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Sample records for prognathism

  1. Treatment of Mandibular Prognathism

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    Hong-Po Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular prognathism (MP or skeletal Class III malocclusion with a prognathic mandible is one of the most severe maxillofacial deformities. Facial growth modification can be an effective method of resolving skeletal Class III jaw discrepancies in growing children with dentofacial orthopedic appliances including the chincup, face mask, maxillary protraction combined with chincup traction and the Fränkel functional regulator III appliance. Orthognathic surgery in conjunction with orthodontic treatment is required for the correction of adult MP. The two most commonly applied surgical procedures to correct MP are sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO and intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy. Both procedures are suitable for patients in whom a desirable occlusal relationship can be obtained with a setback of the mandible, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. In bilateral SSRO, the intentional ostectomy of the posterior part of the distal segment can offer long-term positioned stability. This may be attributable to reduction of tension in the pterygomasseteric sling that applies force in the posterior mandible. While various environmental factors have been found to contribute to the development of MP, heredity plays a substantial role. The relative contributions of genetic and environmental components in the etiology of MP are unclear. The recent identification of the genetic susceptibilities to MP constitutes the first step toward understanding the molecular pathogenesis of MP. Further studies in molecular biology are needed to identify the gene-environment interactions associated with the phenotypic diversity of MP and the heterogenic developmental mechanisms thought to be responsible for them.

  2. Prognathism

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    ... nevus syndrome . It may develop over time in children or adults as the result of conditions such as ... Michael Kapner, DDS, general and aesthetic dentistry, Norwalk Medical Center, Norwalk, CT. Review provided by ...

  3. Chincup treatment modifies the mandibular shape in children with prognathism.

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    Alarcón, José Antonio; Bastir, Markus; Rosas, Antonio; Molero, Julia

    2011-07-01

    Although chincups are the preferred treatment for growing children with mandibular prognathism, the mechanism by which chincups improve this condition remains unclear. The aim of this study was to use geometric morphometrics to evaluate changes in the shape of the mandible of prognathic children treated with a chincup. Geometric morphometrics were used to evaluate the short-term mandibular shape changes in 50 prognathic children treated with chincups compared with 40 untreated matched controls. Twenty-one 2-dimensional mandibular landmarks from cephalograms taken before and after 36 months of treatment or observation were analyzed by Procrustes superimposition and thin plate spline. Permutation tests of the treated patients showed highly significant differences in the mandibular shapes before and after treatment, and compared with the control group after the observation period. The thin plate spline grid deformations indicated more rectangular mandibular configuration, forward condyle orientation, condyle neck compression, gonial area compression, and symphysis narrowing. Early chincup treatment widely modifies the mandibular shape of prognathic children to improve Class III malocclusion. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Maxillary advancement for mandibular prognathism: indications and rationale.

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    Rosen, H M

    1991-05-01

    The surgical correction of mandibular prognathism has traditionally involved posterior repositioning of the mandibular body. This treatment approach corrects the skeletal disproportion at the expense of reducing facial skeletal volume and can unpredictably result in inadequately supported soft tissues with loss of skeletal definition. In an effort to avoid these sequelae of mandibular reduction, 18 patients diagnosed as having mandibular prognathism were treated with maxillary advancement surgery at the Le Fort I level. Mean patient SNB angle was 85.2 degrees, as compared with a normal 79 +/- 3 degrees. Maxillae were documented to be in normal position relative to both cranial base and Frankfort horizontal. The mean maxillary advancement was 6.9 mm, with a range of 4.5 to 8.8 mm. All patients required genioplasty to reduce vertical chin height and/or to laterally shift the chin. At the time of follow-up (mean 16.2 months), all patients retained cephalometric data suggestive of enlarged mandibles and excessive anterior facial divergence. However, maxillomandibular harmony and facial convexity had been restored without sacrificing skeletal volume. Treatment results demonstrated these faces to be skeletally well proportioned despite lower face protrusion that was beyond "normal." Postoperative appearances were characterized by a well-supported soft-tissue envelope and a highlighted skeletal foundation, creating angular, well-defined lower faces. These findings support the credibility of maxillary advancement as the procedure of choice in selected individuals with mandibular prognathism. Indications and an aesthetic rationale for this surgical approach are presented.

  5. Occlusal stability after Herbst treatment of patients with retrognathic and prognathic facial types : A pilot study.

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    Bock, Niko C; Gnandt, Erhard; Ruf, Sabine

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare occlusal changes induced by Herbst treatment and the stability of these changes in patients with retrognathic and prognathic facial types. The sample comprised 11 retrognathic (SNA ≤76°, SNB ≤72°, ML/NSL ≥36°) and 10 prognathic (SNA ≥83°, SNB ≥80°, ML/NSL ≤32°) patients with Class II molar relationships of ≥0.5 cusp widths bilaterally or ≥1.0 cusp width unilaterally. Both groups involved similar distributions of skeletal maturity before treatment. Study parameters were assessed on casts reflecting the situations before treatment (T0), after Herbst treatment (T1), after multibracket treatment immediately following Herbst treatment (T2), and after a mean of 31.1 months of retention (T3). Sagittal molar relationships improved by 0.8 cusp widths in the retrognathic and by 0.7 cusp widths in the prognathic group during active treatment (T0-T2). Insignificant changes of ≤0,2 cusp widths were seen in both groups during retention (T2-T3). Overjet decreased by 8.6 mm in the retrognathic and by 5.5 mm in the prognathic group during T0-T2, and both groups showed clinically irrelevant amounts of relapse by 0.7 mm during T2-T3. Overbite improved by 1.2 mm in the retrognathic and by 2.5 mm in the prognathic group during T0-T2, reaching mean values of 1.0 mm or 1.4 mm by T2, which was followed by 0.2 mm or 1.1 mm of relapse during T2-T3. Treatment with a Herbst appliance seems to offer stable correction of the sagittal occlusal relationships in Class II patients with retrognathic or prognathic facial types, with the vertical changes being more pronounced in the prognathic cases.

  6. Cephalometric analysis of the middle part of the face in patients with mandibular prognathism.

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    Cutović Tatjana; Jović, Nebojsa; Kozomara, Ruzica; Radojicić, Julija; Janosević, Mirjana; Mladenović, Irena; Matijević, Stevo

    2014-11-01

    The middle part of the face, that is the maxilla, has always been mentioned as a possible etiologic factor of skeletal Class III. However, the importance of the relationship of maxillary retroposition towards the cranial base is still unclear, although it has been examined many times. The aim of this study was to conduct cephalometric analysis of the morphology of maxilla, including the whole middle part of the face in patients with divergent and convergent facial types of mandibular prognathism, as well as to determine differences betweeen them. Lateral cephalometric teleradiograph images of 90 patients were analyzed at the Dental Clinic of the Military Medical Academy, Belgrade, Serbia. All the patients were male, aged 18-35 years, not previously treated orthodontically. On the basis of dentalskeletal relations of jaws and teeth, the patients were divided into three groups: the group P1 (patients with divergent facial type of mandibular prognathism), P2 (patients with convergent facial type of mandibular pragmathism) and the group E (control group or eugnathic patients). A total of 9 cephalometric parameters related to the middle face were measured and analyzed: the length of the hard palate--SnaSnp, the length of the maxillary corpus--AptmPP, the length of the soft palate, the angle between the hard and soft palate--SnaSnpUt, the angle of inclination of the maxillary alveolar process, the angle of inclination of the upper front teeth, the effective maxillary length--CoA, the posterior maxillary alveolar hyperplasia--U6PP and the angle of maxillary prognathism. The obtained results showed that the CoA, AptmPP and SnaSnp were significally shorter in patients with divergent facial type of mandibular prognathism compared to patients with convergent facial type of the mandibular prognathism and also in both experimental groups of patients compared to the control group. SnaSnp was significantly shorter in patients with divergent facial type of mandibular prognathism

  7. Cephalometric analysis of the middle part of the face in patients with mandibular prognathism

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    Čutović Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The middle part of the face, that is the maxilla, has always been mentioned as a possible etiologic factor of skeletal Class III. However, the importance of the relationship of maxillary retroposition towards the cranial base is still unclear, although it has been examined many times. The aim of this study was to conduct cephalometric analysis of the morphology of maxilla, including the whole middle part of the face in patients with divergent and convergent facial types of mandibular prognathism, as well as to determine differences betweeen them. Methods. Lateral cephalometric teleradiograph images of 90 patients were analyzed at the Dental Clinic of the Military Medical Academy, Belgrade, Serbia. All the patients were male, aged 18-35 years, not previously treated orthodontically. On the basis of dentalskeletal relations of jaws and teeth, the patients were divided into three groups: the group P1 (patients with divergent facial type of mandibular prognathism, P2 (patients with convergent facial type of mandibular pragmathism and the group E (control group or eugnathic patients. A total of 9 cephalometric parameters related to the middle face were measured and analyzed: the length of the hard palate - SnaSnp, the length of the maxillary corpus - AptmPP, the length of the soft palate, the angle between the hard and soft palate - SnaSnpUt, the angle of inclination of the maxillary alveolar process, the angle of inclination of the upper front teeth, the effective maxillary length - CoA, the posterior maxillary alveolar hyperplasia - U6PP and the angle of maxillary prognathism. Results. The obtained results showed that the CoA, AptmPP and SnaSnp were significally shorter in patients with divergent facial type of mandibular prognathism compared to patients with convergent facial type of the mandibular prognathism and also in both experimental groups of patients compared to the control group. SnaSnp was significantly shorter in

  8. A study of the masticatory muscles morphology and function on asymmetric prognathism

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    Kondoh, Hirotoshi

    1991-01-01

    Each case was measured to analyze the cross sectional area of muscle and mandibular malposition amount using Computed Tomography (CT) photos and P-A cephalogram. At the same time, the relation of morphology and function between the cross sectional area of muscle and mandibular malposition amount was analyzed to examine the function of masseter using electromyography. To determine the relation between morphology and function of masseter in asymmetric prognathism, 23 cases were chosen for the study from among 11 male and 12 female patients who were diagnosed as asymmetric prognathism. In asymmetric prognathism, both morphology and function in the mandibular malposition side were recognized to be larger than that in the cross sectional area of muscle side, on the examination of the cross sectional area of muscle and the activity of masseter. A highly significant and positive correlation was recognized in the left and right difference between the masseteric and medial pterygoid section areas and the CT mandibular malposition amount which were examined by the CT photos. In the left and right difference between the masseteric and medial pterygoid section areas and in the left and right difference of the activity of masseter, there was also a highly positive and significant correlation. (author) 58 refs

  9. The location of the mandibular canal in prognathic patients compared to subjects with normal occlusion

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    Jung, Yun Hoa; Nah, Kyung Soo; Cho, Bong Hae [Pusan National Univ. College of Dentistry, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the location of the mandibular canal in Class {iota}{iota}{iota} patients and 26 normal patients were observed. Four measurements were taken on cross sectional tomography between the first and second molars: the distance from the mandibular canal to the inner surface of both the buccal and lingual cortices, the distance from the mandibular canal to the inferior border of the mandible, and the buccolingual width of the mandible. The buccolingual location of the canals was classified as lingual, central, of buccal. Each measurement was analyzed with an independent test to compare Class {iota}{iota}{iota} malocclusion to normal occlusion. Compared to the control group, the prognathic group had a shorter distance from the canal to the inner surface of the lingual cortex and to the base of the mandible. A higher percentage of the canals were located lingually in the prognathic group. This study showed that the mandibular canal was located more lingually and interiorly in prognathic patients than in patients with normal occlusion. These results could help surgeons to reduce injuries to the inferior alveolar nerve.

  10. [Pre- and post-surgical orthodontic treatment of mandibular asymmetry and prognathism].

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    Chen, Song; Chen, Yang-xi; Hu, Jing

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the pre- and post surgical orthodontic treatment of mandibular asymmetry and prognathism in our hospital, and to summarize some helpful experiences for future clinical work. The data were derived from 21 adults aged from 19 - 28 years who had severe mandibular asymmetry and prognathism. The ANB angle of all patients is from -3 degrees to -8 degrees. The value of wits of all patients is from -7 mm to -14 mm. The deviation of chin point of all patients is from 3 mm to 7 mm. The duration of pre- and post-surgical orthodontic treatment was 10-20 months (mean 18 months) and 5-10 months (mean 7.5 months), respectively. The keys in pre-surgical orthodontic treatment include (1) three dimensional dental decompensation; (2) arch form and transverse discrepancy correction; (3) model surgery and the splint making. The main objective of post surgical orthodontic treatment is to detail the occlusion. Pre- and post surgical orthodontic treatment is essential for the orthognathic treatment of patients with mandibular asymmetry and prognathism.

  11. The effects of orthognathic surgery on mandibular movements in patients with mandibular prognathism

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    Sinobad Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mandibular prognathism, one of the most severe dentofacial deformities, affects the person’s appearance, psychological health and the quality of life in the most sensitive age period. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sagittal split ramus osteotomy on the range of mandibular border movements in the early postoperative period. Methods. The study was conducted on 20 patients, of mean age 20.8 years, with mandibular prognathism. All patients included in this study were operated on by bilateral sagittal spliting ramus osteotomy according to Obwegeser and Dal Pont followed by mandibular immobilization during eight weeks. In all patients mandibular border movements were recorded before and six months after surgery using the computerized pantograph Arcus-Digma (KaVo EWL GmbH, Leutkirch, Germany. Results. The analysis of the chosen kinematic parameters revealed that sagittal split ramus osteotomy followed by eight weeks of mandibular immobilization had severe effects on the mouth opening. Six months after surgery the range of maximal mouth opening decreased for approximately 13.9 mm in relation to the preoperative stage. On the contrary, the ranges of maximal protrusion and the border of laterotrusive excursions increased significantly after surgery. Conclusion. In patients with mandibular prognathism where enormous mandibular growth was the main causal factor of the deformity, the sagittal split ramus osteotomy yielded good results. The rigid fixation of bone fragments and reduced period of mandibular immobilization followed by appropriate physical therapy could considerably contribute to a more rapid recovery of mandibular kinematics in the postoperative period.

  12. A cephalometric analysis of the cranial base and frontal part of the face in patients with mandibular prognathism

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    Čutović Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. The literature suggests different views on the correlation between the cranial base morphology and size and saggital intermaxillary relationships. The aim of this study was to investigate the cranial base morphology, including the frontal facial part in patients with mandibular prognathism, to clarify a certain ambiguities, in opposing viewspoints in the literature. Methods. Cephalometric radiographies of 60 patients were analyzed at the Dental Clinic of the Military Medical Academy, Belgrade, Serbia. All the patients were male, aged 18-35 years, with no previous orthodontic treatment. On the basis of dental and sceletal relations of jaws and teeth, the patients were divided into two groups: the group P (patients with mandibular prognathism and the group E (the control group or eugnathic patients. A total of 15 cephalometric parametres related to the cranial base, frontal part of the face and sagittal intermaxillary relationships were measured and analyzed. Results. The results show that cranial base dimensions and the angle do not play a significant role in the development of mandibular prognathism. Interrelationship analysis indicated a statistically significant negative correlation between the cranial base angle (NSAr and the angles of maxillary (SNA and mandibular (SNB prognathism, as well as a positive correlation between the angle of inclination of the ramus to the cranial base (GoArNS and the angle of sagittal intermaxillary relationships (ANB. Sella turcica dimensions, its width and depth, as well as the nasal bone length were significantly increased in the patients with mandibular prognathism, while the other analyzed frontal part dimensions of the face were not changed by the malocclusion in comparison with the eugnathic patients. Conclusion. This study shows that the impact of the cranial base and the frontal part of the face on the development of profile in patients with mandibular prognathism is much smaller, but

  13. Thin-plate spline graphical analysis of the mandible in mandibular prognathism.

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    Chang, Hsin-Fu; Chang, Hong-Po; Liu, Pao-Hsin; Chang, Chih-Han

    2002-11-01

    The chin cup has been used to treat skeletal mandibular prognathism in growing patients for 200 years. The pull on the orthopedic-force chin cup is oriented along a line from the mandibular symphysis to the mandibular condyle. Various levels of success have been reported with this restraining device. The vertical chin cup produces strong vertical compression stress on the maxillary molar regions when the direction of traction is 20 degrees more vertical than the chin-condyle line. This treatment strategy may prevent relapse due to counter-clockwise rotation of the mandible. In this report, we describe a new strategy for using chin-cup therapy involving thin-plate spline (TPS) analysis of lateral cephalometric roentgenograms to visualize transformation of the mandible. The actual sites of mandibular skeletal change are not detectable with conventional cephalometric analysis. A case of mandibular prognathism treated with a chin cup and a case of dental Class III malocclusion without orthodontic treatment are described. The case analysis illustrates that specific patterns of mandibular transformation are associated with Class III malocclusion with or without orthopedic therapy, and that visualization of these deformations is feasible using TPS graphical analysis.

  14. Radiographic cephalometry analysis of condylar position after bimaxillary osteotomy in patients with mandibular prognathism

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    Miković Nikola D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Postoperative condylar position is a substantial concern in surgical correction of mandibular prognathism. Orthognathic surgery may change condylar position and this is considered a contributing factor for early skeletal relapse and the induction of temporomandibular disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in condylar position, and to correlate angular skeletal measurements following bimaxillary surgery. Methods. On profile teleradiographs of 21 patients with mandibular angular and linear parametres, the changes in condylar position, were measured during preoperative orthodontic treatment and 6 months after the surgical treatment. Results. A statistically significant difference in values between the groups was found. The most distal point on the head of condyle point (DI moved backward for 1.38 mm (p = 0.02, and the point of center of collum mandibulae point (DC moved backward for 1.52 mm (p = 0.007. The amount of upward movement of the point DI was 1.62 mm (p = 0.04. Conclusion. In the patients with mandibular prognathism, the condyles tend to migrate upward and forward six months after bimaxillary surgery.

