apps make use of local notifications to let participants know when to complete surveys and store the data locally until Internet connection is available. Third, our app scaffold was designed with experience sampling methodological issues in mind. We also demonstrate how researchers can easily customize ExperienceSampler even if they have no programming skills. Furthermore, we evaluate the utility of ExperienceSampler apps with results from one social psychological study conducted using ExperienceSampler (N = 168). Mean response rates averaged 84%, and the median response latency was 9 minutes. Taken together, ExperienceSampler creates cost-effective smartphone apps that can be easily customized by researchers to examine experiences in daily life. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Uncertainties in monitoring of SVOCs in air caused by within-sampler degradation during active and passive air sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melymuk, Lisa; Bohlin-Nizzetto, Pernilla; Prokeš, Roman; Kukučka, Petr; Přibylová, Petra; Vojta, Šimon; Kohoutek, Jiří; Lammel, Gerhard; Klánová, Jana

    2017-10-01

    Degradation of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) occurs naturally in ambient air due to reactions with reactive trace gases (e.g., ozone, NOx). During air sampling there is also the possibility for degradation of SVOCs within the air sampler, leading to underestimates of ambient air concentrations. We investigated the possibility of this sampling artifact in commonly used active and passive air samplers for seven classes of SVOCs, including persistent organic pollutants (POPs) typically covered by air monitoring programs, as well as SVOCs of emerging concern. Two active air samplers were used, one equipped with an ozone denuder and one without, to compare relative differences in mass of collected compounds. Two sets of passive samplers were also deployed to determine the influence of degradation during longer deployment times in passive sampling. In active air samplers, comparison of the two sampling configurations suggested degradation of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with concentrations up to 2× higher in the denuder-equipped sampler, while halogenated POPs did not have clear evidence of degradation. In contrast, more polar, reactive compounds (e.g., organophosphate esters and current use pesticides) had evidence of losses in the sampler with denuder. This may be caused by the denuder itself, suggesting sampling bias for these compounds can be created when typical air sampling apparatuses are adapted to limit degradation. Passive air samplers recorded up to 4× higher concentrations when deployed for shorter consecutive sampling periods, suggesting that within-sampler degradation may also be relevant in passive air monitoring programs.

  10. Remote Sampler Demonstration Isolok Configuration Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Steve E. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-08

    The accuracy and precision of a new Isolok sampler configuration was evaluated using a recirculation flow loop. The evaluation was performed using two slurry simulants of Hanford high-level tank waste. Through testing, the capability of the Isolok sampler was evaluated. Sample concentrations were compared to reference samples that were simultaneously collected by a two-stage Vezin sampler. The capability of the Isolok sampler to collect samples that accurately reflect the contents in the test loop improved – biases between the Isolok and Vezin samples were greatly reduce for fast settling particles.

  11. Electronic laboratory quality assurance program: A method of enhancing the prosthodontic curriculum and addressing accreditation standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Marjan; Jahangiri, Leila

    2015-08-01

    An electronic quality assurance (eQA) program was developed to replace a paper-based system and to address standards introduced by the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) and to improve educational outcomes. This eQA program provides feedback to predoctoral dental students on prosthodontic laboratory steps at New York University College of Dentistry. The purpose of this study was to compare the eQA program of performing laboratory quality assurance with the former paper-based format. Fourth-year predoctoral dental students (n=334) who experienced both the paper-based and the electronic version of the quality assurance program were surveyed about their experiences. Additionally, data extracted from the eQA program were analyzed to identify areas of weakness in the curriculum. The study findings revealed that 73.8% of the students preferred the eQA program to the paper-based version. The average number of treatments that did not pass quality assurance standards was 119.5 per month. This indicated a 6.34% laboratory failure rate. Further analysis of these data revealed that 62.1% of the errors were related to fixed prosthodontic treatment, 27.9% to partial removable dental prostheses, and 10% to complete removable dental prostheses in the first 18 months of program implementation. The eQA program was favored by dental students who have experienced both electronic and paper-based versions of the system. Error type analysis can yield the ability to create customized faculty standardization sessions and refine the didactic and clinical teaching of the predoctoral students. This program was also able to link patient care activity with the student's laboratory activities, thus addressing the latest requirements of the CODA regarding the competence of graduates in evaluating laboratory work related to their patient care. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Data Science Programs in U.S. Higher Education: An Exploratory Content Analysis of Program Description, Curriculum Structure, and Course Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rong; Sae-Lim, Watinee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an exploratory content analysis of 30 randomly selected Data Science (DS) programs from eight disciplines revealed significant gaps in current DS education in the United States. The analysis centers on linguistic patterns of program descriptions, curriculum requirements, and DS course focus as pertaining to key skills and domain…

  13. [Model core curriculum in neurology--current status and problems after its application to the medical education program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hidenao

    2007-11-01

    Taking the needs of society and progress of medicine into account, The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, reformed the education program and established a "model core curriculum" on Mar 2001, which is introduced to the medial universities since then. Principles of this curriculum consist of selected categories such as lists mandatory for current medicine, set up of optional courses, and voluntary attitude for lifelong studying. To search for The Education Program of Medical University, the subcommittee of the Japanese Society of Neurology sent a Questionnaire on this curriculum to all the Medical Universities of Japan. Answers were obtained from 56 out of 87 Universities. According to them, some agree to the concept and content of the curriculum, while others insist that it is still insufficient to educate update Neurology. The clinical clerkship is important for the students to experience the basic process of neurology. However, the study disclosed that program of clinical clerkship to neurology is different among the institutes. The list of curriculum needs additional neurological disorders and symptoms commonly seen, and that clinical clerkship to neurology must be taken into account as one of compulsory rather than optional course.

  14. An international, multidisciplinary, service-learning program: an option in the dental school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Mier, Esperanza A; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Stelzner, Sarah M; Lorant, Diane E; Riner, Mary E; Yoder, Karen M

    2011-04-01

    Many health professions students who treat Spanish-speaking patients in the United States have little concept of their culture and health related traditions. The lack of understanding of these concepts may constitute major barriers to healthcare for these patients. International service-learning experiences allow students to work directly in communities from which patients immigrate and, as a result, students gain a better understanding of these barriers. This article describes the implementation of an international, multidisciplinary, service-learning program in a dental school in the United States. The Indiana University International Service-Learning program in Hidalgo, Mexico began in 1999 as an alternative spring break travel and clinical experience for medical students, focusing on the treatment of acute health problems. Travel-related preparatory sessions were offered, and no learning or service objectives had been developed. The program has evolved to include a multidisciplinary team of dental, medical, nursing, public health and social work students and faculty. The experience is now integrated into a curriculum based on the service-learning model that allows students to use their clinical skills in real-life situations and provides structured time for reflection. The program aims to enhance teaching and foster civic responsibility in explicit partnership with the community. Preparatory sessions have evolved into a multidisciplinary graduate level course with defined learning and service objectives. PROGRAM EVALUATION METHODS: In order to assess the program's operation as perceived by students and faculty and to evaluate student's perceptions of learning outcomes, evaluation tools were developed. These tools included student and faculty evaluation questionnaires, experiential learning journals, and a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis. Evaluation data show that after program participation, students perceived an increase in their

  15. The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery National Skills Curriculum: adoption rate, challenges and strategies for effective implementation into surgical residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korndorffer, James R; Arora, Sonal; Sevdalis, Nick; Paige, John; McClusky, David A; Stefanidis, Dimitris

    2013-07-01

    The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery (ACS/APDS) National Skills Curriculum is a 3-phase program targeting technical and nontechnical skills development. Few data exist regarding the adoption of this curriculum by surgical residencies. This study attempted to determine the rate of uptake and identify implementation enablers/barriers. A web-based survey was developed by an international expert panel of surgical educators (5 surgeons and 1 psychologist). After piloting, the survey was sent to all general surgery program directors via email link. Descriptive statistics were used to determine the residency program characteristics and perceptions of the curriculum. Implementation rates for each phase and module were calculated. Adoption barriers were identified quantitatively and qualitatively using free text responses. Standardized qualitative methodology of emergent theme analysis was used to identify strategies for success and details of support required for implementation. Of the 238 program directors approached, 117 (49%) responded to the survey. Twenty-one percent (25/117) were unaware of the ACS/APDS curriculum. Implementation rates for were 36% for phase I, 19% for phase II, and 16% for phase III. The most common modules adopted were the suturing, knot-tying, and chest tube modules of phase I. Over 50% of respondents identified lack of faculty protected time, limited personnel, significant costs, and resident work-hour restrictions as major obstacles to implementation. Strategies for effective uptake included faculty incentives, adequate funding, administrative support, and dedicated time and resources. Despite the availability of a comprehensive curriculum, its diffusion into general surgery residency programs remains low. Obstacles related to successful implementation include personnel, learner, and administrative issues. Addressing these issues may improve the adoption rate of the curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc

  16. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Welding (Program CIP: 48.0508--Welder/Welding Technologist). Secondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for welding I and II. Presented first are a program description and course…

  17. Perceptual Skills Curriculum; Introductory Letters and Numerals, Program IV. Part 1 Capital Letters and Part 2 Lower-case Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Jerome

    This curriculum is designed primarily for use in individualized classrooms where the teacher is working with an assistant, but it has also been proven effective in traditional classrooms and in remedial situations. Program four focuses on four abilities as they relate to the basic symbol system of the classroom. These are the abilities to:…

  18. Measuring outcome in an early intervention program for toddlers with autism spectrum disorder: use of a curriculum-based assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Elizabeth C; Dufek, Sarah; Schreibman, Laura; Stahmer, Aubyn C; Pierce, Karen; Courchesne, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Measuring progress of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) during intervention programs is a challenge faced by researchers and clinicians. Typically, standardized assessments of child development are used within research settings to measure the effects of early intervention programs. However, the use of standardized assessments is not without limitations, including lack of sensitivity of some assessments to measure small or slow progress, testing constraints that may affect the child's performance, and the lack of information provided by the assessments that can be used to guide treatment planning. The utility of a curriculum-based assessment is discussed in comparison to the use of standardized assessments to measure child functioning and progress throughout an early intervention program for toddlers with risk for ASD. Scores derived from the curriculum-based assessment were positively correlated with standardized assessments, captured progress masked by standardized assessments, and early scores were predictive of later outcomes. These results support the use of a curriculum-based assessment as an additional and appropriate method for measuring child progress in an early intervention program. Further benefits of the use of curriculum-based measures for use within community settings are discussed.

  19. Long-Term Impacts of a Faculty Development Program for the Internationalization of Curriculum in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Emily; Navarro, Maria; Borron, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    Faculty development programs for internationalization of the curriculum in higher education are often evaluated for short- and medium-term outcomes, but more long-term assessments are needed to determine impact. This study examined the long-term (6 years) impacts on faculty from colleges of agriculture after participating in a one-year…

  20. Teacher Adaptations to a Core Reading Program: Increasing Access to Curriculum for Elementary Students in Urban Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniates, Helen

    2017-01-01

    This article examines how three urban elementary school teachers adapted pedagogical strategies from a school district--adopted core reading program to increase their students' access to the curriculum. Using teacher interviews and classroom observations to construct a descriptive case study of teacher adaptation, analysis reveals that the…

  1. A Needs Assessment Study and Curriculum Development for a Public and Private Security Program at Alvin Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethscheider, John

    A needs assessment for a community college curriculum in public and private security was conducted by surveying 50 high schools, four-year colleges, and private security agencies in the Alvin Community College area; 36 institutions responded. Findings revealed: most have a designated director of their security program; most would rather hire the…

  2. Measuring Outcome in an Early Intervention Program for Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Use of a Curriculum-Based Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Bacon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Measuring progress of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD during intervention programs is a challenge faced by researchers and clinicians. Typically, standardized assessments of child development are used within research settings to measure the effects of early intervention programs. However, the use of standardized assessments is not without limitations, including lack of sensitivity of some assessments to measure small or slow progress, testing constraints that may affect the child’s performance, and the lack of information provided by the assessments that can be used to guide treatment planning. The utility of a curriculum-based assessment is discussed in comparison to the use of standardized assessments to measure child functioning and progress throughout an early intervention program for toddlers with risk for ASD. Scores derived from the curriculum-based assessment were positively correlated with standardized assessments, captured progress masked by standardized assessments, and early scores were predictive of later outcomes. These results support the use of a curriculum-based assessment as an additional and appropriate method for measuring child progress in an early intervention program. Further benefits of the use of curriculum-based measures for use within community settings are discussed.

  3. Integrative Curriculum Development in Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Jow, Julius O.; Edwards, Matthew E.; Montgomery, V. Trent [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science Center, Alabama A and M University, Huntsville, AL (United States); James, Ralph B.; Blackburn, Noel D. [Nonproliferation and National Security Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Glenn, Chance M. [College of Engineering, Technology and Physical Sciences, Alabama A and M University, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Using a vertical education enhancement model, a Nuclear Education and Research Vertical Enhancement (NERVE) program was developed. The NERVE program is aimed at developing nuclear engineering education and research to 1) enhance skilled workforce development in disciplines relevant to nuclear power, national security and medical physics, and 2) increase the number of students and faculty from underrepresented groups (women and minorities) in fields related to the nuclear industry. The program uses multi-track training activities that vertically cut across the several education domains: undergraduate degree programs, graduate schools, and post-doctoral training. In this paper, we present the results of an integrative curriculum development in the NERVE program. The curriculum development began with nuclear content infusion into existing science, engineering and technology courses. The second step involved the development of nuclear engineering courses: 1) Introduction to Nuclear Engineering, 2) Nuclear Engineering I, and 2) Nuclear Engineering II. The third step is the establishment of nuclear engineering concentrations in two engineering degree programs: 1) electrical engineering, and 2) mechanical engineering. A major outcome of the NERVE program is a collaborative infrastructure that uses laboratory work, internships at nuclear facilities, on-campus research, and mentoring in collaboration with industry and government partners to provide hands-on training for students. The major activities of the research and education collaborations include: - One-week spring training workshop at Brookhaven National Laboratory: The one-week training and workshop is used to enhance research collaborations and train faculty and students on user facilities/equipment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and for summer research internships. Participants included students, faculty members at Alabama A and M University and research collaborators at BNL. The activities include 1) tour and

  4. Strategy of Philosophy Education to Develop Thinking Children : An Analysis of Curriculum for Early Elementally School in the Program “Philosophy for Children”

    OpenAIRE

    Fukui, Suguru

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the author explores the strategy of the philosophy education to develop thinking children by analyzing of structures of the curriculum for early elementally school in the program “Philosophy for Children”. The curriculum consists of a storybook and instructional manual. The curriculum is structured so that children are made aware of problematical concepts in their own life, and then required to practice judge relations of concepts on their own experience. Children discover good...

  5. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haq Nawaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating. Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective: To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods: Training included didactics (six sessions/year, distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents’ progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs, self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results: A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents’ discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01. Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76% compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%. However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11. Conclusion: Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits.

  6. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Haq; Petraro, Paul V; Via, Christina; Ullah, Saif; Lim, Lionel; Wild, Dorothea; Kennedy, Mary; Phillips, Edward M

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating). Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Training included didactics (six sessions/year), distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents' progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents' discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01). Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76%) compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%). However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits.

  7. Commentary: The Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) Program: What's New about the Current Solicitation and Suggestions for the Geosciences' Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jill

    2009-01-01

    The Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) program recently released the program guidelines (NSF 09-529) for the next round of the program. There are several changes to the CCLI program and a new program opportunity that invites proposals for projects that would provide leadership and contribute to transforming undergraduate STEM…

  8. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  9. Stimulated Hyposalivary Flow Rates in Healthcare Students in an Interprofessional Awareness Educational Program Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Constance Wiener

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Hyposalivation influences quality of life and medication compliance. However, oral health knowledge (in general and knowledge about hyposalivation (in particular are often lacking in nondental healthcare professional’s curricula. Additionally, hyposalivation has not been adequately studied in young adults. The purpose for this study is twofold: to use an interprofessional educational curriculum to increase nondental healthcare students’ knowledge about oral health and salivary testing and determine whether hyposalivation is different between sexes in young adults. Method. First-year medical and pharmacy students (N=178 learned the process of saliva collection and provided samples in an interprofessional program. Results. There were 14.4% of participants with hyposalivation; 72.0% were female. Males had higher flow rates (P=0.005. There failed to be a significant difference between the sexes with frank hyposalivation. There failed to be a significant difference in hyposalivation and medication use/nonuse. Conclusions. Hyposalivation is a biomedical, public health concern. However, in this young population, there was no significant difference between sexes or in medication use/nonuse. Through participation in the program, the students learned about salivary flow rates and the need for collaboration among professionals to prevent negative impacts of hyposalivation and oral health.

  10. A Learning Curriculum: Toward Student-Driven Pedagogy in the Context of Adult English for Academic Purposes, English for Specific Purposes, and Workplace English Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyeva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of a learning curriculum that places adult English as a second language (ESL) students' needs in the center and encourages the engagement of ESL learners in curriculum design. The study is based on contemporary research in the field of adult ESL program planning. It summarizes key components of a learning…

  11. Development of a diabetes care management curriculum in a family practice residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuovo, Jim; Balsbaugh, Thomas; Barton, Sue; Davidson, Ellen; Fox-Garcia, Jane; Gandolfo, Angela; Levich, Bridget; Seibles, Joann

    2004-01-01

    Improving the quality of care for patients with chronic illness has become a high priority. Implementing training programs in disease management (DM) so the next generation of physicians can manage chronic illness more effectively is challenging. Residency training programs have no specific mandate to implement DM training. Additional barriers at the training facility include: 1) lack of a population-based perspective for service delivery; 2) weak support for self-management of illness; 3) incomplete implementation due to physician resistance or inertia; and 4) few incentives to change practices and behaviors. In order to overcome these barriers, training programs must take the initiative to implement DM training that addresses each of these issues. We report the implementation of a chronic illness management curriculum based on the Improving Chronic Illness Care (ICIC) Model. Features of this process included both patient care and learner objectives. These were: development of a multidisciplinary diabetes DM team; development of a patient registry; development of diabetes teaching clinics in the family practice center (nutrition, general management classes, and one-on-one teaching); development of a group visit model; and training the residents in the elements of the ICIC Model, ie, the community, the health system, self-management support, delivery system design, decision support, and clinical information systems. Barriers to implementing these curricular changes were: the development of a patient registry; buy-in from faculty, residents, clinic leadership, staff, and patients for the chronic care model; the ability to bill for services and maintain clinical productivity; and support from the health system key stakeholders for sustainability. Unique features of each training site will dictate differences in emphasis and structure; however, the core principles of the ICIC Model in enhancing self-management may be generalized to all sites.

  12. The Biomedical Humanities program: merging humanities and science in a premedical curriculum at Hiram College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Colleen; Madar, Sandra; Donley, Carol

    2003-10-01

    The Biomedical Humanities program at Hiram College, established in 1999, engages premedical and other qualified students in ethical and informed decision making, improves their ability to interact with persons of different backgrounds and cultures, provides them an active introduction to basic medical research and clinical practice, and coaches them in communicating across barriers, appreciating that scientists and humanists typically learn and work differently. The program offers both a major and a minor in biomedical humanities topics. The major requires the core biology and chemistry curriculum necessary for further studies in medicine as well as courses in genetics and statistics. The remainder of the major is devoted to four core areas: Communications, Relationships and Cultural Sensitivity, Ethics and Medical Humanities, and a nonacademic core area, Experiential Learning. Many of the ethics and medical humanities options are team-taught interdisciplinary courses. The Experiential Learning area requires students to take two special topics seminars, two service seminars, and two internships-one shadowing a professional in his or her area of interest and one engaging in basic biomedical research. The shadowing internship and service seminars focus not only on career exploration, but also on human interactions. Students reflect on the personal interactions they observe during their various experiences, and on their own strengths and weaknesses. Essays, designed to help students learn more about their roles in these settings, push them to deal with the sociopolitical issues involved in their service. The major, a robust and vital component of Hiram's undergraduate program, has attracted academically gifted students with a diverse array of career goals.

  13. A passive sampler for atmospheric ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosjean, D.; Hisham, M.W.M. (DGA, Inc., Ventura, CA (United States))

    1992-02-01

    A simple, cost-effective passive sampler has been developed for the determination of atmospheric ozone. This passive sampler is based on a colorant which fades upon reaction with ozone, whose concentration can be determined by reflectance measurement of the color change. Direct, on-site measurements are possible, and no chemical analyses are needed. Sampler design and validation studies have been carried out and included quantitative determination of color change vs exposure time (1-8 days), color change vs. ozone concentration (30-350 ppb), and response to changes in sampler configuration that modify the passive sampling rate. With indigo carmine as the colorant, the detection limits are 30 ppb. day and 120 ppb. day using a plastic grid and Teflon filter, respectively, as diffusion barriers. Interferences from nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and peroxyacetyl nitrate are 15, 4 and 16%, respectively, thus resulting in a negligible bias when measuring ozone in ambient air.

  14. Examining the Sustainability of an Evidence-Based Preschool Curriculum: The REDI Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford DeRousie, Rebecca M.; Bierman, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which an evidence-based preschool curriculum (Head Start REDI) was sustained by 20 teachers during the year following a randomized controlled efficacy trial, when teachers were no longer required by the research project to implement the curriculum. Two quantitative measures of sustainability (teacher ratings, REDI…

  15. Programming in the IS Curriculum: Are Requirements Changing for the Right Reason?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John H.; Adams, D. Robert; Ferguson, Roger C.; Leidig, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    All curricula for any given academic discipline evolves over time. This is also true for the Information Systems (IS) model curriculum. Curriculum evolution is driven by several factors, such as changes in technologies, industry shifts to meet customer needs, and perceived student deficiencies. One outcome of such factors has been a change in the…

  16. Marketing Agricultural Products. Curriculum Guide Developed for Secondary and Post Secondary Agriculture Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. Wade; And Others

    This curriculum guide can be used by secondary and postsecondary agriculture instructors for a semester course in marketing agricultural products or individual units can be incorporated in other courses. The curriculum guide consists of six units of study made up of two to eight lessons each. The units cover the following topics: (1) marketing…

  17. Embedding International Experiences in Business Curriculum Design: Cultivating a Study Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Jeffry; Womble, Lynsee A.; De'Armond, De'Arno

    2013-01-01

    In business education, the impacts of the globalization of markets, financial institutions, and economies exert increasing influence on the curriculum in business schools. Schools of business recognize the need to embed international experiences into their curriculum in order to prepare students for global context of the marketplace. Often,…

  18. Development and evaluation of an ultrasonic personal aerosol sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckens, J; Quinn, C; Leith, D; Mehaffy, J; Henry, C S; Miller-Lionberg, D

    2017-03-01

    Assessing personal exposure to air pollution has long proven challenging due to technological limitations posed by the samplers themselves. Historically, wearable aerosol monitors have proven to be expensive, noisy, and burdensome. The objective of this work was to develop a new type of wearable monitor, an ultrasonic personal aerosol sampler (UPAS), to overcome many of the technological limitations in personal exposure assessment. The UPAS is a time-integrated monitor that features a novel micropump that is virtually silent during operation. A suite of onboard environmental sensors integrated with this pump measure and record mass airflow (0.5-3.0 L/min, accurate within 5%), temperature, pressure, relative humidity, light intensity, and acceleration. Rapid development of the UPAS was made possible through recent advances in low-cost electronics, open-source programming platforms, and additive manufacturing for rapid prototyping. Interchangeable cyclone inlets provided a close match to the EPA PM 2.5 mass criterion (within 5%) for device flows at either 1.0 or 2.0 L/min. Battery life varied from 23 to 45 hours depending on sample flow rate and selected filter media. Laboratory tests of the UPAS prototype demonstrate excellent agreement with equivalent federal reference method samplers for gravimetric analysis of PM 2.5 across a broad range of concentrations. © 2016 The Authors. Indoor Air published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Attitude modification in health education through an interventive, antismoking program incorporated within traditional science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, Uri; Maymon, Tsipora

    The effectiveness of a smoking-prevention program - incorporated within a traditional science curriculum - was assessed in terms of attitude modification in such categories as health, peer pressure, and social image as related to smoking. The study indicates that most relevant attitudes, the emotionally intense in particular, are modifiable in the desired direction, although the changes are small. Some gender differences in the recorded changes suggest a difference in the dynamics of the response to smoking intervention between male and female high school students. A desired change of attitude frequency distributions (e.g., from less extreme to more extreme responses) has also been found. In addition, the tendency of the experimental students to actively act against smoking within family circles increased, although not significantly. All the above was accompanied by a decrease in the number of smokers in the experimental group and a significant increase in the number of smokers in the control group. These results suggest that it is educationally possible to modify attitudes in health education in the desired direction by means of a properly designed interdisciplinary science curricular unit implemented within ongoing traditional science teaching.

  20. Integrating Spanish language training across a Doctor of Physical Therapy curriculum: a case report of one program's evolving model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechak, Celia; Diaz, Deborah; Dillon, Loretta

    2014-12-01

    As the Hispanic population continues to expand in the United States, health professionals increasingly may encounter people who speak Spanish and have limited English proficiency. Responding to these changes, various health profession educators have incorporated Spanish language training into their curricula. Of 12 doctor of physical therapy (DPT) programs identified as including elective or required Spanish courses, the program at The University of Texas at El Paso is the only one integrating required Spanish language training across the curriculum. The purpose of this case report is to describe the development, implementation, and preliminary outcomes of the evolving educational model at The University of Texas at El Paso. The University of Texas at El Paso is situated immediately across the border from Mexico. Responding to the large population with limited English proficiency in the community, faculty began to integrate required Spanish language training during a transition from a master-level to a DPT curriculum. The Spanish language curriculum pillar includes a Spanish medical terminology course, language learning opportunities threaded throughout the clinical courses, clinical education courses, and service-learning. Forty-five DPT students have completed the curriculum. Assessment methods were limited for early cohorts. Clinically relevant Spanish verbal proficiency was assessed with a practical examination in the Spanish course, a clinical instructor-rated instrument, and student feedback. Preliminary data suggested that the model is improving Spanish language proficiency. The model still is evolving. Spanish language learning opportunities in the curriculum are being expanded. Also, problems with the clinical outcome measure have been recognized. Better definition of intended outcomes and validation of a revised tool are needed. This report should promote opportunities for collaboration with others who are interested in linguistic competence. © 2014

  1. The Development and Testing of a Statewide Multilevel Curriculum Management System for Georgia Vocational Education Programs. A Model State Level Curriculum Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Paul; And Others

    A project to propose a system for managing curriculum improvement at the state level (1) identified the basic functions necessary for a statewide curriculum management effort, (2) explained the supporting activities required to initiate and maintain its operation, and (3) developed a model system for curriculum management. The five functions…

  2. Student Perception of the Integrated PBL MBCHB-III Program Curriculum in a Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta Garcia-Jardon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Integrated PBL is now an accepted method of teaching the medical curriculum. The objective of this study was to determine MBChB-III students’ perceptions about some key aspects related to our integrated PBL curriculum. Methods: This was an anonymous, questionnaire based, descriptive study, involving the Walter Sisulu University MBChB year 3 students as participants. The short questionnaire focused on key student perception areas related to integrated PBL curriculum Results: More than half of the students felt that the curriculum enhanced analytical skills, and was reasoning and learning centered. 29.5% of the students felt that the desired goals and objectives were not clear enough. About 90% felt that they felt they could recognize discipline interrelations. While 61.7% of students felt that the curriculum facilitated active learning opportunities, more than 70% felt that it increased the workload and stress levels. About half of the students expressed overall satisfaction with the level of content integration. Conclusion: Students generally presented favorable perceptions of the integrated MBChB-III PBL curriculum.  There were concerns about the associated heavy workload and stress. Student counseling with respect to time and stress management coupled with improvements in curriculum design would be helpful in addressing the issue.

  3. Summer Curriculum Guide for Agriscience/Agrimarketing Programs in Louisiana. Vocational Education Curriculum Development. Bulletin No. 1898.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge.

    Produced by agriscience and agrimarketing teachers, teacher educators in agriculture, and state supervisory staff in agricultural education in Louisiana, this guide was developed to aid experienced and beginning agriscience and agrimarketing teachers to plan and conduct effective summer programs. The guide is organized in the following seven major…

  4. Student Focused Geospatial Curriculum Initiatives: Internships and Certificate Programs at NCCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovic, G.; Malhotra, R.

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports recent efforts by the Department of Environmental, Earth and Geospatial Sciences faculty at North Carolina Central University (NCCU) to develop a leading geospatial sciences program that will be considered a model for other Historically Black College/University (HBCU) peers nationally. NCCU was established in 1909 and is the nation’s first state supported public liberal arts college funded for African Americans. In the most recent annual ranking of America’s best black colleges by the US News and World Report (Best Colleges 2010), NCCU was ranked 10th in the nation. As one of only two HBCUs in the southeast offering an undergraduate degree in Geography (McKee, J.O. and C. V. Dixon. Geography in Historically Black Colleges/ Universities in the Southeast, in The Role of the South in Making of American Geography: Centennial of the AAG, 2004), NCCU is uniquely positioned to positively affect talent and diversity of the geospatial discipline in the future. Therefore, successful creation of research and internship pathways for NCCU students has national implications because it will increase the number of minority students joining the workforce and applying to PhD programs. Several related efforts will be described, including research and internship projects with Fugro EarthData Inc., Center for Remote Sensing and Mapping Science at the University of Georgia, Center for Earthquake Research and Information at the University of Memphis and the City of Durham. The authors will also outline requirements and recent successes of ASPRS Provisional Certification Program, developed and pioneered as collaborative effort between ASPRS and NCCU. This certificate program allows graduating students majoring in geospatial technologies and allied fields to become provisionally certified by passing peer-review and taking the certification exam. At NCCU, projects and certification are conducted under the aegis of the Geospatial Research, Innovative Teaching and

  5. A new passive sampler for collecting atmospheric tritiated water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Chen, Bo; Zhuo, Weihai; Zhang, Weiyuan

    2017-04-01

    A new passive sampler was developed for collecting environmental tritiated water vapor. The construction of the sampler was improved according to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in which the influence on vapor collection by the turbulence inside the sampler was considered. Through changes in temperature from 5 °C to 35 °C and relative humidity from 45% to 90%, the new sampler revealed stable performance of the sampling rate. Compared with the previous samplers, the new sampler significantly lowered the effect of wind speed. Using the adsorption kinetic curve of the sampler provided in the co-comparison experiments, the quantitative relationship between the mass of adsorbed water and the cumulative absolute humidity exposure was established. Field applications in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant show that the data obtained by the new samplers is consistent with the active measurement. The sampler was preliminarily proven to be reliable and flexible for field investigation of HTO in the atmosphere.

  6. Examining the Sustainability of an Evidence-Based Preschool Curriculum: The REDI Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford DeRousie, Rebecca M.; Bierman, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which an evidence-based preschool curriculum (Head Start REDI) was sustained by 20 teachers during the year following a randomized controlled efficacy trial, when teachers were no longer required by the research project to implement the curriculum. Two quantitative measures of sustainability (teacher ratings, REDI coach ratings) and a qualitative measure (teacher interview) were collected and compared. Sustainability varied by the specific curriculum component, with higher rates of sustainability for the social-emotional component (Preschool PATHS) than for the language and literacy components. Estimates of sustainability were affected by the method of measurement, with REDI coach ratings and qualitative teacher interviews more closely aligned than teacher ratings. Responses from qualitative interviews identified the main factors that teachers thought affected sustainability. Teacher responses suggest that efforts to promote sustainability are best targeted at reducing barriers, such as competing demands, rather than simply highlighting the benefits of the new curriculum. PMID:22408287

  7. Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Killu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 25–50 exams on respective systems or organs for a total not less than 125 studies on ICU. The ICU fellows implemented the POC ultrasound curriculum into their daily practice in managing ICU patients, under supervision from ICU staff physicians, who were instructors in POC ultrasound. Impact on patient care including finding a new diagnosis or change in patient management was reviewed over a period of one academic year. Results. 873 POC ultrasound studies in 203 patients admitted to the surgical ICU were reviewed for analysis. All studies included were done through the POC ultrasound curriculum training. The most common exams performed were 379 lung/pleural exams, 239 focused echocardiography and hemodynamic exams, and 237 abdominal exams. New diagnosis was found in 65.52% of cases (95% CI 0.590, 0.720. Changes in patient management were found in 36.95% of cases (95% CI 0.303, 0.435. Conclusions. Implementation of POC ultrasound in the ICU with a structured fellowship curriculum was associated with an increase in new diagnosis in about 2/3 and change in management in over 1/3 of ICU patients studied.

