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Sample records for program boston university

  1. Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program started in 1966 and conducted epidemiologic research to quantify the potential adverse effects of prescription drugs, utilizing in-hospital monitoring.

  2. Case Study Evaluation of the Boston Area Carpooling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    The report evaluates a carpooling program in operation in the Boston, Massachusetts area from August, 1973 through August, 1974. The program, entitled the WBZ/ALA Commuter Computer Campaign, was the first program in the nation to promote and organize...

  3. Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis: the university of california davis experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jay C; Hernandez, Enrique Graue; Schwab, Ivan R; Mannis, Mark J

    2009-04-01

    To compare the University of California Davis experience using the Boston keratoprosthesis with the Boston Keratoprosthesis Study Group's initial report. Retrospective chart review. We analyzed 30 eyes of 28 patients who previously underwent Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis surgery at our institution between 2004 and 2008. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative parameters were collected and analyzed. Visual acuity and keratoprosthesis stability. Preoperative diagnoses were failed graft (26 eyes, 87%), chemical injury (3 eyes, 10%), and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (1 eye, 3%). Twenty eyes (66%) had preoperative glaucoma. Preoperative best-corrected visual acuity ranged from 20/150 to light perception and was or=20/200 in 77% of eyes. Among eyes at least 1 year after the operation (16 eyes), vision was >or=20/200 in 75% of eyes and >or=20/40 in 25% of eyes. At an average follow-up of 19 months, retention of the initial keratoprosthesis was 83.3%. The Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis is a viable option after multiple keratoplasty failures or in conditions with a poor prognosis for primary keratoplasty. Patients with autoimmune disease are at higher risk for complications. The University of California Davis experience seems equivalent to the initial report of the Boston Keratoprosthesis Study Group. With longer follow-up, additional surgical procedures may be required but good anatomic and functional outcomes can be maintained.

  4. Earth Sciences at Boston University: Reorientation and Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R. W.; Simpson, C.

    2003-12-01

    Beginning in 1994 with the renaming of its Department of Geology as the Department of Earth Sciences, Boston University has invested much effort into developing a modern, energetic department that excels in its dual research and teaching mission. These changes required strong leadership at the departmental and senior administrative level, but they have resulted in a moderately sized program (9.5 full time faculty) that is competing with "Top Ten" institutions for graduate students and faculty, and which is also placing its undergraduates in the leading graduate programs. Most of the revitalization was achieved over a 5-year period in which across the board changes occurred in our undergraduate curriculum and during which we recruited junior and mid-level faculty on the basis of their scholarly abilities and for their belief in the culture of our new mission and program. The undergraduate curriculum, which had been oriented towards traditional geologic offerings, was greatly increased in rigor (requiring a full year each of calculus, physics, and chemistry) and redesigned to expand flexibility in the broad field of earth sciences. During the evolution of the curriculum, it was extremely important not to confuse "tradition" with "rigor". Undergraduates became more critically involved with our research mission through senior theses, a formal Undergraduate Research Opportunities program, and by work-study participation in the laboratories. By making the program more challenging, over the period of 3 years we doubled the number of majors and minors and increased the average GPA by 0.5 units. Now, after 8 years, we have nearly tripled our overall number of students, with further improvements in quality and intellectual diversity. The opportunity to replace departing senior faculty was achieved through effectively arguing to the central administration that modern earth sciences are an essential component of any leading institution of higher education. By persuading the

  5. A novel nutrition medicine education model: the Boston University experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenders, Carine; Gorman, Kathy; Milch, Hannah; Decker, Ashley; Harvey, Nanette; Stanfield, Lorraine; Lim-Miller, Aimee; Salge-Blake, Joan; Judd, Laura; Levine, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Most deaths in the United States are preventable and related to nutrition. Although physicians are expected to counsel their patients about nutrition-related health conditions, a recent survey reported minimal improvements in nutrition medicine education in US medical schools in the past decade. Starting in 2006, we have developed an educational plan using a novel student-centered model of nutrition medicine education at Boston University School of Medicine that focuses on medical student-mentored extracurricular activities to develop, evaluate, and sustain nutrition medicine education. The medical school uses a team-based approach focusing on case-based learning in the classroom, practice-based learning in the clinical setting, extracurricular activities, and a virtual curriculum to improve medical students' knowledge, attitudes, and practice skills across their 4-y period of training. We have been using objectives from the NIH National Academy Awards guide and tools from the Association of American Medical Colleges to detect new areas of nutrition medicine taught at the medical school. Although we were only able to identify 20.5 h of teaching in the preclerkship years, we observed that most preclerkship nutrition medicine objectives were covered during the course of the 4-y teaching period, and extracurricular activities provided new opportunities for student leadership and partnership with other health professionals. These observations are very encouraging as new assessment tools are being developed. Future plans include further evaluation and dissemination of lessons learned using this model to improve public health wellness with support from academia, government, industry, and foundations.

  6. Boston University: Sustainability Revolving Loan Fund. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Boston University's (BU) Sustainability Revolving Loan Fund was created in 2008 through an allocation of $1 million from the university's administrative budget. The fund is administered by the Vice President of Operations. Potential projects are identified by the university's Director of Energy Administration and Operations along with the…

  7. Expanding access to gerontological education via distance learning: the Management of Aging Services Masters Program at UMass Boston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadash, Pamela; Miller, Edward Alan; Porell, Frank W; Birchander, Ellen; Glickman, Lillian; Burr, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the online Management of Aging Services Masters Program at the University of Massachusetts Boston and reports on a recent Program review. The Program has experienced rapid growth, evolving from seven matriculating students in 2003 to 108 in 2012. It has graduated 125 students and boasts a 78% completion rate. The authors describe the Program and report on faculty and student perceptions of performance. The Program demonstrates sound pedagogical practice for online education, incorporating techniques to foster community and encourage students and faculty interaction. Distance learning holds considerable promise for expanding access to gerontological education to reach future aging services professionals.

  8. EASE-Grid 2.0 Land Cover Classifications Derived from Boston University MODIS/Terra Land Cover Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These data provide land cover classifications derived from the Boston University MOD12Q1 V004 MODIS/Terra 1 km Land Cover Product (Friedl et al. 2002). The data are...

  9. How Important Are Classroom Peer Effects? Evidence from Boston's METCO Program. Working Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrist, Joshua, D.; Lang, Kevin

    This paper studies the impact of the Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunities (METCO), a desegregation program that sends mostly black students out of the Boston public school district to attend schools in more affluent suburban districts. It examines METCO's impact on the test scores of third, fifth, and seventh graders in a large…

  10. Lessons in Leadership From 3 Nurse Practitioners at the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Melinda

    Nurse practitioners play an integral role in the care of patients in underserved areas. At the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program, many nurses have been promoted into leadership positions. Three nurse practitioners were asked to discuss their career paths, talk about leadership in the context of their career trajectory, and do so while considering how their training and clinical work prepared them to take on leadership roles.

  11. Oral Testimony from the Hispanic Community of Greater Boston; Programa Para el Desarrollo de un Curriculo Universitario en Estudios Etnicos Puertorriquenos y Cubanos (Program for the Development of a University Curriculum in Puerto Rican and Cuban Ethnic Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Robert J., Ed.

    The oral testimony presented in this document was designed to supplement materials, strategies, and recommendations contained in "Guidelines for the Development of a Program in Puerto Rican and Cuban Ethnic Heritage Studies at the Post-Secondary Level" (Curry College, 1976). Part 1, "The Hispanic Media," consists of interviews…

  12. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: contributions from the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, David O; Robbins, Clifford A; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive brain trauma (RBT). Initially described in boxers, CTE has now been found in other contact sport athletes with a history of RBT. In recent years, there has been tremendous media attention regarding CTE, primarily because of the deaths of high profile American football players who were found to have CTE upon neuropathological examination. However, the study of CTE remains in its infancy. This review focuses on research from the Centre for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy (CSTE) at Boston University. This study reviews the formation of the CSTE, major CSTE publications and current ongoing research projects at the CSTE. The neuropathology of CTE has been well-described. Current research focuses on: methods of diagnosing the disease during life (including the development of biomarkers), examination of CTE risk factors (including genetic susceptibility and head impact exposure variables); description of the clinical presentation of CTE; development of research diagnostic criteria for Traumatic Encephalopathy Syndrome; and assessment of mechanism and pathogenesis. Current research at the BU CSTE is aimed at increasing understanding of the long-term consequences of repetitive head impacts and attempting to begin to answer several of the unanswered questions regarding CTE.

  13. FOX: A Fault-Oblivious Extreme-Scale Execution Environment Boston University Final Report Project Number: DE-SC0005365

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appavoo, Jonathan [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2013-03-17

    Exascale computing systems will provide a thousand-fold increase in parallelism and a proportional increase in failure rate relative to today's machines. Systems software for exascale machines must provide the infrastructure to support existing applications while simultaneously enabling efficient execution of new programming models that naturally express dynamic, adaptive, irregular computation; coupled simulations; and massive data analysis in a highly unreliable hardware environment with billions of threads of execution. The FOX project explored systems software and runtime support for a new approach to the data and work distribution for fault oblivious application execution. Our major OS work at Boston University focused on developing a new light-weight operating systems model that provides an appropriate context for both multi-core and multi-node application development. This work is discussed in section 1. Early on in the FOX project BU developed infrastructure for prototyping dynamic HPC environments in which the sets of nodes that an application is run on can be dynamically grown or shrunk. This work was an extension of the Kittyhawk project and is discussed in section 2. Section 3 documents the publications and software repositories that we have produced. To put our work in context of the complete FOX project contribution we include in section 4 an extended version of a paper that documents the complete work of the FOX team.

  14. EASE-Grid 2.0 Land-Ocean-Coastline-Ice Masks Derived from Boston University MODIS/Terra Land Cover Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These Land-Ocean-Coastline-Ice (LOCI) files provide land classification masks derived from the Boston University MOD12Q1 V004 MODIS/Terra 1 km Land Cover Product...

  15. A Novel Nutrition Medicine Education Model: the Boston University Experience123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenders, Carine; Gorman, Kathy; Milch, Hannah; Decker, Ashley; Harvey, Nanette; Stanfield, Lorraine; Lim-Miller, Aimee; Salge-Blake, Joan; Judd, Laura; Levine, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Most deaths in the United States are preventable and related to nutrition. Although physicians are expected to counsel their patients about nutrition-related health conditions, a recent survey reported minimal improvements in nutrition medicine education in US medical schools in the past decade. Starting in 2006, we have developed an educational plan using a novel student-centered model of nutrition medicine education at Boston University School of Medicine that focuses on medical student–mentored extracurricular activities to develop, evaluate, and sustain nutrition medicine education. The medical school uses a team-based approach focusing on case-based learning in the classroom, practice-based learning in the clinical setting, extracurricular activities, and a virtual curriculum to improve medical students’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice skills across their 4-y period of training. We have been using objectives from the NIH National Academy Awards guide and tools from the Association of American Medical Colleges to detect new areas of nutrition medicine taught at the medical school. Although we were only able to identify 20.5 h of teaching in the preclerkship years, we observed that most preclerkship nutrition medicine objectives were covered during the course of the 4-y teaching period, and extracurricular activities provided new opportunities for student leadership and partnership with other health professionals. These observations are very encouraging as new assessment tools are being developed. Future plans include further evaluation and dissemination of lessons learned using this model to improve public health wellness with support from academia, government, industry, and foundations. PMID:23319117

  16. Impacts of the Boston prekindergarten program on the school readiness of young children with special needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Christina

    2016-11-01

    Theory and empirical work suggest inclusion preschool improves the school readiness of young children with special needs, but only 2 studies of the model have used rigorous designs that could identify causality. The present study examined the impacts of the Boston Public prekindergarten program-which combined proven language, literacy, and mathematics curricula with coaching-on the language, literacy, mathematics, executive function, and emotional skills of young children with special needs (N = 242). Children with special needs benefitted from the program in all examined domains. Effects were on par with or surpassed those of their typically developing peers. Results are discussed in the context of their relevance for policy, practice, and theory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Boston children's hospital community asthma initiative: Five-year cost analyses of a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Urmi; Sommer, Susan J; Giller-Leinwohl, Judith; Norris, Kerri; Tsopelas, Lindsay; Nethersole, Shari; Woods, Elizabeth R

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the costs and benefits of the Boston Children's Hospital Community Asthma Initiative (CAI) through reduction of Emergency Department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for the full pilot-phase program participants. A cost-benefit analyses was conducted using hospital administrative data to determine an adjusted Return on Investment (ROI): on all 268 patients enrolled in the CAI program during the 33-month pilot program phase of CAI intervention between October 1, 2005 and June 30, 2008 using a comparison group of 818 patients from a similar cohort in neighboring ZIP codes without CAI intervention. Cost data through June 30, 2013 were used to examine cost changes and calculate an adjusted ROI over a 5-year post-intervention period. CAI patients had a cost reduction greater than the comparison group of $1,216 in Year 1 (P = 0.001), $1,320 in Year 2 (P management programs can decrease the incidence of costly hospitalizations and ED visits from asthma. An ROI of greater than one, as found in this cost analysis, supports the business case for the provision of community-based asthma services as part of patient-centered medical homes and Accountable Care Organizations.

  18. Utility of a dedicated pediatric cardiac anticoagulation program: the Boston Children's Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jenna M; Hellinger, Amy; Dionne, Roger; Brown, Loren; Galvin, Rosemary; Griggs, Suzanne; Mittler, Karen; Harney, Kathy; Manzi, Shannon; VanderPluym, Christina; Baker, Annette; O'Brien, Patricia; O'Connell, Cheryl; Almond, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of stroke in children. Warfarin therapy can be difficult to manage safely in this population because of its narrow therapeutic index, multiple drug and dietary interactions, small patient size, high-risk cardiac indications, and lack of data to support anticoagulation recommendations. We sought to describe our institution's effort to develop a dedicated cardiac anticoagulation service to address the special needs of this population and to review the literature. In 2009, in response to Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals for Anticoagulation, Boston Children's Hospital created a dedicated pediatric Cardiac Anticoagulation Monitoring Program (CAMP). The primary purpose was to provide centralized management of outpatient anticoagulation to cardiac patients, to serve as a disease-specific resource to families and providers, and to devise strategies to evolve clinical care with rapidly emerging trends in anticoagulation care. Over 5 years the CAMP Service, staffed by a primary pediatric cardiology attending, a full-time nurse practitioner, and administrative assistant with dedicated support from pharmacy and nutrition, has enrolled over 240 patients ranging in age from 5 months to 55 years. The most common indications include a prosthetic valve (34 %), Fontan prophylaxis (20 %), atrial arrhythmias (11 %), cardiomyopathy (10 %), Kawasaki disease (7 %), and a ventricular assist device (2 %). A patient-centered multi-disciplinary cardiac anticoagulation clinic was created in 2012. Overall program international normalized ratio (INR) time in therapeutic range (TTR) is favorable at 67 % (81 % with a 0.2 margin) and has improved steadily over 5 years. Pediatric-specific guidelines for VKOR1 and CYP2C9 pharmacogenomics testing, procedural bridging with enoxaparin, novel anticoagulant use, and quality metrics have been developed. Program satisfaction is rated highly among families and providers. A dedicated pediatric

  19. Boston Violence Intervention Advocacy Program: a qualitative study of client experiences and perceived effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Thea L; Bibi, Salma; Langlois, Breanne K; Dugan, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Patricia M

    2014-07-01

    This study intended to explore clients' experiences and provide a contextual basis for understanding their perceptions of the effectiveness of the Boston Medical Center (BMC) Violence Intervention Advocacy Program (VIAP). This was an exploratory, qualitative study conducted in an urban, Level I trauma center from July 1, 2011 to February 24, 2012. Emergency department (ED) patients older than 18 years with penetrating trauma, and who were enrolled in the VIAP, were eligible. Two trained, qualitative interviewers who were not part of the VIAP obtained consent and conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, deidentified, coded, and analyzed. Thematic content analysis consistent with grounded theory was used to identify themes related to client experiences with VIAP, life circumstances, challenges to physical and emotional healing postinjury, services provided by VIAP, and perceptions of VIAP's effectiveness. Twenty subjects were interviewed. Most were male, African American, and younger than 30 years of age, reflecting the overall program's clientele. Most subjects perceived their advocates as caring adults in their lives and cited aspects of the peer support model that helped establish trusting relationships. Major challenges to healing were fear and safety, trust, isolation as a coping mechanism, bitterness, and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Every subject noted important services provided by VIAP advocates. Most subjects explicitly stated that they had positive experiences with the VIAP and perceived advocates' roles as a positive influence, providing client-centered advocacy, education, and support. This study provides insight into the lives of 20 BMC VIAP clients and contextualizes their unique challenges. Participants described positive, life-changing behaviors on their journey to healing through connections to caring, supportive adults. Information gained from this study will help the VIAP to

  20. Faculty Experience Teaching in an Interdisciplinary First-Year Seminar Program: The Case of the University of Guelph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jacqueline; Wolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    First-year seminar programs have been a feature on the landscape of post-secondary teaching and learning in the United States, since they first appeared in the 1880s at Boston University (Mamrick, 2005). More recently, they have begun to appear at Canadian universities. For example, first-year seminars were introduced a decade ago at the…

  1. Longer-term vision outcomes and complications with the Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis at the University of California, Davis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Mark A; Li, Jennifer Y; Mannis, Mark J

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate retention of visual acuity and development of complications after Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis implantation over a longer follow-up period than previously reported. Cohort study. Forty eyes of 35 patients who underwent Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis surgery at the University of California, Davis, between 2004 and 2010. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative parameters were collected and analyzed. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and postoperative complications. Preoperative visual acuity ranged from 20/150 to light perception and was ≤20/400 in 38 eyes (95%). Preoperative diagnoses included failed corneal transplants (19 eyes, 47.5%), chemical injury (10 eyes, 25%), and aniridia (5 eyes, 12.5%). Mean follow-up duration was 33.6 months (range, 5-72 months). Of 36 eyes followed for ≥1 year, 32 eyes (89%) achieved postoperative BCVA ≥20/200. Of eyes that achieved BCVA ≥20/200, at last follow-up, 19 of 32 eyes (59%) followed for ≥1 year retained BCVA ≥20/200; 16 of 27 eyes (59%) followed for ≥2 years retained BCVA ≥20/200; 7 of 14 eyes (50%) followed for ≥3 years retained BCVA ≥20/200; and 2 of 7 eyes (29%) followed for ≥4 years retained BCVA ≥20/200. End-stage glaucoma most commonly caused vision loss (7 of 13 eyes, 54%) when BCVA ≥20/200 was not retained (follow-up ≥1 year). Glaucoma was newly diagnosed in 11 eyes (27.5%); progression was noted in 9 eyes (22.5%). Glaucoma drainage device erosion occurred in 9 eyes (22.5%). Retroprosthetic membrane formed in 22 eyes (55%), 5 eyes (12.5%) developed endophthalmitis, 6 eyes (15%) developed corneal melt, 7 eyes (17.5%) underwent keratoprosthesis replacement, and 23 eyes (57.5%) required major surgery to treat postoperative complications. The initial keratoprosthesis was retained in 32 eyes (80%). Keratoprosthesis implantation remains a viable option for salvaging vision. A significant number of patients lost vision over the postoperative course. Glaucoma and

  2. Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on 'How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary U.S. Science Teaching?'

    CERN Document Server

    Garik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary U.S. Science Teaching? The presentations of the conference speakers and the reports of the working groups are reviewed. Multiple themes emerged for K-16 education from the perspective of the history and philosophy of science. Key ones were that: students need to understand that central to science is argumentation, criticism, and analysis; students should be educated to appreciate science as part of our culture; students should be educated to be science literate; what is meant by the nature of science as discussed in much of the science education literature must be broadened to accommodate a science literacy that includes preparation for soci...

  3. Identifying sources of children's consumption of junk food in Boston after-school programs, April-May 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L; Austin, S Bryn; Cradock, Angie L; Giles, Catherine M; Lee, Rebekka M; Davison, Kirsten K; Gortmaker, Steven L

    2014-11-20

    Little is known about how the nutrition environment in after-school settings may affect children's dietary intake. We measured the nutritional quality of after-school snacks provided by programs participating in the National School Lunch Program or the Child and Adult Care Food Program and compared them with snacks brought from home or purchased elsewhere (nonprogram snacks). We quantified the effect of nonprogram snacks on the dietary intake of children who also received program-provided snacks during after-school time. Our study objective was to determine how different sources of snacks affect children's snack consumption in after-school settings. We recorded snacks served to and brought in by 298 children in 18 after-school programs in Boston, Massachusetts, on 5 program days in April and May 2011. We measured children's snack consumption on 2 program days using a validated observation protocol. We then calculated within-child change-in-change models to estimate the effect of nonprogram snacks on children's dietary intake after school. Nonprogram snacks contained more sugary beverages and candy than program-provided snacks. Having a nonprogram snack was associated with significantly higher consumption of total calories (+114.7 kcal, P foods with added sugars (+0.5 servings; P foods and nearly twice as many calories than on days when they consumed only program-provided snacks. Policy strategies limiting nonprogram snacks or setting nutritional standards for them in after-school settings should be explored further as a way to promote child health.

  4. University Program Management Information System: NASA's University Program Active Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Office of Education/N.

  5. University Program Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  6. Identifying Sources of Children’s Consumption of Junk Food in Boston After-School Programs, April–May 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S. Bryn; Cradock, Angie L.; Giles, Catherine M.; Lee, Rebekka M.; Davison, Kirsten K.; Gortmaker, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about how the nutrition environment in after-school settings may affect children’s dietary intake. We measured the nutritional quality of after-school snacks provided by programs participating in the National School Lunch Program or the Child and Adult Care Food Program and compared them with snacks brought from home or purchased elsewhere (nonprogram snacks). We quantified the effect of nonprogram snacks on the dietary intake of children who also received program-provided snacks during after-school time. Our study objective was to determine how different sources of snacks affect children’s snack consumption in after-school settings. Methods We recorded snacks served to and brought in by 298 children in 18 after-school programs in Boston, Massachusetts, on 5 program days in April and May 2011. We measured children’s snack consumption on 2 program days using a validated observation protocol. We then calculated within-child change-in-change models to estimate the effect of nonprogram snacks on children’s dietary intake after school. Results Nonprogram snacks contained more sugary beverages and candy than program-provided snacks. Having a nonprogram snack was associated with significantly higher consumption of total calories (+114.7 kcal, P desserts (+0.3 servings, P < .001), and foods with added sugars (+0.5 servings; P < .001) during the snack period. Conclusion On days when children brought their own after-school snack, they consumed more salty and sugary foods and nearly twice as many calories than on days when they consumed only program-provided snacks. Policy strategies limiting nonprogram snacks or setting nutritional standards for them in after-school settings should be explored further as a way to promote child health. PMID:25412028

  7. training program in Jimma University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment on problems of the new pre-service teachers training program in Jimma University. Tadesse Walelign* Meaza Fantahun**. ABSTRACT. Education is the key to development; however, it is impossible to think the quality of education With out having academically qualified and professionally responsible teachers.

  8. The search for extraterrestrial life: Recent developments; Proceedings of the Symposium, Boston University, MA, June 18-21, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannis, M. D. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The conference presents papers on the history of the search for extraterrestrial life, the scientific rationale and methods used in the search for other planetary systems, the detection of distant planets with the Space Telescope, planetary searches using optical astrometric interferometers, and infrared spectral identification of complex organic molecules in interstellar grains. Also considered are universal protein ancestors from hydrogen cyanide and water, astronomical sources of polarized light and their role in determining molecular chirality on earth, the universal diagrams and life in the universe, the precambrian evolution of terrestrial life and a thermodynamic approach to the occurrance and appearance of galactic life forms. Papers are also presented on the Ohio Seti program, lunar reflections of terrestrial radio leakage, the multichannel spectrum analyzer, software implementation of detection algorithms for the MCSA, the Serendip II design, galactic colonization and competition in a young galactic disk, implications of ancient and future migrations, extraterrestrial intelligence, the ineviability and the possible structures of supercivilizations, planetary, interplanetary and interstellar organic matter, and universal aspects of biological evolution.

  9. Summer in the City: Cultivating Political Agents in Boston Out-of-School-Time Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Felicia M

    2015-01-01

    Diverse urban youth need a wide range of program opportunities and formats to develop their own sense of political agency and leadership. One size does not fit all. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  10. Installation Restoration Program. Phase I. Records Search. New Boston Air Force Station, New Hampshire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    and rickets . The locations of both these tar;et areas are shown on Fi. 4.1-1. As i 4-19 .. . . . . - . . -. . - -. - - - - - Im z LL 0 z w (ui .2 . 1...sediment transport in selected areas of the Gulf of Mexico . University of Florida, Research Associate--Texaco U.S.A.- funded research grant involving the

  11. CONSTRAINT PROGRAMMING AND UNIVERSITY TIMETABLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.W. Groves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The technology of Constraint Programming is rapidly becoming a popular alternative for solving large-scale industry problems. This paper provides an introduction to Constraint Programming and to Constraint Logic Programming (CLP, an enabler of constraint programming. The use of Constraint Logic Programming is demonstrated by describing a system developed for scheduling university timetables. Timetabling problems have a high degree of algorithmic complexity (they are usually NP-Complete, and share features with scheduling problems encountered in industry. The system allows the declaration of both hard requirements, which must always be satisfied, and soft constraints which need not be satisfied, though this would be an advantage.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Hierdie artikel beskryf ’n familie van probleem-oplossingstegnieke bekend as “Constraint Programming”, wat al hoe meer gebruik word om groot-skaalse industriële probleme op te los. Die nut van hierdie tegnieke word gedemonstreer deur die beskrywing van ’n skeduleringsisteem om die roosters vir ’n universiteit te genereer. Roosterskeduleringsprobleme is in praktiese gevalle NP-volledig en deel baie eienskappe met industriële skeduleringsprobleme. Die sisteem wat hier beskryf word maak gebruik van beide harde beperkings (wat altyd bevredig moet word en sagte beperkings (bevrediging hiervan is wel voordelig maar dit is opsioneel.

  12. Measurement problem in PROGRAM UNIVERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, H.P.; Gefwert, C.

    1984-12-01

    We present a discrete theory that meets the measurement problem in a new way. We generate a growing universe of bit strings, labeled by 2/sup 127/ + 136 strings organized by some representation of the closed, four level, combinatorial hierarchy, of bit-length N/sub 139/ greater than or equal to 139. The rest of the strings for each label, which grow in both length and number, are called addresses. The generating algorithm, called PROGRAM UNIVERSE, starts from a random choice between the two symbols ''0'' and ''1'' and grows (a) by discriminating between two randomly chosen strings and adjoining a novel result to the universe, or when the string so generated is not novel, by (b) adjoining a randomly chosen bit at the growing end of each string. We obtain, by appropriate definitions and interpretations, stable ''particles'' which satisfy the usual relativistic kinematics and quantized angular momentum without being localizable in a continuum space-time. The labeling scheme is congruent with the ''standard model'' of quarks and leptons with three generations, but for the problem at hand, the implementation of this aspect of the theory is unimportant. What matters most is that (a) these complicated ''particles'' have the periodicities familiar from relativistic ''deBroglie waves'' and resolve in a discrete way the ''wave-particle dualism'' and (b) can be ''touched'' by our discrete equivalent of ''soft photons'' in such a way as to follow, macroscopically, the usual Rutherford scattering trajectories with the associated bound states. Thus our theory could provide a discrete description of ''measurement'' in a way that allows no conceptual barrier between the ''micro'' and the ''macro'' worlds, if we are willing to base our physics on

  13. Boston Washer Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlinson, J.J.

    2002-08-06

    To help understand the relative performance gains of conventional and high-efficiency washers and to increase awareness of energy/water savings, the U.S. Department of Energy under its Emerging Technologies Program and in cooperation with Maytag Appliances conducted a field-evaluation of horizontal axis washers in a Boston, Massachusetts condo complex. Baseline washer and dryer performance and customer habits were established using 50 participants and their existing, instrumented washers and dryers for a 2 1/2-month period. After the baseline was established, the machines were replaced with high efficiency tumble action washers and moisture sensing dryers, and tested for the next 2 1/2 months. By information gathered, energy and water savings delivered by the h-axis washers as well as impacts on participants' washing habits and perceptions of cleaning performance were determined. Overall, participants saved 41% of the water and 50% of the energy that they would have used without a changeover to the new h-axis washer. The changeover also produced significant dryer energy savings due primarily to the high-speed final spin of the new washer. The Boston Washer Study report details the experiment including instrumentation, data collection and analysis procedures and discusses the impacts on energy, water and detergent consumption as well as customer satisfaction with the technology.

  14. Telecom Programs in the University: What's Available?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrschloe, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of the growth in the telecommunications industry reviews 13 academic programs currently offering education in telecommunications. The need for new programs is discussed and various methods of accomplishing that goal are suggested, including cooperation between businesses and universities. (LRW)

  15. Assessing the Need for a University Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzberger, Linda K.

    1980-01-01

    At Loyola University of Chicago a needs assessment procedure was used to decide whether to establish a master's degree program in public administration that would serve many part-time students. It required the analysis of potential participants, the university, faculty, competing programs, and potential employers. (CT)

  16. Clinical Exposure to Transgender Medicine Improves Students' Preparedness Above Levels Seen with Didactic Teaching Alone: A Key Addition to the Boston University Model for Teaching Transgender Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jason A; Safer, Joshua D

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Transgender individuals are medically underserved in the United States and face many documented disparities in care due to providers' lack of education, training, and comfort. We have previously demonstrated that specific transgender medicine content in a medical school curriculum increases students' willingness to treat transgender patients. However, we have also identified that those same students are less comfortable with transgender care relative to care for lesbian, gay, and bisexual patients. We aimed to demonstrate that clinical exposure to care for transgender patients would help close this gap. Methods: At Boston University School of Medicine, we piloted a transgender medicine elective where students rotate on services that provide clinical care for transgender individuals. Pre- and postsurveys were administered to students who participated in the elective. Results: After completing the elective, students who reported "high" comfort increased from 45% (9/20) to 80% (16/20) (p=0.04), and students who reported "high" knowledge regarding management of transgender patients increased from 0% (0/20) to 85% (17/20) (pClinical exposure to transgender medicine during clinical years can contribute to closing that gap and improving access to care for transgender individuals.

  17. Integration of basic science and clinical medicine: the innovative approach of the cadaver biopsy project at the Boston University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Anna; Vaisman, Lev; Johnston-Cox, Hillary; Gallan, Alexander; Shaffer, Kitt; Vaughan, Deborah; O'Hara, Carl; Joseph, Lija

    2014-01-01

    Curricular integration has emerged as a consistent theme in medical education reform. Vertical integration of topics such as pathology offers the potential to bring basic science content into the clinical arena, but faculty/student acceptance and curricular design pose challenges for such integration. The authors describe the Cadaver Biopsy Project (CBP) at Boston University School of Medicine as a sustainable model of vertical integration. Faculty and select senior medical students obtained biopsies of cadavers during the first-year gross anatomy course (fall 2009) and used these to develop clinical cases for courses in histology (spring 2010), pathology (fall 2010-spring 2011), and radiology (fall 2011 or spring 2012), thereby linking students' first experiences in basic sciences with other basic science courses and later clinical courses. Project goals included engaging medical stu dents in applying basic science princi ples in all aspects of patient care as they acquire skills. The educational intervention used a patient (cadaver)-centered approach and small-group, collaborative, case-based learning. Through this project, the authors involved clinical and basic science faculty-plus senior medical students-in a collaborative project to design and implement an integrated curriculum through which students revisited, at several different points, the microscopic structure and pathophysiology of common diseases. Developing appropriate, measurable out comes for medical education initiatives, including the CBP, is challenging. Accumu lation of qualitative feedback from surveys will guide continuous improvement of the CBP. Documenting longer-term impact of the curricular innovation on test scores and other competency-based outcomes is an ultimate goal.

  18. Environmental Impact: University Programs in Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Robert J.; Schoenfeld, Clay

    1982-01-01

    A questionnaire was designed and used to measure various aspects of environmentally-related materials/activities in curriculum, internship and placement programs, public service, faculty interests, and institutional liaisons in journalism and mass media communications programs at United States colleges and universities. Background information,…

  19. The Complexity of Leveraging University Program Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Gary M.; Arnold, Noelle Witherspoon; Reed, Cynthia J.; Shoho, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    This article identifies four elements of complexity that influence how university educational leadership programs can leverage program change: faculty reward systems, faculty governance, institutional resources, and state-level influence on leadership preparation. Following the discussion of the elements of complexity, the article provides a…

  20. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  1. Trends in University Programs in Nanoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik; Nielsen, Ivan Ring

    2013-01-01

    and non-electronic devices (such as bio-devices or chemical devices), and possibilities for developing fundamentally new nanoscale electronic devices. Engineering curricula taking this development into account have been around for a number of years. The development over the past five years is examined...... in three representative programs and an overview of present programs in the Nordic countries is given. Also, the services provided for universities by the EuroTraining program1 are described....

  2. Cunard in Boston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford T. Hudson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The steamship Britannia arrived in Boston Harbor on a July evening in 1840. This concluded the inaugural voyage for the flagship of the newly established Cunard Line, which has since become one of the oldest and most distinguished travel companies in the world. To commemorate the occasion, Cunard will send its current flagship Queen Mary 2 along the same route – from Liverpool to Halifax to Boston – during July of 2015.

  3. Cunard in Boston

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford T. Hudson

    2015-01-01

    The steamship Britannia arrived in Boston Harbor on a July evening in 1840. This concluded the inaugural voyage for the flagship of the newly established Cunard Line, which has since become one of the oldest and most distinguished travel companies in the world. To commemorate the occasion, Cunard will send its current flagship Queen Mary 2 along the same route – from Liverpool to Halifax to Boston – during July of 2015.

  4. University/NETL Student Partnership Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Holder; Jonathan Mathews; Thomas Wilson; Steven Chuang; Cristina Amon; Turgay Ertekin; Karl Johnson; Goodarz Ahmadi; David Sholl

    2006-10-31

    The University/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Student Partnership Program stimulated basic and applied research in Energy and Environmental Science areas through NETL's Office of Science and Technology (OST). This Partnership Program supported the education of graduate students in Energy and Environmental Sciences, while fostering increased scientific interaction between NETL and the participating universities, by providing graduate student support for research at a NETL facility under the joint supervision of NETL and university faculty. Projects were intended to enhance a previously established scientific or engineering relationship or to create a new relationship. Major areas of research under the Partnership Program included CO{sub 2} sequestration, granular solids flow, multi-phase flow in porous solids, gas hydrates, nanotubes, acid-mine flow identification and remediation, water-gas shift reaction, circulating fluidized beds, slurry bubble column, fuel desulphurization, carbon fibers, and fuel cells.

  5. NASA University Program Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA:s objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well-being. NASA field codes and certain Headquarters program offices provide funds for those activities in universities which contribute to the mission needs of that particular NASA element. Although NASA has no predetermined amount of money to devote to university activities, the effort funded each year is substantial. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA:s Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.* This report was prepared by the Education Division/FE, Office of Human Resources and Education, using a management information system which was modernized during FY 1993.

  6. Toward Reform of Egyptian Higher Education: Final Report on Cairo University/Boston University Collaboration in Counterpart Training for the Third Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shann, Mary H.; Cronin, Joseph M.

    In 1981, the Egyptian government sought assistance from the World Bank's International Developmental Agency for the Cairo Univesity-IDA Third Education Project. The World Bank loan was designated for training faculty leaders capable of modernizing instruction at Cairo University and for equipping the faculties of agriculture and medicine with…

  7. The NRAO Observing for University Classes Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, John M.; Van Moorsel, Gustaaf A.

    2017-01-01

    The NRAO "Observing for University Classes" program is a tremendous resource for instructors of courses in observational astronomy. As a service to the astronomical and educational communities, the NRAO offers small amounts of observing time on the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Very Long Baseline Array to such instructors. The data can be used by students and faculty to demonstrate radio astronomy theory with modern data products. Further, the results may lead to publication; this is a unique opportunity for faculty members to integrate research into the classroom. Previous experience with NRAO facilities is required for instructors; individuals without radio astronomy experience can take advantage of other NRAO educational opportunities (e.g., the Synthesis Imaging Workshop) prior to using the program. No previous experience with radio astronomy data is required for students; this is the primary target audience of the program. To demonstrate concept, this poster describes three different VLA observing programs that have been completed using the "Observing for University Classes" resource at Macalester College; undergraduate students have published the results of all three of these programs. Other recent "Observing for University Classes" programs are also described.

  8. International Community-University Research Alliance Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The International Community-University Research Alliance program (ICURA) is a joint initiative of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) and IDRC. ICURA seeks to foster innovative research, training and the creation of new knowledge in areas of importance to the social, cultural and economic ...

  9. Update on DOE's Nuclear Energy University Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambregts, Marsha J.

    2009-08-01

    The Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP) Office assists the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) by administering its University Program. To promote accountable relationships between universities and the Technical Integration Offices (TIOs)/Technology Development Offices (TDOs), a process was designed and administered which includes two competitive Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and two Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) in the following areas: (1) Research and Development (R&D) Grants, (2) Infrastructure improvement, and (3) Scholarships and Fellowships. NEUP will also host periodic reviews of university mission-specific R&D that document progress, reinforce accountability, and assess return on investment; sponsor workshops that inform universities of the Department's research needs to facilitate continued alignment of university R&D with NE missions; and conduct communications activities that foster stakeholder trust, serve as a catalyst for accomplishing NEUP objectives, and provide national visibility of NEUP activities and accomplishments. Year to date efforts to achieve these goals will be discussed.

  10. The Mentor Program of Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Hansen, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    the traditional classical engineering disciplines as electrical, electronic, mechanic and civil engineering the rate of female students is about 15% and it is going down. In addition the drop out rate of female students has been double the rate of male students. Consequently a pilot mentoring program...... for these students was established during the summer of 1998. This paper is based on the experiences we have obtained during the first pilot mentor program at Aalborg University. In the paper we will at first present the mentor program which is inspired from the Aalborg University tradition of group work......, and followed by mainly e-mail correspondence and secondly some of the issues which have been raised during our conversations and evaluations with the participating students and mentors will be given. Finally we will present a number of questions which we will invite you all to discuss in groups and in plenum....

  11. University-based sports pharmacy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, K O; Huff, P S; Isetts, B J; Goldwire, M A

    1995-02-01

    Ways for pharmacists to become involved in sports pharmacy are discussed, and a university-based sports pharmacy program is described. Sports pharmacy encompasses treating athletic injuries, distributing drugs and sports-related supplies, counseling patients, and monitoring therapeutic outcomes, along with educating athletes, trainers, and others about drug use and abuse. Pharmacists can contribute their expertise by presenting information at schools, health clubs, and other exercise-related organizations. They can serve on drug-testing crews at collegiate athletic events. Pharmacists can also provide supplies and services to schools or athletic facilities; ideally, this could be a contractual arrangement to provide comprehensive pharmaceutical care. A sports pharmacy program was implemented at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1980. Pharmacists provide drug therapy monitoring and patient education to all patients at the school; patients' level of athletic activity is taken into consideration. Pharmacists also ensure proper use, storage, and distribution of drugs kept in clinics, training rooms, and sports medicine travel bags, as well as identifying and providing drugs and supplies that might be needed at an off-campus event. They provide inservice education to athletic trainers and physicians. The program has improved patient outcomes and helped to ensure adequate drug supplies and minimum waste. There are numerous opportunities for practitioners to become involved in sports pharmacy. A university-based sports pharmacy program improved the care of student athletes and helped contain drug costs.

  12. Identifying Sources of Children’s Consumption of Junk Food in Boston After-School Programs, April–May 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Kenney, Erica L; Austin, S. Bryn; Cradock, Angie L; Giles, Catherine M.; Lee, Rebekka M.; Kirsten K. Davison; Gortmaker, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about how the nutrition environment in after-school settings may affect children’s dietary intake. We measured the nutritional quality of after-school snacks provided by programs participating in the National School Lunch Program or the Child and Adult Care Food Program and compared them with snacks brought from home or purchased elsewhere (nonprogram snacks). We quantified the effect of nonprogram snacks on the dietary intake of children who also received progra...

  13. University Course Timetabling using Constraint Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Shahmoradi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available University course timetabling problem is a challenging and time-consuming task on the overall structure of timetable in every academic environment. The problem deals with many factors such as the number of lessons, classes, teachers, students and working time, and these are influenced by some hard and soft constraints. The aim of solving this problem is to assign courses and classes to teachers and students, so that the restrictions are held. In this paper, a constraint programming method is proposed to satisfy maximum constraints and expectation, in order to address university timetabling problem. For minimizing the penalty of soft constraints, a cost function is introduced and AHP method is used for calculating its coefficients. The proposed model is tested on department of management, University of Isfahan dataset using OPL on the IBM ILOG CPLEX Optimization Studio platform. A statistical analysis has been conducted and shows the performance of the proposed approach in satisfying all hard constraints and also the satisfying degree of the soft constraints is on maximum desirable level. The running time of the model is less than 20 minutes that is significantly better than the non-automated ones.

  14. [The Boston keratoprosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqiang; Huang, Yifei; James, Chodosh; Dohlman, Claes H

    2014-04-01

    The Boston Keratoprosthesis (KPro) is one of several types of artificial cornea manufactured worldwide that are being implanted in increasing numbers in patients with severe corneal diseases and graft failures. To summerize the advances in design of the Boston type I keratoprosthesis and in the treatment strategies to conquer the post operative complications have expanded the indications and application of this technology. Many modifications to the design of the Boston type I keratoprosthesis and treatment of the patient in the post operative period have occurred. Also, the technology has been more widely accepted as a primary surgical option for patients with a poor preoperative prognosis for traditional penetrating keratoplasty. The outcomes of visual acuity, retention, and post-operative infection rates have all significantly improved since the technology has been modified and offers patients an alternative for visual rehabilitation. This is implanted into a carrier corneal graft or into the patient's own cornea. The allograft cornea can be the carrier, which may solve the shortage of donor cornea in China.

  15. NASA University Program Management Information System: FY 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The University Program Report, Fiscal Year 1995, provides current information and related statistics for grants/contracts/cooperative agreements active during the report period. NASA field centers and certain Headquarters program offices provide funds for those R&D activities in universities which contribute to the mission needs of that particular NASA element. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program.

  16. NASA University program management information system, FY 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The University Program Report, Fiscal Year 1993, provides current information and related statistics for 7682 grants/contracts/cooperative agreements active during the report period. NASA field centers and certain Headquarters program offices provide funds for those R&D activities in universities which contribute to the mission needs of that particular NASA element. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program.

  17. NASA university program management information system, FY 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The University Program Report provides current information and related statistics for approximately 4200 grants/contracts/cooperative agreements active during the reporting period. NASA Field Centers and certain Headquarters Program Offices provide funds for those research and development activities in universities which contribute to the mission needs of that particular NASA element. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-University relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program.

  18. NASA university program management information system, FY 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The University Program report, Fiscal Year 1994, provides current information and related statistics for 7841 grants/contracts/cooperative agreements active during the reporting period. NASA field centers and certain Headquarters program offices provide funds for those activities in universities which contribute to the mission needs of that particular NASA element. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program.

  19. NASA university program management information system, FY 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The University Program Report provides current information and related statistics for approximately 4300 grants/contracts/cooperative agreements active during the report period. NASA Field centers and certain Headquarters Program Offices provide funds for those R&D activities in universities which contribute to the mission needs of that particular NASA element. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program.

  20. Social Support, Quality of Life, and University Programs for Seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orte, Carmen; March, Marti X.; Vives, Margarita

    2007-01-01

    In addition to educating and extending knowledge, university programs for seniors, at least the university program for seniors at the University of the Balearic Islands during the period analyzed, also fulfil physical and psychological health-related functions specifically related to our analysis of social support. This article reaches several…

  1. Evaluation of Mexico's Universal Vaccination Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    This article summarizes findings from an evaluation of Mexico's Universal Vaccination Program during 1990-97, the progress achieved, the lessons learned, and objectives under decentralization. The evaluation assessed the cold chain and logistics systems, and the feasibility of vaccine production within Gerencia General de Biologicos y Reactivos. In 1996, 97% of children aged 1-4 years completed the full immunization schedule. Over the past 7 years, the incidence of preventable diseases declined. There were no poliomyelitis cases in the prior 7 years, no diphtheria cases in the prior 6 years, and a gradual decline in morbidity due to measles in the prior 5 years. Several government sectors are giving high priority to vaccination activities. Sufficient resources have been allocated for immunization. The government is planning on adding new vaccines that would benefit the adult population and/or prevent congenital defects. There is close coordination within institutions of the National Health System and with other public health organizations, such as PAHO and UNICEF. It is recommended that the central government perform high quality epidemiological surveillance and improve rapid analysis capacity, especially at the local and regional levels. Improvement is needed in the reporting capacity at the local level, to feed recent data to the central level in a timely fashion, and to use analysis to improve operations. Epidemiological training is needed at the operations level, as is private sector involvement at all levels. Underreporting of morbidity occurs. Regionalization must be monitored to ensure maximizing of resources.