  15. Orthodontic treatment for a mandibular prognathic girl of short stature under growth hormone therapy

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    Chin-Yun Pan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case of a 12-year-old girl with maxillary deficiency, mandibular prognathism, and facial asymmetry, undergoing growth hormone (GH therapy due to idiopathic short stature. Children of short stature with or without GH deficiency have a deviating craniofacial morphology with overall smaller dimensions; facial retrognathism, especially mandibular retrognathism; and increased facial convexity. However, a complete opposite craniofacial pattern was presented in our case of a skeletal Class III girl with idiopathic short stature. The orthodontic treatment goal was to inhibit or change the direction of mandibular growth and stimulate the maxillary growth of the girl during a course of GH therapy. Maxillary protraction and mandibular retraction were achieved using occipitomental anchorage (OMA orthopedic appliance in the first stage of treatment. In the second stage, the patient was treated with a fixed orthodontic appliance using a modified multiple-loop edgewise archwire technique of asymmetric mechanics and an active retainer of vertical chin-cup. The treatment led to an acceptable facial profile and obvious facial asymmetry improvement. Class I dental occlusion and coincident dental midline were also achieved. A 3½-year follow-up of the girl at age 18 showed a stable result of the orthodontic and dentofacial orthopedic treatment. Our case shows that the OMA orthopedic appliance of maxillary protraction combined with mandibular retraction is effective for correcting skeletal Class III malocclusion with midface deficiency and mandibular prognathism in growing children with idiopathic short stature undergoing GH therapy.

  16. Intraoperative Hemorrhage and Postoperative Sequelae after Intraoral Vertical Ramus Osteotomy to Treat Mandibular Prognathism

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    Chen, Chun-Ming; Lai, Steven; Chen, Ker-Kong; Lee, Huey-Er

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the factors affecting intraoperative hemorrhage and postoperative sequelae after orthognathic surgery. Materials and Methods. Eighty patients with mandibular prognathism underwent surgical mandibular setback with intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO). The correlation between the blood loss volume and postoperative VAS with the gender, age, and operating time was assessed using the t-test and Spearman rank correlation coefficient. The correlation between the magnitude of mandibular setback with the presence of TMJ clicking symptoms and lip sensation was also assessed. Results. The mean operating time and blood loss volume for men and women were 249.52 min and 229.39 min, and 104.03 mL and 86.12 mL, respectively. The mean VAS in men and women was 3.21 and 2.93, and 1.79 and 1.32 on the first and second postoperative days. There is no gender difference in the operating time, blood loss, VAS, TMJ symptoms, and lip numbness. The magnitude of mandibular setback was not correlated with immediate and long-term postoperative lip numbness. Conclusion. There are no gender differences in the intraoperative hemorrhage and postoperative sequelae (pain, lip numbness, and TMJ symptoms). In addition, neither symptom was significantly correlated with the amount of mandibular setback. PMID:26543855

  17. Radiologic study of mandibular foramen of mandibular prognathism by three-dimensional computed tomography

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    Lee, Seung Hun; Moon, Cheol Hyun; Im, Jeong Soo; Seo, Hwa Jeong [Graduate School of Public Health and Social Welfare, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    This study is aimed to evaluate the position of mandibular foramen of mandibular prognathism patients using 3-dimensional CT images in order to reduce the chance of an anesthetic failure of the mandibular nerve and to prevent the damage to the inferior alveolar nerve during the orthognathic surgery. The control group consist of 30 patients with class I occlusion. The experimental group consist of 44 patients with class III malocclusion. Three-dimensional computed tomography was used to evaluate the position of the mandibular foramina. The distance between mandibular plane and mandibular foramen, class I was 25.385 mm, class III was 23.628 mm. About the distance between occlusal plane and mandibular foramen, class I was 1.478 mm, class III was 5.144 mm. The distance between posterior border plan of mandibular ramus and mandibular foramen had not statistically significant. About the distance between sagittal plane of mandible and mandibular foramen did not also showed statistically significant. The result of this study could help the clinicians to apprehend more accurate anatomical locations of the foramina on the mandible with various facial skeletal types. Thereby to perform more accurate block anesthesia of the mandibular nerve and osteotomy with minimal nerve damage. In addition, this study could provide fundamental data for any related researches about the location of the mandibular foramina for other purposes.

  18. Radiologic study of mandibular foramen of mandibular prognathism by three-dimensional computed tomography

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    Lee, Seung Hun; Moon, Cheol Hyun; Im, Jeong Soo; Seo, Hwa Jeong

    2010-01-01

    This study is aimed to evaluate the position of mandibular foramen of mandibular prognathism patients using 3-dimensional CT images in order to reduce the chance of an anesthetic failure of the mandibular nerve and to prevent the damage to the inferior alveolar nerve during the orthognathic surgery. The control group consist of 30 patients with class I occlusion. The experimental group consist of 44 patients with class III malocclusion. Three-dimensional computed tomography was used to evaluate the position of the mandibular foramina. The distance between mandibular plane and mandibular foramen, class I was 25.385 mm, class III was 23.628 mm. About the distance between occlusal plane and mandibular foramen, class I was 1.478 mm, class III was 5.144 mm. The distance between posterior border plan of mandibular ramus and mandibular foramen had not statistically significant. About the distance between sagittal plane of mandible and mandibular foramen did not also showed statistically significant. The result of this study could help the clinicians to apprehend more accurate anatomical locations of the foramina on the mandible with various facial skeletal types. Thereby to perform more accurate block anesthesia of the mandibular nerve and osteotomy with minimal nerve damage. In addition, this study could provide fundamental data for any related researches about the location of the mandibular foramina for other purposes.

  19. Intraoperative Hemorrhage and Postoperative Sequelae after Intraoral Vertical Ramus Osteotomy to Treat Mandibular Prognathism

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    Chun-Ming Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the factors affecting intraoperative hemorrhage and postoperative sequelae after orthognathic surgery. Materials and Methods. Eighty patients with mandibular prognathism underwent surgical mandibular setback with intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO. The correlation between the blood loss volume and postoperative VAS with the gender, age, and operating time was assessed using the t-test and Spearman rank correlation coefficient. The correlation between the magnitude of mandibular setback with the presence of TMJ clicking symptoms and lip sensation was also assessed. Results. The mean operating time and blood loss volume for men and women were 249.52 min and 229.39 min, and 104.03 mL and 86.12 mL, respectively. The mean VAS in men and women was 3.21 and 2.93, and 1.79 and 1.32 on the first and second postoperative days. There is no gender difference in the operating time, blood loss, VAS, TMJ symptoms, and lip numbness. The magnitude of mandibular setback was not correlated with immediate and long-term postoperative lip numbness. Conclusion. There are no gender differences in the intraoperative hemorrhage and postoperative sequelae (pain, lip numbness, and TMJ symptoms. In addition, neither symptom was significantly correlated with the amount of mandibular setback.

  20. A Surgery-first approach in surgical-orthodontic treatment of mandibular prognathism--a case report.

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    Yu, Chung-Chih; Chen, Po-Hsun; Liou, Eric J W; Huang, Chiung-Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2010-01-01

    The conventional approach in orthodontic surgery treatment of dentofacial anomalies requires a varied period of pre-surgical orthodontic treatment. This presurgical period is considered to be important for adequate surgical treatment and stable results. This period is usually long bothersome for patients because dental decompensation is required and there is consequent deterioration of aesthetics and function, especially in cases of skeletal Class III occlusion. At Chang Gung Craniofacial Center, a surgery-first approach (SFA), i.e. minimal pre-surgical orthodontics, is one of the treatment choices for Class III patients. In this report, we present a 19-year-old man with mandibular prognathism, an anterior open bite and severe dental crowding treated with SFA. The patient received orthognathic surgery a week after bracing of the teeth. The operation and recovery were uneventful as well as the following orthodontic treatment. The total treatment time was only four months, much shorter than with the conventional approach. The patient benefitted from immediate improvement of the facial profile after surgery, and a much shorter total treatment, and the results were not compromised. We believe in selected cases, SFA is a good and effective treatment alternative.

  1. Novel three dimensional position analysis of the mandibular foramen in patients with skeletal class III mandibular prognathism

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    Kang, Sang Hoon; Kim, Yeon Ho; Won, Yu Jin; Kim, Moon Key

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the relative position of the mandibular foramina (MnFs) in patients diagnosed with skeletal class III malocclusion. Computed tomography (CT) images were collected from 85 patients. The vertical lengths of each anatomic point from the five horizontal planes passing through the MnF were measured at the coronoid process, sigmoid notch, condyle, and the gonion. The distance from the anterior ramus point to the posterior ramus point on the five horizontal planes was designated the anteroposterior horizontal distance of the ramus for each plane. The perpendicular distance from each anterior ramus point to each vertical plane through the MnF was designated the horizontal distance from the anterior ramus to the Mn F. The horizontal and vertical positions were examined by regression analysis. Regression analysis showed the heights of the coronoid process, sigmoid notch, and condyle for the five horizontal planes were significantly related to the height of the MnF, with the highest significance associated with the MnF-mandibular plane (coefficients of determination (R2): 0.424, 0.597, and 0.604, respectively). The horizontal anteroposterior length of the ramus and the distance from the anterior ramus point to the MnF were significant by regression analysis. The relative position of the MnF was significantly related to the vertical heights of the sigmoid notch, coronoid process, and condyle as well as to the horizontal anteroposterior length of the ascending ramus. These findings should be clinically useful for patients with skeletal class III mandibular prognathism

  2. Nasal changes after orthognathic surgery for patients with prognathism and Class III malocclusion: analysis using three-dimensional photogrammetry.

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    Worasakwutiphong, Saran; Chuang, Ya-Fang; Chang, Hsin-Wen; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Lin, Pei-Ju; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2015-02-01

    Orthognathic surgery alters the position of maxilla and mandible, and consequently changes the nasal shape. The nasal change remains a concern to Asian patients. The aim of this study was to measure the nasal changes using a novel three-dimensional photographic imaging method. A total of 38 patients with Class III malocclusion and prognathism were enrolled. All patients underwent two-jaw surgery with the standard technique. A nasal alar cinching suture was included at the end of procedure. Facial landmarks and nasal morphology were defined and measured from pre- and postoperative three-dimensional photographic images. Intra-rater errors on landmark identification were controlled. Patient's reports of perceptual nasal changes were recorded. The average width of the alar base and subalare remained similar after surgery. Alar width was increased by 0.74 mm. Nasal height and length remained the same. Nasolabial angle increased significantly. The area of nostril show revealed a significant increase and was correlated with a decrease of columella inclination. Nasal tip projection decreased significantly, by 1.99 mm. Preoperative nasal morphology was different between patients with and without cleft lip/palate, but most nasal changes were concordant. In the self-perception, 37% of patients reported improved nasal appearance, 58% reported no change, and 5% were not satisfied with the nasal changes. After the surgery, characteristic nasal changes occurred with an increase of nasolabial angle and nostril show, but a preserved nasal width. The majority of patients did not perceive adverse nasal changes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Novel three dimensional position analysis of the mandibular foramen in patients with skeletal class III mandibular prognathism

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    Kang, Sang Hoon; Kim, Yeon Ho; Won, Yu Jin; Kim, Moon Key [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To analyze the relative position of the mandibular foramina (MnFs) in patients diagnosed with skeletal class III malocclusion. Computed tomography (CT) images were collected from 85 patients. The vertical lengths of each anatomic point from the five horizontal planes passing through the MnF were measured at the coronoid process, sigmoid notch, condyle, and the gonion. The distance from the anterior ramus point to the posterior ramus point on the five horizontal planes was designated the anteroposterior horizontal distance of the ramus for each plane. The perpendicular distance from each anterior ramus point to each vertical plane through the MnF was designated the horizontal distance from the anterior ramus to the Mn F. The horizontal and vertical positions were examined by regression analysis. Regression analysis showed the heights of the coronoid process, sigmoid notch, and condyle for the five horizontal planes were significantly related to the height of the MnF, with the highest significance associated with the MnF-mandibular plane (coefficients of determination (R2): 0.424, 0.597, and 0.604, respectively). The horizontal anteroposterior length of the ramus and the distance from the anterior ramus point to the MnF were significant by regression analysis. The relative position of the MnF was significantly related to the vertical heights of the sigmoid notch, coronoid process, and condyle as well as to the horizontal anteroposterior length of the ascending ramus. These findings should be clinically useful for patients with skeletal class III mandibular prognathism.

  4. Combined Orthodontic and Surgical Approach in the Correction of a Class III Skeletal Malocclusion with Mandibular Prognathism and Vertical Maxillary Excess Using Bimaxillary Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose Cherackal, George; Thomas, Eapen; Prathap, Akhilesh

    2013-01-01

    For patients whose orthodontic problems are so severe that neither growth modification nor camouflage offers a solution, surgery to realign the jaws or reposition dentoalveolar segments is the only possible treatment. Surgery is not a substitute for orthodontics in these patients. Instead, it must be properly coordinated with orthodontics and other dental treatments to achieve good overall results. Dramatic progress in recent years has made it possible for combined surgical orthodontic treatment to be carried out successfully for patients with a severe dentofacial problem of any type. This case report provides an overview of the current treatment methodology in managing a combination of asymmetrical mandibular prognathism and vertical maxillary excess.

  5. Combined Orthodontic and Surgical Approach in the Correction of a Class III Skeletal Malocclusion with Mandibular Prognathism and Vertical Maxillary Excess Using Bimaxillary Osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Jose Cherackal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For patients whose orthodontic problems are so severe that neither growth modification nor camouflage offers a solution, surgery to realign the jaws or reposition dentoalveolar segments is the only possible treatment. Surgery is not a substitute for orthodontics in these patients. Instead, it must be properly coordinated with orthodontics and other dental treatments to achieve good overall results. Dramatic progress in recent years has made it possible for combined surgical orthodontic treatment to be carried out successfully for patients with a severe dentofacial problem of any type. This case report provides an overview of the current treatment methodology in managing a combination of asymmetrical mandibular prognathism and vertical maxillary excess.

  6. The prevalence of erosive osseous changes of the articular eminence in the temporomandibular joint in patients with mandibular prognathism without internal derangement. MR and helical CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Takafumi; Ito, Jusuke; Tanaka, Rei; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Kobayashi, Fukiko [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of erosive osseous changes of the articular eminence in the temporomandibular joint without internal derangement. Sixty joints of 30 consecutive patients with mandibular prognathism were evaluated with both MR imaging and helical CT. On MPR images obtained with helical CT, erosive osseous changes of the articular eminence were observed in 18 joints (30%) of 13 patients. None of the joints studied demonstrated an osseous change in the mandibular condyle. MR imaging failed to detect erosive osseous changes of the articular eminence in all of the joints studied. In conclusion, MPR images obtained with helical CT were of value to detect erosive osseous changes of the articular eminence. (author)

  7. The prevalence of erosive osseous changes of the articular eminence in the temporomandibular joint in patients with mandibular prognathism without internal derangement. MR and helical CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takafumi; Ito, Jusuke; Tanaka, Rei; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Kobayashi, Fukiko

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of erosive osseous changes of the articular eminence in the temporomandibular joint without internal derangement. Sixty joints of 30 consecutive patients with mandibular prognathism were evaluated with both MR imaging and helical CT. On MPR images obtained with helical CT, erosive osseous changes of the articular eminence were observed in 18 joints (30%) of 13 patients. None of the joints studied demonstrated an osseous change in the mandibular condyle. MR imaging failed to detect erosive osseous changes of the articular eminence in all of the joints studied. In conclusion, MPR images obtained with helical CT were of value to detect erosive osseous changes of the articular eminence. (author)

  8. Cephalometric analysis of the middle part of the face in patients with mandibular prognathism

    OpenAIRE

    Čutović Tatjana; Jović Nebojša; Kozomara Ružica; Radojčić Julija; Janošević Mirjana; Mladenović Irena; Matijević Stevo

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. The middle part of the face, that is the maxilla, has always been mentioned as a possible etiologic factor of skeletal Class III. However, the importance of the relationship of maxillary retroposition towards the cranial base is still unclear, although it has been examined many times. The aim of this study was to conduct cephalometric analysis of the morphology of maxilla, including the whole middle part of the face in patients with divergen...

  9. Finite element study to quantify the relationship between masticatory stress and prognathism

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available displacements and/or stresses, conclusions are drawn regarding which geometry is better suited to perform a particular function. In this project, we demonstrated the ability of the FEM to predict patient-specific stress distributions due to a variation in facial...

  10. Nasal changes after orthognathic surgery for patients with prognathism and Class III malocclusion: Analysis using three-dimensional photogrammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saran Worasakwutiphong

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: After the surgery, characteristic nasal changes occurred with an increase of nasolabial angle and nostril show, but a preserved nasal width. The majority of patients did not perceive adverse nasal changes.

  11. Combined Orthodontic and Surgical Approach in the Correction of a Class III Skeletal Malocclusion with Mandibular Prognathism and Vertical Maxillary Excess Using Bimaxillary Osteotomy

    OpenAIRE

    George Jose Cherackal; Eapen Thomas; Akhilesh Prathap

    2013-01-01

    For patients whose orthodontic problems are so severe that neither growth modification nor camouflage offers a solution, surgery to realign the jaws or reposition dentoalveolar segments is the only possible treatment. Surgery is not a substitute for orthodontics in these patients. Instead, it must be properly coordinated with orthodontics and other dental treatments to achieve good overall results. Dramatic progress in recent years has made it possible for combined surgical orthodontic treatm...