  8. Model Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum in an Intensive Care Unit Fellowship Program and Its Impact on Patient Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killu, Keith; Coba, Victor; Mendez, Michael; Reddy, Subhash; Adrzejewski, Tanja; Huang, Yung; Ede, Jessica; Horst, Mathilda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study was designed to assess the clinical applicability of a Point-of-Care (POC) ultrasound curriculum into an intensive care unit (ICU) fellowship program and its impact on patient care. Methods. A POC ultrasound curriculum for the surgical ICU (SICU) fellowship was designed and implemented in an urban, academic tertiary care center. It included 30 hours of didactics and hands-on training on models. Minimum requirement for each ICU fellow was to perform 25–50 exams on respective systems or organs for a total not less than 125 studies on ICU. The ICU fellows implemented the POC ultrasound curriculum into their daily practice in managing ICU patients, under supervision from ICU staff physicians, who were instructors in POC ultrasound. Impact on patient care including finding a new diagnosis or change in patient management was reviewed over a period of one academic year. Results. 873 POC ultrasound studies in 203 patients admitted to the surgical ICU were reviewed for analysis. All studies included were done through the POC ultrasound curriculum training. The most common exams performed were 379 lung/pleural exams, 239 focused echocardiography and hemodynamic exams, and 237 abdominal exams. New diagnosis was found in 65.52% of cases (95% CI 0.590, 0.720). Changes in patient management were found in 36.95% of cases (95% CI 0.303, 0.435). Conclusions. Implementation of POC ultrasound in the ICU with a structured fellowship curriculum was associated with an increase in new diagnosis in about 2/3 and change in management in over 1/3 of ICU patients studied. PMID:25478217

  9. Cognitive, Behavioral and Emotional Empathy in Pharmacy Students: Targeting Programs for Curriculum Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Cassandra A.; Rizkalla, Mireille N.; Henderson, Kyle K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Empathy is an essential trait for pharmacists and is recognized as a core competency that can be developed in the classroom. There is a growing body of data regarding levels of empathy in pharmacy students; however, these studies have not measured differences in behavioral, cognitive, and emotional empathy. The goal of this study was to parse the underlying components of empathy and correlate them to psychosocial attributes, with the overall goal of identifying curriculum modifications to enhance levels of empathy in pharmacy students. Methods: IRB approval was obtained to measure empathy levels in pharmacy students attending Midwestern University. An online, anonymous survey administered through a secure website (REDCap) was used. This survey utilized the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (Medical Student version) and included questions regarding demographics and personality traits. Empathy questions were sub-divided into behavioral, cognitive, and emotional categories. Data are presented as mean ± SEM with significance set at P ≤ 0.05. Results: Three hundred and four pharmacy students at Midwestern University participated in a fall survey with an overall response rate of 37%. The average empathy score was 110.4 ± 0.8 on a scale of 20–140; which is comparable to empathy scores found by Fjortoft et al. (2011) and Van Winkle et al. (2012b). Validating prior research, females scored significantly higher than males in empathy as well as behavioral, cognitive, and emotional subcomponents. For the entire population, emotional empathy was significantly higher than cognitive and behavioral empathy (P empathy were observed for self-serving behavior (R D 0.490, P empathy levels in pharmacy students are similar to prior studies with females scoring higher than males. Emotional empathy may play a greater role than cognitive and behavioral empathy in this group of students. Targeted programs that promote volunteerism and activities that foster responsiveness to

  10. Engineering the curriculum: Towards an adaptive curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns-Boast, Lynette Frances

    The curriculum is one of the most important artefacts produced by higher education institutions, yet it is one of the least studied. Additionally, little is known about the decision-making of academics when designing and developing their curricula, nor how they make use of them. This research investigates how 22 Australian higher education engineering, software engineering, computer science, and information systems academics conceive of curriculum, what approaches they take when designing, and developing course and program curricula, and what use they make of the curriculum. It also considers the implications of these conceptions and behaviour upon their curricula. Data were collected through a series of one-to-one, in-depth, qualitative interviews as well as small focus group sessions and were analysed following Charmaz’ (2006) approach to grounded theory. In this thesis, I argue that the development of curricula for new higher degree programs and courses and / or the updating and innovating of an existing curriculum is a design problem. I also argue that curriculum is a complex adaptive system. Surrounding the design and development of a curriculum is a process of design that leads to the creation of a designed object – the official-curriculum. The official-curriculum provides the guiding principles for its implementation, which involves the design and development of the curriculum-in-use, its delivery, and evaluation. Data show that while the participants conceive of curriculum as a problem of design involving a design process leading to the development of the official-curriculum, surprisingly, their behaviour does not match their conceptions. Over a very short period, their behaviour leads to a process I have called curriculum drift where the official-curriculum and the curriculum-in-use drift away from each other causing the curriculum to lose its integrity. Curricular integrity is characterised through the attributes of alignment, coherence, and

  11. Portable XRF analysis of occupational air filter samples from different workplaces using different samplers: final results, summary and conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Martin; Pacolay, Bruce; Hintz, Patrick; Bartley, David L; Slaven, James E; Andrew, Michael E

    2007-11-01

    This paper concludes a five-year program on research into the use of a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer for analyzing lead in air sampling filters from different industrial environments, including mining, manufacturing and recycling. The results from four of these environments have already been reported. The results from two additional metal processes are presented here. At both of these sites, lead was a minor component of the total airborne metals and interferences from other elements were minimal. Nevertheless, only results from the three sites where lead was the most abundant metal were used in the overall calculation of method accuracy. The XRF analyzer was used to interrogate the filters, which were then subjected to acid digestion and analysis by inductively-coupled plasma optical-emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The filter samples were collected using different filter-holders or "samplers" where the size (diameter), depth and homogeneity of aerosol deposit varied from sampler to sampler. The aerosol collection efficiencies of the samplers were expected to differ, especially for larger particles. The distribution of particles once having entered the sampler was also expected to differ between samplers. Samplers were paired to allow the between-sampler variability to be addressed, and, in some cases, internal sampler wall deposits were evaluated and compared to the filter catch. It was found, rather surprisingly, that analysis of the filter deposits (by ICP-OES) of all the samplers gave equivalent results. It was also found that deposits on some of the sampler walls, which in some protocols are considered part of the sample, could be significant in comparison to the filter deposit. If it is concluded that wall-deposits should be analyzed, then XRF analysis of the filter can only give a minimum estimate of the concentration. Techniques for the statistical analysis of field data were also developed as part of this program and have been reported

  12. Cognitive, Behavioral and Emotional Empathy in Pharmacy Students: Targeting Programs for Curriculum Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra A. Tamayo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Empathy is an essential trait for pharmacists and is recognized as a core competency that can be developed in the classroom. There is a growing body of data regarding levels of empathy in pharmacy students; however, these studies have not measured differences in behavioral, cognitive, and emotional empathy. The goal of this study was to parse the underlying components of empathy and correlate them to psychosocial attributes, with the overall goal of identifying curriculum modifications to enhance levels of empathy in pharmacy students.Methods: IRB approval was obtained to measure empathy levels in pharmacy students attending Midwestern University. An online, anonymous survey administered through a secure website (REDCap was used. This survey utilized the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (Medical Student version and included questions regarding demographics and personality traits. Empathy questions were sub-divided into behavioral, cognitive, and emotional categories. Data are presented as mean ± SEM with significance set at P < 0.05.Results: Three hundred and four pharmacy students at Midwestern University participated in a fall survey with an overall response rate of 37%. The average empathy score was 110.4 ± 0.8 on a scale of 20-140; which is comparable to empathy scores found by Fjortoft et al. and Van Winkle et al. Validating prior research, females scored significantly higher than males in empathy as well as behavioral, cognitive, and emotional subcomponents. For the entire population, emotional empathy was significantly higher than cognitive and behavioral empathy (P < 0.05. Furthermore, negative correlations to empathy were observed for self-serving behavior (R = 0.490, P < 0.001, medical authoritarianism (R = 0.428, P < 0.001, and experience of coercion (R = 0.344, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Overall, empathy levels in pharmacy students are similar to prior studies with females scoring higher than males. Emotional empathy may play a

  13. [DIFFERENCES IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND IN PHYSICAL CONDITION BETWEEN SCHOOL AGE STUDENTS OF TWO PUBLIC CURRICULUM PROGRAMS IN BOGOTA, COLOMBIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Cubides, Raúl; Aldana Alarcón, Luis Gonzalo; Gutiérrez Galvis, Adriana Rocío

    2015-11-01

    During the past five decades there has been an increased in the prevalence of obesity and over weight, also in physical inactivity and /or low cardiorespiratory fitness within the population in school age from diverse regions of the planet, including Bogota-Colombia. The general objective of this study was to compare the physical condition and the levels of physical activity from students who belonged to two curriculum programs of the Public Schools Network from Bogota, one of which includes two sessions per week, each session of 90 minutes of physical activity. We developed a research of unlike cross-sectional groups. There were 178 children evaluated from the regular curriculum and 170 kids belonging to the program 40 x 40. The physical condition was evaluated applying the protocol of high priority from the ALPHA -Fitness test Battery. The weight, height, body mass index, the waist circumference, the standing long jump, the handgrip in both hands and the motor fitness 20 meter shuttle run test were developed under standardized conditions. The Global School Health Survey (GSHS) was used to evaluate the levels of AF. No significant statistical differences were founded between P-40x40 and the regular curriculum regarding: weight, height, the body mass index, the waist circumference, the handgrip in both hands and the explosive strength in lower limbs. Nevertheless the cardiorespiratory fitness was significantly lower within de P-40x40. In conclusion the participation in the curricular program 40 x 40 was not associated with better levels of physical condition. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  14. Curriculum Development: Teacher Involvement in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    In order for curriculum development to be effective and schools to be successful, teachers must be involved in the development process. An effective curriculum should reflect the philosophy, goals, objectives, learning experiences, instructional resources, and assessments that comprise a specific educational program ("Guide to curriculum…

  15. Implementing radical curriculum change in a family medicine residency: the majors and masteries program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Michael; Krasovich, Susanne; Fay, David; Ginn, Patrick; Lopresti, Leigh; Nelson, Karen; Ambuel, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    There have been dramatic changes in the specialty of family medicine and the American health care system in the more than 40 years since the formation of the specialty. As a result, there is urgent need for experimentation and innovation in residency training to better prepare family physicians. Waukesha Family Medicine Residency used a strategic planning process to identify four guiding concepts for a new model of residency education: intentional diversification; options for advanced training in a fourth year of residency; longitudinal, competency-based training; and strong fundamental background in family medicine skills. These concepts guided radical restructuring of the curriculum. The new Majors and Masteries curriculum begins with 19 months of training in core family medicine skills. Residents then elect to pursue a Major or Mastery in an area of interest. Majors are completed within 3 years, while Masteries are completed in 4 years and include advanced training (MPH, MBA, advanced obstetrics). Since implementation, residents have selected a broad range of Majors, three residents have elected advanced training in three different mastery areas, and resident recruitment has not been disrupted. The Majors and Masteries curriculum and the process used to implement it may benefit other residencies considering radical curriculum change.

  16. Maintaining Curriculum Consistency of Technical and Vocational Educational Programs through Teacher Design Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albashiry, Nabeel; Voogt, Joke; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining the quality and relevance of Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) curricula is a great challenge for TVET institutions in developing countries. One major challenge lies in the lack of curriculum design expertise of TVET academics. The purpose of this multiplecase study is

  17. Implementing Visual Culture Curriculum for Underserved Populations in an Afterschool Ceramics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Christen Noel

    2017-01-01

    Economically disadvantaged students face an array of adversities during their childhood. With the media having an outstanding influence on the self-esteem of children, it is important that they have the tools necessary to question images they encounter. A Visual Culture curriculum in combination with a ceramics course can provide students with the…

  18. Certification of School Social Workers and Curriculum Content of Programs Offering Training in School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, Ann Marie; Bye, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the status of certification requirements for school social workers across the United States and the policy context in which certification is embedded. The article also details findings of a study on the curriculum available at various schools of social work offering training in school social work. The article makes a case for…

  19. Mexico, Past and Present. Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2002 (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamken, Mary

    This curriculum unit focuses on the Aztec settlement in Mesoamerica comparing it with present-day Mexico. The unit is oriented to teach basic communicative skills to beginning English language learners in small groups of approximately five students. It helps Mexican Spanish-speaking students embrace their own culture and build on their prior…

  20. An Analysis of the e-Business Program in the School of Business Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Shyamalendu; Reddy, Surender

    2007-01-01

    The article analyzes various present and future aspects of e-business as it is or should be incorporated in the school of business curriculum. The study uses both primary and secondary data. The results indicate that e-business courses are currently taught across the traditional disciplines of business schools. The courses are primarily taught as…

  1. Juno Lighting Inc. Curriculum, Basic Skills for Maintenance Workers. Worker Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sabrina Budasi

    The curriculum guide is designed for a basic skills course for machine maintenance workers. The 12-week course is divided into three segments: English as a Second Language and vocabulary development; technical vocabulary and mathematics; and technical symbols, trouble-shooting, and word problems. For each of the three segments, a list of…

  2. China: Tradition and Transformation Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This collection of curriculum projects considers the change and modernization of China. The following 15 projects are in the collection: "Globalization in China" (Allan Cooper); "Religion and Identity in Contemporary China" (Wade H. Dazey); "China and the West: A Global Context for Chinese Immigration to the United…

  3. The Relationship between Curriculum Change and Student Outcomes in a Registered Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Nursing schools face the challenge of improving student academic performance and completion rates. The current supply of newly graduated nurses fails to meet the increasing demands of society. In 2009, Cochise College responded by implementing a major change in their curriculum to improve student retention and academic performance. The problem…

  4. Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler (RAFS) Operation Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler (RAFS) is a field instrument that provides an in-situ measurement of asbestos releasability from consistent and reproducible mechanical agitation of the source material such as soil. The RAFS was designed to measure concentration (asbestos st...

  5. Improving suspended sediment measurements by automatic samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettel, Melissa; Gulliver, John S; Kayhanian, Masoud; DeGroot, Gregory; Brand, Joshua; Mohseni, Omid; Erickson, Andrew J

    2011-10-01

    Suspended solids either as total suspended solids (TSS) or suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is an integral particulate water quality parameter that is important in assessing particle-bound contaminants. At present, nearly all stormwater runoff quality monitoring is performed with automatic samplers in which the sampling intake is typically installed at the bottom of a storm sewer or channel. This method of sampling often results in a less accurate measurement of suspended sediment and associated pollutants due to the vertical variation in particle concentration caused by particle settling. In this study, the inaccuracies associated with sampling by conventional intakes for automatic samplers have been verified by testing with known suspended sediment concentrations and known particle sizes ranging from approximately 20 μm to 355 μm under various flow rates. Experimental results show that, for samples collected at a typical automatic sampler intake position, the ratio of sampled to feed suspended sediment concentration is up to 6600% without an intake strainer and up to 300% with a strainer. When the sampling intake is modified with multiple sampling tubes and fitted with a wing to provide lift (winged arm sampler intake), the accuracy of sampling improves substantially. With this modification, the differences between sampled and feed suspended sediment concentration were more consistent and the sampled to feed concentration ratio was accurate to within 10% for particle sizes up to 250 μm.

  6. Information on the Arnhem Sampler (BTMA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, M.

    1979-01-01

    The Subcommittee 6 of the Technical Committee 113 of the International Standardization Organization (ISO) is dealing with measurements of sediment transport in open channels. As a back-ground paper for TC113 this report is written on the BTMA, internationally named the Arnhem Sampler. The BTMA has

  7. Retained gas sampler system acceptance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, N.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-18

    Acceptance test results for the Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS) obtained in the 306E laboratory are reported. The RGSS will be utilized to retrieve and analyze samples from the Hanford flammable gas watch-list tanks to determine the quantity and chemistry of gases confined within the waste.

  8. Retained Gas Sampler Calibration and Simulant Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CRAWFORD, B.A.

    2000-01-05

    This test plan provides a method for calibration of the retained gas sampler (RGS) for ammonia gas analysis. Simulant solutions of ammonium hydroxide at known concentrations will be diluted with isotopically labeled 0.04 M ammonium hydroxide solution. Sea sand solids will also be mixed with ammonium hydroxide solution and diluent to determine the accuracy of the system for ammonia gas analysis.

  9. Equasions for Curriculum Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrod, James S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Technology in Curriculum (TIC) program resource guides which will be distributed to California schools in the fall of 1986. These guides match available instructional television programs and computer software to existing California curriculum guides in order to facilitate teachers' classroom use. (JDH)

  10. Suggested Curriculum Guidelines for an Effective Bilingual Program. 1972-1973. Destrezas Comunicativas del Idioma Espanol. Spanish Language Skills. Second Grade, Level 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artesia Public Schools, NM.

    This volume contains suggested curriculum guidelines for an effective bilingual program, with specific focus on Spanish language skills for the second grade level. The philosophy of the program views bilingual education as a vehicle and pedagogical tool to be used to better prepare all children to function in society. The point of departure for…

  11. Suggested Curriculum Guidelines for an Effective Bilingual Program, 1972-1973. Destrezas Comunicativas del Idioma Espanol. Spanish Language Skills. Third Grade, Level 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artesia Public Schools, NM.

    This volume contains suggested curriculum guidelines for an effective bilingual program, with specific focus on Spanish language skills for the third grade level. The philosophy of the program views bilingual education as a vehicle and pedagogical tool to be used to better prepare all children to function in society. The point of departure for…

  12. Earth Resources. A Case Study: Oil Sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento.

    This document presents a sample of grades 6-12 science curriculum on Earth resources to promote scientific literacy. This natural resource-based curriculum uses an inquiry-based, hands-on approach and allows for community partnerships during student learning processes. Lessons plans included in this curriculum are divided into 4 categories: (1)…

  13. Curriculum design of emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanazi AF

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Foraih AlanaziCollege of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, was adapted from the integrated problem-based learning curriculum of Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the major adaptations required for adoption of the full-fledged PBL curriculum, use of sequential blocks, and multilayer alignment of the curriculum.Methods: A logical model and step-by-step approach were used to design the curriculum. Several studies using Delphi methods, focus group interviews, and expert opinions were performed to identify the priority health problems; related competencies, learning objectives, and learning strategies; the web-based curriculum for delivery; student assessment; and program evaluation.Results: Sixty priority health problems were identified for inclusion in different blocks of the curriculum. Identified competencies matched the satisfaction of different stakeholders, and ascertained learning objectives and strategies were aligned with the competencies. A full-fledged web-based curriculum was designed and an assessment was created that aligned with a blueprint of the objectives and the mode of delivery.Conclusion: Step-by-step design ensures the multilayer alignment of the curriculum, including priority health problems, competencies, objectives, student assessment, and program evaluation.Keywords: emergency medical services, problem-based learning, logical model, step-by-step approach, multilayer alignment

  14. Program evaluation of an Integrated Basic Science Medical Curriculum in Shiraz Medical School, Using CIPP Evaluation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooholamini, Azadeh; Amini, Mitra; Bazrafkan, Leila; Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Esmaeilzadeh, Zohreh; Nabeiei, Parisa; Rezaee, Rita; Kojuri, Javad

    2017-07-01

    In recent years curriculum reform and integration was done in many medical schools. The integrated curriculum is a popular concept all over the world. In Shiraz medical school, the reform was initiated by stablishing the horizontal basic science integration model and Early Clinical Exposure (ECE) for undergraduate medical education. The purpose of this study was to provide the required data for the program evaluation of this curriculum for undergraduate medical students, using CIPP program evaluation model. This study is an analytic descriptive and triangulation mixed method study which was carried out in Shiraz Medical School in 2012, based on the views of professors of basic sciences courses and first and second year medical students. The study evaluated the quality of the relationship between basic sciences and clinical courses and the method of presenting such courses based on the Context, Input, Process and Product (CIPP) model. The tools for collecting data, both quantitatively and qualitatively, were some questionnaires, content analysis of portfolios, semi- structured interview and brain storming sessions. For quantitative data analysis, SPSS software, version 14, was used. In the context evaluation by modified DREEM questionnaire, 77.75%of the students believed that this educational system encourages them to actively participate in classes. Course schedule and atmosphere of class were reported suitable by 87.81% and 83.86% of students. In input domain that was measured by a researcher made questionnaire, the facilities for education were acceptable except for shortage of cadavers. In process evaluation, the quality of integrated modules presentation and Early Clinical Exposure (ECE) was good from the students' viewpoint. In product evaluation, students' brain storming, students' portfolio and semi-structured interview with faculties were done, showing some positive aspects of integration and some areas that need improvement. The main advantage of assessing

  15. Program evaluation of an integrated basic science medical curriculum in Shiraz Medical School, using CIPP evaluation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZADEH ROOHOLAMINI

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years curriculum reform and integration was done in many medical schools. The integrated curriculum is a popular concept all over the world. In Shiraz medical school, the reform was initiated by stablishing the horizontal basic science integration model and Early Clinical Exposure (ECE for undergraduate medical education. The purpose of this study was to provide the required data for the program evaluation of this curriculum for undergraduate medical students, using CIPP program evaluation model. Methods: This study is an analytic descriptive and triangulation mixed method study which was carried out in Shiraz Medical School in 2012, based on the views of professors of basic sciences courses and first and second year medical students. The study evaluated the quality of the relationship between basic sciences and clinical courses and the method of presenting such courses based on the Context, Input, Process and Product (CIPP model. The tools for collecting data, both quantitatively and qualitatively, were some questionnaires, content analysis of portfolios, semistructured interview and brain storming sessions. For quantitative data analysis, SPSS software, version 14, was used. Results: In the context evaluation by modified DREEM questionnaire, 77.75%of the students believed that this educational system encourages them to actively participate in classes. Course schedule and atmosphere of class were reported suitable by 87.81% and 83.86% of students. In input domain that was measured by a researcher made questionnaire, the facilities for education were acceptable except for shortage of cadavers. In process evaluation, the quality of integrated modules presentation and Early Clinical Exposure (ECE was good from the students’ viewpoint. In product evaluation, students’ brain storming, students’ portfolio and semi-structured interview with faculties were done, showing some positive aspects of integration and some areas

  16. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education: Competency and Curriculum Development for Preventive Medicine and Other Specialty Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Asim A; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2015-11-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS's Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine's dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site's competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees' work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine training

  17. Development and Assessment of an HIV-focused E-learning Flipped Classroom Curriculum in an Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, Sara; Sandkovsky, Uriel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Most of the care of HIV-infected patients is now provided in the clinic where there is less time for bedside teaching than in the inpatient setting. We sought to augment the clinical experience by developing an HIV-focused e-learning flipped classroom curriculum in our ID fellowship program. Methods Six e-learning modules were developed using Articulate Storyline. Topics included: HIV Diagnosis, Evaluation of the HIV-infected Patient, When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy, What to Start, HIV Resistance, and HIV Drug-Drug Interactions. Modules were made available 1 week in advance, lasted 20 minutes, and included interactive questions. Class time was spent discussing clinical cases related to the module. The IDSA “HIV Medicine in Clinical Practice” exam and pre and post-course surveys were administered to measure changes in both objective and self-perceived knowledge before and after completion of the curriculum. Wilcoxon-signed rank test was used to compare test results between the 2 periods. Results Seven fellows participated in the curriculum and 10 fellows completed the pre and post-tests (3 fellows tested only with pretest as they were finishing fellowship, 4 fellows took both pre and post- test, and 3 fellows only took the post-test). Overall scores between pre-and post-test were not significantly different between pooled pre- and post-test results (7 fellows took each test) (P = 0.8). Among the 4 fellows who completed both tests, there was a trend to improved scores (P = 0.06). 7 of 7 fellows completed the pre- and post-curriculum surveys. All agreed or strongly agreed that the flipped classroom model enhanced their learning of the material and self-perceived knowledge improved in all assessed areas following participation in the curriculum (see Figure). Conclusion The introduction of the e-learning modules in a flipped classroom format was well received by fellows and allowed for better preparation and discussion of HIV-related topics

  18. Humanities for medical students? A qualitative study of a medical humanities curriculum in a medical school program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troein Margareta

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today, there is a trend towards establishing the medical humanities as a component of medical education. However, medical humanities programs that exist within the context of a medical school can be problematic. The aim of this study was to explore problems that can arise with the establishment of a medical humanities curriculum in a medical school program. Methods Our theoretical approach in this study is informed by derridean deconstruction and by post-structuralist analysis. We examined the ideology of the Humanities and Medicine program at Lund University, Sweden, the practical implementation of the program, and how ideology and practice corresponded. Examination of the ideology driving the humanities and medicine program was based on a critical reading of all available written material concerning the Humanities and Medicine project. The practice of the program was examined by means of a participatory observation study of one course, and by in-depth interviews with five students who participated in the course. Data was analysed using a hermeneutic editing approach. Results The ideological language used to describe the program calls it an interdisciplinary learning environment but at the same time shows that the conditions of the program are established by the medical faculty's agenda. In practice, the "humanities" are constructed, defined and used within a medical frame of reference. Medical students have interesting discussions, acquire concepts and enjoy the program. But they come away lacking theoretical structure to understand what they have learned. There is no place for humanities students in the program. Conclusion A challenge facing cross-disciplinary programs is creating an environment where the disciplines have equal standing and contribution.

  19. Developing Culturally Sensitive Parent Education Programs for Immigrant Families: The Helping Youth Succeed Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zha Blong Xiong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the process by which the Helping Youth Succeed (HYS curriculum was developed for Cambodian, Hmong, Lao, and Vietnamese immigrants in the United States to help address and minimize conflicts between immigrant parents and their adolescent children. A detailed explanation of this model is provided to encourage the development of additional culturally specific parent education curricula for other immigrant/refugee groups and/or diversepopulations.

  20. Stimulated Hyposalivary Flow Rates in Healthcare Students in an Interprofessional Awareness Educational Program Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Wiener, R. Constance; Morgan, Susan; Swager, Lauren; DeBiase, Christina; Lilly, Christa L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Hyposalivation influences quality of life and medication compliance. However, oral health knowledge (in general) and knowledge about hyposalivation (in particular) are often lacking in nondental healthcare professional’s curricula. Additionally, hyposalivation has not been adequately studied in young adults. The purpose for this study is twofold: to use an interprofessional educational curriculum to increase nondental healthcare students’ knowledge about oral health and salivary test...

  1. The hidden curriculum in radiology residency programs: A path to isolation or integration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Deven, T. [Department of Medical Imaging, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry (Canada); Hibbert, K., E-mail: khibbert@uwo.ca [Faculty of Education, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry (Canada); Faden, L. [Faculty of Education, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); Chhem, R.K. [Institute of History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine, Ulm University, Ulm (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: In this qualitative case study involving five academic Radiology centres across Canada, the authors seek to identify the hidden curriculum. Methods: A qualitative case study methodology was used for its potential to explore and provide rich descriptions and allow for the in-depth analysis of multiple data sources that include official institutional documents, surveys, observations and interviews (including undergraduate students, postgraduate, radiologists, imaging scientists, residents, faculty and administrators). This study relied on 48 interviews and involved primary data analysis by the core research team, and a secondary analysis by external examiners. Results: The results revealed that in four of the five major centres studied, a hidden curriculum of isolation prevailed, reinforcing an image of the radiologist as an independent operator within an organization dependent upon collaboration for optimal performance. The fifth site exhibited a hidden curriculum of collaboration and support, although the messages received were conflicting when addressing issues around teaching. Conclusions: The authors conclude by noting two possibilities for medical imaging departments to consider that of isolation or that of integration. They examine the implications of each and propose a way forward that situates Radiology as the crossroads of medicine. As such, the need for a new, generative metaphor reasserts the importance of recognizing the role and function of scholarship in teaching and learning contexts across Canada.

  2. The hidden curriculum in radiology residency programs: a path to isolation or integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deven, T; Hibbert, K; Faden, L; Chhem, R K

    2013-05-01

    In this qualitative case study involving five academic Radiology centres across Canada, the authors seek to identify the hidden curriculum. A qualitative case study methodology was used for its potential to explore and provide rich descriptions and allow for the in-depth analysis of multiple data sources that include official institutional documents, surveys, observations and interviews (including undergraduate students, postgraduate, radiologists, imaging scientists, residents, faculty and administrators). This study relied on 48 interviews and involved primary data analysis by the core research team, and a secondary analysis by external examiners. The results revealed that in four of the five major centres studied, a hidden curriculum of isolation prevailed, reinforcing an image of the radiologist as an independent operator within an organization dependent upon collaboration for optimal performance. The fifth site exhibited a hidden curriculum of collaboration and support, although the messages received were conflicting when addressing issues around teaching. The authors conclude by noting two possibilities for medical imaging departments to consider that of isolation or that of integration. They examine the implications of each and propose a way forward that situates Radiology as the crossroads of medicine. As such, the need for a new, generative metaphor reasserts the importance of recognizing the role and function of scholarship in teaching and learning contexts across Canada. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Survey of Current Clinical and Curriculum Practices of Postgraduate Pediatric Dentistry Programs in Nonintravenous Conscious Sedation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Aline; Ocanto, Romer; Drukteinis, Lesbia; Hardigan, Patrick C

    2016-10-15

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) describe the sedation protocols of postgraduate pediatric dentistry programs (PPDPs) in the U.S.; (2) evaluate how consistent they were with current American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry sedation guidelines and Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) sedation curriculum requirements; (3) identify barriers to and tools for implementing these guidelines; and (4) determine the independent association between PPDPs' adherence to guidelines and the program setting. In February 2015, a 40-item questionnaire was e-mailed to all postgraduate pediatric dentistry program directors (PPDPDs) of CODA-accredited programs in the U.S. (n equals 74). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Kruskal-Wallis and pairwise Nemenyi tests. Fifty-two PPDPDs responded (70 percent). Since the 2013 change in CODA sedation requirements, only a limited number of PPDPs (36 percent) were found to be noncompliant with CODA standards. PPDPDs trained at hospital-based programs were found to direct programs that were more compliant with CODA sedation standards (PPediatric Dentistry and Commission on Dental Accreditation sedation standards.

  4. Curriculum as natural history: A life-history case study of an alternative science learning program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windward, Rolfe

    The aim of this study is to further our understanding of the nexus between individual development and conceptions of science curriculum with particular emphasis upon root metaphors. The initial conceptual springboard is based upon the rather consistent conflation of selectionist (Darwinian) and developmental cosmologies in most scientific thinking about complex systems. A partial goal of this study then being the development of a visual metaphor that offers a more coherent heuristic of what it means to be a knowing individual within a changing ecosocial reality. This is a paradigmatic examination and it is conjectured that the root assumptions underlying the bulk of curriculum theory are unrealistic, that the appearance of stability in curriculum and practice is largely a byproduct of misclassification or even category error, and that reconceptualizing curriculum as a description of an adaptive system rather than a system-by-design will assist in unpacking a number of problems including the so-called theory-practice gap. The basic procedure is a life-history case study of seven participants--three female high school students, three male high school students, and their teacher--tracked between three learning contexts: the classroom, an extracurricular science "institute," and a virtual astronomy class. The biography of the researcher is incorporated both as a matter of methodology and as a matter of interventionist stance. It is concluded that the 'science institute' embodied a number of innovative features, including more equality among all participants, that also allowed masking-off of countervailing forces perceived as antithetical to its own development. Its organization was not stable but constituted a strongly expansive instrument in the individuation of all participants, allowing the students to more clearly visualize the multiple natures of science and themselves as individuals and scientists. It also allowed the teacher involved to leverage change in his

  5. Research of Relation of Samplers Frequency Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaš Tankeliun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an algorithm to reduce limitations in band-width measurements of sampling oscilloscopes then using a swept sine-wave measurement method. The traditional swept sine-wave method allow measure only magnitude response. Phase response can be computed only if a sampler is a minimal phase circuit. In this paper alternative bandwidth measurement algorithm using the nose-to-nose method with measurements corrections for the non-idle properties of oscilloscope is de-scribed. Algorithm includes for noise, time base distortions and jitter in measurement signals corrections methods. Proposed algorithm allows to measure phase and magnitude responses when only two similar oscilloscopes and the source of sync pulse are used. Algorithm performs as well as the swept sine-wave method in case when both samplers have the same frequency characteristics.

  6. Three-Wheel Brush-Wheel Sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Geoffrey A.; Liu, Jun; Brown, Mark G.

    2010-01-01

    A new sampler is similar to a common snow blower, but is robust and effective in sample collection. The brush wheels are arranged in a triangle shape, each driven by a brushless DC motor and planetary gearhead embedded in the wheel shaft. Its speed can be varied from 800 - 2,000 rpm, depending on the surface regolith resistance. The sample-collecting flow path, and internal features, are designed based on flow dynamics, and the sample-collecting rates have consistently exceeded the requirement under various conditions that span the range of expected surface properties. The brush-wheel sampler (BWS) is designed so that the flow channel is the main body of the apparatus, and links the brush-wheel assembly to the sample canister. The combination of the three brush wheels, the sample flow path, and the canister location make sample collection, storage, and transfer an easier task.

  7. Development of a curriculum and training program in Woman Veterans Health for Internal Medical Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylony, Manju; Porhomayon, Jahan; Pourafkari, Leili; Nader, Nader D

    2017-09-26

    Internal Medicine residents must develop competency as Primary Care Providers, but a gap exists in their curriculum and training with regard to women's reproductive health. With increasing need in VA due to new influx of women veterans it poses problems in recruitment of competent physicians trained in Women's health. An intensive, one-month women's reproductive health curriculum with hands on experience for Internal Medicine residents was provided. Curriculum was taught to the residents who rotated at the Women's Health Clinic for one month. Pre-test and post-test exams were administered. Increase in knowledge of residents in providing gender specific evaluations and management was objectively assessed by changes in post-test scores. Data were analyzed for statistically significant improvement in written tests scores. Total of 47 Internal Medicine residents rotated through Women's Health Center during the evaluation period. All residents completed both pre-test and post-test exams. The average time to complete the pre-test was 20.5 ± 5.4 min and 19.5 ± 4.8 min for post-test. There was no correlation between the time to complete the pre-test exam and the post-test exam. The total score was significantly improved from 8.5 ± 1.6 to 13.2 ± 1.8 (p training with information on women's health that enables them to provide safe and gender appropriate care in primary care settings. This practice will reduce the need for frequent referrals for specialized care and thus provide cost saving for patient and health care on the whole.

  8. Business Education for Plastic Surgeons: A Systematic Review, Development, and Implementation of a Business Principles Curriculum in a Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Bahar; Burce, Karen K; Seal, Stella M; Lifchez, Scott D; Redett, Richard J; Frick, Kevin D; Dorafshar, Amir H; Cooney, Carisa M

    2017-05-01

    Rising health care costs, decreasing reimbursement rates, and changes in American health care are forcing physicians to become increasingly business-minded. Both academic and private plastic surgeons can benefit from being educated in business principles. The authors conducted a systematic review to identify existing business curricula and integrated a business principles curriculum into residency training. The authors anonymously surveyed their department regarding perceived importance of business principles and performed a systematic literature review from 1993 to 2013 using PubMed and Embase to identify residency training programs that had designed/implemented business curricula. Subsequently, the authors implemented a formal, quarterly business curriculum. Thirty-two of 36 physicians (88.9 percent; 76.6 percent response rate) stated business principles are either "pretty important" or "very important" to being a doctor. Only 36 percent of faculty and 41 percent of trainees had previous business instruction. The authors identified 434 articles in the systematic review: 29 documented formal business curricula. Twelve topics were addressed, with practice management/administration (n = 22) and systems-based practice (n = 6) being the most common. Four articles were from surgical specialties: otolaryngology (n = 1), general surgery (n = 2), and combined general surgery/plastic surgery (n = 1). Teaching formats included lectures and self-directed learning modules; outcomes and participant satisfaction were reported inconsistently. From August of 2013 to June of 2015, the authors held eight business principles sessions. Postsession surveys demonstrated moderately to extremely satisfied responses in 75 percent or more of resident/fellow respondents (n = 13; response rate, 48.1 percent) and faculty (n = 9; response rate, 45.0 percent). Business principles can be integrated into residency training programs. Having speakers familiar with the physician audience and a

  9. A wind tunnel test of newly developed personal bioaerosol samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Chung; Tolchinsky, Alexander D; Sigaev, Vladimir I; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2012-07-01

    In this study the performance of two newly developed personal bioaerosol samplers was evaluated. The two test samplers are cyclone-based personal samplers that incorporate a recirculating liquid film. The performance evaluations focused on the physical efficiencies that a personal bioaerosol sampler could provide, including aspiration, collection, and capture efficiencies. The evaluation tests were carried out in a wind tunnel, and the test personal samplers were mounted on the chest of a full-size manikin placed in the test chamber of the wind tunnel. Monodisperse fluorescent aerosols ranging from 0.5 to 20 microm were used to challenge the samplers. Two wind speeds of 0.5 and 2.0 m/sec were employed as the test wind speeds in this study. The test results indicated that the aspiration efficiency of the two test samplers closely agreed with the ACGIH inhalable convention within the size range of the test aerosols. The aspiration efficiency was found to be independent of the sampling orientation. The collection efficiency acquired from these two samplers showed that the 50% cutoff diameters were both around 0.6 microm. However the wall loss of these two test samplers increased as the aerosol size increased, and the wall loss of PAS-4 was considerably higher than that of PAS-5, especially in the aerosol size larger than 5 microm, which resulted in PAS-4 having a relatively lower capture efficiency than PAS-5. Overall, the PAS-5 is considered a better personal bioaerosol sampler than the PAS-4.

  10. The "Comparing Approaches" Workshop as an Introduction to Inquiry-Based Learning, Curriculum Design, and the Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Comparing Approaches to Hands-On Science workshop was developed by the Institute for Inquiry at the Exploratorium and incorporated as a half-day activity into the Center for Adaptive Optics Professional Development Program (PDP) and other teaching venues supported by PDP participants and staff. The Comparing Approaches activity builds upon the common assumption that "hands-on" learning experiences develop deeper and longer-lasting understanding of material. It challenges teacher-participants to reflect on why that is and to consider how hands-on learning is most effectively incorporated into a science curriculum to meet the defined content, scientific process, and attitudinal objectives. I have participated in the Comparing Approaches workshop at several venues and with a variety of roles, and in this paper I describe how the workshop is effective as preparation for exploring the concept of inquiry and inquiry-based learning and as an introduction to "backward" curriculum design and to the PDP as a whole. I discuss challenges I faced as a participant, as a facilitator (instructor) for the activity, and as a discussion leader and provide advice for future implementations of the workshop.