  2. Defense Acquisition University Program Managers Tool Kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    ORGANIZATION ...................................................................... 55–56 Program Office Organization Structures (Examples...C PM LEGEND: Engr—Engineering Log—Logistics Bus—Business DAU PROGRAM MANAGERS TOOL KIT 56 PROGRAM OFFICE ORGANIZATION STRUCTURES (Continued...the LOG CoP • Life Cycle Logistics Guidebook - Will be posted on the LOG CoP DAU PROGRAM MANAGERS TOOL KIT 55 “Pure” Product Structure PROGRAM OFFICE

  3. Outcomes of the Boston Keratoprosthesis in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihadeh, Wisam A.; Mohidat, Hasan M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the indications, outcomes, and complications of the Boston type I keratoprosthesis (KPro) from the first Jordanian study on the subject. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted on 20 eyes of 19 consecutive patients who had Boston type I KPro implantation at King Abdullah University Hospital. Surgeries were performed by the same surgeon (WS) from November 2007 to March 2010. Data collected included age, sex, primary indication, number of previous grafts, preoperative comorbidities, visual acuity before and after surgery, and complications. Results: The mean age of the participants was 51.7±19.9 years (range: 10–80 years). The mean follow-up was 18.1±9.5 months (range: 3–6 months). The most common primary corneal pathology was vascularized corneal opacity (40%). Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) improved significantly in 85% of eyes; 65% had a BCVA of 20/200 or better and 25% had a BCVA of 20/50 or better. The most frequent complication was retroprosthesis membrane (RPM) formation, which occurred in 45% of eyes. Two eyes (10%) had implant extrusion and required further surgery. Conclusion: Boston Kpro offers a reasonably safe and effective solution for patients with corneal blindness in whom the prognosis for natural corneal grafting is poor. PMID:22346122

  4. Examination of a University-Affiliated Safe Ride Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieck, D. Joseph; Slagle, David M.

    2010-01-01

    A university-affiliated safe ride program was evaluated to determine whether these programs can reduce drunk-driving related costs. Data was collected from 187 safe ride passengers during three nights of operation. Among the passengers, 93% were enrolled at a local University, 31% were younger than 21, and 40% reported a prior alcohol-related…

  5. Development of an Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Bioengineering Program at Lehigh University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Lori; Russo, M. Jean; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel; El-Aasser, Mohamed; Jagota, Anand; Tatic-Lucic, Svetlana; Ochs, John

    2011-01-01

    The undergraduate Bioengineering Program at Lehigh University was established as part of the university's Bioscience and Biotechnology Initiative with support from the National Science Foundation through a grant from its Division of Engineering Education and Centers (EEC). The objective here is to describe the program development and…

  6. Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research, 1988-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Frederick R. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The research conducted during 1988 to 1989 under the NASA/FAA-sponsored Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research is summarized. The Joint University Program is a coordinated set of three grants sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center and the Federal Aviation Administration, one each with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Ohio University, and Princeton University. Completed works, status reports, and annotated bibliographies are presented for research topics, which include computer science, guidance and control theory and practice, aircraft performance, flight dynamics, and applied experimental psychology. An overview of the year's activities for each university is also presented.

  7. Contextualizing Earth Science Professional Development Courses for Geoscience Teachers in Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. F.; Pelletier, P.; Dorsen, J.; Douglas, E. M.; Pringle, M. S.; Karp, J.

    2009-12-01

    Inquiry-based, hands-on, graduate content courses have been developed specifically for Boston Public School middle school teachers of Earth Science. Earth Science I: Weather and Water and Earth Science II: The Solid Earth--Earth History and Planetary Systems have been taught a total of seven times to over 120 teachers. Several key attributes to these successful courses have been identified, including co-instruction by a university professor and a high school and a middle school teacher that are familiar with the Boston curriculum, use of hands-on activities that are closed related to those used in the Boston curriculum, pre- and post-course local field trips, and identification of key learning objectives for each day. This model of professional development was developed over several years in all disciplines (Earth Science, Physics, Biology, Chemistry) by the Boston Science Partnership (BSP), an NSF-funded Math Science Partnership program. One of the core strategies of the BSP is these Contextualized Content Courses (CCC), graduate level, lab-based courses taught at either UMass Boston or Northeastern University during summer intensive or semester formats. Two of the eleven courses developed under the grant are Earth Science I & II. This presentation shares the model of the CCC, the impact on teacher participants, the value of these courses for the professor, and lessons learned for successful professional development. Findings about the courses’ impact and effectiveness come from our external evaluation by the Program Evaluation Research Group (PERG). The combination of content and modeling good instructional practices have many positive outcomes for teachers, including increased self-efficacy in science understanding and teaching, positive impacts on student achievement, and teacher shifts from more traditional, more lecture-based instructional models to more inquiry approaches. STEM faculty members become involved in science education and learn and practice new

  8. Theater Program Development in Colleges and Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Martinez, Ed.D.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to find answers to how best colleges and universities can adapt the teaching of theatre in its curriculum. It was then necessary to track the different ways drama has evolved throughout time and how its adoption in formal education has affected its students, both present and past. To this end the researcher examined theater from its earliest inception to its adoption by schools of higher education, more specifically, public colleges and universities.

  9. Effectiveness of University Bridging Programs in Preparing Students for University Education: A Case from East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssempebwa, Jude; Eduan, Wilson; Mulumba, Fawz Nassir

    2012-01-01

    Study abroad brings several advantages to students, universities, countries, and academe. However, across countries with incongruent preuniversity education structures, some students are denied admission to foreign universities, due to gaps in their admissibility. Some institutions offer university bridging programs, to enhance the admissibility…

  10. Insights into Attrition from University-Based Enabling Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookallil, Cheryl; Harreveld, Bobby

    2017-01-01

    High attrition rates from university-based enabling programs continue to be the subject of much research and administrative effort. Understanding the factors behind decisions to withdraw from such programs is difficult since those who do not successfully complete an enabling program may not readily agree to participate in research into their…

  11. Determinants of Participating in Australian University Student Exchange Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Outbound mobility programs such as exchange programs are one of the many strategies implemented at universities to develop graduates' intercultural skills and international knowledge. Few Australian students participate in exchange programs. This article presents a literature review and proposes a model of the contextual and individual factors…

  12. Mathematical Programming Approaches for Optimal University Timetabling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Niels-Christian Fink

    Every semester universities are faced with the challenge of creating timetables for the courses. Creating these timetables is an important task to ensure that students can attend the courses they need for their education. Creating timetables that are feasible can be challenging, and when different...... preferences are taken into account, the problems become even more challenging. Therefore, automating the processes of generating these timetables is a great help for the planners and the universities. Scheduling and timetabling has been studied before in the literature, and two international conferences...... are dedicated to this research field. This thesis considers a University Timetabling problem, more specifically the Curriculumbased Course Timetabling (CTT) problem. The objective of the CTT problem is to assign a set of lectures to time slots and rooms. The literature has focused mainly on heuristic...

  13. Practice Dating Program for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Gail E.

    1978-01-01

    Upon attending university, students often leave behind the parents and close friends who have provided emotional support and now face large classes and grade competition. Dating is one way students can help to overcome social and emotional isolation. The author discusses some of the work with college student nondating. (Author/JEL)

  14. Feminist Teaching in University Physical Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Linda L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examines feminist teaching in university physical education. Three articles describe the personal experiences of physical educators who try to teach in ways that promote equality. The articles focus on social diversity and justice and feminist pedagogy in the sport sciences and physical education. (SM)

  15. The Maryland nuclear science baccalaureate degree program: The university perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear utilities' efforts in response to industry-wide pressures to provide operations staff with degree opportunities have encountered formidable barriers. This paper describes, from the university's perspective, the development and operation of the University of Maryland University College (UMUC) special baccalaureate program in nuclear science. This program has successfully overcome these problems to provide degree education on-site, on-line, and on time. Program delivery began in 1984 with one utility and a single site. It is currently delivered at eight sites under contract to six utilities with a total active student count of over 500. The first graduates are expected in 1989. The program is an accredited university program and enjoys licensure approval from the six states within which it operates. In addition to meeting US Nuclear Regulatory Commission proposed guidelines for degreed operators, the program increasingly appears as part of utility management development programs for all plant personnel and a factor in employee retention. The owner utilities, the University of Maryland, and the growing user's group are committed to the academic integrity, technical capability, and responsiveness of the program. The full support of this partnership speaks well for the long-term service of the Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Science program to the nuclear power industry.

  16. Evaluation of FHWA Technology Transfer Program at HERPICC, Purdue University

    OpenAIRE

    Whitford, Robert K

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation of the FHWA technology transfer program at HERPICC, Purdue University based on a questionnaire sent to operation and management personnel of the highway road system. Future courses of action are also suggested.

  17. UNIVERSITY TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROGRAM SUMMARY AND DIRECTORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence P. Golan; Richard A. Wenglarz

    2004-07-01

    The South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies (SCIES), administratively housed at Clemson University, has participated in the advancement of combustion turbine technology for over a decade. The University Turbine Systems Research Program, previously referred to as the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program, has been administered by SCIES for the U.S. DOE during the 1992-2003 timeframe. The structure of the program is based on a concept presented to the DOE by Clemson University. Under the supervision of the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the UTSR consortium brings together the engineering departments at leading U.S. universities and U.S. combustion turbine developers to provide a solid base of knowledge for the future generations of land-based gas turbines. In the UTSR program, an Industrial Review Board (IRB) (Appendix C) of gas turbine companies and related organizations defines needed gas turbine research. SCIES prepares yearly requests for university proposals to address the research needs identified by the IRB organizations. IRB technical representatives evaluate the university proposals and review progress reports from the awarded university projects. To accelerate technology transfer technical workshops are held to provide opportunities for university, industry and government officials to share comments and improve quality and relevancy of the research. To provide educational growth at the Universities, in addition to sponsored research, the UTSR provides faculty and student fellowships. The basis for all activities--research, technology transfer, and education--is the DOE Turbine Program Plan and identification, through UTSR consortium group processes, technology needed to meet Program Goals that can be appropriately researched at Performing Member Universities.

  18. Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Frederick R. (Compiler)

    1988-01-01

    The research conducted under the NASA/FAA sponsored Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research is summarized. The Joint University Program is a coordinated set of three grants sponsored by NASA and the FAA, one each with the Mass. Inst. of Tech., Ohio Univ., and Princeton Univ. Completed works, status reports, and bibliographies are presented for research topics, which include computer science, guidance and control theory and practice, aircraft performance, flight dynamics, and applied experimental psychology. An overview of activities is presented.

  19. Global Partners : University of Saskatchewan Small Grant Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Global Partners is a University of Saskatchewan program that supports the development of mutually beneficial relationships between the University and institutions of higher education in developing countries. Initial support for ... AUCC-IDRC Partnership Grant 2011-2013: New Models of Partnership for Internationalization.

  20. Gravitation, Book 3. The University of Illinois Astronomy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, J. Myron; Wyatt, Stanley P., Jr.

    Presented is book three in a series of six books in the University of Illinois Astronomy Program which introduces astronomy to upper elementary and junior high school students. The causes of celestial motion are investigated and the laws that apply to all moving things in the universe are examined in detail. Topics discussed include: the basic…

  1. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherfoord, John P. [University of Arizona; Johns, Kenneth A. [University of Arizona; Shupe, Michael A. [University of Arizona; Cheu, Elliott C. [University of Arizona; Varnes, Erich W. [University of Arizona; Dienes, Keith [University of Arizona; Su, Shufang [University of Arizona; Toussaint, William Doug [University of Arizona; Sarcevic, Ina [University of Arizona

    2013-07-29

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  2. Physical Activity for Campus Employees: A University Worksite Wellness Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Carling E; Clark, B Ruth; Burlis, Tamara L; Castillo, Jacqueline C; Racette, Susan B

    2015-04-01

    Workplaces provide ideal environments for wellness programming. The purpose of this study was to explore exercise self-efficacy among university employees and the effects of a worksite wellness program on physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Participants included 121 university employees (85% female). The worksite wellness program included cardiovascular health assessments, personal health reports, 8 weeks of pedometer-based walking and tracking activities, and weekly wellness sessions. Daily step count was assessed at baseline, Week 4, and Week 8. Exercise self-efficacy and CVD risk factors were evaluated at baseline and follow-up. Daily step count increased from 6566 ± 258 (LSM ± SE) at baseline to 8605 ± 356 at Week 4 and 9107 ± 388 at Week 8 (P worksite wellness program was effective for improving physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and CVD risk factors among university employees. Exercise barriers and outcome expectations were identified and have implications for future worksite wellness programming.

  3. University Research Initiative Research Program Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    stomatogastric ganglion are coupled to those in other ganglia. Another physiological system, studied by Dr. Cohen, is the lamprey spinal cord, an ideal...detailed structure of the lamprey oscillators. 103 10O4 I. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Services’ Areas of Emphasis: Geosciences (ARO) Ocean...modeling and remote sensing to understand the mesoscale variability of the eastern Pacific Ocean. The principal objective of the program is to develop a

  4. Shared-Ride Taxi Service in Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the Boston Shared-Ride Taxi Demonstration. The City of Boston's Traffic and Parking Department, the project grantee, designed a shared-ride service for Boston's Allston-Brighton neighborhood; Boston Cab Associati...

  5. Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Frederick R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The research conducted during 1987 under the NASA/FAA sponsored Joint University Program for Air Transportation Research is summarized. The Joint University Program is a coordinated set of 3 grants sponsored by NASA-Langley and the FAA, one each with the MIT, Ohio Univ., and Princeton Univ. Completed works, status reports, and annotated bibliographies are presented for research topics, which include computer science, guidance and control theory and practice, aircraft performance, flight dynamics, and applied experimental psychology. An overview of the year's activities for each university is also presented.

  6. Program Online Learning Sebagai Faktor Penunjang Keunggulan Kompetitif Binus University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Muliadi Kerta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Online learning has become a way to improve efficiency in the learning process without reducing the quality of learning itself. Colleges that run it hope that the program becomes an attraction for prospective students, especially those with limitation to follow the regular program. The goal of this research was to find out whether Binus Online Learning Program has any influence to the competitive advantage of Binus University. Data were compiled by distributing questionnaires to 100 respondents consist of the students and lecturers on Binus Online Learning Program. This thesis is based on a quantitative methodology to gather and analyze the data to find out if they were any correlation between Online Learning Program and the competitive advantage of Binus University. It can be concluded that there are some positive and significant influences of Online Learning Program to the competitive advantage of Binus University. Therefore, promoting and developing Online Learning Program will increase the competitive advantage of Binus University, and cover the target market which regular programs do not. 

  7. Development of an Actuarial Science Program at Salisbury University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of an actuarial science track for the mathematics major at Salisbury University (SU). A timeline from the initial investigation into such a program through the proposal and approval processes is shared for those who might be interested in developing a new actuarial program. It is wise to start small and take…

  8. Friendship Experiences of Participants in a University Based Transition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Maya; Cranston-Gingras, Ann; Jang, Seung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the nature of friendships of 14 students with intellectual and developmental disabilities participating in a university-based transition program in the United States. The transition program is a bridge between high school and adulthood, designed to foster students' self-esteem and self-confidence by providing them with training…

  9. University completes self study for NCAA certification program

    OpenAIRE

    Hincker, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Virginia Tech has completed a year-long, comprehensive self study as part of the NCAA Division I Athletics Certification program, which is required of all NCAA member schools to ensure integrity in the operation of athletics programs at the university.

  10. Exploring Sense of Community in a University Common Book Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kristen; Brown, Natalya; Piper, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Many post-secondary common book programs purport to increase a sense of community on campus. This study explored whether a common book program at a Canadian university was able to create a sense of community among students. Results indicate that in-class discussions about the book, liking the Facebook page, attending the author lecture, and…

  11. Promising Practices: The PRIDE Program at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mary; Wheeler, Mary Alice

    1997-01-01

    Describes the PRIDE Program, a partnership between the Harrisburg School District (Pennsylvania) and Bloomsburg University to provide urban, poverty-level sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students at risk of dropping out with an opportunity to spend a week on campus each summer. Program evaluation shows improved student attitudes and…

  12. New accreditation program: university health network's experience with Qmentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepfers, Anita; Hruska, Christa; Stone, Justin; Moser, Jane

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, University Health Network was surveyed using Accreditation Canada's new Qmentum program. The following article describes UHN's experience rolling out the program to over 12,000 staff, physicians and volunteers. The article also outlines key challenges and lessons learned by the multi-site organization, with a focus on staff engagement, on-site survey preparation and sustainability moving forward. Staff feedback on the Qmentum program was extremely positive, and forecast results from Accreditation Canada were excellent.

  13. FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAMS OFFERED IN TURKISH UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengül CETINTAS

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available n this study, the departments of philology and teaching, which take place in higher education programs in Turkey and give education in foreign language, have been examined. 23 different languages are offered to philology students who wants to attend to faculty of literature. Students can prefer classical languages besides modern languages. However, English, German, French, Arabic and Japanese are offered to the students of teaching department. To teach another foreign language, pedagogical formation is also required.This study focuses on the departments of German Language Teaching and German Language and Literature. From this point, the place and the importance of other philology and foreign language teaching departments in Turkish higher education have been examined.

  14. Genesis of an Employee Wellness Program at a Large University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Lisa K; Crixell, Sylvia H; Bezner, Janet R; Forester, Katherine; Swearingen, Carolyn

    2017-11-01

    University employee wellness programs have potential to support positive changes in employee health, thereby improving productivity and mitigating the rise in health care costs. The purpose of this article is to describe a theory-driven approach to systematically planning, developing, and implementing a comprehensive university employee wellness program. Long-term program goals were to improve employee health, well-being, and productivity by focusing on decreasing sedentary behavior, increasing physical activity, improving dietary habits, and reducing stress. An ecological approach was taken to identify levels of influence specific to a university setting: intrapersonal, interpersonal, department/college/division, and university. This framework guided the development of program components and strategies, which were grounded in several health behavior change theories. Input from supervisors and employees was incorporated throughout program development. A 15-week trial run, involving 514 employees, was evaluated to fine-tune services. Participation and feedback were positive, demonstrating that the program was valued. Support from upper administration is evidenced by continued funding. Critical factors to the successful launch of the program included a supportive administration, leverage of existing facilities and equipment, leadership provided by faculty, and service delivery by students.

  15. A University Faculty and Staff Health Fitness Program, University of Montevallo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishler, J. Ward

    The effects of a health fitness program for college faculty and staff were studied at the University of Montevallo. The program covered physical fitness, assessment, prescription, training, and health education concerning nutrition and stress management. Six male and three female faculty members and staff participated in the 28-week health fitness…

  16. Boston Architectural College Urban Sustainability Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, Arthur C.

    2013-07-31

    The Boston Architectural College's Urban Sustainability initiative is a demonstration project as defined by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. BAC's proposed project with the U.S. Department of Energy - NETL, is a large part of that overall initiative. The BAC's Urban Sustainability Initiative is a multi-part project with several important goals and objectives that will have a significant impact on the surrounding neighborhood including: energy conservation, reduction of storm water runoff, generation of power through alternative energy sources, elimination/reduction of BAC carbon footprint, and to create a vehicle for ongoing public outreach and education. Education and outreach opportunities will serve to add to the already comprehensive Sustainability Design courses offered at BAC relative to energy savings, performance and conservation in building design. At the finish of these essential capital projects there will be technical materials created for the education of the design, sustainability, engineering, community development and historic preservation communities, to inform a new generation of environmentally-minded designers and practitioners, the city of Boston and the general public. The purpose of the initiative, through our green renovations program, is to develop our green alley projects and energy saving renovations to the BAC physical plant, to serve as a working model for energy efficient design in enclosed 19th century and 20th century urban sites and as an educational laboratory for teaching ecological and sustainable technologies to students and the public while creating jobs. The scope of our project as it relates to the BAC and the U.S. Department of Energy- NETL combined efforts includes: Task I of the project is Phase II (Green Alley). Task I encompasses various renovation activities that will demonstrate the effectiveness of permeable paving and ground water recharge systems. It will aid in the reduction of storm water

  17. 77 FR 50916 - Safety Zone; Boston Harbor's Rock Removal Project, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ...) Zone for the drilling, blasting, and dredging operation on the navigable waters of Boston Inner Harbor... navigable waters during the drilling, blasting and dredging operations in support of the U.S. Army Corps of... vicinity of the drilling, dredging and blasting operations being conducted. For the safety concerns noted...

  18. The REU Program in Solar Physics at Montana State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Petrus C.; Canfield, R. C.; McKenzie, D. M.

    2007-05-01

    The Solar Physics group at Montana State University has organized an annual summer REU program in Solar Physics, Astronomy, and Space Physics since 1999, with NSF funding since 2003. The number of students applying and being admitted to the program has increased every year, and we have been very successful in attracting female participants. A great majority of our REU alumni have chosen career paths in the sciences, and, according to their testimonies, our REU program has played a significant role in their decisions. From the start our REU program has had an important international component through a close collaboration with the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. In our poster we will describe the goals, organization, scientific contents, international aspects, and results, and present statistics on applications, participants, gender balance, and diversity.

  19. Environmental Assessment for Boston Harbor Maintenance Dredging, Boston, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    into the harbor, but the sources have never been documented. It is not unusual for the swimming beaches to be closed following a storm of moderate...sand lance involve either swimming in schools or burrowing In suitable substrate. Impacts to their natural schooling movements are iikely to be short...Edison (December 1976 - May 1977) Appendix B Boston Inner Harbor Species List Scientific Name Comm~on Nam~e CNIDARIA (Hycdroids, Anemones, Jellyfish

  20. Three-level university program in meteorology at the Eotvos Lorand University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholy, J.; Meszaros, R.; Pongracz, R.

    2009-09-01

    University programs in Hungary are changed due to the Bologna process from the academic year 2006/2007. In the field of meteorology, instead of the previous graduation process (i.e., getting a university diploma in meteorology after the 10-semester of course work including a thesis work in the last two semesters) two different degrees have been introduced. (1) BSc degree can be earned after 6 semesters of course work (the graduation requirements contain sum of credit values also) and the defence of a BSc thesis, but it is not associated to meteorology directly. Graduating with a BSc degree in Hungary is no longer possible solely in meteorology. Meteorology-orientated students are enrolled either in geosciences, environmental sciences or physics. Students in any of these BSc programs may choose meteorology as a major subject. (2) MSc degree can be earned after 4 semesters of course work with completing the specified number of credit values and defending the MSc thesis. The Eotvos Lorand University has one meteorology MSc program with two possible specializations: synoptic meteorologist/weather forecaster and climate researcher. The third level university program was already introduced in 1993/1994 in Hungary, in which PhD degree can be earned in geosciences (with specialization in meteorology) or environmental sciences (with specialization in geosciences). In this poster, detailed curricula of each university level will be presented.

  1. Students' Needs Analysis in an EFL Program for University Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Paula Andrea; Valencia, Luz María; Montoya, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This study sets out to investigate professors' needs from an English as a foreign language program in a public university regarding demands, interests, and lacks based on the methodology of needs analysis. Data collected through a survey, focus groups, and individual interviews showed that professors need to meet the institutional language policy…

  2. An Innovative Program For Domestic Violence Victims: A University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study also found that women students not eligible for welfare receipt needed program services, and those students using welfare had barriers interconnected with domestic violence issues. Several recommendations are made that will enable caseworkers / counselors working in universities and in the larger community ...

  3. Assessing the Internship Program in Universities: Case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To address this mismatch, companies and universities have initiated the internship program or attachments where final year students pursuing various professions are given an opportunity to work in an effort to gain some experience and beef up other academic credentials that they may not have acquired in their course of ...

  4. Formative Evaluation of a University Birth Control Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettman, Julie K. Doidge; Sarvela, Paul D.

    1992-01-01

    A university birth control education program was created to improve student knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Students attended a birth control class before visiting the health clinic for prescriptions. Pre- and posttest questionnaires and clinician assessments indicated knowledge of birth control improved significantly, and students became…

  5. Preparing an Intercultural Program for University Studies Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbihl, Helene

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on how to teach intercultural communicative competence to learners of English as a foreign language enrolled in a university exchange program in Europe, and help them become "intercultural speakers." The intercultural speaker can be defined as an intermediary between his or her own culture and the other's culture.…

  6. Student Deep Learning in Bachelor English Programs within Pakistani Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Khazima

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contrast undergraduate students' descriptions about transformational teaching practices, and student deep learning in bachelor English programs in selected universities within Pakistan. This study utilized a survey to gather responses from five hundred and twenty three students. A paired sample t test was utilized…

  7. The Universal Decimal Classification; A Programmed Instruction Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellisch, Hans

    The text provides an application of programmed learning to the teaching and study of classification and indexing. It is aimed at students in library schools to familiarize them with the principles and techniques of the Universal Decimal Classification (UDC). The book can also be used as a manual for self-instruction in UDC for those unable to…

  8. Best Practices for a University Laptop Lending Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Buzzard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The University of Arizona Libraries currently circulates over three hundred pieces of equipment including laptops, netbooks, projectors and iPads. This article describes the best practices and workflows we have developed since 2003 to create a laptop/equipment lending program that is efficient and mindful of financial resources and that our student body loves and continues to support.

  9. An Examination of a University Success Coaching Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Marlin

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation builds upon previous coaching research by providing a deep examination of a university success coaching program that uses an International Coach Federation (ICF) coaching framework. The dissertation seeks to identify how ICF coaching compares to the findings of previous research, what training is required to be an ICF coach at a…

  10. Status of Career Programs on College and University Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, William Dale

    1982-01-01

    Studied the status of a sample of college and university career development programs (N=98) in relation to six elements: career counseling, career workshops and seminars, career classes, interest inventories, other services, and evaluation. Found most institutions utilized career counseling, interest inventories, and career workshops. (RC)

  11. Boston bombings: response to disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Maureen; Ferguson, Joanne

    2014-02-01

    Disasters disrupt everyone's lives, and they can disrupt the flow and function of an OR as well as affect personnel on a professional and personal level even though perioperative departments and their personnel are used to caring for trauma patients and coping with surprises. The Boston Marathon bombing was a new experience for personnel at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. This article discusses the incidents surrounding the bombing and how personnel at this hospital met the challenge of caring for patients and the changes we made after the experience to be better prepared in the event a response to a similar incident is needed. Copyright © 2014 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Power engineering program at the University of Missouri-Rolla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanek, E.K.; Anderson, M.D.; Morris, J.F.S.; Richards, E.F. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Univ. of Missouri-Rolla, MO (US))

    1992-01-01

    The Power Engineering Program at the University of Missouri-Rolla owes its success to a strong institutional commitment and faculty strengths in the power area. A well-rounded curricula at both the undergraduate and graduate levels exist, along with excellent laboratory equipment, computing facilities and software. A solid research program is funded by a diverse group of sponsors which provides strong industrial support of and involvement in the Power Engineering Program. Perhaps the most important factor is excellent undergraduate and graduate students in sufficient numbers to achieve a stimulating and competitive environment for learning.

  13. Boston keratoprosthesis in epithelial downgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa-ngiampornpanit, Tarinee; Thiagalingam, Sureka; Dohlman, Claes H.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction To report a case of histologically proven epithelial downgrowth after multiple failed penetrating keratoplasties and glaucoma filtering surgeries that was successfully treated with Boston keratoprosthesis implantation. Materials and Methods A 61-year-old monocular patient had severe congenital ocular syphilis with secondary glaucoma. He had undergone many intraocular surgeries with a history of epithelial downgrowth, and he presented with a failed graft after 7 penetrating keratoplasties. Implantation of a corneal graft with an aphakic type of Boston keratoprosthesis was performed, combined with anterior vitrectomy. The main outcome measures were visual acuity, ocular inflammation and media clarity. Results Media clarity was restored and revealed severe retinal scarring and a pale optic nerve. Best corrected visual acuity of 20/400 was maintained without any further surgical intervention during 6 years follow up. No retroprosthesis membrane or epithelial growth behind the keratoprosthesis was observed. Discussion This is, to our knowledge, the first case of long-term successful treatment of epithelial downgrowth with a Boston keratoprosthesis. This approach might be considered a suitable treatment of epithelial downgrowth. PMID:29276452

  14. The Physics Entrepreneurship Program at Case Western Reserve University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cyrus

    2001-10-01

    The Physics Entrepreneurship Program is a new, two-year Master's Program designed to empower physicists as entrepreneurs. Launched by the Dept. of Physics at Case Western Reserve University in close cooperation with the Weatherhead School of Management, the program is now in its second year. This innovative new program has already attracted important attention from the business community, including seed funding of a student launched venture, international press coverage, including an article in Business Week, and government interest, including an invitation to brief the Advisory Board of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation. This talk will discuss the structure and content of the program, the lessons we are learning, and early indicators of success including a student-launched new business venture that has already secured more than $ 250,000 in seed funding.

  15. The university of queensland medical leadership program: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Lynnette; O'Dowd, Corina; Hewett, David G; Schafer, Jennifer; Fracgp, Dranzcog; Wilkinson, David

    2012-01-01

    Changes in modern healthcare's provision, complexity, and workforce demands provide a compelling rationale for an increasing emphasis on leadership development at all levels of training within the medical profession. Undergraduate medical education has traditionally focused on the development of clinical acumen with little emphasis on the development of leadership skills or on the operational and systemic issues surrounding healthcare delivery. Incorporating leadership education and competencies presents a number of challenges to medical schools, including defining the subject area, determining the specific skills and knowledge bases that should constitute the basis of the program, and optimizing training to be integrated into the existing clinical curriculum. We present a case study of the Medical Leadership Program at The University of Queensland School of Medicine that runs concurrent to the undergraduate medical degree. We outline the inception of the program, its aims, participant selection, and program components and reflect on the program to date.

  16. "Can't We Just Have Some Sazón?" Student, Family, and Staff Perspectives on a New School Food Program at a Boston High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Avik; Daftary, Genevieve; Campbell, Meg; Gatison, Lenward; Day, Liam; Ramsey, Kibret; Goldman, Roberta; Gillman, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In September 2013, a Massachusetts high school launched a nutrition program in line with 2013 United States Department of Agriculture requirements. We sought to understand attitudes of stakeholders toward the new program. Methods: We employed community-based participatory research methods in a qualitative evaluation of the food program…

  17. "We make the path by walking it": building an academic community partnership with Boston Chinatown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Carolyn Leung; Allukian, Nathan; Wang, Xingyue; Ghosh, Sujata; Huang, Chien-Chi; Wang, Jacy; Brugge, Doug; Wong, John B; Mark, Shirley; Dong, Sherry; Koch-Weser, Susan; Parsons, Susan K; Leslie, Laurel K; Freund, Karen M

    2014-01-01

    The potential for academic community partnerships are challenged in places where there is a history of conflict and mistrust. Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT) represents an academic community partnership between researchers and clinicians from Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University and community partners from Boston Chinatown. Based in principles of community-based participatory research and partnership research, this partnership is seeking to build a trusting relationship between Tufts and Boston Chinatown. This case study aims to provides a narrative story of the development and formation of ADAPT as well as discuss challenges to its future viability. Using case study research tools, this study draws upon a variety of data sources including interviews, program evaluation data and documents. Several contextual factors laid the foundation for ADAPT. Weaving these factors together helped to create synergy and led to ADAPT's formation. In its first year, ADAPT has conducted formative research, piloted an educational program for community partners and held stakeholder forums to build a broad base of support. ADAPT recognizes that long term sustainability requires bringing multiple stakeholders to the table even before a funding opportunity is released and attempting to build a diversified funding base.

  18. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary First initiated in 1995 to provide veterinary students with spay/neuter experience, the shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine has grown to be comprehensive in nature incorporating spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Junior veterinary students spend five days in shelters; senior veterinary students spend 2-weeks visiting shelters in mobile veterinary units. The program has three primary components: spay/neuter, shelter medical days and Animals in Focus. Student gain significant hands-on experience and evaluations of the program by students are overwhelmingly positive. Abstract The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association’s Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education. PMID:26479234

  19. The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W.; Buttenschoen, A.; Farr, Q.; Hodgson, C.; Mann, I. R.; Mazzino, L.; Rae, J.; University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon Team

    2011-12-01

    The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon (UA-HAB) program is a one and half year program sponsored by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) that offers hands on experience for undergraduate and graduate students in the design, build, test and flight of an experimental payload on a high altitude balloon platform. Utilising low cost weather balloon platforms, and through utilisation of the CSA David Florida Laboratory for thermal-vacuum tests , in advance of the final flight of the payload on a NASA high altitude balloon platform. Collectively the program provided unique opportunities for students to experience mission phases which parallel those of a space satellite mission. The program has facilitated several weather balloon missions, which additionally provide educational opportunities for university students and staff, as well as outreach opportunities among junior and senior high school students. Weather balloon missions provide a cheap and quick alternative to suborbital missions; they can be used to test components for more expensive missions, as well as to host student based projects from different disciplines such as Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (EAS), Physics, and Engineering. In addition to extensive skills development, the program aims to promote recruitment of graduate and undergraduate students into careers in space science and engineering. Results from the UA-HAB program and the flight of the UA-HAB shielded Gieger counter payload for cosmic ray and space radiation studies will be presented. Lessons learned from developing and maintaining a weather balloon program will also be discussed. This project is undertaken in partnership with the High Altitude Student Platform, organized by Louisiana State University and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSpace), and sponsored by NASA, with the financial support of the Canadian Space Agency.

  20. Pre-freshman enrichment program [University of New Haven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Connecticut Pre-Engineering Program, Inc. (CPEP), is a collaboration of school districts, businesses, colleges, universities, government and community organizations whose mission and program efforts are aimed at increasing the pool of African-American, Hispanic, Native-American Indian, Asian American, Women and other under-represented minority students who pursue mathematics, science, engineering and other technological based college study and careers. CPEP provides enrichment programs and activities throughout the year in New Haven. Since 1987, CPEP has sponsored summer enrichment programs designed to motivate and stimulate middle school and high school students to pursue careers in mathematics, science, engineering and other technology related fields. Through the Summer Enrichment Program, CPEP has been able to better prepare under-represented and urban students with skills that will facilitate their accessing colleges and professionals careers. The essential premise of the program design and academic content is that targeted students must be taught and nurtured as to develop their self-confidence and personal ambitions so that they can seriously plan for and commit to college-level studies. The program stresses multi-disciplinary hands-on science and mathematics experience, group learning and research, and career exploration and academic guidance. Students study under the direction of school teachers and role model undergraduate students. Weekly field trips to industrial sites, science centers and the shoreline are included in this program.

  1. Best Practices: The Neuroscience Program at Central Michigan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Gary L.

    2015-01-01

    The original design of our program at Central Michigan University (CMU) and its evolving curriculum were directly influenced by Faculty for Undergraduate (FUN) workshops at Davidson College, Oberlin College, Trinity College, and Macalester College. The course content, laboratory exercises, and pedagogy used were informed by excellent articles in the Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education (JUNE) and presentations at these FUN workshops and meetings over the years. Like the program at Baldwin-Wallace College, which was a previous winner of the Undergraduate Neuroscience Program of the Year Award, as selected by the Committee on Neuroscience Departments and Programs (CNDP) of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN, our program stresses the importance of inquiry-based, hands-on research experience for our undergraduates and utilizes a peer-mentoring system. A distinct advantage that is employed at CMU is the use of graduate student mentors, which allows us to expand our peer-mentorship to distinct research teams that are focused on a specific research project. Developing our program was not easy. The present manuscript reviews the long and arduous journey (including ways in which we navigated some difficult internal political issues) we made to build a strong program. Hopefully, this description may prove helpful for other evolving programs, in terms of avoiding certain pitfalls and overcoming obstacles, as well as selecting practices that have proven to be successful at our institution. PMID:26240523

  2. The Medical Informatics Program at the National University of Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, K C; Leong, T Y; Ong, K; Raghavan, R; Pung, H K

    1998-01-01

    The Medical Informatics Program at the National University of Singapore was established in September 1996 with a $4 million joint funding from the National Science and Technology Board and the Ministry of Education. The primary aims of the research program are to undertake upstream basic research in medical informatics and to build a critical mass of medical informatics expertise to meet long-term research goals and to effect technology transfer to the health sector of Singapore. Research projects fall into five groups: Clinical Decision Systems, Health Information Systems, Biomedical Datamining Systems, Medical Education Systems and Medical Networking, Applications Development and Integration Systems.

  3. 77 FR 19573 - Safety Zone; Wedding Fireworks Display, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... in the vicinity of Anthony's Pier 4, Boston, MA for a wedding fireworks display. This temporary... ``Document Type'' drop down menu select ``Proposed Rule'' and insert ``USCG-2012-0130'' in the ``Keyword... Boston Inner Harbor in the vicinity of Anthony's Pier 4, Boston, MA. The Captain of the Port (COTP...

  4. Intentional Excellence in the Baldwin Wallace University Neuroscience Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jacqueline K; Peppers, Kieth; Mickley, G Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Neuroscience recognized Baldwin Wallace University's (BWU) undergraduate Neuroscience program as their Program of the Year for 2012. This award acknowledged the "accomplishments of a neuroscience department or program for excellence in educating neuroscientists and providing innovative models to which other programs can aspire." The Neuroscience program grew out of students interested in studying the biological basis of behavior. BWU's neuroscience major is research-intensive, and all students are required to produce an empirically-based senior thesis. This requirement challenges program resources, and the demand for faculty attention is high. Thus, we developed an intentional 3-step peer mentoring system that encourages our students to collaborate with and learn from, not only faculty, but each other. Peer mentoring occurs in the curriculum, faculty research labs, and as students complete their senior theses. As the program has grown with over 80 current majors, we have developed a new Neuroscience Methods course to train students on the safety, ethics, and practice of research in the neuroscience laboratory space. Students in this course leave with the skills and knowledge to assist senior level students with their theses and to begin the process of developing their own projects in the laboratory. Further, our students indicate that their "peer mentorship was excellent," "helped them gain confidence," and "allowed them to be more successful in their research."

  5. A RESEARCH ON STUDENTS’ UNIVERSITY AND PROGRAM PREFERENCE CRITERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa AĞAOĞLU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ÖĞRENCİLERİN ÜNİVERSİTE VE PROGRAM TERCİH ÖLÇÜTLERİ ÜZERİNE BİR ARAŞTIRMAÖzet: Bu araştırma öğrencilerin üniversite ve program tercih ölçütlerini belirlemek ve öğrencilerin çalışma alanına, akademik birimine, eğitim türüne, diline, ve cinsiyetine göre tercih ölçütlerinin farklılık gösterip göstermediğini ortaya koymak amacıyla yapılmıştır. Çalışmada örnek olarak 2216 Marmara Üniversitesi öğrencisi kullanılmıştır. Sonuçlar öğrencilerin beş üniversite tercih ölçütü; “Sosyal ve Sportif Etkinlikler”, “Uluslararası Tanınmışlık ve Araştırma Olanakları”, “Üniversitenin İtibarı”, “Aile ve Arkadaşlar”, “Devlet Üniversitesi ve Düşük Eğitim Maaliyeti” ve dört de program tercih ölçütü; “İlgi Alanı”, “Araştırma Olanakları”, “Puan, Aile ve Arkadaşlar”, “Bölümün İtibarı ve İş Olanakları” kullandığını ortaya koymuştur. Öğrencilerin en önem verdiği ölçütler “Devlet Üniversitesi ve Düşük Eğitim Maaliyeti” ve “İlgi Alanı” olarak bulunmuştur. Bulgular ayrıca tercih ölçütlerinin, öğrencinin çalışma alanına, akademik birimine, eğitim türüne ve diline göre istatistiksel olarak anlamlı farklılar gösterdiğine işaret etmektedir, ancak cinsiyete göre anlamlı bir farklılık bulunmamıştır.A RESEARCH ON STUDENTS’ UNIVERSITY AND PROGRAM PREFERENCE CRITERIAAbstract: This research was conducted to understand university and program preference criteria used by students and to find out differences in preference criteria with regard to students’ study areas, academic units, education type, language of instruction and gender. Sample of the study was consisted of 2216 students from Marmara University. Results revealed that students use five university preference criteria; “Social & Sports Activities,” “International Recognition & Research Opportunities,” “Reputation of the

  6. Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics Program at Ryerson University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimirova, Tetyana

    2006-12-01

    A new Bachelor of Science in Medical Physics program at Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario was launched in Fall 2006. The program builds on Ryerson’s strong existing capabilities in biomedical physics research. The program’s point of entry is the common first year during which all students in Biology, Chemistry, Contemporary Science and Medical Physics programs complete the foundation courses that include physics, calculus, biology, chemistry, and introduction to computing. In addition to the foundation courses, the first-year studies include an orientation course that supports the students in making a successful transition to university studies. The courses beyond the first year include such topics as radiation therapy, image analysis, medical diagnostics and computer modeling techniques. In the final year the students will undertake an independent, faculty-supervised thesis project in an area of personal research interest. Co-op and industrial internship options are available. Our program promotes natural interaction between physics, life sciences, mathematics and computing. The flexibility built into our curriculum will open a variety of career options for our graduates.

  7. The Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine Shelter Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Philip; Woodruff, Kimberly; Shivley, Jake

    2015-04-24

    The shelter program at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with extensive experience in shelter animal care including spay/neuter, basic wellness care, diagnostics, medical management, disease control, shelter management and biosecurity. Students spend five days at shelters in the junior year of the curriculum and two weeks working on mobile veterinary units in their senior year. The program helps meet accreditation standards of the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education that require students to have hands-on experience and is in keeping with recommendations from the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium. The program responds, in part, to the challenge from the Pew Study on Future Directions for Veterinary Medicine that argued that veterinary students do not graduate with the level of knowledge and skills that is commensurate with the number of years of professional education.

  8. Impact of the Boston Marathon Bombing and Its Aftermath on Refugees and Survivors of Torture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowarczyk, Linda; Rous, Dana; Mancuso, Anna; Flinton, Kathleen; Hastings, Erica; Forbush, Leigh; Shepherd, Amy

    2016-08-01

    On April 15, 2013, Boston residents and guests gathered for the Boston Marathon. Two explosives at the finish line killed three people and injured hundreds of others. As part of our clinical encounters, patients of the Boston Center for Refugee Health & Human Rights were asked about the marathon bombing. We were concerned about the high level of armed security as many of our patients had been detained in their countries of origin. Eighty patients seen between April 16 and July 7, 2013 were asked about their experience of the Boston Marathon bombing and its aftermath. A retrospective chart review was undertaken and data analyzed using Atlas.ti & SPSS. Approximately 86 % of those interviewed were reminded of their past trauma. The following themes emerged: triggering and trauma related symptoms, content specific cognitive schemas, recognition of the universality of violence, fears of discrimination, issues surrounding safety, and specific concerns of Muslims.

  9. Idiopatiske skolioser behandlet med Boston-korset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M O; Andersen, G R; Kruuse, A M

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that Boston bracing may stop progression in many patients with minor curves. One hundred and thirty-eight patients were treated with the Boston brace for idiopathic scoliosis. Age was 14.1 +/- 1.6 years at the time of bracing, and the length of time spent in the brace was 2.6 +/- 1...