  12. The stability of mandibular prognathism corrected by bilateral sagittal split osteotomies: a comparison of bi-cortical osteosynthesis and mono-cortical osteosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S S-P; Huang, C-S; Chen, P K-T; Ko, E W-C; Chen, Y-R

    2012-02-01

    This study evaluated the differences in surgical changes and post-surgical changes between bi-cortical and mono-cortical osteosynthesis (MCO) in the correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion with bilateral sagittal split osteotomies (BSSOs). Twenty-five patients had bi-cortical osteosynthesis (BCO), 32 patients had mono-cortical fixation. Lateral and postero-anterior cephalometric radiographs, taken at the time of surgery, before surgery, 1 month after surgery, and on completion of orthodontic treatment (mean 9.9 months after surgery), were obtained for evaluation. Cephalometric analysis and superimposition were used to investigate the surgical and post-surgical changes. Independent t-test was performed to compare the difference between the two groups. Pearson's correlations were tested to evaluate the factors related to the relapse of the mandible. The sagittal relapse rate was 20% in the bi-cortical and 25% in the mono-cortical group. The forward-upward rotation of the mandible in the post-surgical period contributed most of the sagittal relapse. There were no statistically significant differences in sagittal and vertical changes between the two groups during surgery and in the post-surgical period. No factors were found to correlate with post-surgical relapse, but the intergonial width increased more in the bi-cortical group. The study suggested that both methods of skeletal fixation had similar postoperative stability. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Strategic camouflage treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion (mandibular prognathism) using bone-borne rapid maxillary expansion and mandibular anterior subapical osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yu-Jin; Lin, Lu; Kim, Seong-Hun; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Nelson, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This case report presents the camouflage treatment that successfully improved the facial profile of a patient with a skeletal Class III malocclusion using bone-borne rapid maxillary expansion and mandibular anterior subapical osteotomy. The patient was an 18-year-old woman with chief complaints of crooked teeth and a protruded jaw. Camouflage treatment was chosen because she rejected orthognathic surgery under general anesthesia. A hybrid type of bone-borne rapid maxillary expander with palatal mini-implants was used to correct the transverse discrepancy, and a mandibular anterior subapical osteotomy was conducted to achieve proper overjet with normal incisal inclination and to improve her lip and chin profile. As a result, a Class I occlusion with a favorable inclination of the anterior teeth and a good esthetic profile was achieved with no adverse effects. Therefore, the hybrid type of bone-borne rapid maxillary expander and a mandibular anterior subapical osteotomy can be considered effective camouflage treatment of a skeletal Class III malocclusion, providing improved inclination of the dentition and lip profile. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The head of the earwig Forficula auricularia (Dermaptera) and its evolutionary implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neubert, David; Simon, Sabrina; Beutel, Rolf G.; Wipfler, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The external and internal head morphology including the musculature of the common earwig Forficula auricularia is described in detail. We specified and corrected previous descriptions and provided a detailed documentation. The head of Forficula is characterized by prognathism, generalized mandibles

  15. Spatial determinants of the mandibular curve of Spee in modern and archaic Homo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Myra F; Holton, Nathan E; Scott, Jill E; Franciscus, Robert G; Marshall, Steven D; Southard, Thomas E

    2016-10-01

    The curve of Spee (COS) is a mesio-distally curved alignment of the canine through distal molar cusp tips in certain mammals including modern humans and some fossil hominins. In humans, the alignment varies from concave to flat, and previous studies have suggested that this difference reflects craniofacial morphology, including the degree of alveolar prognathism. However, the relationship between prognathism and concavity of the COS has not been tested in craniofacially variant populations. We tested the hypothesis that greater alveolar prognathism covaries with a flatter COS in African-American and European-American populations. We further examined this relationship in fossil Homo including Homo neanderthalensis and early anatomically modern Homo sapiens, which are expected to extend the amount of variation in the COS from the extant sample. These hypotheses were tested using three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. Landmarks were recorded from the skulls of 166 African-Americans, 123 European-Americans, and 10 fossil hominin mandible casts. Landmarks were subjected to generalized Procrustes analysis, principal components analysis, and two-block partial least squares analysis. We documented covariation between the COS and alveolar prognathism such that relatively prognathic individuals have a flatter COS. Mandibular data from the fossil hominin taxa generally confirm and extend this correlation across a greater range of facial size and morphology in Homo. Our results suggest that the magnitude of the COS is related to a suite of features associated with alveolar prognathism in modern humans and across anthropoids. We also discuss the implications for spatial interactions between the dental arches. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Reduction glossectomy for macroglossia in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    functions, especially taste sensation, were not affected by resection. Speech articulation errors were corrected ... problems such as perception of mental retardation, widened interdental spaces, and mandibular prognathism [3 ... sweets, to provide the appropriate sensation [19]. The aim of this study was to describe our initial ...

  17. Genetic response in masseter muscle after orthognathic surgery in comparison with healthy controls - A Microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marewski, Maya; Petto, Carola; Schneider, Matthias; Harzer, Winfried

    2017-04-01

    One third of adult patients with orthognathic surgery of a prognathic or retrognathic mandible show relapse. The sagittal split osteotomy of the mandible leads to a displacement of both parts up to 10 mm without any changes of muscle attachment. Changed mandible length needs adaptation of muscle capacity because of changed force to moment ratio. The aim of this Microarray study was to analyze the general genetic response of masseter muscle in patients with retrognathism or prognathism of the mandible six months after surgery in comparison with healthy untreated controls. We found in tissue samples from masseter muscle a reduction of different entities between patients and controls but less in retrognathic than in prognathic patients (274/429). The different entities to controls in prognathia were reduced from 1862 to 1749 but increased in retrognathia from 1070 to 1563. We have to consider that the total amount of different entities to the controls is higher in patients with prognathic mandible (7364) because of their strong genetic controlled development compared with that in patients with retrognathic mandible (4126), which is more environmentally influenced. It can be concluded that function follows form after surgical change with high inheritance. In retrognathic patients the adaptation could be delayed or the capacity of regeneration potential is not sufficient. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Moebius sequence -a multidisciplinary clinical approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Kjeldgaard; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2017-01-01

    hypomineralisation. All five had abnormal orofacial motor function and maxillary prognathism. Two patients had adactyly, syndactyly and brachydactyly. None of the five patients had Poland anomaly, hip dislocation or dysplasia but all had a mild degree of scoliosis. We observed congenital club-feet, calcaneovalgus...

  19. Lack of national consensus in preoperative airway assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet; Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg

    2016-01-01

    : 77.3-99.2%), history of airway management difficulties (85.7%, 95% CI: 65.4-95.0%), ability to prognath (81.0%, 95% CI: 60.0-92.3%) and neck mobility (81.0%, 95% CI: 60.0-92.3%) were the main predictors registered. CONCLUSION: We found considerable inter-departmental variance in the standards...

  20. Berardinelli–Seip syndrome type 2 – An Egyptian child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-08-30

    Aug 30, 2014 ... Abstract We report a 2.5 year old male, first in order of birth of first cousin ... The patient looked older than his age with the loss of buccal pad of fat, hypertrichosis mainly on the back and lower limbs, thick scalp hair, mild prognathism, large ... On examination, his weight was 14 kg (on 75th percentile),.

  1. Treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion using face mask therapy with alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction (Alt-RAMEC protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Ramchandra Rathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Class III malocclusion is very common malocclusion and can be due to maxillary retrusion, mandibular prognathism, or combination. Ellis and McNamara found a combination of maxillary retrusion and mandibular protrusion to be the most common skeletal relationship (30%. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. Reverse pull head gear combined with maxillary expansion can effectively correct skeletal Class III malocclusion due to maxillary deficiency in growing patient. An eight-year-old female patient with chief complaint of prognathic mandible and anterior crossbite was successfully treated in duration of 5 months with facemask and expansion therapy based on Alternate Rapid Maxillary Expansion and Constriction (Alt-RAMEC protocol.

  2. Nance–Horan Syndrome: A Rare Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Shambhu; Datta, Pankaj; Sabharwal, Janak Raj; Datta, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Dentofacial anomalies may guide us to the diagnosis of many congenital and hereditary syndromes. A 9-year-old boy was diagnosed with Nance–Horan syndrome. This syndrome is an extremely rare X-linked genetic disorder which is entirely expressed in males with semi-dominant transmission which results from mutations occurring in male gametes. It is characterized by facial dysmorphism such as long face, prominent nose and mandibular prognathism, ocular abnormalities such as congenital cataract, mi...

  3. Pyknodysostosis: report of a rare case with review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaiah, Kiran Kumar Kotagudda; George, Giju Baby; Padiyath, Sheeba; Sethuraman, Rupak; Cherian, Babu

    2011-01-01

    Pyknodysostosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the post natal onset of short limbs, short stature, and generalized hyperostosis along with acro-osteolysis with sclerosis of the terminal phalanges, a feature that is considered essentially pathognomonic. Other features include persistence of fontanelles, delayed closure of sutures, wormian bones, absence of frontal sinuses, and obtuse mandibular gonial angle with relative mandibular prognathism. We report a case of 17-y...

  4. BILATERAL SAGITAL SPLIT OSTEOTOMY PADA MANDIBULA PROGNATI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradono Pradono

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A young girl 20 years old with mandibular prognathism, has been treated with orthodontics and surgical treatment in between. Mandibular set back was done intra orally 5 mm length and bilateral sagital split ramus osteotomy method. And rigid fixation was done by inserting three 2 mm bicortical screws for stabilizing the fragment. This method allowed the bony segments to heal properly and allowed the patients to function sooner.

  5. Validity of a Manual Soft Tissue Profile Prediction Method Following Mandibular Setback Osteotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Kolokitha, Olga-Elpis

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the validity of a manual cephalometric method used for predicting the post-operative soft tissue profiles of patients who underwent mandibular setback surgery and compare it to a computerized cephalometric prediction method (Dentofacial Planner). Lateral cephalograms of 18 adults with mandibular prognathism taken at the end of pre-surgical orthodontics and approximately one year after surgery were used. Methods To test the validity of the manu...

  6. Paget's disease of jaw bones as primary manifestation: A case report of a proper diagnosis made by general dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolongo, Martin G; Cabras, Marco; Bava, Luca; Arduino, Paolo G; Carbone, Mario

    2018-06-01

    To present a case of early diagnosis mandibular Paget's disease of bone (PDB), recognised by a general dentist. PDB is responsible of rapid bone resorption and disorganised bone formation. The patient was a 72-year-old female patient complaining of dental malposition and blatant prognathism. Clinicians should consider PDB in differential diagnosis for an elderly patient undergoing unexplained alteration in face profile and occlusion. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Management of skeletal Class III malocclusion with reverse pull headgear in a growing individual

    OpenAIRE

    Ambreen Afzal; Hasnain Sakrani; Norisha Ehsan Mahmood; Kamellia Mehershahi; Fatima Burney

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal Class III malocclusion is considered to be one of the most difficult orthodontic problems to treat. This malocclusion is associated with the retrognathic maxilla or prognathic mandible or sometimes a combination of both. The treatment of such cases requires an integrated approach and a comprehensive treatment plan including growth modification, dental camouflage, or orthognathic surgery. In a growing patient, orthopedic correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion with the help of a...

  8. Do Class III patients have a different growth spurt than the general population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Sik; Lee, Shin-Jae; An, Hongseok; Donatelli, Richard E; Kim, Soo-Hwan

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the timing and length of the growth spurt of Class III prognathic patients is fundamental to the strategy of interceptive orthopedic orthodontics as well as to the timing of orthognathic surgery. Consequently, this study was undertaken to determine whether there are any significant differences in the stature growth pattern of Class III subjects compared with non-Class III subjects and the general population. Twelve-year longitudinal stature growth data were collected for 402 randomly selected adolescents in the general population, 55 Class III mandibular prognathic patients, and 37 non-Class III patients. The growth data were analyzed by using the traditional linear interpolation method and nonlinear growth functions. The 6 stature growth parameters were measured: age at takeoff, stature at takeoff, velocity at takeoff, age at peak height velocity, stature at peak height velocity, and velocity at peak height velocity. Comparisons in the stature growth parameters and 15 cephalometric variables among the general population, Class III subjects, and non-Class III subjects were made with multivariate analysis. Patients with Class III prognathism did not have different growth parameters compared with Class II subjects or the general population. This study does not allow meaningful conclusions with regard to the relationship of mandibular size and stature growth pattern. The application of nonlinear growth curves vs the traditional linear interpolation method was also discussed. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Retrospective 25-year follow-up of treatment outcomes in Angle Class III patients : Success versus failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendl, Brigitte; Kamenica, A; Droschl, H; Jakse, N; Weiland, F; Wendl, T; Wendl, M

    2017-03-01

    Despite recommendations for early treatment of hereditary Angle Class III syndrome, late pubertal growth may cause a relapse requiring surgical intervention. This study was performed to identify predictors of successful Class III treatment. Thirty-eight Class III patients treated with a chincup were retrospectively analyzed. Data were collected from the data archive, cephalograms, and casts, including pretreatment (T0) and posttreatment (T1) data, as well as long-term follow-up data collected approximately 25 years after treatment (T2). Each patient was assigned to a success or a failure group. Data were analyzed based on time (T0, T1, T2), deviations from normal (Class I), and prognathism types (true mandibular prognathism, maxillary retrognathism, combined pro- and retrognathism). Compared to Class I normal values, the data obtained in both groups yielded 11 significant parameters. The success group showed values closer to normal at all times (T0, T1, T2) and vertical parameters decreased from T0 to T2. The failure group showed higher values for vertical and horizontal mandibular growth, as well as dentally more protrusion of the lower anterior teeth and more negative overjet at all times. In adittion, total gonial and upper gonial angle were higher at T0 and T1. A prognostic score-yet to be evaluated in clinical practice-was developed from the results. The failure group showed greater amounts of horizontal development during the years between T1 and T2. Treatment of true mandibular prognathism achieved better outcomes in female patients. Cases of maxillary retrognathism were treated very successfully without gender difference. Failure was clearly more prevalent, again without gender difference, among the patients with combined mandibular prognathism and maxillary retrognathism. Crossbite situations were observed in 44% of cases at T0. Even though this finding had been resolved by T1, it relapsed in 16% of the cases by T2. The failure rate increased in cases of

  10. Thin-plate spline analysis of the cranial base in African, Asian and European populations and its relationship with different malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Antonio; Bastir, Markus; Alarcón, Jose Antonio; Kuroe, Kazuto

    2008-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that midline basicranial orientation and posterior cranial base length are discriminating factors between adults of different populations and its potential maxillo/mandibular disharmonies. Twenty-nine 2D landmarks of the midline cranial base, the face and the mandible of dry skull X-rays from three major populations (45 Asians, 34 Africans, 64 Europeans) were digitized and analysed by geometric morphometrics. We used, first, MANOVA to test for mean shape differences between populations; then, principal components analysis (PCA) to assess the overall variation in the sample and finally, canonical variate analysis (CVA) with jack-knife validations (N=1000) to analyse the anatomical features that best distinguished among populations. Significant mean shapes differences were shown between populations (P<0.001). CVA revealed two significant axes of discrimination (P<0.001). Jack-knife validation correctly identified 92% of 15,000 unknowns. In Africans the whole cranial base is rotated into a forward-downward position, while in Asians it is rotated in the opposite way. The Europeans occupied an intermediate position. African and Asian samples showed a maxillo/mandibular prognathism. African prognathism was produced by an anterior positioned maxilla, Asian prognathism by retruded anterior cranial base and increase of the posterior cranial base length. Europeans showed a trend towards retracted mandibles with relatively shorter posterior cranial bases. The results supported the hypothesis that basicranial orientation and posterior cranial base length are valid factors to distinguish between geographic groups. The whole craniofacial configuration underlying a particular maxillo-facial disharmony must be considered in diagnosis, growth predictions and resulting treatment planning.

  11. Mandibular angle augmentation with the use of distraction and homologous lyophilized cartilage in a case of morphing to Michael Jackson surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommaerts, M Y; Abeloos, J S; Gropp, H

    2001-08-01

    Correction of an ill-defined mandibular angle is not an easy task, whether it is requested by the "congenital, orthognathic or cosmetic" patient. Deliberate over-correction has not been reported to our knowledge. This article presents a combination of distraction osteogenesis and lyophilized cartilage used to three-dimensionally over-augment the mandibular angle of a long-face prognathic patient who had the wish to be morphed to Michael Jackson or at least as far as current technique and his endogenic features allowed.

  12. A case report of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome as a rare hereditary disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirous, Mehri; Tayari, Nazila

    2011-01-01

    Gorlin–Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant and a rare hereditary disease. Diagnosis of this syndrome is based on major and minor criteria. We report a Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in a 25-year-old male who was presented with progressive pain of maxilla and mandible over 5 years. The pain was diffuse and compatible with expansile cyst in alveolar ridges on panoramic radiography. In physical examination, he had coarse face and prognathism. Computer tomography of face revealed two expansile maxillary and one mandibular cyst. Calcification of entire length in falx and tentorium were detected in bone window. PMID:22091315

  13. A case report of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as a rare hereditary disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirous, Mehri; Tayari, Nazila

    2011-06-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant and a rare hereditary disease. Diagnosis of this syndrome is based on major and minor criteria. We report a Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 25-year-old male who was presented with progressive pain of maxilla and mandible over 5 years. The pain was diffuse and compatible with expansile cyst in alveolar ridges on panoramic radiography. In physical examination, he had coarse face and prognathism. Computer tomography of face revealed two expansile maxillary and one mandibular cyst. Calcification of entire length in falx and tentorium were detected in bone window.

  14. A case report of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome as a rare hereditary disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Sirous

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an autosomal dominant and a rare hereditary disease. Diagnosis of this syndrome is based on major and minor criteria. We report a Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a 25-year-old male who was presented with progressive pain of maxilla and mandible over 5 years. The pain was diffuse and compatible with expansile cyst in alveolar ridges on panoramic radiography. In physical examination, he had coarse face and prognathism. Computer tomography of face revealed two expansile maxillary and one mandibular cyst. Calcification of entire length in falx and tentorium were detected in bone window.

  15. Treatment of Class III malocclusion in a young adult patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, B H Jyothi; Kumar, Prashanth; Ravi, S; Shivalinga, B M; Bhagyalaxmi; Pradeep; Kudagi, Vishal

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the treatment of a young adult male with a concave profile, skeletal class III malocclusion because of a prognathic mandible and proclined upper incisors. The therapy included stages: 1. Pre-surgical orthodontics involving leveling and aligning of upper and lower arches, protraction of lower molars and retraction of upper incisors; 2. Surgical phase involving BSSO with mandibular setback and 3. Post-surgical orthodontics for finishing and detailing. The treatment lasted 23 months and improved facial esthetics significantly The treatment resulted in a functional occlusion with a lack of lateral cuspid guidance that could be accepted considering the difficulty of the case. Over jet and overbite are within norms.