  11. Development of a New Curriculum in a Positive Youth Development Program: The Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of a new curriculum in a positive youth development program (Project P.A.T.H.S. in Hong Kong is outlined. The Tier 1 Program of the original phase of the Project P.A.T.H.S. is a universal positive youth development program for students in Secondary 1 to Secondary 3 with the curricula developed by a research team comprising scholars in different disciplines (e.g., social work, psychology, and education. The 120 teaching units are designed with reference to 15 positive youth development constructs identified in the successful positive youth development programs. In the extension phase of the project, a new curriculum with 60 teaching units is developed in accordance with these 15 constructs with specific reference to five major adolescent developmental issues. These issues include substance abuse, sexuality issue, Internet addiction, bullying, and money and success issues. The principles underlying the program development and implementation strategies are outlined.

  12. Cosmetology. Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Michael D.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to offer guidelines along with supporting resources and teaching ideas from which the local secondary instructor can extract a cosmetology curriculum that meets local needs. Following an outline of the philosophy and goals underlying state and local vocational education programs in Georgia, the purpose and…

  13. Marketing Education Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide is intended to provide a common core of competencies from which to design an effective secondary marketing education program. Introductory materials include a definition of marketing education, objectives, outline of instructional content, and questions and answers regarding the curriculum guide. These practical materials are…

  14. Curriculum Development Based on the Big Picture Assessment of the Mechanical Engineering Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Mohd Anas Mohd; Khamis, Nor Kamaliana; Tahir, Mohd Faizal Mat; Wahid, Zaliha; Kamal, Ahmad; Ihsan, Ariffin Mohd; Sulong, Abu Bakar; Abdullah, Shahrum

    2013-01-01

    One of the major concerns of the Engineering Accreditation Council (EAC) is the need for an effective monitoring and evaluation of program outcome domains that can be associated with courses taught under the Mechanical Engineering program. However, an effective monitoring method that can determine the results of each program outcome using Bloom's…

  15. Compendium of Curriculum Projects for 1991 Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program: Ancient and Modern Egypt and Israel, June 20-22, 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of International Education, New York, NY.

    These curriculum projects were produced by teachers who traveled to Egypt and Israel as part of the Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program. The materials developed by the educators were: Activities and Bibliography of Resources to Promote Student Involvement in a Class Study of Egypt and Egyptian Culture (Edith Baxter); Egypt at the Crossroads of…

  16. Developing Leaders Through Future-Aimed Curriculum: An Instructional Future-Aimed Curriculum Model, USOE Programs for Education of the Gifted and Talented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakima School District Number 7, WA.

    The document is designed to provide the teacher of the gifted and talented child with an overview and operational procedure to facilitate the use of future-aimed learning activities for developing leadership capabilities in students. Initial sections cover elements of the future-aimed curriculum mode, definitions of terms, and descriptions of…

  17. Curriculum development for an advanced regional anesthesia education program: one institution's experience from apprenticeship to comprehensive teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouanes, Jean-Pierre P; Schwengel, Deborah; Mathur, Vineesh; Ahmed, Omar I; Hanna, Marie N

    2014-02-01

    Results of recent attitude survey studies suggest that most practicing physicians are inadequately treating postoperative pain. Residents in anesthesia are confident in performing lumbar epidural and spinal anesthesia, but many are not confident in performing the blocks with which they have the least exposure. Changes need to be made in the training processes to a comprehensive model that prepares residents to perform a wider array of blocks in postgraduate practice. Here, we describe one institution's approach to creating a standardized, advanced regional anesthesia curriculum for residents that follows the six core competencies of the ACGME. Residents received training in anatomy dissection, ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, traditional nerve stimulation techniques, problem-based learning and simulation sessions, oral board presentation sessions, and journal club sessions. Residents kept a detailed log for their use of peripheral nerve block procedures. We have now redesigned and implemented an advanced regional anesthesia program within our institution to provide residents with experience in regional anesthesia at a competent level. Resident's knowledge in regional anesthesia did improve after the first year of implementation as reflected in improvements between the pre- and post-tests. As the advanced regional anesthesia education program continues to improve, we hope to demonstrate levels of validity, reliability, and usability by other programs.

  18. Encouraging scholarship: medical school programs to promote student inquiry beyond the traditional medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Emily P; Borkan, Jeffrey M; Pross, Susan H; Adler, Shelley R; Nothnagle, Melissa; Parsonnet, Julie; Gruppuso, Philip A

    2010-03-01

    Many medical curricula now include programs that provide students with opportunities for scholarship beyond that provided by their traditional, core curricula. These scholarly concentration (SC) programs vary greatly in focus and structure, but they share the goal of producing physicians with improved analytic, creative, and critical-thinking skills. In this article, the authors explore models of both required and elective SC programs. They gathered information through a review of medical school Web sites and direct contact with representatives of individual programs. Additionally, they discuss in-depth the SC programs of the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University; the University of South Florida College of Medicine; the University of California, San Francisco; and Stanford University School of Medicine. The authors describe each program's focus, participation, duration, centralization, capstone requirement, faculty involvement, and areas of concentration. Established to address a variety of challenges in the U.S. medical education system, these four programs provide an array of possible models for schools that are considering the establishment of an SC program. Although data on the impact of SC programs are lacking, the authors believe that this type of program has the potential to significantly impact the education of medical students through scholarly, in-depth inquiry and longitudinal faculty mentorship.

  19. What Is the Purpose of the Theses Addressing the Issue of Program Evaluation in Turkey? (The Case of Curriculum and Instruction: 1997-2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkin-Sahin, Senar; Tunca, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, the aim is to investigate the theses addressing the issue of program evaluation in the field of Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) in 1997-2015. The study employed the survey model. The universe of the study consists of totally 87 theses addressing the issue of program evaluation in the field of C&I in 1997-2015. As the…

  20. Interim Evaluation of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S.: First Year of the Full Implementation Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the implementation quality of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum of the Project P.A.T.H.S. (Positive Adolescent Training through Holistic Social Programmes in the full implementation phase, 100 schools were randomly selected to participate in personal and/or telephone interviews regarding the quality of the implementation process of the Tier 1 Program. In the interviews, the participants described the responses of the students to the program, the perceived benefits of the program, the perceived good aspects of the program, and the areas requiring improvement, difficulties encountered in the implementation process, and perceived attributes of the worker-support scheme (“Co-Walker Scheme”. Results showed that most workers perceived that the students had positive responses to the program and the program was beneficial to the students. They also identified several good aspects in the program, although negative comments on the program design and difficulties in the implementation process were also recorded. Roughly half of the respondents had positive comments on the “Co-Walker Scheme”. In sum, the respondents generally regarded the program as beneficial to the students and they were satisfied with the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum in the full implementation phase, although some implementation difficulties were also expressed.

  1. Exploring the "Black Box" of Programming: Applying Systematic Implementation Evaluation to a Structured Camp Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainieri, Tracy L.; Anderson, Denise M.

    2015-01-01

    Camp scholars have designed structured curricula to engender specific outcomes and to break down the "black box" of programming. Implementation evaluation explores how well a program operates when delivered, further breaking down the black box. The purpose of this study was to explore the implementation of a new structured camp…

  2. Peer Mentoring Program in an Interprofessional and Interdisciplinary Curriculum in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Camila Aparecida Machado; de França Carvalho, Carolina Prado; Céspedes, Isabel Cristina; de Oliveira, Flávia; Le Sueur-Maluf, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    The Federal University of São Paulo, Baixada Santista Campus was founded in 2006 with five degree-granting programs in physical education, physiotherapy, nutrition, psychology, and occupational therapy. The guiding principle behind the programs' educational mission was centered on the development of health care professionals capable of working in…

  3. Teaching Astronomy and Computation with Gaia: A New Curriculum for an Extra-curricular High School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Ellianna; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Barua, Prachurjya; Cooper, Ellie; Das, Debjani; Simone-Gonzalez, Luna; Sowah, Maxine; Valdez, Laura; BridgeUP: STEM

    2018-01-01

    BridgeUP: STEM (BridgeUP) is a program at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) that seeks to empower women by providing early-career scientists with research fellowships and high-school aged women with instruction in computer science and algorithmic methods. BridgeUP achieves this goal by employing post-baccalaureate women as Helen Fellows, who, in addition to conducting their own scientific research, mentor and teach high school students from the New York City area. The courses, targeted at early high-school students, are designed to teach algorithmic thinking and scientific methodology through the lens of computational science. In this poster we present the new BridgeUP astronomy curriculum created for 9th and 10th grade girls.The astronomy course we present is designed to introduce basic concepts as well as big data manipulation through a guided exploration of Gaia (DR1). Students learn about measuring astronomical distances through hands-on lab experiments illustrating the brightness/distance relationship, angular size calculations of the height of AMNH buildings, and in-depth Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram activities. Throughout these labs, students increase their proficiency in collecting and analyzing data, while learning to build and share code in teams. The students use their new skills to create color-color diagrams of known co-moving clusters (Oh et al. 2017) in the DR1 dataset using Python, Pandas and Matplotlib. We discuss the successes and lessons learned in the first implementation of this curriculum and show the preliminary work of six of the students, who are continuing with computational astronomy research over the current school year.

  4. Pedagogical approach in the implementation of curriculum programs in nurse training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Maria Vargas Makuch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the trends of changes in the Pedagogical Approach axis in the training of nurse practitioners. Methods: Convergent research with a mixed approach, with 63 participants from 9 nursing schools from Curitiba and metropolitan area. Data collection followed the Focus Group technique. Results: In the Pedagogical Approach axis, 66.7% of the schools reached the Advanced typology (A and 33.3% reached the Innovative typology with an Advanced Trend (ItA. From the analysis of the thematic content, seven units of context emerged. Conclusions: The continuous process experience of commitment to human beings and their context gives autonomy to students. The problematization method is an effective teaching-learning strategy for the construction of comprehensiveness. Implications for practice: The knowledge of pedagogical trends favors changes in nurse's education in line with the profile of the graduates, established by the specific Brazilian Curriculum Guidelines for nursing practice, was confirmed as the intention of professors in this study.

  5. A Gibbs sampler for Bayesian analysis of site-occupancy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorazio, Robert M.; Rodriguez, Daniel Taylor

    2012-01-01

    1. A Bayesian analysis of site-occupancy data containing covariates of species occurrence and species detection probabilities is usually completed using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods in conjunction with software programs that can implement those methods for any statistical model, not just site-occupancy models. Although these software programs are quite flexible, considerable experience is often required to specify a model and to initialize the Markov chain so that summaries of the posterior distribution can be estimated efficiently and accurately. 2. As an alternative to these programs, we develop a Gibbs sampler for Bayesian analysis of site-occupancy data that include covariates of species occurrence and species detection probabilities. This Gibbs sampler is based on a class of site-occupancy models in which probabilities of species occurrence and detection are specified as probit-regression functions of site- and survey-specific covariate measurements. 3. To illustrate the Gibbs sampler, we analyse site-occupancy data of the blue hawker, Aeshna cyanea (Odonata, Aeshnidae), a common dragonfly species in Switzerland. Our analysis includes a comparison of results based on Bayesian and classical (non-Bayesian) methods of inference. We also provide code (based on the R software program) for conducting Bayesian and classical analyses of site-occupancy data.

  6. A Model for a Doctor of Psychology Program in Forensic Psychology: Curriculum and Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, C. Abraham; And Others

    1976-01-01

    An overview of the objectives and courses of a doctoral program in forensic psychology is provided. Forensic psychology is the application of psychological methods, principles, and skills to the relevant needs of the legal system. (DE)

  7. Curriculum Design Issues in Developing a Doctor of Philosophy Program in Aeronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A Ph.D. degree program in the non-engineering aeronautical/aerospace sciences (aeronology) will likely be required in the near future to meet the increasing demands for qualified faculty, administrators, and industry representatives within the aviati...

  8. Development of syringe pump assisted headspace sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Un Jeong; Eom, In-Yong

    2014-09-26

    This report describes a new platform for headspace sampling technique, i.e. a syringe pump assisted headspace sampler (SPHS). The stand type pump's syringe itself was used as a sealed sample vial and a needle trap device (NTD) was adopted as a miniaturized sorbent tube. The NTD was directly used to inject trapped VOCs into a gas chromatograph. The proposed sampler was designed to take a whole headspace volume instead of a portion of it so as to enhance easily the extraction efficiency. The performance of the SPHS-NTD system was evaluated and compared with the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with a static headspace (HS) sampling technique. Calibration curves were obtained for aqueous TEX (toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene) solutions in the concentration range of ∼0.1-45 ng/mL. The calculated limit of detections (LOD, S/N=3) for TEX were 0.13 ng/mL or less. This SPHS-NTD was successfully applied to analyze aqueous TEX in river water samples and showed highly good recovery ranged from 97.2% to 105.8% for all tested VOCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. VALIDATION OF A NEW SOIL VOC SAMPLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

    1997-04-01

    The overall objective of this project is to facilitate national acceptance of the EnCore{trademark} sampling/storage device by conducting product tests, method development, and method validation activities. The specific goals for the initial six-month period of the project are listed: (1) Evaluate and become familiar with the stainless steel EnCore{trademark} sampling/storage device for collecting and holding soil samples for determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs); (2) Initiate interaction with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Committee D-34 on Waste Management to begin the ASTM standard preparation and approval process; (3) Prepare an ASTM drall practice for using a device fitting the description of the EnCore{trademark} sampler for sampling and storing soil for volatile organic analysis. Under ASTM guidelines, the procedure describing the use of a device, such as the EnCore{trademark} sampler, is referred to as a practice rather than a method because it is a definitive set of instructions for performing one or more specific operations that does not produce a test result (ASTM 1996a); and (4) Plan testing needed to establish maximum storage temperatures and times for inclusion in the ASTM practice.

  10. Designing and testing the representative samplers for sampling a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    establishing the optimum mesh of grind for the various ores, to achieve effective separation of the cobalt minerals from those of copper. This prompted the designing and testing of representative samplers for sampling the milling circuit at Nkana Concentrator. In the design of the samplers, use was made of the Gy's formula to ...

  11. Assessing the utility of a continuous, underway fish egg sampler ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The accuracy of using a continuous underway fish egg sampler (CUFES) to sample zooplankton was assessed by comparing CUFES samples with those collected using a vertically towed bongo net. Samples were collected concurrently by the two samplers along four inshore–offshore transects off the south-western coast ...

  12. A novel sampler for limnological investigation in developing world ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple pump sampler for shallow water bodies, constructed with materials that are affordable and readily available in the local market is presented. It is simple to operate and no electric motor is required. The challenge of cost of acquisition of conventional samplers for sampling the lentic habitat, especially small water ...

  13. Performance characteristics of a low-volume PM10 sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four identical PM10 pre-separators, along with four identical low-volume (1m3 hr-1) total suspended particulate (TSP) samplers were tested side-by-side in a controlled laboratory particulate matter (PM) chamber. The four PM10 and four TSP samplers were also tested in an oil pipe-cleaning field to ev...

  14. Communication skills curriculum for foreign medical graduates in an internal medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Williams, Alicia; Clark, Elizabeth M; Kelley, Amy S

    2014-11-01

    Effective communication is an important aspect of caring for the elderly, who are more likely to have multimorbidity, limited health literacy, and psychosocial barriers to care. About half of Internal Medicine (IM) trainees in the United States are foreign medical graduates, and may not have been exposed to prior communication skills education. This novel communication skills curriculum for IM interns aimed to increase trainees' confidence and use of specific communication tools with older adults, particularly in delivering bad news and conducting family meetings. The workshop consisted of two interactive sessions in a small group with two learners and one or two facilitators, during the 4-week geriatrics block in IM internship training year. Twenty-three IM interns at an urban Veterans Affairs Medical Center were surveyed at the beginning and at the end of the 4-week block and 3 months after completion of the workshop about their knowledge, confidence, and skill in communication and asked about challenges to effective communication with older adults. The primary outcome measure was change in self-reported confidence and behavior in communication at 4 weeks. On a 4-point Likert scale, there was average improvement of 0.70 in self-reported confidence in communication, which was sustained 3 months after completion of the workshop. Participants reported several patient, physician, and system barriers to effective communication. Communication skills education in a small-group setting and the opportunity for repeated practice and self-reflection resulted in a sustained increase in overall confidence in IM interns in communication with older adults and may help overcome certain patient- and physician-specific communication barriers. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. Communication Skills Curriculum for Foreign Medical Graduates in an Internal Medicine Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Williams, Alicia; Clark, Elizabeth M.; Kelley, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective communication is an important aspect of caring for the elderly, who are more likely to have multimorbidity, limited health literacy and psychosocial barriers to care. About half of Internal Medicine (IM) trainees in the United States are foreign medical graduates, and may not have been exposed to prior communication skills education. This novel communication skills curriculum for IM interns aimed to increase trainees' confidence and use of specific communication tools with older adults, particularly in delivering bad news and conducting family meetings. Methods The workshop consisted of 2 interactive sessions, in a small group with 2 learners and 1-2 facilitators, during the Geriatrics block of the internship year. Twenty-three IM interns were surveyed at the beginning and at the end of the 4-week block and at 3 months after completion of the workshop about their knowledge, confidence and skill in communication, and asked about any challenges to effective communication with older patients. The primary outcome measure was change in self-reported confidence and behavior in communication at 4 weeks. Results On a 4-point Likert scale, there was an average improvement of 0.70 in self-reported confidence in communication, which sustained at 3 months after completion of the workshop. Participants reported several patient, physician and system barriers to effective communication. Conclusion Communication skills education in a small-group setting and the opportunity for repeated practice and self-reflection resulted in sustained increase in overall confidence among IM interns in communication with older adults, and may help overcome certain patient and physician-specific communication barriers. PMID:25354834

  16. Siting samplers to minimize expected time to detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Travis; Lorenzetti, David M; Sohn, Michael D

    2012-12-01

    We present a probabilistic approach to designing an indoor sampler network for detecting an accidental or intentional chemical or biological release, and demonstrate it for a real building. In an earlier article, Sohn and Lorenzetti developed a proof of concept algorithm that assumed samplers could return measurements only slowly (on the order of hours). This led to optimal "detect to treat" architectures that maximize the probability of detecting a release. This article develops a more general approach and applies it to samplers that can return measurements relatively quickly (in minutes). This leads to optimal "detect to warn" architectures that minimize the expected time to detection. Using a model of a real, large, commercial building, we demonstrate the approach by optimizing networks against uncertain release locations, source terms, and sampler characteristics. Finally, we speculate on rules of thumb for general sampler placement. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  17. Programas de Educacion Inicial en America Latina y los Curriculos Nacionales en el siglo XXI. [Latin American Early Childhood Educational Programs and National Curriculum in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Maria Victoria

    2003-01-01

    Describes the history of early childhood education in Chile and recent educational reforms. Offers an overview of the Chilean Early Childhood Education program and discusses the new national curriculum and issues arising from its implementation. Describes methods taken to help implement the new curriculum nationwide and to assist teachers in…

  18. Carpentry, Culinary Arts Instructor Guide and Curriculums. Bilingual Vocational Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, Roxanne T.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational English as a second language (VESL) instructors in teaching courses in carpentry and the culinary arts to residents of Navajo reservations. The first section outlines the rationale and content of the two training programs as well as the basic VESL objectives that they seek to address. The next section, a…

  19. Rapid Growth of Psychology Programs in Turkey: Undergraduate Curriculum and Structural Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümer, Nebi

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the other developing countries, undergraduate psychology programs in Turkish universities have rapidly grown in the last two decades. Although this sharp increment signifies the need for psychologists, it has also caused a number of challenges for effective teaching of psychology. The department chairs (N = 42) were interviewed with an…

  20. 2005 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Cosmetology. (Program CIP: 12.0401 - Cosmetology/Cosmetologist, General)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanon, Rouser; Farmer, Helen

    2005-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  1. Communicating across the Curriculum in an Undergraduate Business Program: Management 100--Leadership and Communication in Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleja, Elizabeth A.; Greenhalgh, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    Educating undergraduate business students in the 21st century requires more than addressing the quantitative side of business; rather, it calls for including the more qualitative "soft skills," such as speaking and writing. This article examines the design, delivery, and effectiveness of an undergraduate program dedicated to leadership,…

  2. Linking Curriculum and Learning to Facilities: Arizona State University's GK-12 Sustainable Schools Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, Monica M.; Pollari, Lynette; Frisk, Erin; Wood, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Arizona State University's "Sustainability Science for Sustainable Schools program" brings together graduate students, sustainability researchers, high school teachers and students, and school or district administrators in a project designed to address the challenge of becoming a "sustainable school." Funded by the National…

  3. 2007 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Computer Graphics. (Program CIP: 50.0402 - Commercial and Advertising Art)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, Jo Anne; Denson, Cornelius; New, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  4. Situating Information Literacy within the Curriculum: Using a Rubric to Shape a Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastram, Iris; Leebaw, Danya; Tompkins, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Rubrics are a rapidly growing subfield of information literacy assessment, providing a powerful tool for understanding student learning. This paper explores the role that the creation and application of an information literacy rubric can play in program development. Because of the Information Literacy in Student Writing assessment project at…

  5. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Diesel Equipment Repair & Service (Program CIP: 47.0605--Diesel Engine Mechanic & Repairer). Secondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for diesel engine mechanics I and II. Presented first are a program…

  6. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Agriculture Production (Program CIP: 01.0301--Agricultural Prod. Workers & Mgrs.). Secondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for agriculture production I and II. Presented first are a program…

  7. Curriculum and Design Analysis of a Mathematics-Based Educational Television Program: A Case Study of Cyberchase Animated Television Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusop, Farrah Dina

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a curriculum and design analyses of an Emmy-award winning children educational television series, Cyberchase. Using Posner's (2004) four process of curriculum analysis framework, this paper addresses each of the components and relates it to the design principles undertaken by the Cyberchase production team. Media and document…

  8. Evaluation of the 2006 and 2015 Turkish Education Program in Secondary School Curriculum in Turkey in Terms of Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytan, Talat

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the primary school second stage Turkish Education Curriculum effectuated in 2006 and the secondary school Turkish Education Curriculum effectuated in 2015 comparatively in terms of critical thinking. Of qualitative research designs, document analysis approach and content analysis were adopted for the…

  9. Reconceptualizing Curriculum Politics: A Case Study of an ESP Program for Vocational High School Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yi-Hsuan Gloria

    2017-01-01

    A curriculum is a form of politics (Apple, 1993). The politics of a curriculum defines what is legitimate and valued and what is not. In Taiwan, the objectives of vocational high school (VHS) education are to prepare students to acquire relevant professional knowledge and practical skills and to integrate them into their future career development.…

  10. The Role of Counseling in an Associate Degree in Labor Studies Program: Counseling in a Work Oriented Setting (The Importance of Including Counseling Courses within the Curriculum of the Associate Degree in Labor Studies Program at the Community College Level).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingery, Bruce

    This research had a two-fold purpose: (1) to assess the need for a labor studies program at the community college level; and (2) to consider the advisability of including within such a curriculum a cross-section of adult/family/worker-oriented counseling and guidance courses. The study employed a questionnaire completed by union delegates, which…

  11. An analysis of undergraduate exercise science programs: an exercise science curriculum survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Craig L; Pujol, Thomas J; Barnes, Jeremy T

    2003-08-01

    Undergraduate exercise science programs develop curricula by referring to standards set by professional organizations. A web-based survey was administered to 235 institutions with exercise science undergraduate programs to evaluate their adherence to stated curricular guidelines. Results indicate that 29% of institutions considered American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs); 33% both ACSM and National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) guidelines; 6% ACSM, NASPE, and National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA); 8% ACSM, NASPE, NSCA, and American Society of Exercise Physiologists, and 5% NASPE. The two largest subgroups had good compliance with the areas of exercise physiology, biomechanics, and human anatomy and physiology. However, neither subgroup adhered to the areas of exercise prescription, testing, and implementation; exercise and aging; or exercise with special populations. Regardless of the implemented guideline(s), most institutions placed minimal emphasis on areas related to health promotion and many curricula did not require any field experience.

  12. Implementation of the court visitor program in a clinical nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Jane M; Pihlak, Mary Rose; Matzke, Amanda; O'Keefe, Mary

    2013-12-01

    The State of Texas has more than 19,000 individuals who lack the physical or mental ability to provide for their need for shelter, financial management, or physical care. These individuals have been designated as wards of the court and placed under guardianship. Texas probate courts appoint individuals known as court visitors to make annual visits to wards of the court to assess their well-being under guardianship. Although the 10 statutory probate courts have court visitor programs, many county courts do not. This article describes the details of a service-learning experience using an online distance educational program to train undergraduate nursing students in a mental health course to become court visitors. This information may be useful to others looking for nontraditional clinical experiences and service-learning opportunities for undergraduate nursing students.

  13. Calibration of nylon organic chemical integrative samplers and sentinel samplers for quantitative measurement of pulsed aquatic exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shane A; Belden, Jason B

    2016-06-03

    Environmental exposures often occur through short, pulsed events; therefore, the ability to accurately measure these toxicologically-relevant concentrations is important. Three different integrative passive sampler configurations were evaluated under different flow and pulsed exposure conditions for the measurement of current-use pesticides (n=19), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (n=10), and personal care products (n=5) spanning a broad range of hydrophobicities (log Kow 1.5-7.6). Two modified POCIS-style samplers were investigated using macroporous nylon mesh membranes (35μm pores) and two different sorbent materials (i.e. Oasis HLB and Dowex Optipore L-493). A recently developed design, the Sentinel Sampler (ABS Materials), utilizing Osorb media enclosed within stainless steel mesh (145μm pores), was also investigated. Relatively high sampling rates (Rs) were achieved for all sampler configurations during the short eight-day exposure (4300-27mL/d). Under flow conditions, median Rs were approximately 5-10 times higher for POCIS-style samplers and 27 times higher for Sentinel Samplers, as compared to static conditions. The ability of samplers to rapidly measure hydrophobic contaminants may be a trade off with increased flow dependence. Analyte accumulation was integrative under pulsed and continuous exposures for POCIS-style samplers with mean difference between treatments of 11% and 33%; however, accumulation into Sentinel Samplers was more variable. Collectively, results show that reducing membrane limitations allows for rapid, integrative accumulation of a broad range of analytes even under pulsed exposures. As such, these sampler designs may be suitable for monitoring environmental substances that have short aquatic half-lives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Demonstration of the AGI Universal Samplers (F.K.A. the GORE (registered trademark) Modules) for Passive Sampling of Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    conversion of the mass data to concentration values. In September 2010, the Gore Laboratory became accredited to ISO /IEC* 17025 , DOD ELAP, and NELAC...Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry HSE Health and Safety Executive HWEP High Water Entry Pressure IRP Installation Restoration Program ISO /IEC...there will be more than 32 ft of head above the sampler. * ISO /IEC International

  15. Demonstration of the AGI Universal Samplers (F.K.A. the GORE Modules) for Passive Sampling of Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    conversion of the mass data to concentration values. In September 2010, the Gore Laboratory became accredited to ISO /IEC* 17025 , DOD ELAP, and NELAC...Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry HSE Health and Safety Executive HWEP High Water Entry Pressure IRP Installation Restoration Program ISO /IEC...there will be more than 32 ft of head above the sampler. * ISO /IEC International

  16. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the Margins-Geoprisms Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum: The Subduction Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penniston-Dorland, S.; Stern, R. J.; Edwards, B. R.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes. The NSF-GeoPRISMS Mini-lesson Project, funded by NSF-TUES, is designed to integrate fundamental results from the MARGINS program into open-source college-level curriculum. Three Subduction Factory (SubFac) mini-lessons were developed as part of this project. These include hands-on examinations of data sets representing 3 key components of the subduction zone system: 1) Heat transfer in the subducted slab; 2) Metamorphic processes happening at the plate interface; and 3) Typical magmatic products of arc systems above subduction zones. Module 1: "Slab Temperatures Control Melting in Subduction Zones, What Controls Slab Temperature?" allows students to work in groups using beads rolling down slopes as an analog for the mathematics of heat flow. Using this hands-on, exploration-based approach, students develop an intuition for the mathematics of heatflow and learn about heat conduction and advection in the subduction zone environment. Module 2: "Subduction zone metamorphism" introduces students to the metamorphic rocks that form as the subducted slab descends and the mineral reactions that characterize subduction-related metamorphism. This module includes a suite of metamorphic rocks available for instructors to use in a lab, and exercises in which students compare pressure-temperature estimates obtained from metamorphic rocks to predictions from thermal models. Module 3: "Central American Arc Volcanoes, Petrology and Geochemistry" introduces students to basic concepts in igneous petrology using the Central American volcanic arc, a MARGINS Subduction Factory focus site, as an example. The module relates data from two different volcanoes - basaltic Cerro Negro (Nicaragua) and andesitic Ilopango (El Salvador) including hand sample observations and major element geochemistry - to explore processes of mantle and crustal melting and differentiation in arc volcanism.

  17. Effects of Curriculum and Nonacademic Factors on Undergraduate Electronic Engineering Program Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Munir

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs in higher education institutions, particularly engineering programs, face challenges related to recruitment, retention, and graduation rates. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are significant relationships among students' major preference, academic skills, nonacademic characteristics and perceptions, and retention to year 2 among students in electronic engineering, other STEM, and non STEM majors. The academic skills considered were study habits, intellectual interest, verbal and writing confidence, and academic assistance. The non-academic factors included academic support, family support, financial support, and student social integration into the campus environment. Tinto's theory of retention served as the theoretical framework. The research design was quantitative with a general linear method of analysis using responses to the College Student Inventory (CSI) survey as secondary data to determine the relationships among the independent variables (major and academic and non-academic factors) and dependent variable (retention). Participants were 3,575 first year undergraduate full-time students from three entering classes, 2012 to 2014. Findings suggested that student major and non-academic factors had no effect on student retention, but student study habits and seeking academic assistance were predictors of retention in each of the three groups of majors: engineering, other STEM majors, and nonSTEM majors. Strategies to help increase undergraduate students' study skills and help seeking behaviors may contribute to positive social change at HBCU institutions.

  18. Field intercomparison of ammonia passive samplers: results and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Amy; Leeson, Sarah; Jones, Matthew; van Dijk, Netty; Kentisbeer, John; Twigg, Marsailidh; Simmons, Ivan; Braban, Christine; Martin, Nick; Poskitt, Janet; Ferm, Martin; Seitler, Eva; Sacco, Paolo; Gates, Linda; Stolk, Ariën; Stoll, Jean-Marc; Tang, Sim

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia pollution contributes significantly to eutrophication and acidification of ecosystems with resultant losses of biodiversity and ecosystem changes. Monitoring of ambient ammonia over a wide spatial and long temporal scales is primarily done with low-cost diffusive samplers. Less frequently, surface flux measurements of ammonia can be made using passive samplers at plot scale. This paper will present a field intercomparison conducted within the MetNH3 project to assess the performance of passive samplers for ambient measurements of ammonia. Eight different designs of commercial passive samplers housed in shelters provided by the manufacturer/laboratory were exposed over an 8-week period at the Whim experimental field site in Scotland between August and October 2016. Whim Bog has a facility in place for controlled releases of ammonia (http://www.whimbog.ceh.ac.uk/). Automated conditional release from the line source occurs when the wind direction in the preceding minute is from the northeast (wind sector 180-215°) and wind speed is > 5 m s-1. The passive samplers were exposed at different distances from the release source (16, 32 and 60 m) and also at a background location. Most were exposed for 2 x 4-week long periods and some for 4 x 2-week long periods. At the 32 m position, an active denuder method, the CEH DELTA sampler and a continuous high temporal resolution wet chemistry ammonia instrument (AiRRmonia, Mechatronics, NL.) were also deployed alongside the passive samplers to provide reference measurements of ammonia. Results are presented within the context of the MetNH3 CATFAC controlled laboratory exposure assessments. The results are discussed in terms of typical deployments of passive samplers and quality control. Measurement for policy evidence for both local and regional studies using passive samplers are discussed.

  19. 7 CFR 800.185 - Duties of official personnel and warehouse samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of § 800.161. (d) Scope of operations. Official personnel and warehouse samplers shall operate only... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duties of official personnel and warehouse samplers... official personnel and warehouse samplers. (a) General. Official personnel and warehouse samplers shall...

  20. A blueprint of pain curriculum across prelicensure health sciences programs: one NIH Pain Consortium Center of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPE) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorenbos, Ardith Z; Gordon, Deborah B; Tauben, David; Palisoc, Jenny; Drangsholt, Mark; Lindhorst, Taryn; Danielson, Jennifer; Spector, June; Ballweg, Ruth; Vorvick, Linda; Loeser, John D

    2013-12-01

    To improve U.S. pain education and promote interinstitutional and interprofessional collaborations, the National Institutes of Health Pain Consortium has funded 12 sites to develop Centers of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPEs). Each site was given the tasks of development, evaluation, integration, and promotion of pain management curriculum resources, including case studies that will be shared nationally. Collaborations among schools of medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, and others were encouraged. The John D. Loeser CoEPE is unique in that it represents extensive regionalization of health science education, in this case in the region covering the states of Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho. This paper describes a blueprint of pain content and teaching methods across the University of Washington's 6 health sciences schools and provides recommendations for improvement in pain education at the prelicensure level. The Schools of Dentistry and Physician Assistant provide the highest percentage of total required curriculum hours devoted to pain compared with the Schools of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work. The findings confirm the paucity of pain content in health sciences curricula, missing International Association for the Study of Pain curriculum topics, and limited use of innovative teaching methods such as problem-based and team-based learning. Findings confirm the paucity of pain education across the health sciences curriculum in a CoEPE that serves a large region in the United States. The data provide a pain curriculum blueprint that can be used to recommend added pain content in health sciences programs across the country. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Developing a Communication Curriculum and Workshop for an Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salib, Sherine; Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Chilek, Lindsay A; Mackert, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Learning effective communication is essential for physicians. Effective communication has been shown to affect healthcare outcomes, including patient safety, adherence rates, patient satisfaction, and enhanced teamwork. The importance of these skills has become even more apparent in recent years, with value-based purchasing programs and federal measures of patient satisfaction in the form of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores becoming an important part of measuring the performance of a healthcare facility. We conducted a communication workshop for internal medicine residents at the University of Texas. Topics covered included the Acknowledge, Introduce, Duration, Explanation, Thank You framework; managing up; resolving conflicts; error disclosure; new medication and discharge counseling; intercultural communication; understanding Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores; and avoiding burnout. Because it would have been logistically difficult to block whole days for the workshop, the various topics were offered to residents during their regular noon conference hour for several consecutive days. After the workshop, the residents completed an anonymous questionnaire regarding their perception of the importance of various aspects of communication in patient care. The majority of the participating residents perceived the various communication skills explored during the workshop to be highly important in patient care. Concurrently, however, most residents believed that they had initially overestimated their knowledge about these various communication issues. Some demographic differences in the responses also were noted. Our findings demonstrate a needs gap and an area of potential improvement in medical education. We anticipate that with the growing understanding of the importance of communication skills in the healthcare setting, there will be an enhanced role for teaching these skills at all levels of

  2. Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

    1996-10-01

    The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

  3. CalCOFI Continuous Underway Fish-Egg Sampler

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Samples collected using the Continuous Underway Fish-Egg Sampler, known as CUFES. The data include numbers of anchovy, sardine, jack mackerel, squid, hake, and...