  10. Report From Boston: The Struggle for Desegregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancy, Joette; Franklin, Brenda

    1975-01-01

    A report on the school integration controversy in Boston by one of the coordinators of the National Student Coalition Against Racism (NASCAR), an organization that has been building national support for school desegregation in Boston, and by a former staff member of NASCAR who has toured the U. S. to explain the issues involved in the Boston…

  11. Nuclear Security Education Program at the Pennsylvania State University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uenlue, Kenan [The Pennsylvania State University, Radiation Science and Engineering Center, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States); The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States); Jovanovic, Igor [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, University Park, PA 16802-2304 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The availability of trained and qualified nuclear and radiation security experts worldwide has decreased as those with hands-on experience have retired while the demand for these experts and skills have increased. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has responded to the continued loss of technical and policy expertise amongst personnel and students in the security field by initiating the establishment of a Nuclear Security Education Initiative, in partnership with Pennsylvania State University (PSU), Texas A and M (TAMU), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). This collaborative, multi-year initiative forms the basis of specific education programs designed to educate the next generation of personnel who plan on careers in the nonproliferation and security fields with both domestic and international focus. The three universities worked collaboratively to develop five core courses consistent with the GTRI mission, policies, and practices. These courses are the following: Global Nuclear Security Policies, Detectors and Source Technologies, Applications of Detectors/Sensors/Sources for Radiation Detection and Measurements Nuclear Security Laboratory, Threat Analysis and Assessment, and Design and Analysis of Security Systems for Nuclear and Radiological Facilities. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Nuclear Engineering Program is a leader in undergraduate and graduate-level nuclear engineering education in the USA. The PSU offers undergraduate and graduate programs in nuclear engineering. The PSU undergraduate program in nuclear engineering is the largest nuclear engineering programs in the USA. The PSU Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC) facilities are being used for most of the nuclear security education program activities. Laboratory space and equipment was made available for this purpose. The RSEC facilities include the Penn State Breazeale

  12. Faculty Experience Teaching in an Interdisciplinary First-Year Seminar Program: The Case of the University of Guelph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Murray

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available First-year seminar programs have been a feature on the landscape of post-secondary teaching and learning in the United States, since they first appeared in the 1880s at Boston University (Mamrick, 2005. More recently, they have begun to appear at Canadian universities. For example, first-year seminars were introduced a decade ago at the University of Guelph, as a campus-wide initiative. To recognize the first decade that these unique, interdisciplinary seminars have been offered, faculty were surveyed to understand better the impact of the program on those teaching in it, as well as their perceptions of their students. The experience of the University of Guelph suggests first-year seminar programs can have a significant influence on the teaching and professional experience of faculty and encourages them to extend their networks beyond the department and across the campus. Significantly, seminars serve as sites for pedagogical experimentation that can influence departmental curricula. Faculty who teach a first-year seminar have high satisfaction and report myriad benefits to morale, teaching, and research. The salutary effects of a first-year seminar program are not local but would be transferable across post-secondary institutions. Aux États-Unis, on a beaucoup parlé des programmes de séminaires de première année dans le paysage de la pédagogie dans l’enseignement supérieur, depuis leur première apparition dans les années 1880 à l’Université de Boston (Mamrick, 2005. Plus récemment, ils ont commencé à apparaître dans les universités canadiennes. Par exemple, des séminaires de première année ont été introduits il y a dix ans à l’Université de Guelph en tant qu’initiative à l’échelle du campus. Afin de marquer la première décennie au cours de laquelle ces séminaires interdisciplinaires uniques ont été offerts, une enquête a été menée auprès des professeurs pour mieux comprendre les effets du programme

  13. Preliminary assessment report for Wayland Army National Guard Armory (former Boston Defense Area Nike Battery 73), Installation 23295, Wayland, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.; Krokosz, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard property near Wayland, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in respond to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining sites activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Wayland Army National Guard Army property, Phase I of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

  14. Supporting Universal Prevention Programs: A Two-Phased Coaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students’ emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter, Snyder, & Artman, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter & Van Norman, 2010). Ongoing professional development in the form of coaching may enhance teacher skills and implementation (Noell et al., 2005; Stormont, Reinke, Newcomer, Darney, & Lewis, 2012). There exists a need for a coaching model that can be applied to a variety of teacher skill levels and one that guides coach decision-making about how best to support teachers. This article provides a detailed account of a two-phased coaching model with empirical support developed and tested with coaches and teachers in urban schools (Becker, Bradshaw, Domitrovich, & Ialongo, 2013). In the initial universal coaching phase, all teachers receive the same coaching elements regardless of their skill level. Then, in the tailored coaching phase, coaching varies according to the strengths and needs of each teacher. Specifically, more intensive coaching strategies are used only with teachers who need additional coaching supports whereas other teachers receive just enough support to consolidate and maintain their strong implementation. Examples of how coaches used the two-phased coaching model when working with teachers who were implementing two universal prevention programs (i.e., the PATHS® curriculum and PAX Good Behavior Game [PAX GBG]) provide illustrations of the application of this model. The potential reach of this coaching model extends to other school-based programs as well as other settings in which coaches partner with interventionists to implement evidence-based programs. PMID:23660973

  15. Efficacy of a sexual assault resistance program for university women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Charlene Y; Eliasziw, Misha; Barata, Paula C; Thurston, Wilfreda E; Newby-Clark, Ian R; Radtke, H Lorraine; Hobden, Karen L

    2015-06-11

    Young women attending university are at substantial risk for being sexually assaulted, primarily by male acquaintances, but effective strategies to reduce this risk remain elusive. We randomly assigned first-year female students at three universities in Canada to the Enhanced Assess, Acknowledge, Act Sexual Assault Resistance program (resistance group) or to a session providing access to brochures on sexual assault, as was common university practice (control group). The resistance program consists of four 3-hour units in which information is provided and skills are taught and practiced, with the goal of being able to assess risk from acquaintances, overcome emotional barriers in acknowledging danger, and engage in effective verbal and physical self-defense. The primary outcome was completed rape, as measured by the Sexual Experiences Survey-Short Form Victimization, during 1 year of follow-up. A total of 451 women were assigned to the resistance group and 442 women to the control group. Of the women assigned to the resistance group, 91% attended at least three of the four units. The 1-year risk of completed rape was significantly lower in the resistance group than in the control group (5.2% vs. 9.8%; relative risk reduction, 46.3% [95% confidence interval, 6.8 to 69.1]; P=0.02). The 1-year risk of attempted rape was also significantly lower in the resistance group (3.4% vs. 9.3%, Pwomen. (Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the University of Windsor; SARE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01338428.).

  16. Program Accreditation by Association of Classical Universities of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Zapryagaev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Quality assurance is a general problem in the higher education system. The modern condition of this problem is out of a national frame and got the international measurement. There are a lot of the processes that display globalization in understanding of quality in higher education. Among them are the international universities ratings, the institute and the program accreditation by international bodies, professional accreditation in special area of education, distribution of a quality culture philosophy and other comparison technologies in estimation of higher education institutes activity.

  17. Programming a massively parallel, computation universal system: static behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapedes, A.; Farber, R.

    1986-01-01

    In previous work by the authors, the ''optimum finding'' properties of Hopfield neural nets were applied to the nets themselves to create a ''neural compiler.'' This was done in such a way that the problem of programming the attractors of one neural net (called the Slave net) was expressed as an optimization problem that was in turn solved by a second neural net (the Master net). In this series of papers that approach is extended to programming nets that contain interneurons (sometimes called ''hidden neurons''), and thus deals with nets capable of universal computation. 22 refs.

  18. Students’ Needs Analysis in an EFL Program for University Professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andrea Bedoya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study sets out to investigate professors’ needs from an English as a foreign language program in a public university regarding demands, interests, and lacks based on the methodology of needs analysis. Data collected through a survey, focus groups, and individual interviews showed that professors need to meet the institutional language policy for contractual and academic reasons. Additionally, data revealed their desire to learn English to communicate in both academic and non-academic settings. Moreover, the lack of time and effective learning strategies were reported as comprising the main constraints for learning. Finally, the authors present the strengths and weaknesses of the program as well as the participants’ suggestions for curriculum restructuring.

  19. Institutional profile: University of Florida Health Personalized Medicine Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Larisa H; Weitzel, Kristin W; Elsey, Amanda R; Liu, Xinyue; Mosley, Scott A; Smith, Donald M; Staley, Benjamin J; Winterstein, Almut G; Mathews, Carol A; Franchi, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Starostik, Petr; Clare-Salzler, Michael J; Nelson, David R; Johnson, Julie A

    2017-04-01

    The University of Florida (UF) Health Personalized Medicine Program launched in 2012 with CYP2C19 genotyping for clopidogrel response at UF Health Shands Hospital. We have since expanded CYP2C19 genotyping to UF Health Jacksonville and established the infrastructure at UF Health to support clinical implementation for five additional gene-drug pairs: TPMT-thiopurines, IFNL3 (IL28B)-PEG IFN-α-based regimens, CYP2D6-opioids, CYP2D6/CYP2C19-antidepressants and CYP2C19-proton pump inhibitors. We are contributing to the evidence based on outcomes with genotype-guided therapy through pragmatic studies of our clinical implementations. In addition, we have developed a broad array of educational programs for providers, trainees and students that incorporate personal genotype evaluation to enhance participant learning.

  20. Climate Science Program at California State University, Northridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele Cox, H.; Klein, D.; Cadavid, A. C.; Foley, B.

    2012-12-01

    Due to its interdisciplinary nature, climate science poses wide-ranging challenges for science and mathematics students seeking careers in this field. There is a compelling need for universities to provide coherent programs in climate science in order to train future climate scientists. With funding from NASA Innovations in Climate Education (NICE), California State University, Northridge (CSUN), is creating the CSUN Climate Science Program. An interdisciplinary team of faculty members is working in collaboration with UCLA, Santa Monica College and NASA/JPL partners to create a new curriculum in climate science. The resulting sequence of climate science courses, or Pathway for studying the Mathematics of Climate Change (PMCC), is integrated into a Bachelor of Science degree program in the Applied Mathematical Sciences offered by the Mathematics Department at CSUN. The PMCC consists of courses offered by the departments of Mathematics, Physics, and Geography and is designed to prepare students for Ph.D. programs in technical fields relevant to global climate change and related careers. The students who choose to follow this program will be guided to enroll in the following sequence of courses for their 12 units of upper division electives: 1) A newly created course junior level course, Math 396CL, in applied mathematics which will introduce students to applications of vector calculus and differential equations to the study of thermodynamics and atmospheric dynamics. 2) An already existing course, Math 483, with new content on mathematical modeling specialized for this program; 3) An improved version of Phys 595CL on the mathematics and physics of climate change with emphasis on Radiative Transfer; 4) A choice of Geog 407 on Remote Sensing or Geog 416 on Climate Change with updated content to train the students in the analysis of satellite data obtained with the NASA Earth Observing System and instruction in the analysis of data obtained within a Geographical

  1. Boston type I keratoprosthesis: Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Fernanda Pedreira; Sousa, Luciene Barbosa de; Oliveira, Lauro Augusto de

    2012-01-01

    Regardless of significant progress in the field of corneal transplantation to treat corneal opacification, some cases of corneal blindness still present a poor prognosis for conventional penetrating keratoplasty. In patients with repeated graft failure and/or with severe ocular surface disease, the Boston type I keratoprosthesis (type I BKPro) has become a viable option. Modifications in its design and postoperative management have improved the long-term outcomes of visual acuity, retention, and postoperative infection rates. These advances made the type I BKPro be considered a safe alternative for visual rehabilitation in many patients with corneal pathologies. However, postoperative handle of chronic comorbidities, such as glaucoma, is still critical for preserving the visual gains achieved with BKPro.

  2. Boston type I keratoprosthesis: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Pedreira Magalhães

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Regardless of significant progress in the field of corneal transplantation to treat corneal opacification, some cases of corneal blindness still present a poor prognosis for conventional penetrating keratoplasty. In patients with repeated graft failure and/or with severe ocular surface disease, the Boston type I keratoprosthesis (type I BKPro has become a viable option. Modifications in its design and postoperative management have improved the long-term outcomes of visual acuity, retention, and postoperative infection rates. These advances made the type I BKPro be considered a safe alternative for visual rehabilitation in many patients with corneal pathologies. However, postoperative handle of chronic comorbidities, such as glaucoma, is still critical for preserving the visual gains achieved with BKPro.

  3. The Role of Continuous Education Programs Organized by Saudi Universities in Literacy--A Case Study of King Saud University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rawaf, Haya Saad Abdulla; Fattah, Azza Khalil Abdel; Megeid, Fadia Yousif Abdel; Nazmy, Rania Mohammed Aziz; Alarifi, Sarah Nasser; Al Sulaihm, Hind Sulaiman

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at highlighting the role of Continuous Education Programs at the Saudi Universities in Religious, Social, and Health Literacy; King Saud University was taken as an example. To achieve the goals of the study two questionnaires were distributed among two samples from King Saud University; (101) of students, and (9) of continuous…

  4. Howard University Energy Expert Systems Institute Summer Program (EESI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoh, James A.; Chuku, Arunsi; Abban, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Howard University, under the auspices of the Center for Energy Systems and Controls runs the Energy Expert Systems Institute (EESI) summer outreach program for high school/pre-college minority students. The main objectives are to introduce precollege minority students to research in the power industry using modern state-of-the-art technology such as Expert Systems, Fuzzy Logic and Artificial Neural Networks; to involve minority students in space power management, systems and failure diagnosis; to generate interest in career options in electrical engineering; and to experience problem-solving in a teamwork environment consisting of faculty, senior research associates and graduate students. For five weeks the students are exposed not only to the exciting experience of college life, but also to the inspiring field of engineering, especially electrical engineering. The program consists of lectures in the fundamentals of engineering, mathematics, communication skills and computer skills. The projects are divided into mini and major. Topics for the 1995 mini projects were Expert Systems for the Electric Bus and Breast Cancer Detection. Topics on the major projects include Hybrid Electric Vehicle, Solar Dynamics and Distribution Automation. On the final day, designated as 'EESI Day' the students did oral presentations of their projects and prizes were awarded to the best group. The program began in the summer of 1993. The reaction from the students has been very positive. The program also arranges field trips to special places of interest such as the NASA Goddard Space Center.

  5. Business planning for university health science programs: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Michael; Milos, Nadine; Raborn, G Wayne

    2002-02-01

    Many publicly funded education programs and organizations have developed business plans to enhance accountability. In the case of the Department of Dentistry at the University of Alberta, the main impetus for business planning was a persistent deficit in the annual operating fund since a merger of a stand-alone dental faculty with the Faculty of Medicine. The main challenges were to balance revenues with expenditures, to reduce expenditures without compromising quality of teaching, service delivery and research, to maintain adequate funding to ensure future competitiveness, and to repay the accumulated debt owed to the university. The business plan comprises key strategies in the areas of education, clinical practice and service, and research. One of the strategies for education was to start a BSc program in dental hygiene, which was accomplished in September 2000. In clinical practice, a key strategy was implementation of a clinic operations fee, which also occurred in September 2000. This student fee helps to offset the cost of clinical practice. In research, a key strategy has been to strengthen our emphasis on prevention technologies. In completing the business plan, we learned the importance of identifying clear goals and ensuring that the goals are reasonable and achievable; gaining access to high-quality data to support planning; and nurturing existing positive relationships with external stakeholders such as the provincial government and professional associations.

  6. Undergraduate Research and Service-Learning Programs in a Kinesiology Program at a Teaching University

    Science.gov (United States)

    O, Jenny; Sherwood, Jennifer J.; Yingling, Vanessa R.

    2017-01-01

    High-impact practices foster student success, but faculty faced with heavy teaching loads and lack of resources and infrastructure are challenged to implement such practices. Kinesiology faculty at California State University, East Bay collaborated to implement two student programs: Kinesiology Research Group and Get Fit! Stay Fit! The Kinesiology…

  7. Success of the Undergraduate Public Health Program At Tulane University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luann Ellis White

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (SPHTM launched the Bachelors of Science in Public Health (BSPH in 2005. The BSPH has steadily grown and comprises one third of the total enrollment in the school. A review of the organizational structure demonstrates that direct responsibility for undergraduate education by a school of public health is advantageous to the success of the program. The competency and skills-based curriculum attracts students. Outcome measures show the enrollment is steadily increasing. The majority of the BSPH graduates continue onto competitive graduate and professional degree programs. Those who seek jobs find employment related to their public health education, but outside of the traditional governmental public health agencies. The combined BSPH/MPH degree is a pipeline for students to pursue a MPH and increases the likelihood students will pursue careers in public health. The range and depth of study in the bachelors program is continually examined. Topics once within the purview of graduate education are now being incorporated into undergraduate courses. Undergraduate public health is one of a number of factors that is influencing changes in the MPH degree.

  8. Research training program: Duke University and Brazilian Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellanda, Lucia Campos; Cesa, Claudia Ciceri; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; David, Vinicius Frayze; Rodrigues, Clarissa Garcia; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Bacal, Fernando; Kalil, Renato A K; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2012-12-01

    Research coaching program focuses on the development of abilities and scientific reasoning. For health professionals, it may be useful to increase both the number and quality of projects and manuscripts. To evaluate the initial results and implementation methodology of the Research and Innovation Coaching Program of the Research on Research group of Duke University in the Brazilian Society of Cardiology. The program works on two bases: training and coaching. Training is done online and addresses contents on research ideas, literature search, scientific writing and statistics. After training, coaching favors the establishment of a collaboration between researchers and centers by means of a network of contacts. The present study describes the implementation and initial results in reference to the years 2011-2012. In 2011, 24 centers received training, which consisted of online meetings, study and practice of the contents addressed. In January 2012, a new format was implemented with the objective of reaching more researchers. In six months, 52 researchers were allocated. In all, 20 manuscripts were published and 49 more were written and await submission and/or publication. Additionally, five research funding proposals have been elaborated. The number of manuscripts and funding proposals achieved the objectives initially proposed. However, the main results of this type of initiative should be measured in the long term, because the consolidation of the national production of high-quality research is a virtuous cycle that feeds itself back and expands over time.

  9. Improved centration of the type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis in donor carrier tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousuf M Khalifa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Yousuf M Khalifa1, Majid Moshirfar21Flaum Eye Institute, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA; 2Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USAAbstract: The type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis preparation requires a 3-mm central punch and an 8.5 mm or larger punch in the carrier tissue. These punches are ideally concentric, but we have found difficulty in achieving concentric punches when the larger punch is performed first. We present a modification in the preparation procedure to help minimize centration error.Keywords: Boston Keratoprosthesis, centration error

  10. Infectious keratitis in patients undergoing Boston Type 1 keratoprosthesis (Boston KPro procedure: case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Moraes do Nascimento

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Description of two cases of infectious keratitis in patients after Boston Type 1 keratoprosthesis (Boston KPro implantation. The first case refers to a patient that had the device indicated due to limbal deficiency secondary to severe dry eye who presented a fungal infection by Aerobasidium pullulans that was successfully treated with amphotericin B eye drops. The second case reports a patient with Boston KPro implantation due to previous corneal transplant rejection showing bacterial keratitis in the fourth postoperative month. The etiologic agent was identified asStreptococcus sp and topical treatment with vancomycin was effective. The importance of postoperative surveillance in Boston KPro eyes is discussed.

  11. NASA LeRC/Akron University Graduate Cooperative Fellowship Program and Graduate Student Researchers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertis, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    On June 1, 1980, the University of Akron and the NASA Lewis Research Center (LERC) established a Graduate Cooperative Fellowship Program in the specialized areas of Engine Structural Analysis and Dynamics, Computational Mechanics, Mechanics of Composite Materials, and Structural Optimization, in order to promote and develop requisite technologies in these areas of engine technology. The objectives of this program are consistent with those of the NASA Engine Structure Program in which graduate students of the University of Akron participate by conducting research at Lewis. This report is the second on this grant and summarizes the second and third year research effort, which includes the participation of five graduate students where each student selects one of the above areas as his special field of interest. Each student is required to spend 30 percent of his educational training time at the NASA Lewis Research Center and the balance at the University of Akron. His course work is judiciously selected and tailored to prepare him for research work in his field of interest. A research topic is selected for each student while in residence at the NASA Lewis Research Center, which is also approved by the faculty of the University of Akron as his thesis topic for a Master's and/or a Ph.D. degree.

  12. [Oncofertility program at the Montpellier university hospital 2 years after].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrac, M; Rafii, A; Vincens, C; Brunet, C; Monforte, M; Vintejoux, E; Loup, V; Hamamah, S; Ferrieres, A; Rathat, G; Dechaud, H; Hedon, B; Bringer-Deutsch, S

    2015-06-01

    Female fertility preservation in the context of cancer management is crucial for patient's health care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oncofertility practice at our university hospital of Montpellier since 2011. The evaluation of management of young patients referred to Montpellier University Hospital from September 2011 to September 2013 for oncofertility counselling before cancer treatment. Seventy-one patients were referred to a specialized oncofertility center. Forty-two patients (59.1%) were included in the oncofertility program. Twenty-two patients (31%) were proposed for oocyte vitrification after COS protocol, eight patients (11.3%) for ovarian tissue cryoconservation, seven patients (9.9%) for GnRH injections, three patients (4.2%) ovarian transposition and two patients (2.8%) for embryo cryopreservation. Among the 42 indications of fertility preservation, only 18 will have finally taken place. Oncofertility counselling for young patients should now be part of the cancer management. It involves multidisciplinary teams. Further information of both oncologists and patients is needed to improve this new approach in the field of cancer treatments. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. “We Make the Path by Walking It”: Building an Academic Community Partnership With Boston Chinatown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Carolyn Leung; Allukian, Nathan; Wang, Xingyue; Ghosh, Sujata; Huang, Chien-Chi; Wang, Jacy; Brugge, Doug; Wong, John B.; Mark, Shirley; Dong, Sherry; Koch-Weser, Susan; Parsons, Susan K.; Leslie, Laurel K.; Freund, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential for academic community partnerships are challenged in places where there is a history of conflict and mistrust. Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT) represents an academic community partnership between researchers and clinicians from Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University and community partners from Boston Chinatown. Based in principles of community-based participatory research and partnership research, this partnership is seeking to build a trusting relationship between Tufts and Boston Chinatown. Objectives This case study aims to provides a narrative story of the development and formation of ADAPT as well as discuss challenges to its future viability. Methods Using case study research tools, this study draws upon a variety of data sources including interviews, program evaluation data and documents. Results Several contextual factors laid the foundation for ADAPT. Weaving these factors together helped to create synergy and led to ADAPT’s formation. In its first year, ADAPT has conducted formative research, piloted an educational program for community partners and held stakeholder forums to build a broad base of support. Conclusions ADAPT recognizes that long term sustainability requires bringing multiple stakeholders to the table even before a funding opportunity is released and attempting to build a diversified funding base. PMID:25435562

  14. Mapping International University Partnerships Identified by East African Universities as Strengthening Their Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmoshuk, Aaron N; Guantai, Anastasia Nkatha; Mwangu, Mughwira; Cole, Donald C; Zarowsky, Christina

    International university partnerships are recommended for increasing the capacity of sub-Saharan African universities. Many publications describe individual partnerships and projects, and tools are available for guiding collaborations, but systematic mappings of the basic, common characteristics of partnerships are scarce. To document and categorize the international interuniversity partnerships deemed significant to building the capacity of medicine, nursing, and public health programs of 4 East African universities. Two universities in Kenya and 2 in Tanzania were purposefully selected. Key informant interviews, conducted with 42 senior representatives of the 4 universities, identified partnerships they considered significant for increasing the capacity of their institutions' medicine, nursing, and public health programs in education, research, or service. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed. Partners were classified by country of origin and corresponding international groupings, duration, programs, and academic health science components. One hundred twenty-nine university-to-university partnerships from 23 countries were identified. Each university reported between 25 and 36 international university partners. Seventy-four percent of partnerships were with universities in high-income countries, 15% in low- and middle-income countries, and 11% with consortia. Seventy percent included medicine, 37% nursing, and 45% public health; 15% included all 3 programs. Ninety-two percent included an education component, 47% research, and 24% service; 12% included all 3 components. This study confirms the rapid growth of interuniversity cross-border health partnerships this century. It also finds, however, that there is a pool of established international partnerships from numerous countries at each university. Most partnerships that seek to strengthen universities in East Africa should likely ensure they have a significant education component. Universities should make

  15. Effectiveness of automated external defibrillators in high schools in greater Boston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Hannah; Hoffman, Caitlin; Hodgman, Thomas; Singh, Sushil; Homoud, Munther; Weinstock, Jonathan; Link, Mark; Estes, N A Mark

    2005-06-15

    A program using a strategy of donating a single automatic external defibrillator to 35 schools in the Boston area resulted in compliance with American Heart Association guidelines on automatic external defibrillator placement and training and 2 successful resuscitations from sudden cardiac arrest. Participating schools indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the program.

  16. International results with the Boston type I keratoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldave, Anthony J; Sangwan, Virender S; Basu, Sayan; Basak, Samar K; Hovakimyan, Anna; Gevorgyan, Ofelya; Kharashi, Soliman Al; Jindan, Mohanna Al; Tandon, Radhika; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Malyugin, Boris; Padilla, Ma Dominga B; Maskati, Quresh; Agarwala, Nisheeta; Hutauruk, Johan; Sharma, Manoj; Yu, Fei

    2012-08-01

    To determine the indications and outcomes of Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis (Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA) surgery performed outside of North America and to compare them with those obtained in the United States by the surgeon who trained the international surgeons. Retrospective review of consecutive clinical case series. One hundred ninety-four patients (223 keratoprosthesis procedures performed in 205 eyes) who received Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis at 11 ophthalmology centers in Armenia, India, Indonesia, Nepal, Philippines, Russia, and Saudi Arabia between May 1, 2006, and July 1, 2011 (international series), and at the Jules Stein Eye Institute between May 1, 2004, and July 1, 2011 (University of California, Los Angeles [UCLA] series). Data were collected for each procedure regarding the preoperative characteristics of each eye, the surgical procedure(s) performed, and the postoperative outcomes. Statistical analysis was performed to identify significant differences between the international and UCLA series in terms of retention and complications. Interval visual acuities, keratoprosthesis retention, and significant postoperative complications. In the international series, 113 Boston type I keratoprostheses were implanted in 107 eyes of 100 patients. The most common indication for surgery was corneal graft failure (n = 50; 44%) followed by chemical injury (n = 30; 27%). Although only 2% of eyes had a preoperative corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) of 20/20 to 20/200, 70%, 68%, and 59% of eyes had a postoperative CDVA of 20/20 to 20/200 at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after surgery, respectively. Ninety-one of the 113 keratoprostheses implanted (80.5%) were retained at a mean follow-up of 14.2 months, for a retention failure rate of 22 per 134.6 eye-years (0.163/eye-year). The most common postoperative complications were retroprosthetic membrane formation (27%) and sterile corneal necrosis (18%). The only postoperative complication

  17. On Becoming an Entrepreneurial Leader: A Focus on the Impacts of University Entrepreneurship Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Afsaneh Bagheri; Zaidatol A.L. Pihie

    2011-01-01

    Despite the significant influences of university entrepreneurship programs in developing students entrepreneurial intention and abilities, there is little knowledge about how such programs shape students abilities to successfully lead entrepreneurial activities. The main purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the impacts of university entrepreneurship programs in developing students entrepreneurial leadership competencies. A sample of 14 undergraduate entrepreneurial leaders defined...

  18. Ohio University On-Campus Preretirement Education Programs: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Charlene

    1996-01-01

    Some practical approaches to implementing preretirement education programs for personnel at public research universities are offered, based on a program developed at Ohio University. Preretirement program goals are to educate employees about the critical components in retirement planning and to provide unbiased and impartial resource information…

  19. The Young Gifted/Talented Child: Programs at the University of Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnes, Merle B.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Discusses (1) rationale for early identification and programing for gifted/talented children, (2) issues in developing a program for young children, (3) procedures for identifying the young gifted child, (4) guidelines for program evaluation, and (5) principles for program development. Two university programs, one for identifying gifted…

  20. Framing Social Justice Leadership in a University-Based Preparation Program: The University of California's Principal Leadership Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Tina; Cooper, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Scholars are increasingly considering how theoretical concepts about social justice might permeate leadership preparation programs' design. Yet the degree to which these concepts actually anchor these programs is unclear. This article addresses this gap by analyzing how the University of California's Principal Leadership Institute bridges theory…

  1. Clemson University Science Master's Program in Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure: A program evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sell, Elizabeth Eberhart

    The Clemson University Science Master's Program (SMP) in Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure is a program which aims to link engineering, materials, construction, environment, architecture, business, and public policy to produce graduates with unique holistic perspective and expertise to immediately contribute to the workforce in the area of sustainable and resilient infrastructure. A program evaluation of the SMP has been performed to study the effectiveness of the SMP and identify areas where the goals and vision of the SMP are achieved and areas where improvements can be made. This was completed by analysis of trends within survey responses, review of Master's thesis reports, and review of courses taken. It was found that the SMP has facilitated new interdisciplinary research collaborations of faculty in different concentration areas within the Glenn Department of Civil Engineering, as well as collaboration with faculty in other departments. It is recommended that a course which provides instruction in all eight competency areas be required for all SMP students to provide a comprehensive overview and ensure all students are exposed to concepts of all competency areas. While all stakeholders are satisfied with the program and believe it has been successful thus far, efforts do need to be made as the program moves forward to address and improve some items that have been mentioned as needing improvement. The concerns about concentration courses, internship planning, and advising should be addressed. This evaluation provides benefits to prospective students, current SMP participants, and outside program supporters. The goal of this evaluation is to provide support that the SMP is an effective and worthwhile program for participating students, while attempting to identify any necessary program improvements and provide recommendations for achieving these improvements. This goal has been accomplished.

  2. [JSPS-NRCT Core university program on natural medicine in pharmaceutical sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Ikuo; Yamazaki, Mikako; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2009-04-01

    The Core University Program provides a framework for international cooperative research in specifically designated fields and topics, centering around a core university in Japan and its counterpart university in other countries. In this program, individual scientists in the affiliated countries carry out cooperative research projects with sharply focused topics and explicitly delineated goals under leadership of the core universities. The Core University Program which we introduce here has been renewed since 2001 under the support of both the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) and the National Research Council of Thailand (NRCT). Our program aims to conduct cooperative researches particularly focusing on Natural Medicine in the field of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Institute of Natural Medicine at University of Toyama (Japan), Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Chulalongkorn University (Thailand), and Chulabhorn Research Institute (Thailand) have been taking part in this JSPS-NRCT Core University Program as core universities. The Program is also supported by the 20 institution members in both countries. This program is running the five research subject under a key word of natural medicine which are related to i) age-related diseases, ii) allergy and cancer, iii) hepatitis and infectious diseases, iv) structure, synthesis, and bioactivity of natural medicines, and v) molecular biology of Thai medicinal plant components and database assembling of Thai medicinal plants. The program also encourages university members to strengthen related research activities, to share advanced academic and scientific knowledge on natural medicines.

  3. Russian Practices in Rating the Effectiveness of University Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balatskii, E.

    2014-01-01

    Russian universities do not do well in international rankings. Recent attempts in Russia to create different forms of ranking are aimed at reflecting what strengths universities there may have, but it is up to the universities themselves to find ways to better characterize themselves in existing systems of ranking.

  4. Final report to DOE: Matching Grant Program for the Penn State University Nuclear Engineering Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack S. Brenizer, Jr.

    2003-01-17

    The DOE/Industry Matching Grant Program is designed to encourage collaborative support for nuclear engineering education as well as research between the nation's nuclear industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Despite a serious decline in student enrollments in the 1980s and 1990s, the discipline of nuclear engineering remained important to the advancement of the mission goals of DOE. The program is designed to ensure that academic programs in nuclear engineering are maintained and enhanced in universities throughout the U.S. At Penn State, the Matching Grant Program played a critical role in the survival of the Nuclear Engineering degree programs. Funds were used in a variety of ways to support both undergraduate and graduate students directly. Some of these included providing seed funding for new graduate research initiatives, funding the development of new course materials, supporting new teaching facilities, maintenance and purchase of teaching laboratory equipment, and providing undergraduate scholarships, graduate fellowships, and wage payroll positions for students.

  5. Eyelid Mass in Boston Keratoprosthesis Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Catherine J; Stagner, Anna M; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Chodosh, James; Yoon, Michael K

    Boston keratoprosthesis type 2 is used to treat severe corneal blindness secondary to cicatricial or autoimmune ocular surface disease. This case report describes an atypical eyelid mass in a 41-year-old woman with Stevens-Johnson syndrome who underwent placement of Boston keratoprosthesis type 2 in the left eye. The postoperative course was complicated by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus keratitis and endophthalmitis requiring replacement of the keratoprosthesis. Three months thereafter, the patient presented with a progressively enlarging upper eyelid mass adjacent to the keratoprosthesis optic causing distortion of the eyelid. Excisional biopsy revealed an elongated cystic mass abutting the superior aspect of the optic. Pathologic examination was consistent with a conjunctival cyst with lipogranulomatous reaction. Removal of eyelid margins and conjunctiva, and placement of a full-thickness blepharotomy are standard steps in placement of Boston keratoprosthesis type 2, which can lead to conjunctival cysts and lipogranulomas that present as eyelid masses.

  6. Self-Esteem and Vocational Self-Esteem Enhancement: A Group Counseling Program for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricak, O. Tolga

    2002-01-01

    This study is a group counseling program developed to enhance self-esteem and vocational self-esteem of university students. In this paper, a brief theoretical background, all sessions of the program and applications were presented. (Contains 14 footnotes.)

  7. Participation in a scientific pre-university program and medical students' interest in an academic career

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Leng, W.E. (Wendy E.); K.M. Stegers-Jager (Karen); M.Ph. Born (Marise); Frens, M.A. (Maarten A.); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The proportion of medical doctors involved in research activities is declining. Undergraduate medical research programs are positively associated with medical students' research interest. Scientific pre-university programs (SPUPs) outside the medical domain are also

  8. School Breakfast Program and School Performance

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1989-01-01

    The effects of participation in the school breakfast program by low income children on academic achievement and rates of absence and tardiness are reported from the Department of Pediatrics, Boston City Hospital, Boston, MA.

  9. University Instructors' Responses on Implementation of Differentiated Instruction in Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, Jeannie; Jackson, Nykela; Downing, Allison; Roberts, Jalynn

    2017-01-01

    General education teachers are encouraged in many teacher education programs to differentiate instruction. The question was if instructors in teacher education programs modeled differentiated instruction (DI) in their teacher education programs. University instructors in teacher education programs were surveyed about their use of DI. DI included…

  10. Experience with Boston keratoprosthesis type 1 in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Lauro Augusto; Pedreira Magalhães, Fernanda; Hirai, Flavio E; de Sousa, Luciene Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    To report the experience of the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil, in performing Boston keratoprosthesis type 1 implantation in the developing world. We analyzed 30 eyes of 30 patients who underwent Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis surgery between 2008 and 2012 in a prospective interventional study. Preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative parameters were analyzed, including visual acuity (VA), keratoprosthesis stability, and postoperative complications. Preoperative diagnoses were failed grafts in 16 eyes (53.33%), chemical injury in 10 eyes (33.33%) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in 4 eyes (13.33%). Also, 16 eyes (53.33%) had preoperative glaucoma. Preoperative best corrected VA ranged from 20/400 to light perception. With an average follow-up of 32 months (range 1-55 months), postoperative vision improved to >20/200 in 24 eyes (80%). Postoperative VA was statistically improved compared with the preoperative measurement during all postoperative follow-ups (up to 36 months). During the follow-up period (32 months), retention of the initial keratoprosthesis was 93.3%. The incidence of retroprosthetic membrane was 26.66%. Progression of glaucoma occurred in 7 of 16 eyes (43%). Three patients experienced development of glaucoma after keratoprosthesis implantation. One eye experienced development of infectious keratitis, and 2 eyes had retinal detachment. Performing Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis in a developing country is a viable option after multiple keratoplasty failures and conditions with a poor prognosis for keratoplasty. Our experience appears similar to major reports in the field from investigators in developed countries. Adjustments to postoperative management must be considered according to the particular location. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of aniridia with Boston type I keratoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixen, Jordan J; Cohen, Alex W; Kitzmann, Anna S; Wagoner, Michael D; Goins, Kenneth M

    2013-07-01

    To report the outcomes of Boston keratoprosthesis (K-pro) type I implantation for congenital aniridia. A retrospective review of the medical records of every patient with congenital aniridia who underwent Boston K-pro type I implantation at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2011 was performed. The main outcome measures were visual acuity, graft retention, and postoperative complications. A total of 7 eyes (7 patients) met the inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 52 years (range, 12-85 years). The preoperative visual acuity was 20/1600 in 6 eyes (85.7%) and hand motions in 1 eye (14.3%). After a median follow-up period of 18 months (range, 3-30 months), the median final best spectacle-corrected visual acuity was 20/200 (range, 20/100 to light perception). This included 2 eyes (28.6%) that were 20/100 and 5 eyes (71.4%) that were better than 20/300. Compared with the preoperative best spectacle-corrected visual acuity, the final vision was improved in 6 eyes (85.7%) and worse in 1 eye (14.3%). The K-pro graft was retained in all 7 eyes (100%). The most common complication was the formation of a retroprosthetic membrane in 3 eyes (42.9%), none of which required either a YAG capsulotomy or a vitrectomy. One eye (14.3%) developed a wound dehiscence that required surgical repair. The Boston K-pro type I is a good option for the visual rehabilitation of eyes with congenital aniridia.

  12. Knowledge Transfer through a Transnational Program Partnership between Indonesian and Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno, Agustian; Pillay, Hitendra

    2015-01-01

    As transnational programs are often advocated as a knowledge transfer opportunity between the partner universities, this case study investigated the knowledge transfer (KT) processes between Indonesian and Australian universities through an undergraduate transnational program partnership (TPP). An inter-organisational KT theoretical framework from…

  13. The Origin and Development of an Interdisciplinary Humanities Program at Arizona State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Robert Carter

    The purpose of this case study was to examine the origin and development of the Center for the Humanities at Arizona State University in Tempe. An attempt was made to explicate why and how the interdisciplinary humanities program began at Arizona State University, to describe the expansion of and changes in the program as it evolved into the…

  14. Non-Verbal Communication Training: An Avenue for University Professionalizing Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazaille, Mariane

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with today's workplace expectations, many university programs identify the ability to communicate as a crucial asset for future professionals. Yet, if the teaching of verbal communication is clearly identifiable in most university programs, the same cannot be said of non-verbal communication (NVC). Knowing the importance of the…

  15. 24 CFR 570.404 - Historically Black colleges and universities program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... universities program. 570.404 Section 570.404 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT... Purpose Grants § 570.404 Historically Black colleges and universities program. (a) General. Grants under...

  16. Teaching Ethical Copyright Behavior: Assessing the Effects of a University-Sponsored Computing Ethics Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, Jennifer Christie; Kopp, Steven W.

    2006-01-01

    Universities have become sensitized to the potential for students' illegal downloading of copyrighted materials. Education has been advocated as one way to curb downloading of copyrighted digital content. This study investigates the effectiveness of a university-sponsored computing ethics education program. The program positively influenced…

  17. Program Level Assessment: A Case Study for a University Clothing and Textile Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Zee-Sun; Frazier, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for program assessment and a case study in assessment for a university clothing and textile program in family and consumer sciences. Assessment activities and the process implemented by the Textile and Apparel Studies (TAS) major at Western Michigan University are explained. The process adopts the International…

  18. Organizing the Program. The Logistics Involved in Introducing Microcomputing at Drexel University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Microcomputing Program.

    The introduction of Drexel University's microcomputing program, which provides students access to this technology for coursework, is described, with attention to the groups who played a major role in preparing the university. Faculty helped set the initial direction of the program and have been central to its operation. Other faculty roles…

  19. 78 FR 34123 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... NAGPRA Program, c/o Department of Anthropology, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San... construction activities for the Middle Fork American River Project. Site materials from the Middle Fork... Jeffrey Boland Fentress, San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, c/o Department of Anthropology...

  20. Creating University-Community Alliances to Build Internship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Schmitt, Ara J.; Hughes, Tammy L.; Herndon-Sobalvarro, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    By bringing together a community of field-based practitioners, university faculty can help school districts develop accredited school psychology internships. This article describes the rationale for an increase in university involvement in the development of internships, offers considerations unique to schools when supporting the development of an…

  1. A Comparison of Internships among Louisiana University Principal Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kathleen Taylor; Parker, Randy

    2016-01-01

    After widespread accusations that universities were not adequately preparing school leadership candidates with real world experiences, the movement to reform U.S. university principal preparation began. The National Policy Board for Educational Administration approved the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards as guidelines…

  2. Academics as Part-Time Marketers in University Offshore Programs: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, David; Ewan, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Australian universities maintain almost 900 offshore programs delivered to more than 100 000 students, primarily in the nations of Singapore, Malaysia, China, and Hong Kong (Universities Australia, 2009; IDP, 2009a). Although offshore students comprise an estimated 30 per cent of international student enrolments at Australian universities (IDP,…

  3. The Benefits of Intergenerational Learning in Higher Education: Lessons Learned from Two Age Friendly University Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pstross, Mikulas; Corrigan, Trudy; Knopf, Richard C.; Sung, HeeKyung; Talmage, Craig A.; Conroy, Carmel; Fowley, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on the role of universities in the promotion of intergenerational learning and the facilitation of reciprocal sharing of expertise among learners of all ages. The principles of the Age Friendly University are used as a particular lens for interpreting two university programs, one in the United States and one in Ireland. Though…

  4. 76 FR 64882 - Inquiry Into Disbursement Process for the Universal Service Fund Low Income Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Inquiry Into Disbursement Process for the Universal Service Fund Low Income Program... Universal Service Fund low income support to eligible telecommunications carriers (ETCs) based upon claims... Universal Service Administrative Company (USAC) reimburses ETCs for low income support each month based on...

  5. Easing the Transfer of Students from College to University Programs: How Can Learning Outcomes Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Irene; Coyle, James; Leslie, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, students are seeking transfer from college to university educational programs. This challenges universities to assess the effectiveness of transfer policies and also challenges colleges to prepare students for continued education. This paper reviews the various transfer procedures used by Canadian universities, barriers experienced…

  6. Controlling Violent Offenders Released to the Community: An Evaluation of the Boston Reentry Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Anthony A.; Piehl, Anne M.; Hureau, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite the high level of funding and policy interest in prisoner reentry, there is still little rigorous scientific evidence to guide jurisdictions in developing reentry programs to enhance public safety, particularly for managing those who pose the greatest safety risks. The Boston Reentry Initiative (BRI) is an interagency initiative to help…

  7. 2009 National Renewable Energy Labratory/Boston Redevelopment Authority Topographic LiDAR: Boston, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC contracted with Sanborn to provide LiDAR mapping services for the Boston area. Utilizing multi-return systems, Light...

  8. 2009 National Renewable Energy Laboratory/Boston Redevelopment Authority Topographic LiDAR: Boston, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC contracted with Sanborn to provide LiDAR mapping services for the Boston area. Utilizing multi-return systems, Light...

  9. Action Research: Effective Marketing Strategies for a Blended University Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ruth Gannon; Ley, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This action research study investigated a marketing plan based on collaboration among a program faculty team and other organizational units for a graduate professional program. From its inception through the second year of operation, program enrollment increased due to the marketing plan based on an effective approach grounded in simple marketing…

  10. Constructing an Interactive Tutorial: "Boston Massacre."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, James B. M.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses "Boston Massacre," an interactive tutorial game for learning about the Revolutionary War incident. Describes the development of the game and its academic uses. Includes instructions, a sample student response sheet, short answer and multiple choice examinations, and a listing of teacher resources. Reminds history teachers that…

  11. Art and Historical Truth: The Boston Massacre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agresto, John

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the inaccuracy of Revere's "Boston Massacre" print as a description of historical fact. Notes, however, that the print is still a description of truth, a correct understanding of the meaning and portent of the occurrence in a way that historical accuracy (rather than art) might well have distorted. (JMF)

  12. Boston Water & Sewer Commission (BWSC) | Stormwater ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    The Boston Water and Sewer Commission (BWSC) was issued National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit MAS010001, which became effective on October 29, 1999, authorizing stormwater and allowable non-stormwater discharges from its municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4).

  13. Writing Boston: Graffiti Bombing as Community Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesh, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Working as an ethnographer with graffiti writers in Boston, the author has collected a range of materials, and experiences. Graffiti writing is a patently spatial practice, and existing scholarship across disciplines has emphasized this situated relationship between graffiti and the production of, and resistance to, contemporary, neoliberal…

  14. UNIVERSITY SEED CAPITAL PROGRAMS: BENEFITS BEYOND THE LOAN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donna L Herber; Joelle Mendez-Hinds; Jack Miner; Marc C Sedam; Kevin Wozniak; Valerie Landrio McDevitt; Paul R Sanberg

    2017-01-01

    ...-up; Technology transfer As the U.S. economy starts to show signs of recovery (1), university technology transfer offices are shifting their business aims and increasingly focusing on start-ups and the development of industry relationships (2...

  15. University Honors program awards scholarships to three outstanding sophomores

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Meghan

    2007-01-01

    Virginia Tech's University Honors students have long been known for their outstanding academic achievements and service to the community, and three new recipients of sophomore scholarships are no exception.

  16. Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0531 TITLE: Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer Scholars Program PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0531 Cancer Scholars Program 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c... PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Adam Kisailus, PHD; Wendy Huss, PHD ; Richard Hershberger, MBA, PHD; Anna Allen PHD 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK

  17. Double-degree Master's Program in Computational Science: Experiences of ITMO University and University of Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dukhanov, A.V.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Bilyatdinova, A.; Boukhanovsky, A.V.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new double-degree graduate (Master's) programme developed together by the ITMO University, Russia and University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. First, we look into the global aspects of integration of d ifferent educational systems and list some funding opportunities fro m European

  18. A Comparison of Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke Outcomes in two Populations: The Crete-Boston Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaganas, Ioannis; Halpin, Amy P; Oleinik, Alexandra; Alegakis, Athanasios; Kotzamani, Dimitra; Zafiris, Spiros; Chlapoutaki, Chryssanthi; Tsimoulis, Dimitris; Giannakoudakis, Emmanouil; Chochlidakis, Nikolaos; Ntailiani, Aikaterini; Valatsou, Christina; Papadaki, Efrosini; Vakis, Antonios; Furie, Karen L; Greenberg, Steven M; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Background While corticosteroid use in Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke (AHS) is not widely adopted, management with intravenous dexamethasone (IVDxM) has been standard of care at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete (UH-Crete) with observed outcomes superior to those reported in literature. To explore this further, we conducted a retrospective, multivariable-adjusted two-center study. Methods We studied 391 AHS cases admitted to UH-Crete between 1/1997 and 7/2010 and compared them with 510 AHS cases admitted to Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston from 1/2003 to 9/2009. Of the Cretan cases, 340 received a tapering scheme of IVDxM, starting with 16–32 mg/day, while the Boston patients were managed without steroids. Results The two cohorts had comparable demographics and stroke severity on admission, although anticoagulation was more frequent in Boston. The in-hospital mortality was significantly lower on Crete (23.8%, n=340) than in Boston (38.0 %, n=510; p<0.001) as was the 30-day mortality (Crete: 25.4%, n=307; Boston: 39.4%, n=510; p<0.001). Exclusion of patients on anticoagulants showed even greater differences (30-day mortality: Crete 20.8%; n=259; Boston 37.0%; n=359; p<0.001). The improved survival on Crete was observed three days after initiation of IVDxM and was pronounced for deep-seated hemorrhages. After adjusting for AHS volume/location, GCS, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, coronary artery disease and statin, antiplatelet and anticoagulant use, IVDxM treatment was associated with better functional outcomes and significantly lower risk of death at 30-days (odds ratio 0.357; 95% C.I. 0.174–0.732). Conclusions This study suggests that IVDxM improves outcome in AHS and supports a randomized clinical trial using this approach. PMID:22020030

  19. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory/University of California lighting program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, S.