  16. Geometric morphometrics in primatology: craniofacial variation in Homo sapiens and Pan troglodytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J M; Wood, C G; Luboga, S A

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally, morphometric studies have relied on statistical analysis of distances, angles or ratios to investigate morphometric variation among taxa. Recently, geometric techniques have been developed for the direct analysis of landmark data. In this paper, we offer a summary (with examples) of three of these newer techniques, namely shape coordinate, thin-plate spline and relative warp analyses. Shape coordinate analysis detected significant craniofacial variation between 4 modern human populations, with African and Australian Aboriginal specimens being relatively prognathous compared with their Eurasian counterparts. In addition, the Australian specimens exhibited greater basicranial flexion than all other samples. The observed relationships between size and craniofacial shape were weak. The decomposition of shape variation into affine and non-affine components is illustrated via a thin-plate spline analysis of Homo and Pan cranial landmarks. We note differences between Homo and Pan in the degree of prognathism and basicranial flexion and the position and orientation of the foramen magnum. We compare these results with previous studies of these features in higher primates and discuss the utility of geometric morphometrics as a tool in primatology and physical anthropology. We conclude that many studies of morphological variation, both within and between taxa, would benefit from the graphical nature of these techniques.

  17. A case of cleidocranial dysostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hyung Kyu; You, Dong Soo; Park, Tae Won; Lim, C. Y.; Kim, S. W.

    1977-01-01

    The authors had observed a case of cleidocranial dysostosis of 42 year old unmarried woman. The observation was founded upon roentgenogram of skull P-A view, orthopantomograph, cephalometric view, chest P-A view , and wrist X-ray view. The patient gave a dwarfish impression with 145 cm body height and concave mandibular prognathic facial feature. The palate was narrowed and extremely high arched. The eruption state of teeth was extremely poor, only four teeth were erupted, composed of upper third molar and lower three deformed teeth. The skull P-A view of reontgenogram reveals overlying metopic suture, and the suture are delayed up to date and many wormian bones are formed. On the cephalometric view, the maxilla is underdeveloped and produce the false mandibular prognathism. Twenty four impacted teeth can be detected by orthopantmograph, twelve in upper jaw and twelve in lower jaw. There are many supernumerary teeth, one in upper jaw and seven in lower jaw. On the chest P-A view, the clavicles are totally aplastic, but a vestige of clavicle is visible in the right side. On the wrist roentgenogram, the epiphyseal ossification of distal phalanx, mesial phalanx, and proximal phalanx is delayed.

  18. The influence of mandibular skeletal characteristics on inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Tae Min; Kim, Kee-Deog; Huh, Jisun; Woo, Eun-Jung; Park, Wonse

    2015-09-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is the most common anesthetic techniques in dentistry; however, its success rate is low. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between IANB failure and mandibular skeletal characteristics. In total, 693 cases of lower third molar extraction (n = 575 patients) were examined in this study. The ratio of the condylar and coronoid distances from the mandibular foramen (condyle-coronoid ratio [CC ratio]) was calculated, and the mandibular skeleton was then classified as normal, retrognathic, or prognathic. The correlation between IANB failure and sex, treatment side, and the CC ratio was assessed. The IANB failure rates for normal, retrognathic, and prognathic mandibles were 7.3%, 14.5%, and 9.5%, respectively, and the failure rate was highest among those with a CC ratio < 0.8 (severe retrognathic mandible). The failure rate was significantly higher in the retrognathic group than in normal group (P = 0.019), and there was no statistically significant difference between the other two groups. IANB failure could be attributable, in part, to the skeletal characteristics of the mandible. In addition, the failure rate was found to be significantly higher in the retrognathic group.

  19. Nance-Horan Syndrome: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shambhu; Datta, Pankaj; Sabharwal, Janak Raj; Datta, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Dentofacial anomalies may guide us to the diagnosis of many congenital and hereditary syndromes. A 9-year-old boy was diagnosed with Nance-Horan syndrome. This syndrome is an extremely rare X-linked genetic disorder which is entirely expressed in males with semi-dominant transmission which results from mutations occurring in male gametes. It is characterized by facial dysmorphism such as long face, prominent nose and mandibular prognathism, ocular abnormalities such as congenital cataract, microcornea, microphthalmia and strabismus, and dental anomalies including mulberry molars and screwdriver-shaped incisors. Heterozygous females inherit this disease and also suffer from this syndrome but in a milder form. Approximately one-third of the affected males show signs of developmental delay and intellectual abnormalities. This syndrome is very rare and the incidence of the disease has not been established so far. The present article describes the clinical and radiological features and the genetic implications of this syndrome.

  20. Nance–Horan syndrome: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shambhu Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentofacial anomalies may guide us to the diagnosis of many congenital and hereditary syndromes. A 9-year-old boy was diagnosed with Nance–Horan syndrome. This syndrome is an extremely rare X-linked genetic disorder which is entirely expressed in males with semi-dominant transmission which results from mutations occurring in male gametes. It is characterized by facial dysmorphism such as long face, prominent nose and mandibular prognathism, ocular abnormalities such as congenital cataract, microcornea, microphthalmia and strabismus, and dental anomalies including mulberry molars and screwdriver-shaped incisors. Heterozygous females inherit this disease and also suffer from this syndrome but in a milder form. Approximately one-third of the affected males show signs of developmental delay and intellectual abnormalities. This syndrome is very rare and the incidence of the disease has not been established so far. The present article describes the clinical and radiological features and the genetic implications of this syndrome.

  1. Nance–Horan Syndrome: A Rare Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shambhu; Datta, Pankaj; Sabharwal, Janak Raj; Datta, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Dentofacial anomalies may guide us to the diagnosis of many congenital and hereditary syndromes. A 9-year-old boy was diagnosed with Nance–Horan syndrome. This syndrome is an extremely rare X-linked genetic disorder which is entirely expressed in males with semi-dominant transmission which results from mutations occurring in male gametes. It is characterized by facial dysmorphism such as long face, prominent nose and mandibular prognathism, ocular abnormalities such as congenital cataract, microcornea, microphthalmia and strabismus, and dental anomalies including mulberry molars and screwdriver-shaped incisors. Heterozygous females inherit this disease and also suffer from this syndrome but in a milder form. Approximately one-third of the affected males show signs of developmental delay and intellectual abnormalities. This syndrome is very rare and the incidence of the disease has not been established so far. The present article describes the clinical and radiological features and the genetic implications of this syndrome. PMID:29042737

  2. Orthodontics-surgical combination therapy for Class III skeletal malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion with severe mandibular prognathism in an adult individual requires surgical and Othodontic combination therapy. The inter disciplinary approach is the treatment of choice in most of the skeletal malocclusions. A case report of an adult individual with Class III malocclusion, having mandibular excess in sagittal and vertical plane and treated with orthodontics,, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and Le - Forte I osteotomy for the correction of skeletal, dental and soft tissue discrepancies is herewith presented. The surgical-orthodontic combination therapy has resulted in near-normal skeletal, dental and soft tissue relationship, with marked improvement in the facial esthetics in turn, has helped the patient to improve the self-confidence level.

  3. Mitochondrial phylogenomics of Hemiptera reveals adaptive innovations driving the diversification of true bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hu; Leavengood, John M.; Chapman, Eric G.; Burkhardt, Daniel; Song, Fan; Jiang, Pei; Liu, Jinpeng; Cai, Wanzhi

    2017-01-01

    Hemiptera, the largest non-holometabolous order of insects, represents approximately 7% of metazoan diversity. With extraordinary life histories and highly specialized morphological adaptations, hemipterans have exploited diverse habitats and food sources through approximately 300 Myr of evolution. To elucidate the phylogeny and evolutionary history of Hemiptera, we carried out the most comprehensive mitogenomics analysis on the richest taxon sampling to date covering all the suborders and infraorders, including 34 newly sequenced and 94 published mitogenomes. With optimized branch length and sequence heterogeneity, Bayesian analyses using a site-heterogeneous mixture model resolved the higher-level hemipteran phylogeny as (Sternorrhyncha, (Auchenorrhyncha, (Coleorrhyncha, Heteroptera))). Ancestral character state reconstruction and divergence time estimation suggest that the success of true bugs (Heteroptera) is probably due to angiosperm coevolution, but key adaptive innovations (e.g. prognathous mouthpart, predatory behaviour, and haemelytron) facilitated multiple independent shifts among diverse feeding habits and multiple independent colonizations of aquatic habitats. PMID:28878063

  4. Indian Board of Orthodontics case report: Orthodontic management of vertical excess using skeletal anchorage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit J Kalia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available B.B., a 21-year-old girl, presented with the chief complaint of forwardly placed upper front teeth and gummy smile. Diagnosis revealed prognathic maxilla and average mandible, Class II skeletal base with vertical growth pattern, end-on molars and Class II canine relationship bilaterally, convex profile, potentially incompetent lips, gummy smile, and protrusive lower lip. The patient′s treatment plan was extraction of all first bicuspids and retraction using temporary anchorage devices. Anchorage was reinforced using microimplants in the maxillary arch and second molar banding in the mandibular arch. The implants were placed high up in the vestibule to have more of an intrusive component and to reduce gummy smile at the end of the treatment.

  5. Fixed-functional appliance treatment combined with growth hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min-Ho

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to illustrate the effects of growth hormone (GH) therapy and fixed functional appliance treatment in a 13-year-old Class II malocclusion patient without GH deficiency. GH has been shown to effectively increase endochondral growth and induce a more prognathic skeletal pattern. Although a major concern in Class II retrognathic patients is chin deficiency, long-term studies have shown that the mandibular growth enhancement effects of functional appliances are clinically insignificant. This case report demonstrates that the mandible grew significantly during fixed functional appliance treatment combined with GH therapy, with stable results during 2 years 11 months of retention. More studies are needed to evaluate GH therapy as a supplement in Class II treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Syndromic odontogenic keratocyst: A case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Fazil

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) may occur in two different forms, either as solitary (nonsyndromic OKCs) or as multiple OKCs (syndromic OKCs). Multiple OKCs usually occur as one of the findings in Gorlin–Goltz syndrome with other features such as skin carcinomas and rib, eye, and neurologic abnormalities. We report a rare case of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with a slow growing swelling on lower right and left back teeth region since 2 months. Apart from these, other findings were frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, ocular hypertelorism, prominent supra orbital ridge, and mild mandibular prognathism. Excision was done and microscopic study revealed OKC and the follow-up could not be carried out for the complete management. We also presented a review of its pathogenesis, criterion, and differences between syndromic and nonsyndromic OKCs and suggest to thoroughly examine any patient who presents with multiple OKCs to rule out syndromic variety. PMID:27011939

  7. Orthodontic Camouflage: A Treatment Option – A Clinical Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, William Ubilla; Torres, Fátima Mazzini

    2017-01-01

    Orthodontic camouflage provides an alternative treatment for angle III malocclusion since patients with limited economic resources cannot opt for orthognathic surgery, it being clear that correction will be achieved at the dental level and not at the bone complex. Objective: To determine an alternative treatment for patients who do not have the possibility of having orthognathic surgery. Clinical case: A 13-year-old female patient, dolico facial biotype with slightly concave profile, with Class III Skeletal by mandibular prognathism, anterior crossbite, anterior diastema, and large mandibular body, molar class, and canine III. Alexander technique brackets were placed; premolar extraction was not planned. Once the case was completed, the correction of the anterior crossbite was achieved, thanks to the use of the spaces that existed at the beginning of the treatment and also that a correct distalization of canines and retraction of the lower anterior segment were performed. PMID:29326524

  8. Berardinelli–Seip syndrome type 2 – An Egyptian child

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    Rabah M. Shawky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a 2.5 year old male, first in order of birth of first cousin consanguineous parents with the typical features of Berardinelli–Seip congenital lipodystrophy 2 (BSCL2 since birth with moderate mental retardation. He had generalized lipodystrophy with various dermatologic and systemic manifestations. The patient looked older than his age with the loss of buccal pad of fat, hypertrichosis mainly on the back and lower limbs, thick scalp hair, mild prognathism, large hands and feet with prominent joints and muscular hypertrophy. Acanthosis nigricans was evident over the neck and both axillae inspite of the normal level of sugar and insulin. The abdomen was markedly prominent with mild hepatosplenomegaly and enlarged external genitals. Echo-cardiography demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy. Triglyceride level was high with reduced high density lipoproteins (HDL.

  9. Ontogeny of the maxilla in Neanderthals and their ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Bromage, Timothy G; O'Higgins, Paul; Arsuaga, Juan-Luis; Stringer, Chris; Godinho, Ricardo Miguel; Warshaw, Johanna; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Tellez, Ana; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-12-07

    Neanderthals had large and projecting (prognathic) faces similar to those of their putative ancestors from Sima de los Huesos (SH) and different from the retracted modern human face. When such differences arose during development and the morphogenetic modifications involved are unknown. We show that maxillary growth remodelling (bone formation and resorption) of the Devil's Tower (Gibraltar 2) and La Quina 18 Neanderthals and four SH hominins, all sub-adults, show extensive bone deposition, whereas in modern humans extensive osteoclastic bone resorption is found in the same regions. This morphogenetic difference is evident by ∼5 years of age. Modern human faces are distinct from those of the Neanderthal and SH fossils in part because their postnatal growth processes differ markedly. The growth remodelling identified in these fossil hominins is shared with Australopithecus and early Homo but not with modern humans suggesting that the modern human face is developmentally derived.

  10. Pyknodysostosis: report of a rare case with review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramaiah, Kiran Kumar Kotagudda; George, Giju Baby; Padiyath, Sheeba; Sethuraman, Rupak; Cherian, Babu

    2011-01-01

    Pyknodysostosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the post natal onset of short limbs, short stature, and generalized hyperostosis along with acro-osteolysis with sclerosis of the terminal phalanges, a feature that is considered essentially pathognomonic. Other features include persistence of fontanelles, delayed closure of sutures, wormian bones, absence of frontal sinuses, and obtuse mandibular gonial angle with relative mandibular prognathism. We report a case of 17-year-old girl who presented with a chief complaint of retention of deciduous teeth. General physical examination demonstrated short stature, frontal and parietal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, beaked nose, hypoplastic midface, wrinkled skin over the finger tips, and nail abnormalities. Radiographs showed multiple impacted permanent and supernumerary teeth, hypoplastic paranasal sinuses with acro-osteolysis of terminal phalanges, and open fontanelles, and sutures along with wormian bones in the lambdoidal region.

  11. Pyknodysostosis: report of a rare case with review of literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramaiah, Kiran Kumar Kotagudda; George, Giju Baby; Padiyath, Sheeba; Sethuraman, Rupak; Cherian, Babu [Mar Baselios Dental College, Kothamangalam (India)

    2011-12-15

    Pyknodysostosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the post natal onset of short limbs, short stature, and generalized hyperostosis along with acro-osteolysis with sclerosis of the terminal phalanges, a feature that is considered essentially pathognomonic. Other features include persistence of fontanelles, delayed closure of sutures, wormian bones, absence of frontal sinuses, and obtuse mandibular gonial angle with relative mandibular prognathism. We report a case of 17-year-old girl who presented with a chief complaint of retention of deciduous teeth. General physical examination demonstrated short stature, frontal and parietal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, beaked nose, hypoplastic midface, wrinkled skin over the finger tips, and nail abnormalities. Radiographs showed multiple impacted permanent and supernumerary teeth, hypoplastic paranasal sinuses with acro-osteolysis of terminal phalanges, and open fontanelles, and sutures along with wormian bones in the lambdoidal region.

  12. Cranial nerve injury after Le Fort I osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-W; Chin, B-R; Park, H-S; Lee, S-H; Kwon, T-G

    2011-03-01

    A Le Fort I osteotomy is widely used to correct dentofacial deformity because it is a safe and reliable surgical method. Although rare, various complications have been reported in relation to pterygomaxillary separation. Cranial nerve damage is one of the serious complications that can occur after Le Fort I osteotomy. In this report, a 19-year-old man with unilateral cleft lip and palate underwent surgery to correct maxillary hypoplasia, asymmetry and mandibular prognathism. After the Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy, the patient showed multiple cranial nerve damage; an impairment of outward movement of the eye (abducens nerve), decreased vision (optic nerve), and paraesthesia of the frontal and upper cheek area (ophthalmic and maxillary nerve). The damage to the cranial nerve was related to an unexpected sphenoid bone fracture and subsequent trauma in the cavernous sinus during the pterygomaxillary osteotomy. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Las manifestaciones orales de acromegalia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ku, Chih Hao; Alpizar Monge, Dafne

    2005-01-01

    Acromegaly has been a disease caused in most cases by a benign pituitary tumor secreting growth hormone. A series of physical and metabolic changes are produced, shorting the lifespan of the sufferer and also the risk of other diseases is increased. The prevalence of this disease has been of 40-90 cases per million of person. Usually, a very slow course has contributed to a high rate of misdiagnosis. Within its manifestations have arisen some of odontological origin and their prognathism, separation of teeth, macroglossia, and poor occlusion. The odontologist must consider the possibility of acromegaly when a patient has presented with some manifestations. The diagnosis is confirmed by elevated levels of growth hormones and growth factor similar to type 1 insulin. (author) [es

  14. Perception of facial profile attractiveness by a Saudi sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talic, Nabeel; Alshakhs, Mohammad S.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have reported different levels of perception of attractiveness among different ethnicities and among varying education-level groups on facial profile rating.To study the perception of facial profile attractiveness among Saudi dentists and lay-individuals. Digital facial profile images with altered degree of prognathism and retrognathism were presented to a sample of 60 Saudi dentists and 60 lay-persons with equal gender distribution. High reliability of repeated assessment of profile images was detected (ICC=0.982). Significant difference in perception of facial profile was found between genders (P<0.05) and among the groups with different education backgrounds (P<0.001). General agreement was established in both sample groups on average facial profile to be the most attractive and on the most retrognathic profile to be the least attractive. (author)

  15. Morphological and Histopathological Changes in Orofacial Structures of Experimentally Developed Acromegaly-Like Rats: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Iikubo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tongue enlargement and mandibular prognathism are clinically recognized in almost all patients with acromegaly. An acromegaly-like rat model recently developed by exogenous administration of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I was used to investigate morphological and histopathological changes in orofacial structures and to clarify whether these changes were reversible. Exogenous administration of IGF-I evoked specific enlargement of the tongue with identifiable histopathological changes (increased muscle bundle width, increased space between muscle bundles, and increased epithelial thickness, elongation of the mandibular alveolar bone and ascending ramus, and lateral expansion of the mandibular dental arch. Regarding histopathological changes in the mandibular condyle, the cartilaginous layer width, bone matrix ratio, and number of osteoblasts were all significantly greater in this rat model. After normalization of the circulating IGF-I level, tongue enlargement and histopathological changes in the tongue and mandibular condyle were reversible, whereas morphological skeletal changes in the mandible remained.