  4. Successful implementation of the american college of surgeons/association of program directors in surgery surgical skills curriculum via a 4-week consecutive simulation rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Mayank Kumar; Dumon, Kristoffel R; Edelson, Paula Kaitlyn; Acero, Natalia Martinez; Hashimoto, Daniel; Danzer, Enrico; Selvan, Ben; Resnick, Andrew S; Morris, Jon B; Williams, Noel N

    2012-06-01

    Increased patient awareness, duty hour restrictions, escalating costs, and time constraints in the operating room have revolutionized surgery education. Although simulation and skills laboratories are emerging as promising alternatives for skills training, their integration into graduate surgical education is inconsistent, erratic, and often on a voluntary basis. We hypothesize that, by implementing the American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery Surgical Skills Curriculum in a structured, inanimate setting, we can address some of these concerns. Sixty junior surgery residents were assigned to the Penn Surgical Simulation and Skills Rotation. The National Surgical Skills Curriculum was implemented using multiple educational tools under faculty supervision. Pretraining and posttraining assessments of technical skills were conducted using validated instruments. Trainee and faculty feedbacks were collected using a structured feedback form. Significant global performance improvement was demonstrated using Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills score for basic surgical skills (knot tying, wound closure, enterotomy closure, and vascular anastomosis) and Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery skills, P < 0.001. Six trainees were retested on an average of 13.5 months later (range, 8-16 months) and retained more than 75% of their basic surgical skills. The American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery National Surgical Skills Curriculum can be implemented in its totality as a 4-week consecutive surgical simulation rotation in an inanimate setting, leading to global enhancement of junior surgical residents' technical skills and contributing to attainment of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competency.

  5. Fluidized Bed Asbestos Sampler Design and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen E. Wright; Barry H. O' Brien

    2007-12-01

    A large number of samples are required to characterize a site contaminated with asbestos from previous mine or other industrial operations. Current methods, such as EPA Region 10’s glovebox method, or the Berman Elutriator method are time consuming and costly primarily because the equipment is difficult to decontaminate between samples. EPA desires a shorter and less costly method for characterizing soil samples for asbestos. The objective of this was to design and test a qualitative asbestos sampler that operates as a fluidized bed. The proposed sampler employs a conical spouted bed to vigorously mix the soil and separate fine particulate including asbestos fibers on filters. The filters are then analyzed using transmission electron microscopy for presence of asbestos. During initial testing of a glass prototype using ASTM 20/30 sand and clay fines as asbestos surrogates, fine particulate adhered to the sides of the glass vessel and the tubing to the collection filter – presumably due to static charge on the fine particulate. This limited the fines recovery to ~5% of the amount added to the sand surrogate. A second prototype was constructed of stainless steel, which improved fines recovery to about 10%. Fines recovery was increased to 15% by either humidifying the inlet air or introducing a voltage probe in the air space above the sample. Since this was not a substantial improvement, testing using the steel prototype proceeded without using these techniques. Final testing of the second prototype using asbestos suggests that the fluidized bed is considerably more sensitive than the Berman elutriator method. Using a sand/tremolite mixture with 0.005% tremolite, the Berman elutriator did not segregate any asbestos structures while the fluidized bed segregated an average of 11.7. The fluidized bed was also able to segregate structures in samples containing asbestos at a 0.0001% concentration, while the Berman elutriator method did not detect any fibers at this

  6. The MAGIC meteoric smoke particle sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, Jonas; Giovane, Frank; Waldemarsson, Tomas; Gumbel, Jörg; Blum, Jürgen; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Marlin, Layne; Moser, John; Siskind, David E.; Jansson, Kjell; Saunders, Russell W.; Summers, Michael E.; Reissaus, Philipp; Stegman, Jacek; Plane, John M. C.; Horányi, Mihály

    2014-10-01

    Between a few tons to several hundred tons of meteoric material enters the Earth's atmosphere each day, and most of this material is ablated and vaporized in the 70-120 km altitude region. The subsequent chemical conversion, re-condensation and coagulation of this evaporated material are thought to form nanometre sized meteoric smoke particles (MSPs). These smoke particles are then subject to further coagulation, sedimentation and global transport by the mesospheric circulation. MSPs have been proposed as a key player in the formation and evolution of ice particle layers around the mesopause region, i.e. noctilucent clouds (NLC) and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). MSPs have also been implicated in mesospheric heterogeneous chemistry to influence the mesospheric odd oxygen/odd hydrogen (Ox/HOx) chemistry, to play an important role in the mesospheric charge balance, and to be a significant component of stratospheric aerosol and enhance the depletion of O3. Despite their apparent importance, little is known about the properties of MSPs and none of the hypotheses can be verified without direct evidence of the existence, altitude and size distribution, shape and elemental composition. The aim of the MAGIC project (Mesospheric Aerosol - Genesis, Interaction and Composition) was to develop an instrument and analysis techniques to sample for the first time MSPs in the mesosphere and return them to the ground for detailed analysis in the laboratory. MAGIC meteoric smoke particle samplers have been flown on several sounding rocket payloads between 2005 and 2011. Several of these flights concerned non-summer mesosphere conditions when pure MSP populations can be expected. Other flights concerned high latitude summer conditions when MSPs are expected to be contained in ice particles in the upper mesosphere. In this paper we present the MAGIC project and describe the MAGIC MSP sampler, the measurement procedure and laboratory analysis. We also present the attempts to

  7. astroABC: Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Elise

    2017-05-01

    astroABC is a Python implementation of an Approximate Bayesian Computation Sequential Monte Carlo (ABC SMC) sampler for parameter estimation. astroABC allows for massive parallelization using MPI, a framework that handles spawning of processes across multiple nodes. It has the ability to create MPI groups with different communicators, one for the sampler and several others for the forward model simulation, which speeds up sampling time considerably. For smaller jobs the Python multiprocessing option is also available.

  8. Spatial Distribution of Tropospheric Ozone in National Parks of California: Interpretation of Passive-Sampler Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Ray

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The National Park Service (NPS has tested and used passive ozone samplers for several years to get baseline values for parks and to determine the spatial variability within parks. Experience has shown that the Ogawa passive samplers can provide ±10% accuracy when used with a quality assurance program consisting of blanks, duplicates, collocated instrumentation, and a standard operating procedure that carefully guides site operators. Although the passive device does not meet EPA criteria as a certified method (mainly, that hourly values be measured, it does provide seasonal summed values of ozone. The seasonal ozone concentrations from the passive devices can be compared to other monitoring to determine baseline values, trends, and spatial variations. This point is illustrated with some kriged interpolation maps of ozone statistics. Passive ozone samplers were used to get elevational gradients and spatial distributions of ozone within a park. This was done in varying degrees at Mount Rainier, Olympic, Sequoia–Kings Canyon, Yosemite, Joshua Tree, Rocky Mountain, and Great Smoky Mountains national parks. The ozone has been found to vary by factors of 2 and 3 within a park when average ozone is compared between locations. Specific examples of the spatial distributions of ozone in three parks within California are given using interpolation maps. Positive aspects and limitations of the passive sampling approach are presented.

  9. Pesticide monitoring in surface water and groundwater using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodes, V.; Grabic, R.

    2009-04-01

    Passive samplers as screening devices have been used within a czech national water quality monitoring network since 2002 (SPMD and DGT samplers for non polar substances and metals). The passive sampler monitoring of surface water was extended to polar substances, in 2005. Pesticide and pharmaceutical POCIS samplers have been exposed in surface water at 21 locations and analysed for polar pesticides, perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Pesticide POCIS samplers in groundwater were exposed at 5 locations and analysed for polar pesticides. The following active substances of plant protection products were analyzed in surface water and groundwater using LC/MS/MS: 2,4,5-T, 2,4-D, Acetochlor, Alachlor, Atrazine, Atrazine_desethyl, Azoxystrobin, Bentazone, Bromacil, Bromoxynil, Carbofuran, Clopyralid, Cyanazin, Desmetryn, Diazinon, Dicamba, Dichlobenil, Dichlorprop, Dimethoat, Diuron, Ethofumesate, Fenarimol, Fenhexamid, Fipronil, Fluazifop-p-butyl, Hexazinone, Chlorbromuron, Chlorotoluron, Imazethapyr, Isoproturon, Kresoxim-methyl, Linuron, MCPA, MCPP, Metalaxyl, Metamitron, Methabenzthiazuron, Methamidophos, Methidathion, Metobromuron, Metolachlor, Metoxuron, Metribuzin, Monolinuron, Nicosulfuron, Phorate, Phosalone, Phosphamidon, Prometryn, Propiconazole, Propyzamide, Pyridate, Rimsulfuron, Simazine, Tebuconazole, Terbuthylazine, Terbutryn, Thifensulfuron-methyl, Thiophanate-methyl and Tri-allate. The POCIS samplers performed very well being able to provide better picture than grab samples. The results show that polar pesticides and also perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals as well occur in hydrosphere of the Czech republic. Acknowledgment: Authors acknowledge the financial support of grant No. 2B06095 by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports.

  10. Transient digitizer with displacement current samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A low component count, high speed sample gate, and digitizer architecture using the sample gates is based on use of a signal transmission line, a strobe transmission line and a plurality of sample gates connected to the sample transmission line at a plurality of positions. The sample gates include a strobe pickoff structure near the strobe transmission line which generates a charge displacement current in response to propagation of the strobe signal on the strobe transmission line sufficient to trigger the sample gate. The sample gate comprises a two-diode sampling bridge and is connected to a meandered signal transmission line at one end and to a charge-holding cap at the other. The common cathodes are reverse biased. A voltage step is propagated down the strobe transmission line. As the step propagates past a capacitive pickoff, displacement current i=c(dv/dT), flows into the cathodes, driving the bridge into conduction and thereby charging the charge-holding capacitor to a value related to the signal. A charge amplifier converts the charge on the charge-holding capacitor to an output voltage. The sampler is mounted on a printed circuit board, and the sample transmission line and strobe transmission line comprise coplanar microstrips formed on a surface of the substrate. Also, the strobe pickoff structure may comprise a planar pad adjacent the strobe transmission line on the printed circuit board.

  11. Improved passive flux samplers for measuring ammonia emissions from animal houses, Part 2: Performance of different types of sampler as a function of angle of incidence of airflow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, R.; Wagemans, M.J.M.; Phillips, V.R.

    2003-01-01

    The basic principle of the improved passive flux sampler has been reported in a companion paper. In the present paper, the performance of different types of the sampler as a function of angle of incidence of airflow was studied in a wind tunnel. The following types of sampler were examined: a basic

  12. Curriculum Online Review System: Proposing Curriculum with Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhinehart, Marilyn; Barlow, Rhonda; Shafer, Stu; Hassur, Debby

    2009-01-01

    The Curriculum Online Review System (CORS) at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) uses SharePoint as a Web platform for the JCCC Curriculum Proposals Process. The CORS application manages proposals throughout the approval process using collaboration tools and workflows to notify all stakeholders. This innovative new program has changed the way…

  13. Development and Evaluation of the Curriculum for BOLD (Bronx Oncology Living Daily) Healthy Living: a Diabetes Prevention and Control Program for Underserved Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Beth A; Kahan, Michelle; Martinez, Melissa; Isaac, Kathleen; Rossi, Amerigo; Skyhart, Rebecca; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Moadel-Robblee, Alyson

    2015-09-01

    Underserved minority communities have few resources for addressing comorbidity risk reduction among long-term cancer survivors. To address this community need, we developed and piloted the Bronx Oncology Living Daily (BOLD) Healthy Living program, the first known diabetes prevention and control program to target cancer survivors and co-survivors in Bronx County, NY. The program aimed to facilitate lifestyle change and improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL) through weekly group nutrition education (60-90 min) and exercise (60 min) classes. We examined baseline characteristics of participants using simple descriptive statistics and evaluated program implementation and impact using the Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. The curriculum, which drew from the social-ecological framework and motivational and cognitive behavioral strategies, consisted of 12 culturally and medically tailored modules with options for implementation as a 12- or 4-week program. Seven programs (four 12 weeks and three 4 weeks in length, respectively) were implemented at five community site locations. Sixty-six cancer survivors and 17 cancer co-survivors (mean age 60.5 ± 10.2 years) enrolled in one of the programs. Most participants were female (95.2 %) minority (55.4 % black, 26.5 % Hispanic/Latino) breast cancer survivors (75.7 %). Median program attendance was 62.5 % and did not significantly differ by program length; however, 67.3 % of participants achieved ≥60 % attendance among the 12-week programs, compared to 41.9 % among the 4-week programs, and this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.02). Overall, participants reported significant pre/post improvements in perceived health as good/excellent (66.0 to 75.5 %; p = 0.001) and borderline significant decreases in perceived pain as moderate/severe (45.5 to 38.2 %; p = 0.05). More than 90 % of participants reported that the program helped them to achieve their

  14. Deep-Sea Hydrothermal-Vent Sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Venkateswaran, Kasthur; Matthews, Jaret B.

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus is being developed for sampling water for signs of microbial life in an ocean hydrothermal vent at a depth of as much as 6.5 km. Heretofore, evidence of microbial life in deep-sea hydrothermal vents has been elusive and difficult to validate. Because of the extreme conditions in these environments (high pressures and temperatures often in excess of 300 C), deep-sea hydrothermal- vent samplers must be robust. Because of the presumed low density of biomass of these environments, samplers must be capable of collecting water samples of significant volume. It is also essential to prevent contamination of samples by microbes entrained from surrounding waters. Prior to the development of the present apparatus, no sampling device was capable of satisfying these requirements. The apparatus (see figure) includes an intake equipped with a temperature probe, plus several other temperature probes located away from the intake. The readings from the temperature probes are utilized in conjunction with readings from flowmeters to determine the position of the intake relative to the hydrothermal plume and, thereby, to position the intake to sample directly from the plume. Because it is necessary to collect large samples of water in order to obtain sufficient microbial biomass but it is not practical to retain all the water from the samples, four filter arrays are used to concentrate the microbial biomass (which is assumed to consist of particles larger than 0.2 m) into smaller volumes. The apparatus can collect multiple samples per dive and is designed to process a total volume of 10 L of vent fluid, of which most passes through the filters, leaving a total possibly-microbe-containing sample volume of 200 mL remaining in filters. A rigid titanium nose at the intake is used for cooling the sample water before it enters a flexible inlet hose connected to a pump. As the water passes through the titanium nose, it must be cooled to a temperature that is above a mineral

  15. Cosmetology. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Michael D.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to offer guidelines along with supporting resources and teaching ideas from which the local postsecondary instructor can extract a cosmetology curriculum that meets local needs. Following an outline of the philosophy and goals underlying state and local vocational education programs in Georgia, the purpose and…

  16. Precision Machining Technology. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide was developed from a Technical Committee Report prepared with the assistance of industry personnel and containing a Task List which is the basis of the guide. It presents competency-based program standards for courses in precision machining technology and is part of the Idaho Vocational Curriculum Guide Project, a cooperative…

  17. Transnational Policy Transfer over Three Curriculum Reforms in Finland: The Constructions of Conditional and Purposive Programs (1994-2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivesind, Kirsten; Afsar, Azita; Bachmann, Kari E.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how three national curricula for basic education in Finland reflect transnational policy perspectives from 1994 to the present. By developing a conceptual apparatus for curriculum analysis, we examine how national curricula in Finland can be interpreted as modifications of transnational policy transfers shaped by…

  18. The Robust Learning Model with a Spiral Curriculum: Implications for the Educational Effectiveness of Online Master Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Yoram; Neumann, Edith; Lewis, Shelia

    2017-01-01

    This study integrated the Spiral Curriculum approach into the Robust Learning Model as part of a continuous improvement process that was designed to improve educational effectiveness and then assessed the differences between the initial and integrated models as well as the predictability of the first course in the integrated learning model on a…

  19. Monterrey, La Ciudad Dorada/Monterrey, The Golden City. Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2002 (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintyne, Susan

    This curriculum project is designed for high school classes in Spanish, social studies, or global studies. The project's lesson plan lists materials needed; poses seven key questions about Mexico and Monterrey; outlines background notes on Mexico; and provides a detailed, step-by-step procedure for classroom implementation during three days. Also…

  20. Fostering High-Quality Teaching with an Enriched Curriculum and Professional Development Support: The Head Start REDI Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrovich, Celene E.; Gest, Scott D.; Gill, Sukhdeep; Bierman, Karen L.; Welsh, Janet A.; Jones, Damon

    2009-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial tested whether teaching quality in Head Start classrooms could be improved with the addition of evidence-based curriculum components targeting emergent language or literacy and social-emotional development and the provision of associated professional development support. Participants were lead and assistant…

  1. Curriculum Planning: Trends in Communication Studies, Workplace Competencies, and Current Programs at 4-Year Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Dale A.; Goodboy, Alan K.

    2009-01-01

    Many communication scholars recognize the need to regularly explore current communication curriculum and to evaluate its contribution to meeting the needs of students and the demands of the workplace. However, within the communication discipline, current curricular decisions are based on studies conducted nearly a decade ago. This study (a)…

  2. Mexican Muralists: Rivera, Siqueiros, and Orozco. Curriculum Projects. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 2002 (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Kim

    Murals created by Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros embody a time of change in Mexico. The murals they created were intended to educate an illiterate population. Today these murals embody national pride. The goal of this curriculum project is rooted in learning about the history, culture, and art of Mexico. The project…

  3. The Curriculum Improvement Project in Business Careers Programs: Business Manager, Officer Administrator, Real Estate Agent, Real Estate Broker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College of the Mainland, Texas City, TX.

    In 1987, the College of the Mainland undertook a project to update curricula in real estate, business management, and office technology. The project entailed a survey of the labor market to clarify personnel needs in selected fields; the use of the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process, which involved expert workers in the creation of task…

  4. Change in Mexico: Problems and Promise. Curriculum Project. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program, 1993 (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrum, Andrea

    This curriculum unit presents an overview of change in Mexico. The unit is not meant to be an in-depth study, but rather a survey of four areas traditionally important in Mexican life: the economy, politics, religion, and literature, with particular emphasis on the first two. The unit is designed as a module on contemporary Mexico in a Latin…

  5. Performance of high flow rate samplers for respirable particle collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taekhee; Kim, Seung Won; Chisholm, William P; Slaven, James; Harper, Martin

    2010-08-01

    The American Conference of Governmental Industrial hygienists (ACGIH) lowered the threshold limit value (TLV) for respirable crystalline silica (RCS) exposure from 0.05 to 0.025 mg m(-3) in 2006. For a working environment with an airborne dust concentration near this lowered TLV, the sample collected with current standard respirable aerosol samplers might not provide enough RCS for quantitative analysis. Adopting high flow rate sampling devices for respirable dust containing silica may provide a sufficient amount of RCS to be above the limit of quantification even for samples collected for less than full shift. The performances of three high flow rate respirable samplers (CIP10-R, GK2.69, and FSP10) have been evaluated in this study. Eleven different sizes of monodisperse aerosols of ammonium fluorescein were generated with a vibrating orifice aerosol generator in a calm air chamber in order to determine the sampling efficiency of each sampler. Aluminum oxide particles generated by a fluidized bed aerosol generator were used to test (i) the uniformity of a modified calm air chamber, (ii) the effect of loading on the sampling efficiency, and (iii) the performance of dust collection compared to lower flow rate cyclones in common use in the USA (10-mm nylon and Higgins-Dewell cyclones). The coefficient of variation for eight simultaneous samples in the modified calm air chamber ranged from 1.9 to 6.1% for triplicate measures of three different aerosols. The 50% cutoff size ((50)d(ae)) of the high flow rate samplers operated at the flow rates recommended by manufacturers were determined as 4.7, 4.1, and 4.8 microm for CIP10-R, GK2.69, and FSP10, respectively. The mass concentration ratio of the high flow rate samplers to the low flow rate cyclones decreased with decreasing mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and high flow rate samplers collected more dust than low flow rate samplers by a range of 2-11 times based on gravimetric analysis. Dust loading inside the

  6. Writing across and against the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Art

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the author's career as a teacher of composition and literature and as a writing program administrator of writing across the curriculum. Discusses the potential of poetry across the curriculum as an important tool for writing "against" the curriculum of academic discourse. Concludes that when they write poetry, students often express…

  7. Nationwide program of education for undergraduates in the field of disaster medicine: development of a core curriculum centered on blended learning and simulation tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Ragazzoni, Luca; Tengattini, Marco; Carenzo, Luca; Della Corte, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, effective models of disaster medicine curricula for medical schools have been established. However, only a small percentage of medical schools worldwide have considered at least basic disaster medicine teaching in their study program. In Italy, disaster medicine has not yet been included in the medical school curriculum. Perceiving the lack of a specific course on disaster medicine, the Segretariato Italiano Studenti in Medicina (SISM) contacted the Centro di Ricerca Interdipartimentale in Medicina di Emergenza e dei Disastri ed Informatica applicata alla didattica e alla pratica Medica (CRIMEDIM) with a proposal for a nationwide program in this field. Seven modules (introduction to disaster medicine, prehospital disaster management, definition of triage, characteristics of hospital disaster plans, treatment of the health consequences of different disasters, psychosocial care, and presentation of past disasters) were developed using an e-learning platform and a 12-hour classroom session which involved problem-based learning (PBL) activities, table-top exercises, and a computerized simulation (Table 1). The modules were designed as a framework for a disaster medicine curriculum for undergraduates and covered the three main disciplines (clinical and psychosocial, public health, and emergency and risk management) of the core of "Disaster Health" according to the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM) international guidelines for disaster medicine education. From January 2011 through May 2013, 21 editions of the course were delivered to 21 different medical schools, and 524 students attended the course. The blended approach and the use of simulation tools were appreciated by all participants and successfully increased participants' knowledge of disaster medicine and basic competencies in performing mass-casualty triage. This manuscript reports on the designing process and the initial outcomes with respect to learners

  8. The neighborhood MCMC sampler for learning Bayesian networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, Salem A.; Azad, A. K. M.; Keith, Jonathan M.

    2016-07-01

    Getting stuck in local maxima is a problem that arises while learning Bayesian networks (BNs) structures. In this paper, we studied a recently proposed Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampler, called the Neighbourhood sampler (NS), and examined how efficiently it can sample BNs when local maxima are present. We assume that a posterior distribution f(N,E|D) has been defined, where D represents data relevant to the inference, N and E are the sets of nodes and directed edges, respectively. We illustrate the new approach by sampling from such a distribution, and inferring BNs. The simulations conducted in this paper show that the new learning approach substantially avoids getting stuck in local modes of the distribution, and achieves a more rapid rate of convergence, compared to other common algorithms e.g. the MCMC Metropolis-Hastings sampler.

  9. Developing an Aging Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Allen J.; Roubinek, Darrell L.

    The program upon which this paper is based, Developing an Aging Curriculum, was initiated as a pilot project to assess the appropriateness of introducing aging information and concepts to elementary-age students. Seventeen teachers in grades K-6 in one school district have been involved in the project as part of a graduate course. The project was…

  10. K-6 Science Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueford, J. R.; And Others

    A unified science approach is incorporated in this K-6 curriculum mode. The program is organized into six major cycles. These include: (1) science, math, and technology cycle; (2) universe cycle; (3) life cycle; (4) water cycle; (5) plate tectonics cycle; and (6) rock cycle. An overview is provided of each cycle's major concepts. The topic…

  11. Plumbing and Heating Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    Theory and experience in the following areas are included in this plumbing curriculum: (1) plumbing fixtures and heating; (2) city water service; (3) fixture roughing; (4) venting; and (5) solar heating systems. The plumbing program manual includes the following sections: (1) general objectives for grades 10, 11, and 12; (2) a list of 33 major…

  12. Designing Undergraduate Curriculum for Management Information Systems (MIS Education: A Comparison of the MIS Programs of Turkish Universities with those of Global Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyüp AKÇETİN

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Competition in the global environment takes place among multinational corporations, which is directly linked to human resources and the quality of training and education they have. The competitive advantage of the businesses is associated with the excellence of human resources, which is measured by the education quality of the employees. Information systems have become an essential requirement for the businesses of today’s digital age. Therefore, with this study, curricula of 90 universities’ Management Information Systems (MIS Undergraduate Programs, 57 of which are foreign and 33 are Turkish, were compared. The study methods include data mining approaches namely random clustering and making a text mining analysis. As the number and importance of the MIS programs are rapidly increasing, it is aimed with these approaches to contribute developing a world-class curriculum model to improve the quality of education of them. On that ground, the main purpose of this study is creating a framework that defines a world-class MIS curriculum model by presenting the current situation in Turkey.

  13. Design, delivery, and validation of a trainer curriculum for the national laparoscopic colorectal training program in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Hugh; Cuming, Tamzin; Miskovic, Danilo; Wyles, Susannah M; Langsford, Laura; Anderson, John; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Valori, Roland; Hanna, George B; Coleman, Mark G; Francis, Nader

    2015-01-01

    To validate the delivery and efficacy of the national laparoscopic colorectal surgery "training the trainer" (Lapco TT) curriculum. The National Training Programme in Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery designed the Lapco TT curriculum to improve, standardize, and benchmark the quality of training. Evidence for such courses rarely extends beyond subjective feedback. The Lapco TT curriculum tailors key teaching skills for laparoscopic colorectal surgery: training structure, skills deconstruction, trainer intervention, and performance enhancing feedback. Ten Lapco TT courses were delivered to 65 national Lapco trainers since 2010. The course was validated at Kirkpatrick's 4 levels of evaluation: (i) pre- and post-course interviews reflecting initial reaction; (ii) training quality assessment on simulated scenarios using the Structured Training Trainer Assessment Report (STTAR) tool; (iii) follow-up interviews at 4 to 6 months; and (iv) delegate performance ratings, by their trainees, using the mini-STTAR and the delegates' trainees learning curves before and after the course. There were significant improvements in training in the post-course simulated scenario, especially in the "set" (P situations. Findings mirrored in performance ratings by their trainees: overall (4.37 vs 4.46, P = 0.040), agreed learning points (3.65 vs 4.00, P = 0.042), encouraged self-reflection (3.67 vs 3.94, P = 0.046), and encouraged team awareness (3.53 vs 4.05, P = 0.045). The learning curve of delegates' trainees improved after the course. The Lapco TT curriculum improved training performance in the short- and long-term, provided a structured training framework, and enhanced the learning curve of delegates' trainees.

  14. A mathematics sampler topics for the liberal arts

    CERN Document Server

    Berlinghoff, William P; Skrien, Dale

    2001-01-01

    Now in its fifth edition, A Mathematics Sampler presents mathematics as both science and art, focusing on the historical role of mathematics in our culture. It uses selected topics from modern mathematics-including computers, perfect numbers, and four-dimensional geometry-to exemplify the distinctive features of mathematics as an intellectual endeavor, a problem-solving tool, and a way of thinking about the rapidly changing world in which we live. A Mathematics Sampler also includes unique LINK sections throughout the book, each of which connects mathematical concepts with areas of interest th

  15. Nonwoven textile for use in a nanoparticle respiratory deposition sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosburgh, Donna J H; Park, Jae Hong; Mines, Levi W D; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A; Anthony, T Renée; Peters, Thomas M

    2017-05-01

    The nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler is a personal sampler that combines a cyclone, impactor, and a nylon mesh diffusion stage to measure a worker's exposure to nanoparticles. The concentration of titanium in the nylon mesh of the diffusion stage complicates the application of the NRD sampler for assessing exposures to titanium dioxide nanoparticles. This study evaluated commercially available nonwoven textiles for use as an alternative media in the diffusion stage of the NRD sampler. Three textiles were selected as containing little titanium from an initial screening of 11 textiles by field portable x-ray fluorescence (FPXRF). Further evaluation on these three textiles was conducted to determine the concentration of titanium and other metals by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), the number of layers required to achieve desired collection characteristics for use as the diffusion stage in the NRD sampler (i.e., the nanoparticulate matter, NPM, criterion), and the pressure drop associated with that number of layers.  Only three (two composed of cotton fibers, C1 and C2; and one of viscose bamboo and cotton fibers, BC) of 11 textiles screened had titanium concentrations below the limit of detection the XRF device (0.15 µg/cm 2 ). Multiple metals, including small amounts of titanium, were found in each of the three nonwoven textiles using ICP-OES. The number of 25-mm-diameter layers required to achieve the collection efficiency by size required for the NRD sampler was three for C1 (R 2 = 0.95 with reference to the NPM criterion), two for C2 (R 2 = 0.79), and three for BC (R 2 = 0.87). All measured pressure drops were less than theoretical and even the greatest pressure drop of 65.4 Pa indicated that a typical personal sampling pump could accommodate any of the three nonwoven textiles in the NRD sampler. The titanium concentration, collection efficiency, and measured pressure drops show there is a potential for

  16. Evaluating the Relationship between Equilibrium Passive Sampler Uptake and Aquatic Organism Bioaccumulation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives. This review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in water column and interstitial water exposures as a surrogate for organism bioaccumulation. Approach/Activities. Fifty-five studies were found where both passive sampler uptake...

  17. Public-health instruction necessary to supplement the veterinary professional curriculum: the DVM/MPH coordinated-degree program at Auburn University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, James G W; Nusbaum, Kenneth E; Wright, James C; Hall, Dugald C A

    2008-01-01

    To meet long-term needs, many veterinary colleges and schools are participating in dual-degree DVM/MPH programs. Auburn University's College of Veterinary Medicine and the School of Public Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have developed a coordinated-degree curriculum in which the DVM and the MPH are not necessarily awarded simultaneously. Other opportunities at Auburn include Public Health Careers Day, trips to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, several elective courses related to veterinary epidemiology, and online access to the Emerging and Exotic Diseases of Animals course available from the Veterinary Information Network. We have been able to increase our students' exposure to the role of the veterinarian in public health and to develop a program to augment their training in public practice.

  18. Toward a Collaborative Approach to Curriculum Development: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the National Curriculum Project, an effort in curriculum renewal set up within the Australian Adult Migrant Education Program. The rationale for and the effectiveness of a collaborative approach between teachers and curriculum specialists in school-based English-as-a-Second-Language curriculum development are discussed. Project…

  19. Initial field evaluation of the Harvard active ozone sampler for personal ozone monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyh, A S; Roberts, P T; Lurmann, F W; Schoell, B M; Avol, E L

    1999-01-01

    Assessing personal exposure to ozone has only been feasible recently with the introduction of passive ozone samplers. These devices are easy to use, but changes in air velocity across their collection surfaces can affect performance. The Harvard active ozone sampler (AS) was developed in response to problems with the passive methods. This active sampler has been tested extensively as a microenvironmental sampler. To test for personal sampling, 40 children attending summer day-camp in Riverside, California wore the active ozone sampler for approximately 2.6 h on July 19 and 21, 1994, when ozone concentrations were about 100 ppb and 140 ppb, respectively. The children spent 94-100% of the sampling period outside, staying within a well-defined area while participating in normal camp activities. Ambient ozone concentrations across this area were monitored by two UV photometric ozone monitors. The active sampler was worn in a small backpack that was also equipped with a passive ozone sampler. Device precision, reported as the percent difference between duplicate pairs of samplers, was +/- 3.7% and +/- 4.2% for the active and passive samplers, respectively. The active sampler measured, on average, 94.5 +/- 8.2% of the ambient ozone while the passive samplers measured, on average, 124.5 +/- 18.8%. The samplers were worn successfully for the entire sampling period by all participating children.

  20. 50 CFR 697.12 - At-sea sea sampler/observer coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... must: (1) Notify the sea sampler/observer of any sea turtles, marine mammals, or other specimens taken by the vessel. (2) Provide the sea sampler/observer with sea turtles, marine mammals, or other... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false At-sea sea sampler/observer coverage. 697...

  1. Healthy Eating and Harambee: curriculum development for a culturally-centered bio-medically oriented nutrition education program to reach African American women of childbearing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Srimathi; Sparks, Arlene V; Webster, J DeWitt; Krishnakumar, Ambika; Lumeng, Julie

    2010-07-01

    The purpose was to develop, implement and evaluate a peer-led nutrition curriculum Healthy Eating and Harambee that addresses established objectives of maternal and infant health and to shift the stage for African American women of childbearing age in Genesee County toward healthier dietary patterns using a socio-cultural and biomedical orientation. The PEN-3 model, which frames culture in the context of health promotion interventions, was integrated with the Transtheoretical Model to guide this 13-week pre-test/post-test curriculum. Materials developed included soul food plate visuals, a micronutrient availability worksheet, a fruit stand, and gardening kits. Learning activities included affirmations, stories, case-scenarios, point-of-purchase product recognition, church health teams, and community health fairs. We investigated health-promoting dietary behaviors (consumption of more fruits and vegetables (F&V), serving more F&V to their families, and moderating dietary sodium and fat intakes), and biomedical behaviors (self-monitoring blood pressure and exercising) across five stages of change. Session attendance and program satisfaction were assessed. N = 102 women participated (mean age = 27.5 years). A majority (77%) reported adopting at least one healthy eating behavior (moderating sodium, serving more F&V to their families), 23% adopted at least two such behaviors (reading food labels for sodium; using culinary herbs/spices; serving more F&V to their families), and 45% adopted both dietary (moderating sodium; eating more fruits) and biomedical behaviors. Participants and facilitators favorably evaluated the curriculum and suggested improvements. A multi-conceptual approach coupled with cultural and biomedical tailoring has potential to promote young African American women's movement to more advanced stages of change and improve self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable intake, dietary sodium moderation, and self-monitoring blood pressure and physical activity.

  2. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Master Surgeon Educators ACS Fundamentals of Surgery Curriculum Transition to Practice Program ACS/APDS Surgery Resident Skills Curriculum ACS/APDS/ASE Resident Prep Curriculum ACS/ASE ...

  3. Curriculum Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    This essay addresses the problem of the nature of curriculum integration, and an attempt is made to lay the basis for a theory of integration. An aspect of the relationship between mathematics and physics is discussed. (Author/MLF)

  4. FIELD EVALUATION OF A HIGH-VOLUME DICHOTOMOUS SAMPLER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study presents the field evaluation of a high-volume dichotomous sampler that collects coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter. The key feature of this device is the utilization of a round-nozzle virtual impactor with a 50% cutpoint at 2.5 5m to split PM10 into...

  5. Grab Samplers for Benthic Macroinvertebrates in the Lower Mississippi River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    River 26. AftTRACT (Cfeo do reversn e o if neem mod Identiy by block nuibot) -- he use of any one single type and size of existing grab sampler for...was from the stern of a 40-ft* vessel. The vessel’s bow was tied to a tree on the shoreline. Although the range of water depths during sampling was

  6. Fluidic Sampler. Tanks Focus Area. OST Reference No. 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Problem Definition; Millions of gallons of radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored in underground tanks across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. To manage this waste, tank operators need safe, cost-effective methods for mixing tank material, transferring tank waste between tanks, and collecting samples. Samples must be collected at different depths within storage tanks containing various kinds of waste including salt, sludge, and supernatant. With current or baseline methods, a grab sampler or a core sampler is inserted into the tank, waste is maneuvered into the sample chamber, and the sample is withdrawn from the tank. The mixing pumps in the tank, which are required to keep the contents homogeneous, must be shut down before and during sampling to prevent airborne releases. These methods are expensive, require substantial hands-on labor, increase the risk of worker exposure to radiation, and often produce nonrepresentative and unreproducible samples. How It Works: The Fluidic Sampler manufactured by AEA Technology Engineering Services, Inc., enables tank sampling to be done remotely with the mixing pumps in operation. Remote operation minimizes the risk of exposure to personnel and the possibility of spills, reducing associated costs. Sampling while the tank contents are being agitated yields consistently homogeneous, representative samples and facilitates more efficient feed preparation and evaluation of the tank contents. The above-tank portion of the Fluidic Sampler and the replacement plug and pipework that insert through the tank top are shown.