    1981-12-01

    The objective of the Lighting Program is to assist and work in concert with the lighting community (composed of manufacturers, designers, and users) to achieve a more efficient lighting economy. To implement its objectives, the Lighting Program has been divided into three major categories: technical engineering, buildings applications, and human impacts (impacts on health and vision). The technical program aims to undertake research and development projects that are both long-range and high-risk and which the lighting industry has little interest in pursuing on its own, but from which significant benefits could accrue to both the public and the industry. The building applications program studies the effects that introducing daylighting in commercial buildings has on lighting and cooling electrical energy requirements as well as on peak demand. This program also examines optimization strategies for integrating energy-efficient design, lighting hardware, daylighting, and overall building energy requirements. The impacts program examines relationships between the user and the physical lighting environment, in particular how new energy-efficient technologies relate to human productivity and health. These efforts are interdisciplinary, involving engineering, optometry, and medicine. The program facilities are described and the personnel in the program is identified.

  20. Application of a Pod Exercise to University Education Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Dietz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a novel method and subsequent partnership to engage and teach university students. Prior to 11 September 2001 or 9/11, much of the public safety readiness responsibility was limited to a few government officials. Today, public safety is much more widely managed. For this effort, we developed a strategic partnership between state and local government and Purdue University that provides an improved environment for learning and for public health and safety. By using an exercise deployment Strategic National Stockpile (SNS in a Point of Distribution (POD exercise, our efforts with partnering between state and local government and the university provide benefits and opportunities to each. Simultaneously, we tested a full scale POD mass prophylaxis response to an anthrax attack through teaching and training university students who also gain valuable internship-like experience. The ongoing relationship between government and the university's student talent can benefit all in developing paths for future research and data analysis expected of academia and of improving public safety and responsiveness of government.

  1. Colleges and Universities with Degree or Certificate Bearing Programs in Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudess, Jo

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a list of colleges and universities with degree or certificate bearing programs in creativity. Since this focuses only on degree bearing programs, an individual might also focus on creativity by working with a specific faculty member in a more general program such as industrial-organizational psychology or…

  2. Cultivating Leadership, Pedagogy and Programming for CSPAP and Healthy, Active Lifestyles at the University of Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goc Karp, Grace; Brown, Helen; Scruggs, Philip W.; Berei, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    This article highlights processes for infusing comprehensive school physical activity programming (CSPAP) into the physical education teacher education (PETE) program at the University of Idaho (UI). The PETE program uses a modified leadership framework to target learning outcomes and activities pertinent to CSPAP. Student CSPAP knowledge and…

  3. Resolving Issues in Innovative Graduate Degree Programs: The Metropolitan State University Doctor of Business Administration Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmont, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Applied Master's Degree and doctoral programs have been criticized widely for their lack of relevance, rigor and quality. New graduate degree programs have responded to these criticisms by implementing innovative academic policies, program curriculum, and student services. A case study of the Metropolitan State University Doctor of Business…

  4. Leadership Behaviour and Effectiveness of Academic Program Directors in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkinas, Tricia; Ladyshewsky, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on leadership behaviour and effectiveness of university academic program directors who have responsibility for managing a program or course of study. The leadership capabilities were assessed using the Integrated Competing Values Framework as its theoretical foundation. Data from 90 academic program directors and 710…

  5. Neuroscience-Inspired, Behavioral Change Program for University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudziak, James J; Tiemeier, Gesa L

    2017-04-01

    It is clear that environmental influences impact the structure and function of the human brain, and thus, thoughts, actions, and behaviors. These in turn influence whether an individual engages in high-risk (drugs, alcohol, violence) or health-promoting (exercise, meditation, music) activities. The developmental mismatch between cortical and subcortical maturation of the transitional age brain places college students at risk for negative outcomes. This article argues that the prescription of incentive-based behavioral change and brain-building activities simply make good scientific, programmatic, and financial sense for colleges and universities. The authors present University of Vermont Wellness Environment as an example. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Integral urban solid waste management program in a Mexican university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, R M; Turpin, S; Polanco, G; De Latorre, A; Delfín, I; Raygoza, I

    2008-01-01

    The Azcapotzalco campus of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (UAM-A) has implemented an Integral Urban Solid Waste Management Program, "Segregation for a Better UAM Environment" (Separacción por un mejor UAMbiente). This program is directed to create awareness and involve the academic community of the UAM-A concerning the problem of solid wastes, at the same time fulfilling the local environmental legislation. The program consists in separating solid wastes into two classes: (1) recoverable wastes (glass and PET bottles, aluminum cans, Tetrapak packages) and (2) other wastes (non-recoverable). During the past three years, thanks to this program, the amount of solid wastes delivered monthly to municipal collecting services has been considerably reduced. In this period, UAM-A has sent to recycling: 2.2 tons of glass bottles; 2.3 tons of PET bottles; 1.2 tons of Tetrapak packages and 27.5 kg of aluminum cans.

  7. The effectiveness of a learning strategies program for university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roces Montero, Cristina; Sierra Y Arizmendiarrieta, Beatriz

    2017-11-01

    University lecturers often complain about their students’ lack of learning strategies, but not many universities in Spain offer specific courses in this area. Studies on their effectiveness are also rare. This study presents the results of a Learning Strategies Course implemented at the School of Teacher Training and Education, University of Oviedo, Spain. A quasi-experimental design was used with an experi-mental (n = 60) and a control group (n = 57) of students on the Educational Psychology course. A Spanish adaptation of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ): the CEAMR2 was used as a pre and post-test measure. Group A (EG) received training in learning strategies, while group B (CG) received no training. Post-test measures showed significant differences in five out of the ten learning strategies assessed: elaboration, organization, repetition, self-questioning and study space, and also an improvement in one out of the six motivational scales: control of learning beliefs. The results suggest that learning strategies courses with proven effectiveness should be offered to university students.

  8. Developing a Science Cafe Program for Your University Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramozzino, Jeanine Marie; Trujillo, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Science Cafe is a national movement that attempts to foster community dialog and inquiry on scientific topics in informal venues such as coffee houses, bookstores, restaurants and bars. The California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Robert E. Kennedy Library staff have taken the Science Cafe model out of bars and cafes and into…

  9. Effects of a Service-Learning Program on University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervás Torres, Mirian; Fernández Martín, Francisco D.; Arco Tirado, José Luis; Miñaca Laprida, María Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The low productivity that prevailing in recent years in Higher Education requires urgently institutional responses aimed to improving quality of university education contributing to the development among students of key competences for lifelong learning. In this sense, the aim of this research was to explore the effects of an…

  10. University/School District Collaboration Changes a Kindergarten Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer-Vida, Louisa; Levitt, Roberta; Kelly, Susan P.

    2012-01-01

    On their way to a state English board meeting, Susan Kelly, a curriculum director, and Louisa Kramer-Vida, a university professor, used their travel time as an opportunity to converse about pedagogy (McAdamis 2010). Specifically, they reflected about enhancing K-12 writing in a suburban, middle class school district. "We need to introduce a…

  11. Sustainable Procurement: Integrating Classroom Learning with University Sustainability Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Kyle; Harrison, Terry; Holtry, Matthew; Reeh, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Organizations are facing increased pressure from various stakeholders to address issues of sustainability, resulting in a growing demand for sustainability education and training. Procurement groups remain the key drivers of many sustainability-related strategies, placing pressure on universities to integrate sustainability concepts into the…

  12. Roswell Park Cancer Institute / Howard University Prostate Cancer Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    tele-mentored Directed Readings ,(2) a core summer research experience internship and (3) post-internship mentored professional activities. Pre ... skills -attainment by responding to a pre -/post-internship program survey. Significant results and key outcomes- Three of the four tele-mentored...Under this new program structure, these students would conduct a two-sequence pre -internship tele-mentored reading course in 15 the fall and

  13. Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Summer Conference: NASA/USRA University Advanced Aeronautics Design Program and Advanced Space Design Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA/USRA University Advanced Design Program was established in 1984 as an attempt to add more and better design education to primarily undergraduate engineering programs. The original focus of the pilot program encompassing nine universities and five NASA centers was on space design. Two years later, the program was expanded to include aeronautics design with six universities and three NASA centers participating. This year marks the last of a three-year cycle of participation by forty-one universities, eight NASA centers, and one industry participant. The Advanced Space Design Program offers universities an opportunity to plan and design missions and hardware that would be of usc in the future as NASA enters a new era of exploration and discovery, while the Advanced Aeronautics Design Program generally offers opportunities for study of design problems closer to the present time, ranging from small, slow-speed vehicles to large, supersonic and hypersonic passenger transports. The systems approach to the design problem is emphasized in both the space and aeronautics projects. The student teams pursue the chosen problem during their senior year in a one- or two-semester capstone design course and submit a comprehensive written report at the conclusion of the project. Finally, student representatives from each of the universities summarize their work in oral presentations at the Annual Summer Conference, sponsored by one of the NASA centers and attended by the university faculty, NASA and USRA personnel and aerospace industry representatives. As the Advanced Design Program has grown in size, it has also matured in terms of the quality of the student projects. The present volume represents the student work accomplished during the 1992-1993 academic year reported at the Ninth Annual Summer Conference hosted by NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, June 14-18, 1993.

  14. Research in particle physics. [Dept. of Physics, Boston Univ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, Scott J.

    1992-09-01

    Research accomplishments and current activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics are presented. Principal areas of activity include the following: detectors for studies of electron[endash]positron annihilation in colliding beams; advanced accelerator component design, including the superconducting beam inflector, electrostatic quadrupoles, and the electrostatic muon kicker''; the detector for the MACRO (Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory) experiment; neutrino astrophysics and the search for proton decay; theoretical particle physics (electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking, hadron collider phenomenology, cosmology and astrophysics, new field-theoretic models, nonperturbative investigations of quantum field theories, electroweak interactions); measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; calorimetry for the GEM experiment; and muon detectors for the GEM experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  15. The University of Hawaii NEO Follow-Up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohring, Dora; Tholen, David J.; Claytor, Zach; Ramanjooloo, Yudish; Hung, Denise; Aspin, Colin

    2017-10-01

    At the University of Hawaii, we carry out NEO follow-up observations for orbital refinement. We regularly observe eight nights a month using the University of Hawaii 88-inch (UH88) telescope and utilise Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope queue time for recovery of targets with large ephemeris uncertainties. Our focus is follow-up of Virtual Impactors and faint asteroids with magnitudes V>21. The combination of excellent atmospheric conditions on Mauna Kea and long integration times allow us to observe asteroids as faint as V=25. Recent extensive improvements to our workhorse UH88 telescope have included renovations to the telescope exterior, software upgrades, and the commissioning of the new monolithic STA-1600 10K CCD. Recent observational highlights include astrometry of 2017 JB2 during its diurnal retrograde loop and photometric observations 2016 HO3 which was measured to have a synodic period of 27.90 minutes.

  16. LATTICEEASY A Program for Lattice Simulations of Scalar Fields in an Expanding Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G; Tkachev, Igor; Felder, Gary

    2008-01-01

    We describe a C++ program that we have written and made available for calculating the evolution of interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe. The program is particularly useful for the study of reheating and thermalization after inflation. The program and its full documentation are available on the Web at http://physics.stanford.edu/gfelder/latticeeasy. In this paper we provide a brief overview of what the program does and what it is useful for.

  17. Patricia Hyer receives Women in Engineering Program Advocates Network University Change Agent Award

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Virginia Tech's Patricia Hyer, associate provost for academic administration, was awarded the University Change Agent Award at the Women in Engineering Program Advocates Network (WEPAN) national conference in Austin, Texas.

  18. The University of Utah Clinical Genetics Research Program as an NF1 Consortium Site

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Viskochil, David H; Stevenson, David; Carey, John

    2007-01-01

    The University of Utah Clinical Genetics Research Program (CGRP) provided the infrastructure for our site to perform clinical trials within the scope of a consortium to treat multiple medical complications of neurofibromatosis type 1...

  19. The rate of Azad University medical graduates entrance to residency programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monireh Sayyar

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Azad University medical school in Tehran was established in 1985 which followed by establishment of 13 medical schools in other cities. In 1992, the first group of medical graduates of Azad University medical schools found their way to residency programs. One of the indices that has been long interpreted as a basic medical education program success indicator is the proportion of medical graduates who enters residency program. As there has been no report on the proportion or exact number of Azad University medical graduates participating in residency program, we decided to provide a report on the medical graduates who entered residency program in 1992-9. The list of medical graduates from Tehran, Yazd, Najafabad, Kazeroon, Mashad, Tabriz, Ardebil, Quom, Shahrood, and Tonekabon medical schools of Azad University were provided through correspondence with each medical school. A list of Azad University medical graduates who entered residency program in 1992-9 was obtained from Ministry of Health and Medical Education and matched against the list of Azad University medical graduates and further confirmed by the respective medical schools. The students of Semman, Zahedan, Karaj, and Babol medical schools which were closed were included under transferred to Tehran. The 1992's graduates of Yazd and Tabriz medical school and the medical graduates of Najafabad till 1993 and the medical graduates of Quom and Mashad till 1994 are also included under transferred to Tehran. In 1992 Tehran medical school of Azad University graduated its first group of medical students. In 1992-9 Azad University medical schools graduated a total of 3830 medical students. Table 1, Figure 1 and Figure 2 give a general overview of Azad University medical graduates distribution through Azad University medical schools by year of graduation.

  20. Sustainability in the University Student's Mind: Are University Endorsements, Financial Support, and Programs Making a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Evan K.; Clark, Scott K.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the increasing awareness that sustainability is an issue needing ongoing attention, and despite millions of dollars spent yearly at universities to promote sustainable behaviors, previous research has found college students have primarily a unidimensional understanding of what sustainability encompasses. The current research sought to…

  1. Kansas State University electric vehicle site operator program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

    1991-01-01

    K-State is presently working with Grumman Allied and Unique Mobility to establish a working agreement for the research and development of a pure electric postal vehicle. K-State has worked on the design of this vehicle for the past year and is working to establish the appropriate consortium to bring this vehicle to commercial realization. K-State is working to establish infrastructure support for electric vehicles. Presently, a Kansas company is working with K-State to bring its patented low-cost vehicle metering product to market. An anticipated second year DOE project would provide 100 electric metering stations to Southern California for a large scale electric vehicle infrastructure demonstration project. This project would allow a parking lot(s) to be made EV ready. K-State's Site Operator Program continues to get the word-out'' about electric vehicles. From a personal visit by Senator Bob Dole, to Corporate Board of Director Meetings, to school classrooms, to shopping mall demonstrations; K-State Employees are increasing public access and awareness about the electric vehicle industry. As has been shown in this report, K-State's G-Van has logged an average eighteen miles per day while maintaining a full schedule of public relations tours within the state of Kansas and Missouri. K-State has now been contacted by companies in Nebraska and Iowa requesting information and involvement in this program. Kansas and Kansas State will continue its work to contribute to the Site Operator Program effort. With the purchase of two additional electric vehicles and the pending request to purchase two more electric vehicles during the next contractual year, K-states's program will grow. When vehicle development plans and infrastructure requirements are solidified, K-State's program will be ready to participate and be a major contributor to the development and introduction of this technology.

  2. The DOE infrastructure support program at the University of Texas at El Paso. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) is located on 300 acres, only a few hundred years from the US/Mexico border. The DOE Infrastructure Support Program was initiated at UTEP in 1987. The purpose of the program was to assist the University in building the infrastructure required for its emerging role as a regional center for energy-related research. Equally important was the need to strength the University`s ability to complete for sponsored energy-related programs at the state and national levels and to provide opportunities for faculty, staff and students to participate in energy-related research and outreach activities. The program had four major objectives, as follows: (1) implement energy research, outreach and demonstration projects already funded, and prepare new proposals to fund university research interests; (2) establish an Energy Center as a separate operational entity to provide continuing infrastructure support for energy-related programs; (3) strengthen university/private sector energy research linkages; and (4) involve minority graduate and undergraduate students in energy research and outreach activities. Each of the above objectives has been exceeded substantially, and, as a consequence, the University has become a regional leader in energy and environmental research and outreach efforts.

  3. CALL English Courses in the General Studies Program : A Case Study in Iwate Prefectural University

    OpenAIRE

    Eishiro, Ito

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to define English language education at the university level, especially English courses in "Zengaku Kyotsu Kamoku" (Course Offered by the University General Studies Program) and to introduce an example of CALL English courses carried out in Iwate Prefectural University with the result of the survey for Ito's six courses dated between October 24 (Mon)-27 (Thu), 2005. CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning) is an efficient and effective method of learning a foreign languag...

  4. Purposes of Transnational Higher Education Programs: Lessons from Two Indonesian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno, Agustian; Pillay, Hitendra

    2013-01-01

    While intended to facilitate knowledge transfer from international universities and develop Indonesian universities' capacity, transnational higher education programs (TEPs) in Indonesia have been criticised for operating merely as an international trade in education -- implying discrepancy between the rhetoric and reality surrounding the key…

  5. The Non-Consonance between Tourism Universities' Programs and the Needs of Tourism Employment in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Mairna Hussein

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at exploring the reasons behind the contradiction between the outputs of tourism educational programs in Jordanian universities and expectations of tourism employers from the perception of tourism private businesses (travel agents and hotels), also to make an evaluation of universities' educational outcomes. Seventy-nine tourism…

  6. College-University Transfer Programs in Ontario: A History and a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlihey, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    In Ontario, the topic of increasing transferability between colleges and universities has recently attracted the attention of numerous individuals in the fields of higher education, politics and the local media--many of whom have suggested that increasing the availability of college to university transfer programs, also known as articulation…

  7. The Value and Attributes of an Effective Preparatory English Program: Perceptions of Saudi University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Maram George

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of gender and geographical location on the perceptions of Saudi university students regarding the value of preparatory English programs and their attributes. Data was collected during the fall of 2013 from three sample universities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) using an online survey as the instrument.…

  8. Universities' Expectations for Study-Abroad Programs Fostering Internationalization: Educational Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Take, Hiroko; Shoraku, Ai

    2018-01-01

    Because internationalization in higher education has recently received significant attention within the context of globalization, universities in Japan have begun to develop study-abroad programs to support their students in gaining international experience. This article explores those university policies designed to support the…

  9. Understanding the Experience of Women in Undergraduate Engineering Programs at Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jessica Ohanian

    2017-01-01

    Women earn bachelor's degrees in engineering at a rate of less than 17% at public universities in California. The purpose of this study was to understand how women experience undergraduate engineering programs at public universities. To understand this lack of attainment, a qualitative methodology and Feminist Poststructuralist perspective were…

  10. 77 FR 59648 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, NAGPRA Program, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, c/o Department of Anthropology, San Francisco State University... contains Augustine Pattern components along with ethnohistoric and historic era materials. In 1997, human... between the archeological record and historic material culture as early as 500 B.C. Ethnographic records...

  11. Development and implementation of an in-house healthcare program for university-level performing artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambegaonkar, Jatin P; Caswell, Shane V

    2011-01-01

    Performing Arts Medicine (PAM) specializes in providing healthcare to performing artists. Participation in the performing arts can cause injury and impair performing artists' art and livelihood. While healthcare is often available for professionals, university-level students remain underserved. Therefore, our objective was to describe the successful development and implementation of the George Mason University university-level PAM program as a possible template for other institutions. Collaborations among the Athletic Training Education Program, the Department of Dance, and the University Central Administration. An athletic trainer provided free healthcare services that included preventive care, acute emergency and non-emergency injury care, assessment and referral, and rehabilitation to the students. Nearly 100 different injuries and 300 assessment and treatment healthcare sessions were provided in the first year of the program. Program benefits included improved healthcare for dancers, increased learning opportunities for students, research opportunities, and enhanced university recognition. The PAM program offers primary injury prevention by implementing performing artists specific interventions and secondary prevention to improve their health outcomes. Overall, we hope the program's success encourages other institutions to provide in-house healthcare to their students, eventually helping improve healthcare status of all university-level performing artists.

  12. Trial of the University Assistance Program for Alcohol Use Among Mandated Students*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Hortensia; Ahl, Marilyn; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Prado, Guillermo; Mulé, Christina; Kemmemer, Amaura; Larimer, Mary E.; Masi, Dale; Mantella, Philomena

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a brief intervention for mandated students in the context of the University Assistance Program, a Student Assistance Program developed and modeled after workplace Employee Assistance Programs. Method: Participants were 265 (196 males and 69 females) judicially mandated college students enrolled in a large, urban university in the northeast United States. All participants were sanctioned by the university's judicial office for an alcohol- or drug-related violation. Participants were randomized to one of two intervention conditions (the University Assistance Program or services as usual) and were assessed at baseline and 3 and 6 months after intervention. Results: Growth curve analyses showed that, relative to services as usual, the University Assistance Program was more efficacious in reducing past-90-day weekday alcohol consumption and the number of alcohol-related consequences while increasing past-90-day use of protective behaviors and coping skills. No significant differences in growth trajectories were found between the two intervention conditions on past-90-day blood alcohol concentration, total alcohol consumption, or weekend consumption. Conclusions: The University Assistance Program may have a possible advantage over services as usual for mandated students. PMID:19538912

  13. High energy physics program at Texas A and M University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Texas A M experimental high energy physics program continued to reach significant milestones in each of its research initiatives during the course of the past year. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO. In CDF, the Texas A M group has spearheaded the test beam program to recalibrate the Forward Hadron Calorimeter for the upcoming CDF data run, as well as contributing to the ongoing analysis work on jets and b-quarks. In MACRO, we have assisted in the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. The construction of the first six supermodules of the detector has been completed and all six are currently taking data with streamer chambers while four have the completed scintillator counter system up and running. We have built and tested prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry at the SSC. The microstrip chamber is a new technology for precision track chambers that offers the performance required for future hadron colliders. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued to develop during the past funding cycle. We have continued the study of their very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions; flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  14. An Analysis of Retention Programs for Female Students in Engineering at the University of Toledo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchetti, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of a five-year study aimed at improving the retention rates of female students pursuing careers in engineering. The study analyzed a series of programs implemented at the University of Toledo. The programs involve hands-on design projects, research experiences, communication tools geared towards females,…

  15. Marketing of Revenue-Generating ESL Programs at the University of Calgary: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative case study endeavored to understand how program managers at one post-secondary Canadian university define, understand and undertake the marketing of their revenue-generating English as a Second Language (ESL) programs. Data were collected through interviews with three managers of distinct English as a Second Language (ESL)…

  16. Responsive BScN Programming at Nipissing University: The Continuing Education of Ontario Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Scott; Beattie, Beverley; Carter, Lorraine; Caswell, Wenda

    2014-01-01

    Nipissing University in North Bay, Ontario, is currently the only post-secondary institution in that province to offer a part-time Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing (BScN) program for Registered Practical Nurses (RPNs) through a blended learning model. This program represents a "bridge" from the nurse's college diploma and offers a…

  17. Data Curation Program Development in U.S. Universities: The Georgia Institute of Technology Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler O. Walters

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The curation of scientific research data at U.S. universities is a story of enterprising individuals and of incremental progress. A small number of libraries and data centers who see the possibilities of becoming “digital information management centers” are taking entrepreneurial steps to extend beyond their traditional information assets and include managing scientific and scholarly research data. The Georgia Institute of Technology (GT has had a similar development path toward a data curation program based in its library. This paper will articulate GT’s program development, which the author offers as an experience common in U.S. universities. The main characteristic is a program devoid of top-level mandates and incentives, but rich with independent, “bottom-up” action. The paper will address program antecedents and context, inter-institutional partnerships that advance the library’s curation program, library organizational developments, partnerships with campus research communities, and a proposed model for curation program development. It concludes that despite the clear need for data curation put forth by researchers such as the groups of neuroscientists and bioscientists referenced in this paper, the university experience examined suggests that gathering resources for developing data curation programs at the institutional level is proving to be a quite onerous. However, and in spite of the challenges, some U.S. research universities are beginning to establish perceptible data curation programs.

  18. Equine Education Programs and Related Studies as Found in Colleges and Universities in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmenter, Carol L. W.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the nature and scope of equine education programs being offered in the colleges and universities throughout the country and the attitudes of specialists toward these programs. The paper is organized into five major categories: (1) introduction, statement of purpose, design and scope of the study, and…

  19. Master Program in Foreign Language Education at New York University Steinhardt (US)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonnikova, Maryna

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with master program in foreign language education at New York University Steinhardt (US). Thus, its peculiarities have been revealed. It has been defined that the study program presupposes mastering of foreign language teaching approaches that meet various needs of learners. It has been indicated that students acquire the…

  20. How Academics in Undergraduate Business Programs at an Australian University View Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Heidt, Tania; Lamberton, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    This article explores conceptualisations of sustainability and perceptions of its importance in curriculum held by business subject and program leaders. Results are reported from an empirical study of the first-year Bachelor of Business program at an Australian university. Research data was collected in 16 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with…

  1. Yoga for Stress Management Program as a Complementary Alternative Counseling Resource in a University Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Colleen K.

    2006-01-01

    A Yoga for Stress Management Program (YSMP) that served as a complementary alternative therapy resource was successfully implemented at a midsize, predominantly undergraduate university. It was offered in addition to traditional treatments for student mental health. Counselors, Residence Life staff, and faculty found that the program was useful…

  2. The Advanced Education in General Dentistry Program at the University of Maryland at Baltimore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Douglas M.; Blank, Lawrence W.

    1991-01-01

    The University of Maryland at Baltimore's 12-month graduate program in general dentistry focuses on comprehensive care and treatment planning in a simulated group practice environment. To achieve its goal of self-support, the program solicits training grants from international corporations, generates income from clinical facilities, encourages…

  3. The perceived impact of a university outdoor education program on students' environmental behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather Boland; Paul. Heintzman

    2010-01-01

    Outdoor educators often seek to design programs that influence participants' daily lifestyles, especially environmental behaviors. Research on the impact of outdoor education programs on environmental behaviors has typically focused on schoolchildren and teenagers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceived impact of a university outdoor education...

  4. Designing an Academic Project Management Program: A Collaboration between a University and a PMI Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Robin S.; Richardson, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    The demand for project management skills in industry is increasing resulting in a higher demand for project management educational programs. Universities are addressing industry demand by developing project management courses, degree offerings and certificate programs that focus on both technical and general project management skills. While…

  5. The University of Toledo Competency-Based Teacher Education and Individually Guided Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, George E.

    The cooperative program for competency-based teacher education (CBTE) and individually guided education (IGE) operating in the Toledo, Ohio, area is described. Planning, development, design, and redesign processes of the program (which involves the University of Toledo, and public and private schools in the district) are surveyed. Nineteen forces…

  6. University Organizational Culture through Insider Eyes: A Case Study of a Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Haley; Conley, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Using a case study approach, the authors examined university administrator and instructor perspectives about a writing program's organizational culture. In so doing, members of the writing program were invited to participate in interviews over a three-year period. This qualitative case study suggests that examples of culture through a three-lens…

  7. Accreditation of University Undergraduate Programs in Nigeria from 2001-2012: Implications for Graduates Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, M. S.; Imam, Hauwa

    2015-01-01

    This study analysed accreditation exercises of universities undergraduate programs in Nigeria from 2001-2013. Accreditation is a quality assurance mechanism to ensure that undergraduate programs offered in Nigeria satisfies benchmark minimum academic standards for producing graduates with requisite skills for employability. The study adopted the…

  8. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society 1964-1972. A Final Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Program on Technology and Society.

    Eight years of research by the Harvard University's Program on Technology and Society are summarized. Lengthy abstracts of the 29 books and 164 articles that resulted from the Program, as well as interim accounts of projects not yet completed are presented. The report is divided into four parts; institutions (including business, education, and…

  9. A Successful Applied Physics Program at the University of Puerto Rico at Humacao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Rafael J.; Guerra-Vela, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    Presents innovative ideas that have been incorporated into the applied physics program at the Humacao Campus of the University of Puerto Rico since 1981. Describes a program that was designed as a professional (terminal) one with mechanisms to guide students who wish to pursue graduate studies. (Author/YDS)

  10. Communication Barriers: A Study of Eastern Mediterranean University Students' and Teachers' of Online Program and Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Altinay, Fahriye

    2005-01-01

    This research study defines communication barriers in online programs and courses by determining the perceptions of students and teachers at Eastern Mediterranean University. It aims to get the answers to the questions of what sorts of problems students and teachers face while being involved in online courses and online programs. Distance…

  11. Suicide Prevention in the Dot Com Era: Technological Aspects of a University Suicide Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jessica; VanDeusen, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Western Michigan University's Suicide Prevention Program utilizes multiple technological components, including an online training course, a Web site, and 2 social networking Web site profiles, as integral aspects of a comprehensive program. This article discusses the development, maintenance, use, and impact of the technological aspects of this…

  12. Quality Management of Body Donation Program at the University of Padova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Stecco, Carla; Mazzi, Anna; Rambaldo, Anna; Sarasin, Gloria; Parenti, Anna; Scipioni, Antonio; De Caro, Raffaele

    2012-01-01

    Quality management improvement has become a recent focus of attention in medical education. The program for the donation of bodies and body parts (Body Donation Program) at the University of Padova has recently been subjected to a global quality management standard, the ISO 9001:2008 certification. The aim of the present work is to show how the…

  13. Health Science Students' Perception about Research Training Programs Offered in Saudi Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kuwaiti, Ahmed; Subbarayalu, Arun Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to examine the perceptions of students of health sciences on research training programs offered at Saudi universities. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional survey design was adopted to capture the perceptions of health science students about research training programs offered at selected Saudi…

  14. The Rise of International Relations Programs in the Brazilian Federal Universities: Curriculum Specificities and Current Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Marcos Alan S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this reflection is to study the new international relations (IR) programs introduced by Brazilian federal universities, looking comparatively at their curriculum specificities and current challenges. In recent years, Brazil has seen an increase of IR programs launched in several regions. Since 2003, the Ministry of Education is in the…

  15. Experiential Learning: Introducing Faculty and Staff to a University Leadership Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, Martin J.; Page, Diana

    2004-01-01

    This description explores a form of experiential learning using specific outdoor learning activities in a higher education setting to introduce participants to each other and to build a team in a leadership program. Participants in the Leadership Enhancement and Development Program (LEAD) created at the University of West Florida (UWF) include…

  16. Connecting Student Realities and Ideal Models: Changing the University of South Florida's Educational Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Bobbie; Bruner, Darlene Y.; Hill, Marie Somers

    2009-01-01

    Educational leadership program evolution naturally creates tensions among institutional, national, regional, departmental, practitioner, and student cultures. Learning that has occurred during University of South Florida's educational leadership program's change process will be shared as well as national survey documentation examining student…

  17. Investments in the future of behavioral science: the University of California, San Francisco, Visiting Professors Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolcini, M Margaret; Grinstead Reznick, Olga A; Marín, Barbara V

    2009-04-01

    A need exists for the promotion of diversity in the scientific workforce to better address health disparities. In response to this need, funding agencies and institutions have developed programs to encourage ethnic-minority and early-career scientists to pursue research careers. We describe one such program, the University of California, San Francisco, Visiting Professors Program, which trains scientists to conduct HIV/AIDS-related research in communities of color. The program provides training and mentoring in navigating grant processes and developing strong research proposals and provides crucial networking opportunities. Although this program is focused on community-based HIV prevention, its principles and methods are widely applicable.

  18. The Clemson University, University Research Initiative Program in Discrete Mathematics and Computational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    for partial differential equations problems, a new model in fluid flows, and dynamical systems in neurel network problems). The investigators on this...workshop sessions at night and between sessions. Attendance at these conferences has risen from about thirty visitors from largely regional institutions to...sixty visiting distinguished scientists from all regions of the United States and Canada. This has been one of the highlights of the URI program at

  19. Health Sciences Library Support of a University Common Reading Program: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delwiche, Frances A

    2017-01-01

    Common reading programs have become increasingly popular on college and university campuses as a means for increasing student engagement, retention, and success. This article describes the characteristics, goals, and benefits of common reading programs and provides examples from the literature of academic library involvement in them. Finally, an example is provided of how one academic health sciences library participated in its institution's First-Year Summer Reading program.

  20. 67 FR 54410 - University Research for the High Temperature Superconductivity Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-22

    ...The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office (ID) is seeking applications for university research projects in partnership with a national laboratory in support of the High Temperature Superconductivity Program to expand the research base. The research must support Superconductivity for Electric Systems Program milestones, research objectives, and long-term goals. Information on Superconductivity for Electric Systems Program can be found at URL: http://www.eren.doe.gov/superconductivity/pdfs/ superconelectric_reg_materials.pdf.

  1. University of Louisville Research and Energy Independence Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkara, Mahendra K. [Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States)

    2016-02-16

    The development of domestic, environmentally friendly and sustainable sources of energy and liquid fuel is a critical need for the United States (US). Kentucky (KY) is rich in natural energy and agricultural resources that could provide sustainable energy for the state and for the nation. New technology is needed to capture, store, and distribute this sustainable energy in KY. Development of KY’s sustainable energy resources will create economic benefit for the citizens of KY and can serve as a model for other states in the US. Existing technologies for solar energy collection and storage are practical for regions with high and consistent solar intensity, such as the southwest US. Solar energy is plentiful in KY, but is less intense and less regular. As such, novel innovative technology is needed to capture, store, and distribute this energy. KY also has plentiful biomass resources that can be converted to renewable fuels. In addition, the state offers low energy rates, which are conducive for any type of manufacturing industry. A manufacturing R&D center at the University of Louisville (UofL) can help attract high-tech manufacturing industries to the city of Louisville and the state of KY.

  2. Hybrid rocket engine research program at Ryerson University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpynczyk, J.; Greatrix, D.R. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Hybrid rocket engines (HREs) are a combination of solid and liquid propellant rocket engine designs. A solid fuel grain is located in the main combustion chamber and nozzle aft, while a stored liquid or gaseous oxidizer source supplies the required oxygen content through a throttle valve, for combustion downstream in the main chamber. HREs have drawn significant interest in certain flight applications, as they can be advantageous in terms of cost, ease and safety in storage, controllability in flight, and availability of propellant constituents. Key factors that will lead to further practical usage of HREs for flight applications are their predictability and reproducibility of operational performance. This paper presented information on studies being conducted at Ryerson University aimed at analyzing and testing the performance of HREs. It discussed and illustrated the conventional HRE and analyzed engine performance considerations such as the fuel regression rate, mass flux about the fuel surface, burning rate, and zero transformation parameter. Other factors relating to HRE performance that were presented included induced forward and aft oxidizer flow swirl effects as a means for augmenting the fuel regression rate, stoichiometric grain length issues, and feed system stability. Last, the paper presented a simplified schematic diagram of a proposed thrust/test stand for HRE test firings. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Boston keratoprosthesis type I in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homayounfar, Gelareh; Grassi, Christina M; Al-Moujahed, Ahmad; Colby, Kathryn A; Dohlman, Claes H; Chodosh, James

    2017-04-01

    To determine the outcomes of Boston type I keratoprosthesis implanted in elderly patients. A retrospective case series was performed on patients at least 75 years old who received the Boston type I keratoprosthesis between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2012. Preoperative diagnosis, interval visual acuity, keratoprosthesis retention and postoperative complications were recorded for each patient. Forty-four Boston type I keratoprostheses were implanted in 44 eyes of 43 patients. The most common indication for surgery was corneal graft failure (n=23; 52.3%) followed by corneal scar (n=8; 18.2%) and limbal stem cell dysfunction (n=8; 18.2%). All patients had preoperative visual acuity of ≤20/200. Thirty-six of 44 (82%) patients achieved visual acuity of 20/200 or better postoperatively, and 20 of those (55.6%) maintained 20/200 or better for 1 year after surgery. The median length of follow-up was 825 days (range: 27-2193 days), and at the last follow-up visit, 20 of 44 (45.5%) had 20/200 or better vision. The median best-corrected visual acuity (logMAR) improved from 2.6 preoperatively to 1.0 at 1 year postoperative (pkeratoprosthesis is an effective modality in corneal blindness in elderly patients. Failure to restore or maintain ambulatory vision was typically due to non-corneal comorbidities, often unrelated to the keratoprosthesis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. 33 CFR 165.120 - Safety Zone: Chelsea River, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, MA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... is a safety zone: The waters of the Chelsea River, Boston Inner Harbor, for 100 yards upstream and... the Jenny Dock (approximate position latitude 42°23′05.2″ N., longitude 71°01′35.8″ W.)—or the Mobile...

  5. SETI Programs at the University of California, Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, E. J.; Siemion, A. V. P.; Werthimer, D.; Korff, J. V.; Gautham, A.; Cobb, J.; Lebofsky, M.; Dexter, M.; MacMahon, D.; Wright, S.

    2014-03-01

    I describe recent SETI efforts by the University of California, Berkeley SETI Research center and efforts to be undertaken in the near future. In addition to our well known SETI@home (Korpela 2011) and Astropulse (Von Korff et al. 2013) public participation SETI survey projects, we have performed several targeted obsevations of different object classes. These include 1) Observations between 1.1 and 1.9 GHz of planetary systems idenfied by Kepler as containing earthlike planets in or near the habitable zones. (Siemion et al. 2013) 2) Wide-band Arecibo observations of 112 sky locations where the Astropulse project has identified strong µs duration dispersed radio pulses. 3) Observations of Kepler identified planetary systems at times when two planets would appear to be in conjuction when viewed from Earth. We plan a future campaign to simultaneously observe known planetary systems at radio, optical and IR wavelengths. We have also continued to advance our instrumentation. We are currently building the sixth generation of our SERENDIP (Siemion et al. 2011, Korpela et al. 2011) series of SETI instrumentation for installation at both Arecibo and GBT. SERENDIP VI will utilize an FPGA based polyphase filter bank course spectrometer feeding 8 or more GPU based compute nodes. The Arecibo version of this spectrometer will be capable of providing thresholded 1Hz resolution spectra of all seven beams of the 320 MHz bandwidth Arecibo L-band Feed Array in dual polarization. A separate front end will be available to allow up to 2.2 GHz of bandwidth in dual polarization from single pixel receivers. The Green Bank version of this spectrometer will utilize the single pixel front end. We are invesitating the possibility of simultaneous back end stages operating on the same or minimal processed data, for example, we could support simulataneous detection of fast extragalactic radio bursts (Thornton et al. 2013) by adding additional compute nodes. We are also developing new instruments

  6. Vaccination Timeliness in Children Under India's Universal Immunization Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastwa, Nijika; Gillespie, Brenda W; Lepkowski, James M; Boulton, Matthew L

    2016-09-01

    India has the highest number of deaths among children younger than 5 years of age globally; the majority are from vaccine preventable diseases. Untimely vaccination unnecessarily prolongs susceptibility to disease and contributes to the burden of childhood morbidity and mortality, yet there is scarce literature on vaccination delays. The aim of this study is to characterize the timeliness of childhood vaccinations administered under India's routine immunization program using a novel application of an existing statistical methodology. This study utilized the district level household and facility survey data, 2008 from India using vaccination data from children with and without immunization cards. Turnbull estimator of the cumulative distribution function was used to estimate the probability of vaccination at each age. Timeliness of Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), all 3 doses of diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus vaccine (DPT) and measles-containing vaccine (MCV) were considered for this analysis. Vaccination data on 268,553 children who were 0-60 months of age were analyzed; timely administration of BCG, DPT3 and MCV occurred in 31%, 19% and 34% of children, respectively. The estimated vaccination probability plateaued for DPT and BCG around the age of 24 months, whereas MCV uptake increased another 5% after 24 months of age. The 5-year coverage of BCG, DPT3 and MCV in Indian children was 87%, 63% and 76%, respectively. Lack of timely administration of key childhood vaccines, especially DPT3 and MCV, remains a major challenge in India and likely contributes to the significant burden of vaccine preventable disease-related morbidity and mortality in children.

  7. Sustainability Science Educational Program as Integrated Disciplinary Education : Practices and Lessons at Osaka University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwasu, Michinori; Shimoda, Yoshiyuki

    As global threats such as climate change and economic crisis have been emerging, the demand for the establishment of integrated disciplinary education programs is increasing. The Research Institute for Sustainability Science (RISS) at Osaka University started a new program on sustainability in October 2007. The RISS program addresses the ways to utilize knowledge effectively to understand the dynamic interactions between nature and human society. This paper first overviews the RISS Program for Sustainability Science. The paper then discusses the main problems as well as attempts and efforts to challenge those issues. Although issues including institutional barriers and faculty development yet remain in promoting integrated education, the RISS program functions as a platform to disseminate the idea of sustainability science across the university.

  8. Phacoemulsification outcomes in Boston terriers as compared to non-Boston terriers: a retrospective study (2002-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbold, Georgina M; Kelch, William J; Chen, Thomas; Ward, Daniel A; Hendrix, Diane V H

    2018-01-30

    To compare visual outcome and cause of blindness between two groups of dogs undergoing phacoemulsification. Study population consisted of 35 Boston terriers (BT; 70 eyes) and 77 non-Boston terriers (NBT; 154 eyes) that underwent bilateral phacoemulsification surgery. Medical records were reviewed to determine visual outcome, complications leading to blindness and follow-up. A Kaplan-Meier survival curve was used to estimate surgical success at 1 and 2 years postoperatively. Eleven of 35 BT developed known vision loss, with 12 of 70 (17.1%) eyes becoming blind within one year of surgery, and 17 of 77 NBT developed known vision loss, with 19 of 154 (12.3%) eyes becoming blind within 1 year of surgery. No further vision loss was reported among those BT with a 2-year follow-up. In the NBT group, seven additional dogs, a total of 24 of 77 NBT developed vision loss, with a known total of 31 of 154 (20.1%) eyes becoming blind within two years of surgery. These results were not significantly different. The overall surgical success in both groups based on individual eyes was estimated to be between 80 and 90% at 1 year postsurgery and between 65 and 80% at 2 years postsurgery. Glaucoma was the leading cause of vision loss in both groups. There was no significant difference in visual outcomes between a group of BT and a group of NBT undergoing bilateral phacoemulsification at the University of Tennessee between 2002 and 2015. Glaucoma was the leading cause of vision loss in both groups. © 2018 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  9. Perspectives of Implementers on the Student Teacher Practicum Program of a Philippine University: Inputs for Program Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generoso N. Mazo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine the perspectives of the 316 program implementers of the Student Teacher Practicum Program in the Leyte Normal University, Tacloban City. Using the descriptive survey method the inquiry focused on the importance, objectives, relevance, and competencies of the program. The Statistical Program for Social Sciences (SPSS was used to test the level of significance between the perspectives of “in-campus” and “off-campus” respondents. The implementers construed the program as Very Important, Very Effective in attaining its objectives, Very Relevant, and the competencies Very Useful. The null hypotheses were not rejected on the aspects of importance, attaining the objectives and competencies while on the aspect of relevance it was rejected.

  10. Winsor, Dewey, and Putnam: The Boston Experience. Occasional Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Donald G., Jr.; Carpenter, Kenneth E.; Wiegand, Wayne A.; Aikin, Jane

    This volume contains three papers about early library leaders with Boston (Massachusetts) connections. Donald G. Davis, Jr. provides an introduction to the papers. "Justin Winsor, Librarian and Scholar" (Kenneth E. Carpenter) discusses the life of Justin Winsor, who was director of the Boston Public Library (1868-76), president of the…

  11. Fear of Crime among Elderly Jews in Boston and London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Yona

    1985-01-01

    Examines the impact of fear of crime on the daily behavior of elderly Jews in racially mixed, deteriorating neighborhoods in Boston and London. Results showed the Boston elderly retreated behind locked doors, while the London elderly continued their daily routine. (JAC)

  12. Developing a clinical research associate training program at Dillard University: the impact of collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Charlotte; Dennis, Betty P

    2013-01-01

    In 2010 Dillard University and Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans collaborated to secure a five year-grant from the National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health to establish a Minority Health and Health Disparities Research Center (MHHDRC) located on the campus of Dillard University. The MHHDRC is the first Federally funded Center of Excellence in the state of Louisiana. Three cores of the Center operate to achieve its mission. One core includes a clinical research associate (CRA) training program. The major goal of the program is to increase the number of minority CRAs in the state of Louisiana, especially in New Orleans and, ultimately promote greater participation and retention of minorities in clinical trials research. This article discusses the initiation of the CRA training program, its planning, community outreach, implementation, integration of multiple resources and role of collaboration in the development of the MHHDRC including accomplishments, challenges and future plans.