  16. Successful treatment of Class II malocclusion with bidental protrusion using standard edgewise prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ayaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report deals with the successful orthodontic treatment of a 14-year-old female patient having Class II malocclusion with bidental protrusion using standard edgewise prescription. She reported with forwardly placed upper front teeth and difficulty in closing lips. She had prognathic maxilla, retrognathic mandible, and full cusp Class II molar and canine relation bilaterally with overjet of 7 mm. She was in cervical vertebrae maturation indicator Stage IV. The case was treated by fixed extraction mechanotherapy. Interarch Class II mechanics was used to retract the upper incisor and to mesialize the lower molars. Simultaneously, Class I mechanics was used to upright lower incisors. Tip back bend, curve of Spee, and extra palatal root torque were incorporated in upper archwire to maintain molars in upright position and prevent extrusion and deepening of bite, respectively. There was satisfactory improvement in facial profile at the end of 24 months. After a follow-up of 6 months, occlusion was stable.

  17. Orthodontic Camouflage: A Treatment Option - A Clinical Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, William Ubilla; Torres, Fátima Mazzini

    2017-01-01

    Orthodontic camouflage provides an alternative treatment for angle III malocclusion since patients with limited economic resources cannot opt for orthognathic surgery, it being clear that correction will be achieved at the dental level and not at the bone complex. To determine an alternative treatment for patients who do not have the possibility of having orthognathic surgery. A 13-year-old female patient, dolico facial biotype with slightly concave profile, with Class III Skeletal by mandibular prognathism, anterior crossbite, anterior diastema, and large mandibular body, molar class, and canine III. Alexander technique brackets were placed; premolar extraction was not planned. Once the case was completed, the correction of the anterior crossbite was achieved, thanks to the use of the spaces that existed at the beginning of the treatment and also that a correct distalization of canines and retraction of the lower anterior segment were performed.

  18. Anesthetic management of a patient with Bartter′s syndrome undergoing bilateral sagittal split osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Nooh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartter′s syndrome is an unusual (estimated incidence is 1.2 per million people but important congenital form of secondary hyperaldosteronism; due to abnormalities in renal handling of electrolytes. It is associated with hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular cells, normal blood pressure, and hypokalemic alkalosis withoutedema.We present a 22-year-old woman with Bartter′s syndrome underwent bilateral sagittal split osteotomy to correct mandibular prognathic. The anesthetic management of Bartter′s syndrome should be relevant to the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Therefore, it should be directed toward maintaining cardiovascular stability, control of associated fluid, electrolyte and acid-base derangements, and the prevention of renal damage.

  19. Consequences of evolution: is rhinosinusitis, like otitis media, a unique disease of humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestone, Charles D; Pagano, Anthony S; Swarts, J Douglas; Laitman, Jeffrey T

    2012-12-01

    We hypothesize that if otitis media is most likely primarily a human disease due to consequences of evolution, rhinosinusitis may also be limited to humans for similar reasons. If otitis media, with its associated hearing loss, occurred in animals in the wild, they probably would have been culled out by predation. Similarly, if rhinosinusitis occurred regularly in animals, they likely would have suffered from severely decreased olfactory abilities, crucial for predator avoidance, and presumably would likewise have been selected against evolutionarily. Thus, both otitis media and rhinosinusitis-common conditions particularly in infants and young children-appear to be essentially human conditions. Their manifestation in our species is likely due to our unique evolutionary trajectory and may be a consequence of adaptations, including adaptations to bipedalism and speech, loss of prognathism, and immunologic and environmental factors.

  20. A Pediatric Case of Cowden Syndrome with Graves’ Disease

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    Cláudia Patraquim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden syndrome (CS is a rare dominantly inherited multisystem disorder, characterized by an extraordinary malignant potential. In 80% of cases, the human tumor suppressor gene phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN is mutated. We present a case of a 17-year-old boy with genetically confirmed CS and Graves’ disease (GD. At the age of 15, he presented with intention tremor, palpitations, and marked anxiety. On examination, he had macrocephaly, coarse facies, slight prognathism, facial trichilemmomas, abdominal keratoses, leg hemangioma, and a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland. He started antithyroid drug (ATD therapy with methimazole and, after a 2-year treatment period without achieving a remission status, a total thyroidectomy was performed. Diagnosis and management of CS should be multidisciplinary. Thyroid disease is frequent, but its management has yet to be fully defined. The authors present a case report of a pediatric patient with CS and GD and discuss treatment options.

  1. Simplified Model Surgery Technique for Segmental Maxillary Surgeries

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    Namit Nagar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Model surgery is the dental cast version of cephalometric prediction of surgical results. Patients having vertical maxillary excess with prognathism invariably require Lefort I osteotomy with maxillary segmentation and maxillary first premolar extractions during surgery. Traditionally, model surgeries in these cases have been done by sawing the model through the first premolar interproximal area and removing that segment. This clinical innovation employed the use of X-ray film strips as separators in maxillary first premolar interproximal area. The method advocated is a time-saving procedure where no special clinical or laboratory tools, such as plaster saw (with accompanying plaster dust, were required and reusable separators were made from old and discarded X-ray films.

  2. Concurrent peste des petits ruminants virus and pestivirus infection in stillborn twin lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kul, O; Kabakci, N; Ozkul, A; Kalender, H; Atmaca, H T

    2008-03-01

    Concurrent infection with peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) and pestivirus was diagnosed in stillborn twin lambs. With the flock history, the findings of epidermal syncytial cells and necrotizing bronchitis/bronchiolitis prompted testing for PPRV infection, and PPRV antigen was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the skin, lungs, kidneys, rumen, and thymus. Macroscopic anomalies that were typical of border disease included scoliosis, brachygnathism, prognathism, arthrogryposis, hydranencephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia, and hairy fleece; pestiviral antigen was detected by IHC in the brain, liver, lungs, and kidneys. Tissues from both lambs were positive by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for PPRV and pestivirus. To the authors' knowledge, PPR has not been reported previously as a congenital infection or in combination with pestiviral infection.

  3. Cranial suture biology of the Aleutian Island inhabitants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, James; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2011-04-01

    Research on cranial suture biology suggests there is biological and taxonomic information to be garnered from the heritable pattern of suture synostosis. Suture synostosis along with brain growth patterns, diet, and biomechanical forces influence phenotypic variability in cranial vault morphology. This study was designed to determine the pattern of ectocranial suture synostosis in skeletal populations from the Aleutian Islands. We address the hypothesis that ectocranial suture synostosis pattern will differ according to cranial vault shape. Ales Hrdlicka identified two phenotypes in remains excavated from the Aleutian Island. The Paleo-Aleutians, exhibiting a dolichocranic phenotype with little prognathism linked to artifacts distinguished from later inhabitants, Aleutians, who exhibited a brachycranic phenotype with a greater amount of prognathism. A total of 212 crania representing Paleo-Aleuts and Aleutian as defined by Hrdlicka were investigated for suture synostosis pattern following standard methodologies. Comparisons were performed using Guttmann analyses. Results revealed similar suture fusion patterns for the Paleo-Aleut and Aleutian, a strong anterior to posterior pattern of suture fusion for the lateral-anterior suture sites, and a pattern of early termination at the sagittal suture sites for the vault. These patterns were found to differ from that reported in the literature. Because these two populations with distinct cranial shapes exhibit similar patterns of suture synostosis it appears pattern is independent of cranial shape in these populations of Homo sapiens. These findings suggest that suture fusion patterns may be population dependent and that a standardized methodology, using suture fusion to determine age-at-death, may not be applicable to all populations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Validity of a manual soft tissue profile prediction method following mandibular setback osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokitha, Olga-Elpis

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the validity of a manual cephalometric method used for predicting the post-operative soft tissue profiles of patients who underwent mandibular setback surgery and compare it to a computerized cephalometric prediction method (Dentofacial Planner). Lateral cephalograms of 18 adults with mandibular prognathism taken at the end of pre-surgical orthodontics and approximately one year after surgery were used. To test the validity of the manual method the prediction tracings were compared to the actual post-operative tracings. The Dentofacial Planner software was used to develop the computerized post-surgical prediction tracings. Both manual and computerized prediction printouts were analyzed by using the cephalometric system PORDIOS. Statistical analysis was performed by means of t-test. Comparison between manual prediction tracings and the actual post-operative profile showed that the manual method results in more convex soft tissue profiles; the upper lip was found in a more prominent position, upper lip thickness was increased and, the mandible and lower lip were found in a less posterior position than that of the actual profiles. Comparison between computerized and manual prediction methods showed that in the manual method upper lip thickness was increased, the upper lip was found in a more anterior position and the lower anterior facial height was increased as compared to the computerized prediction method. Cephalometric simulation of post-operative soft tissue profile following orthodontic-surgical management of mandibular prognathism imposes certain limitations related to the methods implied. However, both manual and computerized prediction methods remain a useful tool for patient communication.

  5. Radiographic cephalometry analysis of head posture and craniofacial morphology in oral breathing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukićević Vladanka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nasal breathing plays an important role in overall physical growth and mental development, as well as in the growth of the craniofacial complex. Oral breathing over a long period of time, can cause changes in position of the head relative to the cervical spine and jaw relationship. It can cause an open bite and the narrowness of the maxillary arch due to increased pressure of strained face. The aim of this study was to analyze the position of the head and craniofacial morphology in oral breathing children, and compare the values obtained compared with those of the same parameters in nasal brething children. Methods. We analyzed the profile cephalometric radiographs of 60 patients who had various orthodontic problems. In the first group there were 30 patients aged 8–14 years, in which oral breathing is confirmed by clinical examination. In the second group there were 30 patients of the same age who had orthodontic problems, but did not show clinical signs of oral breathing. The analyses covered the following: craniocervical angle (NS/OPT, the length of the anterior cranial base (NS, anterior facial height (N-Me, posterior facial height (S-Go, the angle of maxillary prognathism (SNA, angle of mandibular prognathism (SNB, difference between angles SNA and SNB (ANB angle, the angle of the basal planes of the jaws (SpP/MP, cranial base angle (NSB, and the angle of facial convexity (NA/Apg. Results. The average value of the craniocervical angle (NS/OPT was significantly higher in OB children (p = 0.004. There were significantly different values of SNA (p < 0.001, ANB (p < 0.001, NA/APg (p < 0.001 and length of the anterior cranial base (NS (p = 0.024 between groups. Conclusion. Oral breathing children have pronounced retroflexion of the head in relation to the cervical spine compared to nasal breathing children, and the most prominent characteristics of the craniofacial morphology of skeletal jaw relationship of class II and

  6. Two-year follow-up of changes in bite force and occlusal contact area after intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy with and without Le Fort I osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y J; Lim, H; Chung, C J; Park, K H; Kim, K H

    2014-06-01

    This study was performed to examine the longitudinal changes in bite force and occlusal contact area after mandibular setback surgery via intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO). Patients with mandibular prognathism who underwent IVRO (surgical group: 39 men and 39 women) were compared with subjects with class I skeletal and dental relationships (control group; 32 men and 35 women). The surgical group was divided into two subgroups: 1-jaw surgery (n = 30) and 2-jaw surgery (n = 48). Bite force and contact area were measured in maximum intercuspation with the Dental Prescale System before treatment, within 1 month before surgery, and at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 months postsurgery. A linear mixed model was used to investigate the time-dependent changes and associated factors. Bite force and contact area decreased during presurgical orthodontic treatment, were minimal at 1 month postsurgery, and increased gradually thereafter. The 1-jaw and 2-jaw subgroups showed no significant differences in bite force. The time-dependent changes in bite force were significantly different according to the contact area (P contact area gradually increase throughout the postsurgical evaluation period. Increasing the occlusal contact area may be essential for improving bite force after surgery. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of recovery in lip closing pressure and occlusal force and contact area after orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Koichiro; Moroi, Akinori; Sotobori, Megumi; Ishihara, Yuri; Marukawa, Kohei; Iguchi, Ran; Kosaka, Akihiko; Ikawa, Hiroumi; Nakazawa, Ryuichi; Higuchi, Masatoshi

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between lip closing force, occlusal contact area and occlusal force after orthognathic surgery in skeletal Class III patients. The subjects consisted of 54 patients (28 female and 26 male) diagnosed with mandibular prognathism who underwent sagittal split ramus osteotomy with and without Le Fort I osteotomy. Maximum and minimum lip closing forces, occlusal contact area and occlusal force were measured pre-operatively, 6 months and 1 year post-operative. Maximum and minimum lip closing forces, occlusal contact area and occlusal force increased with time after surgery, however a significant increase was not found in the occlusal contact area in women. In increased ratio (6 months/pre-operative and 1 year/pre-operative), the maximum lip closing force was significantly correlated with the occlusal contact area (P contact area and lip closing force, and an increase ratio in maximum lip closing force was associated with an increased ratio in occlusal contact area. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Incomplete mobilization of the maxilla resulting in failed maxillary distraction: a case report.

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    Alkan, Alper; Inal, Samet; Baş, Burcu; Ozer, Mete

    2007-12-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis has become an accepted alternative method in the treatment of patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia in craniofacial syndromes and cleft-related deformities. Insufficient distraction, undesirable soft tissue changes, and occurrence of defective distraction vectors are among the potential complications of intraoral maxillary distraction osteogenesis. A 2-stage procedure combining maxillary advancement by distraction technique with genioplasty and mandibular setback surgery was planned to correct jaw deformities in a 22-year-old patient with severe maxillary retrusion, mandibular prognathism, and excessive lower facial height. In the first stage, osteotomies were performed and maxilla was lightly mobilized after down-fracture. Distractors were placed to the maxilla intraorally. During activation period, the maxilla rotated in a clockwise direction, producing a discrepancy between the planned and the actual vectors. Complete distraction was unsatisfactory and the complication was due to surgical technique. This case report presents the failure of maxillary distraction due to incomplete mobilization of the maxilla. Treatment of the case was achieved by the conventional osteotomy techniques at final operation. The maxilla was successfully advanced to the desired position producing good occlusion and an improved facial profile.

  9. Distraction osteogenesis and orthognathic surgery for a patient with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Il Hong; Lee, Sang Min; Yang, Byoung Eun; Park, In Young

    2015-03-01

    Maxillary deficiency is a common feature in patients with repaired cleft lip and palate. Orthognathic surgery has been the conventional approach for the management of cleft-related maxillary hypoplasia. However, for patients with a severe maxillary deficiency, orthognathic surgery alone has many disadvantages, such as high relapse rates of 25% to 40%, instability, limited amount of advancement, and a highly invasive surgical technique. As an alternative treatment method, distraction osteogenesis has been used successfully in the distraction of the mandible, the maxilla, the entire midface, and the orbits as well as the cranial bones, with stable outcomes. The type of distraction device, either external or internal, can be chosen based on the surgical goals set for the patient. In this study, we report on the use of a rigid external distraction device for maxillary advancement in a 22-year-old woman with a repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate and severe maxillary hypoplasia. After the distraction osteogenesis, 2-jaw surgery was performed to correct the maxillary yaw deviation and the mandibular prognathism. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Eggs for breakfast? Analysis of a probable mosasaur biting trace on the Cretaceous echinoid Echinocorys ovata Leske, 1778

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    C. Neumann

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Fossil biting traces (praedichnia represent indirect evidence of predation and shed light on fossil predator–prey interactions and fossil food webs. Especially from echinoderm skeletons, biting traces are well known. Here, we describe the oral surface of a large Cretaceous (Maastrichtian holasteroid echinoid Echinocorys ovata Leske, 1778 from Hemmoor (northern Germany which exhibits four circular punctures arranged in a semi-circular arc. Whereas three of the punctures penetrated the skeleton, one puncture only just hit the margin of the echinoid test at the ambitus, leaving a long incision furrow in the skeleton. The punctures were not lethal to the sea urchin as is indicated by progressed skeletal regeneration and closure of the fractures. The overall appearance of the punctures suggests that they were produced during a single mechanical event, most likely by the biting action of the teeth of a large vertebrate animal. We analysed the shape and arrangement of the biting trace and conclude that it was probably produced by a marine reptile possessing a prognath tooth position, most likely by a globidensine mosasauroid. Our finding not only sheds light on mosasaur feeding behaviour and prey selection but also increases the knowledge of the food webs in the chalk sea ecosystem during the uppermost Cretaceous.

  11. Reliability of computerized cephalometric outcome predictions of mandibular set-back surgery

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    Stefanović Neda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A successful treatment outcome in dentofacial deformity patients commonly requires combined orthodontic-surgical therapy. This enables us to overcome functional, aesthetic and psychological problems. Since most patients state aesthetics as the primary motive for seeking therapy, cephalometric predictions of treatment outcome have become the essential part of treatment planning, especially in combined orthodontic-surgical cases. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of computerized orthognathic surgery outcome predictions generated using the Nemotec Dental Studio NX 2005 software. Methods. The sample of the study consisted of 31 patients diagnosed with mandibular prognathism who were surgically treated at the Hospital for Maxillofacial Surgery in Belgrade. Investigation was done on lateral cephalograms made before and after surgical treatment. Cephalograms were digitized and analyzed using computer software. According to measurements made on superimposed pre- and postsurgical cephalograms, the patients were retreated within the software and the predictions were assessed by measuring seven angular and three linear parameters. Prediction measurements were then compared with the actual outcome. Results. Results showed statistically significant changes between posttreatment and predicted values for parameters referring to lower lip and mentolabial sulcus position. Conclusion. Computerized cephalometric predictions for hard-tissue structures in the sagittal and vertical planes, as well as the VTO parameters, generated using the Nemotec Dental Studio NX 2005 software are reliable, while lower lip and mentolabial sulcus position predictions are not reliable enough.

  12. "Converting a bi-jaw surgery to a single-jaw surgery:" Posterior maxillary dentoalveolar intrusion with microimplants to avoid the need of a maxillary surgery in the surgical management of skeletal Class III vertical malocclusion

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    Abhisek Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of a vertical skeletal Class III malocclusion with mandibular prognathism revolves around the protocol of bi-jaw surgery (maxillary LeFort I impaction and mandibular bilateral sagittal split osteotomy with setback. The maxillary surgery not only provides increased stability to the ultimate surgical outcome but also increases the amount by which the mandibular set back can be done, therefore aiding in greater profile improvement. With the need of maxillary surgery almost inevitable in treating such situations, the complexity and the increased discomfort associated with such surgery can never be ignored. Is it at all possible to convert a bi-jaw surgery into a single-jaw surgery with the aid of microimplants? With increasing number of patients being treated with microimplants for anterior openbite and gummy smiles, our idea was to incorporate this novel protocol in treating Class III vertical situations and therefore avoid the need of a maxillary surgery in treating such a situation, together with achieving optimum treatment outcome.