  7. Optimisation of the membrane-assisted passive sampler and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In both cases, extraction efficiency was highest for 2,4-dichlorophenol. The low extraction efficiency in the passive sampler supports the idea that it is not an exhaustive extraction technique and does not disturb the chemical equilibrium of the sample. It therefore measures the bioavailable fraction of the compound and can ...

  8. Optimisation of the membrane-assisted passive sampler and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-20

    Jul 20, 2010 ... extraction technique in terms of the extraction efficiency, enrichment factor, detection limit and selectivity in wastewater. The passive sampler .... compounds such as polar industrial pollutants, pesticides, personal care prod- ... Chlorinated phenols can also form during wastewater treat- ment, since chlorine ...

  9. Scanning SQUID sampler with 40-ps time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zheng; Kirtley, John R.; Wang, Yihua; Kratz, Philip A.; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Watson, Christopher A.; Gibson, Gerald W.; Ketchen, Mark B.; Moler, Kathryn. A.

    2017-08-01

    Scanning Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) microscopy provides valuable information about magnetic properties of materials and devices. The magnetic flux response of the SQUID is often linearized with a flux-locked feedback loop, which limits the response time to microseconds or longer. In this work, we present the design, fabrication, and characterization of a novel scanning SQUID sampler with a 40-ps time resolution and linearized response to periodically triggered signals. Other design features include a micron-scale pickup loop for the detection of local magnetic flux, a field coil to apply a local magnetic field to the sample, and a modulation coil to operate the SQUID sampler in a flux-locked loop to linearize the flux response. The entire sampler device is fabricated on a 2 mm × 2 mm chip and can be scanned over macroscopic planar samples. The flux noise at 4.2 K with 100 kHz repetition rate and 1 s of averaging is of order 1 mΦ0. This SQUID sampler will be useful for imaging dynamics in magnetic and superconducting materials and devices.

  10. Developments in Emission Measurements Using Lightweight Sensors and Samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightweight emission measurement systems making use of miniaturized sensors and samplers have been developed for portable and aerial sampling for an array of pollutants. Shoebox-sized systems called “Kolibri”, weighing 3-5 kg, have been deployed on NASA-flown unmanned...

  11. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program: Cross-sectional quantitative survey to inform curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-03-01

    To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Family medicine residents' attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement "I am a leader" received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  12. Evaluation of IOM personal sampler at different flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yue; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    2010-02-01

    The Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) personal sampler is usually operated at a flow rate of 2.0 L/min, the rate at which it was designed and calibrated, for sampling the inhalable mass fraction of airborne particles in occupational environments. In an environment of low aerosol concentrations only small amounts of material are collected, and that may not be sufficient for analysis. Recently, a new sampling pump with a flow rate up to 15 L/min became available for personal samplers, with the potential of operating at higher flow rates. The flow rate of a Leland Legacy sampling pump, which operates at high flow rates, was evaluated and calibrated, and its maximum flow was found to be 10.6 L/min. IOM samplers were placed on a mannequin, and sampling was conducted in a large aerosol wind tunnel at wind speeds of 0.56 and 2.22 m/s. Monodisperse aerosols of oleic acid tagged with sodium fluorescein in the size range of 2 to 100 microm were used in the test. The IOM samplers were operated at flow rates of 2.0 and 10.6 L/min. Results showed that the IOM samplers mounted in the front of the mannequin had a higher sampling efficiency than those mounted at the side and back, regardless of the wind speed and flow rate. For the wind speed of 0.56 m/s, the direction-averaged (the average value of all orientations facing the wind direction) sampling efficiency of the samplers operated at 2.0 L/min was slightly higher than that of 10.6 L/min. For the wind speed of 2.22 m/s, the sampling efficiencies at both flow rates were similar for particles flow rates follows the inhalable mass curve for particles in the size range of 2 to 20 microm. The test results indicate that the IOM sampler can be used at higher flow rates.

  13. Automated particulate sampler for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty verification (the DOE radionuclide aerosol sampler/analyzer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, S. M.; Miley, H. S.; Thompson, R. C.; Hubbard, C. W.

    1997-06-01

    The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) was recently signed by President Clinton and is intended to eliminate all nuclear weapons testing. One way which the treaty seeks to accomplish this is by the establishment of the International Monitoring System. As stated in the latest Working Papers of the Draft CTBT, "The International Monitoring System shall comprise facilities for seismological monitoring, radionuclide monitoring including certified laboratories, hydroacoustic monitoring, infrasound monitoring, and respective means of communication, and shall be supported by the International Data Centre of the Technical Secretariat". Radionuclide monitoring consists of both radionuclides associated with particulates and relevant noble gases. This type of monitoring is quite valuable since indications of a nuclear test in the form of radioactive particulate or radioactive noble gases may be detected at great distances from the detonation site. The system presented here is concerned only with radioactive particulate monitoring and is described as an automated sampler/analyzer which has been developed for the Department of Energy (DoE) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

  14. Computer Service Technician "COMPS." Curriculum Grant 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoolcraft Coll., Livonia, MI.

    This document is a curriculum guide for a program in computer service technology developed at Schoolcraft College, Livonia, Michigan. The program is designed to give students a strong background in the fundamentals of electricity, electronic devices, and basic circuits (digital and linear). The curriculum includes laboratory demonstrations of the…

  15. Evaluation of intake efficiencies and associated sediment-concentration errors in US D-77 bag-type and US D-96-type depth-integrating suspended-sediment samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, Thomas A.; Topping, David J.

    2013-01-01

    with that predicted on the basis of the 1940s FISP laboratory experiments. Because suspended-sediment samplers can respond differently between laboratory and field conditions, actual-river tests such as those in this study should be conducted when models of suspended-sediment samplers are changed from one type to another during the course of long-term monitoring programs. Otherwise, potential large differences in the suspended-sediment data collected by different types of samplers would lead to large step changes in sediment loads that may be misinterpreted as real, when, in fact, they are associated with the change in suspended‑sediment sampling equipment.

  16. Statewide collaborative curriculum project: a shared vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Susan C; Aldrich, Suzanne L; Dahlvang, Victoria K; Fenlason, Kristen L; Jennissen, Sarah A; Madigan, Kristin N; Thoma, Dione M

    2014-12-01

    In 2011, national accreditation was mandated for all nursing programs within the state of Minnesota. Only three of the 23 practical nursing (PN) programs were nationally accredited at the time. The majority of the PN programs needed major curricular revisions to meet national accreditation standards. Many of the PN programs were rural, with limited resources, faculty, or expertise. A collaborative process between industry and nursing programs was established to develop a curriculum framework that met national accreditation standards and could be used as a foundation by the PN programs for curriculum development and revision. The results of the collaborative process included a curriculum framework that was guided by eight student learning outcomes and included an online resource of course outlines, assignments, rubrics, and clinical evaluation tools. The process described in this article can be replicated to guide other programs in development of a curriculum framework to ease the burden of individual nursing programs. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Beyond Canisters (SUMMAs): Passive and Active Samplers and International Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    cleanliness . Repeat this clean, store, and clean sequence as many times as necessary. • Bulky - require special storage facilities and transport...Desorption Analysis Procedures for Volatile Organic Compounds in Air ISO 16017-2 Indoor, ambient and workplace air — Sampling and analysis of...Practice for Sampling Workplace Atmospheres to Collect Gases or Vapors with Solid Sorbent Diffusive Samplers Sorbent Sampling Guidance ITALY Approximately

  18. The SKI*HI Model: Programming for Hearing Impaired Infants through Home Intervention, Home Visit Curriculum. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Thomas C.; Watkins, Susan

    The manual describes the SKI*HI Model, a comprehensive approach to identification and home intervention treatment of hearing impaired children and their families. The model features home programing in four basic areas: the home hearing aid program (nine lessons which facilitate the proper fit and acceptance of amplification by the child), home…

  19. A Hands-On, Interdisciplinary Laboratory Program and Educational Model to Strengthen a Radar Curriculum for Broad Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeary, Mark; Yu, Tian-You; Palmer, Robert; Biggerstaff, Michael; Fink, L. Dee; Ahem, Carolyn; Tarp, Keli Pirtle

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the details of a National Science Foundation multi-year educational project at the University of Oklahoma (OU). The goal of this comprehensive active-learning and hands-on laboratory program is to develop an interdisciplinary program, in which engineering, geoscience, and meteorology students participate, which forms a…

  20. Teaching Students to Write across a Border: A Writing Curriculum for Inner-City College Access Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Jennifer Kwon

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the development of the Summer Tools, Information, Motivation, and Education (SummerTIME) Writing Program, the only program of its kind in Los Angeles that conducts self-assessment. The author describes the geographical and political boundaries separating inner-city Los Angeles high school graduates from higher education,…

  1. A carbon monoxide passive sampler: Research and development needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traynor, G.W.; Apte, M.G.; Diamond, R.C.; Woods, A.L.

    1991-11-01

    In rare instances, carbon monoxide (CO) levels in houses can reach dangerously high concentrations, causing adverse health effects ranging from mild headaches to, under extreme conditions, death. Hundreds of fatal accidental carbon monoxide poisonings occur each year primarily due to the indoor operation of motor vehicles, the indoor use of charcoal for cooking, the operation of malfunctioning vented and unvented combustion appliances, and the misuse combustion appliances. Because there is a lack of simple, inexpensive, and accurate field sampling instrumentation, it is difficult for gas utilities and researchers to conduct field research studies designed to quantify the concentrations of CO in residences. Determining the concentration of CO in residences is the first step towards identifying the high risk appliances and high-CO environments which pose health risks. Thus, there exists an urgent need to develop and field-validate a CO-quantifying technique suitable for affordable field research. A CO passive sampler, if developed, could fulfill these requirements. Existing CO monitoring techniques are discussed as well as three potential CO-detection methods for use in a CO passive sampler. Laboratory and field research needed for the development and validation of an effective and cost-efficient CO passive sampler are also discussed.

  2. Field intercomparison of diffusive samplers for measuring ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, M; Braeutigam, S; Ferm, M; Haas, M; Hangartner, M; Hofschreuder, P; Kasper-Giebl, A; Römmelt, H; Striedner, J; Terzer, W; Thöni, L; Werner, H; Zimmerling, R

    1999-06-01

    Agricultural production systems are recognised as a major source of atmospheric ammonia. Deposition of ammonia and ammonium may contribute to undesired changes in oligotrophic ecosystems. The continuous measurement of atmospheric ammonia requires expensive and sophisticated techniques and is performed only in a very restrict number of ambient air stations in Europe. Therefore, the application of passive samplers, which have the advantage of being easy to handle and cost-efficient, is useful. In the past the comparability of different passive samplers must be considered as rather scarce. In a joint European project under the leadership of the GSF-Forschungszentrum für Umwelt und Gesundheit, Neuherberg, in 1997 a comparison of different passive ammonia monitoring methods was carried out in a prealpine rural site near Garmisch-Partenkirchen. It was considered valuable to include not only well established systems but also methods still being developed. For the comparative test ten working groups with different methods took part. A wet annular denuder system, which has been developed by the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation for on-line measurement of atmospheric ammonia, served as reference of passive methods. The experiment, which started in June and finished in December, showed that most of the passive samplers fulfil the requirements and can be recommended for further measurements. Additional measurements of meteorological parameters were performed to check the influences of different weather conditions on passive sampling.

  3. Projects in medical education: "Social Justice in Medicine" a rationale for an elective program as part of the medical education curriculum at John A. Burns School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Teresa; Rieth, Katherine

    2012-04-01

    Research has shown that cultural competence training improves the attitudes, knowledge, and skills of clinicians related to caring for diverse populations. Social Justice in medicine is the idea that healthcare workers promote fair treatment in healthcare so that disparities are eliminated. Providing students with the opportunity to explore social issues in health is the first step toward decreasing discrimination. This concept is required for institutional accreditation and widely publicized as improving health care delivery in our society. A literature review was performed searching for social justice training in medical curricula in North America. Twenty-six articles were discovered addressing the topic or related to the concept of social justice or cultural humility. The concepts are in accordance with objectives supported by the Future of Medical Education in Canada Report (2010), the Carnegie Foundation Report (2010), and the LCME guidelines. The authors have introduced into the elective curriculum of the John A. Burns School of Medicine a series of activities within a time span of four years to encourage medical students to further their knowledge and skills in social awareness and cultural competence as it relates to their future practice as physicians. At the completion of this adjunct curriculum, participants will earn the Dean's Certificate of Distinction in Social Justice, a novel program at the medical school. It is the hope of these efforts that medical students go beyond cultural competence and become fluent in the critical consciousness that will enable them to understand different health beliefs and practices, engage in meaningful discourse, perform collaborative problem-solving, conduct continuous self-reflection, and, as a result, deliver socially responsible, compassionate care to all members of society.

  4. [Is smoking cessation part of the basic nursing education curriculum in Quebec? A survey of the program administrators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Mario; Dumas, Louise; Saint-Pierre, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Basic nursing education has a major impact on the future professional practices of nurses. Nurses must be adequately trained to perform health promotion activities, such as smoking cessation. However, nurses play only a minor role in this field. The objective of this research was to describe the smoking cessation content in basic nursing programmes in Quebec. A simple descriptive mixed design (quantitative and qualitative) study was conducted among nursing programme administrators in Quebec, using a validated online questionnaire. On average, the time devoted to smoking cessation was reported to be less than one hour per year, essentially concerning the physiological and pathophysiological factors of tobacco consumption, while nursing professional assessment and counselling in smoking cessation were almost non-existent. The results confirm the need to increase and improve the time and content devoted to smoking cessation in the basic nursing education curriculum. It is also important to structure basic training courses so to improve knowledge, attitudes, and skills of future nurses in order to influence their role in smoking cessation in their future professional practice.

  5. Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands- on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Mailloux, B. J.; Martin, S.; Kelsey, R.; Bower, P.

    2008-12-01

    Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands-on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College T. C. Kenna, S. Pfirman, B. J. Mailloux, M. Stute, R. Kelsey, and P. Bower By adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program (SEA semester) to the typical college format of classes, we are improving the technical and quantitative skills of undergraduate women and minorities in environmental science and improving their critical thinking and problem-solving by exposing our students to open-ended real-world environmental issues. Our approach uses the Hudson River Estuary as a natural laboratory. In a series of hands-on inquiry-based activities, students use advanced equipment to collect data and samples. Each class session introduces new analytical and data analysis techniques. All classes have the connecting theme of the river. Working with real data is open-ended. Our major findings as indicated by surveys as well as journaling throughout the semester are that the field- based experience significantly contributed to student learning and engagement. Journaling responses indicated that nearly all students discussed the importance and excitement of an authentic research experience. Some students were frustrated with data irregularities, uncertainty in methods and data, and the general challenge of a curriculum with inherent ambiguity. The majority were satisfied with the aims of the course to provide an integrative experience. All students demonstrated transfer of learned skills. This project has had a significant impact on our undergraduate female students: several students have pursued senior thesis projects stemming from grant activities, stating that the field activities were the highlight of their semester. Some students love the experience and want more. Others decide that they want to pursue a different career. All learn how science is conducted and have a better foundation to understand concepts such

  6. Comparison of the sampling rates and partitioning behaviour of polar and non-polar contaminants in the polar organic chemical integrative sampler and a monophasic mixed polymer sampler for application as an equilibrium passive sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yoonah; Schäffer, Andreas; Smith, Kilian

    2018-02-02

    In this work, Oasis HLB® beads were embedded in a silicone matrix to make a single phase passive sampler with a higher affinity for polar and ionisable compounds than silicone alone. The applicability of this mixed polymer sampler (MPS) was investigated for 34 aquatic contaminants (log K OW -0.03 to 6.26) in batch experiments. The influence of flow was investigated by comparing uptake under static and stirred conditions. The sampler characteristics of the MPS was assessed in terms of sampling rates (R S ) and sampler-water partition coefficients (K SW ), and these were compared to those of the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) as a reference kinetic passive sampler. The MPS was characterized as an equilibrium sampler for both polar and non-polar compounds, with faster uptake rates and a shorter time to reach equilibrium than the POCIS. Water flow rate impacted sampling rates by up to a factor of 12 when comparing static and stirred conditions. In addition, the relative accumulation of compounds in the polyethersulfone (PES) membranes versus the inner Oasis HLB sorbent was compared for the POCIS, and ranged from <1% to 83% depending on the analyte properties. This is indicative of a potentially significant lag-phase for less polar compounds within POCIS. The findings of this study can be used to quantitatively describe the partitioning and kinetic behaviour of MPS and POCIS for a range of aquatic organic contaminants for application in field sampling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nutrition Education Curriculum. Kindergarten Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Six major concepts form the framework for this kindergarten nutrition education curriculum: (1) Food is essential for all living things (learning to identify foods and food sources); (2) Nutrition is the food you eat and how the body uses it (recognizing the relationship between body growth and the ingestion of food); (3) Food is made up of…

  8. Summary report on the design of the retained gas sampler system (retained gas sampler, extruder and extractor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootan, D.W.; Bolden, R.C.; Bridges, A.E.; Cannon, N.S.; Chastain, S.A.; Hey, B.E.; Knight, R.C.; Linschooten, C.G.; Pitner, A.L.; Webb, B.J.

    1994-09-29

    This document summarizes work performs in Fiscal Year 1994 to develop the three main components of Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS). These primary components are the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), the Retained Gas Extruder (RGE), and the Retained Gas Extractor (RGEx). The RGS is based on the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Universal Sampler design, and includes modifications to reduce gas leakage. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. Significant progress has been made in developing the RGSS. The RGSS is being developed by WHC to extract a representative waste sample from a Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks and to measure both the amount and composition of free and {open_quotes}bound{close_quotes} gases. Sudden releases of flammable gas mixtures are a safety concern for normal waste storage operations and eventual waste retrieval. Flow visualization testing was used to identify important fluid dynamic issues related to the sampling process. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. The safety analysis for the RGSS is being performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and is more than sixty percent (60%) complete.

  9. Development of an EMS curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Jane H; Perina, Debra G; Liu, J Marc; Braude, Darren A; Rinnert, Kathy J; MacDonald, Russell D

    2014-01-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) became an American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) approved subspecialty of emergency medicine in September 2010. Achieving specialty or subspecialty recognition in an area of medical practice requires a unique body of knowledge, a scientific basis for the practice, a significant number of physicians who dedicate a portion of their practice to the area, and a sufficient number of fellowship programs. To prepare EMS fellows for successful completion of fellowship training, a lifetime of subspecialty practice, and certification examination, a formalized structured fellowship curriculum is necessary. A functional curriculum is one that takes the entire body of knowledge necessary to appropriately practice in the identified area and codifies it into a training blueprint to ensure that all of the items are covered over the prescribed training period. A curriculum can be as detailed as desired but typically all major headings and subheadings of the core content are identified and addressed. Common curricular components, specific to each area of the core content, include goals and objectives, implementation methods, evaluation, and outcomes assessment methods. Implementation methods can include simulation, observations, didactics, and experiential elements. Evaluation and outcomes assessment methods can include direct observation of patient assessment and treatment skills, structured patient simulations, 360° feedback, written and oral testing, and retrospective chart reviews. This paper describes a curriculum that is congruent with the current EMS core content, as well as providing a 12-month format to deploy the curriculum in an EMS fellowship program. Key words: curriculum; education; emergency medical services; fellowships and scholarships.

  10. Programa único o diferenciado: especificidad curricular de la escuela rural uruguaya - Common or differentiated school programs: uruguayan rural school curriculum specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limber Elbio Santos, Uruguay

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available O artigo se refere ao fenômeno da especificidade curricular que as escolas rurais uruguaias têm tido durante mais de um século e à ruptura histórica registrada em 2009 quando se começou a aplicar uma estrutura curricular comum a escolas urbanas e rurais. Analisam-se as circunstâncias históricas da pedagogia rural e, em particular, uma de suas materialidades simbolicamente mais potentes constituída pelo Programa para Escolas Rurais de 1949. Assim mesmo, refere-se ao peso que essa pedagogia continua tendo atualmente e da maneira como influi na gestão curricular do programa único. As especificidades social e didática da escola rural têm efeitos evidentes sobre o programa curricular no seu sentido mais amplo, com alcances muito mais extensos que os relativos ao currículo prescrito. No entanto, o desafio da escola rural atual de abordar a nova estrutura curricular de caráter único não é tão diferente do que se registrou historicamente: dialogar com o meio de igual para igual e maximizar o potencial de aprendizagem proporcionado pela instituição educacional, pela comunidade e estrutura multidisciplinar do grupo.Palavras-chave: escola rural, currículo, programa, pedagogia rural. COMMON OR DIFFERENTIATED SCHOOL PROGRAMS: URUGUAYAN RURAL SCHOOL CURRICULUM SPECIFICITY AbstractThe paper refers to the phenomenon of the Curriculum specificity to which the Rural Schools had for more than a century inUruguayand to the historic rupture registered in 2009 when a common Curriculum for Rural and Urban schools was introduced. The paper analyses the historic circumstances of the Rural Pedagogy and, in particular, one of its most potent symbolic materiality constituted of the 1949 program for Rural Education. The analysis show that the challenge to current Rural Education is not that different to that registered historically: to dialogue with the environment and take maximum advantage of the potential to learn which is provided by the

  11. Evaluation of the Snap Sampler for Sampling Ground Water Monitoring Wells for Inorganic Analytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Louise V; Mulherin, Nathan D; Gooch, Gordon E

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory studies and a field demonstration were conducted to determine the ability of the Snap Sampler to recover representative concentrations of inorganic analytes, including metals, from ground water...

  12. Quartz measurement in coal dust with high-flow rate samplers: laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taekhee; Lee, Eun Gyung; Kim, Seung Won; Chisholm, William P; Kashon, Michael; Harper, Martin

    2012-05-01

    A laboratory study was performed to measure quartz in coal dust using high-flow rate samplers (CIP10-R, GK2.69 cyclone, and FSP10 cyclone) and low-flow rate samplers [10-mm nylon and Higgins-Dewell type (BGI4L) cyclones] and to determine whether an increased mass collection from high-flow rate samplers would affect the subsequent quartz measurement by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analytical procedures. Two different sizes of coal dusts, mass median aerodynamic diameter 4.48 μm (Coal Dust A) and 2.33 μm (Coal Dust B), were aerosolized in a calm air chamber. The mass of coal dust collected by the samplers was measured gravimetrically, while the mass of quartz collected by the samplers was determined by FTIR (NIOSH Manual of Analytical Method 7603) and XRD (NIOSH Manual of Analytical Method 7500) after one of two different indirect preparations. Comparisons between high-flow rate samplers and low-flow rate samplers were made by calculating mass concentration ratios of coal dusts, net mass ratios of coal dusts, and quartz net mass. Mass concentrations of coal dust from the FSP10 cyclone were significantly higher than those from other samplers and mass concentrations of coal dust from 10-mm nylon cyclone were significantly lower than those from other samplers, while the CIP10-R, GK2.69, and BGI4L samplers did not show significant difference in the comparison of mass concentration of coal dusts. The BGI4L cyclone showed larger mass concentration of ∼9% compared to the 10-mm nylon cyclone. All cyclones provided dust mass concentrations that can be used in complying with the International Standard Organization standard for the determination of respirable dust concentration. The amount of coal dust collected from the high-flow rate samplers was found to be higher with a factor of 2-8 compared to the low-flow rate samplers but not in direct proportion of increased flow rates. The high-flow rate samplers collected more quartz compared to

  13. Particle-capturing performance of South African non-corrosive samplers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pretorius, CJ

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available analysis (PSA) could be carried out. The duration of the sampling was established at ? 30 seconds, so the mass of dust collected per sample ranged from 1 to 2 mg. The flow rates for each sampler were specified by the suppliers. For the X... chain to eliminate pulsation in the air flow. The pressure loss due to air flow resistance was measured with a digital micro manometer for each sampler with 2.2 L/min passing through the sampler (2.5 L/min for the aluminium samplers). PSA...

  14. 14 CFR 91.1075 - Training program: Special rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Operations Program Management § 91.1075 Training program: Special rules. Other than the program manager, only... approved curriculums, curriculum segments, and portions of curriculum segments applicable for use in...

  15. A Survey of Military Counseling Content and Curriculum among Council on Rehabilitation Education- and Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs-Accredited Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebnicki, Mark A.; Clemmons-James, Dominiquie; Leierer, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the amount, frequency, and type of course content related to military counseling issues in Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE)- and Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)-accredited master's-level counselor education programs. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all CORE- and…

  16. Towards Internationalising the Curriculum: A Case Study of Chinese Language Teacher Education Programs in China and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danping; Moloney, Robyn; Li, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative curricular inquiry of teacher education programs of Chinese as a foreign language in China and Australia. While there is an increasing demand for qualified Chinese language teachers both within China and Western countries, pre-service teacher training is regarded as one of the major factors in impeding success in…

  17. 2005 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management. (Program CIP: 52.0901--Hospitality Administration/Management)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Lady Anne; Chandler, Mark; Nichols, Raynette; Nevill, Becky

    2005-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  18. Specific and Optional Curriculum: An Experience in the Undergraduate Program of Chemical Engineering in Cienfuegos University, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Yolanda García; Velázquez, Claudia Alvarado; Castillo, Rolando Delgado

    2016-01-01

    This paper pursues to define the pillars for designing the specific (SC) and optional curricula (OC) of Unit Operations and Processes (UOP) Discipline in the Chemical Engineering Program. To achieve this objective a methodology was developed, which was characterized by the participation of every member in the educational process: professors,…

  19. 2007 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Design Technology for Fashion and Interiors. (Program CIP: 19.0901 - Apparel and Textiles, General)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Carol; Lawrence, Angie; Pou, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  20. Evidence Summary for First-Grade Classroom Prevention Program (Good Behavior Game Plus Enhanced Academic Curriculum). Top Tier Evidence Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    U.S. social programs, set up to address important problems, often fall short by funding specific models/strategies ("interventions") that are not effective. When evaluated in scientifically-rigorous studies, social interventions in K-12 education, job training, crime prevention, and other areas are frequently found ineffective or…

  1. 2006 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Culinary and Related Foods Technology. (Program CIP: 20.0401 - Institutional Food Workers & Admin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Linda; Early, Lanell; Wood, Becky Jolly

    2006-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  2. 2005 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Secondary Horticulture. (Program CIP: 01.0601 - Applied Horticulture/Horticultural Operations, General)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research and Curriculum Unit, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Secondary vocational-technical education programs in Mississippi are faced with many challenges resulting from sweeping educational reforms at the national and state levels. Schools and teachers are increasingly being held accountable for providing true learning activities to every student in the classroom. This accountability is measured through…

  3. Curriculum Lessons from the Animal School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Maggie A.; Willems, Arnold L.

    1996-01-01

    Uses a metaphor of an animal school (where teachers, students, administrators, and parents are represented by various species of animals) to address the nature of school curriculum. Synthesizes, from the description of the animal school, fundamental principles of curriculum that should be considered when improving school programs. (PA)

  4. Projects and Tools for a Mechatronic Curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amerongen, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the elements with a mechatronic character in the BSc curriculum of Electrical Engineering in the University of Twente as well as the Mechatronics MSc curriculum of this university. In the BSc program there is a complete semester with mechatronics related content, concluded by a

  5. Adolescent Sexual Education: Designing Curriculum That Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quincy, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review paper, "Adolescent Sexual Education: Designing Curriculum That Works", is to present some basic curriculum necessities for developing an in-school sexual education program that results in decreasing the number of teenagers initiating sex, thus reducing the number of teen pregnancies and cases of sexually transmitted…

  6. Spelling CCA Basic Skills Curriculum. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Computer-Based Education Research Lab.

    Designed and programmed by the staff of the Courseware and Curriculum Applications (CCA) Group (a unit of the Computer-Based Education Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), this instructor's guide describes a computer-based spelling curriculum designed to help adult and adolescent students learn basic rules of…

  7. Use Of A Real World Business Panel To Assist In MBA Program Outcomes Assessment And Curriculum Refinement

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph G. Glynn; Richard A. Shick

    2011-01-01

    The world of business operates in an extremely dynamic environment. Domestic issues (competition, cultural diversity, regulation/deregulation) global issues (competition, economic, cultural/social, and political), and rapidly changing technologies all require business school curricula that are designed to be flexible and proactive as well as reactive. An ever increasingly important responsibility of schools of business is the assessment of outcomes of their programs. Outcomes may be measured ...

  8. Rethinking Curriculum and Instruction: Lessons From an Integrated Learning Program and Its Impact on Students and Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Doyle, Dennis; Huie Hofstetter, Carolyn; Kendig, Julie; Strick, Betsy

    2014-01-01

    CoTA (Collaborations: Teachers and Artists) is a professional development program that empowers teachers to access the arts in everyday instruction to support student achievement. CoTA schools commit to intense, 3-year collaborations for ten weeks each year where teachers learn to capitalize on arts content and strategies to promote knowledge and skills in other curricular areas, such as language arts and math. Teachers and artists work together to identify the learning needs of students, cus...

  9. The parent-adolescent relationship education (PARE) program: a curriculum for prevention of STDs and pregnancy in middle school youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Regina P; Mian, Tahir S

    2003-01-01

    The Parent-Adolescent Relationship Education (PARE) Program, designed for parents and middle school students, focuses on strengthening family communication about sexual issues and behaviors to help prevent teen pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The program includes content about reproduction, STDs and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), contraception, sex risks, and safe-sex behaviors. The course uses social learning and cognitive behavioral concepts to enhance decision-making, refusal, and resistance skills. A randomized treatment or control group design is used to assign parent-child dyads to an experimental education group (social learning) or an attention-control group (traditional didactic teaching). Three post-program maintenance or booster sessions are held at 6-month intervals and at times prior to peak teen conception periods to reinforce the knowledge and skills learned. Pre- and posttests for parents and students assess group differences in parental involvement and communication, contraception, sex attitudes and intentions, sex behaviors (initiation of sexual intercourse, frequency, number of partners, contraceptive practices, refusal skills), and the incidence of pregnancy.

  10. Curriculum development for a national cardiotocography education program: a Delphi survey to obtain consensus on learning objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thellesen, Line; Hedegaard, Morten; Bergholt, Thomas; Colov, Nina P; Hoegh, Stinne; Sorensen, Jette L

    2015-08-01

    To define learning objectives for a national cardiotocography (CTG) education program based on expert consensus. A three-round Delphi survey. One midwife and one obstetrician from each maternity unit in Denmark were appointed based on CTG teaching experience and clinical obstetric experience. Following national and international guidelines, the research group determined six topics as important when using CTG: fetal physiology, equipment, indication, interpretation, clinical management, and communication/responsibility. In the first Delphi round, participants listed one to five learning objectives within the predefined topics. Responses were analyzed by a directed approach to content analysis. Phrasing was modified in accordance with Bloom's taxonomy. In the second and third Delphi rounds, participants rated each objective on a five-point relevance scale. Consensus was predefined as objectives with a mean rating value of ≥ 3. A prioritized list of CTG learning objectives. A total of 42 midwives and obstetricians from 21 maternity units were invited to participate, of whom 26 completed all three Delphi rounds, representing 18 maternity units. The final prioritized list included 40 objectives. The highest ranked objectives emphasized CTG interpretation and clinical management. The lowest ranked objectives emphasized fetal physiology. Mean ratings of relevance ranged from 3.15 to 5.00. National consensus on CTG learning objectives was achieved using the Delphi methodology. This was an initial step in developing a valid CTG education program. A prioritized list of objectives will clarify which topics to emphasize in a CTG education program. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  11. Dealing with the challenge of building a Biochemistry Program in an integrated Medical curriculum. The need for new didactics, new focal interests, and new connections to other disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. R. B. Castanho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Teaching in Health Sciences is rapidly evolving. Medical schools, for instance, are increasingly opting for integrated curricula. Biochemistry no longer is considered a discipline by itself; instead, Biochemistry is a part of a wider universe of knowledge integrated in modulus. These modulus often relate to physiological human body systems or the concept of Organic and Functional Systems. In either case, the bridging between Biochemistry, Histology, Anatomy, Physiology, and Pharmacology is largely explored. This bridging is a challenge in Biochemistry teaching. A second challenge adds to this: the way new generations of students perceive communication is much different than the way knowledge is communicated in classrooms. Modern forms of information exchange are multimedia, fast and interactive; lectures are traditionally descriptive, use classical expositive didactics and highlight detailed disciplinary matters. How to cope with the new challenges in the Biochemistry classroom will be addressed. A new biochemistry textbook, totally conceived for a Biochemistry Program in an integrated curriculum in health sciences at present will be taken as example. The choice of core contents, illustrative examples and the approach to teaching were carefully addressed in light of the new challenges identified above.

  12. Soil separator and sampler and method of sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Barry H [Idaho Falls, ID; Ritter, Paul D [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-16

    A soil sampler includes a fluidized bed for receiving a soil sample. The fluidized bed may be in communication with a vacuum for drawing air through the fluidized bed and suspending particulate matter of the soil sample in the air. In a method of sampling, the air may be drawn across a filter, separating the particulate matter. Optionally, a baffle or a cyclone may be included within the fluidized bed for disentrainment, or dedusting, so only the finest particulate matter, including asbestos, will be trapped on the filter. The filter may be removable, and may be tested to determine the content of asbestos and other hazardous particulate matter in the soil sample.

  13. Inexpensive weir and proportional sampler for miniature watershed ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabholz, J V; Crossley, Jr, D A; Best, G R

    1979-07-01

    A weir system with proportional sampler for use on miniature water-shed ecosystems is described. Eight weir collection systems were evaluated for their ability to measure and sample the inputs and outputs of soil-island ecosystems which occur on granite outcrops. The proportion of water actually collected by the weir systems was generally less than the proportion the systems were designed to sample, but adequate for supplying data needed for estimating elemental budgets. The weir systems were not able to account for 25 to 50% of the variation in total water passing over the cutoff wall. Several ways of improving overall performance of the weir systems are discussed.

  14. Envisioning Curriculum as Six Simultaneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Hanin; Conner, Lindsey; Mayo, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the discourse of complexity thinking to envision curriculum as six partial and coupled facets that exist simultaneously: curriculum as structure, curriculum as process, curriculum as content, curriculum as teaching, curriculum as learning and curriculum as activity. Such a curriculum is emergent and self-organising. It is emergent…

  15. Skills for Drug-Free Living Curriculum Guide. Future Quest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, Bridget M.; And Others

    The Future Quest curriculum is a functional curriculum to teach drug abuse prevention skills to youth with mild disabilities. The curriculum is a one-semester instructional program of lesson plans that incorporate research-based effective teaching practices and are specifically designed to meet the needs of students with learning and behavior…

  16. 25 CFR 36.13 - Standard IV-Curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard IV-Curriculum development. 36.13 Section 36.13... § 36.13 Standard IV—Curriculum development. (a) Each school shall implement an organized program of curriculum development involving certified and non-certified staff and shall provide the opportunity for...