  13. Let's Start at the Very Beginning: The Impact of Program Origins and Negotiated Community-University Partnerships on Canadian Radical Humanities Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Janet; Hyland-Russell, Tara

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the community-university partnerships and the planning process of three Canadian Radical Humanities programs: programs that offer university entry-level humanities to adult learners on the margins of society. Examining these three iterations has revealed the significance of program origins, particularly the introduction of…

  14. Experience in using computer technologies for university training of future NPP personnel based on “University-Enterprise” program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Semenov

    2015-10-01

    Software packages and procedural guides have been developed for mathematical modeling of reactor transients; simulation programs and procedures for the computer and full-scale simulators of neutron experiments and plant startup/shutdown operations have also been developed. Integrated training systems contribute to promoting occupational mentality and form an efficient tool for the personal development of future staff, so most attention in the use of simulators is given to the effects of individual qualities on the level of success achieved at the given stage of training. For illustration, a mathematical model is described and results from numerical experiments to study the reactor xenon stability are presented. Integrated implementation of the described training programs makes it possible to cut practically by half the period for the university graduates to adapt themselves to plant environment as confirmed by reports from the leaders of respective departments.

  15. Level of radiation dose in university hospital non-insured private health screening programs in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Keun Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate radiation exposure resulting from the comprehensive health examinations of selected university hospital programs and to present basic data for research and management strategies on the health effects of medical radiation exposure. Methods Radiation-based diagnostic studies of the comprehensive health examination programs of ten university hospitals in Seoul, Korea, as introduced in their websites, were analyzed. The medical radiation studies of the programs were reviewed by radiologists. Only the effective doses of the basic studies were included in the analysis. The optional studies of the programs were excluded. Results Among the 190 comprehensive health examination programs, 132 programs (69.5% included computed tomography studies, with an average of 1.4 scans. The average effective dose of radiation by program was 3.62 mSv for an intensive program for specific diseases; 11.12 mSv for an intensive program for cancer; 18.14 mSv for a premium program; and 24.08 mSv for an overnight program. A higher cost of a programs was linked to a higher effective dose (r=0.812. The effective doses of the examination programs for the same purposes differed by as much as 2.1 times by hospital. Inclusion of positron emission tomography–computed tomography was the most critical factor in determining the level of effective dose. Conclusions It was found that radiation exposure dose from comprehensive health exam programs targeted for an asymptomatic, healthy public reached between 3.6 and 24 times the annual dose limit for the general public. Relevant management policies at the national level should be provided to minimize medical radiation exposure.

  16. Promoting Success in the Physical Sciences: The University of Wisconsin's Physics Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossal, S. M.; Jacob, A. T.

    2002-05-01

    The Physics Learning Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides small group, academic and mentoring support for students enrolled in algebra-based introductory physics courses. Those students accepted into our program are potentially at-risk academically in their physics course or for feeling isolated at the University. They include, among others, students who have not taken high school physics, returning adults, minority students, students with disabilities, and students with English as a second language. A core component of the program is the peer-lead teaching and mentoring groups that match upper level undergraduate physics majors with students potentially at-risk in introductory physics. The tutors receive ongoing training and supervision throughout the year. The program has expanded over the years to include staff tutors, the majority of whom are scientists who seek additional teaching experience. The Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program is run in collaboration with a similar chemistry program at the University of Wisconsin's Chemistry Learning Center. We will describe our Physics Learning Programs and discuss some of the challenges, successes, and strategies used to work with our tutors and students.

  17. Differences in mathematics anxiety by sex, program, and education of university mathematics students in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Arif

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we aimed to re-examine sex-related differences in mathematics anxiety and to investigate the effects of two different programs associated with mathematics education applied in Turkish universities on mathematics anxiety. Mathematics anxiety scores were assessed in 221 male and 142 female students, 238 in the education faculty and 125 in the science faculty. There were no sex-related mean differences for mathematics anxiety scores, and scores were not related to faculty program. The lower mean mathematics performance on the university entry examination of the students of science faculty may be associated with the mathematics anxiety.

  18. New Perspectives Over The Use Of Smartbands In University-Based Health Education Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Constantin Strunga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our case study is to analyze the perceived impact of smartbands on adopting an active and healthy lifestyle by students at the level of university education. Integrating recent contributions from education sciences, knowledge management and applied health informatics, the paper highlights the premises of an institutional educational program that aims to improve students' health (with a special focus on weight loss. Starting from the arguments for using smarbands in health education programs and the current research being made in this field, the authors propose several directions of study and solutions that could be integrated at university level in order to improve students' health.

  19. The impact of industry/university consortia programs on space education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, John R.; Stone, Barbara A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the industry/university consortia programs established by the United States and Australia and examines these programs from the viewpoint of their impact on space education in their respective countries. Particular attention is given to the aim and the nature of the three programs involved: the Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDSs) (funded by NASA), which are currently involving about 250 companies and 88 universities as participants; the Space Industry Development Centers (SIDCs) (funded by the Australian Space Office): and the Cooperative Research Centers (CRCs) (funded by the Federal Government), which are not limited to the space area but are open to activities ranging from medical research to waste-water treatment. It is emphasized that, while the main aim of the CCDS, SIDC, and CRC programs is to develop space expertise, space education is a very significant byproduct of the activity of these agencies.

  20. Athabasca University: Conversion from Traditional Distance Education to Online Courses, Programs and Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Davis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In its 30 years of operation, Athabasca University has witnessed the full impact of the growth of online distance education. Its conversion from mixed media course production and telephone/ mail tutoring to a variety of electronic information and communication technologies has been heterogeneous across disciplines and programs. Undergraduate programs in business, computing, and some social science programs have largely led the conversion, and all graduate programs have, since their inception, employed various features of online delivery. The parallel conversion of student services has been equally important to the effectiveness of these processes. The implications of this approach for the quality of offerings, support systems, costing, and the primary mandate of the University (which is to remove barriers, not create them are discussed.

  1. Efficacy of an Intervention Program to Improve Employability of University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Fernaud, Estefanía; Ruiz-de la Rosa, Carmen Inés; Negrín, Fátima; Ramos-Sapena, Yeray; Hernández, Bernardo

    2017-01-19

    In the current socioeconomic situation, the need to improve employability of potential workers is especially relevant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an intervention program focusing on improving employability of university students. To do this, a two-group study was designed: one group undertook the intervention program and the other group were used for comparison. Two measurements were taken at different times (pre-intervention and post-intervention). The sample consisted of 271 university students. The results show that the group that underwent the intervention program improved their perceived employability F(1, 269) = 17.49, p employment resources F(1, 269) = 512.89, p < .001; η2 = .66 compared to the group that did not. Furthermore, there was a high level of satisfaction of participants with the intervention program.

  2. Building a culture of excellence in Boston and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Patricia A

    2010-10-01

    There is mounting evidence that unhealthy work environments result in dissatisfied staff, breakdown in communication among disciplines, and poor patient outcomes. The American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) Standards for Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments and the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) Patient-Focused Care project were developed as complementary initiatives to provide direction for improving patient care environments. Hospitalized pediatric patients benefit from interdisciplinary collaboration, teamwork, and clinical innovation that are not obstructed by disciplinary silos and rigid roles. AACN's 6 evidence-based standards are used as a framework to guide this discussion about cultures of excellence in pediatric cardiovascular programs through the lens of an experienced nurse administrator. Each standard interacts in a dynamic way to promote clinical and operational excellence for optimal patient outcomes. Evidence-based examples of contemporary interdisciplinary practice from pediatric cardiovascular centers are described for each of the standards. The 2010 results from the AACN Healthy Work Environment Survey for the cardiovascular program at Children's Hospital Boston are documented. The AACN standards are aligned as a foundation for assessment and improvement of pediatric professional practice environments. Implementation of the standards may be helpful in achieving a culture of excellence in pediatric cardiovascular centers. Monitoring the standards across programs and organizations may be accomplished through the AACN Healthy Work Environment Survey.

  3. Challenges of Implementing a University English for Academic Purposes Program in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Keiko; 田中, 桂子

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the results of a study that investigated the learningoutcomes of a cohort of 293 students enrolled in a English for Academic Purposes (EAP)program in a Japanese university using the results of the TOEFL-ITP and other datagathered through an ethnographic study. The EAP program examined in this study wasonly marginally successful from a statistical point of view using the TOEFL-ITP data.However, the ethnography indicates that when certain conditions are met, even thosest...

  4. Exploratory energy research program at the University of Michigan. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, W.

    1980-12-08

    A DOE grant to the University of Michigan for an Exploratory Energy Research Program is being used by the U-M Office of Energy Research (OER) to support faculty research and grad student research assistantships. Progress on activity during the first six months of the program is described and brief status reports on 20 energy-related faculty research projects in the physical, engineering, biological, and behavioral sciences are presented.

  5. [Michigan Technological University Pre-Service Teacher Enhancement Program]. [Includes a copy of the Student Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.S.; Yarroch, W.L.

    1993-04-27

    The Michigan Technological University Teacher Education Program received funding from the US Department of Energy for the purpose of providing capable and suitably inclined, MTU Engineering and Science students a chance to explore high school level science and mathematics teaching as a career option. Ten undergraduate students were selected from nominations and were paired with mentor teachers for the study. This report covers the experience of the first ten nominees and their participation in the program.

  6. [Michigan Technological University Pre-Service Teacher Enhancement Program]. Progress performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.S.; Yarroch, W.L.

    1993-04-27

    The Michigan Technological University Teacher Education Program received funding from the US Department of Energy for the purpose of providing capable and suitably inclined, MTU Engineering and Science students a chance to explore high school level science and mathematics teaching as a career option. Ten undergraduate students were selected from nominations and were paired with mentor teachers for the study. This report covers the experience of the first ten nominees and their participation in the program.

  7. Nuclear criticality safety program at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.; Brewer, R.; Dunn, M.; Haught, C.; Plaster, M.; Wilkinson, A.; Dodds, H. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Elliott, E.; Waddell, W. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) educational program at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. The program is an academic specialization for nuclear engineering graduate students pursuing either the MS or PhD degree and includes special NCS courses and NCS research projects. Both the courses and the research projects serve as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree being pursued.

  8. Career support in medicine - experiences with a mentoring program for junior physicians at a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Vetsch, Esther; Mattanza, Guido

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Until now, mentoring has hardly been used by the medical profession in German-speaking countries as a means of supporting junior physicians in their careers. The aim of the mentoring project described here was to obtain information for promoting and developing future mentoring programs at a university hospital. Method: A new integrated mentoring model was developed and implemented over a 12-month period. Peer groups were advised on the mentoring process by mentors and program manager...

  9. MPH program at Manipal University, India-experiences, challenges, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Hattangadi Vinod; Kamath, Ramachandra; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar; Delzell, Elizabeth; Tipre, Meghan; Upadhyay, Divvy Kant; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2013-01-01

    The UAB-ITREOH program has initiated a skill-based MPH program at Manipal University (MU), India, in 2009, to address the critical need for trained public health professionals and build institutional public health training capacity in the country. Funds from Fogarty have supported the curriculum development and specialized training of MU faculty to teach in the MPH program. The program has been successfully launched and is gaining momentum. The lessons learned from our experiences as well as several challenges faced from the initialization to execution of the program are described in the article. Government support is crucial for raising the profile of this program by accreditation, creating job opportunities and by recognizing these professionals as leaders in the public health sector. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. UNIESPAÇO A Space Technology and Science Program for Brazillian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Gurgel, Carlos

    This work describes the activioties of The UNIESPAÇO Program of the Brazillian Space Agency AEB. This program was stablished in 1997, just three years after the official announcement of the Brazillian Space Agency. Its objective is to integrate the university sector to the goals of the Brazillian National Space Activities Program - PNAE in order to attend the requirements of the Brazillian space sector by developing processes, products, analysis and studies relevants to PNAE development. Its main goal is to form a solid base for space research and development composed by specialized groups capable to execute projects for the space sector. In summary the main tasks for the UNIESPAÇO program are: - Stimulate and amplify the participation of universities and others related research institutionsd in the PNAE. - To promote research projects on selected topics to generate products, processes, analysis and studies that can be applied on the brazillian space program with emphasis on possible prototype instruments development as a result of the research projects. - To improve research and development groups on space science and technology in order to give and increase capacities to execute projects with higher complexity. The guidelines of the UNIESPAÇO program are determined by represetants from AEB, Brazillian Universities, Brazillian Academy of Sciences (ABC), INPE (Brazillian Space Institute) and IAE(Institute of Space and Aeronautics from DCTA).

  11. Adolescents' reactions to universal and indicated prevention programs for depression: perceived stigma and consumer satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapee, Ronald M; Wignall, Ann; Sheffield, Jeanie; Kowalenko, Nick; Davis, Anna; McLoone, Jordana; Spence, Susan H

    2006-06-01

    There is a common view that one of the major considerations in selecting between universal and indicated interventions is the marked stigma produced by the latter. However, to date there has been no empirical examination of this assumption. The current study examined reported stigma and program satisfaction following two school-based interventions aimed at preventing depression in 532 middle adolescents. The interventions were conducted either across entire classes by classroom teachers (universal delivery) or in small high risk groups by mental health professionals (indicated delivery). The indicated delivery was associated with significantly greater levels of perceived stigma, but effect sizes were small and neither program was associated with marked stigma in absolute terms. Perceived stigma was more strongly associated with aspects of the individual including being male and showing greater externalizing symptomatology. In contrast, the indicated program was evaluated more positively by both participants and program leaders and effect sizes for these measures of satisfaction were moderate to large. The results point to the need for further empirical evaluation of both perceived stigma and program satisfaction in providing balanced considerations of the value of indicated and universal programs.

  12. Changes in University Students’ Perceptions towards a Two-Week Summer English Immersion Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meihua Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research examined how university students perceived a 2-week summer English immersion program organized and designated by Chinese teachers of English in a highly prestigious university in Beijing and whether their perceptions changed during the period. Data included 208 surveys and 19 informal interviews in week 1 and 207 surveys and 19 interviews in week 2 (the participants were largely the same in both weeks. Analyses of the data showed that in both weeks, most students considered the courses interesting and liked most of them for similar reasons (e.g., being interesting and having much participation, that the program improved students’ English abilities in listening, speaking, reading and writing as well as overall English proficiency, and that the program enhanced students’ interpersonal communication ability, confidence in using English, knowledge of the culture of English-speaking countries, interest in and motivation to learn English. The results also revealed that the participants tended to become more positive about the program, have a more comprehensive view of the program and assess it more objectively toward the end of the program. Evidently, the program helped the students in various aspects. To better help students, it is useful to do needs analyses prior to the program so that more acceptable courses and activities can be designed and offered.

  13. Universal violence and child maltreatment prevention programs for parents: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Rachel Pisani Altafim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to review recent literature on universal violence and child maltreatment prevention programs for parents. The following databases were used: Web of Science, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, PubMed, LILACS, and SciELO. The keywords included the following: (Parenting Program or Parent Training or Parent Intervention and (Maltreatment or Violence or Violence Prevention. For inclusion in this review, the programs had to be structured, working in groups of parents aiming to improve parenting practices. Twenty-three studies were included, and 16 different types of parenting programs were identified. Ninety-one percent of the studies were conducted in developed countries. All the programs focused on the prevention of violence and maltreatment by promoting positive parenting practices. Only seven studies were randomized controlled trials. All studies that evaluated parenting strategies (n = 18, reported after the interventions. The programs also effectively improved child behavior in 90% of the studies that assessed this outcome. In conclusion, parenting educational programs appear to be an important strategy for the universal prevention of violence and maltreatment against children. Future studies should assess the applicability and effectiveness of parenting programs for the prevention of violence against children in developing countries. Further randomized control trials are also required.

  14. A Meta-analysis of universal mental health prevention programs for higher education students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Colleen S; Durlak, Joseph A; Kirsch, Alexandra C

    2015-05-01

    This meta-analysis investigated the effectiveness of universal mental health prevention programs for higher education students on a range of adjustment outcomes. A systematic literature search identified 103 controlled published and unpublished interventions involving college, graduate, or professional students. As hypothesized, skill-training programs that included a supervised practice component were significantly more effective overall (mean effect size = 0.45, confidence interval (CI) = 0.39 to 0.52) compared to skill-training programs without supervised practice (0.11, CI = -0.01 to 0.22) and psychoeducational (information-only) programs (0.13, CI = 0.06 to 0.21). When comparisons on specific outcomes were possible, skill-training programs including supervised practice were significantly more effective than the other two groups of programs in reducing symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress, and general psychological distress, and in improving social-emotional skills, self-perceptions, and academic behaviors and performance. The magnitude of effects achieved in several outcome areas is comparable to or higher than that reported in other reviews of universal programs, suggesting that skill-training programs for higher education students that incorporate supervised practice now join the ranks of other effective preventive mental health interventions. This review offers several recommendations to improve the experimental rigor of future research.

  15. Overview of NASA's Universe of Learning: An Integrated Astrophysics STEM Learning and Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise; Lestition, Kathleen; Squires, Gordon; Biferno, Anya A.; Cominsky, Lynn; Manning, Colleen; NASA's Universe of Learning Team

    2018-01-01

    NASA's Universe of Learning creates and delivers science-driven, audience-driven resources and experiences designed to engage and immerse learners of all ages and backgrounds in exploring the universe for themselves. The project is the result of a unique partnership between the Space Telescope Science Institute, Caltech/IPAC, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and Sonoma State University, and is one of 27 competitively-selected cooperative agreements within the NASA Science Mission Directorate STEM Activation program. The NASA's Universe of Learning team draws upon cutting-edge science and works closely with Subject Matter Experts (scientists and engineers) from across the NASA Astrophysics Physics of the Cosmos, Cosmic Origins, and Exoplanet Exploration themes. Together we develop and disseminate data tools and participatory experiences, multimedia and immersive experiences, exhibits and community programs, and professional learning experiences that meet the needs of our audiences, with attention to underserved and underrepresented populations. In doing so, scientists and educators from the partner institutions work together as a collaborative, integrated Astrophysics team to support NASA objectives to enable STEM education, increase scientific literacy, advance national education goals, and leverage efforts through partnerships. Robust program evaluation is central to our efforts, and utilizes portfolio analysis, process studies, and studies of reach and impact. This presentation will provide an overview of NASA's Universe of Learning, our direct connection to NASA Astrophysics, and our collaborative work with the NASA Astrophysics science community.

  16. Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis for failed keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Jonathan L; Phillips, David L; Goins, Kenneth M; Kitzmann, Anna S; Greiner, Mark A; Cohen, Alex W; Welder, Jeffrey D; Wagoner, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of the Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis (Kpro-1) in eyes with failed keratoplasty. A retrospective review was performed of every patient treated with a Kpro-1 at a tertiary eye care center between January 1, 2008 and July 1, 2013. Eyes with a failed keratoplasty originally performed for corneal edema, trauma, or keratoconus were included in the statistical analysis. The main outcome measures were visual outcome, prosthesis retention, and postoperative complications. Twenty-four eyes met the inclusion criteria, including 13 eyes with corneal edema, 8 eyes with trauma, and 3 eyes with keratoconus. After a mean follow-up period of 28.9 months (range 7-63 months), the median best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/125. The BCVA was ≥ 20/40 in 4 (16.7 %) eyes, ≥ 20/70 in 9 (37.5 %) eyes, and ≥ 20/200 in 14 (58.3 %) eyes. Overall, the postoperative BCVA improved in 17 (70.9 %) eyes, was unchanged in 3 (12.5 %) eyes, and was worse in 4 (16.7 %) eyes. The initial Kpro-1 was retained in 22 (91.7 %) eyes, and was successfully repeated in the other 2 eyes. One or more serious prosthesis- or sight-threatening complications occurred in 8 (33.3 %) eyes. These included 1 case of wound dehiscence leading to prosthesis extrusion, 1 case of fungal keratitis leading to prosthesis extrusion, 4 cases of endophthalmitis, and 5 retinal detachments. The Boston Kpro-1 is associated with an excellent prognosis for prosthesis retention and satisfactory visual improvement in eyes with previous failed keratoplasty.

  17. Admission and Graduation Requirements for Special Education Doctoral Programs at 20 Top American Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of the admissions and graduation requirements guidelines of the special education doctoral programs at 20 top American universities was conducted. Admission requirements typically include an application fee, previous coursework GPA, previous field experience, GRE scores, TOEFL scores, professional writing sample(s), and…

  18. Perceived Value of University-Based Continuing Education Leadership Development Programs for Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Geri L.; Major, Claire H.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study, which involved development of a Value Creation Survey, examined the perceived value of leadership development programs (LDPs) provided by continuing higher education for administrators in colleges and universities. Participants were administrators at Association for Continuing Higher Education (ACHE) member institutions.…

  19. The Writing Program and the Call to Service: A Progress Report from a Land Grant University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Although a vibrant literature on the social justice advantages of writing service-learning programs has existed for many years, the focus has tended to be on specific projects and courses, often accompanied by an understandable suspicion that entrenched institutions like universities have interests inimical to radical social change. As a result,…

  20. Influence of Multiculturalism on the Study Programs in Malaysian Public Universities: International Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Ambigapathy; Baboo, Shanthi Balraj; Mahfoodh, Omer Hassan Ali

    2016-01-01

    In response to the emphasis on the benefits of enhanced multicultural educational experiences of international students in higher education, this study examined international students' perceptions of the influence of multiculturalism on the study programs in Malaysian public universities. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. The…

  1. Research in the Doctoral Program in Second Language Acquisition at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Costa, Peter I.; Bernales, Carolina; Merrill, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Faculty and graduate students in the Doctoral Program in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison engage in a broad spectrum of research. From Professor Sally Magnan's research on study abroad and Professor Monika Chavez's work in foreign language policy through Professor Richard Young's examination of…

  2. Career Advancement, Career Enhancement, and Personal Growth of Pepperdine University's Educational Leadership Academy Graduate Program Alumni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Ruth I.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was two-fold: (a) to explore and describe the perceived impact of Pepperdine University's Educational Leadership Academy (ELA) on 2003-2006 ELA graduates' career advancement, career enhancement, and personal growth; and (b) to obtain ELA graduates' suggestions for ELA program improvement to better prepare…

  3. Stanford University: The Building Energy Retrofit Programs. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Stanford University's Energy Retrofit Program was created in 1993 to target resource reduction and conservation focused projects on campus. Fahmida Ahmed, Associate Director of the Department of Sustainability and Energy Management, says that Stanford has been investing in sustainability and energy-efficiency since the late 1970s, longer than many…

  4. The Effects of a Peer Mentoring Program on Academic Success among First Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Susan; Tremblay, Paul F.

    2003-01-01

    The present study examines the effect of participation of first-year university students in a full-year peer mentoring program as well as individual differences in motivation in relation to outcome measures of retention and achievement. A sample of 983 first year students completed the Academic Motivation Inventory (Tremblay, 1998) and agreed to…

  5. Environmental Biology Programs at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Lowell L.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the programs of the Department of Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution at the University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign). Focuses on the graduate degrees offered in environmental biology. Lists research interests and courses in plant biology, entomology, forestry, civil engineering, and landscape architecture. (TW)

  6. 1976 Inter-university symposium on renewable resource assessment and programming: executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billy G. Pemberton

    1977-01-01

    The Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974 directs the Secretary of Agriculture to prepare an assessment of the nation's renewable resources and a program that will assure an adequate future supply of these resources. Responsibility for this work is assigned to the Forest Service. An inter-university symposium was held in 1976 to evaluate...

  7. Effectiveness of a Universal, Interdependent Group Contingency Program on Children's Academic Achievement: A Countywide Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Robert; Osborne, Karen J.; Dean, Emily L.

    2015-01-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a universal prevention program designed to increase academic engagement and to decrease disruptive behavior in elementary school-age children. Teachers and other school personnel use interdependent group contingencies to improve students' behavior in the classroom. Previous research indicates the GBG is efficacious…

  8. Composing a Professional Writing Program at the University of Puget Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, Sarah; Turnbull, Mary

    English is the second-largest major at the University of Puget Sound (Tacoma, Washington). Students may choose one of three emphases within their major: literature, creative writing, or professional writing. Puget Sound's professional writing program has grown gradually and slowly over the last 11-year period to include an array of 10 professional…

  9. A visit to Cornell University, Ithaca, USA : Notes on the International Workplace Studies Program IWSP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voordt, Theo

    2004-01-01

    In October 2004 I had the opportunity to visit Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. The purpose of my visit was to learn more about the International Workplace Studies Program (IWSP) that was launched in 1989 by Franklin Becker and William (Bill) Sims. Frank is the present chair (Bill the former)

  10. iPrincipals: Innovative Themes, Strategies, and Recommendations of Ten Online University Educational Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Teri A.; Loose, William V.

    2015-01-01

    This report, the second in a series, provides comparative empirical data on current state and national university trends around the thematic strategies and constructs ten fully online Educational Leadership programs engage within their innovative designs. Our 2014 iPrincipals report provided information on how one California University…

  11. University Worksite Health-Promotion Programs: An Opportunity for Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Lisa; Adams, Kent

    2017-01-01

    Worksite health-promotion programs (WHPPs) are prevalent in a variety of worksite settings, including universities, due to their numerous individual health and organizational benefits. Simultaneously, WHPPs provide many employment opportunities for kinesiology graduates. However, few students graduate with applied experience in worksite health…

  12. The Impact of an Undergraduate Honors Program on Gifted University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Thomas P.; McBee, Matthew T.

    2007-01-01

    Through a qualitative research design, this study examined the experiences of seven gifted university students in an undergraduate honors program. The findings indicated the students as adolescents experienced a sense of isolation resulting from the differences between their abilities, interests, life goals, religious value systems, and the…

  13. Unifying Program Goals: Developing and Implementing a Writing and Rhetoric Major at Oakland University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergaard, Lori; Giberson, Greg A.

    2010-01-01

    In this critical program profile, the authors provide an analysis of the historical, political, theoretical, and practical circumstances that influenced the development of Oakland University's undergraduate major in writing and rhetoric. Through an analysis of the developmental process and the major itself, this article explores many separate, yet…

  14. Financing Policies for High Cost University of Minnesota Health Professions Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Higher Education Coordinating Board, St. Paul.

    Issues and related data are examined concerning financial aid to students in the health professions at the University of Minnesota, with a focus on targeted grant programs for dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, and medicine. Following a discussion of policy implications in general and an overview of each of the fields involved, eight policy…

  15. Linking Curriculum and Learning to Facilities: Arizona State University's GK-12 Sustainable Schools Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elser, Monica M.; Pollari, Lynette; Frisk, Erin; Wood, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Arizona State University's "Sustainability Science for Sustainable Schools program" brings together graduate students, sustainability researchers, high school teachers and students, and school or district administrators in a project designed to address the challenge of becoming a "sustainable school." Funded by the National…

  16. University HRD Programs. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on university HRD (human resource development) programs. A survey of 20 multinational corporations reported in "Determining the Labor Demand and Development Needs of HR/HRD Professionals in China" (William J. Rothwell) finds the demand for HR generalists and specialists in China is…

  17. University partnerships with the corporate sector faculty experiences with for-profit matriculation pathway programs

    CERN Document Server

    Winkle, Carter

    2013-01-01

    Carter Winkle provides emperically derived insight into both positive and negative implications of the contemporary phenomena of partnerships between universities and private, for-profit educational service providers resulting in matriculation pathway programs for non-native English speaking students in the United States.

  18. The Design and Implementation of a Peer Mentoring Program for International Students at Morehead State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Donell Cochran

    2017-01-01

    Peer mentoring is a way to help guide and form valuable relationships between two or more students and plays an important role in the success, both academically and socially, of students. At Morehead State University (MSU), the International Peer Mentoring Program (IPMP) was designed and implemented in the Fall of 2016 to assist in the academic…

  19. Gerontological Training Programs Offered by Latin American Universities: Number, Characteristics, and Disciplinary Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Giuliani, María Florencia; Serrat, Rodrigo; Curcio, Carmen-Lucía; Lopes, Alexandra; Maldonado, María de la Luz Martínez; Oliveira, Rita da Cássia

    2017-01-01

    One of the challenges of population aging is to ensure that there are enough trained professionals to meet the changing, specific needs of aging populations. The aim of this study was to describe the number, geographical distribution, and general characteristics of gerontological training programs offered by Latin American universities and to…

  20. Motivation and Outcomes for University Students in a Restorative Justice Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher Dahl, Meghan; Meagher, Peter; Vander Velde, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    A restorative justice program (RJP) was developed at a large university in the housing student conduct office. Students accused of misconduct who participated in a restorative justice (RJ) conference completed surveys regarding their motivations and perceived outcomes. Results showed that students who were motivated to make reparations to others…

  1. The Impact of Immersion Programs upon Undergraduate Students of Jesuit Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Statement of the problem: This research study examined the impact of international immersion programs upon undergraduate students at Jesuit colleges and universities. Students return from immersion experiences claiming that the experience changed their lives. This study offered an assessment strategy to give greater evidence as to the impact of…

  2. Take a Paws: Fostering Student Wellness with a Therapy Dog Program at Your University Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannon, Amber; Harrison, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Therapy dogs are trained and socialized to provide comfort to individuals who are ill or experiencing stress. The following article explores therapy dog outreach programs in academic libraries by describing a successful venture at McGill University Library. Background, planning advice, assessment results, and recommendations are presented with an…

  3. Improving English Pronunciation through Computer-Assisted Programs in Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qudah, Fatima Zaki Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of using computer- assisted programs for teaching English pronunciation on students' performance in English Language pronunciation in Jordanian universities. To achieve the purpose of the study, a pre/post-test was constructed to measure students' level in English pronunciation. The sample…

  4. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  5. University of New Mexico Undergraduate Breast Cancer Training Program: Pathway to Research Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    objectives and the schedule for the pathways program has been included in the appendix. Objective 3: Provide Trainees familiarity with state-of-the-art breast...Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 915 Camino de Salud , NE Basic Medical Science Building, Room #249 University of New Mexico School of

  6. International Students' Perceptions of Their Learning Environment in Graduate Programs at One Normal University in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwin, Thawdar; Aslam, Sarfraz; Mukhale, Phoebe Naliaka

    2017-01-01

    This study was an investigation of the international students' perceptions of their learning environment in graduate programs at one normal university in China. The study used both quantitative and qualitative research methods. The sample comprised 91 international students, 51 Master and 40 doctoral from three schools: Education, Life Sciences…

  7. 78 FR 21403 - Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University NAGPRA Program, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... NAGPRA Program, c/o Department of Anthropology, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San... conjunction with the construction of the New Don Pedro Reservoir. Site materials from the New Don Pedro...-Wuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of California. The objects are consistent with the material...

  8. Towards a Marketing Communication Recruitment Plan for the Rowan University Educational Leadership Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyi, Titus Kamau

    2009-01-01

    Doctoral studies are at the apex of the education system. Attracting, recruiting, enrolling, and graduating the best suited students in doctoral education is, therefore, critical in ensuring the highest academic standards and service to society. Focusing on Rowan University's Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership program, this…

  9. Baccalaureate-linked oncology nursing education: McMaster University's Paediatric and Adult Oncology Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    For new nursing graduates prepared as generalists, the transition from student to graduate and from new generalist graduate to experienced specialized nurse can be very anxiety-provoking. This paper discusses one program, the Oncology Nursing Program, McMaster University, designed for nurses working along the cancer continuum. Proposed by oncology nurses seeking baccalaureate-linked specialty education, the year-long program has now been in existence for 10 years. A cadre of nearly 200 graduates affirm that specialized education influences direct patient care, health care team membership, professional and personal development.

  10. Associated Western Universities summer participant program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Summer 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, B.

    1997-08-01

    The Associated Western Universities, Inc. (AWU) supports a student summer program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This program is structured so that honors undergraduate students may participate in the Laboratory`s research program under direct supervision of senior Laboratory scientists. Included in this report is a list of the AWU participants for the summer of 1997. All students are required to submit original reports of their summer activities in a format of their own choosing. These unaltered student reports constitute the major portion of this report.

  11. university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Universities occupy a special place in the city’s life, the place where centuries-old traditions of the past meet the future. Universities keep their ancestral roots stretching back into the Middle Ages. University rooms and laboratories are the places where the future of science and society is built and discussed.The oldest Siberian University located in Tomsk was included in the City Charter as a city-forming enterprise. Other Siberian cities have not yet come to such deep comprehension of the role of universities. But who can doubt the significance and beneficence of this role?A complex and debatable process of reformation of the Russian higher education has been going on for several decades. Many things are perceived painfully. Irkutsk has been a student city for a long time and ranked second in the percentage of students among citizens. But recently we have lost Irkutsk High Military Aviation Engineering School, nearly lost the MIA High School. Pedagogical University has lost its status of university, and then its independence. Linguistic University has turned into a branch of Moscow University…Besides, external threats still exist and even grow. The lands and the buildings of universities are of keen interest among big businessmen, speculators and developers… Isn’t it the reason why the ideas to evacuate universities to suburban campuses arise increasingly frequently?What is the impact of dislocation of universities out of the city historical center? Does it make the city poorer and older? Or safer and more manageable? As usual, we tried to show the challenge and diversity of the main topic of the issue.

  12. Needs, interests, and attitudes of university faculty for a wellness program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhart, G A; Ebro, L L; Claypool, P L

    1988-08-01

    During the 1986-1987 academic year, 484 full-time faculty members at Oklahoma State University responded to a health habits questionnaire. The purpose of this study was to assess the needs, interests, and attitudes of faculty for a wellness program. Behaviors were assessed in the following categories: cigarette smoking, alcohol/drugs, eating habits, exercise/fitness, stress management, and safety. Only 100 (20.6%) of the total indicated that they were currently smokers. Neither the alcohol/drugs nor the safety categories appeared to be problem areas, with no significance noted. Categories indicating a need for improvement were exercise/fitness, eating habits, and stress management. Faculty members were interested in and willing to participate in a wellness program. Preferred areas of interest in rank order were (1) exercise/fitness, (2) stress management, and (3) nutrition. Results of this study indicate that faculty in a major university are interested in wellness and will participate in a wellness program. Need and interest suggest that an exercise/fitness program should be instituted first, with stress management and nutrition components added as funds become available. A successful wellness program in a university setting has implications for happier, more productive employees, reduced absenteeism, and lower health insurance premiums.

  13. Mothers' and fathers' attendance in a community-based universally offered parenting program in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Michael B; Sarkadi, Anna; Salari, Raziye

    2016-05-01

    Using a public health perspective, this study examined the characteristics of mothers and fathers who attended, compared to those who did not attend, a community-based practitioner-led universally offered parenting program. Mothers (141) and fathers (96) of 4- to 5-year-olds completed a set of questionnaires, including their demographic characteristics, their child's behavioral and emotional problems, and their own parenting behavior. They were all then given the opportunity to attend level 2 of the Triple P--Positive Parenting Program. During the first six months of the study, 33 mothers and 11 fathers opted to attend the program. The relation between program attendance and parental characteristics was similar for mothers and fathers. In general, fathers, non-native and lower educated parents were less likely to attend the program. Mothers, but not fathers, were more likely to attend if they reported more child behavior problems, while fathers, but not mothers, were observed at a trend level to attend if they perceived their child as having more emotional problems. In addition, parents in general were more likely to attend if they used more harsh parenting strategies. Although the universal offer did not reach parents universally, generally those parents who needed it were more likely to attend. Furthermore, this study shows that different factors may impact mothers' and fathers' attendance; therefore, parental data should be analyzed separately and different recruitment strategies should be used for mothers and fathers. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  14. Laser Safety Program Development at Texas A&M University--Issues and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Latha; Menchaca, Daniel I; Tutt, James

    2015-09-01

    Implementing a laser safety program within a University setting encompassing a wide variety of Class 3b and Class 4 lasers with varied potential uses introduces many challenges. Texas A&M University (TAMU) currently has over 310 laser units that are registered with the Texas Department of State Health Services (TDSHS). One primary task in maintaining the laser registration is to have a program that identifies the regulatory responsibilities of the registrant. The Radiological Safety Staff, a part of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS), administers the use of both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The Radiological Safety Officer (RSO)/Laser Safety Officer (LSO) maintains the laser registration. This article outlines key elements that were put forth in the development and implementation of the laser safety program at TAMU.

  15. University of Florida--US Department of Energy 1994-1995 reactor sharing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetson, W.G.

    1996-06-01

    The grant support of $24,250 (1994-95?) was well used by the University of Florida as host institution to support various educational institutions in the use of UFTR Reactor. All users and uses were screened to assure the usage was for educational institutions eligible for participation in the Reactor Sharing Program; where research activities were involved, care was taken to assure the research was not funded by grants for contract funding from outside sources. Over 12 years, the program has been a key catalyst for renewing utilization of UFTR both by external users around the State of Florida and the Southeast and by various faculty members within the University of Florida. Tables provide basic information about the 1994-95 program and utilization of UFTR.

  16. Practices of reading and writing in five diferent programs of the Sergio Arboleda university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca González

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an investigation into the practices of reading and writing present in five courses of different programs assigned at the Sergio Arboleda University (Bogotá. The research derives from the following questions: What is the role of reading and writing process in the course of some programs at the University? How is assign, directed and accompanied the task of reading and writing? and how are assessed the progress and results in the process of reading and writing? The information was obtained from written tests, surveys, classroom observations and interviews with teachers of these programs. After the analysis process, were set up five units of information, which in the case of reading were reading assignment, intervention guidance, intervention to clarify, evaluation and assessments of teachers, and for the case of writing: defining text types, intervention process, intervention in the correction process, evaluation and assessments of teachers.

  17. Superstorm Sandy: How the New York University Psychiatry Residency Training Program Weathered the Storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Rebecca; Adler, Laura

    2016-10-01

    The teaching hospitals of the New York University psychiatry residency program were evacuated and then closed for a minimum of 3 months in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. Faculty and residents were deployed to alternate clinical sites. The authors examine the consequences of Superstorm Sandy and its implications for the New York University psychiatry residency training program. A survey was administered to faculty and residents. The authors tabulated 98 surveys, for which 24 % of faculty and 84 % of residents responded. Among respondents, 61 % believed that being involved in the evacuation of the hospitals was a positive experience. During deployment, most (85 %) found being placed with peers and supervisors to be beneficial, but there were significant disruptions. Despite facing multiple challenges including closed facilities, deployment to nonaffiliated hospitals, and exhausted personal resources, the training program continued to provide accredited clinical experiences, a core curriculum, and supervision for psychiatry residents during and after Superstorm Sandy.

  18. A Nonlinear Goal Programming Model for University Admission Capacity Planning with Modified Differential Evolution Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Ali El-Quliti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a nonlinear Goal Programming Model (GPM for solving the problem of admission capacity planning in academic universities. Many factors of university admission capacity planning have been taken into consideration among which are number of admitted students in the past years, total population in the country, number of graduates from secondary schools, desired ratios of specific specialties, faculty-to-students ratio, and the past number of graduates. The proposed model is general and has been tested at King Abdulaziz University (KAU in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, where the work aims to achieve the key objectives of a five-year development plan in addition to a 25-year future plan (AAFAQ for universities education in the Kingdom. Based on the results of this test, the proposed GPM with a modified differential evolution algorithm has approved an ability to solve general admission capacity planning problem in terms of high quality, rapid convergence speed, efficiency, and robustness.

  19. Can Universal SEL Programs Benefit Universally? Effects of the Positive Action Program on Multiple Trajectories of Social-Emotional and Misconduct Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Robert; Washburn, Isaac J; Lewis, Kendra M; Bavarian, Niloofar; DuBois, David L; Acock, Alan C; Vuchinich, Samuel; Flay, Brian R

    2017-02-01

    Behavioral trajectories during middle childhood are predictive of consequential outcomes later in life (e.g., substance abuse, violence). Social and emotional learning (SEL) programs are designed to promote trajectories that reflect both growth in positive behaviors and inhibited development of negative behaviors. The current study used growth mixture models to examine effects of the Positive Action (PA) program on behavioral trajectories of social-emotional and character development (SECD) and misconduct using data from a cluster-randomized trial that involved 14 schools and a sample of predominately low-income, urban youth followed from 3rd through 8th grade. For SECD, findings indicated that PA was similarly effective at improving trajectories within latent classes characterized as "high/declining" and "low/stable". Favorable program effects were likewise evident to a comparable degree for misconduct across observed latent classes that reflected "low/rising" and "high/rising" trajectories. These findings suggest that PA and perhaps other school-based universal SEL programs have the potential to yield comparable benefits across subgroups of youth with differing trajectories of positive and negative behaviors, making them promising strategies for achieving the intended goal of school-wide improvements in student outcomes.

  20. Programming Basics for Beginners. Experience of the Institute of Informatics at Tallinn University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mironova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper demonstrates the teaching approach in programming basics course for novices: schoolchildren of different ages and schoolteachers. This programming course was developed at the Institute of Informatics at Tallinn University of Technology in Tallinn, Estonia and it based on many years experience in teaching programming for non-IT first year students. The main aim of the chosen teaching approach in the course is to raise the motivation and keep the learners’ interest in programming field on the high level. The idea of developed teaching technique is the implementation of the visual programming before a serious textual coding. Furthermore, authors suggest readers some ways and methods to overcome learners’ difficulties in the first stage in a textual coding.

  1. CHARACTERISTICS OF GRADUATE ACCOUNTING PROGRAMS: AN ANALYSIS OF UNIVERSITIES IN ENGLISH-SPEAKING COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Rolim Ensslin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The literature indicates there is a shortage of professors of accounting. For some researchers this lack is related to the high price paid to obtain an advanced degree in this area. According to the American Accounting Association (AAA, graduate programs need to be more attractive, less stressful and less expensive for students. Therefore, the objective of this study is to map the characteristics of the selection process, the courses offered and the requirements to obtain a master’s degree in accounting from universities located in English-speaking. This study can be classified as descriptive, with a theoretical-conceptual nature and a qualitative approach. We rely on secondary sources and apply inductive logic. The main results are that in the United States, 71% of the programs require candidates to have knowledge of accounting, finance, economics, taxes, statistics and mathematics; 75% of Australian universities require a minimum score on the TOEFL for foreign students, 20% have a minimum GPA and 10% require taking the GMAT; and no Canadian university requires a letter of recommendation. Regarding the purpose of the courses, 88% of the institutions that offer master programs in accounting focus on improved professional qualification of accountants. In Australia, 30% of the programs last 18 months, while in Canada this figure is 66% and in New Zealand, 50% of the programs last at least two years. With respect to the graduation requirements, 82% of the universities require between 4 and 9 mandatory disciplines. In conclusion, the master programs in the United States and United Kingdom are relatively more demanding with respect to the degree requirements than in the other countries investigated.

  2. Design and Success of a 21st Century Cancer Education Program at the University of Louisville.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, David W; Kidd, La Creis R

    2016-07-30

    Cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality in the Commonwealth of Kentucky are among the highest in the nation. The University of Louisville was the recipient of a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cancer education program grant in 1975 under the leadership of Dr. Norbert Burzynski. A new and totally redesigned performance-based University of Louisville Cancer Education Program was funded by NCI in 2011 to recruit and motivate outstanding undergraduate and health professional students to pursue further training and careers in cancer research. Here, we describe the strategy, design, methods, implementation, and accomplishments of our twenty-first century performance-based cancer education program. Our program will meet or exceed all of its 5-year performance goals, including the total number students (n = 156) and under-represented minorities (n = 53) who successfully completed the program under the mentorship of cancer research-intensive faculty members of the James Graham Brown Cancer Center (JGBCC). The mentored research program is complemented with professional development and enhancement activities, including cancer research seminars presented by faculty members actively engaged in research centered on the diagnosis, treatment or prevention of cancer, creation of individual career development plans, exploration of cancer research careers, and acquisition of professionalism skills. Student interests towards cancer research significantly increased after completion of the program compared to baseline (P = 0.02). Based on quantitative and qualitative analysis of various components of the curricula, the trainees favor practical, engaging, and interactive activities aligned within professional career goals and objectives. For instance, the trainees prefer two 30-min small group discussions on "Navigating Careers in Cancer Research" with faculty, professional students, and program alumni. Future updates to the program include new activities that

  3. Final report for U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-95NE38118-5 University Reactor Sharing Program [Purdue University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, R.S.

    2001-06-01

    Under the Reactor Sharing Program, a total of 350 high school students participated in the neutron activation experiment and 484 high school and university students and members of the general public participated in reactor tours.

  4. On program of extracurricular mini-football training program for university girl students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamozhanskaya A.V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at working out of efficient program for first year girl students’ health improvement, which is based on mini-football means’ application in extra-curricular activities. Purpose: to substantiate the program of one year mini-football trainings for girl students. Material: one year experiment envisaged participation of 18-20 years’ age 56 first year girl students (two groups, 28 people each. The girl students of every group endured different physical loads: group 1 - 70% of specific means and 30% of non-specific; group 2 - 65% of specific means and 35% of non specific. Results: we worked one year efficient program for girl students’ health improvement, which was based on application of mini-football specific and non specific means’ optimal correlation in extracurricular trainings. We found that optimal correlation of specific and non-specific training loads was 70:30 (%. Practically equal level of workability in both groups was ensured by the following: in group 1 - at the account of special endurance; in group 2 - by means of general physical training. Conclusions: we recommend the program of one-year mini-football trainings, which ensures improvement of physical and technical fitness, rising of girl students organism’s and health indicators.