  13. Endoscope-assisted conservative condylectomy combined with orthognathic surgery in the treatment of mandibular condylar osteochondroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbo; Jiao, Feifei; Li, Biao; Zhang, Lei; Shen, Steve Guofang; Wang, Xudong

    2014-07-01

    Mandibular condylar osteochondroma (OC) results in asymmetric prognathism with facial morphologic and functional disturbance. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of endoscope-assisted conservative condylectomy combined with simultaneous orthognathic surgery in the treatment of condylar OC. Thirteen patients with OC of the mandibular condyle were enrolled in this study. With the aid of endoscope, condylar OC resection and conservative condylectomy were carried out via intraoral approach. A direct vision of the magnified and illuminated operative field was realized. Simultaneous orthognathic surgery was used to correct facial asymmetry and malocclusion. All patients healed uneventfully. No facial nerve injury and salivary fistula occurred. Facial symmetry and morphology were greatly improved, and stable occlusion was obtained in all cases. The patients showed no signs of recurrence and temporomandibular joint ankylosis in the 16 to 54 months of follow-up. Endoscope-assisted tumor resection and condylectomy combined with simultaneous orthognathic surgery provide us a valuable option in the treatment of mandibular condylar OC.

  14. New bimaxillary orthognathic surgery planning and model surgery based on the concept of six degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jaeho; Kim, Yongdeok; Kim, Jongryoul; Kang, Heejea; Ji, Hyunjin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to propose a new method of bimaxillary orthognathic surgery planning and model surgery based on the concept of 6 degrees of freedom (DOF). A 22-year-old man with Class III malocclusion was referred to our clinic with complaints of facial deformity and chewing difficulty. To correct a prognathic mandible, facial asymmetry, flat occlusal plane angle, labioversion of the maxillary central incisors, and concavity of the facial profile, bimaxillary orthognathic surgery was planned. After preoperative orthodontic treatment, surgical planning based on the concept of 6 DOF was performed on a surgical treatment objective drawing, and a Jeon's model surgery chart (JMSC) was prepared. Model surgery was performed with Jeon's orthognathic surgery simulator (JOSS) using the JMSC, and an interim wafer was fabricated. Le Fort I osteotomy, bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy, and malar augmentation were performed. The patient received lateral cephalometric and posteroanterior cephalometric analysis in postretention for 1 year. The follow-up results were determined to be satisfactory, and skeletal relapse did not occur after 1.5 years of surgery. When maxillary and mandibular models are considered as rigid bodies, and their state of motion is described in a quantitative manner based on 6 DOF, sharing of exact information on locational movement in 3-dimensional space is possible. The use of JMSC and JOSS will actualize accurate communication and performance of model surgery among clinicians based on objective measurements. PMID:23503161

  15. Cephalometric aspects of thalassemic children in the Indian subcontinent: A cross-sectional study

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    Amit Anand Samba

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the cephalometric characteristics of thalassemic children in the Indian subcontinent with the controls, matched for sex and dental age. Methodology: A total of 31 thalassemic children were a part of the study. Cephalometric readings were recorded for the study and the control group. Results: Within the Group I stage, the anterior cranial base length was 68.40±2.93 mm, shorter when compared to the control group. In the Group II stage, the maxillary/mandibular angle was 31.58° for the case group and the mandibular length was shorter in comparison to the controls. In the Group III stage, the SNB angle was 76.42°, lesser than the control group. A relative maxillary prognathism of 9.88 mm and 12.85 mm was observed in thalassemic males and females respectively through the Wiley's analysis. Conclusion: The overall picture depicted a retruded position of the maxilla and a retrognathic mandible within the study group. A class II profile has also been observed among the study subjects.

  16. Computed tomographic cephalometric analysis of chinese patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peh, W.C.G.; Chu, F.S.K.; Ip, M.S.M.; Chung, K.-F.

    2000-01-01

    Variations of craniofacial and upper airway structures are recognized to contribute to the phenomenon of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Most previous cephalometric studies were performed using erect lateral radiographs in Caucasian patients. The present project aims to determine cephalometric measurements, utilizing CT, in normal Chinese subjects and in Chinese patients with OSA. Computed tomography of 25 patients with OSA (proven using overnight polysomnography), and of 25 age-, sex-, height-, bodyweight- and body mass index (BMI)-matched control subjects were prospectively performed. Thirteen standard bony and soft-tissue measurements were obtained from the CT lateral scout view of the head and neck, taken with each subject in the neutral supine position. The cross-sectional area was calculated at two axial levels (velopharynx and hypopharynx). The measurements in the two groups, OSA and control subjects, were compared. The measurements for hyoid position (P=0.00), nasal cavity length (P=0.01), mandibular prognathism (P = 0.05), tongue size (P = 0.02), oropharyngeal airway space (P = 0.02), posterior tongue airway space (P = 0.04) and cross-sectional areas at the level of the velopharynx (P = 0.00) and hypopharynx (P = 0.01) differed significantly between the two groups. In conclusion, CT cephalometric measurements show that certain anatomical variations in the head and neck are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of OSA in Chinese patients. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  17. Mosaic trisomy 8 detected by fibroblasts cultured of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Ana M; Mora, Lina; Suarez-Obando, Fernando; Moreno, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Mosaic trisomy 8 or "Warkany's Syndrome" is a chromosomopathy with an estimated prevalance of 1:25,000 to 1:50,000, whose clinical presentation has a wide phenotypic variability. Case Description: Patient aged 14 years old with antecedents of global retardation of development, moderate cognitive deficit and hypothyroidism of possible congenital origin. Clinical Findings: Physical examination revealed palpebral ptosis, small corneas and corectopia, hypoplasia of the upper maxilla and prognathism, dental crowding, high-arched palate, anomalies of the extremities such as digitalization of the thumbs, clinodactyly and bilateral shortening of the fifth finger, shortening of the right femur, columnar deviation and linear brown blotches that followed Blaschko's lines. Cerebral nuclear magnetic resonance revealed type 1 Chiari's malformation and ventriculomegaly. Although the karyotype was normal in peripheral blood (46,XY), based on the finding of cutaneous mosaicism the lesions were biopsied and cytogenetic analysis demonstrated mosaic trisomy 8: mos 47,XY,+8[7]/46,XY[93]. Clinical Relevance: Trisomy 8 is clinically presented as a mosaic, universal cases being unfailingly lethal. In this particular case, cutaneous lesions identified the mosaic in tissue, although the karyotype was normal in peripheral blood. The cutaneous mosaicism represented by brown linear blotches which follow Blaschko's lines is a clinical finding that has not previously been described in Warkany's syndrome. PMID:27546932

  18. Assessment of pterygomaxillary separation in Le Fort I Osteotomy in class III patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Koichiro; Hashiba, Yukari; Marukawa, Kohei; Okabe, Katsuhiko; Alam, Shamiul; Nakagawa, Kiyomasa; Yamamoto, Etsuhide

    2009-04-01

    To examine the separation of the pterygomaxillary region at the posterior nasal spine level after Le Fort I osteotomy in Class III patients. The study group consisted of 37 Japanese patients with mandibular prognathism and asymmetry, with maxillary retrognathism or asymmetry. A total of 74 sides were examined. Le Fort I osteotomy was performed without a pterygoid osteotome, with an ultrasonic curette used to remove interference at the pterygomaxillary region. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) was analyzed for all patients. The separation of the pterygomaxillary region and the location of the descending palatine artery were assessed. Although acceptable separation between the maxilla and pterygoid plates was achieved in all patients, an exact separation of the pterygomaxillary junction at the posterior nasal spine level was found in only 18 of 74 sides (24%). In 29 of 74 sides (39.2%), the separation occurred anterior to the descending palatine artery. In 29 of 74 sides (39.2%), complete separation between the maxilla and lateral and/or medial pterygoid plate was not achieved, but lower level separation of the maxilla and pterygoid plate was always complete. The maxillary segments could be moved to the postoperative ideal position in all cases. Le Fort I osteotomy without an osteotome does not always induce an exact separation at the pterygomaxillary junction at the posterior nasal spine level, but the ultrasonic bone curette can remove the interference between maxillary segment and pterygoid plates more safely.

  19. Determining the anatomy of the descending palatine artery and pterygoid plates with computed tomography in Class III patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Koichiro; Hashiba, Yukari; Marukawa, Kohei; Nakagawa, Kiyomasa; Okabe, Katsuhiko; Yamamoto, Etsuhide

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the pterygomaxillary junction region helps prevent blood loss in Le Fort I osteotomy. Here, we determined the location of the descending palatine artery and the structure of the pterygomaxillary region. The study group consisted of 82 Japanese patients with mandibular prognathism and asymmetry, with and without maxillary retrognathism or asymmetry. A total of 164 sides were measured and divided into right versus left, men versus women, and bimaxillary osteotomy (B) versus mandibular osteotomy (S). Lateral and frontal cephalograms and computed tomography (CT) were analysed for all patients. The relationship between the cephalometric measurements and the measurements of the descending palatine artery and pterygoid plate (PP) were assessed. There were no significant correlations between measurements of cephalograms and those of the descending palatine artery and PPs. There were significant differences between right and left in lateral plate length (p=0.0014) and thickness of PP (p=0.0047). There were significant differences between men and women in right width of PP (p=0.0034), right thickness of PP (p=0.0063), left posterior length (p=0.0196), and left thickness of PP (p=0.0279). The B group had a shorter anterior length than the S group (right: ppalatine artery and the morphology of the PPs were not significantly associated with any cephalometric measurements. CT examination is necessary to recognize the anatomy of pterygomaxillary region and the exact positions of descending palatine artery before Le Fort I osteotomy.

  20. Modified protrusion arch for anterior crossbite correction - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Abhishek Singha; Singh, Gulshan Kr; Tandon, Pradeep; Chaudhary, Ramsukh

    2013-01-01

    Borderline and mild skeletal Class III relationships in adult patients are usually treated by orthodontic camouflage. Reasonably rood results have been achieved with nonsurgical teatment of anterior crossbite. Class III malocclusion may be associated with mandibular prognathism, maxillary retrognathism, or both. Class III maxillary retrognathism generally involves anterior crossbite, which must be opened if upper labial brackets are to be bonded. If multiple teeth are in crossbite, after opening the bite usual step is to ligate forward or advancement arch made of 0.018" or 0.020" stainless steel or NiTi wire main arch that must be kept separated 2 mm from the slot ofupper incisor braces. Two stops or omegas are made 1 mm mesial to the tubes of the molar bands that will impede main arch from slipping,and in this manner the arch will push the anterior teeth forward Here we have fabricated a modified multiple loop protrusion arch to correct an anterior crossbite with severe crowding that was not amenable to correct by advancement arches.

  1. Inheritance of craniofacial features in Colombian families with class III malocclusion

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    L Otero

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available L Otero, L Quintero, D Champsaur, E SimancaPontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, ColombiaIntroduction: The inheritance of class III malocclusion has been well documented, but the inheritance of craniofacial structures in Colombian families with this malocclusion has been not yet reported.Patients and methods: The study sample of 25 families comprised 186 untreated orthodontic individuals from 8 to 60 years old. Pedigrees were drawn using Cyrillic software. Complete family histories for each proband were ascertained and the affection status of relatives was confirmed by lateral cephalograms and facial and dental photographs. Analysis of variance and odds ratio test for each parameter was performed to estimate inheritance from parents to offspring and to determine similar phenotypic features in relatives.Results: The analysis of the pedigrees suggests autosomal dominant inheritance. The craniofacial characteristics that showed more resemblance between parents and offspring were middle facial height, shorter anterior cranial base and mandibular prognathism. In contrast the protrusion of upper lip and maxillary retrusion were the phenotypic features that contributed to class III in the majority of families.Conclusion: Knowledge of the inheritance of craniofacial phenotypes in class III malocclusion will enable the design of new therapies to treat this malocclusion.Keywords: inheritance, craniofacial, phenotype, class III malocclusion

  2. [Sotos syndrome associated with focal dystonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, M; Chacón, J; Bautista, E; Pérez-Camacho, I; Trujillo, A; Grande, M A

    Sotos syndrome is a form of infantile gigantism characterized by excessive body size from the time of birth, particular facies, acromegalic changes and signs of non-progressive cerebral involvement. The etiology is unknown. Diagnosis is based on somatometric data and the particular phenotype traits. Biochemical and endocrine studies are normal. Torticollis is a focal dystonia and therefore more common in adults. A 20 year old woman with macrosomic features since birth presented with: weight 104 kg, height 182 cm; prognathism, hypertelorism, a broad over hanging forehead with a high hair line; large ears, hands and feet; torticollis towards the right with elevation and anteroversion of the right shoulder which caused symptomatic scoliosis. She was bradypsychic and rather slow in speech. The complementary tests done (cerebral and cervical CT and MR, bone gammography, evoked potentials, EMG-ENG, sural nerve biopsy, biopsy of skin and muscle, EEG and hormone and biochemistry studies) were normal. The torticollis was treated with botulinus toxin and improved considerably, as did the scoliosis. To date, dystonia has not been described in association with Sotos syndrome. This may be a causal association, or even perhaps hereditary, since the patient's mother had dystonia (in the form of blepharospasm).

  3. The life history of Ardipithecus ramidus: a heterochronic model of sexual and social maturation

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    Clark Gary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the ontogeny of craniofacial growth in Ardipithecus ramidus in the context of its possible social and environmental determinants. We sought to test the hypothesis that this form of early hominin evolved a specific adult craniofacial morphology via heterochronic dissociation of growth trajectories. We suggest the lack of sexual dimorphism in craniofacial morphology provides evidence for a suite of adult behavioral adaptations, and consequently an ontogeny, unlike any other species of extant ape. The lack of sexually dimorphic craniofacial morphology suggests A. ramidus males adopted reproductive strategies that did not require male on male conflict. Male investment in the maternal metabolic budget and/or paternal investment in offspring may have been reproductive strategies adopted by males. Such strategies would account for the absence of innate morphological armoury in males. Consequently, A. ramidus would have most likely had sub-adult periods of socialisation unlike that of any extant ape. We also argue that A.ramidus and chimpanzee craniofacial morphology are apomorphic, each representing a derived condition relative to that of the common ancestor, with A. ramidus developing its orthognatic condition via paedomoporhosis, and chimpanzees evolving increased prognathism via peramorphosis. In contrast we suggest cranial volume and life history trajectories may be synapomorphic traits that both species inherited and retained form a putative common ancestral condition. Our analysis also provides support for the hypothesis that an intensification of maternal care was central to the process of hominization.

  4. The Sima de los Huesos crania (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain). A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsuaga, J L; Martínez, I; Gracia, A; Lorenzo, C

    1997-01-01

    The Sima de los Huesos (Sierra de Atapuerca) cranial remains found up to and including the 1995 field season are described and compared with other fossils in order to assess their evolutionary relationships. The phenetic affinities of the Sima de los Huesos crania and a large sample of Homo fossils are investigated through principal component analyses. Metrical comparisons of the Sima de los Huesos and other European and African Middle Pleistocene fossils with Neandertals are performed using Z-scores relative to the Neandertal sample statistics. The most relevant cranial traits are metrically and morphologically analyzed and cladistically evaluated. The Sima de los Huesos crania exhibit a number of primitive traits lost in Upper Pleistocene Neandertals (especially in the braincase, but also in the facial skeleton), as well as other traits that are transitional to the Neandertal morphology (particularly in the occipital bone), and features close to what is found in Neandertals (as the supraorbital morphology and midfacial prognathism). Different combinations of primitive and derived traits (shared with Neandertals) are also displayed by the other European Middle Pleistocene fossils. In conclusion, the Sima de los Huesos sample is evolutionarily related to Neandertals as well as to the other European Middle Pleistocene fossils. In our opinion, all the European Middle Pleistocene fossils belong to the Neandertal lineage, and none can be included in an Afroeuropean common ancestor of Neandertals and modern humans.

  5. Thin-plate spline analysis of craniofacial morphology in subjects with adenoid or tonsillar hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Michela; Ballanti, Fabiana; Polimeni, Antonella; Franchi, Lorenzo; Cozza, Paola

    2011-04-01

    To compare the skeletal features of subjects with adenoid hypertrophy with those of children with tonsillar hypertrophy using thin-plate spline (TPS) analysis. A group of 20 subjects (9 girls and 11 boys; mean age 8.4 ± 0.9 years) with adenoid hypertrophy (AG) was compared with a group of 20 subjects (10 girls and 10 boys; mean age 8.2 ± 1.1 years) with tonsillar hypertrophy (TG). Craniofacial morphology was analyzed on the lateral cephalograms of the subjects in both groups by means of TPS analysis. A cross-sectional comparison was performed on both size and shape differences between the two groups. AG exhibited statistically significant shape and size differences in craniofacial configuration with respect to TG. Subjects with adenoid hypertrophy showed an upward dislocation of the anterior region of the maxilla, a more downward/backward position of the anterior region of the mandibular body and an upward/backward displacement of the condylar region. Conversely, subjects with tonsillar hypertrophy showed a downward dislocation of the anterior region of the maxilla, a more upward/forward position of the anterior region of the mandibular body and a downward/forward displacement of the condylar region. Subjects with adenoid hypertrophy exhibited features suggesting a more retrognathic mandible while subjects with tonsillar hypertrophy showed features suggesting a more prognathic mandible. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Morphometric Analysis of the Mandible in Subjects with Class III Malocclusion

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    Jin-Yun Pan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the deformations that contribute to Class III mandibular configuration, employing geometric morphometric analysis. Lateral cephalograms of male and female groups of 100 young adults and 70 children with Class III malocclusion were compared to those of counterparts with normal occlusion. The sample included an equal number of both genders. The cephalographs were traced, and 12 homologous landmarks were identified and digitized. Average mandibular geometries were generated by means of Procrustes analysis. Thin-plate spline analysis was then applied to mandibular configurations to determine local form differences in male and female groups of adults and children with normal occlusion and Class III malocclusion. The mandibular morphology was significantly different between these two groups of male and female adults, and children (p < 0.0001. This spline analysis revealed an anteroposterior elongation of the mandible along the condylion-gnathion axis, showing an extension in the regions of the mandibular condyle and ramus, and of the anteroinferior portion of the mandibular symphysis in Class III groups. More extension was evident in Class III adults. The deformations in subjects with Class III malocclusion may represent a developmental elongation of the mandible anteroposteriorly, which leads to the appearance of a prognathic mandibular profile.