  17. Translation of a Taxonomy into a Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Charles R.; And Others

    This paper explains the process by which Middlesex County College (MCC) translated a taxonomy of the functions of dental x-ray technologists into a curriculum guide for its dental radiography program. After noting the limited use of taxonomies, the paper describes MCC's curriculum project during which: (1) the developing a curriculum (DACUM)…

  18. Collaboration leads to enhanced curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerius, J; Mohan, V; Doctor, D; Hersh, W

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, we initiated a health information management (HIM) track of our biomedical informatics graduate program, and subsequent ongoing program assessment revealed a confluence of topics and courses within HIM and clinical informatics (CI) tracks. We completed a thorough comparative analysis of competencies derived from AMIA, AHIMA, and CAHIIM. Coupled with the need to streamline course offerings, the process, described in this paper allowed new opportunities for faculty collaboration, resulted in the creation of a model assessment for best practice in courses, and led to new avenues of growth within the program. The objective of the case study is to provide others in the informatics educational community with a model for analysis of curriculum in order to improve quality of student learning. We describe a case study where an academic informatics program realigned its course offerings to better reflect the HIM of today, and prepare for challenges of the future. Visionary leadership, intra-departmental self-analysis and alignment of the curriculum through defined mapping process reduced overlap within the CI and HIM tracks. Teaching within courses was optimized through the work of core faculty collaboration. The analysis of curriculum resulted in reduction of overlap within course curriculum. This allowed for additional and new course content to be added to existing courses. Leadership fostered an environment where top-down as well as bottom-up collaborative assessment activities resulted in a model to consolidate learning and reduce unnecessary duplication within courses. A focus on curriculum integration, emphasis on course alignment and strategic consolidation of course content raised the quality of informatics education provided to students. Faculty synergy was an essential component of this redesign process. Continuous quality improvement strategy included an ongoing alignment of curriculum and competencies through a comparative analysis approach. Through

  19. Multimodel parameter optimization with adaptive population importance sampler (APIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Jarmo; Susiluoto, Jouni; Knauer, Jürgen; Aurela, Mika; Mammarella, Ivan; Markkanen, Tiina; Thum, Tea; Zaehle, Sönke; Aalto, Tuula

    2017-04-01

    We are optimizing key parameters in soil hydrology and forest water and carbon exchange related formulations in ecosystem model JSBACH, which is the land surface component of the Earth System model of Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-ESM). The model has been modified to use multiple stomatal/canopy conductance formulations which will vary during the optimization process. Our previous results have shown that JSBACH is lacking in its response to drought, which is the motivation to test the different conductance formulations. The optimization is done with the adaptive population importance sampler (APIS) algorithm, that provides a global estimation of the selected JSBACH parameters, using all generated samples. Additionally APIS is able to estimate the model evidence (or partition function), which can be used to determine the optimal submodel (conductance formulation). APIS starts with a set of N randomly generated proposals (standard deviations for the parameters), with location parameters spread in the state space. We draw M samples and calculate the partial IS (importance sampler) estimators for each proposal, after which we update the location parameters and each proposal as well as the global estimator for each JSBACH parameter. This process is then repeated a number of times. The study focuses on boreal coniferous evergreen forests. The optimization is based on site level eddy covariance flux measurements on multiple sites across the Northern Hemisphere, where the parameters are estimated by minimizing the model-data mismatch in evapotranspiration and gross primary production.

  20. Hayabusa2 Sampler: Collection of Asteroidal Surface Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hirotaka; Okazaki, Ryuji; Tachibana, Shogo; Sakamoto, Kanako; Takano, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Chisato; Yano, Hajime; Miura, Yayoi; Abe, Masanao; Hasegawa, Sunao; Noguchi, Takaaki

    2017-07-01

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) launched the asteroid exploration probe "Hayabusa2" in December 3rd, 2014, following the 1st Hayabusa mission. With technological and scientific improvements from the Hayabusa probe, we plan to visit the C-type asteroid 162137 Ryugu (1999 JU3), and to sample surface materials of the C-type asteroid that is likely to be different from the S-type asteroid Itokawa and contain more pristine materials, including organic matter and/or hydrated minerals, than S-type asteroids. We developed the Hayabusa2 sampler to collect a minimum of 100 mg of surface samples including several mm-sized particles at three surface locations without any severe terrestrial contamination. The basic configuration of the sampler design is mainly as same as the 1st Hayabusa (Yano et al. in Science, 312(5778):1350-1353, 2006), with several minor but important modifications based on lessons learned from the Hayabusa to fulfill the scientific requirements and to raise the scientific value of the returned samples.

  1. An on-the-go-soil sampler for an automated soil nitrate mapping system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sibley, K.J.; Adsett, J.F.; Struik, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    An automated on-the-go soil sampler was developed as part of a soil nitrate mapping system that collects data for precisely analyzing small-scale variation in soil NO3-N. An essential requirement of the sampler is the ability to reliably collect a soil sample of known "weight" (mass). It was

  2. Determination of organochlorine pesticides in Indian coastal water using a moored in-situ sampler

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.; SenGupta, R.

    An attempt has been made to determine the concentration of different organochlorine pesticides in the seawater off the central West Coast of India using an in-situ-sampler. The Seastar in-situ sampler is an instrument, which is designed to pump...

  3. 40 CFR 53.54 - Test for proper sampler operation following power interruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... are to be recorded with an analog recording device, the accuracy of the entire instrument-recorder... Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 or PM10â2.5 § 53.54 Test for proper sampler operation following power... performance parameters tested are: (i) Proper flow rate performance of the sampler. (ii) Accuracy of the...

  4. Effects of Hardness on Pintle Rod Performance in the Universal and Retained Gas Samplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-11-18

    Interaction between hardness of the pintle rods and the retainer rings used in the core samplers is investigated. It is found that ordinary Rockwell C measurements are not sufficient and superficial hardness instruments are recommended to verify hardness since in-production hardness of pintle rods is found to vary widely and probably leads to some premature release of pistons in samplers.

  5. Evaluation of Bio-VOC Sampler for Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds in Exhaled Breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jae; Fan, Maomian; Harshman, Sean W; Garrison, Catherine E; Dershem, Victoria L; Phillips, Jeffrey B; Grigsby, Claude C; Ott, Darrin K

    2014-09-29

    Monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from exhaled breath has been used to determine exposures of humans to chemicals. Prior to analysis of VOCs, breath samples are often collected with canisters or bags and concentrated. The Bio-VOC breath sampler, a commercial sampling device, has been recently introduced to the market with growing use. The main advantage for this sampler is to collect the last portion of exhaled breath, which is more likely to represent the air deep in the lungs. However, information about the Bio-VOC sampler is somewhat limited. Therefore, we have thoroughly evaluated the sampler here. We determined the volume of the breath air collected in the sampler was approximately 88 mL. When sampling was repeated multiple times, with the succeeding exhalations applied to a single sorbent tube, we observed linear relationships between the normalized peak intensity and the number of repeated collections with the sampler in many of the breath VOCs detected. No moisture effect was observed on the Tenax sorbent tubes used. However, due to the limitation in the collection volume, the use of the Bio-VOC sampler is recommended only for detection of VOCs present at high concentrations unless repeated collections of breath samples on the sampler are conducted.

  6. A left-in-place group milk sampler can improve disease monitoring in dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, T.; Deveraux, R.S.; Madison, N.; Hannah, M.C.; Ridge, S.E.; Ryan, L.; Wientjes, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    A novel milk sampler (MilkThief) is described. It can collect representative samples of milk to be used for disease monitoring from groups of cows during a milking session. The maximum dilution of each individual cow¿s milk did not exceed a 1 : 45 limit when we tested the sampler in a range of

  7. Guidelines for passive sampling of hydrophobic contaminants in water using silicone rubber samplers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smedes, F.; Booij, K.

    2012-01-01

    This ICES Techniques in Marine Environmental Sciences provides advice on the use of silicone rubber passive samplers for the determination of freely dissolved non-polar contaminants in seawater. The level of detail offered may be helpful to first-timeusers of passive samplers, who wish to implement

  8. Characteristics of Non-metallic Inclusions in Steel Obtained from Different-Sized Samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hang; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Feng, Jie

    2017-12-01

    To determine the effect of sampler size on the detection of inclusions in liquid steel, four different-sized samplers were designed for industrial sampling from a continuous casting tundish. The samples were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. With increasing sample size, the cooling rate of the sample and velocity for particle engulfment decreased. The extent of encapsulation of complex inclusions increased from 0 pct with the smallest sampler to 48.2 pct with the largest sampler. In the samplers that cooled at 41.2 and 26.7 K s-1, the major inclusions were calcium aluminates; in the larger samplers, which cooled more slowly at 8.2 and 1.0 K s-1, the complex inclusions predominately comprised Al2O3 + (Ca, Mn)S and Al2O3 + CaS, respectively. The sizes of the sulfides gradually increased with increasing sampler size; for example, the sulfide average diameter increased from 2.5 to 3.5 μm when the sampler inner diameter increased from 50 to 70 mm. The main direction of movement of the inclusions during the sampling process was upward.

  9. Assessment of increased sampling pump flow rates in a disposable, inhalable aerosol sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Justin; Sleeth, Darrah K; Handy, Rod G; Pahler, Leon F; Anthony, T Renee; Volckens, John

    2017-03-01

    A newly designed, low-cost, disposable inhalable aerosol sampler was developed to assess workers personal exposure to inhalable particles. This sampler was originally designed to operate at 10 L/min to increase sample mass and, therefore, improve analytical detection limits for filter-based methods. Computational fluid dynamics modeling revealed that sampler performance (relative to aerosol inhalability criteria) would not differ substantially at sampler flows of 2 and 10 L/min. With this in mind, the newly designed inhalable aerosol sampler was tested in a wind tunnel, simultaneously, at flows of 2 and 10 L/min flow. A mannequin was equipped with 6 sampler/pump assemblies (three pumps operated at 2 L/min and three pumps at 10 L/min) inside a wind tunnel, operated at 0.2 m/s, which has been shown to be a typical indoor workplace wind speed. In separate tests, four different particle sizes were injected to determine if the sampler's performance with the new 10 L/min flow rate significantly differed to that at 2 L/min. A comparison between inhalable mass concentrations using a Wilcoxon signed rank test found no significant difference in the concentration of particles sampled at 10 and 2 L/min for all particle sizes tested. Our results suggest that this new aerosol sampler is a versatile tool that can improve exposure assessment capabilities for the practicing industrial hygienist by improving the limit of detection and allowing for shorting sampling times.

  10. Chemistry of the sea surface microlayer. 1. Fabrication and testing of the sampler

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singbal, S.Y.S.; Narvekar, P.V.

    A screen sampler fabricated to study the sea surface microlayer (SML) has been described. The screen sampler was tested in the Mandovi estuary and adjacent waters. Physico-chemical parameters of the subsurface waters from a depth of 25 cm was also...

  11. A new model for bed load sampler calibration to replace the probability-matching method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert B. Thomas; Jack Lewis

    1993-01-01

    In 1977 extensive data were collected to calibrate six Helley-Smith bed load samplers with four sediment particle sizes in a flume at the St. Anthony Falls Hydraulic Laboratory at the University of Minnesota. Because sampler data cannot be collected at the same time and place as ""true"" trap measurements, the ""probability-matching...

  12. Evaluating the Relationship between Equilibrium Passive Sampler Uptake and Aquatic Organism Bioaccumulation (IPSW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) as it relates to organism bioaccumulation in the water column and interstitial water. Fifty-five studies were found where both passive samplers and organism bioaccumulation were used to measur...

  13. Characteristics of Non-metallic Inclusions in Steel Obtained from Different-Sized Samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hang; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Feng, Jie

    2017-09-01

    To determine the effect of sampler size on the detection of inclusions in liquid steel, four different-sized samplers were designed for industrial sampling from a continuous casting tundish. The samples were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. With increasing sample size, the cooling rate of the sample and velocity for particle engulfment decreased. The extent of encapsulation of complex inclusions increased from 0 pct with the smallest sampler to 48.2 pct with the largest sampler. In the samplers that cooled at 41.2 and 26.7 K s-1, the major inclusions were calcium aluminates; in the larger samplers, which cooled more slowly at 8.2 and 1.0 K s-1, the complex inclusions predominately comprised Al2O3 + (Ca, Mn)S and Al2O3 + CaS, respectively. The sizes of the sulfides gradually increased with increasing sampler size; for example, the sulfide average diameter increased from 2.5 to 3.5 μm when the sampler inner diameter increased from 50 to 70 mm. The main direction of movement of the inclusions during the sampling process was upward.

  14. The hidden curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Rechell G; Mai, Derek

    2012-09-01

    The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Internal Medicine Third Year Clerkship Program recently instituted an academic exercise to be completed by medical students during the first 6 weeks of their 12 weeks of Internal Medicine. The academic exercise involves reflecting on professional values through art and being exposed to the hidden curriculum of professionalism. Students are instructed at the beginning of their clerkship to observe the professional activities of their teachers, peers, ancillary staff, and of themselves. Students are provided a selection of art pieces to choose from. They select one which best exemplifies the professional activity they observed and are then to write a structured, reflective article.

  15. Curriculum Innovation: Difference and Resemblance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Una; Torrance, Harry

    2011-01-01

    How do teachers respond to a mathematics curriculum innovation? This paper reports some of the findings from a UK Research Council (ESRC)-funded project investigating how teachers in English secondary schools (students aged 12-16 years) responded to innovation. A Gatsby Foundation funded program implemented new materials; the project investigated…

  16. Ethics Across-the-Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, David L.

    One attempt to integrate the aims of liberal and professional education at a public university, St. Cloud State Univesity (St. Cloud, Minnesota), is described. The question of whether professional education precludes a coherent liberal arts curriculum is raised. At St. Cloud, relationships between the liberal arts and professional programs are…

  17. Developing a Curriculum for Teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Kolkin, Donna; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Outlines the development of a secondary school curriculum for teaching the following critical television viewing abilities: to evaluate and manage one's own television viewing behavior, to question the reality of television programing, to recognize the persuasive arguments on television, and to recognize the effects of television on daily life.…

  18. Convergence of the Equi-Energy Sampler and Its Application to the Ising Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xia; Kou, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    We provide a complete proof of the convergence of a recently developed sampling algorithm called the equi-energy (EE) sampler (Kou, Zhou, and Wong, 2006) in the case that the state space is countable. We show that in a countable state space, each sampling chain in the EE sampler is strongly ergodic a.s. with the desired steady-state distribution. Furthermore, all chains satisfy the individual ergodic property. We apply the EE sampler to the Ising model to test its efficiency, comparing it with the Metropolis algorithm and the parallel tempering algorithm. We observe that the dynamic exponent of the EE sampler is significantly smaller than those of parallel tempering and the Metropolis algorithm, demonstrating the high efficiency of the EE sampler. PMID:21969801

  19. ReCAP: ASCO Core Curriculum for Cancer Survivorship Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shapiro, Charles L; Jacobsen, Paul B; Henderson, Tara; Hurria, Arti; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Ng, Andrea; Surbone, Antonella; Mayer, Deborah K; Rowland, Julia H

    2016-01-01

    ..., training programs, and policymaking organizations. Adapted from Institute of Medicine recommendations for survivorship care, the core curriculum and competencies include the following subheadings...

  20. Technology as a Tool for Understanding: a Pipeline of Curriculum-based Programs for Grades 4 to high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, G.

    2006-05-01

    New NASA-funded educational initiatives make for a pipeline of products meeting the needs of today's educators in inner city schools, for NASA Explorer Schools and across the nation. Three projects include training and include: 1) WDLC [Weather Data Learning Center] , a math achievement program with data entry, inquiry-based investigations, and the application of math using weather maps and imagery for Grade 4; 2) Project 3D-VIEW, where students in Grades 5 and 6 become experts in air, life, water, land and Earth systems using 3D technologies requiring 3D glasses. A formal literacy and math piece are included, and 1200 teachers will be provided training and materials free beginning in Fall 2006, and 3) Signals of Spring, where students in Grades 7 to 8, or high school, use NASA data to explain the movement of dozens of birds, land and marine animals that are tracked by satellite. Comprehensive content in life and Earth science is taught with curricular activities, interactive mapping, image interpretation, and online journals and common misconceptions are dispelled. Scientist involvement and support for a project is essential for students who are developing process skills and performing science activities. Current research partners include Columbia University's Teachers College and Stanford University's School of Education.

  1. Evaluation of low cost in-line milk samplers for estimating individual cow somatic cell counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, T; Andrews, S P; Moate, P J; Pollino, C A; Schmidt, W L

    1997-02-01

    The Dairy Herd Improvement Fund of Victoria recently identified a requirement for a simple and inexpensive in-line sampler to enable dairy farmers to collect representative milk samples for counting somatic cells. We found that the currently available simple in-line milk samplers, when connected to standard 35 ml collection vessels, terminate sampling early in a milking, and thus provide samples that are unrepresentative of the whole milking. We showed that cell count during a milking varies greatly, tending to be high for the first 1-21. Analyses of resulting samples will thus tend to overestimate cell counts if samplers are used in their traditional way. We found greater sampling rates in high-line compared with low-line milking systems, and consequently developed modified samplers suitable for both situations. Our samplers utilize low sampling rates (approximately 1-3%) and large collection vessels (450 ml). Compared with currently available simple in-line samplers, our type of sampler provided milk samples considerably more representative of the entire milking for the majority of cows. In conjunction with subsampling, they provided samples of appropriate size (12.5 ml minimum to 25 ml maximum) for testing fat, protein, lactose and cell count. Cell count results indicated that errors associated with the use of currently available simple in-line samplers could frequently be > 200%. In contrast, we found that use of our samplers gave an estimate for cell count that was only slightly higher (mean 20%) than that from samples collected by an approved Tru-Test sampler.

  2. Performance of prototype high-flow inhalable dust sampler in a livestock production facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, T Renée; Cai, Changjie; Mehaffy, John; Sleeth, Darrah; Volckens, John

    2017-05-01

    A high-flow inhalable sampler, designed for operational flow rates up to 10 L/min using computer simulations and examined in wind tunnel experiments, was evaluated in the field. This prototype sampler was deployed in collocation with an IOM (the benchmark standard sampler) in a swine farrowing building to examine the sampling performance for assessing concentrations of inhalable particulate mass and endotoxin. Paired samplers were deployed for 24 hr on 19 days over a 3-month period. On each sampling day, the paired samplers were deployed at three fixed locations and data were analyzed to identify agreement and to examine systematic biases between concentrations measured by these samplers. Thirty-six paired gravimetric samples were analyzed; insignificant, unsubstantial differences between concentrations were identified between the two samplers (p = 0.16; mean difference 0.03 mg/m 3 ). Forty-four paired samples were available for endotoxin analysis, and a significant (p = 0.001) difference in endotoxin concentration was identified: the prototype sampler, on average, had 120 EU/m 3 more endotoxin than did the IOM samples. Since the same gravimetric samples were analyzed for endotoxin content, the endotoxin difference is likely attributable to differences in endotoxin extraction. The prototype's disposable thin-film polycarbonate capsule was included with the filter in the 1-hr extraction procedure while the internal plastic cassette of the IOM required a rinse procedure that is susceptible to dust losses. Endotoxin concentrations measured with standard plastic IOM inserts that follow this rinsing procedure may underestimate the true endotoxin exposure concentrations. The maximum concentrations in the study (1.55 mg/m 3 gravimetric, 2328 EU/m 3 endotoxin) were lower than other agricultural or industrial environments. Future work should explore the performance of the prototype sampler in dustier environments, where concentrations approach particulates not otherwise

  3. Silica Measurement with High Flow Rate Respirable Size Selective Samplers: A Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taekhee; Harper, Martin; Kashon, Michael; Lee, Larry A; Healy, Catherine B; Coggins, Marie A; Susi, Pam; O'Brien, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    High and low flow rate respirable size selective samplers including the CIP10-R (10 l min(-1)), FSP10 (11.2 l min(-1)), GK2.69 (4.4 l min(-1)), 10-mm nylon (1.7 l min(-1)), and Higgins-Dewell type (2.2 l min(-1)) were compared via side-by-side sampling in workplaces for respirable crystalline silica measurement. Sampling was conducted at eight different occupational sites in the USA and five different stonemasonry sites in Ireland. A total of 536 (268 pairs) personal samples and 55 area samples were collected. Gravimetric analysis was used to determine respirable dust mass and X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine quartz mass. Ratios of respirable dust mass concentration, quartz mass concentration, respirable dust mass, and quartz mass from high and low flow rate samplers were compared. In general, samplers did not show significant differences greater than 30% in respirable dust mass concentration and quartz mass concentration when outliers (ratio 3.0) were removed from the analysis. The frequency of samples above the limit of detection and limit of quantification of quartz was significantly higher for the CIP10-R and FSP10 samplers compared to low flow rate samplers, while the GK2.69 cyclone did not show significant difference from low flow rate samplers. High flow rate samplers collected significantly more respirable dust and quartz than low flow rate samplers as expected indicating that utilizing high flow rate samplers might improve precision in quartz measurement. Although the samplers did not show significant differences in respirable dust and quartz concentrations, other practical attributes might make them more or less suitable for personal sampling. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society 2015.

  4. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 18 AND TANK 19 WALL SAMPLER PERFORMANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.; Thaxton, D.; Minichan, R.; France, T.; Steeper, T.; Corbett, J.; Martin, B.; Vetsch, B.

    2009-12-19

    A sampling tool was required to evaluate residual activity ({mu}Curies per square foot) on the inner wall surfaces of underground nuclear waste storage tanks. The tool was required to collect a small sample from the 3/8 inch thick tank walls. This paper documents the design, testing, and deployment of the remotely operated sampling device. The sampler provides material from a known surface area to estimate the overall surface contamination in the tank prior to closure. The sampler consisted of a sampler and mast assembly mast assembly, control system, and the sampler, or end effector, which is defined as the operating component of a robotic arm. The mast assembly consisted of a vertical 30 feet long, 3 inch by 3 inch, vertical steel mast and a cantilevered arm hinged at the bottom of the mast and lowered by cable to align the attached sampler to the wall. The sampler and mast assembly were raised and lowered through an opening in the tank tops, called a riser. The sampler is constructed of a mounting plate, a drill, springs to provide a drive force to the drill, a removable sampler head to collect the sample, a vacuum pump to draw the sample from the drill to a filter, and controls to operate the system. Once the sampler was positioned near the wall, electromagnets attached it to the wall, and the control system was operated to turn on the drill and vacuum to remove and collect a sample from the wall. Samples were collected on filters in removable sampler heads, which were readily transported for further laboratory testing.

  5. Evaluation of Coli-Count Samplers for Possible Use in Standard Counting of Total and Fecal Coliforms in Recreational Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Mary; Connor, Douglas A.

    1975-01-01

    Millipore Coli-Count Samplers were used to enumerate colonies of laboratory cultures of coliform bacteria. The samplers gave significantly lower counts than standard membrane-filter procedures for both total and fecal coliforms. Although the samplers are useful for semiquantitative analysis as indicated by the manufacturer, they are not suitable for standard examinations of recreational waters. PMID:1106326

  6. Intentional Hidden Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    氏原, 陽子

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to make clear the existence of an intentional hidden curriculum and define the hidden curriculum. First, this paper criticizes hidden curriculum arguments thatregard hidden curriculum as unintentional learning outcome. Since these arguments can go up Bloom, this paper reviews Bloom and shows that the biggest problem is the difficulty injudging whether there is intention or not. Second, this paper investigates into intentional hidden curriculum. Portelli argues about the hidden...

  7. Field tests of nylon-screen diffusion samplers and pushpoint samplers for detection of metals in sediment pore water, Ashland and Clinton, Massachusetts, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc J.; Vroblesky, Don A.; Campo, Kimberly W.; Massey, Andrew J.; Scheible, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Efficient and economical screening methods are needed to detect and to determine the approximate concentrations of potentially toxic trace-element metals in shallow groundwater- discharge areas (pore water) where the metals may pose threats to aquatic organisms; such areas are likely to be near hazardous-waste sites. Pushpoint and nylon-screen diffusion samplers are two complementary options for use in such environments. The pushpoint sampler, a simple well point, is easy to insert manually and to use. Only 1 day is required to collect samples. The nylon-screen diffusion sampler is well suited for use in sediments that do not allow a pump to draw water into a pushpoint sampler. In this study, both types of devices were used in sediments suitable for the use of the pushpoint sampler. Sampling with the nylon-screen diffusion sampler requires at least two site visits: one to deploy the samplers in the sediment, and a second to retrieve the samplers and collect the samples after a predetermined equilibration period. Extensive laboratory quality-control studies, field testing, and laboratory analysis of samples collected at the Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Superfund site along the Sudbury River in Ashland, Massachusetts, and at a Superfund site-assessment location on Rigby Brook in Clinton, Massachusetts, indicate that these two devices yield comparable results for most metals and should be effective tools for pore-water studies. The nylon-screen diffusion samplers equilibrated within 1-2 days in homogeneous, controlled conditions in the laboratory. Nylon-screen diffusion samplers that were not purged of dissolved oxygen prior to deployment yielded results similar to those that were purged. Further testing of the nylon-screen diffusion samplers in homogeneous media would help to resolve any ambiguities about the data variability from the field studies. Comparison of data from replicate samples taken in both study areas shows that even samples taken from sites within a

  8. Particle-into-Liquid Sampler (PILS) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Thomas B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Particle-into-Liquid Sampler (PILS) is an aqueous-solution-based online technique for determining bulk chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles. As shown in Figure 1, the instrument consists of two units, briefly described below: 1. An aerosol extraction unit where particles are passed through a growth chamber saturated with water vapor, liquid droplets are grown, and the resulting liquid collected and transferred to the detection system. 2. The detection system that includes ion chromatographs (IC) or a total organic carbon detector (TOC). Ion chromatography is performed using two Metrohm ICs—one for positive ions and one for negative ions—with conductivity detectors. The TOC is detected using a GE TOC analyzer. The instrument can be run in either the ion detection mode or the TOC mode.

  9. Albatrosses as Ocean Samplers of Sea Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, S. A.; Kappes, M.; Tremblay, Y.; Costa, D. P.; Weber, R.; Weimerskirch, H.

    2006-12-01

    Albatrosses are unique ocean voyagers because they range so widely and travel at speeds exceeding 90 km per hour. Because they can integrate vast areas of open-ocean, albatrosses are ideal ocean samplers. Between 2003 and 2005 breeding seasons, 21 Laysan and 15 black-footed albatrosses (body mass 2.5 to 3.5 kg) were equipped with 6 g leg-mounted geolocation archival data loggers at Tern Island, French Frigate Shoals, Northwest Hawaiian Islands. The tags sampled environmental temperatures every 480 or 540 s and provided a single location per day for the duration of deployment. Whenever an albatross landed on the sea surface to feed or rest, the tag sampled sea surface temperature (SST). After nearly one year of deployment, 31 albatrosses were recaptured and 29 tags provided complete records. A total of 377,455 SST readings were obtained over 7,360 bird-days at sea. Given the location errors in the geolocation methodology (200 km) and the lack of temporal resolution (1 location per day), the SST measurements can only be used to characterize broad-scale correlates between albatross distribution and the ocean environment. However, in February 2006, we deployed 45 g GPS data loggers on 10 breeding albatrosses for 2-4 day deployments. The GPS loggers were attached to feathers on the albatrosses backs, they sampled every 10 s, and were accurate to within 10 m. One albatross was also equipped with the same leg-mounted archival tag that sampled SST every 8 s. This albatross collected 6,289 SST measurements with complementary GPS quality locations in 3 days at sea. These results highlight the efficacy of albatrosses as ocean samplers. Given that Laysan and black- footed albatrosses range throughout the North Pacific Ocean, it is conceivable that these seabirds could someday become sentinels of changing oceanic conditions. Moreover, these technologies provide exciting new information about the oceanic habitats of North Pacific albatrosses.

  10. The development of an active personal ozone sampler using a diffusion denuder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyh, A.S.; Wolfson, J.M.; Koutrakis, P. [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). School of Public Health; Mulik, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Personal, microenvironmental and indoor ozone monitoring is currently carried out using a passive sampling device which is both light-weight and inexpensive. However, the collection properties of these samplers have been found to be sensitive to wind effects and sampler placement, thus limiting their potential use for personal monitoring. In addition, because of their relative insensitivity, these samplers cannot be used for short-term monitoring of ozone at low concentrations. In response to these problems the authors are developing a light-weight active ozone sampler which uses a single tube diffusion denuder for sample collection. The new single tube diffusion denuder (STTD) consists of a 1.4 cm (ID) x 10 cm etched Pyrex tube attached to a very small, low-flow, relatively low-cost personal pump. Tube diameter and length were chosen to maximize collection efficiency at a sampling rate of 65 mL/min. The tube is coated with a nitrite reagent which has been successfully used in the passive ozone samplers. Variations in relative humidity, ozone concentration, and total ozone exposure have relatively small affects on the accuracy and precision of the STTD. In addition, the low limit of detection (LOD) of approximately 20 ppb hrs gives a tenfold increase in sensitivity over the passive samplers for which a 200 ppb hr LOD has been determined. This new active sampler thus makes possible both short-term personal and microenvironmental monitoring.

  11. Evaluation of the polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air sampler: Computational modeling and experimental measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Andrew A.; Ashman, Paul; Huang, Jiaoyan; Dhaniyala, Suresh; Holsen, Thomas M.

    2011-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations coupled with wind tunnel-experiments were used to determine the sampling rate (SR) of the widely used polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive sampler. In the wind-tunnel experiments, water evaporation rates from a water saturated PUF disk installed in the sampler housing were determined by measuring weight loss over time. In addition, a modified passive sampler designed to collect elemental mercury (Hg 0) with gold-coated filters was used. Experiments were carried out at different wind speeds and various sampler angles. The SRs obtained from wind-tunnel experiments were compared to those obtained from the field by scaling the values by the ratios of air diffusivities. Three-dimensional (3D) CFD simulations were also used to generate SRs for both polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and Hg 0. Overall, the modeled and measured SRs agree well and are consistent with the values obtained from field studies. As previously observed, the SRs increased linearly with increasing wind speed. In addition, it was determined that the SR was strongly dependent on the angle of the ambient wind. The SRs increased when the base was tilted up pointing into the wind and when the base was tilted down (i.e., such that the top of the sampler was facing the wind) the SR decreased initially and then increased. The results suggest that there may be significant uncertainty in concentrations obtained from passive sampler measurements without knowledge of wind speed and wind angle relative to the sampler.

  12. AN AFFINE-INVARIANT SAMPLER FOR EXOPLANET FITTING AND DISCOVERY IN RADIAL VELOCITY DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou Fengji; Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Goodman, Jonathan; Weare, Jonathan [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Schwab, Christian, E-mail: fh417@nyu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) proves to be powerful for Bayesian inference and in particular for exoplanet radial velocity fitting because MCMC provides more statistical information and makes better use of data than common approaches like chi-square fitting. However, the nonlinear density functions encountered in these problems can make MCMC time-consuming. In this paper, we apply an ensemble sampler respecting affine invariance to orbital parameter extraction from radial velocity data. This new sampler has only one free parameter, and does not require much tuning for good performance, which is important for automatization. The autocorrelation time of this sampler is approximately the same for all parameters and far smaller than Metropolis-Hastings, which means it requires many fewer function calls to produce the same number of independent samples. The affine-invariant sampler speeds up MCMC by hundreds of times compared with Metropolis-Hastings in the same computing situation. This novel sampler would be ideal for projects involving large data sets such as statistical investigations of planet distribution. The biggest obstacle to ensemble samplers is the existence of multiple local optima; we present a clustering technique to deal with local optima by clustering based on the likelihood of the walkers in the ensemble. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the sampler on real radial velocity data.

  13. Inverse Problem Optimization Method to Design Passive Samplers for Volatile Organic Compounds: Principle and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jianping; Du, Zhengjian; Mo, Jinhan; Li, Xinxiao; Xu, Qiujian; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-12-20

    Passive sampling is an alternative to active sampling for measuring concentrations of gas-phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, the uncertainty or relative error of the measurements have not been minimized due to the limitations of existing design methods. In this paper, we have developed a novel method, the inverse problem optimization method, to address the problems associated with designing accurate passive samplers. The principle is to determine the most appropriate physical properties of the materials, and the optimal geometry of a passive sampler, by minimizing the relative sampling error based on the mass transfer model of VOCs for a passive sampler. As an example application, we used our proposed method to optimize radial passive samplers for the sampling of benzene and formaldehyde in a normal indoor environment. A new passive sampler, which we have called the Tsinghua Passive Diffusive Sampler (THPDS), for indoor benzene measurement was developed according to the optimized results. Silica zeolite was selected as the sorbent for the THPDS. The measured overall uncertainty of THPDS (22% for benzene) is lower than that of most commercially available passive samplers but is quite a bit larger than the modeled uncertainty (4.8% for benzene, the optimized result), suggesting that further research is required.

  14. An Inverted Curriculum for CS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard

    2003-01-01

    present and discuss the inverted curriculum for our introductory object-oriented programming course, and our experiences from teaching this course for four years. We identify four levels for the systematic construction of programs, and the structure of our programming course is based on these four levels...

  15. Student Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    This nine-lesson program was designed to excite kids (ages 9-13) about environmental health and empower them to take steps in their everyday lives to improve the environment for their community and reduce their environmental risks.

  16. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Online Guide to Choosing a Surgical Residency Practice Management Workshops Patients and Family Patient Education Patient ... Educators ACS Fundamentals of Surgery Curriculum Transition to Practice Program ACS/APDS Surgery Resident Skills Curriculum ACS/ ...

  17. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ASE Medical Student Core Curriculum ACS/ASE Medical Student Simulation-Based Surgical Skills Curriculum Cancer Education Cancer Education Cancer Education Cancer Programs Conference: Creating ...