  5. Comparison of University-Based Teacher Certification Programs and Alternative Certification Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Keonna

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand further similarities and differences between traditionally certified teachers and alternatively certified teachers specifically in the areas of teacher self-efficacy, classroom management, and teacher perceptions of their preparation program. The following research questions guided this…

  6. Program review. The Interdisciplinary Biophysics Graduate Program at the University of Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni, Ari; Walter, Nils G

    2008-04-01

    The Michigan Biophysics Graduate Program (MBGP) was established in 1949, making it one of the first such programs in the world. The intellectual base of the program was significantly broadened in the 1980 when faculty members from a number of other units on campus were invited to join. Currently over forty faculty members from a variety of disciplines participate as mentors for the Ph.D. students enrolled in the MBGP providing our students with rich opportunities for academic learning and research. The MBGP has two main objectives: 1) to provide graduate students with both the intellectual and technical training in modern biophysics, 2) to sensitize our students to the power and unique opportunities of interdisciplinary work and thinking so as to train them to conduct research that crosses the boundaries between the biological and physical sciences. The program offers students opportunities to conduct research in a variety of areas of contemporary biophysics including structural biology, single molecule spectroscopy, spectroscopy and its applications, computational biology, membrane biophysics, neurobiophysics and enzymology. The MBGP offers a balanced curriculum that aims to provide our students with a strong academic base and, at the same time, accommodate their different academic backgrounds. Judging its past performance through the success of its former students, the MBGP has been highly successful, and there is every reason to believe that strong training in the biophysical sciences, as provided by the MBGP, will become even more valuable in the future both in the academic and the industrial settings. in the academic and the industrial settings.

  7. Vocational choices made by alumni of the Leadership Program for Veterinary Students at Cornell University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, David R; Parker, John S L; McGregor, Douglas D

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare vocational aspirations and outcomes of participants in the 10-week Leadership Program for Veterinary Students at Cornell University. DESIGN Survey. SAMPLE Veterinary students who participated in the program between 1990 and 2013. PROCEDURES Questionnaires that sought information about the career aspirations of participants at the beginning and end of the program were reviewed, along with records documenting the career progression of participants, audio recordings of interviews conducted with students, and notes of vocation-oriented counseling sessions held during each year's program. RESULTS At the conclusion of the program, 143 of 174 (82%) participants indicated they were more likely than not to undertake research training after completing their veterinary degree, compared with 106 of 174 (61%) at the beginning. Participation also stimulated interest in residency training and industry, but did little to promote interest in careers in government or the military. The percentage of participants who indicated they were more likely than not to pursue additional training in private practice decreased from 97 of 174 (56%) at the beginning of the program to 75 of 174 (43%) at the end. Information on career progression was available for 391 individuals, of whom 177 (45%) were pursuing careers of the kind envisioned by the program. However, 189 (48%) participants had a career in general or specialty clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The Leadership Program appeared to have a short-term influence on careers anticipated by program participants. However, a substantial proportion pursued careers in clinical practice after graduation.

  8. Assessment of the DOE/NREL Historically Black College and University Photovoltaic Research Associates Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posey-Eddy, F.; McConnell, R. D.

    2002-08-01

    This report details the DOE/NREL Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Photovoltaic Research Associates Program, a small but remarkable program that directly affected dozens of minority undergraduate students in ways that changed many of their lives. The progress and accomplishments of undergraduates within the nine participating universities were monitored and assessed through their presentations at an annual NREL-sponsored HBCU conference. Although the funding was small, typically $400,000 per year, the money made a significant impact. The best students sometimes went on to the nation's top graduate schools (e.g., MIT) or important management positions in large companies. Other students had opportunities to learn how renewable energy could positively affect their lives and their neighbors' lives. A few were lucky enough to install photovoltaic lighting and water-pumping systems in Africa, and to see and feel firsthand the technical and emotional benefits of this technology for families and villages. Two of the schools, Texas Southern University and Central State University, were particularly successful in leveraging their DOE/NREL funding to obtain additional funding for expanded programs.

  9. Hampton University/American Society for Engineering Education/NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 or 11 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society of Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university will be faculty members appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA-Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of general interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research project. The lecturers and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education or industry.

  10. 1996 NASA-Hampton University American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives were: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, or industry.

  11. Charles Wagley's legacy of Interdisciplinary Graduate Research and Training Programs at the University of Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Schmink

    Full Text Available When Charles Wagley moved from Columbia University to the University of Florida (UF in 1972, he established the Tropical South America Program. In this program he began an enduring legacy at UF of interdisciplinarity, collaborative research and training focused on the problems and solutions of tropical development, and support for students as future leaders. Reaching out to agricultural researchers and other social science disciplines, Wagley later co-founded and directed the Amazon Research and Training Program (ARTP, and remained active even after his retirement in 1983. The ARTP built on Wagley's strategy of supporting student research and building collaboration with partners in Latin America, and innovated in bringing in visiting professors from different disciplines, developing new interdisciplinary courses, and networking among Amazonian scholars in different countries. Wagley's most lasting contribution is the Tropical Conservation and Development (TCD program, which grew out of the ARTP to become an internationally-recognized interdisciplinary graduate program focused on the intersection between biodiversity conservation and the well-being of people in the tropical world. Drawing on participation from over 100 faculty affiliates in 27 academic units at UF, since 1980 the ARTP and TCD programs have trained over 400 graduate students from two dozen countries.

  12. Predictors of doctoral student success in professional psychology: characteristics of students, programs, and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, James M; Kim, Yang-Hyang

    2011-04-01

    In the face of the rising number of doctoral recipients in professional psychology, many have voiced concerns about the quality of nontraditional training programs. Past research suggests that, on a variety of outcomes, graduates from clinical PhD programs outperform graduates from clinical PsyD and, to a lesser extent, counseling PhD programs. We examine an aggregate archival dataset to determine whether student or university characteristics account for the differences in outcomes among programs. The data show meaningful differences in the outcomes of clinical PhD, PsyD, and counseling PhD programs. Furthermore, graduates from research-intensive universities perform better on the psychology licensure exam and are more likely to become American Board of Professional Psychology diplomates. The available data support the notion that the ability to conduct research is an essential component of graduate education. In this light, PsyD programs represent a unique opportunity to train students in the types of evaluation and outcomes assessments used by practicing psychologists. We discuss implications for graduate-level training in professional psychology. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Promoting academic excellence through leadership development at the University of Washington: the Teaching Scholars Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lynne; Ambrozy, Donna; Pinsky, Linda E

    2006-11-01

    The University of Washington Teaching Scholars Program (TSP) was established in 1995 to prepare faculty for local and national leadership and promote academic excellence by fostering a community of educational leaders to innovate, enliven, and enrich the environment for teaching and learning at the University of Washington (UW). Faculty in the Department of Medical Education and Biomedical Informatics designed and continue to implement the program. Qualified individuals from the UW Health Sciences Professional Schools and foreign scholars who are studying at the UW are eligible to apply for acceptance into the program. To date, 109 faculty and fellows have participated in the program, the majority of whom have been physicians. The program is committed to interprofessional education and seeks to diversify its participants. The curriculum is developed collaboratively with each cohort and comprises topics central to medical education and an emergent set of topics related to the specific interests and teaching responsibilities of the participating scholars. Core sessions cover the history of health professions education, learning theories, educational research methods, assessment, curriculum development, instructional methods, professionalism, and leadership. To graduate, scholars must complete a scholarly project in curriculum development, faculty development, or educational research; demonstrate progress towards construction of a teaching portfolio; and participate regularly and actively in program sessions. The TSP has developed and nurtured an active cadre of supportive colleagues who are transforming educational practice, elevating the status of teaching, and increasing the recognition of teachers. Graduates fill key teaching and leadership positions at the UW and in national and international professional organizations.

  14. An Investigation of the Effectiveness of the Modular General English Language Teaching Preparatory Program at a Turkish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating existing foreign language programs on a regular basis is essential because program evaluation leads to more effective programs. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the modular intensive general English language teaching program applied at a university in Turkey by investigating students' and English instructors' perceptions of…

  15. Narratives of Iraqi Adult Learners: Experiences of Spoken Register in English for Academic Purposes Programs at an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hamdany, Hayder; Picard, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the perceptions of Iraqi students of three different English Programs (a general English for academic purposes program, a pre-enrolment English program and the English component of a disciplinary bridging program) at an Australian University as reflected in their language learning narratives. It focuses specifically on the…

  16. The Efficiency of the University Teaching and Learning Training Program (UTL) on Developing the Teaching Competencies of the Teaching Staff at Imam University

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlRweithy, Eman; Alsaleem, Basma Issa

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at presenting the University Teaching and Learning training program UTL and determining the efficiency of the UTL on developing the teaching competencies of the teaching staff at Imam University in Saudi Arabia. The results revealed that there were statistically significant differences between the performance of the training group…

  17. The MD-MEd Joint-Degree Program at Vanderbilt University: Training Future Expert Medical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, William M; DeVolder, Jacob; Bhutiani, Monica; Neal, Kristen W; Miller, Bonnie M

    2017-08-01

    Some medical students are drawn to medical education as an area of academic specialization. However, few options exist for medical students who wish to build a scholarly foundation for future careers in medical education. In 2011, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (VUSM) and Peabody College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt University partnered to establish a novel dual-degree program that, through transfer of credit, allows students to graduate with both an MD and a master of education (MEd) degree in five years. The MD-MEd joint-degree program equips students with robust knowledge and skills related to general education while providing opportunities through independent studies and capstone projects to contextualize these ideas in medical education. This innovation at Vanderbilt University demonstrates the feasibility of an MD-MEd joint-degree program. MD-MEd graduates' demonstrated commitment to medical education and credentials will allow them to take on greater educational responsibilities earlier in their careers and quickly gain experience. The three author participants feel their experiences allowed them to achieve desired competencies as educators. They have each gained early experience by chairing the Student Curriculum Committee and contributing to major curricular reform at VUSM. The authors plan to integrate specific medical education competencies into the program, which will require MD-MEd students to develop and demonstrate proficiency in the knowledge and skills expected of dedicated medical educators. Graduates' career trajectories will be tracked to explore whether they become medical educators, conduct educational research, and assume leadership positions.

  18. SUSTAINABILITY UNIVERSITY PROGRAM FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT COMPANY (PUEDES IN THE CITY OF ESTELÍ, NICARAGUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly Castillo Herrera

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the sustainability that has taken the program Company University for Sustainable Development (PUEDES which ran from 2008 to 2009 in the city of Estelí, Nicaragua. It highlights the success stories of MSMEs involved, enabling sustainability and strengthening the links between Estelí Multidisciplinary Regional School (Unite-FAREM-Estelí and employers organized in the Chamber of Commerce of Estelí. The methodology for this article includes desk research and interviews with the president of the Chamber of Industry and Trade of Estelí, businessmen and university professors involved in this experience.

  19. Boston, the Booth Brothers, and the Parker House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Wilson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available April 14, 2015 was the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. This is the story of how that fateful day was linked to Boston, the Booth Brothers, and the Parker House.

  20. Results with the Boston Type I keratoprosthesis after Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Albert; Silva, Luzia Diegues; de Sousa, Luciene Barbosa; de Freitas, Denise; de Oliveira, Lauro Augusto

    2017-06-01

    To report the outcomes of implantation of the Boston Type I keratoprosthesis in three patients with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a severe infection that can lead to significant visual loss. Case series reporting three patients with difficult cases of AK that needed multiple corneal transplantations and glaucoma surgeries. All patients were implanted with the Boston Type I keratoprosthesis device. The main outcomes measure were the visual function and anatomical retention after implantation of the Boston Type I keratoprosthesis. All patients retained the device over the long-term and had good visual function. In one patient a retroprosthetic membrane developed and in another patient an epithelial lip developed over the anterior surface of the keratoprosthesis. The visual acuities range from 20/25 to 20/80 in the implanted eyes. The Boston Type I keratoprosthesis resulted in good anatomic and functional results after multiple graft failures after AK.

  1. Boston Harbor and approaches samples (WILLETT72 shapefile

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Boston Harbor (and its approaches) is a glacially carved, tidally dominated estuary in western Massachusetts Bay. Characterized by low river discharge and...

  2. 2: April 30-May 1, 2012, Boston, USA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ho, Mitchell; Royston, Ivor; Beck, Alain

    2012-01-01

    The 2nd Annual Antibodies for Cancer Therapy symposium, organized again by Cambridge Healthtech Institute as part of the Protein Engineering Summit, was held in Boston, USA from April 30 th to May 1 st , 2012...

  3. Túnel bajo el puerto de Boston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1963-05-01

    Full Text Available The new tunnel under Boston harbour has been constructed because of the insufficient capacity of a similar, earlier, tunnel to cope with the ever increasing road traffic. This tunnel is 1,550 ms long, and 9.50 ms in external diameter. There are two traffic lanes, each 3.20 ms wide. Inside it is faced with ceramic tiles, has fluorescent lighting, and ventilation is maintained by means of two ducts, one at each entrance, where the necessary compressor and other equipment has been situated. The most interesting feature of this important project is the excavation method adopted for its construction: the tunnel crosses a clay layer, which at certain places is sufficiently fluid to allow a pneumatic shield to be forced through it leaving hardly any debris behind. It will be readily appreciated that this procedure shows an obvious advantage over ordinary methods, in which it is necessary to cut out, and transport to the exterior all the excavated material. The metal sheathing was by the Commercial Shearing and Stamping Co., Youngstown, Ohio.Este nuevo túnel, bajo el puerto de Boston, es una consecuencia de la necesidad imperiosa que se hacía sentir dada la insuficiente capacidad del otro túnel similar antiguo y el aumento continuo del tráfico urbano y por carretera. Tiene 1.550 m de longitud, 9,50 m de diámetro exterior y una calzada con dos bandas de circulación de 3,20 m de anchura cada una. Está revestido ccn baldosa cerámica, iluminado con luz fluorescente, y el aire viciado se ventila y renueva por medio de dos torres de ventilación—una en cada portal—, en las que se han instalado el equipo mecánico adecuado de ventilación y compresores. La parte más interesante de esta importante obra estriba en los procedimientos empleados para llevar a cabo la excavación, pues atraviesa un banco de arcilla que, en ciertos tramos, es suficientemente fluida para permitir dejarse empujar y ceder paso a un escudo neumático que avanza sin apenas

  4. Results with the Boston Type I keratoprosthesis after Acanthamoeba keratitis

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Albert; Silva, Luzia Diegues; Sousa,Luciene Barbosa de; Freitas, Denise de; Oliveira,Lauro Augusto de

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of implantation of the Boston Type I keratoprosthesis in three patients with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a severe infection that can lead to significant visual loss. Observations: Case series reporting three patients with difficult cases of AK that needed multiple corneal transplantations and glaucoma surgeries. All patients were implanted with the Boston Type I keratoprosthesis device. The main outcomes measure were the visual function and anatomical reten...

  5. Vision Restoration with a Collagen Crosslinked Boston Keratoprosthesis Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-2-0044 TITLE: Vision Restoration with a Collagen Crosslinked Boston Keratoprosthesis Unit PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Joseph B...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Vision Restoration with a Collagen Cross-linked Boston Keratoprosthesis Unit 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-2-0044...the incidence or potentially eliminate corneal melts by strengthening the keratoprosthesis carrier tissue by collagen -crosslinking the cornea graft

  6. Terrorist bombings: foreign bodies from the Boston Marathon bombing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, John; Singh, Ajay K; Rocha, Tatiana; Havens, Joaquim; Goralnick, Eric; Sodickson, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    On April 15, 2013, 2 improvised explosive devices detonated at the 117th Boston Marathon, killing 3 people and injuring 264 others. In this article, the foreign bodies and injuries that presented at 2 of the responding level 1 trauma hospitals in Boston-Brigham and Women׳s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital--are reviewed with a broader discussion of blast injuries and imaging strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mortality Among Homeless Adults in Boston: Shifts in Causes of Death Over a 15-year Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggett, Travis P.; Hwang, Stephen W.; O'Connell, James J.; Porneala, Bianca C.; Stringfellow, Erin J.; Orav, E. John; Singer, Daniel E.; Rigotti, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Homeless persons experience excess mortality, but U.S.-based studies on this topic are outdated or lack information about causes of death. No studies have examined shifts in causes of death for this population over time. Methods We assessed all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates in a cohort of 28,033 adults aged 18 years or older who were seen at Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2008. Deaths were identified through probabilistic linkage to the Massachusetts death occurrence files. We compared mortality rates in this cohort to rates in the 2003–08 Massachusetts population and a 1988–93 cohort of homeless adults in Boston using standardized rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Results 1,302 deaths occurred during 90,450 person-years of observation. Drug overdose (n=219), cancer (n=206), and heart disease (n=203) were the major causes of death. Drug overdose accounted for one-third of deaths among adults homeless adults in Boston remains high and unchanged since 1988–93 despite a major interim expansion in clinical services. Drug overdose has replaced HIV as the emerging epidemic. Interventions to reduce mortality in this population should include behavioral health integration into primary medical care, public health initiatives to prevent and reverse drug overdose, and social policy measures to end homelessness. PMID:23318302

  8. Exploring Student and Advisor Experiences in a College-University Pathway Program: A Study of the Bachelor of Commerce Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Jennifer; DiGiuseppe, Maurice; Goodman, Bill; LeSage, Ann; Hinch, Ron; Samis, John; Sanchez, Otto; Rodrigues, Anna; Raby, Phil; Longo, Fabiola; De La Rocha, Arlene

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is great interest across Ontario in the expansion of pathway programs between colleges and universities. Through strategic partnerships, two Ontario-based postsecondary institutions (a college and a university) have developed innovative and effective pathway programs that facilitate the transition of students between institutions…

  9. British University Certificate and Diploma Programs (All Fields Except Education, Teacher Training and Health). NAFSA Field Service Working Paper #7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinman-Madoff, Elaine

    This document presents information on programs in all areas of study, with the exception of education, teacher training and health programs, offered at 38 British higher education institutions, including the University of Cambridge, Leeds, Oxford, York and the Open University. The document covers undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate…

  10. Exploring knowledge processes based on teacher research in a school-university research network of a master's program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    prof dr Theo Bergen; prof dr Douwe Beijaard; dr Frank Cornelissen; Dr. Jacqueline van Swet

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of five participants in a school-university research network in a Dutch master's program. Outcomes indicate that use of existing network structures in master's programs is complex, but could be a promising avenue for creating succesful school-university

  11. Do They Make a Difference? The Impact of English Language Programs on Second Language Students in Canadian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Janna; Cheng, Liying; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the impact of English language programs on second language (L2) students studying in Canadian universities (Cheng & Fox, 2008; Fox, 2005, 2009). This article reports on questionnaire responses of 641 L2 students studying in 36 English language programs in 26 Canadian universities. The researchers identified…

  12. An Evaluative Study of a Distance Teacher Education Program in a University in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwasi Addo Sampong

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The study used an adaptation of Provus’ discrepancy evaluation model to evaluate a distance teacher education program in the University of Cape Coast, the premier teacher education institution in Ghana. The study involved comparing performance data of the program as perceived by students and faculty/administrators to standards prepared from the program’s design. Performance data was obtained by administering two survey instruments to a random sample of students and faculty/administrators. Discrepancies between performance and standards were reported. The study concluded that although there were some discrepancies between program standards and performance the program is fulfilling its purpose of upgrading the professional and academic performance of a large number of teachers in the public K-8 schools in Ghana.

  13. The Role of Discussion Boards in a University Blended Learning Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Isabel González Moreno

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussion boards as tools in blended English language learning programs have unique characteristics when compared to other synchronous and asynchronous communication tools that are different. Therefore, it is important to investigate the way they operate, their role within a given program and the students', teachers' and tutors' attitudes towards them. This paper contains the report of a study that took place in an English virtual program of a public university in Colombia. Students' surveys and reflections, the tutor's and teachers' interviews and reflections were used to collect data. The results showed the main advantages and disadvantages of the use of the tool as well as ideas for new proposals to improve their use and, therefore, increase the students' performance in the program.

  14. University Reactor Sharing Program. Final report, September 30, 1992--September 29, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehring, B.W. [J.J. Pickle Research Campus, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the number of nuclear reactors on university campuses in the US declined from more than 70 to less than 40. Contrary to this trend, The University of Texas at Austin constructed a new reactor facility at a cost of $5.8 million. The new reactor facility houses a new TRIGA Mark II reactor which replaces an in-ground TRIGA Mark I reactor located in a 50-year old building. The new reactor facility was constructed to strengthen the instruction and research opportunities in nuclear science and engineering for both undergraduate and graduate students at The University of Texas. On January 17, 1992, The University of Texas at Austin received a license for operation of the new reactor. Initial criticality was achieved on March 12, 1992, and full power operation, on March 25, 1992. The UT-TRIGA research reactor provides hands-on education, multidisciplinary research and unique service activities for academic, medical, industrial, and government groups. Support by the University Reactor Sharing Programs increases the availability of The University of Texas reactor facility for use by other educational institutions which do not have nuclear reactors.

  15. The Boston marathon bombings: the early plastic surgery experience of one Boston hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter S; Malin, Edward; Kirkham, John C; Helliwell, Lydia A; Ibrahim, Ahmed M S; Tobias, Adam M; Upton, Joseph; Lee, Bernard T; Lin, Samuel J

    2013-11-01

    On April 15, 2013, at approximately 2:49 p.m. EDT, two improvised explosive devices detonated near the finish line of the 117th Boston Marathon. Patients were transported from the scene to several trauma centers, including the authors' institution. Plastic surgical assessment of patients began in the Emergency Department and then rapidly expanded as the scope of the incident became clear. Daily interdisciplinary meetings involving the acute care surgery, orthopedic surgery, plastic surgery, and nursing services were convened in order to coordinate operating room schedules and treatment plans. An interdisciplinary weekly clinic continued until all patient goals had been reached. Twenty-four patients were treated at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center within the first 24 hours of the Boston Marathon bombing. Seven were triaged directly to the operating room from the Emergency Department. The Division of Plastic Surgery was directly involved with the care of 11 patients, all of whom were treated surgically within 24 hours of the bombing. Patients were aged 23 to 50 years old. All 11 patients sustained lower extremity injuries with gross contamination. Four patients also sustained significant upper extremity trauma. Injuries included extremity amputations and fractures, soft-tissue loss, impaction of nails and other debris, burns, ocular injury, and ruptured tympanic membranes. Twenty-four patients received acute care at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center following the Boston Marathon bombing. Institution of dedicated interdisciplinary daily rounds, protected operating room block time, and joint follow-up clinic allowed for efficient early diagnosis and treatment of patients' injuries.

  16. A specialist peer mentoring program for university students on the autism spectrum: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Choo Ting; Mazzucchelli, Trevor G; Rooney, Rosanna; Girdler, Sonya

    2017-01-01

    The provision of peer mentoring may improve tertiary education outcomes of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study evaluated the pilot year of the Curtin Specialist Mentoring Program (CSMP), a specialised peer mentoring program for university students with ASD aimed at improving self-reported well-being, academic success and retention in university studies. A single group pre-test, post-test design was employed. Quantitative and qualitative evaluations were undertaken with 10 young adults with ASD to explore the effectiveness and acceptability of the CSMP program. Students completed a battery of questionnaires focused on general anxiety, state communication apprehension, perceived communication competence, and communication apprehension both prior to, and five months after commencing enrolment in the CSMP. Information regarding academic success and retention was also obtained. Interviews with participants provided further insight into their experience of the program. Students enrolled in the CSMP showed significant improvement in social support and general communication apprehension assessment scores. Interviews revealed key features of the CSMP that may have contributed to these positive outcomes. The current study provides preliminary evidence that a specialised peer mentoring program can improve the well-being of students with ASD, and highlights the importance of interventions which are individualised, flexible, based on a social model, and target environmental factors such as social support.

  17. A specialist peer mentoring program for university students on the autism spectrum: A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choo Ting Siew

    Full Text Available The provision of peer mentoring may improve tertiary education outcomes of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. This study evaluated the pilot year of the Curtin Specialist Mentoring Program (CSMP, a specialised peer mentoring program for university students with ASD aimed at improving self-reported well-being, academic success and retention in university studies.A single group pre-test, post-test design was employed. Quantitative and qualitative evaluations were undertaken with 10 young adults with ASD to explore the effectiveness and acceptability of the CSMP program. Students completed a battery of questionnaires focused on general anxiety, state communication apprehension, perceived communication competence, and communication apprehension both prior to, and five months after commencing enrolment in the CSMP. Information regarding academic success and retention was also obtained. Interviews with participants provided further insight into their experience of the program.Students enrolled in the CSMP showed significant improvement in social support and general communication apprehension assessment scores. Interviews revealed key features of the CSMP that may have contributed to these positive outcomes.The current study provides preliminary evidence that a specialised peer mentoring program can improve the well-being of students with ASD, and highlights the importance of interventions which are individualised, flexible, based on a social model, and target environmental factors such as social support.

  18. The University of Kitakyushu-Tacoma Community College Semester Study Abroad Program: Overview, Goals and Reflections

    OpenAIRE

    Anne CRESCINI; Rodger WILLIAMSON

    2011-01-01

    Although declining in recent years, the number of Japanese students studying in the United States every year is still over 20,000. According to Open Doors International, in 2009, 24,264 Japanese students spent time studying for some length of time at an American university (2009). Many of these students participated in a program of a semester of less. Recent research (Dwyer, 2004) has shown that while perhaps longterm programs (a semester or more) have a more significant impact on language gr...

  19. Strengthening field education in aging through university-community agency partnership: the Practicum Partnership Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrance, Frances P; Damron-Rodriguez, Joann; Rosenfeld, Peri; Sisco, Sarah; Volland, Patricia J

    2007-01-01

    The Practicum Partnership Program (PPP), an innovative field education model developed and implemented by six demonstration sites over four years (2000-2004), uses a structured university-community partnership, or consortium, as the foundation for designing, implementing, and evaluating internships for graduate social work students specializing in aging. This paper describes the site consortia and PPP programs, presents evaluation findings, and identifies future directions for the PPP. Student learning outcomes were positive and both students and consortia agencies reported positive PPP experiences. The PPP model underscores the value of the community agencies as equal partners in educating future geriatric social workers.

  20. Psychological Counseling and Guidance Programs Perception of Hidden Curriculum (Inonu University Example: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal DURUHAN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Inonu University Faculty of Educations Psychological Counseling and Guidance Programs Hidden Curriculum, third grade students’ views and conducted observations are intended to be studied. The method of qualitative research ‘Case Study’ is designed. The studies work group consists of 18 third grade Inonu University Psychological Counseling and Guidance Program students. The research data was obtained using observation and half structured interaction technique and the data was analyzed using a descriptive and content method. Due to some findings in the research, in accordance to the physical areas Hidden Curriculum show that leaning towards more interaction is not supported by educational effort; about interaction between the teacher and the student; the teachers implication of class rules, the way of teaching, participation, homework leading to the evaluation method and the Hidden Curriculums expectations to be reached according to the results and from these results a variety changing recommendations were reached.

  1. Canada's first universal varicella immunization program: Lessons from Prince Edward Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Lamont; Gallant, Peggy; Morris, Marie; Halperin, Scott A

    2003-01-01

    A live attenuated varicella vaccine was licensed in Canada in December 1998. The first universal varicella immunization program in Canada was initiated in Prince Edward Island in 2000. Students in grades one to six without a history of varicella were offered the vaccine, administered by Public Health Nurses, in school clinics during February and March 2000. The acceptance rate ranged from 29.1% of all grade one students to 9.8% of all grade six students; overall, 18.8% of students received the vaccine. A universal program for children 12 months of age was introduced on April 1, 2000 and catch-up clinics for those between 12 months of age and those in grade one were introduced in June 2000. Repeated media announcements and the cooperation of staff in schools and daycare facilities assisted in informing parents about the availability of the vaccine. Vaccine-associated adverse events have been uncommon and the vaccine has been well accepted.

  2. Sediment quality assessment studies in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.S.; Chapman, D.C.; Biedenbach, J.M. [National Biological Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Texas Gulf Coast Field Station; Long, E.R. [NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); Thursby, G. [Science Applications International Corp., Narragansett, RI (United States); MacDonald, D.D. [MacDonald Environmental Sciences Ltd., Ladysmith, British Columbia (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    As part of NOAA`s National Status and Trends program, a bioeffects assessment study was conducted in the vicinity of Boston Harbor, Massachusetts. Surficial sediment samples were collected at 55 sites and subsamples were tested for toxicity using (1) the 10-day whole sediment test with Ampelisca abdita, (2) the sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development assays with sediment pore water, and (3) Microtox{trademark} assay with organic sediment extracts. Eleven percent of the samples were significantly toxic in the amphipod test, only 4% were toxic in the sea urchin fertilization test whereas all of the samples were highly toxic in the sea urchin embryological development assay; the Microtox assay determined 56% of the organic sediment extracts to be significantly toxic. Sediment chemical analyses for metals, AVS/SEM, PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides were performed on 30 of the 55 samples. Twenty-seven of the 30 samples exceeded at least one probable effects level (PEL) value. For the 20 samples that exceeded 5 or more PELS, the concordance between the predicted and observed toxicity was 20% for the amphipod test, 60% for the Microtox test, and 100% for the sea urchin embryological development assay. There were no significant correlations among the different toxicity tests or between the tests and the contaminant concentrations in the bulk sediment. Possible explanations for the apparent lack of correlation between the sediment chemistry and the toxicity tests will be discussed.

  3. Six University Canada/US/Mexico exchange program in Earth Hazards (EHaz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stix, J.; Rose, W. I.

    2005-12-01

    This program is a consortium of six research-based universities in Canada, Mexico, and the U.S (Michigan Tech, Buffalo, McGill, Waterloo, UNAM and Colima) funded by the Department of education in the US and equivalent organizations in Canada and Mexico as part of the NAFTA agreement. The focus area for the mobility program is mitigation of geological natural hazards in North America. The consortium universities will exchange students and faculty in several engineering and science disciplines (e.g. environmental engineering, civil engineering, geological engineering, social sciences and geology) involved in the study of natural geological hazards. Students in the social sciences also will be exchanged, recognizing that the solution of natural hazards problems involves critical political, social, and economic aspects. Students will be mobilized among the participating universities through one- to two-semester visits and up to 60 more students will be mobilized via short-term, intensive courses. Student activities will consist of three stages: intensive language training, natural hazards coursework, and professional or research internships with local industries, agencies or at the host university. In each of the next three years there will be a joint advanced volcanology class run via videoconferencing and a three week field trip to areas of volcanological interest in Canada, US and Mexico. The course and field trip foci for the next three years are: 2006: Megaeruptions/ LongValley and Yellowstone; 2007: Volcanic edifice failure/ Cascades and Western Canada 2008: Convergent plate Boundary Volcanism/ Mexican Volcanic Belt Although the six universities will have first access to the exchange we are constructing ways for other volcanology programs to share the teleconference courses and field trips.

  4. Boston Keratoprosthesis Type 1 in Chemical Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Culla, Borja; Kolovou, Paraskevi E; Arzeno, Linnette; Martínez, Santiago; López, Miguel A

    2016-06-01

    To describe and further analyze the long-term results in visual acuity (VA), anatomical retention, and rate of complications from patients who underwent Boston keratoprosthesis (B-Kpro) type 1 after ocular chemical burns in the Dominican Republic. A retrospective review of 42 eyes (22 OD:20 OS) of 36 patients who underwent B-Kpro type 1 implantation after severe ocular burn at Hospital Elías Santana in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, between April 2006 and October 2014, were included. Demographics, VA, anatomical retention, and the rates of postoperative complications and concurrent surgeries were evaluated. The excellent anatomical retention rates and visual outcomes presented in this study support the remarkable capability of B-Kpro type 1 to restore functional VA in eyes with severe chemical injuries. However, strict control of the postoperative complications is necessary for long-term success. In conclusion, the use of a B-Kpro type 1 after severe chemical burn is a viable option in patients otherwise condemned to the high risk of failure associated with conventional corneal grafts.

  5. Cancer Prevention Interdisciplinary Education Program at Purdue University: Overview and Preliminary Results

    OpenAIRE

    Teegarden, D; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Adedokun, Omolola A.; Childress, Amy; Parker, Loran C.; Burgess, Wilella D; Nagel, Julie; Knapp,Deborah W.; Lelievre, Sophie A.; Agnew, Christopher; Shields, Cleveland G.; Leary, James F.; Adams, Robin; Jensen, Jakob D.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer prevention is a broad field that crosses many disciplines; therefore, educational efforts to enhance cancer prevention research focused on interdisciplinary approaches to the field are greatly needed. In order to hasten progress in cancer prevention research, the Cancer Prevention Internship Program (CPIP) at Purdue University was designed to develop and test an interdisciplinary curriculum for undergraduate and graduate students. The hypothesis was that course curriculum specific to i...

  6. Final report. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Sharing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, John A

    2003-01-21

    Activities supported at the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory under the U.S. DOE University Reactor Sharing Program are reported for Grant DE FG02-95NE38121 (September 16, 1995 through May 31, 2002). These activities fell under four subcategories: support for research at thesis and post-doctoral levels, support for college-level laboratory exercises, support for reactor tours/lectures on nuclear energy, and support for science fair participants.

  7. Nanocommunication design in graduate-level education and research training programs at Osaka University

    OpenAIRE

    Sekiya, Mizuki; An, SoonHwa; Ata, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    After more than ten years of strategic investment research and development supported by government policies on science and technology, nanotechnology in Japan is making a transition from the knowledge creation stage of exploratory research to the stage of making the outcomes available for the benefit of society as a whole. Osaka University has been proactive in discussions about the relationship between nanotechnology and society as part of graduate and continuing education programs. These pr...

  8. A Study On English Reading Habits Of Students Of English Study Program Of Riau University

    OpenAIRE

    Al Nazhari, Hafiz; Delfi, Syofia; ', Syafri K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the habits of English reading among the students of English Study Program of Riau University. The method used in this research is quantitative research and the design is survey study. A questionnaire was used as the instrument of this research. The questionnaire involved seven indicators of reading habits: attitudes toward reading, reading frequency, reading materials read, time spend on academic reading, time spend on non-academic reading, motivation in t...

  9. Effects of Water and Land-based Sensorimotor Training Programs on Static Balance among University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolhamid Daneshjoo; Ashril Yusof

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effect of sensorimotor training on static balance in two different environments; in water and on land. Thirty non-clinical university male students (aged 22±0.85 years) were divided randomly into three groups; water, land and control groups. The experimental groups performed their respective sensorimotor training programs for 6 weeks (3 times per week). The Stork Stand Balance Test was used to examine the static balance at pre- and post-time points. Significant main ef...

  10. Evaluation program university for everyone prouni, course of law faculty in paradise Juazeiro North - CE

    OpenAIRE

    Francisca Disnà CÃndido Feitoza

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the Brazilian public policies that provide access to higher education in Brazil, which were implemented by the federal government from 2005 with the creation of Programa Universidade para Todos- PROUNI for the purpose of positive actions targeted social inclusion the lower classes of Brazilian society that has always been absent from public universities. Shows that the program was implemented by the Ministry of Education - MEC for the purpose of inc...

  11. Evaluation of an Undergraduate Neuroscience Research Program at the University of Kentucky

    OpenAIRE

    Gould, Douglas J.; MacPherson, Brian

    2003-01-01

    For the past 12 years the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology at the University of Kentucky has run an interdisciplinary neuroscience research experience for undergraduates. Over the years the programs funding sources and participant numbers have steadily increased, to a total of 16 undergraduates in the summer of 2003, supported with internal funds, state funds, and a Research Experience for Undergraduates site grant from the National Science Foundation. The goals of the UK summer researc...

  12. Implementation and evaluation of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine leadership program for women faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Rachel B; González-Fernández, Marlís; Bodurtha, Joann; Skarupski, Kimberly A; Fivush, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Women continue to be underrepresented in top leadership roles in academic medicine. Leadership training programs for women are designed to enhance women's leadership skills and confidence and increase overall leadership diversity. The authors present a description and evaluation of a longitudinal, cohort-based, experiential leadership program for women faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. We compared pre- and post-program self-assessed ratings of 11 leadership skills and specific negotiation behaviors from 3 cohorts of leadership program participants (n=134) from 2010 to 2013. Women reported significant improvements in skills across 11 domains with the exceptions of 2 domains, Public Speaking and Working in Teams, both of which received high scores in the pre-program assessment. The greatest improvement in rankings occurred within the domain of negotiation skills. Although women reported an increase in their negotiation skills, we were not able to demonstrate an increase in the number of times that women negotiated for salary, space, or promotion following participation in the program. The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Leadership Program for Women Faculty has demonstrable value for the professional development of participants and addresses institutional strategies to enhance leadership diversity and the advancement of women.

  13. Case Study of a School-Based Universal Dating Violence Prevention Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Cascardi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of universal dating violence prevention programs has rapidly expanded in the past two decades. Many programs demonstrate change in attitudes supportive of dating violence, and a few show evidence of behavior change; however, detailed analysis of process and fidelity of program implementation is generally neglected. An important goal of prevention research is to identify successful initiatives that can be replicated and disseminated in the field. The purpose of the current case study is to document the implementation process of a middle school–based dating violence prevention curriculum in economically disadvantaged urban neighborhoods. Particular attention is given to the school context, such as the process of school and teacher recruitment, the program model, and classroom implementation of the dating violence prevention program in four areas: teacher training, student outcomes, program fidelity, and student engagement. Nine health and physical education teachers from six urban middle schools participated. Results describe effective strategies to secure school participation and engagement, and provide evidence regarding methods to train health and physical education teachers in low-income, urban neighborhoods. Furthermore, classroom observations demonstrate that teachers successfully implemented the five-lesson curriculum, which resulted in positive student outcomes to prevent dating violence. This case study represents an important step in deepening our understanding of the mechanisms of program delivery.

  14. Health Informatics Master Program at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altwaijiri, M; Aldosari, B

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the Health Informatics Master Program at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We have reviewed health informatics master programs worldwide with more emphasis on the recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association on education in health informatics, research, and faculty/trainee participation at KSAU-HS. An applied health informatics master program has been designed where graduates will be able to deploy information and communication technology in support of health systems' processes. This is due to the fact that most of health organizations are driven by information and communication technology. The program embodies the features of effective applied health informatics master programs recommended by the International Medical Informatics Association on education in health informatics and delineated as curricula integrating three areas of knowledge and skills: 1) Methodology and technology for the processing of data, information and knowledge in medicine and healthcare, 2) Medicine, health and biosciences, and 3) Informatics/computer science, mathematics and biometry. The health informatics master program (MHI) immerses students in the multidisciplinary field of health informatics education. Graduates of the MHI program will be well-prepared informaticians for leadership positions, able to meet the increasing demands in the field of health informatics to manage, plan, develop, and provide expert consultations to the healthcare sectors.

  15. [Trial and evaluation of a remedial education program at Kobe Pharmaceutical University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Junko; Kodama, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical education is suffering from the decentralization of students due to the establishment of new pharmaceutical universities, the shift to a six-year program from a four-year program in the colleges of pharmacy in 2006, and a decrease in the number of students. Combined, these have lead to academic failings, even at high-ranking universities. However, abundant knowledge and ability are necessary to pass the national examination for pharmacists. At Kobe Pharmaceutical University, a Basic Education Center for Pharmacy was instituted in 2006 for the purpose of supporting the scholastic abilities of students with various challenges, as well as for students in general. One approach at the Basic Education Center for Pharmacy, has been to offer supplementary lessons, and to provide additional opportunities for learning for the repeater. We offer supplementary lessons as an "Office Hours Class" and also use DVD-learning for remedial teaching. "Office Hours Class" is conducted in a question/answer format with a small number of students. In order to develop the DVD-learning system (pharmaceutical educational digital learning; PEDL), which promotes self-learning, our supplementary lectures and "Office Hours Class" lectures are recorded and edited on DVD media. The learning effect of using these systems, as determined by regular examination, shows that these have been helpful. As a result, we concluded that these supplementary learning programs are useful as a learning method to help students acquire necessary knowledge as potential pharmaceutical professionals, and to increase student motivation.

  16. Injury/illness physician referral profile from a youth university-sponsored summer sport camp program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oller, Daria M; Vairo, Giampietro L; Sebastianelli, Wayne J; Buckley, William E

    2013-08-01

    Participation at university-sponsored summer sport camps is popular among youth athletes; however, there is a dearth of information to describe the injuries/illnesses experienced by camp participants. Data from a university-sponsored sport camp program from 2008 to 2011 were accessed retrospectively. The sport camp program had approximately 80 camps for 28 sports over 12 weeks annually. Male and female participants were 10 to 17 years old. Athletic trainers maintained medical documentation and provided medical referrals. Referrals were made for 9.9% (n=478) of all injuries/illnesses. Emergency department referrals were made for 2.9% of injuries/illnesses. University health services received 42.5% of referrals. There were 1.1 referrals per 100 participants. Boys comprised 60.7% of referrals. Rugby had the highest referral rate--5.0 per 100 participants. These data help increase physician preparedness and guide the delivery of sports medicine services for related sport camp programs as a means to improve quality of care delivered to participants.

  17. [Public health competencies and contents in pharmacy degree programs in Spanish universities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbreras, Blanca; Davó-Blanes, María Carmen; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Bosch, Félix

    2015-01-01

    To identify public health core competencies and contents in pharmacy degrees at a meeting of public health lecturers in pharmacy degrees from various public and private universities. The first Meeting of the Forum of University Teaching Staff in Pharmacy Degrees was held at the Faculty of Medicine in the Complutense University, Madrid, Spain on the 19(th) and 20(th) of November 2013. The meeting was attended by 17 lecturers. Participants brought their own teaching programs and were given two previous studies on public health competencies for analysis of public health contents and competencies in pharmacy degrees. Working groups were formed and the results were shared. The highest number of core competencies was identified in the following functions: "Assessment of the population's health needs" and "Developing health policies". The final program included basic contents organized into 8 units: Concept of Public Health, Demography, Epidemiological Method, Environment and Health, Food Safety, Epidemiology of Major Health Problems, Health Promotion and Education, and Health Planning and Management. Representation of almost all the Spanish Pharmacy Faculties and the consensus reached in the description of competences and program contents will greatly improve the quality of teaching in this area. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Economic Appraisal of Ontario's Universal Influenza Immunization Program: A Cost-Utility Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Beate; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Bauch, Chris T.; Maetzel, Andreas; McGeer, Allison; Raboud, Janet M.; Krahn, Murray

    2010-01-01

    Background In July 2000, the province of Ontario, Canada, initiated a universal influenza immunization program (UIIP) to provide free seasonal influenza vaccines for the entire population. This is the first large-scale program of its kind worldwide. The objective of this study was to conduct an economic appraisal of Ontario's UIIP compared to a targeted influenza immunization program (TIIP). Methods and Findings A cost-utility analysis using Ontario health administrative data was performed. The study was informed by a companion ecological study comparing physician visits, emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and deaths between 1997 and 2004 in Ontario and nine other Canadian provinces offering targeted immunization programs. The relative change estimates from pre-2000 to post-2000 as observed in other provinces were applied to pre-UIIP Ontario event rates to calculate the expected number of events had Ontario continued to offer targeted immunization. Main outcome measures were quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), costs in 2006 Canadian dollars, and incremental cost-utility ratios (incremental cost per QALY gained). Program and other costs were drawn from Ontario sources. Utility weights were obtained from the literature. The incremental cost of the program per QALY gained was calculated from the health care payer perspective. Ontario's UIIP costs approximately twice as much as a targeted program but reduces influenza cases by 61% and mortality by 28%, saving an estimated 1,134 QALYs per season overall. Reducing influenza cases decreases health care services cost by 52%. Most cost savings can be attributed to hospitalizations avoided. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is Can$10,797/QALY gained. Results are most sensitive to immunization cost and number of deaths averted. Conclusions Universal immunization against seasonal influenza was estimated to be an economically attractive intervention. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

  19. Assessing preferences for a university-based smoking cessation program in Lebanon: a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Ramzi G; Abbyad, Christine W; Kohler, Racquel E; Kratka, Allison K; Oh, Leighanne; Wood, Kathryn A

    2015-05-01

    Smoking prevalence rates in Lebanon are among the highest in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Few smoking cessation programs are offered in Lebanon and little is known about the preferences of Lebanese smokers for cessation treatment programs. To establish which attributes of smoking cessation programs are most important to Lebanese smokers. Smokers at the American University of Beirut were surveyed to elicit their preferences for, and tradeoffs between the attributes of a hypothetical university-based smoking cessation program. Preferences for medication type/mechanism, risk of benign side effects, availability of support, distance traveled to obtain medication, and price of complete treatment were assessed using the discrete choice experiment method. The smokers' responses (N = 191) to changes in attributes were statistically significant. Smokers were willing to make trade-offs between attributes. On average, smokers were willing to pay LBP 103,000 (USD 69) for cessation support. Respondents were willing to give up LBP 105,000 (USD 70) to avoid an additional 10% risk of minor side effects and LBP 18,000 (USD 12) to avoid an addition kilometer of travel to the nearest pharmacy. Heavy smokers were the least responsive group and had the lowest demand elasticities. Student smokers were willing to participate in a relatively complex exercise that weighs the advantages and disadvantages of a hypothetical smoking cessation program. Overall they were less interested in the pill form of smoking cessation treatment, but they were willing to make tradeoffs to be smoke-free. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The DataTools Professional Development Program: Sustainability via a University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, N.; Ledley, T. S.; McAuliffe, C. A.; Reider, D.