  7. Morphometric studies on the facial skeleton of humans and pongids based on CT-scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, K U; Koppe, T; Fanghänel, J; Schumacher, G H; Nagai, H

    1994-10-01

    The changes of the skull, which we can observe during the anthropogenesis, are reflected especially in the different skull proportions. We carried out metric measurements at the median level on 10 adult skulls each of humans, chimpanzees and gorillas as well as 11 skulls of orangutans. All skulls were scanned with a CT at the median level. We measured the lines and angles of the scans and the means and the standard deviations were calculated. We carried out a correlation analysis to observe the relation of their characteristics. We showed that there is a relation between the length of the skull base and the facial length in all species. From the results of the correlation analysis, we can also conclude that a relation exists between the degree of prognathism and the different length measurements of the facial skeleton. We also found a bending of the facial skeleton in relation to the cranial base towards the ventral side, also known as klinorhynchy, in all observed species. The highest degree of klinorhynchy was found in humans and the lowest in orangutans. We will discuss the different definition of the term klinorhynchy and its importance in the evolution of the hominoids.

  8. Orthodontic and surgical management of a patient with severe skeletal Class II deformity and facial asymmetry: A case report with a 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Tao; Song, Jinlin

    2017-04-01

    In this case report, we present the orthodontic and surgical management of an 18-year-old girl who had a severe craniofacial deformity, including maxillary prognathism, vertical maxillary excess (gummy smile), mandibular retrognathism, receding chin, and facial asymmetry caused by unilateral temporomandibular joint ankylosis. For correction of the facial asymmetry, the patient's right mandibular ramus and body were lengthened via distraction osteogenesis after 5 months of preoperative orthodontic therapy. Subsequently, extraction of 4 first premolars, bimaxillary anterior segmental osteotomy, and genioplasty were simultaneously performed in the second-stage operation to correct the skeletal deformities in the sagittal and vertical planes. Postoperative orthodontic treatment completed the final occlusal adjustment. The total active treatment period lasted approximately 30 months. The clinical results show that the patient's facial esthetics were significantly improved with minimal surgical invasion and distress, and a desirable occlusion was achieved. These pleasing results were maintained during the 5-year follow-up. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Possibility of estimating three-dimensional mandibular morphology by cephalogram analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.; Motegi, Etsuko; Kikuchi, Yu; Yamaguchi, Hideharu; Takaki, Takashi; Shibahara, Takahiko

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of a surmise of three-dimensional mandibular morphology by two-dimensional cephalogram analysis. The materials were three-dimensional CT and cephalogram of 20 female mandibular prognathism patients (average age: 25.20±7.49) before there orthognathic surgery. Mandibular bone volume and sponge bone width were calculated from three-dimensional images constructed from CT images using imaging software (Real Intage, KGT inc.). There was a positive correlation (r=0.72) between mandibular volume value and mandibular ramus width. There was a positive correlation between sponge bone width at the site of the mandibular cuspid and mandibular ramus width and SNB angle (r=0.80), and between sponge bone width at the site of the mandibular molar and symphysis height and mandibular ramus width (r=0.81). It was thought that these results will be useful for a surmise of three-dimensional mandibular morphology by cephalogram analysis. (author)

  10. Fragile X syndrome: panoramic radiographic evaluation of dental anomalies, dental mineralization stage, and mandibular angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh-Haddad, Aida; Haddad, Denise Sabbagh; Michel-Crosato, Edgard; Arita, Emiko Saito

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a disorder linked to the chromosome X long arm (Xq27.3), which is identified by a constriction named fragile site. It determines various changes, such as behavioral or emotional problems, learning difficulties, and intellectual disabilities. Craniofacial abnormalities such as elongated and narrow face, prominent forehead, broad nose, large and prominent ear pavilions, strabismus, and myopia are frequent characteristics. Regarding the oral aspects, deep and high-arched palate, mandibular prognathism, and malocclusion are also observed. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dental radiographic characteristics as described in 40 records of patients with panoramic radiography. Material and Methods: The patients were in the range of 6–17 years old, and were divided into two groups (20 subjects who were compatible with the normality standard and 20 individuals diagnosed with the FXS), which were matched for gender and age. Analysis of the panoramic radiographic examination involved the evaluation of dental mineralization stage, mandibular angle size, and presence of dental anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentitions. Results: The results of radiographic evaluation demonstrated that the chronology of tooth eruption of all third and second lower molars is anticipated in individuals with FXS (pdental anomalies. In addition, an increase was observed in the mandibular angle size in the FXS group (pdental radiographic changes is of great importance for dental surgeons to plan the treatment of these individuals. PMID:27812623

  11. Human evolutionary history: consequences for the pathogenesis of otitis media.

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    Bluestone, Charles D; Swarts, J Douglas

    2010-12-01

    The pathogenesis of otitis media is multifactorial, but the role of evolution on its development has not been addressed. We posit that the high prevalence of middle-ear disease is most likely restricted to humans, in contrast to other wild species, because the associated hearing loss would have reduced the fitness of affected individuals as a result of predation. We present here the possible consequences of two human adaptations that may have resulted in ubiquitous otitis media: the interaction of bipedalism and increased brain size, and the loss of facial prognathism resulting from speech or cooking. As a consequence of our adaptation for bipedalism, the female pelvic outlet is constricted, which, in the context of a rapidly enlarging brain, results in humans being born 12 months too soon. Significantly, immature eustachian tube structure and function, in conjunction with an immature immune system, helps to explain the high incidence of otitis media in the first year of life. But the persistence of middle-ear disease beyond this stage is not explained by "immaturity." The morphology of the palate changed with the adaptations that produced facial flattening, with concomitant effects on eustachian tube function. These changes resulted in relatively poor human physiologic tubal function in comparison to the nonhuman primate. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiographic assessment of lower third molar eruption in different anteroposterior skeletal patterns and age-related groups.

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    Jakovljevic, Aleksandar; Lazic, Emira; Soldatovic, Ivan; Nedeljkovic, Nenad; Andric, Miroslav

    2015-07-01

    To analyze radiographic predictors for lower third molar eruption among subjects with different anteroposterior skeletal relations and of different age groups. In total, 300 lower third molars were recorded on diagnostic digital orthopantomograms (DPTs) and lateral cephalograms (LCs). The radiographs were grouped according to sagittal intermaxillary angle (ANB), subject age, and level of lower third molar eruption. The DPT was used to analyze retromolar space, mesiodistal crown width, space/width ratio, third and second molar angulation (α, γ), third molar inclination (β), and gonion angle. The LC was used to determine ANB, angles of maxillar and mandibular prognathism (SNA, SNB), mandibular plane angle (SN/MP), and mandibular lengths. A logistic regression model was created using the statistically significant predictors. The logistic regression analysis revealed a statistically significant impact of β angle and distance between gonion and gnathion (Go-Gn) on the level of lower third molar eruption (P third molar impaction rate was significantly higher in the adult subgroup with the Class II (62.3%) compared with Class III subjects (31.7%; P third molar eruption were measured in Class III subjects. For valid estimation of mandibular third molar eruption, certain linear and angular measures (β angle, Go-Gn), as well as the size of the retromolar space, need to be considered.

  13. Early orthognathic surgery with three-dimensional image simulation during presurgical orthodontics in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Moon-Key; Park, Sun-Yeon; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Park, Wonse; Lee, Sang-Hwy

    2011-03-01

    To correct dentofacial deformities, three-dimensional skeletal analysis and computerized orthognathic surgery simulation are used to facilitate accurate diagnoses and surgical plans. Computed tomography imaging of dental occlusion can inform three-dimensional facial analyses and orthognathic surgical simulations. Furthermore, three-dimensional laser scans of a cast model of the predetermined postoperative dental occlusion can be used to increase the accuracy of the preoperative surgical simulation. In this study, we prepared cast models of planned postoperative dental occlusions from 12 patients diagnosed with skeletal class III malocclusions with mandibular prognathism and facial asymmetry that had planned to undergo bimaxillary orthognathic surgery during preoperative orthodontic treatment. The data from three-dimensional laser scans of the cast models were used in three-dimensional surgical simulations. Early orthognathic surgeries were performed based on three-dimensional image simulations using the cast images in several presurgical orthodontic states in which teeth alignment, leveling, and space closure were incomplete. After postoperative orthodontic treatments, intraoral examinations revealed that no patient had a posterior open bite or space. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional skeletal analyses showed that no mandibular deviations occurred between the immediate and final postoperative states of orthodontic treatment. These results showed that early orthognathic surgery with three-dimensional computerized simulations based on cast models of predetermined postoperative dental occlusions could provide early correction of facial deformities and improved efficacy of preoperative orthodontic treatment. This approach can reduce the decompensation treatment period of the presurgical orthodontics and contribute to efficient postoperative orthodontic treatments.

  14. Management of skeletal Class III malocclusion with reverse pull headgear in a growing individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambreen Afzal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal Class III malocclusion is considered to be one of the most difficult orthodontic problems to treat. This malocclusion is associated with the retrognathic maxilla or prognathic mandible or sometimes a combination of both. The treatment of such cases requires an integrated approach and a comprehensive treatment plan including growth modification, dental camouflage, or orthognathic surgery. In a growing patient, orthopedic correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion with the help of a reverse pull headgear is crucial as it can reduce the chances of further surgical treatment to correct the skeletal discrepancy. This case report describes the management of skeletal Class III malocclusion in a 12-year-old female child with a retrognathic maxilla. The patient did not have any other genetic abnormality or significant known comorbidity. The treatment plan involved fixed orthodontic appliance therapy in combination with a reverse pull headgear for an orthopedic effect. This treatment was continued for 3 years, and well-aligned dental arches with a positive over jet were achieved at the conclusion of treatment. Using facemask therapy in conjunction with fixed orthodontic appliances has been a successful treatment option in growing children. Treatment should be carried out as early as possible to correct the skeletal discrepancy nonsurgically and achieve better results.

  15. Mandibular cervical headgear vs rapid maxillary expander and facemask for orthopedic treatment of Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Rey, Diego; Angel, David; Oberti, Giovanni; McNamara, James A

    2007-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of the rapid maxillary expander and facemask (RME/ FM) and mandibular cervical headgear (MCH) protocols when followed by fixed appliances and evaluated at a postpubertal observation in patients with dentoskeletal Class III malocclusion. The sample treated with the RME/FM followed by fixed appliances included 32 patients (12 boys and 20 girls). The sample treated with the MCH followed by fixed appliances included 26 patients (eight boys and 18 girls). Cephalometric analysis was performed at T(1) (before treatment) and T(2) (after the first phase of orthopedic therapy and the second phase of fixed appliances). T(1)-T(2) changes were evaluated by means of t-tests. Midfacial length, mandibular length, and the sagittal position of the chin all showed significantly smaller increases in the MCH group than in the RME/FM group. The amount of increase in the overjet was also significantly smaller in the MCH group, whereas the amount of molar correction was greater. The upper incisors were significantly less proclined and the lower incisors were significantly less retroclined in the MCH group when compared with the RME/FM group. RME/FM therapy appears to be indicated in Class III patients with a component of maxillary retrusion, whereas MCH therapy is preferable in patients with mandibular prognathism.

  16. Morphological caracteristics of malocclusion class II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Class II malocclusion are complex anomalies of the skeletal and dental systems. The aim of this study is that the rengenkefalometrics analysis closer determine the morphological characteristics of this malocclusion. For this study were used 30 patients aged 18-30, previously clinically diagnosed class II, before the planned orthodontic treatment. The results analisis lateral cephalometric radiographs were compared with the 30 patients with class I malocclusion. Analyzed three linear and two angular cranial base dimensions and nine angular and four linear measures from the facial skeleton. The Results show: No statistically significant differensis in cranial base angle (SNBa and anterior cranial base length (S-N between class II and control Class I. Angle maxillar prognathism ( SNA is no signifikant different between class I and Class II but SNB angle were signifikant smaller. The length of maxillary base (A'-SnP is longer and the length of mandibule (Pg'-MT1/MT is signifficantly smaller. The gonial angle (ArGo-Me was smaller with open articular angle (GoArSN. Morphological characteristics of class II malocclusion are , retrognathic and smaller mandibular ligth, normognathic and longer maxilla, open articular angle with vertical tendency of the craniofacial growth pattern.

  17. Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism): a clinical and radiological study of 14 cases from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al Rashed, A A; al-Jarallah, A A; Salih, M A; Kolawole, T; al-Jarallah, J

    1999-06-01

    Fourteen children (of Arab ethnic origin) with Sotos syndrome are described. They were referred to King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh between July 1992 and June 1997. Their phenotypic characteristics were compared with established diagnostic criteria. There was a male:female ratio of 1.3:1 and a high rate of consanguinity (36%) among parents. At birth, 54% were large and about one-third showed increased height and occipitofrontal head circumference (OFHC). The neonatal histories revealed respiratory and feeding problems in 21%, followed later by delayed motor milestones and speech development in 57%. During childhood, weight, height and OFHC increased further to > 97th centile in 71%, 71% and 93%, respectively. A seizure disorder affected 43%, and 75% had mental retardation (IQ < 70). A non-specific EEG abnormality was found in half of those with seizures. Cranial CT/MRI showed ventricular dilatation in 15% and one patient had corpus callosum dysgenesis. Abdominal ultrasound revealed hydronephrosis in two patients. Radiological cephalometric measurements showed relative prognathism in cases of Sotos syndrome compared with controls (p = 0.003). The study highlights the importance of considering Sotos syndrome in children who present with psychomotor delay.

  18. Late onset isotretinoin resistant acne conglobata in a patient with acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Kapil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 55 year-old male presented with multiple pus-discharging abscesses and sinuses and mutilating scarring on the gluteal region and back prevalent for the last ten years with exacerbations and remissions. Physical examination revealed acromegaly with frontal bossing, prognathism, a barrel chest and acral hypertrophy. Dermatological examination revealed cutis verticis gyrata, thick eyelids, a large triangular nose, a thickened lower lip, macroglossia, widely spaced teeth and widened skin pores with wet and oily skin. Hair was fine and nails were flat and wide. There were multiple inflammatory papules, tender nodules, draining sinuses, and grouped, polyporous comedones as well as multiple and extensive depressed and keloidal scars localized predominantly over the gluteal region with a few scattered lesions over the back. A computed tomography (CT scan showed widened sella turcica. His basal fasting growth hormone (GH levels were markedly raised (230 ng/mL; normal 1-5 ng/mL while the prolactin levels were moderately raised (87 ng/mL; normal 2-5 ng/mL. These findings were consistent with a diagnosis of acromegaly. The patient was put on antibiotics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and isotretinoin at a dose of 1 mg/kg/day, which was increased to 1.5 mg/kg/day. Except for an initial mildly beneficial response, the skin lesions were largely resistant to high doses of isotretinoin at the end of four months.

  19. Acromegaly: clinical features at diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Lucio; Vilar, Clarice Freitas; Lyra, Ruy; Lyra, Raissa; Naves, Luciana A

    2017-02-01

    Acromegaly is a rare and underdiagnosed disorder caused, in more than 95% of cases, by a growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenoma. The GH hypersecretion leads to overproduction of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) which results in a multisystem disease characterized by somatic overgrowth, multiple comorbidities, physical disfigurement, and increased mortality. This article aims to review the clinical features of acromegaly at diagnosis. Acromegaly affects both males and females equally and the average age at diagnosis ranges from 40 to 50 years (up to 5% of cases acromegaly is often diagnosed five to more than ten years after its onset. The typical coarsening of facial features include furrowing of fronthead, pronounced brow protrusion, enlargement of the nose and the ears, thickening of the lips, skin wrinkles and nasolabial folds, as well as mandibular prognathism that leads to dental malocclusion and increased interdental spacing. Excessive growth of hands and feet (predominantly due to soft tissue swelling) is present in the vast majority of acromegalic patients. Gigantism accounts for up to 5% of cases and occurs when the excess of GH becomes manifest in the young, before the epiphyseal fusion. The disease also has rheumatologic, cardiovascular, respiratory, neoplastic, neurological, and metabolic manifestations which negatively impact its prognosis and patients quality of life. Less than 15% of acromegalic patients actively seek medical attention for change in appearance or enlargement of the extremities. The presentation of acromegaly is more often related to its systemic comorbidities or to local tumor effects.

  20. Gerodermia osteodysplastica and wrinkly skin syndrome: are they the same?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gazali, L I; Sztriha, L; Skaff, F; Haas, D

    2001-07-01

    Gerodermia osteodysplastica (GO) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by premature aging, wrinkled, and lax skin with reduced elasticity which is more marked on the dorsum of the hands and feet associated with hyperextensible joints and osteoporosis. The wrinkly skin syndrome (WSS) is characterized by wrinkled skin over the dorsum of the hands, feet, and abdomen; hyperextensible joints, particularly of the hands; intrauterine growth retardation; postnatal failure to thrive; and mental and developmental delay. We report on five children from two consanguineous Arab families with features overlapping both GO and WSS. All five children had similar dysmorphic facial features consisting of broad and prominent forehead, hypotelorism with epicanthal folds, prominent bulbous nose, flat malar region, and large protruding ears. All had wrinkling of the skin more marked on the dorsum of the hands, feet, and abdomen; hyperextensibility of the joints, particularly of the hands; and aged appearance. Intrauterine growth retardation, subsequent failure to thrive, developmental delay, and variable degree of osteoporosis was also present in all of them. The older three children developed progressive prognathism. We suggest that GO and WSS could represent variable manifestation of the same disorder. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. The effect of orthognathic surgery on the lip lines while smiling in skeletal class III patients with facial asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Moon-Key; An, Sang-In; Lee, Ji-Yeon

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between improvements in lip asymmetry at rest and while smiling after orthognathic surgery in patients with skeletal class III malocclusion. This study included 21 patients with skeletal class III malocclusion and facial asymmetry. We used preoperative and postoperative CT data and photographs to measure the vertical distance of the lips when smiling. The photographs were calibrated based on these distances and the CT image. We compared preoperative and postoperative results with the t test and correlations between measurements at rest and when smiling by regression analyses. There were significant correlations between the postoperative changes in canting of the mouth corners at rest, canting of the canines, canting of the first molars, the slope of the line connecting the canines, and the slope of the line connecting first molars. The magnitude of the postoperative lip line improvement while smiling was not significantly correlated with changes in the canting and slopes of the canines, molars, and lip lines at rest. It remains difficult to predict lip line changes while smiling compared with at rest after orthognathic surgery in patients with mandibular prognathism, accompanied by facial asymmetry.