  18. Sustainability Infused Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Independent Schools Foundation Academy (ISF) in Hong Kong established a sustainability policy in 2015, which explicitly states, "an experimentally integrated, environmentally and ethically sustainable system of science education and conservation practices based on the 2012 Jeju Declaration of the World Conservation Congress will be implemented through the school". ISF Academy is a private Chinese bilingual school in Hong Kong serving over 1500 students K-12, following the framework and curriculum of the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). The strategy behind the implementation of this policy includes: development of a scientific sustainable curriculum that is age appropriate; establish a culture of sustainability within the ISF community and beyond to the wider HK community; install sustainable infrastructure that allows students to learn; and learn first hand sustainable living practices. It is well understood that solutions to the environmental challenges facing Hong Kong and our planet will require multiple disciplines. The current sustainability programs at ISF include: a) a whole school aerobic food waste composting system and organic farming, b) energy consumption monitoring of existing buildings, c) upcoming installation of an air pollution monitoring equipment that will correlate with the AQHI data collected by the Hong Kong government, d) a Renewable Energy Education Center (REEC) that will teach students about RE and also produce solar energy for classroom consumption, and e) student lead environmental group that manages the paper and used cooking oil recycling on campus. The Shuyuan Science and Sustainability faculty work closely with classroom teachers to ensure that the above mentioned projects are incorporated into the curriculum throughout the school. Interdisciplinary units (IDU) of study are being developed that encourage faculty and students to work across subject areas. Projects include Personal Projects, Extended Essays

  19. Influence of Sulfide Nanoparticles on Dissolved Mercury and Zinc Quantification by Diffusive Gradient in Thin-Film Passive Samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Anh Le-Tuan; Johnson, Carol; Manley, Devon; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2015-11-03

    Diffusive gradient in thin-film (DGT) passive samplers are frequently used to monitor the concentrations of metals such as mercury and zinc in sediments and other aquatic environments. The application of these samplers generally presumes that they quantify only the dissolved fraction and not particle-bound metal species that are too large to migrate into the sampler. However, metals associated with very small nanoparticles (smaller than the pore size of DGT samplers) can be abundant in certain environments, yet the implications of these nanoparticles for DGT measurements are unclear. The objective of this study was to determine how the performance of the DGT sampler is affected by the presence of nanoparticulate species of Hg and Zn. DGT samplers were exposed to solutions containing known amounts of dissolved Hg(II) and nanoparticulate HgS (or dissolved Zn(II) and nanoparticulate ZnS). The amounts of Hg and Zn accumulated onto the DGT samplers were quantified over hours to days, and the rates of diffusion of the dissolved metal (i.e., the effective diffusion coefficient D) into the sampler's diffusion layer were calculated and compared for solutions containing varying concentrations of nanoparticles. The results suggested that the nanoparticles deposited on the surface of the samplers might have acted as sorbents, slowing the migration of the dissolved species into the samplers. The consequence was that the DGT sampler data underestimated the dissolved metal concentration in the solution. In addition, X-ray absorption spectroscopy was employed to determine the speciation of the Hg accumulated on the sampler binding layer, and the results indicated that HgS nanoparticles did not appear to directly contribute to the DGT measurement. Overall, our findings suggest that the deployment of DGT samplers in settings where nanoparticles are relevant (e.g., sediments) may result in DGT data that incorrectly estimated the dissolved metal concentrations. Models for metal uptake

  20. Curriculum Redesign in Veterinary Medicine: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Kristin P; Macik, Maria L; Turner, Jacqueline S; Korich, Jodi A; Rogers, Kenita S; Fowler, Debra; Scallan, Elizabeth M; Keefe, Lisa M

    Curricular review is considered a necessary component for growth and enhancement of academic programs and requires time, energy, creativity, and persistence from both faculty and administration. At Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (TAMU), the faculty and administration partnered with the university's Center for Teaching Excellence to create a faculty-driven, data-enhanced curricular redesign process. The 8-step process begins with the formation of a dedicated faculty curriculum design team to drive the redesign process and to support the college curriculum committee. The next steps include defining graduate outcomes and mapping the current curriculum to identify gaps and redundancies across the curriculum. Data are collected from internal and external stakeholders including veterinary students, faculty, alumni, and employers of graduates. Data collected through curriculum mapping and stakeholder engagement substantiate the curriculum redesign. The guidelines, supporting documents, and 8-step process developed at TAMU are provided to assist other veterinary schools in successful curricular redesign. This is the first of a two-part report that provides the background, context, and description of the process for charting the course for curricular change. The process involves defining expected learning outcomes for new graduates, conducting a curriculum mapping exercise, and collecting stakeholder data for curricular evaluation (steps 1-4). The second part of the report describes the development of rubrics that were applied to the graduate learning outcomes (steps 5-8) and engagement of faculty during the implementation phases of data-driven curriculum change.

  1. Curriculum and Course Materials for a Forensic DNA Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2014-01-01

    The Forensic Science Education Programs Accreditation Commission (FEPAC) requires accredited programs offer a "coherent curriculum" to ensure each student gains a "thorough grounding of the natural…sciences." Part of this curriculum includes completion of a minimum of 15 semester-hours forensic science coursework, nine of which…

  2. The AirWaterGas Teacher Professional Development Program: Lessons Learned by Pairing Scientists and Teachers to Develop Curriculum on Global Climate Change and Regional Unconventional Oil and Gas Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, L. S.; Hatheway, B.; Rogers, J. D.; Casey, J. G.; Lackey, G.; Birdsell, D.; Brown, K.; Polmear, M.; Capps, S.; Rosenblum, J.; Sitterley, K.; Hafich, K. A.; Hannigan, M.; Knight, D.

    2015-12-01

    The AirWaterGas Teacher Professional Development Program, run by the UCAR Center for Science Education, brought together scientists and secondary science teachers in a yearlong program culminating in the development of curriculum related to the impacts of unconventional oil and gas development. Graduate students and research scientists taught about their research area and its relationship to oil and gas throughout three online courses during the 2015-16 school year, during which teachers and scientists engaged in active online discussions. Topics covered included climate change, oil and gas infrastructure, air quality, water quality, public health, and practices and policies relating to oil and gas development. Building upon their initial online interactions and a face-to-face meeting in March, teachers were paired with appropriate AirWaterGas team members as science advisors during a month-long residency in Boulder, Colorado. During the residency, graduate student scientists provided resources and feedback as teachers developed curriculum projects in collaboration with each other and UCAR science educators. Additionally, teachers and AirWaterGas researchers shared experiences on an oil and gas well site tour, and a short course on drilling methods with a drilling rig simulator. Here, we share lessons learned from both sides of the aisle, including initial results from program assessment conducted with the participating teachers.

  3. Improving Teacher Comfort Levels and Self-Efficacy with Technology Integration and Application of Technology into the Elementary Education Curriculum through the Tech Buddy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susan Christine

    2016-01-01

    Professional Development for technology integration into the elementary curriculum has been a costly and frequently ineffective endeavor. The idea for the Tech Buddy model came from this frustration. Teaming a teacher who had high comfort and self-efficacy levels with technology, however who still had much to learn, together with a teacher who was…

  4. Towards a Culturally Inclusive, Integrated, and Transdisciplinary Media Education Curriculum: Case Study of an International MA Program at the University of Lapland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasi, Paivi; Ruokamo, Heli; Maasiita, Mari

    2017-01-01

    Internationalization presents both opportunities and challenges for higher education policies and curricula, as well as for teaching and learning methods. This article describes and discusses ongoing exploration and development of the planned curriculum of the MA in Media Education at the Faculty of Education at the University of Lapland, Finland,…

  5. Piscicultura. Productor Comercial de Peces. Guia Tecnica. Documento de trabajo, Programa de Educacion Agricola (Fish Farming. Commercial Fish Producer. Technical Guide. Curriculum Document, Agriculture Education Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey. Area for Vocational and Technical Education.

    This curriculum guide begins with an introduction, course description, and description of the occupation of commercial fish farmer. A course outline covers five units: starting a business, establishing the fish farm, managing the enterprise, harvesting the fish, and administering the business. For each unit, the following are provided: terminal…

  6. Novel Highly Efficient Compact Rotary-Hammering Planetary Sampler Actuated by a Single Piezoelectric Actuator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We had two objectives in this task: 1. Develop effective single low-mass, low-power piezoelectric drive that can actuate rotary-hammer samplers through walls. 2....

  7. A comparative study between real time monitor KH-3000 and conventional Durham sampler measuring airborne pollen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoda, Shigetoshi; Enomoto, Tadao; Shibano, Akira; Ikeda, Hiroki; Yajin, Shinji; Dake, Yoshihiro; Harada, Tamotsu

    2005-01-01

    .... A problem arose, however, due to differences between the KH3000 (Yamato Co. Ltd) monitor and the conventional Durham sampler pointed out in results of airborne pollen monitoring in Wakayama in 2004...

  8. AirCore Reusable InSitu Sampler for CO2 and Trace Gas Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AirCore is a simple and novel atmospheric air column sampler to validate satellite observation data of greenhouse gases, using a lightweight, inexpensive coated...

  9. [The hidden curriculum in medical teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Alberto O

    2012-09-01

    Medical education must ascribe to a curriculum but clinical teaching poses special difficulties that go beyond any programming attempt. Attitudes and skills learned during tutored clinical practice are called the "hidden curriculum". The figure and personal features of the teacher, his environment and the atmosphere that projects every particular medical school, are essential to shape the characteristics of the student. Paradoxically, it is almost impossible to measure the impact of this hidden curriculum. This article is a reflection on an issue that is acquiring special relevance in medical education.

  10. Evaluation of particle resuspension in young children's breathing zone using stationary and robotic (PIPER) aerosol samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagona, Jessica A; Shalat, Stuart L; Wang, Zuocheng; Ramagopal, Maya; Black, Kathleen; Hernandez, Marta; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2015-07-01

    Development of asthma in young children may be associated with high exposure to particulate matter (PM). However, typical stationary samplers may not represent the personal exposure of children ages 3 and younger since they may not detect particles resuspended from the floor as children play, thus reducing our ability to correlate exposure and disease etiology. To address this, an autonomous robot, the Pretoddler Inhalable Particulate Environmental Robotic (PIPER) sampler, was developed to simulate the movements of children as they play on the floor. PIPER and a stationary sampler took simultaneous measurements of particle number concentration in six size channels using an optical particle counter and inhalable PM on filters in 65 homes in New Jersey, USA. To study particle resuspension, for each sampler we calculated the ratio of particle concentration measured while PIPER was moving to the average concentration of particles measured during a reference period when PIPER remained still. For all investigated particle sizes, higher particle resuspension was observed by PIPER compared to the stationary sampler. In 71% of carpeted homes a more significant (at the α = 0.05 level) resuspension of particles larger than 2.5 μm was observed by PIPER compared to the stationary sampler. Typically, particles larger than 2.5 μm were resuspended more efficiently than smaller particles, over both carpeted and bare floors. Additionally, in carpeted homes estimations of PM10 mass from the particle number concentrations measured on PIPER while it was moving were on average a factor of 1.54 higher compared to reference period when PIPER was not moving. For comparison, the stationary sampler measured an increase of PM2.5 mass by a factor of only 1.08 when PIPER was moving compared to a reference period. This demonstrates that PIPER is able to resuspend particles through movement, and provide a better characterization of the resuspended particles than stationary samplers. Accurate

  11. The CHROME Honors Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eleanor

    2002-01-01

    The CHROME Honors Program was designed as a two-week residential program for 9th and 1Oth grade students participating in CHROME clubs. The curriculum focused on the health sciences with instruction from: (1) the science and health curriculum of the Dozoretz National Program for Minorities in Applied Sciences (DNIMAS) Program of Norfolk State University (NSU); (2) the humanities curriculum of the NSU Honors Program; (3) NASA-related curriculum in human physiology. An Advisory Committee was formed to work with the Project Coordinator in the design of the summer program.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of a newly designed passive particle sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, H; Tavakoli, B; Ahmadi, G; Dhaniyala, S; Harner, T; Holsen, T M

    2016-07-01

    In this work a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed to predict the deposition of particles on a newly designed passive dry deposition (Pas-DD) sampler. The sampler uses a parallel plate design and a conventional polyurethane foam (PUF) disk as the deposition surface. The deposition of particles with sizes between 0.5 and 10 μm was investigated for two different geometries of the Pas-DD sampler for different wind speeds and various angles of attack. To evaluate the mean flow field, the k-ɛ turbulence model was used and turbulent fluctuating velocities were generated using the discrete random walk (DRW) model. The CFD software ANSYS-FLUENT was used for performing the numerical simulations. It was found that the deposition velocity increased with particle size or wind speed. The modeled deposition velocities were in general agreement with the experimental measurements and they increased when flow entered the sampler with a non-zero angle of attack. The particle-size dependent deposition velocity was also dependent on the geometry of the leading edge of the sampler; deposition velocities were more dependent on particle size and wind speeds for the sampler without the bend in the leading edge of the deposition plate, compared to a flat plate design. Foam roughness was also found to have a small impact on particle deposition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Curriculum Integration: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Amanda; Leckie, Alisa

    2017-01-01

    Curriculum integration is a tenet of middle level education. "This We Believe," the position paper of the Association for Middle Level Education, advocates for curriculum that is exploratory, relevant, integrative, and meaningful for young adolescents. Teachers can integrate curriculum across content areas by anchoring units of study in…

  14. Curriculum Development in Geomorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the context of present curriculum development in geomorphology and the way in which it has developed in recent years. Discusses the content of the geomorphology curriculum in higher education and the consequences of curriculum development together with a consideration of future trends and their implications. (GEA)

  15. Curriculum Writing in Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Colleen

    2002-01-01

    Explains the process for creating a curriculum in music education. Offers a definition of curriculum and address issues to be considered while designing the curriculum. Discusses how to incorporate the National Standards for Music Education, describes important music concepts, and offer guidelines for writing. (CMK)

  16. Marketing Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This handbook contains a competency-based curriculum for teaching marketing education in Alaska. The handbook is organized in seven sections. Section 1 introduces the competency-based curriculum, while Section 2 provides the scope and sequence and hierarchy of marketing education competencies. Section 3, the core of the curriculum, includes the…

  17. Using long-term air monitoring of semi-volatile organic compounds to evaluate the uncertainty in polyurethane-disk passive sampler-derived air concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Eva; Bohlin-Nizzetto, Pernilla; Borůvková, Jana; Harner, Tom; Kalina, Jiří; Melymuk, Lisa; Klánová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Much effort has been made to standardise sampling procedures, laboratory analysis, data analysis, etc. for semi volatile organic contaminants (SVOCs). Yet there are some unresolved issues in regards to comparing measurements from one of the most commonly used passive samplers (PAS), the polyurethane foam (PUF) disk PAS (PUF-PAS), between monitoring networks or different studies. One such issue is that there is no universal means to derive a sampling rate (Rs) or to calculate air concentrations (Cair) from PUF-PAS measurements for SVOCs. Cair was calculated from PUF-PAS measurements from a long-term monitoring program at a site in central Europe applying current understanding of passive sampling theory coupled with a consideration for the sampling of particle associated compounds. Cair were assessed against concurrent active air sampler (AAS) measurements. Use of "site-based/sampler-specific" variables: Rs, calculated using a site calibration, provided similar results for most gas-phase SVOCs to air concentrations derived using "default" values (commonly accepted Rs). Individual monthly PUF-PAS-derived air concentrations for the majority of the target compounds were significantly different (Wilcoxon signed-rank (WSR) test; p < 0.05) to AAS regardless of the input values (site/sampler based or default) used to calculate them. However, annual average PUF-PAS-derived air concentrations were within the same order of magnitude as AAS measurements except for the particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Underestimation of PUF-derived air concentrations for particle-phase PAHs was attributed to a potential overestimation of the particle infiltration into the PUF-PAS chamber and underestimation of the particle bound fraction of PAHs. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Personal samplers of bioavailable pesticides integrated with a hair follicle assay of DNA damage to assess environmental exposures and their associated risks in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Anderson, Kim A; Chen, Haiying; Anderson, Rebecca; Salvador-Moreno, Naike; Mora, Dana C; Poutasse, Carolyn; Laurienti, Paul J; Daniel, Stephanie S; Arcury, Thomas A

    2017-10-01

    Agriculture in the United States employs youth ages ten and older in work environments with high pesticide levels. Younger children in rural areas may also be affected by indirect pesticide exposures. The long-term effects of pesticides on health and development are difficult to assess and poorly understood. Yet, epidemiologic studies suggest associations with cancer as well as cognitive deficits. We report a practical and cost-effective approach to assess environmental pesticide exposures and their biological consequences in children. Our approach combines silicone wristband personal samplers and DNA damage quantification from hair follicles, and was tested as part of a community-based participatory research (CBPR) project involving ten Latino children from farmworker households in North Carolina. Our study documents high acceptance among Latino children and their caregivers of these noninvasive sampling methods. The personal samplers detected organophosphates, organochlorines, and pyrethroids in the majority of the participants (70%, 90%, 80%, respectively). Pesticides were detected in all participant samplers, with an average of 6.2±2.4 detections/participant sampler. DNA damage in epithelial cells from the sheath and bulb of plucked hairs follicles was quantified by immunostaining 53BP1-labled DNA repair foci. This method is sensitive, as shown by dose response analyses to γ radiations where the lowest dose tested (0.1Gy) led to significant increased 53BP1 foci density. Immunolabeling of DNA repair foci has significant advantages over the comet assay in that specific regions of the follicles can be analyzed. In this cohort of child participants, significant association was found between the number of pesticide detections and DNA damage in the papilla region of the hairs. We anticipate that this monitoring approach of bioavailable pesticides and genotoxicity will enhance our knowledge of the biological effects of pesticides to guide education programs and

  19. Astronaut Edwin Aldrin on Lunar Surface With Core Sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 manned lunar mission launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida on July 16, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle, and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. The 3-man crew aboard the flight consisted of Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module pilot. Carrying astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., the Lunar Module (LM) 'Eagle' was the first crewed vehicle to land on the Moon. The LM landed on the moon's surface on July 20, 1969 in the region known as Mare Tranquilitatis (the Sea of Tranquility). Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface. As he stepped off the LM, Armstrong proclaimed, 'That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind'. He was followed by Edwin Aldrin, describing the lunar surface as magnificent desolation. This photo is of Edwin Aldrin on the lunar surface using the core sampler, one of the many tools used by the astronauts to collect samples. The crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material which was returned to Earth for analysis. The surface exploration was concluded in 2½ hours. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  20. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the Margins-Geoprisms Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum, Rupturing Continental Lithosphere Part II: Introducing Euler Poles Using Baja-North America Relative Plate Motion Across the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, J. P.; Bennett, S. E. K.; Cashman, S. M.; Dorsey, R. J.; Goodliffe, A. M.; Lamb, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes. The NSF-GeoPRISMS Mini-lesson Project, funded by NSF-TUES, is designed to integrate the significant findings from the MARGINS program into open-source college-level curriculum. The Gulf of California (GOC) served as the focus site for the Rupturing Continental Lithosphere (RCL) initiative, which addressed several scientific questions: What forces drive rift initiation, localization, propagation and evolution? How does deformation vary in time and space, and why? How does crust evolve, physically and chemically, as rifting proceeds to sea-floor spreading? What is the role of sedimentation and magmatism in continental extension? We developed two weeks of curriculum, including lectures, labs, and in-class activities that can be used as a whole or individually. This component of the curriculum introduces students to the Euler pole description of relative plate motion (RPM) by examining the tectonic interactions of the Baja California microplate and North American plate. The plate boundary varies in rift obliquity along strike, from highly oblique and strike-slip dominated in the south to slightly less oblique and with a larger extensional component in the north. This Google Earth-based exercise provides students with a visualization of RPM using small circle contours of the local direction and magnitude of Baja-North America movement on a spherical Earth. Students use RPM to calculate the fault slip rates on transform, normal, and oblique-slip faults and examine how the varying faulting styles combine to accommodate RPM. MARGINS results are integrated via comparison of rift obliquity with the structural style of rift-related faults around the GOC. We find this exercise to fit naturally into courses about plate tectonics, geophysics, and especially structural geology, given the similarity between Euler pole rotations and stereonet-based rotations of structural data.

  1. Incorporating Cutting Edge Scientific Results from the Margins-Geoprisms Program into the Undergraduate Curriculum, Rupturing Continental Lithosphere Part I: Introducing Seismic Interpretation and Isostasy Principles Using Gulf of California Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, M. A.; Cashman, S. M.; Dorsey, R. J.; Bennett, S. E. K.; Loveless, J. P.; Goodliffe, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-MARGINS Program funded a decade of research on continental margin processes. The NSF-GeoPRISMS Mini-lesson Project, funded by NSF-TUES, is designed to integrate the significant findings from the MARGINS program into open-source college-level curriculum. The Gulf of California (GOC) served as the focus site for the Rupturing Continental Lithosphere initiative, which addressed several scientific questions: What forces drive rift initiation, localization, propagation and evolution? How does deformation vary in time and space, and why? How does crust evolve, physically and chemically, as rifting proceeds to sea-floor spreading? What is the role of sedimentation and magmatism in continental extension? We developed two weeks of curriculum designed for an upper-division structural geology, tectonics or geophysics course. The curriculum includes lectures, labs, and in-class activities that can be used as a whole or individually. The first set of materials introduces the RCL initiative to students and has them analyze the bathymetry and oblique-rifting geometry of the GOC in an exercise using GeoMapApp. The second set of materials has two goals: (1) introduce students to fundamental concepts of interpreting seismic reflection data via lectures and in-class interpretation of strata, basement, and faults from recent GOC seismic data, and (2) encourage students to discover the structural geometry and rift evolution, including the east-to-west progression of faulting and transition from detachment to high-angle faulting in the northern GOC, and changes in deformation style from north to south. In the third set of materials, students investigate isostatic affects of sediment fill in GOC oblique rift basins. This activity consists of a problem set, introduced in a lecture, where students integrate their findings from the previous bathymetry- and seismic-interpretation exercises.

  2. Design, implementation and evaluation of a community health training program in an integrated problem-based medical curriculum: a fifteen-year experience at the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastonay, Philippe; Vu, Nu Viet; Humair, Jean-Paul; Mpinga, Emmanuel Kabengele; Bernheim, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Background In the literature the need for relevance in medical education and training has been stressed. In the last 40 years medical schools have been challenged to train doctors competent to respond to community health needs. In the mid-90s the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine introduced an integrated medical curriculum. In this initiative a particular emphasis was put in introducing a 6-year longitudinal and multidisciplinary Community Health Program (CHP). Objectives The aims of the present article are to describe the conception, elaboration and implementation of the CHP as well as its evolution over 15 years and the evaluation of its outcomes. Methods The CHP was at its origin elaborated by a small group of highly motivated teachers and later on developed by a multi-disciplinary group of primary care physicians, epidemiologists, public health and bio-ethics specialists, occupational health professionals, lawyers and historians. Evaluation of the program outcomes included educational innovations, new developments of the curriculum and interactions between students and the community. Results The CHP learning objectives and teaching modalities were defined by the multi-disciplinary group in consensus meetings which triggered a collaborative spirit among teachers and facilitated further developments. The evaluation procedures allowed the monitoring of students’ satisfaction which remained high over the years, students’ active participation which decreased over time and success at certifying exams which was globally as good as in basic life sciences. The evaluation also assessed outcomes such as educational innovations, new developments of the curriculum and interactions between students and the community. Conclusion As suggested in the literature, our experience shows that the students’ direct exposure and practice in the community health environment is an effective training approach to broaden students’ education by offering them a community

  3. Using structural equation modeling to construct calibration equations relating PM2.5 mass concentration samplers to the federal reference method sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilonick, Richard A.; Connell, Daniel P.; Talbott, Evelyn O.; Rager, Judith R.; Xue, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to remove systematic bias among fine particulate matter (PM2.5) mass concentration measurements made by different types of samplers used in the Pittsburgh Aerosol Research and Inhalation Epidemiology Study (PARIES). PARIES is a retrospective epidemiology study that aims to provide a comprehensive analysis of the associations between air quality and human health effects in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, region from 1999 to 2008. Calibration was needed in order to minimize the amount of systematic error in PM2.5 exposure estimation as a result of including data from 97 different PM2.5 samplers at 47 monitoring sites. Ordinary regression often has been used for calibrating air quality measurements from pairs of measurement devices; however, this is only appropriate when one of the two devices (the "independent" variable) is free from random error, which is rarely the case. A group of methods known as "errors-in-variables" (e.g., Deming regression, reduced major axis regression) has been developed to handle calibration between two devices when both are subject to random error, but these methods require information on the relative sizes of the random errors for each device, which typically cannot be obtained from the observed data. When data from more than two devices (or repeats of the same device) are available, the additional information is not used to inform the calibration. A more general approach that often has been overlooked is the use of a measurement error structural equation model (SEM) that allows the simultaneous comparison of three or more devices (or repeats). The theoretical underpinnings of all of these approaches to calibration are described, and the pros and cons of each are discussed. In particular, it is shown that both ordinary regression (when used for calibration) and Deming regression are particular examples of SEMs but with substantial deficiencies. To illustrate the use of SEMs, the 7865 daily average PM2.5 mass

  4. Vadose Zone Monitoring of Dairy Green Water Lagoons using Soil Solution Samplers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brainard, James R.; Coplen, Amy K

    2005-11-01

    Over the last decade, dairy farms in New Mexico have become an important component to the economy of many rural ranching and farming communities. Dairy operations are water intensive and use groundwater that otherwise would be used for irrigation purposes. Most dairies reuse their process/green water three times and utilize lined lagoons for temporary storage of green water. Leakage of water from lagoons can pose a risk to groundwater quality. Groundwater resource protection infrastructures at dairies are regulated by the New Mexico Environment Department which currently relies on monitoring wells installed in the saturated zone for detecting leakage of waste water lagoon liners. Here we present a proposal to monitor the unsaturated zone beneath the lagoons with soil water solution samplers to provide early detection of leaking liners. Early detection of leaking liners along with rapid repair can minimize contamination of aquifers and reduce dairy liability for aquifer remediation. Additionally, acceptance of vadose zone monitoring as a NMED requirement over saturated zone monitoring would very likely significantly reduce dairy startup and expansion costs. Acknowledgment Funding for this project was provided by the Sandia National Laboratories Small Business Assistance Program

  5. Pine needles as passive bio-samplers to determine polybrominated diphenyl ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratola, Nuno; Alves, Arminda; Santos, Lúcia; Lacorte, Silvia

    2011-09-01

    Eight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were determined in pine needles of three species (Pinus halepensis, Pinus pinea and Pinus nigra) collected in the NE Spain in an attempt to use this matrix for the biomonitoring of airborne PBDEs. The method used was based in ultrasonic extraction followed by alumina and Florisil clean-up and determination by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization. Recoveries were between 99% and 138%, limits of detection between 0.011 and 0.070 ng g(-1)-dw (0.232 ng g(-1)-dw for BDE 209) and repeatability lower than 13%. PBDE levels ranged between 0.027 ng g(-1)-dw and 13.04 ng g(-1)-dw, with predominance of BDE 209, followed by BDEs 47. P. halepensis was the species with the highest PBDE levels and P. nigra, the least, according to their widespread and remote distribution, respectively. The presence of PBDEs in pine needles was attributed to the release of in-use PBDEs, transport through atmosphere and adsorption upon lipid rich pine needles. Given the easy collection of pine needles, its ample distribution and its potential to accumulate airborne contaminants, this matrix is proposed as passive bio-sampler to be used in PBDE monitoring programs. Pine needles can be used to biomonitor airborne PBDEs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Designing a Standardized Laparoscopy Curriculum for Gynecology Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shore, Eliane M; Lefebvre, Guylaine G; Husslein, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that simulation leads to improved operative skill, shorter operating room time, and better patient outcomes. Currently, no standardized laparoscopy curriculum exists for gynecology residents. OBJECTIVE: To design a structured laparoscopy curriculum for gynecology res......: This study used Delphi consensus to develop a comprehensive curriculum for teaching gynecologic laparoscopy. The curriculum conforms to current educational standards of proficiency-based training, and is suggested as a standard in residency programs.......BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that simulation leads to improved operative skill, shorter operating room time, and better patient outcomes. Currently, no standardized laparoscopy curriculum exists for gynecology residents. OBJECTIVE: To design a structured laparoscopy curriculum for gynecology...... residents using Delphi consensus methodology. METHODS: This study began with Delphi methodology to determine expert consensus on the components of a gynecology laparoscopic skills curriculum. We generated a list of cognitive content, technical skills, and nontechnical skills for training in laparoscopic...

  7. Real Estate Curriculum for Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Robert W.

    The Oregon Department of Education has prepared this curriculum guide to assist community college personnel in developing or upgrading real estate programs. This fast-growing field has demanded that community colleges analyze the course content of such programs so that they are relevant to the actual needs of the industry. An Advisory Committee…

  8. Motorcycle Safety Education. A Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Board of Education, Columbus.

    This curriculum guide was produced to assist instructors of educational programs for novice motorcycle operators, automobile drivers, and all highway users. An introductory section discusses program implementation concerns, such as public relations, legal considerations, scheduling, staff, students, facilities, motorcycles, insurance, financial…

  9. Agriculture: Horticulture. Secondary Schools. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands Dept. of Education, Saipan.

    This agricultural curriculum guide on horticulture for secondary students is one of six developed for inservice teachers at Marianas High School in Saipan. The guide provides the rationale, description, goals, and objectives of the program; the program of studies and performance objectives by levels; samples of lesson plans for effective delivery…

  10. Final Report: Radiation Health Technology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Dwight A.; Hunt, Hiram M.

    This report describes all aspects of a radiation health technology program at a lower-division college level. Such a program must include certain basic courses, plus supplementary ones to meet the needs of local employers. To implement and sustain a curriculum, the college must (1) determine the need for it, (2) establish its objectives, (3)…

  11. Development of a new passive sampler based on diffusive milligel beads for copper analysis in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, M.; Reynaud, S.; Lespes, G.; Potin-Gautier, M. [Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour/CNRS UMR IPREM 5254, Hélioparc, 2 av. du Président Angot, 64053 Pau (France); Mignard, E. [CNRS-Solvay-Université Bordeaux, UMR5258, Laboratoire du Futur, 178 Avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac Cedex (France); Chéry, P. [Bordeaux Science Agro, 1 cours du Général De Gaulle, Gradignan, 33175 (France); Schaumlöffel, D. [Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour/CNRS UMR IPREM 5254, Hélioparc, 2 av. du Président Angot, 64053 Pau (France); Grassl, B., E-mail: bruno.grassl@univ-pau.fr [Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour/CNRS UMR IPREM 5254, Hélioparc, 2 av. du Président Angot, 64053 Pau (France)

    2015-08-26

    A new passive sampler was designed and characterized for the determination of free copper ion (Cu{sup 2+}) concentration in aqueous solution. Each sampling device was composed of a set of about 30 diffusive milligel (DMG) beads. Milligel beads with incorporated cation exchange resin (Chelex) particles were synthetized using an adapted droplet-based millifluidic process. Beads were assumed to be prolate spheroids, with a diameter of 1.6 mm and an anisotropic factor of 1.4. The milligel was controlled in chemical composition of hydrogel (monomer, cross-linker, initiator and Chelex concentration) and characterized in pore size. Two types of sampling devices were developed containing 7.5% and 15% of Chelex, respectively, and 6 nm pore size. The kinetic curves obtained demonstrated the accumulation of copper in the DMG according to the process described in the literature as absorption (and/or adsorption) and release following the Fick's first law of diffusion. For their use in water monitoring, the typical physico-chemical characteristics of the samplers, i.e. the mass-transfer coefficient (k{sub 0}) and the sampler-water partition coefficient (K{sub sw}), were determined based on a static exposure design. In order to determine the copper concentration in the samplers after their exposure, a method using DMG bead digestion combined to Inductively Coupled Plasma – Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis was developed and optimized. The DMG devices proved to be capable to absorb free copper ions from an aqueous solution, which could be accurately quantified with a mean recovery of 99% and a repeatability of 7% (mean relative uncertainty). - Highlights: • Controlled geometry of new passive sampler with ellipsoidal shape. • Original manufacturing process based on droplet-based millifluidic device. • Pore size characterization of the sampler. • Mass-transfer and sampler-water partitioning coefficients by static exposure experiments.

  12. Multilevel Samplers to Assess Microbial Community Response to Biostimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, B. R.; McKinley, J. P.; Peacock, A. D.; Park, M.; Ogles, D.; Istok, J. D.; Resch, C. T.; White, D. C.

    2006-05-01

    Passive multilevel samplers (MLS) containing a solid matrix for microbial colonization were used in conjunction with a push-pull biostimulation experiment designed to promote biological U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction. MLS were deployed at 24 elevations in the injection well and two down gradient wells to investigate the spatial variability in microbial community composition and growth prior to and following biostimulation. The microbial community was characterized by real-time PCR (Q-PCR) quantification of eubacteria, NO3- reducing bacteria (nirS and nirK), δ-proteobacteria, Geobacter sp., and methanogens (mcrA). Pretest cell densities were low overall but varied substantially with significantly greater eubacterial populations detected at circumneutral pH (T-test, α=0.05) suggesting carbon substrate and low pH limitation of microbial activity. Although pretest cell densities were low, denitrifying bacteria were dominant members of the microbial community. Biostimulation with an ethanol amended groundwater resulted in concurrent NO3- and Tc(VII) reduction followed by U(VI) reduction. Q-PCR analysis of MLS revealed significant (1-2 orders of magnitude, T-test, α=0.05) increases in cell densities of eubacteria, denitrifiers, δ- proteobacteria, Geobacter sp., and methanogens in response to biostimulation. Traditionally characterization of sediment samples has been used to investigate the microbial community response to biostimulation, however, collection of sediment samples is expensive and not conducive to deep aquifers or temporal studies. The results presented demonstrate that push-pull tests with passive MLS provide an inexpensive approach to determine the effect of biostimulation on contaminant concentrations, geochemical conditions, and the microbial community composition and function.

  13. Digestive oncologist in the gastroenterology training curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Chris Jacob Johan; Peeters, Marc; Cats, Annemieke; Dahele, Anna; Droste, Jochim Terhaar sive

    2011-01-01

    Until the late 1980s, gastroenterology (GE) was considered a subspecialty of Internal Medicine. Today, GE also incorporates Hepatology. However, Digestive Oncology training is poorly defined in the Hepatogastroenterology (HGE)-curriculum. Therefore, a Digestive Oncology curriculum should be developed and this document might be a starting point for such a curriculum. HGE-specialists are increasingly resisting the paradigm in which they play only a diagnostic and technical role in the management of digestive tumors. We suggest minimum end-points in the standard HGE-curriculum for oncology, and recommend a focus year in the Netherlands for Digestive Oncology in the HGE-curriculum. To produce well-trained digestive oncologists, an advanced Digestive Oncology training program with specific qualifications in Digestive Oncology (2 years) has been developed. The schedule in Belgium includes a period of at least 6 mo to be spent in a medical oncology department. The goal of these programs remains the production of well-trained digestive oncologists. HGE specialists are part of the multidisciplinary oncological teams, and some have been administering chemotherapy in their countries for years. In this article, we provide a road map for the organization of a proper training in Digestive Oncology. We hope that the World Gastroenterology Organisation and other (inter)national societies will support the necessary certifications for this specific training in the HGE-curriculum. PMID:21556128

  14. Midwifery participatory curriculum development: Transformation through active partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebotham, Mary; Walters, Caroline; Chipperfield, Janine; Gamble, Jenny

    2017-07-01

    Evolving knowledge and professional practice combined with advances in pedagogy and learning technology create challenges for accredited professional programs. Internationally a sparsity of literature exists around curriculum development for professional programs responsive to regulatory and societal drivers. This paper evaluates a participatory curriculum development framework, adapted from the community development sector, to determine its applicability to promote engagement and ownership during the development of a Bachelor of Midwifery curriculum at an Australian University. The structures, processes and resulting curriculum development framework are described. A representative sample of key curriculum development team members were interviewed in relation to their participation. Qualitative analysis of transcribed interviews occurred through inductive, essentialist thematic analysis. Two main themes emerged: (1) 'it is a transformative journey' and (2) focused 'partnership in action'. Results confirmed the participatory curriculum development process provides symbiotic benefits to participants leading to individual and organisational growth and the perception of a shared curriculum. A final operational model using a participatory curriculum development process to guide the development of accredited health programs emerged. The model provides an appropriate structure to create meaningful collaboration with multiple stakeholders to produce a curriculum that is contemporary, underpinned by evidence and reflective of 'real world' practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Formaldehyde passive sampler using an optical chemical sensor: how to limit the humidity interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignau-Laulhere, Jane; Mocho, Pierre; Plaisance, Hervé; Raulin-Woznica, Katarzyna; Tran-Thi, Thu-Hoa; Desauziers, Valérie

    2017-10-01

    The behaviour of a new formaldehyde diffusive sampler using an optical chemical sensor with respect to high humidity conditions is examined in controlled atmospheres. Five prototypes of the radial diffusion sampler having the same chemical sensor and different designs were tested. In addition, a set of experiments were performed on the chemical sensor to characterise its efficiency of trapping water vapour in the absence and in the presence of the reactants, Fluoral-P and formaldehyde. Differences in humidity interference between the five diffusive sampler prototypes were studied and discussed. From all the results obtained, it was shown that the prototype LDE1.4 combining a small diffusion slot, a reduced internal volume and a sensor shifted upwards from the diffusion slot provided formaldehyde measurements least affected by humidity up to 80% RH at 20 °C. This new type of diffusive sampler with on-site direct reading is intended to ultimately replace conventional passive samplers with DNPH requiring offset laboratory analyses.