    2009-12-01

    The DataTools professional development program (http://serc.carleton.edu/eet/msdatatools), offered by TERC, helps teachers integrate technology, scientific data, and inquiry into their middle and high school curricula. It leverages the resources and techniques of the Earth Exploration Toolbook (http://serc.carleton.edu/eet), an online collection of investigations that promotes the use of technology and scientific data in the context of studying the earth system. Over the course of the year-long program, teachers develop skills and a pedagogy of inquiry through a combination of on-line and face-to-face professional development and a significant amount of peer support. They learn to use information technologies that support the visualization and analysis of numerical, geospatial, and image data. DataTools was funded by NSF’s ITEST program to operate for three years. During year two we started to investigate the possibility of transforming the program into a graduate-level course at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (UMD). The first step in that process was partnering with UMD to offer the third year of the NSF-funded program as a 3-credit graduate course on a 1-year trial basis. Our UMD partner participated in advertising the program to teachers in its network, provided classroom space at UMD for the face-to-face meetings and summer workshop, and offered three graduate credits to teachers who successfully completed the program. TERC staff continued to provide the professional development. The formation of the School for Education, Public Policy, and Civic Engagement at UMD, and the new STEM Department within that school appear to be favoring the transformation of this NSF-funded program into a sustainable graduate level course for in-service teachers. A key element to developing a sustainable course at a large university is to position it in a way that can service the largest number of students. In addition to the tremendous need of science professional

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of neonatal hearing screening program in China: should universal screening be prioritized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Hui; Zhang, Luo; Tobe, Ruo-Yan Gai; Qi, Fang-Hua; Sun, Long; Teng, Yue; Ke, Qing-Lin; Mai, Fei; Zhang, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Ru-Lan; Tu, Lin; Li, Hong-Hui; Gu, Yan-Qing; Xu, Sai-Nan; Yue, Xiao-Yan; Li, Xiao-Dong; Qi, Bei-Er; Cheng, Xiao-Huan; Tang, Wei; Xu, Ling-Zhong; Han, De-Min

    2012-04-17

    Neonatal hearing screening (NHS) has been routinely offered as a vital component of early childhood care in developed countries, whereas such a screening program is still at the pilot or preliminary stage as regards its nationwide implementation in developing countries. To provide significant evidence for health policy making in China, this study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of NHS program implementation in case of eight provinces of China. A cost-effectiveness model was conducted and all neonates annually born from 2007 to 2009 in eight provinces of China were simulated in this model. The model parameters were estimated from the established databases in the general hospitals or maternal and child health hospitals of these eight provinces, supplemented from the published literature. The model estimated changes in program implementation costs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), average cost-effectiveness ratio (ACER), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for universal screening compared to targeted screening in eight provinces. A multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed to determine uncertainty in health effect estimates and cost-effectiveness ratios using a probabilistic modeling technique. Targeted strategy trended to be cost-effective in Guangxi, Jiangxi, Henan, Guangdong, Zhejiang, Hebei, Shandong, and Beijing from the level of 9%, 9%, 8%, 4%, 3%, 7%, 5%, and 2%, respectively; while universal strategy trended to be cost-effective in those provinces from the level of 70%, 70%, 48%, 10%, 8%, 28%, 15%, 4%, respectively. This study showed although there was a huge disparity in the implementation of the NHS program in the surveyed provinces, both universal strategy and targeted strategy showed cost-effectiveness in those relatively developed provinces, while neither of the screening strategy showed cost-effectiveness in those relatively developing provinces. This study also showed that both strategies especially universal strategy

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis of neonatal hearing screening program in china: should universal screening be prioritized?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Li-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neonatal hearing screening (NHS has been routinely offered as a vital component of early childhood care in developed countries, whereas such a screening program is still at the pilot or preliminary stage as regards its nationwide implementation in developing countries. To provide significant evidence for health policy making in China, this study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of NHS program implementation in case of eight provinces of China. Methods A cost-effectiveness model was conducted and all neonates annually born from 2007 to 2009 in eight provinces of China were simulated in this model. The model parameters were estimated from the established databases in the general hospitals or maternal and child health hospitals of these eight provinces, supplemented from the published literature. The model estimated changes in program implementation costs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, average cost-effectiveness ratio (ACER, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for universal screening compared to targeted screening in eight provinces. Results and discussion A multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed to determine uncertainty in health effect estimates and cost-effectiveness ratios using a probabilistic modeling technique. Targeted strategy trended to be cost-effective in Guangxi, Jiangxi, Henan, Guangdong, Zhejiang, Hebei, Shandong, and Beijing from the level of 9%, 9%, 8%, 4%, 3%, 7%, 5%, and 2%, respectively; while universal strategy trended to be cost-effective in those provinces from the level of 70%, 70%, 48%, 10%, 8%, 28%, 15%, 4%, respectively. This study showed although there was a huge disparity in the implementation of the NHS program in the surveyed provinces, both universal strategy and targeted strategy showed cost-effectiveness in those relatively developed provinces, while neither of the screening strategy showed cost-effectiveness in those relatively developing provinces. This

  3. Peer health advisor program to reduce the health risks of university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, M I

    1984-01-01

    Health promoters in the United States need to address the challenge of reducing health risks in young adults. The conditions that lead to the largest percentages of early disabilities and deaths are related to lifestyle characteristics. As health care costs continue spiraling upward, many professionals question the use of solely medical solutions to health problems. Health leaders have called for a change in priorities from curing the sick to keeping people well. Reducing health risks will increase longevity, improve quality of life, and reduce health care costs. It is widely believed that during the adolescent and young adult years many important health habits are formed and set. An individual person's health destiny can, in fact, be greatly shaped by the attitudes, behavior, and knowledge adopted during the early years of independence. For these reasons, wellness and self-care programming for college students is vital and worthy of being rigorously explored and evaluated. In this health promotion proposal, peers deliver a Lifestyle Health Planning Program to university students. They can encourage an internal locus of control over health matters and a perception of choice in those they counsel. The peer advisors conduct one-on-one sessions and outreach programs in the subject areas of fitness, nutrition, health-impairing habits, stress management, and sexuality. Promoting self-responsibility during college years can set lifelong positive health habits. A group of trained peer health advisors can be an innovative device to implement a health promotion program in a university setting.

  4. A University-Hosted Program in Pursuit of Coastal Sustainability: The Case of Tokyo Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Baba

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a unique way by which a university program can contribute to capacity development for coastal sustainability. The program is steered by a working group of volunteer faculty members, having different academic backgrounds, in collaboration with students and marine professionals, including fisherfolk and environment education interpreters. Although the program began with conventional educational ideas and style, its practical framework evolved to include interactive activities with collaborators in the community, all of which were geared toward social learning. The combination of service learning and participatory action research (PAR was proven to be an adequate approach to link higher education for sustainable development (HESD and university-community partnerships and to promote learning for coastal sustainability. Challenges identified include (1 ensuring continuity of learning and (2 reducing the heavy workload of faculty members involved in program preparation and coordination. The authors would like to emphasize the possibilities offered by the engagement of scholarship in the capacity development for coastal sustainability by focusing on community-based efforts.

  5. Scientific culture from the University. Research competence evaluation of students enrolled in the Summer Science Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Antonio GRIJALVA VERDUGO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The training of young researchers from tertiary education represents a latent concern in educational centers worldwide. In that sense, there are private and public initiatives that encourage scientific culture inside and outside the school curriculum; such as the Summer Science Program in Mexico. This program aims to provide university students with research competence, to incorporate them into the production, creation, and transfer of knowledge through various means: graduate studies, collaboration with solid research groups, among others, so that they contribute to the social, economic, and technological development of their region. Therefore, this work inquires the research competence levels shown in eight generations of undergraduate students in a public university in the Mexican state of Sinaloa that completed the Summer Science Program.In the fieldwork, 227 students participated. They were divided into four knowledge areas: 1 Economic and administrative sciences, 2 Social sciences and humanities, 3 Engineering and Technology, and 4 Biological sciences. As data collecting instruments, interviews and polls were applied, as well as a structured questionnaire composed by 34 items; this report shows the findings of the last one. For the analysis, nonparametric statistics were used, to contrast the competence levels between the different subgroups of students. The results have a descriptive scope, but also allow visualizing a theoretical and empirical spectrum of the needs and strengths of the young researchers training programs

  6. Development of multidisciplinary nanotechnology undergraduate education program at the University of Rochester Integrated Nanosystems Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukishova, Svetlana G.; Bigelow, Nicholas P.; D'Alessandris, Paul D.

    2017-08-01

    Supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation educational grant, a coherent educational program at the University of Rochester (UR) in nanoscience and nanoengineering, based on the Institute of Optics and Intergrated Nanosystems Center resources was created. The main achievements of this program are (1) developing curriculum and offering the Certificate for Nanoscience and Nanoengineering program (15 students were awarded the Certificate and approximately 10 other students are working in this direction), (2) creating a reproducible model of collaboration in nanotechnology between a university with state-of-the-art, expensive experimental facilities, and a nearby, two-year community college (CC) with participation of a local Monroe Community College (MCC). 52 MCC students carried out two labs at the UR on the atomic force microscopy and a photolithography at a clean room; (3) developing reproducible hand-on experiments on nanophotonics ("mini-labs"), learning materials and pedagogical methods to educate students with diverse backgrounds, including freshmen and non-STEM-major CC students. These minilabs on nanophotonics were also introduced in some Institute of Optics classes. For the Certificate program UR students must take three courses: Nanometrology Laboratory (a new course) and two other selective courses from the list of several. Students also should carry out a one-semester research or a design project in the field of nanoscience and nanoengineering.

  7. SATISFACTION CLUSTERING ANALYSIS OF DISTANCE EDUCATION COMPUTER PROGRAMMING STUDENTS: A Sample of Karadeniz Technical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer OZYURT

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In line with recently developing technology, distant education systems based on information technologies are started to be commonly used within higher education. Students’ satisfaction is one of the vital aspects in order to maintain distant education efficiently and achieving its goal. As a matter of the fact, previous studies proved that student satisfaction is one of the most important factors in deciding the success of a system in terms of application. Therefore, this paper analyzes satisfaction variables of distant education computer programming students regarding this program as well as their clustering tendencies. 96 students who were having their majors in distant education computer programming at Karadeniz Technical University during 2012-2013 academic term constitute the sample of the study. The study employed Satisfaction Scale for Students of Distant education Based on Information Technologies as data collection tool which comprised of 42 items. Data obtained from the scale was analyzed via Ward method, one of the hierarchical clustering methods, in order to reveal their clustering tendencies. Accordingly, satisfaction variables were divided into three main clusters which were A, B and C. Of these main clusters, it was seen that A and B has two sub-clusters each which were A1, A2 and B1, B2 respectively. These divisions were named after the variables they include; A1: “Interest of the instructors and the implementation of program content”, A2: “Support and rapport of the university”, B1: “Scope of the program”, B2: “Individuality and the opportunity for interaction” and C: “The defects in application by both the program and the university”. From an overall perspective, it is seen that Cluster A covers variables positively affecting the satisfaction which are “the quality of service provided by the university for this program”, “application of program content fitting to the purpose” and

  8. Methods used for Undergraduate Education at the University of Alaska Southeast Environmental Sciences Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavner, M. J.; Hood, E. W.; Connor, C. L.

    2004-12-01

    The Environmental Science Program at the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau, Alaska utilizes our unique outdoor field experience opportunities as part of both the classroom experience and our undergraduate research component. This presentation focuses on our successes in taking advantage of our surrounding environment in the maritime rainforest of the Alaska panhandle to enhance our undergraduate program. We will highlight some of our most successful undergraduate experiences, which include a snow pack monitoring site at our local ski area, glacier mass balance studies on the Mendenhall Glacier, glacial geology studies in Glacier Bay National Park, and the development of wireless networks to monitor bats. We will describe methods we have used to integrate the field opportunities into our program.

  9. [Training program on cardiopulmonary resuscitation with the use of automated external defibrillator in a university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Ana Paula; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue

    2012-03-01

    Early defibrillation in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) receives increasing emphasis on its priority and rapidity. This is an experience report about the implementation of a training program in CPR using a defibrillator in a private university. The training program in basic CPR maneuvers was based on global guidelines, including a theorical course with practical demonstration of CPR maneuvers with the defibrillator, individual practical training and theoretical and practical assessments. About the performance of students in the practical assessment the mean scores obtained by students in the first stage of the course was 26.4 points, while in the second stage the mean was 252.8 points, in the theoretical assessment the mean in the first stage was 3.06 points and in the second 9.0 points. The implementation of programs like this contribute to the effective acquisition of knowledge (theory) and skill (pratice) for the care of CPR victims.

  10. Cases in Partnership between Independent Schools and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnan, Vincent W.

    2016-01-01

    This study provides an in-depth look at six unique models of partnership between independent schools and a nearby college/university. The six cases include the University School of Nashville and Vanderbilt University; the Lab School and University of Chicago; the School at Columbia and Columbia University; the Boston University Academy and Boston…

  11. ONE WEEK ONE ARTICLE PROGRAM IN READING CLASS (A CASE STUDY AT MATHLAUL ANWAR UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Rahmatullah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The research focused on the implementation of one week one article program in improving students’ reading skill and vocabulary mastery. The research was conducted by using qualitative research. The participant of the research was the first semester students of English Department in Mathla’ul Anwar University. There were 53 students taken as the subject. The collecting data Techniques were observation, interview, and questionnaire. The data were analyzed by reduction, display, and conclusion of the data. The result of the research showed that firstly, the implementation of one week one article program is able to improve students’ reading skill and vocabulary mastery. Secondly, the students actively selected, discussed and presented the article in the implementation of one week one article program. Thirdly, the students used reading techniques in the implementation of one week one article program. The last, the students pronounced English words properly in the implementation of one week one article program. It can be concluded that the implementation of one week one article program is able to improve students’ reading skill and vocabulary mastery; in addition the students actively prepared the article and pronounce the vocabulary correctly.

  12. Education programs of the Institute for Optical Sciences at the University of Toronto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istrate, Emanuel; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2009-06-01

    The Institute for Optical Sciences at the University of Toronto is an association of faculty members from various departments with research interests in optics. The institute has an extensive program of academic activities, for graduate and undergraduate students, as well as public outreach. For undergraduate students, we have a course on holography. We provide opportunities for students to gain optics experience through research by providing access to summer research positions and by enrolling them in the Research Skills Program, a summer course teaching the basic skills needed in research. For graduate students, we offer the Distinguished Visiting Scientists program, where world-renowned researchers come for a week, giving a series of 3 lectures and interacting closely with students and professors. The extended stay allows the program to run like a mini-course. We launched a Collaborative Master's Program in Optics, where students earn a degree from their home department, along with a certification of participation in the collaborative program. Physics, Chemistry and Engineering students attending together are exposed to the various points of view on optics, ranging from the pure to the applied sciences. For the general public, we offer the Stoicheff Lecture, a yearly public lecture on optics, organized with the Royal Canadian Institute. Our institute also initiated Science Rendezvous, a yearly public celebration of science across the Greater Toronto Area, with lab tours, demonstrations, and other opportunities to learn about science and those who are actively advancing it. This year, this event attracted over 20,000 attendees.

  13. An Assessment of the Effectiveness of the Mcnair Program at the University of Akron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Paul C.; Ugweje, Okechukwu; Mawasha, P. Ruby; Srivatsan, Tirumalai

    The Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program is one of the six federal TRIO programs funded and periodically reviewed by the U.S. Department of Education. The program is an opportunity for educational outreach designed to inspire, motivate, and support students from disadvantaged backgrounds. The McNair program at The University of Akron is designed to educate, prepare, and qualify underrepresented students and those from first-generation, low-income families to take an important step toward pursuing graduate degrees in mathematics, science, engineering, and technology. This article investigates several selection variables, including students' research activities, support services of the program director's office, the role and enthusiasm of faculty mentors, and research- and workshop-related activities, as predictors of success in the program during its first 2 years at Akron. Preliminary data, including comments of the 2000 and 2001 McNair students and mentors, were used in the analysis. The results indicate that the overall experience of the McNair scholars was encouraging and satisfactory and provide knowledge on areas for improvement.

  14. Preventing the Onset of Child Sexual Abuse by Targeting Young Adolescents With Universal Prevention Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Elizabeth J.; Schaeffer, Cindy M.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Feder, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a serious public health problem that increases risk for physical and mental health problems across the life course. Young adolescents are responsible for a substantial portion of CSA offending, yet to our knowledge, no validated prevention programs that target CSA perpetration by youth exist. Most existing efforts to address CSA rely on reactive criminal justice policies or programs that teach children to protect themselves; neither approach is well validated. Given the high rates of desistance from sexual offending following a youth’s first CSA-related adjudication, it seems plausible that many youth could be prevented from engaging in their first offense. The goal of this article is to examine how school-based universal prevention programs might be used to prevent CSA perpetrated by adolescents. We review the literature on risk and protective factors for CSA perpetration and identify several promising factors to target in an intervention. We also summarize the literature on programs that have been effective at preventing adolescent dating violence and other serious problem behaviors. Finally, we describe a new CSA prevention program under development and early evaluation and make recommendations for program design characteristics, including unambiguous messaging, parental involvement, multisession dosage, skills practice, and bystander considerations. PMID:28413921

  15. Preventing the Onset of Child Sexual Abuse by Targeting Young Adolescents With Universal Prevention Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, Elizabeth J; Schaeffer, Cindy M; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Feder, Kenneth A

    2017-05-01

    Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a serious public health problem that increases risk for physical and mental health problems across the life course. Young adolescents are responsible for a substantial portion of CSA offending, yet to our knowledge, no validated prevention programs that target CSA perpetration by youth exist. Most existing efforts to address CSA rely on reactive criminal justice policies or programs that teach children to protect themselves; neither approach is well validated. Given the high rates of desistance from sexual offending following a youth's first CSA-related adjudication, it seems plausible that many youth could be prevented from engaging in their first offense. The goal of this article is to examine how school-based universal prevention programs might be used to prevent CSA perpetrated by adolescents. We review the literature on risk and protective factors for CSA perpetration and identify several promising factors to target in an intervention. We also summarize the literature on programs that have been effective at preventing adolescent dating violence and other serious problem behaviors. Finally, we describe a new CSA prevention program under development and early evaluation and make recommendations for program design characteristics, including unambiguous messaging, parental involvement, multisession dosage, skills practice, and bystander considerations.

  16. Epithelial growth over the optic surface of the type 1 Boston Keratoprosthesis: histopathology and implications for biointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousuf M Khalifa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Yousuf M Khalifa, Don Davis, Nick Mamalis, Majid MoshirfarMoran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USAAbstract: We report the histopathology of epithelial overgrowth in the Boston type I keratoprosthesis. The epithelium shows an inconsistent number of layers and basement membrane and goblet cells are absent. Epithelialization of the keratoprosthesis optic would have multiple advantages, but the limitation of vision makes tolerating the overgrowth difficult.Keywords: keratoprosthesis, cornea, corneal transplant, biocompatibility, biointegration epithelium

  17. The Family Startup Program: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a universal group-based parenting support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillingsgaard, Tea; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-04-21

    Inadequate parenting is an important public health problem with possible severe and long-term consequences related to child development. We have solid theoretical and political arguments in favor of efforts enhancing the quality of the early family environment in the population at large. However, little is known about effect of universal approaches to parenting support during the transition to parenthood. This protocol describes an experimental evaluation of group based parenting support, the Family Startup Program (FSP), currently implemented large scale in Denmark. Participants will be approximately 2500 pregnant women and partners. Inclusion criteria are parental age above 18 and the mother expecting first child. Families are recruited when attending routine pregnancy scans provided as a part of the publicly available prenatal care program at Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby. Families are randomized within four geographically defined strata to one of two conditions a) participation in FSP or b) Treatment As Usual (TAU). FSP aims to prepare new families for their roles as parents and enhance parental access to informal sources of support, i.e. social network and community resources. The program consists of twelve group sessions, with nine families in each group, continuing from pregnancy until the child is 15 months old. TAU is the publicly available pre- and postnatal care available to families in both conditions. Analyses will employ survey data, administrative data from health visitors, and administrative register based data from Statistics Denmark. All data sources will be linked via the unique Danish Civil Registration Register (CPR) identifier. Data will be obtained at four time points, during pregnancy, when the child is nine months, 18 months and seven years. The primary study outcome is measured by the Parenting Sense of Competence scale (PSOC) J Clin Child Psychol 18:167-75, 1989. Other outcomes include parenting and couple relationship quality

  18. Titanium Coating of the Boston Keratoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Culla, Borja; Jeong, Kyung Jae; Kolovou, Paraskevi Evi; Chiang, Homer H; Chodosh, James; Dohlman, Claes H; Kohane, Daniel S

    2016-04-01

    We tested the feasibility of using titanium to enhance adhesion of the Boston Keratoprosthesis (B-KPro), ultimately to decrease the risk of implant-associated complications. Cylindrical rods were made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), PMMA coated with titanium dioxide (TiO2) over a layer of polydopamine (PMMATiO2), smooth (Ti) and sandblasted (TiSB) titanium, and titanium treated with oxygen plasma (Tiox and TiSBox). Topography and surface chemistry were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adhesion force between rods and porcine corneas was measured ex vivo. Titanium sleeves, smooth and sandblasted, were inserted around the stem of the B-KPro and implanted in rabbits. Tissue adhesion to the stem was assessed and compared to an unmodified B-Kpro after 1 month. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated successful deposition of TiO2 on polydopamine-coated PMMA. Oxygen plasma treatment did not change the XPS spectra of titanium rods (Ti and TiSB), although it increased their hydrophilicity. The materials did not show cell toxicity. After 14 days of incubation, PMMATiO2, smooth titanium treated with oxygen plasma (Tiox), and sandblasted titanium rods (TiSB, TiSBox) showed significantly higher adhesion forces than PMMA ex vivo. In vivo, the use of a TiSB sleeve around the stem of the B-KPro induced a significant increase in tissue adhesion compared to a Ti sleeve or bare PMMA. Sandblasted titanium sleeves greatly enhanced adherence of the B-KPro to the rabbit cornea. This approach may improve adhesion with the donor cornea in humans as well. This approach may improve adhesion with donor corneas in humans.

  19. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  20. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  1. FORMATION PROGRAM IN MATHEMATICS AT THE TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY AND THE QUALITY OF KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Bogomolova

    2016-01-01

    in mathematics application.Practical significance. Research implications may be useful to managers and training specialists of Mathematical Departments of technical universities, program builders in mathematics and educational standards in engineering fields.

  2. Satellite Monitoring of Boston Harbor Water Quality: Initial Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, P.; Chen, R. F.; Schaaf, C.; Pahlevan, N.; Lee, Z.

    2016-02-01

    The transformation of Boston Harbor from the "dirtiest in America" to a National Park Area is one of the most remarkable estuarine recoveries in the world. A long-term water quality dataset from 1991 to present exists in Boston Harbor due to a $3. 8 billion lawsuit requiring the harbor clean-up. This project uses discrete water sampling and underway transects with a towed vehicle coordinated with Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 to create surface maps of chlorophyll a (Chl a), dissolved organic matter (CDOM and DOC), total suspended solids (TSS), diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd_490), and photic depth in Boston Harbor. In addition, 3 buoys have been designed, constructed, and deployed in Boston Harbor that measure Chl a and CDOM fluorescence, optical backscatter, salinity, temperature, and meteorological parameters. We are initially using summer and fall of 2015 to develop atmospheric corrections for conditions in Boston Harbor and develop algorithms for Landsat 8 data to estimate in water photic depth, TSS, Chl a, Kd_490, and CDOM. We will report on initial buoy and cruise data and show 2015 Landsat-derived distributions of water quality parameters. It is our hope that once algorithms for present Landsat imagery can be developed, historical maps of water quality can be constructed using in water data back to 1991.

  3. The Boston Marathon versus the World Marathon Majors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip B Maffetone

    Full Text Available To compare finish times across WMM races for Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago and New York Marathons.Race times of the top 10 male and 10 female finishers were analyzed from 2005 to 2014 using the high-performance mixed linear model procedure in the Statistical Analysis System. Venue-to-venue comparisons, as well as comparisons between Boston and other WMM races, with and without factors of temperature, humidity and altitude change were examined.Performance from 2005 to 2014 in the WMM races was found to improve at a rate of ~1% each 7 years. Despite its higher variability, comparison between Boston's estimated mean finishing time and all other venues revealed moderate positive differences, indicating the Boston event to be typically slower than other venues.Across the 10-year study period, performance times improved ~1% each 7 years for both genders for the WMM, with the Boston Marathon being slower on average than other WMM venues. Weather rather than course metrics appeared to impact performance times most.

  4. The effects of an HPV education program by gender among Korean university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Won; Park, Seungmi; Ahn, Hye Young; Park, Eun-Jun

    2015-04-01

    This study compared the effects of an HPV education program by gender among Korean university students in terms of their knowledge of HPV, intention to prevent HPV, awareness of sexual rights, and perception of gender equality. A quasi-experimental pre-post design was employed. 31 male and 28 female university students participated in eight sessions of an HPV prevention program for four weeks and in a self-administrative survey. At pre-test, the perception of gender equality and some of the intentions to prevent HPV, including the intention to make regular use of condoms, reduce the number of sexual partners, abstain from sex until marriage, and stop smoking or stay non-smoker, were lower among men than women. When these differences by gender at pre-test were taken into account using ANCOVA, education outcome measures at post-test did not differ by gender. After completing the HPV prevention program, both male and female students presented a significant increase in terms of HPV knowledge, awareness of sexual rights, and perception of gender equality. Among the intentions to prevent HPV, only male intention to recommend the Pap test to their partner and female intention to regularly seek the Pap test and pelvic examinations were significantly increased after the program. The HPV program was effective for both genders eliminating gender differences in attitudes and prevention intentions of HPV. However, the intentions to prevent HPV did not increase significantly, and future research is warranted to better understand students' perceived obstacles for practicing HPV prevention methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of a Workplace Health Promotion Program on Employees' Blood Pressure in a Public University.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Y Eng

    Full Text Available Workplace health promotion is important in the prevention of non-communicable diseases among employees. Previous workplace health programs have shown benefits such as lowered disease prevalence, reduced medical costs and improved productivity. This study aims to evaluate the impact of a 6-year workplace health promotion program on employees' blood pressure in a public university.In this prospective cohort study, we included 1,365 employees enrolled in the university's workplace health promotion program, a program conducted since 2008 and using data from the 2008-2013 follow-up period. Participants were permanent employees aged 35 years and above, with at least one follow up measurements and no change in antihypertensive medication during the study period. Baseline socio-demographic information was collected using a questionnaire while anthropometry measurements and resting blood pressure were collected during annual health screening. Changes in blood pressure over time were analyzed using a linear mixed model.The systolic blood pressure in the hypertension subgroup decreased 2.36 mmHg per year (p<0.0001. There was also significant improvement in systolic blood pressure among the participants who were at risk of hypertension (-0.75 mmHg, p<0.001. The diastolic blood pressure among the hypertensive and at risk subgroups improved 1.76 mmHg/year (p<0.001 and 0.56 mmHg/year (p<0.001, respectively. However, there was no change in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure among participants in the healthy subgroup over the 6-year period.This study shows that continuing participation in workplace health promotion program has the potential to improve blood pressure levels among employees.

  6. Nanocommunication design in graduate-level education and research training programs at Osaka University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Mizuki; An, SoonHwa; Ata, Masafumi

    2014-09-01

    After more than ten years of strategic investment research and development supported by government policies on science and technology, nanotechnology in Japan is making a transition from the knowledge creation stage of exploratory research to the stage of making the outcomes available for the benefit of society as a whole. Osaka University has been proactive in discussions about the relationship between nanotechnology and society as part of graduate and continuing education programs. These programs are intended to fulfill the social accountability obligation of scientists and corporations involved in R&D, and to deepen their understanding of the relationship between science and society. To meet those aims, the program has covered themes relating to overall public engagement relating to nanotechnology governance, such as risk management of nanomaterials, international standardization for nanotechnology, nanomeasurement, intellectual property management in an open innovation environment, and interactive communication with society. Nanotechnology is an emerging field of science and technology. This paper reports and comments on initiatives for public engagement on nanotechnology at Osaka University's Institute for NanoScience Design, which aims to create new technologies based on nanotechnology that can help realize a sustainable society.

  7. Analysis of the rendering services individual register of phonoaudiology program of the Cauca University, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela Eugenia Zúñiga-Pino

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The program of Phonoaudiology of the University of Cauca has included the systematization of RIPS in their practices: Integrated I, Integrated II and Community VII, VIII and IX semester. The systematization uses the communicative pathologies codes stipulated in the procedure manual for the practice of audiology MPPF-II of the Colombian Association of Audiology and Technical Annex 2 of the agreement 008, 2009. The aim of this study was to analyze the information available in the RIPS, about the procedures performed in communicative disorders and therapy evaluation in the periods 2004-2009. This analysis allowed knowing the behavior of communicative disorders and the number of procedures performed by the Audiology program at the University of Cauca in the areas of professional practice: speech, language and hearing; in addition to highlighting the impact on health of communication disorders by the program through pre-professional practices. For purposes of systematization the records in the first consultation, monitoring and control and tests practiced were took into account.

  8. Gerontological Social Work Student-Delivered Respite: A Community-University Partnership Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Tiffany R; Tachman, Jacqueline A

    2017-01-01

    This study describes a community-university partnership to support a gerontological social work student-delivered respite program, the Houseguest Program (Houseguest). Houseguest was designed using a community-engaged scholarship model of integrating research, teaching, and service. Houseguest was piloted with a small group of community-dwelling, coresiding dementia caregivers and care recipients. We examined caregivers' experiences with student-delivered respite using qualitative data analysis. Thematic analysis produced 8 themes: (a) respite from full time caregiving role, (b) information on caregiving strategies, (c) no-cost supportive services, (d) opportunity for care recipients to socialize, (e) tailored activities for care recipients, (f) rapport-building between students and family dyad, (g) reciprocity between students and family dyad, and (h) program continuation. We conclude with a proposed community-engaged scholarship model for dementia caregiving. Through a community-university partnership, Houseguest reduced the impact of caregiver burden and created an opportunity for students to serve families affected by dementia through respite and tailored activities.

  9. How Does The Universe Work? The Physics Of The Cosmos Program (PCOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambruna, Rita M.

    2011-09-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) program incorporates cosmology, high-energy astrophysics, and fundamental physics projects aimed at addressing central questions about the nature of complex astrophysical phenomena such as black holes, neutron stars, dark energy, and gravitational waves. Its overarching theme is, How does the Universe work? PCOS includes a suite of operating (Chandra, Fermi, Planck, XMM-Newton, INTEGRAL) and future missions across the electromagnetic spectrum and beyond, which are in concept development and/or formulation. The PCOS program directly supports development of intermediate TRL (4-6) technology relevant to future missions through the Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program, as well as data analysis, theory, and experimental astrophysics via other R&A avenues (e.g., ADAP, ATP). The Einstein Fellowship is a vital and vibrant PCOS component funded by the program. PCOS receives community input via its Program Analysis Group, the PhysPAG (www.pcos.gsfc.nasa.gov/physpag.php), whose membership and meetings are open to the community at large. In this poster, we describe the detailed science questions addressed within PCOS, with special emphasis on future opportunities. Details about the PhysPAG operations and functions will be provided, as well as an update on future meetings.

  10. STAIRSTEP -- a research-oriented program for undergraduate students at Lamar University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrim, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    The relative low number of undergraduate STEM students in many science disciplines, and in particular in physics, represents a major concern for our faculty and the administration at Lamar University. Therefore, a collaborative effort between several science programs, including computer science, chemistry, geology, mathematics and physics was set up with the goal of increasing the number of science majors and to minimize the retention rate. Lamar's Student Advancing through Involvement in Research Student Talent Expansion Program (STAIRSTEP) is a NSF-DUE sponsored program designed to motivate STEM students to graduate with a science degree from one of these five disciplines by involving them in state-of-the-art research projects and various outreach activities organized on-campus or in road shows at the secondary and high schools. The physics program offers hands-on experience in optics, such as computer-based experiments for studying the diffraction and interference of light incident on nettings or electronic wave packets incident on crystals, with applications in optical imaging, electron microscopy, and crystallography. The impact of the various activities done in STAIRSTEP on our Physics Program will be discussed.

  11. Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis outcomes in ocular burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Fernanda Pedreira; Hirai, Flavio Eduardo; de Sousa, Luciene Barbosa; de Oliveira, Lauro Augusto

    2013-09-01

    To report the outcomes of Boston type I keratoprosthesis (BKPro) in the management of ocular burn injuries. This was a prospective study including all cases of BKPro implantation for ocular burns at the External Diseases and Cornea Service of the Federal University of São Paulo, between February 2008 and February 2010. Ten patients (10 eyes) were enrolled. Procedures performed to manage ocular injury were identified, and data were collected regarding patients' ocular history, surgical procedure(s) performed, and postoperative outcomes, including visual acuity, retention, complications and required surgical procedures. A total of 11 Type 1 BKPro were implanted in 10 eyes of 10 patients. The mean follow-up period was 25.7 ± 10.8 months. Preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from count fingers to light perception. Postoperative BCVA was better than 20/200 in 90% of the patients and better than 20/60 in 60% of the patients. The overall BKPro retention rate was 90%. The most common complications were retroprosthetic membrane formation (50%) and persistent corneal epithelial defect evolving to corneal melting (40%). Patients who underwent ocular surface procedures such as limbal transplantation prior to BKPRo implantation had a lower incidence of corneal melting/thinning (p = 0.07), although this was not statistically significant. The anatomical and functional results identified in this study support the use of BKPro in managing bilateral limbal stem cell deficiency secondary to ocular burns. © 2013 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. NCCN Guidelines implementation in the multidisciplinary Merkel Cell Carcinoma Program at the University of Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer L; Wong, Sandra L; McLean, Scott A; Hayman, James A; Lao, Christopher D; Kozlow, Jeffrey H; Malloy, Kelly M; Bradford, Carol R; Frohm, Marcus L; Fullen, Douglas R; Lowe, Lori; Bichakjian, Christopher K

    2014-03-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare malignancy of the skin, and prospective randomized clinical studies on management and treatment are very limited. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for MCC provide up-to-date, best evidence-based, and consensus-driven management pathways with the purpose of providing best care and outcomes. Multidisciplinary management with consensus treatment recommendations to individualize patient care within the framework of these guidelines is optimal. The University of Michigan multidisciplinary MCC program uses NCCN Guidelines in the management and treatment of its patients. This article discusses 4 patient presentations to highlight the implementation of the NCCN Guidelines for MCC at the University of Michigan.

  13. A Collection of Articles Reprinted from Science & Technology Review on University Relations Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H; Rennie, G; Henke, A

    2006-08-23

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) The Power of Partnership--Livermore researchers forge strategic collaborations with colleagues from other University of California campuses to further science and better protect the nation; (2) Collaborative Research Prepares Our Next-Generation Scientists and Engineers--Commentary by Laura R. Gilliom; (3) Next-Generation Scientists and Engineers Tap Lab's Resources--University of California Ph.D. candidates work with Livermore scientists and engineers to conduct fundamental research as part of their theses; (4) The Best and the Brightest Come to Livermore--The Lawrence Fellowship Program attracts the most sought-after postdoctoral researchers to the Laboratory; and (5) Faculty on Sabbatical Find a Good Home at Livermore--Faculty members from around the world come to the Laboratory as sabbatical scholars.

  14. A New Master of Natural Hazards Program at The Australian National University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozgay, S.; Zoleta-Nantes, D.

    2009-12-01

    The new Master of Natural Hazards program at The Australian National University provides a multi-disciplinary approach to the study and monitoring of geophysical processes that can lead to the recognition of hazards and a consequent reduction of their impacts through emergency measures, disaster plans, and relief and rehabilitation. The program provides people with an understanding of the most up-to-date scientific understanding on the causes of natural hazards, their effects on human societies, and ways to mitigate their impacts and reduce their losses by focusing on Australia and the Asia-Pacific case studies. The Master of Natural Hazards program brings together the expertise of researchers across the university to provide an opportunity for students to do coursework and research projects that will provide them with extensive knowledge of the natural hazards that occur and pose the greatest risks on human communities in the Asia-Pacific, and an understanding of the human dimensions of the natural hazards occurrences. The program consists of two compulsory courses each in the Earth Sciences and in the Social Sciences that are designed to provide a complementary and comprehensive overview of natural hazards issues. Elective courses can be of a general grouping, or students may choose one of four Focus Streams: Environmental and Geographic Studies; Climate Change; Earth Structure and Imaging; or Socio-economic, Development and Policy Studies. A special case study project will involve writing a thesis on a topic to be approved by the Program Conveners and will comprise a body of work on an approved topic in natural hazards in the Asia-Pacific region. Students in this program will gain a broad scientific knowledge and methodological skills to understand the physical causes and frequency of the most important natural hazards in the Asia-Pacific region, as well as the latest scientific methods and best practices of monitoring them for hazard mapping and disaster

  15. Earth Institute at Columbia University ADVANCE Program: Addressing Needs for Women in Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R. E.; Cane, M.; Mutter, J.; Miller, R.; Pfirman, S.; Laird, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Earth Institute has received a major NSF ADVANCE grant targeted at increasing the participation and advancement of women scientists and engineers in the Academy through institutional transformation. The Earth Institute at Columbia University includes 9 research institutes including Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Center for Environmental Research and Conservation (CERC), Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), International Research Institute (IRI) for Climate Prediction, Earth Engineering Center, NASA-Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Center for Risks and Hazards, Center for Globalization and Sustainable Development, and Center for Global Health and Economic Development and six academic departments including Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology (E3B, School of Arts and Sciences), Earth and Environmental Engineering (DEEE, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences), Department of Environmental Health (School of Public Health), Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (DEES, School of Arts and Sciences), Department of International and Public Affairs (School of International and Policy Affairs), and Barnard College Department of Environmental Science. The Earth Institute at Columbia University's ADVANCE program is based both on a study of the status of women at Columbia and research on the progression of women in science elsewhere. The five major targets of the Columbia ADVANCE program are to (1) change the demographics of the faculty through intelligent hiring practices, (2) provide support to women scientists through difficult life transitions including elder care and adoption or birth of a child, (3) enhance mentoring and networking opportunities, (4) implement transparent promotion procedures and policies, and (5) conduct an institutional self study. The Earth Institute ADVANCE program is unique in that it addresses issues that tend to manifest themselves in the earth and environmental fields, such as extended

  16. High energy physics program at Texas A&M University. Final report, April 1, 1990--March 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    The Texas A&M experimental high energy physics program has been supported since its inception by DOE Contract DE-AS05-81ER40039. During that period we established a viable experimental program at a university which before this time had no program in high energy physics. In 1990, the experimental program was augmented with a program in particle theory. In the accompanying final report, we outline the research work accomplished during the final year of this contract and the program being proposed for consideration by the Department of Energy for future grant support. Some of the particular areas covered are: Collider detector at Fermilab program; the TAMU MACRO program; SSC R&D program; SSC experimental program; and theoretical physics program.

  17. Geothermal Technologies Program Geoscience and Supporting Technologies 2001 University Research Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creed, Robert John; Laney, Patrick Thomas

    2002-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Wind and Geothermal Technologies (DOE) is funding advanced geothermal research through University Geothermal Research solicitations. These solicitations are intended to generate research proposals in the areas of fracture permeability location and characterization, reservoir management and geochemistry. The work funded through these solicitations should stimulate the development of new geothermal electrical generating capacity through increasing scientific knowledge of high-temperature geothermal systems. In order to meet this objective researchers are encouraged to collaborate with the geothermal industry. These objectives and strategies are consistent with DOE Geothermal Energy Program strategic objectives.

  18. Geothermal Technologies Program Geoscience and Supporting Technologies 2001 University Research Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creed, R.J.; Laney, P.T.

    2002-05-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Wind and Geothermal Technologies (DOE) is funding advanced geothermal research through University Geothermal Research solicitations. These solicitations are intended to generate research proposals in the areas of fracture permeability location and characterization, reservoir management and geochemistry. The work funded through these solicitations should stimulate the development of new geothermal electrical generating capacity through increasing scientific knowledge of high-temperature geothermal systems. In order to meet this objective researchers are encouraged to collaborate with the geothermal industry. These objectives and strategies are consistent with DOE Geothermal Energy Program strategic objectives.

  19. University of Arizona High Energy Physics Program at the Cosmic Frontier 2014-2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    abate, alex [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); cheu, elliott [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2016-10-24

    This is the final technical report from the University of Arizona High Energy Physics program at the Cosmic Frontier covering the period 2014-2016. The work aims to advance the understanding of dark energy using the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Progress on the engineering design of the power supplies for the LSST camera is discussed. A variety of contributions to photometric redshift measurement uncertainties were studied. The effect of the intergalactic medium on the photometric redshift of very distant galaxies was evaluated. Computer code was developed realizing the full chain of calculations needed to accurately and efficiently run large-scale simulations.

  20. New Sustainability Programs and Their Impact at a Large Public State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bralower, T. J.; Guertin, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Pennsylvania State University comprises 24 campuses across the state. Students who are admitted to any campus are automatically admitted to the University Park Campus once they meet the entrance requirements for their major. The University Park Campus has a Geoscience Department with over 30 faculty and several degree programs. Several of the campuses also have Geoscience faculty. Two of the campuses offer majors in geoscience fields with plans at other campuses to add Environmental Science degree programs. Campus faculty play an instrumental role in recruiting students into the geosciences and providing them with general and allied science education. However, these faculty have high teaching loads and often struggle to fulfill student demand for courses. Penn State is also home to the World Campus which offers courses solely online to students all around the world including a large number of Military personnel. Penn State has led the development of five introductory-level blended and online courses as part of the InTeGrate STEP center. These courses are Coastal Processes, Hazards and Society; Water Science and Society; Climate, Energy, and Our Future; the Future of Food; and Earth Modeling. They add to an existing blended and online course, Earth in the Future that has been taught at the University Park and World Campuses for four years. Combined, the courses include 70 weekly modules. The courses constitute the basis of a recently approved Minor and Certificate of Excellence in Earth Sustainability offered in online format through the World Campus and in blended format at all the campuses. We are in the process of establishing an e-Learning Cooperative so that faculty at a campus can teach any of the sustainability courses online to students throughout the Penn State system. This will enable students to receive a greater introduction to, and variety of, sustainability courses at the campuses, and enable faculty to tailor courses to local campus interests and

  1. An introduction of internationalisation in food science doctoral program: a case study of Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunaefi, D

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Food Science and Technology- Bogor Agricultural University (DFST-IPB), Indonesia is one of the oldest Departments of its kind in Indonesia. The Department has been founded since 1964 under the Faculty of Agricultural Engineering and Technology. The Department has a core competence in the area of food science and technology, particularly in the development of food chemistry, food microbiology, food process engineering, food analysis, food quality and safety. The Department offers educational programs: Undergraduate Program in Food Technology and Master as well as Doctorate Program in Food Science. The Master and Doctorate Program are enrolled by 35 students annually. Globalisation as a global phenomenon has been influencing DFST doctoral program as internationalization in response to globalization is a common feature in majority universities. Facing this challenge, DFST Doctorate Program's has made some efforts to provide students with international atmosphere, including having international guest lecturers, inviting prospective international students, and initiating join program with international universities. In addition, research focusing in tropical food and collaboration with international universities may need to be improved to widen the network, increase publication and place DFST doctorate program visible in the international forum. This paper is intended to reveal the perceived challenges of globalization for food science doctoral program (DFST-IPB) and to what extent and in what form internationalization has been achieved. However, it should be noted that this article is selective rather than comprehensive in reflecting on the internationalization process of food science doctoral program (DFST-IPB).

  2. Innovations in nutrition education and global health: the Bangalore Boston nutrition collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background India has a wide range of nutrition and health problems which require professionals with appropriate skills, knowledge and trans-disciplinary collaborative abilities to influence policy making at the national and global level. Methods The Bangalore Boston Nutrition Collaborative (BBNC) was established as collaboration between St. John’s Research Institute (SJRI), Harvard School of Public Health and Tufts University, with a focus on nutrition research and training. The goals of the BBNC were to conduct an interdisciplinary course, develop web-based courses and identify promising Indian students and junior faculty for graduate training in Boston. Results From 2010, an annual two-week short course in nutrition research methods was conducted on the SJRI campus taught by international faculty from Indian and US universities. More than 100 students applied yearly for approximately 30 positions. The course had didactic lectures in the morning and practical hands-on sessions in the afternoon. Student rating of the course was excellent and consistent across the years. The ratings on the design and conduct of the course significantly improved (p nutrition and global health. Efforts are ongoing to secure long term funding to sustain and expand this collaboration to deliver high quality nutrition and global health education enabled by information and communication technologies. PMID:24400811

  3. Knowledge Sharing among University Students Facilitated with a Creative Commons Licensing Mechanism: A Case Study in a Programming Course

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen-Chung Liu; Chia-Ching Lin; Chun-Yi Chang; Po-Yao Chao

    2014-01-01

    .... This study investigates the role of the CC mechanism in supporting knowledge sharing among a group of university students studying programming from the perspectives of social cognitive and social capital theories...