  16. Sensor transition failure in the high flow sampler: Implications for methane emission inventories of natural gas infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Touché; Ferrara, Thomas W; Townsend-Small, Amy

    2015-07-01

    Quantification of leaks from natural gas (NG) infrastructure is a key step in reducing emissions of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4), particularly as NG becomes a larger component of domestic energy supply. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires measurement and reporting of emissions of CH4 from NG transmission, storage, and processing facilities, and the high-flow sampler (or high-volume sampler) is one of the tools approved for this by the EPA. The Bacharach Hi-Flow Sampler (BHFS) is the only commercially available high-flow instrument, and it is also used throughout the NG supply chain for directed inspection and maintenance, emission factor development, and greenhouse gas reduction programs. Here we document failure of the BHFS to transition from a catalytic oxidation sensor used to measure low NG (~5% or less) concentrations to a thermal conductivity sensor for higher concentrations (from ~5% to 100%), resulting in underestimation of NG emission rates. Our analysis includes both our own field testing and analysis of data from two other studies (Modrak et al., 2012; City of Fort Worth, 2011). Although this failure is not completely understood, and although we do not know if all BHFS models are similarly affected, sensor transition failure has been observed under one or more of these conditions: (1) Calibration is more than ~2 weeks old; (2) firmware is out of date; or (3) the composition of the NG source is less than ~91% CH4. The extent to which this issue has affected recent emission studies is uncertain, but the analysis presented here suggests that the problem could be widespread. Furthermore, it is critical that this problem be resolved before the onset of regulations on CH4 emissions from the oil and gas industry, as the BHFS is a popular instrument for these measurements. An instrument commonly used to measure leaks in natural gas infrastructure has a critical sensor transition failure issue that results in underestimation of leaks, with

  17. The MAGIC Meteoric Smoke Particle Sampler - Description and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, J.

    2013-12-01

    properties is by direct collection followed by detailed laboratory analysis. However, the sounding rocket approach, which is the only practical method to carry out a sampling experiment at the desired mesospheric altitudes, is subject to critical limitations imposed by aerodynamics. As nanometer size particles tend to follow the airflow around the rocket payload structure, their sampling is a substantial experimental challenge. The objective of the MAGIC project (Mesospheric Aerosol - Genesis, Interaction and Composition) was to design and build an instrument to directly sample meteoric smoke particles in the mesosphere and return them to ground for detailed laboratory investigations. Here we describe the MAGIC meteoric smoke particle sampler and present attempts to directly sample MSPs and the challenges and uncertainties in the sampling procedure.

  18. Accessing Curriculum Through Technology Tools (ACTTT): A Model Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daytner, Katrina M.; Johanson, Joyce; Clark, Letha; Robinson, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Accessing Curriculum Through Technology Tools (ACTTT), a project funded by the U.S. Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), developed and tested a model designed to allow children in early elementary school, including those "at risk" and with disabilities, to better access, participate in, and benefit from the general curriculum.…

  19. Early Childhood Education: Curriculum Organization and Classroom Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Barbara; Drake, Kay

    Designed to accompany four filmstrips, this manual was developed to help early childhood educators--including curriculum specialists, administrators, teachers, and university faculty--implement a developmental program for young children. Filmstrip 1 introduces six components of curriculum organization and classroom mangement underlying a…

  20. The Design of an Individualized Perceptual Skills Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Jerome

    The purpose of this individualized perceptual skills curriculum is to ensure that each child acquires facility in processing concrete information before being exposed to abstraction demands of an academic program. The four major curriculum areas described are general motor, visual motor, auditory motor, and integrative. Unit areas are defined,…

  1. Finance and Credit. Curriculum Guide. Marketing and Distributive Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb. Dept. of Business Education and Administration Services.

    Designed to be used with the General Marketing Curriculum Guide (ED 156 860), this guide is intended to provide the curriculum coordinator with a basis for planning a comprehensive program in the field of marketing and to allow marketing and distributive education teacher-coordinators maximum flexibility. It contains job competency sheets in ten…

  2. Mentoring BUGS: An Integrated Science and Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo; Walker, Michelle; Hildreth, Bertina; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2004-01-01

    The current study describes an authentic learning experience designed to develop technology and science process skills through a carefully scaffolded curriculum using mealworms as a content focus. An individual mentor assigned to each 4th and 5th grade girl participating in the program delivered the curriculum. Results indicate mastery of science…

  3. A Review of Howard University's Financial Literacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey-Taliefero, Debby; Kelly, Lynne; Brent, William; Price, Russell

    2011-01-01

    This article evaluates a financial literacy curriculum at the Howard University (HU) School of Business, by measuring the financial knowledge acquired after participating in a variety of programs. To evaluate the HU curriculum, the National Jump$tart Coalition (NJC) survey was administered to collect data on financial knowledge and demographic…

  4. MILE Curriculum [and Nine CD-ROM Lessons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, John

    This curriculum on money management skills for deaf adolescent and young adult students is presented on nine video CD-ROMs as well as in a print version. The curriculum was developed following a survey of the needs of school and rehabilitation programs. It was also piloted and subsequently revised. Each teaching segment is presented in sign…

  5. Aerospace Technology Curriculum Guide. Invest in Success. Vo. Ed. #260.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document contains standards for an articulated secondary and postsecondary curriculum in aerospace technology. The curriculum standards can be used to ensure that vocational programs meet the needs of local business and industry. The first part of the document contains a task list and student performance standards for the aerospace technology…

  6. Marketing and Distributive Education Curriculum Planning Guide. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, E. Edward; And Others

    This curriculum guide for marketing and distributive education programs in Illinois consists of two sections. In the first section, the rationale for the curriculum is presented, along with the process used to develop it. This presentation is followed by a discussion on articulation in education, especially between high school and postsecondary…

  7. Language Arts CCA Basic Skills Curriculum. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Computer-Based Education Research Lab.

    Designed and programmed by the staff of the Courseware and Curriculum Applications (CCA) Group (a unit of the Computer-Based Education Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), this instructor's guide describes a computer-based language arts curriculum intended to move adult and adolescent students performing at the…

  8. Reading Comprehension CCA Basic Skills Curriculum. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Computer-Based Education Research Lab.

    Designed and programmed by the staff of the Courseware and Curriculum Applications (CCA) Group (a unit of the Computer-Based Education Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), this instructor's guide describes a computer-based reading comprehension curriculum designed for adults and adolescents who read at the…

  9. Marketing and Distributive Education Curriculum Guide for Agricultural Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Vocational Education Studies.

    This curriculum guide provides curriculum coordinators with a basis for planning a comprehensive program in the career field of marketing agricultural services and allows marketing and distributive education teachers maximum flexibility. Introductory materials include information on use of the guide, information on careers in agricultural…

  10. A Military Transitional Year Professionalism Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mary; Sterbis, Joseph R; Olson, Holly L

    2014-09-01

    Development of professionalism is a critical component of a military transitional year residency. Little published research exists to guide programs in meeting this challenge. After significant concerns regarding resident professionalism were raised by Tripler Army Medical Center faculty, a novel transitional residency professionalism curriculum was conceived and implemented. Universal expectations of physician professionalism, as perceived by various stakeholders (patients, parents, faculty, and nurses), were explored using a small group, discussion-based curriculum. This was combined with a small group, discussion-based, lessons-learned project and a military-unique curriculum. Since implementation, the curriculum has had 100% satisfaction on the part of the faculty and 80% to 100% on the part of the residents, as measured by annual review surveys. Although resident professionalism scores on evaluations did not change significantly, the number of adverse actions because of professionalism lapses has decreased steadily in the 4 years since inception, and the program has been without any such actions for the past 18 months. Our novel transitional residency professionalism curriculum has been successful in a military residency program.

  11. Surgical Technology Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This surgical technology program guide presents the standard curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum addresses the minimum competencies for a surgical technology program. The program guide is designed to relate primarily to the development of those skills needed by individuals in the field to provide services in the…

  12. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surgical Skills Curriculum Cancer Education Cancer Education Cancer Education Cancer Programs Conference: Creating a Culture of Quality CoC Events Quality Education Quality Education ...

  13. Passive Sampler for Measurements of Atmospheric Nitric Acid Vapor (HNO3 Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Bytnerowicz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric acid (HNO3 vapor is an important nitrogenous air pollutant responsible for increasing saturation of forests with nitrogen and direct injury to plants. The USDA Forest Service and University of California researchers have developed a simple and inexpensive passive sampler for monitoring air concentrations of HNO3. Nitric acid is selectively absorbed on 47-mm Nylasorb nylon filters with no interference from particulate NO3-. Concentrations determined with the passive samplers closely corresponded with those measured with the co-located honeycomb annular denuder systems. The PVC protective caps of standardized dimensions protect nylon filters from rain and wind and allow for reliable measurements of ambient HNO3 concentrations. The described samplers have been successfully used in Sequoia National Park, the San Bernardino Mountains, and on Mammoth Mountain in California.

  14. Bayesian analysis for exponential random graph models using the adaptive exchange sampler

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Ick Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Exponential random graph models have been widely used in social network analysis. However, these models are extremely difficult to handle from a statistical viewpoint, because of the existence of intractable normalizing constants. In this paper, we consider a fully Bayesian analysis for exponential random graph models using the adaptive exchange sampler, which solves the issue of intractable normalizing constants encountered in Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. The adaptive exchange sampler can be viewed as a MCMC extension of the exchange algorithm, and it generates auxiliary networks via an importance sampling procedure from an auxiliary Markov chain running in parallel. The convergence of this algorithm is established under mild conditions. The adaptive exchange sampler is illustrated using a few social networks, including the Florentine business network, molecule synthetic network, and dolphins network. The results indicate that the adaptive exchange algorithm can produce more accurate estimates than approximate exchange algorithms, while maintaining the same computational efficiency.

  15. Chaotic motif sampler: detecting motifs from biological sequences by using chaotic neurodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Takafumi; Ikeguchi, Tohru

    Identification of a region in biological sequences, motif extraction problem (MEP) is solved in bioinformatics. However, the MEP is an NP-hard problem. Therefore, it is almost impossible to obtain an optimal solution within a reasonable time frame. To find near optimal solutions for NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems such as traveling salesman problems, quadratic assignment problems, and vehicle routing problems, chaotic search, which is one of the deterministic approaches, has been proposed and exhibits better performance than stochastic approaches. In this paper, we propose a new alignment method that employs chaotic dynamics to solve the MEPs. It is called the Chaotic Motif Sampler. We show that the performance of the Chaotic Motif Sampler is considerably better than that of the conventional methods such as the Gibbs Site Sampler and the Neighborhood Optimization for Multiple Alignment Discovery.

  16. Creating a Fellowship Curriculum in Patient Safety and Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abookire, Susan A; Gandhi, Tejal K; Kachalia, Allen; Sands, Kenneth; Mort, Elizabeth; Bommarito, Grace; Gagne, Jane; Sato, Luke; Weingart, Saul N

    2016-01-01

    The authors sought to create a curriculum suitable for a newly created clinical fellowship curriculum across Harvard Medical School-affiliated teaching hospitals as part of a newly created 2-year quality and safety fellowship program described in the companion article "Design and Implementation of the Harvard Fellowship in Patient Safety and Quality." The aim of the curriculum development process was to define, coordinate, design, and implement a set of essential skills for future physician-scholars of any specialty to lead operational quality and patient safety efforts. The process of curriculum development and the ultimate content are described in this article. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Teachers’ Readiness to Implement Digital Curriculum in Kuwaiti Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mubarak Al-Awidi

    2017-03-01

    Findings\tTeachers are moderately ready for implementation of the digital curriculum in both components of readiness (technical and pedagogical. Teachers identified some factors that that hinder their readiness. These factors are related to time constraints, knowledge and skills, infrastructure, and technical support. Recommendations for Practitioners: This paper will guide curriculum decision makers to find the best ways to help and support teachers to effectively implement the digital. Future Research: Follow up studies may examine the effectiveness of teacher education pro-grams in preparing students teachers to implement the digital curriculum, and the role of education decision makers in facilitating the implementation of the digital curriculum.

  18. Porous Polyurethane Foam for Use as a Particle Collection Substrate in a Nanoparticle Respiratory Deposition Sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mines, Levi W D; Park, Jae Hong; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A; Anthony, T Renée; Grassian, Vicki H; Peters, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Porous polyurethane foam was evaluated to replace the eight nylon meshes used as a substrate to collect nanoparticles in the Nanoparticle Respiratory Deposition (NRD) sampler. Cylindrical (25-mm diameter by 40-mm deep) foam with 110 pores per inch was housed in a 25-mm-diameter conductive polypropylene cassette cowl compatible with the NRD sampler. Pristine foam and nylon meshes were evaluated for metals content via elemental analysis. The size-selective collection efficiency of the foam was evaluated using salt (NaCl) and metal fume aerosols in independent tests. Collection efficiencies were compared to the nanoparticulate matter (NPM) criterion and a semi-empirical model for foam. Changes in collection efficiency and pressure drop of the foam and nylon meshes were measured after loading with metal fume particles as measures of substrate performance. Substantially less titanium was found in the foam (0.173 μg sampler -1 ) compared to the nylon mesh (125 μg sampler -1 ), improving the detection capabilities of the NRD sampler for titanium dioxide particles. The foam collection efficiency was similar to that of the nylon meshes and the NPM criterion (R 2 = 0.98, for NaCl), although the semi-empirical model underestimated the experimental efficiency (R 2 = 0.38). The pressure drop across the foam was 8% that of the nylon meshes when pristine and changed minimally with metal fume loading (~ 19 mg). In contrast, the pores of the nylon meshes clogged after loading with ~ 1 mg metal fume. These results indicate that foam is a suitable substrate to collect metal (except for cadmium) nanoparticles in the NRD sampler.

  19. Determining particle size distributions in the inhalable size range for wood dust collected by air samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Martin; Muller, Brian S; Bartolucci, Al

    2002-10-01

    In the absence of methods for determining particle size distributions in the inhalable size range with good discrimination, the samples collected by personal air sampling devices can only be characterized by their total mass. This parameter gives no information regarding the size distribution of the aerosol or the size-selection characteristics of different samplers in field use conditions. A method is described where the particles collected by a sampler are removed, suspended, and re-deposited on a mixed cellulose-ester filter, and examined by optical microscopy to determine particle aerodynamic diameters. This method is particularly appropriate to wood dust particles which are generally large and close to rectangular prisms in shape. Over 200 wood dust samples have been collected in three different wood-products industries, using the traditional closed-face polystyrene/acrylonitrile cassette, the Institute of Occupational Medicine inhalable sampler, and the Button sampler developed by the University of Cincinnati. A portion of these samples has been analyzed to determine the limitations of this method. Extensive quality control measures are being developed to improve the robustness of the procedure, and preliminary results suggest the method has an accuracy similar to that required of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) methods. The results should provide valuable insights into the collection characteristics of the samplers and the impact of these characteristics on comparison of sampler results to present and potential future limit values. The NIOSH Deep South Education and Research Center has a focus on research into hazards of the forestry and associated wood-products industry, and it is hoped to expand this activity in the future.

  20. Composite sampling of a Bacillus anthracis surrogate with cellulose sponge surface samplers from a nonporous surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenia A M Tufts

    Full Text Available A series of experiments was conducted to explore the utility of composite-based collection of surface samples for the detection of a Bacillus anthracis surrogate using cellulose sponge samplers on a nonporous stainless steel surface. Two composite-based collection approaches were evaluated over a surface area of 3716 cm2 (four separate 929 cm2 areas, larger than the 645 cm2 prescribed by the standard Centers for Disease Control (CDC and Prevention cellulose sponge sampling protocol for use on nonporous surfaces. The CDC method was also compared to a modified protocol where only one surface of the sponge sampler was used for each of the four areas composited. Differences in collection efficiency compared to positive controls and the potential for contaminant transfer for each protocol were assessed. The impact of the loss of wetting buffer from the sponge sampler onto additional surface areas sampled was evaluated. Statistical tests of the results using ANOVA indicate that the collection of composite samples using the modified sampling protocol is comparable to the collection of composite samples using the standard CDC protocol (p  =  0.261. Most of the surface-bound spores are collected on the first sampling pass, suggesting that multiple passes with the sponge sampler over the same surface may be unnecessary. The effect of moisture loss from the sponge sampler on collection efficiency was not significant (p  =  0.720 for both methods. Contaminant transfer occurs with both sampling protocols, but the magnitude of transfer is significantly greater when using the standard protocol than when the modified protocol is used (p<0.001. The results of this study suggest that composite surface sampling, by either method presented here, could successfully be used to increase the surface area sampled per sponge sampler, resulting in reduced sampling times in the field and decreased laboratory processing cost and turn-around times.

  1. Mathematical modelling of dust samplers and application of the method to the gravimetric dust sampler RESPICON; Mathematische Modellierung von Staubmessgeraeten und Anwendung der Methode auf das gravimetrische Staubmessgeraet RESPICON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, L. [Deutsche Montan Technologie GmbH, Essen (Germany). Gas and Fire Div.

    2004-07-01

    The evaluation and assessment of the fractionating particle sampler RESPICON due to the European test standard prEN 13205 has been continued by mathematical modelling of the candidate sampler and its response to different aerosols, characterized by the mean aerodynamic particle size (MMAD) and standard deviation (GSD). The three health related size fractions are sampled by the candidate sampler within the limits given by the standard, but correction factors for each fraction have to be taken into account. This result stands only for the use of the candidate as affixed point sampler. But due to the regulations in the standard it can be used as a personal sampler for windspeeds up to 2/ms. The investigations also have shown some disadvantages of the test standard itself, these should be eliminated in the future. (orig.)

  2. Field testing of three bedload samplers' efficiency in a gravel-bed river, Spitsbergen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachlewicz, Grzegorz; Zwoliński, Zbigniew; Kociuba, Waldemar; Stawska, Monika

    2017-06-01

    A comparative study of the three bedload traps was accomplished to determine the effectiveness differences between the devices. The research was carried out in two transverse sections of the proglacial, gravel-bedded Scott River (SW Svalbard) using three devices to perform direct measurements of bedload transport in the river channels. Several samplers are used for field measurements, but none of them has gained widespread acceptance as a standard so far. The paper compares transport rates collected in three bedload samplers that differ in structure and functionality: i) a portable Helley-Smith, pressure-difference bedload sampler (H-S), ii) an anchored River Bedload Trap (RBT), and iii) the portable sampler used by the Polish Hydrological Services (PIHM type C). All three samplers are constructed using the same components: a frame made of thin stainless steel sheet and a nylon bag with the same (2 mm) mesh size (except PIHM). Measurements were conducted within three consecutive days in two cross sections, in the same vertical profiles and at the same time (at intervals of 30 and 60 min). Measurements of bedload transport and water velocity were performed simultaneously. In order to determine the effectiveness and representativeness of short-term measurements using particular devices, the masses of the samples were converted into a specific rate of bedload transport and compared to the results of long-term continuous measurement (24 h measurement cycle). The results confirm that both specific transport indicators and the mass of the samples collected by the tested devices show a significant variation. Generally, the highest mass and specific transport indicators were obtained using the H-S sampler. The RBT produced moderate transport rates, while the PIHM sampler gave the lowest rates. The bedload transport rate in a profile estimated on the short-term measurements was compared to results of the continuous measurements conducted in the same cross sections. In the 7

  3. Silicone passive equilibrium samplers as ‘chemometers’ in eels and sediments of a Swedish lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnke, Annika; Mayer, Philipp; McLachlan, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Passive equilibrium samplers deployed in two or more media of a system and allowed to come to equilibrium can be viewed as ‘chemometers’ that reflect the difference in chemical activities of contaminants between the media. We applied silicone-based equilibrium samplers to measure relative chemical...... diagenesis and sorption to phytoplankton. The ‘chemometer’ approach has the potential to become a powerful tool to study the thermodynamic controls on persistent organic chemicals in the environment and should be extended to other environmental compartments....

  4. Hispanic Folk Arts and the Environment: An Interdisciplinary Curriculum Guide. A New Mexican Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Alejandro

    This interdisciplinary, bilingual curriculum resource, contains a 29-minute videotape program, 20 colorplate posters, and a curriculum guide. The resource presents an examination of the folklife and folklore expressions of the Hispanic people of New Mexico. The focus of the curriculum is the relationship of survival-based folk activities to the…

  5. A Proposed Concentration Curriculum Design for Big Data Analytics for Information Systems Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molluzzo, John C.; Lawler, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Big Data is becoming a critical component of the Information Systems curriculum. Educators are enhancing gradually the concentration curriculum for Big Data in schools of computer science and information systems. This paper proposes a creative curriculum design for Big Data Analytics for a program at a major metropolitan university. The design…

  6. Curriculum-based neurosurgery digital library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Jean-Philippe; Dang, Thai; Kon, David; Sapo, Monica; Batzdorf, Ulrich; Martin, Neil

    2010-11-01

    Recent work-hour restrictions and the constantly evolving body of knowledge are challenging the current ways of teaching neurosurgery residents. To develop a curriculum-based digital library of multimedia content to face the challenges in neurosurgery education. We used the residency program curriculum developed by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons to structure the library and Microsoft Sharepoint as the user interface. This project led to the creation of a user-friendly and searchable digital library that could be accessed remotely and throughout the hospital, including the operating rooms. The electronic format allows standardization of the content and transformation of the operating room into a classroom. This in turn facilitates the implementation of a curriculum within the training program and improves teaching efficiency. Future work will focus on evaluating the efficacy of the library as a teaching tool for residents.

  7. Curriculum reform in Finnish pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katajavuori, Nina; Hakkarainen, Katja; Kuosa, Tiina; Airaksinen, Marja; Hirvonen, Jouni; Holm, Yvonne

    2009-12-17

    To improve pharmacy education through integrating theory and practice, coherent constructively aligned course entities, and enhanced deep-level learning. The reform was conducted collaboratively with faculty and staff members, students, and stakeholders in pharmacy. The curriculum, syllabus, and teaching methods were assessed through evaluations and research, conducting core content analyses, and measuring the workload of pharmacy education courses. The new curriculum, launched in August 2005, consists of 6 strands, comprised of different courses which run through the entire program. Three years after the introduction of the reformed curriculum, the results of the reform are being evaluated. Ongoing assessments of teaching and learning will reveal how the education at the faculty level has developed since the reform. These assessment procedures are an integral part of the faculty's quality assurance program. The integration of practical training and theoretical studies was improved with personal study plans introduced to enhance students' learning.

  8. Curriculum Issues: Error Analysis in Thinking About Curriculum for the Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanTassel-Baska, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    In this article the author reports on a continued effort to evaluate programs for the gifted that includes examining the curriculum that is used, the ways it is implemented in classrooms, and the outcome data that districts have collected about its effectiveness. The author adds that the heart of program evaluation really lies with how effectively…

  9. The Bologna Agreement and its impact on the Master in Advanced Nursing Practice Program at Rotterdam University of Applied Science: incorporating mandatory internationalization in the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas-Garcia, L; Ter Maten-Speksnijder, A

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the impact on nursing education in the Netherlands since the implementation of the Bologna Agreement. In 1999, the Bologna Agreement was constructed to establish a comparable and transferable degree system in universities within the European Union for nine subject areas (chemistry, physics, mathematics, geology, history, business, education science, nursing and European studies). The target date for implementation of the undergraduate and graduate degrees is 2010. Since 2004, Rotterdam University of Applied Science has offered a Master in Advance Nursing Practice degree. This graduate study offers nursing students the opportunity to continue career and academic mobility within the nursing profession. This paper reports on the need for internationalization within nursing curriculum to meet the demands of the increasingly mobile nursing workforce.

  10. On the Development of Digital Forensics Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manghui Tu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer Crime and computer related incidents continue their prevalence and frequency and result in loss of billions of dollars. To fight against those crimes and frauds, it is urgent to develop digital forensics education programs to train a suitable workforce to efficiently and effectively investigate crimes and frauds. However, there is no standard to guide the design of digital forensics curriculum for an academic program. In this research, we investigate the research works on digital forensics curriculum design and existing education programs.  Both digital forensics educators and practitioners were surveyed and the results are analyzed to determine what industry and law enforcement need. Based on the survey results and what the industry certificate programs cover, we identified topics that are desired to be covered in digital forensics courses. Finally, we propose six digital forensics courses and their topics that can be offered in both undergraduate and graduate digital forensics programs.

  11. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Provides six fully developed library media activities designed to be used with specific curriculum units in health, physical education, reading/language arts, science, and social studies. Library media skills, objectives, curriculum objectives, grade levels, instructional roles, activity and procedures for completion, evaluation, and follow-up are…

  12. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities designed for specific curriculum units. Curriculum areas represented include reading and language arts (proverbs and fables, letters of the alphabet, and biographies); science (the study of Gregor Mendel and genetics, oil resources); and social studies (global awareness). (LRW)

  13. Illinois Manufacturing Technology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliffe, Roger; And Others

    This manufacturing technology curriculum involves students in learning problem-solving, communication, team building, quality control, safety, math, science, and technical skills. The document begins with a section on implementation, which gives background information on the purposes and development of the curriculum, explains its rationale,…

  14. A Critical Humanist Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Kevin; Rodriguez, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a critical humanist discussion of curriculum; a departure from the technicist view of education [education meant to support a global capitalist economy] and an analysis of curriculum considering critical humanism, political economy and critical race theory among other modes of critical analysis and inquiry. Our discussion supports a…

  15. The Galapagos Jason Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, VA.

    The JASON Curriculum Project materials are designed to prepare teachers and students for an exploration around the Galapagos Islands via satellite transmission of live images and sound. This curriculum package contains five units, 25 lesson plans, and over 50 activities, along with teacher background material, student worksheets and readings, a…

  16. Solar Technology Curriculum, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This curriculum guide contains lecture outlines and handouts for training solar technicians in the installation, maintenance, and repair of solar energy hot water and space heating systems. The curriculum consists of four modular units developed to provide a model through which community colleges and area vocational/technical schools can respond…

  17. The Marriage of Language and Business: A Working Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Anita

    The Foreign Language for International Trade degree program developed by Indiana University of Pennsylvania is described. The curriculum combines elements of a basic business course with elements of a language program. It is a rigorous program with 36 credit hours in both business and language. The program presents problems for language students…

  18. Integrating Numerical Computation into the Modeling Instruction Curriculum

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, Marcos D; Aiken, John M; Douglas, Scott S; Scanlon, Erin M; Thoms, Brian; Schatz, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    We describe a way to introduce physics high school students with no background in programming to computational problem-solving experiences. Our approach builds on the great strides made by the Modeling Instruction reform curriculum. This approach emphasizes the practices of "Developing and using models" and "Computational thinking" highlighted by the NRC K-12 science standards framework. We taught 9th-grade students in a Modeling-Instruction-based physics course to construct computational models using the VPython programming environment. Numerical computation within the Modeling Instruction curriculum provides coherence among the curriculum's different force and motion models, links the various representations which the curriculum employs, and extends the curriculum to include real-world problems that are inaccessible to a purely analytic approach.

  19. 4-H After-School Program: Bloco Drum and Dance, Part 3. Fundraising for Your Program.

    OpenAIRE

    Conklin-Ginop, Evelyn L; Junge, Sharon K; Pulley, Karyn

    2012-01-01

    Part 3 of the curriculum: Fundraising for Your Program. With this 11-part curriculum, you can set up an after-school program that teaches teens leadership, fitness, and good nutrition in an exciting music-and-dance environment.

  20. Life Cycle. K-6 Science Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueford, J. R.; And Others

    Life Cycle is one of the units of a K-6 unified science curriculum program. The unit consists of four organizing sub-themes: (1) past life (focusing on dinosaurs and fossil formation, types, and importance); (2) animal life (examining groups of invertebrates and vertebrates, cells, reproduction, and classification systems); (3) plant life…

  1. Using Learner Data in Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1990-01-01

    Describes an approach to curriculum development that has evolved out of a learner-centered philosophy of second and foreign language teaching. The use of information about and from learners for decision-making at each of these stages is illustrated with data from the Australian Adult Immigrant Education Program. (Author/VWL)

  2. The Challenge to Internationalize the Engineering Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallo, Joseph C.

    1991-01-01

    Urges the internationalization of the engineering curriculum to prepare students for the rigors of global competition in the international marketplace. Lists accreditation pressures and market incentives as barriers to needed diversity. Discusses engineering programs at several schools. Concludes that interdisciplinary inquiry is needed to provide…

  3. Plate Tectonic Cycle. K-6 Science Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueford, J. R.; And Others

    Plate Tectonics Cycle is one of the units of a K-6 unified science curriculum program. The unit consists of four organizing sub-themes: (1) volcanoes (covering formation, distribution, and major volcanic groups); (2) earthquakes (with investigations on wave movements, seismograms and sub-suface earth currents); (3) plate tectonics (providing maps…

  4. Whales of New England. Secondary Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New England Aquarium, Boston, MA.

    Instructional materials and suggestions for conducting a whale watching field trip are contained in this curriculum packet for secondary science teachers. It is one unit in a series of curricular programs developed by the New England Aquarium Education Department. Activities and information are organized into three sections: (1) pre-trip…

  5. Solar Energy Installers Curriculum Guides. Book II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gene C.

    This second volume of a comprehensive curriculum guide for the heating-ventilation-air conditioning-refrigeration-solar student is designed to assist high school area vocational centers or community college instructors in the implementation and operation of comfort training programs. The guide is comprised of ten units of instruction within three…

  6. Solar Energy Installers Curriculum Guides. Book I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gene C.

    This first volume of a comprehensive curriculum guide for the heating-ventilation-air conditioning-refrigeration-solar student is designed to assist high school area vocational centers or community college instructors in the implementation and operation of comfort training programs. Following an introductory section, the guide provides job…

  7. Cultural Competence Integration in the Nursing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Boniface C.

    2013-01-01

    With an increasingly diverse population, it is important to ensure that graduates of nursing programs are able to deliver culturally competent care (Krainovich-Miller et al., 2008; Allen, 2010). This study was undertaken to address this call to include cultural competence integration into nursing curriculum. The purpose of this study was to…

  8. Competency based ophthalmology training curriculum for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The establishment of a credible, defensible and acceptable “formal competency based ophthalmology training curriculum for undergraduate medical and dental students” is fundamental to program recognition, monitoring and evaluation. The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZ-CHS) has ...

  9. Child Care Lead Poisoning Prevention. Training Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Dept. of Health Services, Oakland. Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch.

    In an effort to address young children's substantial risk for exposure to lead in out-of-home child care programs, outreach and training were developed for child care providers. This workshop curriculum consists of training activities and materials appropriate for child care providers in centers or homes for the purpose of educating them about the…

  10. A Curriculum Guide for Electricity/Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Bill, Comp.

    This curriculum guide is designed to upgrade the secondary electrical trades program in Mississippi by broadening its scope to incorporate basic electronic principles. Covered in the individual chapters of the guide are the following courses: basic electricity (occupational information, basic physics, circuit fundamentals, resistance and Ohm's…

  11. Rock Cycle. K-6 Science Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueford, J. R.; And Others

    Rock Cycle is one of the units of a K-6 unified science curriculum program. The unit consists of four organizing sub-themes: (1) chemistry (introducing the topics of matter, elements, compounds, and chemical bonding); (2) characteristics (presenting hands-on activities with rocks and minerals); (3) minerals (emphasizing the aesthetic and economic…

  12. Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbert, William T.

    1976-01-01

    The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

  13. Multispectral Resource Sampler: Proof of concept. Literature survey of bidirectional reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    A bibliography compiled in order to give a comprehensive review of previous work in scene bidirectional reflectance, particularly those studies relevant to the Multispectral Resource Sampler (MRS) is presented. The bibliography contains 124 abstracts. In addition a synthesis of the literature results is given along with background information concerning MRS.

  14. Development and Calibration of a Passive Sampler for Perfluorinated Alkyl Carboxylates and Sulfonates in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaserzon, S.L.; Kennedy, K.; Hawker, D.W.; Thompson, J.; Carter, S.; Roach, A.C.; Booij, K.; Mueller, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are emerging environmental contaminants with a global distribution. Due to their moderate water solubility, the majority of the environmental burden is assumed to be in the water phase. This work describes the application of the first passive sampler for the

  15. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Testing Physical (Design) and Performance Characteristics of Reference Methods and Class I and Class II... candidate test sampler shall have its inlet and impactor or impactors removed. The lower end of the down... aerosol is introduced at the top of the downtube. (f) Test procedure. (1) All surfaces of the added or...

  16. Page 1 34 C N R Rao meters, high speed samplers and Voltage ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    meters, high speed samplers and Voltage standards based on Josephson effects as well as non-Josephson devices such as Superconducting bolometers and SIS mixers are areas where success is likely. Transistor-like devices compatible with oxide superconductors need to be explored vigorously. The new bismuth ...

  17. Comparative performance of two air samplers for monitoring airborne fungal propagules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G.F. Távora

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have attempted to evaluate the importance of airborne fungi in the development of invasive fungal infection, especially for immunocompromised hosts. Several kinds of instruments are available to quantitate fungal propagule levels in air. We compared the performance of the most frequently used air sampler, the Andersen sampler with six stages, with a portable one, the Reuter centrifugal sampler (RCS. A total of 84 samples were analyzed, 42 with each sampler. Twenty-eight different fungal genera were identified in samples analyzed with the Andersen instrument. In samples obtained with the RCS only seven different fungal genera were identified. The three most frequently isolated genera in samples analyzed with both devices were Penicillium, Aspergillus and Cladophialophora. In areas supplied with a high efficiency particulate air filter, fungal spore levels were usually lower when compared to areas without these filters. There was a significant correlation between total fungal propagule measurements taken with both devices on each sampling occasion (Pearson coefficient = 0.50. However, the Andersen device recovered a broader spectrum of fungi. We conclude that the RCS can be used for quantitative estimates of airborne microbiological concentrations. For qualitative studies, however, this device cannot be recommended.

  18. Evaluation of a depth proportional intake device for automatic pumping samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand E. Eads; Robert B. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Abstract - A depth proportional intake boom for portable pumping samplers was used to collect suspended sediment samples in two coastal streams for three winters. The boom pivots on the stream bed while a float on the downstream end allows debris to depress the boom and pass without becoming trapped. This equipment modifies point sampling by maintaining the intake...

  19. Framing the Problem of Identity in Composition and TESOL Studies: A Sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messekher, Hayat

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at how the intricate issue of identity has been addressed and framed in composition and TESOL studies (C&T). It reviews five articles and a book as a sampler to explore identity research in various contexts ranging from the problematic rise of identity in second-language acquisition (SLA) research in 1997, which represented a…

  20. The use of simple diffusion tube samplers for the measurement of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of simple diffusion tube samplers for the measurement of nitrogen dioxide in an operating room using nitrogen oxide as an anaesthetic (July — November 1999). *E. E. Ukpebor and C. 0. lmarengiaye. *Department Qf Chemistry and Department of/1 naesthesiology. University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria. Summary.