  4. Generalizability of a composite student selection procedure at a university-based chiropractic program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Lotte Dyhrberg; Korsholm, Lars; Wallstedt, Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Non-cognitive admission criteria are typically used in chiropractic student selection to supplement grades. The reliability of non-cognitive student admission criteria in chiropractic education has not previously been examined. In addition, very few studies have examined the overall test...... generalizability of composites of non-cognitive admission variables in admission to health science programs. The aim of this study was to estimate the generalizability of a composite selection to a chiropractic program, consisting of: application form information, a written motivational essay, a common knowledge...... test, and an admission interview. METHODS: Data from 105 Chiropractic applicants from the 2007 admission at the University of Southern Denmark were available for analysis. Each admission parameter was double scored using two random, blinded, and independent raters. Variance components for applicant...

  5. Curricular renovation in the phonoaudiology program of the University of Cauca: a proposal for educational quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana María Pérez-Tenorio

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In Colombia, the Superior Education is going through a transformation process. These changes must be in coherence with the formulation of flexible policies among the diverse components of the curriculum and with the need for new forms of working and producing knowledge. The curricular renovation must ref lect an educational quality compromise and contribute to generate human development with high social impact. This article presents a proposal for Curricular Renovation, elaborated by faculty and students of the Phonoaudiology Program of the University of Cauca. This document contains aspects related to the pedagogic model, didactics, faculty-student relation, systems of evaluation and plan of studies. Furthermore, in this document the bases for the Route of Curricular Renovation are presented, consisting of the following phases: background, diagnosis and operational plan. These should facilitate the academic integration for adjusting the curricular processes to the needs of the academic program in a local, national and international context.

  6. Civic Engagement in Adolescents: Engendering Civic Awareness Through a University Youth Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Parker

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A weeklong residential Youth Leadership Institute Project was conducted at USC Upstate to promote essential skills deemed necessary for future civic engagement and political identity. The program and curriculum followed a framework that suggests that underlying civic skills are necessary to foster civic engagement among youth. Building on this theory, this reported study illustrates that civic engagement requires a developmental and educational process. Adolescence is a primary time for identity exploration and formation, which makes this stage an optimal time to engender civic awareness. A diverse group of 49 youth ranging in age from 14 to 17 participated. Results from the project demonstrate that when evaluating the significance and success of youth civic engagement programs, an account must be made for both the developmental and educational capacities. In pursuing projects such as ours on university campuses and beyond, psychologists and political scientists should work together to measure their outcomes in terms of these variables.

  7. Reading and writing academic practices in the phonoaudiology program at the University of Cauca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mirely Chois-Lenis

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents some results of an investigation aimed to characterize the academic literacy practices that are developed in the Phonoaudiology program at the University of Cauca. In this descriptive study, a sample of 24 students was taken from those in the last semester of the first academic period of 2009, who answered a survey of 26 multiple choice questions. The results indicate that the academic moment for which the students write and read the most is for the courses, who develop these practices primarily to be assessed and predominantly read and write their own lecture notes and the materials prepared by their faculty, to the detriment of scientific articles or papers for publication. It is expected, from these results, to generate reflexion processes and actions that qualify the practices of academic literacy within the program for the benefit of academic and professional performance of their students and graduates.

  8. The University of Saint Louis’ Foreign Language Program: Introspections and Realizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel James P. Pattaguan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was meant to present an evaluation of the delivery of the University of Saint Louis’ Foreign Language Program-Mandarin Chinese. Using descriptive research design, coupled with focus group discussion with the students in total enumeration, data along the different aspects of the teaching and learning of Mandarin Chinese, was ascertained using a developed and validated questionnaire. The student-respondents have evaluated the following areas: 1.Objectives of the Lesson/Course 2 Lesson Strategies 3 Lesson Assessments 4 Student Engagement 5 Learning Resources and Environment 5 Classroom Management 6 Outcomes. Moreover, the grades of the students along two major assessments-oral and written were also looked into to validate the perceptions of students along outcomes. In addition, a structured interview with the teachers was also conducted to provide further information. Looking within, data gathered and analyzed reveals that the University’s Foreign Language Program with the offering of Mandarin Chinese is generally very satisfactory along all areas evaluated. The oral and written examination results as reflected in the grades of the students show that the students have gained adequate skills in both oral and written Mandarin Chinese, although among all areas, it’s the written Mandarin that got the lowest mean rating among all items under “outcomes”. From the foregoing, realizations have been made that while the evaluation is generally very satisfactory using the scale, there is a need for the University to look into specific items under the major areas by way of designing intervention programs to further improve the delivery of the current foreign language program to its students. Moreover, an in-depth study of the same can be expanded to other classes delivered by Filipino professors.

  9. College and University Environmental Programs as a Policy Problem (Part 2): Strategies for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan G.; Rutherford, Murray B.; Auer, Matthew R.; Cherney, David N.; Wallace, Richard L.; Mattson, David J.; Clark, Douglas A.; Foote, Lee; Krogman, Naomi; Wilshusen, Peter; Steelman, Toddi

    2011-05-01

    Environmental studies and environmental sciences programs in American and Canadian colleges and universities seek to ameliorate environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. In a companion article (Part 1) we describe the environmental program movement (EPM) and discuss factors that have hindered its performance. Here, we complete our analysis by proposing strategies for improvement. We recommend that environmental programs re-organize around three principles. First, adopt as an overriding goal the concept of human dignity—defined as freedom and social justice in healthy, sustainable environments. This clear higher-order goal captures the human and environmental aspirations of the EPM and would provide a more coherent direction for the efforts of diverse participants. Second, employ an explicit, genuinely interdisciplinary analytical framework that facilitates the use of multiple methods to investigate and address environmental and social problems in context. Third, develop educational programs and applied experiences that provide students with the technical knowledge, powers of observation, critical thinking skills and management acumen required for them to become effective professionals and leaders. Organizing around these three principles would build unity in the EPM while at the same time capitalizing on the strengths of the many disciplines and diverse local conditions involved.

  10. College and university environmental programs as a policy problem (Part 2): Strategies for improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.G.; Rutherford, M.B.; Auer, M.R.; Cherney, D.N.; Wallace, R.L.; Mattson, D.J.; Clark, D.A.; Foote, L.; Krogman, N.; Wilshusen, P.; Steelman, T.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental studies and environmental sciences programs in American and Canadian colleges and universities seek to ameliorate environmental problems through empirical enquiry and analytic judgment. In a companion article (Part 1) we describe the environmental program movement (EPM) and discuss factors that have hindered its performance. Here, we complete our analysis by proposing strategies for improvement. We recommend that environmental programs re-organize around three principles. First, adopt as an overriding goal the concept of human dignity-defined as freedom and social justice in healthy, sustainable environments. This clear higher-order goal captures the human and environmental aspirations of the EPM and would provide a more coherent direction for the efforts of diverse participants. Second, employ an explicit, genuinely interdisciplinary analytical framework that facilitates the use of multiple methods to investigate and address environmental and social problems in context. Third, develop educational programs and applied experiences that provide students with the technical knowledge, powers of observation, critical thinking skills and management acumen required for them to become effective professionals and leaders. Organizing around these three principles would build unity in the EPM while at the same time capitalizing on the strengths of the many disciplines and diverse local conditions involved. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  11. Negotiation between peers: strategic device for a reading and writing program at the university level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Ines Moyano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The following paper focuses on the description and exemplification of a device which is the core of the Academic Reading and Writing Program (PROLEA, for its acronym in Spanish conducting at University of Flores (UFLO: the “negotiation between peers” or “negotiation between teaching partners”. The Program design is based on the Sydney School's developments in Systemic Functional Linguistics. The negotiation between peers comprises the work between a professor on academic and professional literacies, who is a member of the Program, and the professors of each of the specific subjects involved. In order to successfully implement this modality, the realization of the negotiation between peers is necessary. This device entails a series of agreements between the professors involved about the teaching of the curricula contents through reading and writing tasks. First in this paper, the negotiation between peers is characterized, and its function and value in the Program are highlighted; second, two scenarios of application are presented in order to show the device contribution as well as its difficulties and the way of resolution of the problems found.

  12. Negotiation between peers: strategic device for a reading and writing program at the university level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Ines Moyano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n3p157 The following paper focuses on the description and exemplification of a device which is the core of the Academic Reading and Writing Program (PROLEA, for its acronym in Spanish conducting at University of Flores (UFLO: the “negotiation between peers” or “negotiation between teaching partners”. The Program design is based on the Sydney School's developments in Systemic Functional Linguistics. The negotiation between peers comprises the work between a professor on academic and professional literacies, who is a member of the Program, and the professors of each of the specific subjects involved. In order to successfully implement this modality, the realization of the negotiation between peers is necessary. This device entails a series of agreements between the professors involved about the teaching of the curricula contents through reading and writing tasks. First in this paper, the negotiation between peers is characterized, and its function and value in the Program are highlighted; second, two scenarios of application are presented in order to show the device contribution as well as its difficulties and the way of resolution of the problems found.

  13. Pigmented deposits on a Boston keratoprosthesis from topical ibopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoff, Justin M; Colby, Kathryn

    2010-09-01

    To report a case of pigmented deposits on a type I Boston keratoprosthesis (KPro) associated with the use of topical ibopamine as a treatment for hypotony. Case report and literature review. The dopamine-like agent ibopamine caused black deposits on the bandage lens and on the front plate of the Boston KPro that resulted in reduced visual acuity. Change to a daily disposable contact lens and regular cleaning of the KPro front plate with diluted baby shampoo eliminated this problem. This is the first report of this complication with topical ibopamine use and should be considered when ibopamine is used chronically for hypotony.

  14. Physics Learning Achievement Study: Projectile, Using Mathematica Program of Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutem, Artit; Kerdmee, Supoj

    2013-01-01

    The propose of this study is to study Physics Learning Achievement, projectile motion, using the Mathematica program of Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students, comparing with Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students who study the projectile motion experiment set. The samples are…

  15. The Effects of a Communication and Conflict Resolution Skill Training Program on Sociotropy Levels of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, T. Fikret

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the effect of a Communication and Conflict Resolution Skill Training Program on sociotropy levels of university students were investigated. The working group was consisted of thirty two voluntary university students. A pre-test and post-test model was used with control group and experimental group, each consisting of sixteen…

  16. 75 FR 21367 - Advanced Electronics, Inc.; Boston, MA; Notice of Negative Determination on Remand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... Employment and Training Administration Advanced Electronics, Inc.; Boston, MA; Notice of Negative... Department of Labor (Department) for further investigation Former Employees of Advanced Electronics, Inc. v... Adjustment Assistance (ATAA) applicable to workers and former workers of Advanced Electronics, Inc., Boston...

  17. Media's role in broadcasting acute stress following the Boston Marathon bombings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    E. Alison Holman; Dana Rose Garfin; Roxane Cohen Silver

    2014-01-01

    .... We conducted an Internet-based survey following the Boston Marathon bombings between April 29 and May 13, 2013, with representative samples of residents from Boston (n = 846), New York City (n = 941...

  18. Patent and Copyright Policies at Selected Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    Gathered are statements of copyright and patent policies in effect at 13 universities. In some cases policies concerning publication and sponsored research are included. The statements are reproduced exactly as received from the institutions, without interpretation. The universities participating are: Boston University (Massachusetts); California…

  19. Assessment of students’ perspectives about master of public health program in medical school of Shiraz University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAMAN FARAHANGIZ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Integration of public health and medical education has been thought to have an important role in medical students’ training. Shiraz University of Medical Sciences has developed an MD/MPH dual degree educational program for the talented volunteer students. The aim of this study was to assess the students’ viewpoints about various aspects of Shiraz MD/MPH program. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on Shiraz undergraduate medical students, who were enrolled in MD/MPH program. A self-structured questionnaire in Persian consisting of 4 parts was used; it included demographic factors including 16 questions which evaluated the students’ perspective of the goals, content, skill development, applicability and meeting their expectations; 7 questions evaluating the self-reported increase of knowledge; and 3 multiple choice questions to assess the students’ motivations and opinions on the impact of the program on their future career. Descriptive statistics was used for data analysis. Results: All MD/MPH students (89 with a mean age of 21.4±1.34 participated in this study. Forty one of the students (46.1% were male and 48 (53.9% female. Overall, 86.1% of them had positive views about the goals of the program; also, 83.5%, 81.2% and 81.9% of them reported a positive viewpoint about the contents, the applicability and development of specific skills, and meeting their expectations, respectively. The students’ most frequent motivation was “learning how to research systematically” (73%. The majority of the students reported this program to be moderately to highly effective in increasing their knowledge in the provided courses. Conclusion: The students had a positive view about almost all of the aspects of the MD/MPH program; this may be indicative of the program being successful in delivering the goals, increasing the students’ knowledge and skills, and meeting their expectations to date. Students’ enthusiasm for

  20. Faculty-Exchange Programs Promoting Change: Motivations, Experiences, and Influence of Participants in the Carnegie Mellon University-Portugal Faculty Exchange Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrício, Maria Teresa; Santos, Patrícia; Loureiro, Paulo Maia; Horta, Hugo

    2018-01-01

    The international mobility of faculty is increasing worldwide. Although studies have considered the experiences of academics abroad, less is known about faculty-exchange programs with policy objectives. This study helps to fill this gap by analyzing a nationwide structured faculty exchange program established by Carnegie Mellon University and…

  1. Evaluation of Basic Life Support Training Program Provided for Nurses in A University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Terzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study was conducted to assess the efficiency of the basic life support (BLS training program provided for nurses in a university hospital. To evaluate the efficiency of the BLS training program provided for nurses in a university hospital. Methods: In this a quasi-experimental study, a total of 404 nurses who received BLS training were enrolled. The study was performed in two stages. In stage one, the participant nurses were given a pre-test that consisted of 25 questions, four points each, before the training on the first day of the 2-day BLS training. The post-test was conducted in addition to practical exams on manikins to determine nurses’ practice skills on BLS. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the nurses with previous BLS training and the difference between their pre- and post-test results (p<0.05, and high statistically significant difference was found between the nurses with previous advanced life support (ALS training and the difference between their pre- and post-test results (p<0.001. Conclusion: Nurses should receive BLS training in hospitals and the training should be repeated on a regular basis. The BLS training that the nurses received in this study was effective and increased their knowledge level on BLS

  2. Model Servqual Rule Base Asean University Network untuk Penilaian Kualitas Program Studi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esti Wijayanti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As well known that AUN (Asean University Network.AUN and ABET (Accreditation Boardb for Enginnering and Technology are non-profit organitatinon which have. AUN (Asean University Network were using variable with refer to AUN’s criteria’s there consist of fifteen which are: Expected Learning Outcomes, Programme Specification, Programme Structure and Content, Teaching and Learning Strategy, Student Assessment, Academic Staff Quality, Support Staff Quality, Student Quality, Student Advice and Support, Facilities and Infrastructure, Quality Assurance of Teaching/Learning Process, Staff Development Activities, Stakeholders Feedback, Output, Stakeholders Satisfaction,and adopted score's scale 7. In there here, we discuss the fifteen AUN’s of AUN in the criterias. There servqual of as can be into five dimensions, assurance, empathy, responsive, reliability and facilty in order to make the assessment's process easier. This research outcome indicated that this proposed method can be used to evaluate an education program. The validation result by using AUN's data and the analysis of servqual rule base Asean University Network almost have the same pattern with correlation value is 0,985 and this is can be accepted because its validity have reach 97%.

  3. Perspectives of Stakeholders on Implementing a Farm-to-University Program at an HBCU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilme, Helene; López, Ivette A; Walters, Lurleen; Suther, Sandra; Brown, C Perry; Dutton, Matthew; Barber, Janet

    2015-07-01

    To explore the perspectives of various stakeholders on whether an HBCU has the resources to establish a farm-to-university program that can improve fruits and vegetables intake among African American students. Additionally, this study assessed students' satisfaction with fruits and vegetables served in University dining halls, and their desire for changes in policies to increase local fruits and vegetables access on campus. This study employed a mixed method data collection strategy. Semi-structured interviews were used to explore the stakeholders' perspectives and self-administered questionnaires were used to assess students' satisfaction with fruits and vegetables and desire for policy changes. Barriers reported by both food service administrators and farmers were cost and variation in supply and demand. Students expressed lack of satisfaction with fresh produce served in campus dining halls and a desire for change in policies to increase local fruits and vegetables access on campus. While there is student desire for improved access to fresh produce on campus, there are perceived barriers to overcome. University partnerships are needed to address the desired nutritional improvements.

  4. Career support in medicine - experiences with a mentoring program for junior physicians at a university hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Vetsch, Esther; Mattanza, Guido

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Until now, mentoring has hardly been used by the medical profession in German-speaking countries as a means of supporting junior physicians in their careers. The aim of the mentoring project described here was to obtain information for promoting and developing future mentoring programs at a university hospital. Method: A new integrated mentoring model was developed and implemented over a 12-month period. Peer groups were advised on the mentoring process by mentors and program managers. A total of eight mentoring groups (40 peers) from four departments of a university hospital took part in the project: four voluntarily, and four on a compulsory basis. The evaluation was carried out using qualitative methods for analysis of the group protocols and the focus group interviews with the participants. Results: Group discussions revealed that individual mentees, young female physicians in particular, developed concrete career plans and initiated further career-relevant steps. Some mentees - again more women than men - were promoted to senior physician posts. Further measurable career steps were increased research and publishing activity, and research fellowships abroad. The group process developed in five typical phases (forming, storming, norming, performing, and finalizing), which differed according to whether the groups had been formed on a voluntary or compulsory basis. In the evaluation interviews, mentees emphasized the following as effective mentoring factors: Concrete definition of own career goals; exchange of experiences within the peer groups; support and motivation from the mentors; and fostering of the group process by the program managers. Conclusion: Participation in mentoring programs has to be voluntary. Mentees are motivated, autonomous, goal-oriented and prepared to take action. Mentors serve as examples and advisers. They derive satisfaction from being held in high esteem, as well as from the advancement of their own careers. Program managers

  5. Career support in medicine - experiences with a mentoring program for junior physicians at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Vetsch, Esther; Mattanza, Guido

    2004-07-01

    Until now, mentoring has hardly been used by the medical profession in German-speaking countries as a means of supporting junior physicians in their careers. The aim of the mentoring project described here was to obtain information for promoting and developing future mentoring programs at a university hospital. A new integrated mentoring model was developed and implemented over a 12-month period. Peer groups were advised on the mentoring process by mentors and program managers. A total of eight mentoring groups (40 peers) from four departments of a university hospital took part in the project: four voluntarily, and four on a compulsory basis. The evaluation was carried out using qualitative methods for analysis of the group protocols and the focus group interviews with the participants. Group discussions revealed that individual mentees, young female physicians in particular, developed concrete career plans and initiated further career-relevant steps. Some mentees - again more women than men - were promoted to senior physician posts. Further measurable career steps were increased research and publishing activity, and research fellowships abroad. The group process developed in five typical phases (forming, storming, norming, performing, and finalizing), which differed according to whether the groups had been formed on a voluntary or compulsory basis. In the evaluation interviews, mentees emphasized the following as effective mentoring factors: Concrete definition of own career goals; exchange of experiences within the peer groups; support and motivation from the mentors; and fostering of the group process by the program managers. Participation in mentoring programs has to be voluntary. Mentees are motivated, autonomous, goal-oriented and prepared to take action. Mentors serve as examples and advisers. They derive satisfaction from being held in high esteem, as well as from the advancement of their own careers. Program managers have experience in systems theory and

  6. U.S. Department of Energy University Reactor Instrumentation Program Final Report for 1992-94 Grant for the University of Florida Training Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernetson, William G.

    1999-04-01

    Overall, the instrumentation obtained under the first year 1992-93 University Reactor Instrumentation Program grant assured that the goals of the program were well understood and met as well as possible at the level of support provided for the University of Florida Training Reactor facility. Though the initial grant support of $21,000 provided toward the purchase of $23,865 of proposed instrumentation certainly did not meet many of the facility's needs, the instrumentation items obtained and implemented did meet some critical needs and hence the goals of the Program to support modernization and improvement of reactor facilities such as the UFTR within the academic community. Similarly, the instrumentation obtained under the second year 1993-94 University Reactor Instrumentation Program grant again met some of the critical needs for instrumentation support at the UFTR facility. Again, though the grant support of $32,799 for proposed instrumentation at the same cost projection does not need all of the facility's needs, it does assure continued facility viability and improvement in operations. Certainly, reduction of forced unavailability of the reactor is the most obvious achievement of the University Reactor Instrumentation Program to date at the UFTR. Nevertheless, the ability to close out several expressed-inspection concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with acquisition of the low level survey meter and the area radiation monitoring system is also very important. Most importantly, with modest cost sharing the facility has been able to continue and even accelerate the improvement and modernization of a facility, especially in the Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory, that is used by nearly every post-secondary school in the State of Florida and several in other states, by dozens of departments within the University of Florida, and by several dozen high schools around the State of Florida on a regular basis. Better, more reliable service to such

  7. Overview of the University of Washington's Pre-Major in Astronomy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, Daryl; Pre-Major in Astronomy Program

    2015-01-01

    The fraction of science PhDs awarded to women, African American, Latino, and other minority students is currently far smaller than the fraction of the general population that these groups constitute (NSF 06-320, NSF 04-317). The future of Physics and Astronomy in the United States depends on recruiting and retaining these students in STEM majors and careers (Norman et al., 2009). The greatest obstacles for persistence in science reported by students are loss of interest, intimidation, poor advising, and lack of acceptance (Seymour & Hewitt, 1997). In 2005, a group of University of Washington graduate students created the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) to connect incoming undergraduate students to authentic research experiences as a means of recruiting and retaining them in STEM. Pre-MAP was one of only 13 initiatives supported by the President's Diversity Appraisal Implementation Fund and has proved to be one of its greatest success stories. At its core is a 10-week seminar in which undergraduates learn astronomical research techniques (e.g., computing, data analysis, documentation, statistics, and literature review) and apply them to projects conducted in small groups, under the supervision of faculty and postdocs. Now in its tenth year, Pre-MAP has engaged more than 100 undergraduates — its ongoing success has made it a model for similar programs at UW and other universities.I will outline the beginnings, funding streams, and structure of this long-running diversity program. The Pre-MAP sessions that follow will highlight our best practices and lessons learned, and feature first-hand accounts from several of our fantastic Pre-MAP alumni.

  8. Program in Functional Genomics of Autoimmunity and Immunology of yhe University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan M Kaplan

    2012-10-12

    This grant will be used to augment the equipment infrastructure and core support at the University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama particularly in the areas of genomics/informatics, molecular analysis and cell separation. In addition, we will promote collaborative research interactions through scientific workshops and exchange of scientists, as well as joint exploration of the role of immune receptors as targets in autoimmunity and host defense, innate and adaptive immune responses, and mucosal immunity in host defense.

  9. Fossil Energy Program report. University activities, 1 October 1977-30 September 1978. [US DOE supported

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-12-01

    This document describes the Fossil Energy-supported contract and project activity for FY 1978. The primary thrust of the Program is on coal - especially direct coal combustion and what can be done to increase the environmental acceptability of coal. We are concerned with developing cleaner technologies, and we are working on precombustion cleanup, fluidized-bed combustion, and post-combustion cleanup. Longer range technologies are being developed that will use coal more efficiently; for example, magnetohydrodynamics, fuel cells, and high-temperature turbine utilization. Another priority is the development of a capability to produce synthetic fuels from coal. We are also engaged in a coal mining research and development program that focuses on increased mine productivity and workers' safety through the development of improved technologies. Our activity in the petroleum and gas research areas is intended to complement efforts in the private sector, which are to be further stimulated by new pricing or Federal incentives. Our present enhanced oil recovery efforts represent a shift in emphasis toward longer range, high-technology development projects instead of numerous field demonstrations and tests. The enhanced gas program emphasizes activities to increase our knowledge of the size and economic productivity of the unconventional gas resources. We are also involved in oil shale development, with the major research concentration on in situ retorting. We are continually assessing our program. Total annual funding has increased from $58 million in FY 1973 to $881 million in FY 1979. Fossil Energy is working closely with all parts of the Department of Energy, other appropriate Federal agencies, industry, and universities to insure that we maintain a balanced, aggressive, and responsive program suited to our national needs.

  10. Acceptance and commitment therapy universal prevention program for adolescents: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckhardt, Rowan; Manicavasagar, Vijaya; Batterham, Philip J; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Shand, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    There is a need to prevent anxiety and depression in young people and mindfulness contains important emotion regulation strategies. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), a mindfulness-based therapy, has yet to be evaluated as a prevention program, but has demonstrated an ability to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression in adult and adolescent populations. This study examines the feasibility of using an ACT-based prevention program in a sample of year 10 (aged 14-16 years) high school students from Sydney, Australia. Participants were allocated to either their usual classes or to the ACT-based intervention. Participants were followed for a period of 5 months post-intervention and completed the Flourishing Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, and a program evaluation questionnaire. Analyses were completed using intention-to-treat mixed models for repeated measures. The results indicated that the intervention was acceptable to students and feasible to administer in a school setting. There were no statistically significant differences between the conditions, likely due to the small sample size (N = 48). However, between-group effect sizes demonstrated small to large differences for baseline to post-intervention mean scores and medium to large differences for baseline to follow-up mean scores, all favouring the ACT-based condition. The results suggest that an ACT-based school program has potential as a universal prevention program and merits further investigation in a larger trial. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry. Trial ID: ACTRN12616001383459. Registered 06/10/2016. Retrospectively registered.

  11. Retention and Recruitment Programs for Female Undergraduate Students in Engineering at The University of Toledo, Ohio, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchetti, Matthew; Ravn, Tina; Kuntz, Vicki L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of a five year study aimed at improving both recruitment and retention of female students pursuing careers in engineering. The study analyzed a series of five programs implemented at the College of Engineering at The University of Toledo in Ohio, USA. The effectiveness of the programs over time is measured from…

  12. Developing Flexible Dual Master's Degree Programs at UPAEP (Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla) and OSU (Oklahoma State University)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregas-Janeiro, Maria G.; de la Parra, Pablo Nuno

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, UPAEP (Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla) and OSU (Oklahoma State University) signed a MOU (memorandum of understanding) to develop more than 20 dual master's degree programs. This special partnership has allowed students from Mexico and the United States to study two master degree programs, in two languages, in two…

  13. The First Master Program in Petroleum Geology at the University of Dar es Salaam : Lessons and Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertotti, G.; Boniface, N.; De Bresser, H.P.; Manya, S.; Nkotagu, H.; Ruitenbeek, F.

    2015-01-01

    The UDSM, supported by group of geoscientists from Universities of the Netherlands has been able to establish the first Master program in Petroleum Geology of the country. With the crucial financial support of BG-Group 13 students has enrolled for the program. Courses have been given in the first

  14. Competencies for 2020: Revalidation of the Curricular Competencies of the Emory University Doctor of Physical Therapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Patricia H.; Carter, Vincent M.; Phillips, Tami; Chong, Hyun; Conwell, Ryan; Hensley, Brittany; Kimbrell, Alyson; Sigle, Mallory

    2013-01-01

    Background: Transformation in the healthcare environment prompted Emory University's Doctor of Physical Therapy Program (DPT) to revalidate its competency-based education program. The goal was to revalidate the essentialness of its curricular competencies: Provision of Patient Care, Interpersonal Relationships, Teaching and Learning, Research,…

  15. Reconceptualizing Teacher Preparation for Inclusive Classrooms: A Description of the Dual License Program at the University of New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Elizabeth B.; Rossi, Pamela J.; de Valenzuela, J. S.; Howarth, Sam

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the Dual License Teacher Preparation Program at the University of New Mexico and the national and state context within which it was developed and continues to evolve. Graduates of the program are eligible for licensure in general education (K-8) and special education (K-12). Teacher collaboration is highlighted. (Contains…

  16. Evaluating Locally-Developed Language Testing: A Predictive Study of "Direct Entry" Language Programs at an Australian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    The study reported here investigates the predictive validity of language assessments by "Direct Entry" programs at an Australian University--programs developed on site for Non English Speaking Background international students, principally to provide (i) pre-entry academic and language preparation and (ii) language assessment for…

  17. The Florida State University's Learning District: A Case Study of an Academic Library-Run Peer Tutoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeter, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In March 2010, the first floor of the main library at The Florida State University was renovated as a learning commons. With this change in design, all tutoring that existed throughout the library was moved into the commons. The crown jewel of these programs is the library's in-house, late-night peer tutoring program that has seen incredible…

  18. Assessing the Impact of the McNair Program on Students at a Public Liberal Arts University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, John T.; Hopkins, Valerie M.

    2001-01-01

    Assessed the impact of the Ronald E. McNair Post-baccalaureate Achievement Program at Truman State University in Missouri on first-generation, low-income (FGLI) students in comparison to a control group. Found that FGLI program participants are far more successful than non-McNair FGLI students, even when controlling for academic ability and…

  19. A Healthy Mix: A Case Study of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Interdisciplinary Health Communication Certificate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Toukhy, Sherine; Holman, Lynette

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated attitudes toward interdisciplinary education by appraising the Interdisciplinary Health Communication (IHC) Certificate program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as a case study. Sixteen affiliated faculty and thirteen students enrolled in the IHC program as of 2008-2009 were surveyed. Although the attitude…

  20. The University of Arizona College of Medicine Optimal Aging Program: Stepping in the Shadows of Successful Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    The Optimal Aging Program (OAP) at the University of Arizona, College of Medicine is a longitudinal mentoring program that pairs students with older adults who are considered to be aging "successfully." This credit-bearing elective was initially established in 2001 through a grant from the John A. Hartford Foundation, and aims to expand…

  1. A Survey of University-Based Programs That Support In-Service and Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers' Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Olive; An, Shuhua

    2017-01-01

    This survey paper discusses recent relevant contributions and trends in university-based teacher education "programs" for in-service and pre-service teachers. The goal of this small-scale survey of the mathematics education literature was to identify examples of studies that investigated such programs and their effectiveness in…

  2. The Impact of an Urban Universal Public Prekindergarten Program on Children's Early Numeracy, Language, Literacy, and Executive Function Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Christina; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

    2011-01-01

    The authors add to and extend the emerging evidence base of the effects of public preschool programs on child school readiness. Using a quasi-experimental, Regression Discontinuity (RD) design, they estimate the impacts of a universal preschool program on children's early numeracy, language, literacy, and executive function skills, both for the…

  3. Faculty Perceptions of Race to the Top Policy Influence on a University-Based Preparation Program Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Guerra, Daniel; Lochmiller, Chad R.

    2016-01-01

    Florida's Race to the Top (RTTT) competition invited university-district partnerships to compete for funds aimed at improving principal preparation programs. In this article, we report findings from a qualitative case study focused on one program partnership funded by RTTT. Drawing upon interviews with faculty and relevant documents, we conducted…

  4. Evaluation of Arabic Language Learning Program for Non-Native Speakers in Saudi Electronic University According to Total Quality Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alowaydhi, Wafa Hafez

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed at standardizing the program of learning Arabic for non-native speakers in Saudi Electronic University according to certain standards of total quality. To achieve its purpose, the study adopted the descriptive analytical method. The author prepared a measurement tool for evaluating the electronic learning programs in light…

  5. GTA Preparation as a Model for Cross-Tier Collaboration at North Carolina State University: A Program Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedukovich, Casie; Hall, Megan

    2016-01-01

    This program profile describes recent changes to the process for preparing graduate teaching instructors (GTAs) in North Carolina State University's first-year writing program. The authors--one a nontenure-track faculty member and the other a tenure-track faculty member--describe the philosophical, ethical, and practical concerns in scaling…

  6. Femtosecond-assisted preparation of donor tissue for Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshirfar M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Majid Moshirfar1, Marcus C Neuffer1, Krista Kinard1, Monette T Lependu1, Shameema Sikder21John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: We describe a technique for femtosecond laser-assisted preparation of donor tissue for Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis to provide accurate double punching of the donor tissue for optimized alignment in the visual axis. The technique was reproducibly performed in four donor corneas mounted in an artificial anterior chamber. This technique can provide optically centered donor tissue with smooth trephinated edges.Keywords: keratoplasty, femtosecond laser, cornea, laser-trephinated tissue

  7. Development, dissemination, adherence, and effectiveness of a Smoking Cessation Programs offered in a public university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Machado Lopes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Smoking Cessation Programs (SCP must comprise factors that increase the chances of successful treatment, such as choice of approach and modality based on scientific evidence; adaptation of the intervention to the characteristics of target patients; records of procedures and efficacy rates; and the use of both active and reactive strategies to recruit smokers. Given this, this study was designed with the aim of describing the implementation of a SCP in a public university that has adopted a 100% smoke-free campus policy, including the evaluation of publicity methods and their possible impact in adherence rates and program success. There were 128 smokers enrolled in nine program groups offered over two years: 97 (76% attended the first meeting and 69 (71% effectively completed the SCP. The groups that underwent follow-up assessment (n = 58 achieved abstinence rates of 27% and 32%, greater than expected for solely psychological treatment and similar to rates that combined cognitive-behavioral approach to pharmacology. The recruitment strategies that combined active strategies (personal contacts, personal invitations, individual interviews and reactive strategies (posters, corporate e-mail, newspapers were the most effective to attract and gain the adherence of smokers to the SCP, corroborating the literature. We conclude that 100% smoke-free environment campaigns are opportunities that favor the effectiveness of SCPs, which can be developed and implemented by any trained health professional.

  8. Healthy Schools-Healthy Kids: a controlled evaluation of a comprehensive universal eating disorder prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Gail; Tweed, Stacey; Blackmore, Elizabeth

    2007-06-01

    This study was a controlled evaluation of a comprehensive school-based universal prevention program involving male and female students, parents, teachers, school administrators and local public health professionals. A total of 982 male and female Grades 6 and 7 middle school students (and 91 teachers/school administrators) completed self-report surveys at baseline on measures of body satisfaction, internalization of media ideals, size acceptance, disordered eating, weight-based teasing, weight loss and muscle-gaining behaviours, and perceptions of school climate (teachers only). Eighty-four percent of the students repeated the surveys immediately following the 8-month school-wide intervention and 71% again 6 months later. Repeated measures ANCOVAs revealed that participation in the Healthy Schools-Healthy Kids (HS-HK) program had a positive influence by reducing the internalization of media ideals among male and female students and by reducing disordered eating among female students. The program was also associated with reductions in weight-loss behaviours among the students, although this effect was lost by the 6-month follow-up. When the intervention students were sub-divided into low versus high-risk groups, the high-risk group appeared to benefit most from the intervention with significant reductions in internalization of media ideals, greater body satisfaction, and reduced disordered eating over time. There were no intervention effects for teachers. Challenges of engaging teachers in prevention are discussed.

  9. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF THE DISTANCE ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAM (DELTTP IN ANADOLU UNIVERSITY, TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagri Ozkose BlYlK

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a preliminary evaluation of a relatively new interactive distance learning model for training English language teachers in Turkey. The Distance English Language Teacher Training Program (DELTTP was established as a result of the contractual agreement between the Ministry of National Education and Eskisehir Anadolu University, Turkey in 2000, whose goal is to train a sufficient number of EFL teachers, in the shortest time possible, without abandoning the high quality of professional training provided heretofore (AOF, 2006. In order to seek objective information regarding their current status as well as to obtain opinion data concerning their perceptions of the adequacy of their education, 2004 and 2005 graduates of the DELTTP Program were administered questionnaires. Four interviews were conducted with different stakeholders. The results and statistics indicate that DELTTP is presently unable to train English teachers of the desired number and in a short period of time due to a variety of factors; however, the program has been successful in maintaining a high standard of quality and has not abandoned the essentials needed for foreign language teacher education.

  10. Dialysis vascular access management by interventional nephrology programs at University Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, Tushar J; Moossavi, Shahriar; Salman, Loay; Wu, Steven; Dwyer, Amy C; Ross, Jamie; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Maya, Ivan D; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Agarwal, Anil; Abreo, Kenneth D; Work, Jack; Asif, Arif

    2011-01-01

    The development of interventional nephrology has undoubtedly led to an improvement in patient care at many facilities across the United States. However, these services have traditionally been offered by interventional nephrologists in the private practice arena. While interventional nephrology was born in the private practice setting, several academic medical centers across the United States have now developed interventional nephrology programs. University Medical Centers (UMCs) that offer interventional nephrology face challenges, such as smaller dialysis populations, limited financial resources, and real or perceived political "turf" issues." Despite these hurdles, several UMCs have successfully established interventional nephrology as an intricate part of a larger nephrology program. This has largely been accomplished by consolidating available resources and collaborating with other specialties irrespective of the size of the dialysis population. The collaboration with other specialties also offers an opportunity to perform advanced procedures, such as application of excimer laser and endovascular ultrasound. As more UMCs establish interventional nephrology programs, opportunities for developing standardized training centers will improve, resulting in better quality and availability of nephrology-related procedures, and providing an impetus for research activities. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Boston College Case Shows Weakness of Researchers' Confidentiality Pledges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The author reports on a legal battle over oral-history records housed at Boston College that casts light on how little legal weight pledges of confidentiality to research subjects actually have. As a federal court weighs whether to let the federal government seize, and hand over to British authorities, the college's records of confidential…

  12. VITREORETINAL COMPLICATIONS IN EYES WITH BOSTON KERATOPROSTHESIS TYPE I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Pukhraj; Rishi, Ekta; Koundanya, Vikram V; Mathur, Gaurav; Iyer, Geetha; Srinivasan, Bhaskar

    2016-03-01

    To describe the spectrum of vitreoretinal complications in eyes with Boston keratoprosthesis type I and evaluate the treatment outcomes. This was a retrospective interventional case series of 23 of 45 eyes that underwent Boston keratoprosthesis from April 2003 to December 2013 and developed vitreoretinal complications. Types of vitreoretinal complications, surgical techniques, and anatomical and visual outcomes were analyzed. Vitreoretinal complications in eyes with Boston keratoprosthesis included retroprosthetic membranes (n = 11), retinal detachment (n = 6), endophthalmitis (n = 4), epiretinal membrane (n = 4), vitreous hemorrhage (n = 2), and choroidal detachment (n = 1). Twenty of 23 eyes (87%) underwent surgical intervention. Retinal reattachment was achieved in 5 eyes (83%) with significant visual improvement in 3 (50%). Mean preoperative visual acuity improved from 1.84 ± 0.89 logMAR to 1.5 ± 0.87 logMAR (P = 0.01) at the last follow-up. Mean 1.4 surgical procedures were performed per eye. Mean follow-up was 28 months (median: 28 months, range: 5-57 months). Retroprosthetic membrane and retinal detachment are most common vitreoretinal complications in eyes with Boston keratoprosthesis. Vitreoretinal complications can be managed by appropriate intervention in such eyes with encouraging anatomical and functional results.

  13. Clinical research progress of Boston type I keratoprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Qi Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Boston Type I keratoprosthesis is currently widely used. In this article, the indication, number of cases, best-corrected visual acuity(BCVA, retention, and complications in all the international published case reports will be sum up; then the main post-operative complications and their respective treatments one by one, which include retrospective membrane, glaucoma, infection will be introduced.

  14. Boston Naming Test Discontinuation Rule: "Rigorous" versus "Lenient" Interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferman, Tanis J.; Ivnik, Robert J.; Lucas, John A.

    1998-01-01

    Two interpretations of the Boston Naming Test (BNT) (E. Kaplan, H. Goodglass, and S. Weintraub, 1983) discontinuation rule of six consecutive failures were found in BNT use with 655 normal older adults and 140 people with Alzheimer's disease. Differences between lenient and rigorous interpretations of responses could have impact on…

  15. Charter, Private, and Public Schools Work Together in Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Diana

    2014-01-01

    A public, Catholic, and charter school in Boston all work together to share their strengths and learn from each other in an effort to deliver the best education for all of their students. The arrangement is called the School Performance Partnership, and it is a grantee of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

  16. Early weaning might reduce the psychological strain of Boston bracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Ø; Andersen, Gert Rahbek; Thomsen, Karsten

    2002-01-01

    From 1983 to 1990 a total of 136 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were treated with the Boston brace. With the aim of examining the social and psychological impact of the brace treatment all patients received a questionnaire at an average of 3.5 years after termination of the treatment...

  17. A new spin on research translation: the Boston Consensus Conference on Human Biomonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jessica W; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Altman, Rebecca Gasior; Webster, Thomas F; Ozonoff, David M

    2009-04-01

    Translating research to make it more understandable and effective (research translation) has been declared a priority in environmental health but does not always include communication to the public or residents of communities affected by environmental hazards. Their unique perspectives are also commonly missing from discussions about science and technology policy. The consensus conference process, developed in Denmark, offers a way to address this gap. The Boston Consensus Conference on Human Biomonitoring, held in Boston, Massachusetts, in the fall of 2006, was designed to educate and elicit input from 15 Boston-area residents on the scientifically complex topic of human biomonitoring for environmental chemicals. This lay panel considered the many ethical, legal, and scientific issues surrounding biomonitoring and prepared a report expressing their views. The lay panel's findings provide a distinct and important voice on the expanding use of biomonitoring. In some cases, such as a call for opt-in reporting of biomonitoring results to study participants, they mirror recommendations raised elsewhere. Other conclusions have not been heard previously, including the recommendation that an individual's results should be statutorily exempted from the medical record unless permission is granted, and the opportunity to use biomonitoring data to stimulate green chemistry. The consensus conference model addresses both aspects of a broader conception of research translation: engaging the public in scientific questions, and bringing their unique perspectives to bear on public health research, practice, and policy. In this specific application, a lay panel's recommendations on biomonitoring surveillance, communication, and ethics have practical implications for the conduct of biomonitoring studies and surveillance programs.

  18. The Boston keratoprosthesis type I in mucous membrane pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palioura, Sotiria; Kim, Bryan; Dohlman, Claes H; Chodosh, James

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the use of the Boston keratoprosthesis type I implantation in patients with mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP). Retrospective review of 8 eyes of 8 patients with severe ocular surface disease and corneal blindness as a result of MMP who underwent Boston keratoprosthesis type I implantation at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2009. The main outcome measures were best-corrected visual acuity, keratoprosthesis retention, and postoperative complications. The mean age of patients was 71.3 years (range, 55-94 years), and the mean duration of their disease preoperatively was 6.1 years (range, 1.7-11.4 years). Visual acuity after the surgery improved to 20/200 or better in 6 eyes (75%) and to 20/40 or better in 3 eyes (37.5%). Only 1 of 6 eyes (16.7%) was able to maintain visual acuity of 20/200 or better over a mean follow-up period of 3.2 years. Five of the 8 Boston keratoprosthesis type I devices (62.5%) extruded or had to be replaced during a mean follow-up time of 1.7 ± 1.7 years. Loss of vision to worse than 20/200 during the follow-up period occurred because of keratoprosthesis type I extrusion, end-stage glaucoma, and retinal or choroidal detachment. The clinical outcomes of Boston keratoprosthesis type I implantation in MMP are guarded and, as judged from the literature, less favorable than those with the Boston keratoprosthesis type II for the same disease.

  19. The Role of Discussion Boards in a University Blended Learning Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Moreno Rosa Isabel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Discussion boards as tools in blended English language learning programs have unique characteristics when compared to other synchronous and asynchronous communication tools that are different. Therefore, it is important to investigate the way they operate, their role within a given program and the students’, teachers’ and tutors’ attitudes towards them. This paper contains the report of a study that took place in an English virtual program of a public university in Colombia. Students’ surveys and reflections, the tutor’s and teachers’ interviews and reflections were used to collect data. The results showed the main advantages and disadvantages of the use of the tool as well as ideas for new proposals to improve their use and, therefore, increase the students’ performance in the program.

    Los foros de discusión, como herramientas en programas de aprendizaje mixto de inglés, tienen características únicas en comparación con otras herramientas sincrónicas y asincrónicas de comunicación. En consecuencia, es importante indagar sobre la forma como funcionan, el papel dentro del programa y las percepciones que tienen los estudiantes, tutores y profesores acerca de ellos. En este artículo se reporta el estudio que se realizó en un programa virtual de inglés de una universidad pública en Colombia, en el primer semestre de 2010. Se recolectó información mediante encuestas y reflexiones de los estudiantes y entrevistas y reflexiones de los profesores. Los resultados muestran las principales ventajas y desventajas en el uso de esta herramienta e ideas para generar nuevas propuestas que mejoren su uso, para así incrementar el desempeño de los estudiantes en el programa.

  20. Harvey Cushing and the battle of Boston common: military medical preparedness for world war one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, Eric; Rutkow, Ira

    2010-07-01

    To explore the events and people that shaped Harvey Cushing, one of the nation's leading surgeons, into a political actor as he rallied support for the issue of military medical preparedness for World War One. In a little remembered episode of American medical history, for 2 years before the nation's formal entry into World War One in April 1917, Harvey Cushing attempted to garner political and professional support for the idea of military medical preparedness. His efforts, including the proposed construction of a functioning Base Hospital on Boston Common, sparked controversy in a public that was torn between maintaining neutrality and going to war. An analysis of Harvey Cushing's unpublished letters, manuscripts, and papers located at the Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. While Harvey Cushing's crusade for military medical preparedness failed to win over the local public, it helped convince national military leaders that the civilian medical community was ready to assist in the war. This, in turn, laid the foundation for much of the American medical establishment's success on the battlefields of World War One. The disagreement surrounding the Battle of Boston Common, as Harvey Cushing had labeled the debate, reveals both how, even at the brink of war, ideas formulated on the war front could not be translated to the home front, and how early military medical preparedness, although national in character, was commanded by only a few select voices.