  2. Occlusal plane change after intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth by microimplants to avoid maxillary surgery with skeletal Class III orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo-Sang; Kim, Ji-Yeun; Kwon, Tae-Geon

    2010-11-01

    To increase stability and mandibular setback movement, surgical maxillary impaction is normally performed with mandibular setback surgery in treating adult skeletal Class III patients. This article demonstrates the use of microimplants for anchorage to intrude molars and the resultant rotation of the maxillary occlusal plane clockwise to increase the surgical mandibular setback and reduce the posterior vertical dimension instead of maxillary surgical impaction. A 21-year-old man with mandibular prognathism was treated with mandibular setback surgery that included orthodontic treatment for decompensation. Microimplants placed into the palatal alveolar bone between the maxillary first and second molars were used to intrude the maxillary posterior teeth and change the occlusal plane clockwise. This produced 4 mm more of distal movement of the chin during mandibular setback surgery compared with the surgical prediction with no change in the occlusal plane. These results were similar to those of 2-jaw surgery with maxillary posterior impaction. The intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth with microimplants might prevent the need for maxillary surgery in adult skeletal Class III patients. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stability of pre-orthodontic orthognathic surgery depending on mandibular surgical techniques: SSRO vs IVRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Hwan; Yoo, Ho Jin; Lee, Jang-Yeol; Jung, Young-Soo; Choi, Jong-Woo; Lee, Kee-Joon

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the postoperative stability of sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) and intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) in pre-orthodontic orthognathic surgery (POGS) for skeletal Class III malocclusion. Thirty-seven patients (SSRO, n = 18; IVRO, n = 19) who underwent bimaxillary surgery were divided into two groups according to the type of surgery. During the postoperative period, there were no significant differences in anterior and superior movements of the mandible at point B between the two groups, but occlusal plane angle of the SSRO group significantly decreased more than that of the IVRO group (P = 0.003). Only the SSRO group showed a linear relationship between the amount of postoperative horizontal and vertical movements of the mandible (R(2) = 0.254; P = 0.033), indicating that the amount of postoperative upward movement of the mandible increased as the amount of postoperative forward movement increased (r = -0.504; P = 0.033). The mandible after SSRO in POGS rotated counterclockwise due to rigid fixation between two segments, whereas the mandible after IVRO without rigid fixation in POGS moved mainly in a superior direction. These differences must be considered before surgery to ensure postsurgical stability for patients with mandibular prognathism. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Skull deformations in craniosynostosis and endocrine disorders: morphological and tomographic analysis of the skull from the crypt of the Silesian Piasts in Brzeg (16th-17th century), Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowski, T; Cybulska, M; Błaszczyk, B; Krajewska, M; Jeśman, C

    2014-10-01

    of morphological and tomographic (CT) studies of the skull that was found in the crypt of the Silesian Piasts in the St. Jadwiga church in Brzeg (Silesia, Poland) are presented and discussed here. The established date of burial of probably a 20-30 years old male was 16th-17th century. The analyzed skull showed premature obliteration of the major skull sutures. It resulted in the braincase deformation, similar to the forms found in oxycephaly and microcephaly. Tomographic analysis revealed gross pathology. Signs of increased intracranial pressure, basilar invagination and hypoplasia of the occipital bone were observed. Those results suggested the occurrence of the very rare Arnold-Chiari syndrome. Lesions found in the sella turcica indicated the development of pituitary macroadenoma, which resulted in the occurrence of discreet features of acromegaly in the facial bones. The studied skull was characterized by a significantly smaller size of the neurocranium (horizontal circumference 471 mm, cranial capacity ∼ 1080 ml) and strongly expressed brachycephaly (cranial index=86.3), while its height remained within the range for non-deformed skulls. A narrow face, high eye-sockets and prognathism were also observed. Signs of alveolar process hypertrophy with rotation and displacement of the teeth were noted. The skull showed significant morphological differences compared to both normal and other pathological skulls such as those with pituitary gigantism, scaphocephaly and microcephaly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Adaptações do sistema estomatognático em indivíduos com desproporções maxilo-mandibulares: revisão da literatura Adaptations on the stomatognathic system of individuals with maxillomandibular disproportion: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Albuquerque Coutinho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa procurou identificar as adaptações do sistema estomatognático em indivíduos com desproporções maxilomandibulares. A revisão bibliográfica se fez por meio das bases de dados nacionais e internacionais, abordando as adaptações do sistema estomatognático em indivíduos com desproporção maxilo-mandibular submetidos a tratamento ortodôntico-cirúrgico (cirurgia ortognática associado à intervenção fonoaudiológica. Observou-se que sujeitos com prognatismo e retrognatismo apresentam adaptações em todas as funções realizadas pelo sistema motor oral, no período pré-cirurgia ortognática. No prognatismo mandibular, a função mais adaptada é a mastigação, caracterizando-se em movimentos verticalizados com utilização do dorso da língua para amassamento do alimento e pouca utilização dos músculos mastigatórios. No retrognatismo mandibular, estudos mostram que a deglutição apresenta-se bastante adaptada, com presença de deslize mandibular anterior somado ao movimento póstero-anterior de língua e com participação da musculatura perioral. Após a cirurgia ortognática, alguns casos podem apresentar adequação das funções do sistema estomatognático, porém em outros persistem as alterações, sendo necessário o conhecimento do fonoaudiólogo sobre as adaptações pré-existentes para traçar o melhor plano de reabilitação.This research had the aim to identify adaptations on the stomatognathic system of individuals with maxillomandibular disproportions. The literature review was carried out using national and international databases, addressing adaptations on the stomatognathic system of subjects with maxillomandibular disproportions submitted to orthognathic surgery associated to speech-language intervention. It was found that subjects with prognathism and retrognathism present adaptations in all oral-motor functions during the presurgical period. In mandibular prognathism, the most adapted function

  6. Craniofacial morphology of Homo floresiensis: description, taxonomic affinities, and evolutionary implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaifu, Yousuke; Baba, Hisao; Sutikna, Thomas; Morwood, Michael J; Kubo, Daisuke; Saptomo, E Wahyu; Jatmiko; Awe, Rokhus Due; Djubiantono, Tony

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes in detail the external morphology of LB1/1, the nearly complete and only known cranium of Homo floresiensis. Comparisons were made with a large sample of early groups of the genus Homo to assess primitive, derived, and unique craniofacial traits of LB1 and discuss its evolution. Principal cranial shape differences between H. floresiensis and Homo sapiens are also explored metrically. The LB1 specimen exhibits a marked reductive trend in its facial skeleton, which is comparable to the H. sapiens condition and is probably associated with reduced masticatory stresses. However, LB1 is craniometrically different from H. sapiens showing an extremely small overall cranial size, and the combination of a primitive low and anteriorly narrow vault shape, a relatively prognathic face, a rounded oval foramen that is greatly separated anteriorly from the carotid canal/jugular foramen, and a unique, tall orbital shape. Whereas the neurocranium of LB1 is as small as that of some Homo habilis specimens, it exhibits laterally expanded parietals, a weak suprameatal crest, a moderately flexed occipital, a marked facial reduction, and many other derived features that characterize post-habilis Homo. Other craniofacial characteristics of LB1 include, for example, a relatively narrow frontal squama with flattened right and left sides, a marked frontal keel, posteriorly divergent temporal lines, a posteriorly flexed anteromedial corner of the mandibular fossa, a bulbous lateral end of the supraorbital torus, and a forward protruding maxillary body with a distinct infraorbital sulcus. LB1 is most similar to early Javanese Homo erectus from Sangiran and Trinil in these and other aspects. We conclude that the craniofacial morphology of LB1 is consistent with the hypothesis that H. floresiensis evolved from early Javanese H. erectus with dramatic island dwarfism. However, further field discoveries of early hominin skeletal remains from Flores and detailed analyses of the

  7. Clinical spectrum of KIAA2022 pathogenic variants in males: Case report of two boys with kiaa2022 pathogenic variants and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Melissa; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; van Rheenen, Patrick; Smith, Ronald Garth; Scheers, Tom; Walia, Jagdeep S

    2018-04-25

    KIAA2022 is an X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) syndrome affecting males more severely than females. Few males with KIAA2022 variants and XLID have been reported. We present a clinical report of two unrelated males, with two nonsense KIAA2022 pathogenic variants, with profound intellectual disabilities, limited language development, strikingly similar autistic behavior, delay in motor milestones, and postnatal growth restriction. Patient 1, 19-years-old, has long ears, deeply set eyes with keratoconus, strabismus, a narrow forehead, anteverted nares, café-au-lait spots, macroglossia, thick vermilion of the upper and lower lips, and prognathism. He has gastroesophageal reflux, constipation with delayed rectosigmoid colonic transit time, difficulty regulating temperature, several musculoskeletal issues, and a history of one grand mal seizure. Patient 2, 10-years-old, has mild dysmorphic features, therapy resistant vomiting with diminished motility of the stomach, mild constipation, cortical visual impairment with intermittent strabismus, axial hypotonia, difficulty regulating temperature, and cutaneous mastocytosis. Genetic testing identified KIAA2022 variant c.652C > T(p.Arg218*) in Patient 1, and a novel nonsense de novo variant c.2707G > T(p.Glu903*) in Patient 2. We also summarized features of all reported males with KIAA2022 variants to date. This report not only adds knowledge of a novel pathogenic variant to the KIAA2022 variant database, but also likely extends the spectrum by describing novel dysmorphic features and medical conditions including macroglossia, café-au-lait spots, keratoconus, severe cutaneous mastocytosis, and motility problems of the GI tract, which may help physicians involved in the care of patients with this syndrome. Lastly, we describe the power of social media in bringing families with rare medical conditions together. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Cephalometric analysis in cases with Class III malocclusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, D

    1989-01-01

    Various orthodontic class III anomalies, classified into several experimental groups, and eugnathic occlusions serving as controls were studied by roentgencephalometry. The objective of the study was to detect possible distinctions in the quantitative values of two variables chosen and to select the variables which most significantly discriminate the group of class III orthodontic anomalies. Attempts were made to ascertain whether or not there were sex-related differences. The teleroentgenograms of 269 examines, aged 10-18 years, of both sexes were analyzed. The experimental group consisted of 89 examinees class III orthodontic anomalies. The control group consisted of 180 examines with eugnathic occlusion. Latero-lateral skull roentgenograms were taken observing the rules of roentgenocephalometry. Using acetate paper, the drawings of profile teleroentgenograms were elaborated and the reference points and lines were entered. A total of 38 variables were analyzed, of which there were 10 linear, 19 angular, and 8 variables were obtained by mathematical calculation; the age variable was also analyzed. In statistical analyses an electronic computer was used. The results are presented in tables and graphs. The results obtained showed that: --compared to the findings in the control group, the subjects in the experimental group displayed significant changes in the following craniofacial characteristics a negative difference in the position of the apical base of the jaw, manifest concavity of the osseous profile and diminished convexity of the profile of soft parts, retroinclination of the lower incisors, mandibular prognathism, increased mandibular angle and increased mandibular proportion compared to maxillary and the anterior cranial base; --with regard to the sex of the examinees, only four linear variables of significantly discriminating character were selected, so that in can be concluded that there were no significant sex differences among the morphological

  9. An evaluation of non-metric cranial traits used to estimate ancestry in a South African sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Abbé, E N; Van Rooyen, C; Nawrocki, S P; Becker, P J

    2011-06-15

    Establishing ancestry from a skeleton for forensic purposes has been shown to be difficult. The purpose of this paper is to address the application of thirteen non-metric traits to estimate ancestry in three South African groups, namely White, Black and "Coloured". In doing so, the frequency distribution of thirteen non-metric traits among South Africans are presented; the relationship of these non-metric traits with ancestry, sex, age at death are evaluated; and Kappa statistics are utilized to assess the inter and intra-rater reliability. Crania of 520 known individuals were obtained from four skeletal samples in South Africa: the Pretoria Bone Collection, the Raymond A. Dart Collection, the Kirsten Collection and the Student Bone Collection from the University of the Free State. Average age at death was 51, with an age range between 18 and 90. Thirteen commonly used non-metric traits from the face and jaw were scored; definition and illustrations were taken from Hefner, Bass and Hauser and De Stephano. Frequency distributions, ordinal regression and Cohen's Kappa statistics were performed as a means to assess population variation and repeatability. Frequency distributions were highly variable among South Africans. Twelve of the 13 variables had a statistically significant relationship with ancestry. Sex significantly affected only one variable, inter-orbital breadth, and age at death affected two (anterior nasal spine and alveolar prognathism). The interaction of ancestry and sex independently affected three variables (nasal bone contour, nasal breadth, and interorbital breadth). Seven traits had moderate to excellent repeatability, while poor scoring consistency was noted for six variables. Difficulties in repeating several of the trait scores may require either a need for refinement of the definitions, or these character states may not adequately describe the observable morphology in the population. The application of the traditional experience-based approach

  10. FMR1 Knockout mice: A model to study fragile X mental retardation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostra, B.A.; Bakker, C.E.; Reyniers, E. [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most frequent form of inherited mental retardation in humans with an incidence of 1 in 1250 males and 1 in 2500 females. The clinical syndrome includes moderate to severe mental retardation, autistic behavior, macroorchidism, and facial features, such as long face with mandibular prognathism and large, everted ears. The molecular basis for this disease is a large expansion of a triplet repeat (CGG){sub n} in the 5{prime} untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. Due to this large expansion of the CGG repeat, the promoter region becomes methylated and the FMR1 gene is subsequently silenced. Hardly anything is known about the physiologic function of FMR1 and the pathologic mechanisms leading to these symptoms. Since the FMR1 gene is highly conserved in the mouse, we used the mouse to design a knockout model for the fragile X syndrome. These knockout mice lacking Fmrp have normal litter size suggesting that FMR1 is not essential in human gametogenesis and embryonic development. The knockout mice show the abnormalities also seen in the affected organs of human patients. Mutant mice show a gradual development through time of macroorchidism. In the knockout mice we observed cognitive defects in the form of deficits in learning (as shown by the hidden platform Morris water maze task) and behavioral abnormalities such as increased exploratory behavior and hyperactivity. Therefore this knockout mouse may serve as a valuable tool in studying the role of FMR1 in the fragile X syndrome and may serve as a model to elucidate the mechanisms involved in macroorchidism, abnormal behavior, and mental retardation.

  11. Thin-plate spline analysis of allometry and sexual dimorphism in the human craniofacial complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Antonio; Bastir, Markus

    2002-03-01

    The relationship between allometry and sexual dimorphism in the human craniofacial complex was analyzed using geometric morphometric methods. Thin-plate splines (TPS) analysis has been applied to investigate the lateral profile of complete adult skulls of known sex. Twenty-nine three-dimensional (3D) craniofacial and mandibular landmark coordinates were recorded from a sample of 52 adult females and 52 adult males of known age and sex. No difference in the influence of size on shape was detected between sexes. Both size and sex had significant influences on shape. As expected, the influence of centroid size on shape (allometry) revealed a shift in the proportions of the neurocranium and the viscerocranium, with a marked allometric variation of the lower face. Adjusted for centroid size, males presented a relatively larger size of the nasopharyngeal space than females. A mean-male TPS transformation revealed a larger piriform aperture, achieved by an increase of the angulation of the nasal bones and a downward rotation of the anterior nasal floor. Male pharynx expansion was also reflected by larger choanae and a more posteriorly inclined basilar part of the occipital clivus. Male muscle attachment sites appeared more pronounced. In contrast, the mean-female TPS transformation was characterized by a relatively small nasal aperture. The occipital clivus inclined anteriorly, and muscle insertion areas became smoothed. Besides these variations, both maxillary and mandibular alveolar regions became prognathic. The sex-specific TPS deformation patterns are hypothesized to be associated with sexual differences in body composition and energetic requirements. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Life history and systematics of Albusambia elaphoglossumae (Lepidoptera:Crambidae: A new genus and species of musotimine with leaf-mining biology from Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Alma Solis

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Albusambia elaphoglossumae Solis &Davis,a new genus and species,is described.It was discov- ered mining the fronds of the fern Elaphoglossum conspersum in Costa Rica (San José and Cartago Provinces, at elevations of 2300-3100 m.The type series was obtained by rearing of the immature stages in laboratory. The adult is defined by unique genital characters,and the pupa with a medial depression on the vertex and with two anterolateral horn-like structures on the prothorax.The larva is a gregarious leaf miner with its body flat- tened dorsoventrally and head prognathous; morphological adaptations to its leaf-mining habit are new to the Musotiminae.Fern-feeding musotimines are important to the discovery of new biological control agents for invasive ferns.Rev.Biol.Trop.53(3-4:487-501.Epub 2005 Oct 3.Se describen un género y especie nuevos de Musotiminae,Albusambia elaphoglossumae Solis and Davis,de Costa Rica.Esta especie mina las frondas del helecho Elaphoglossum conspersum .La serie tipo se obtuvo mediante la recolección de las minas y mediante crianza en laboratorio.El adulto se define por caracteres específicos en el aparato genital;la pupa se caracteriza por una depresión media en el vértex y por dos estructuras anterolaterales en forma de cuernos en el protórax.La larva es un minador gregario de la fronda,con su cuerpo aplanado dorsoventralmente y su cabeza prognata;ambas adaptaciones morfológicas para minar frondas (vistas por primera vez en Musotiminae. Actualmente,Musotiminae es de alta prioridad en la búsqueda de nuevos agentes para el control biológico de helechos invasores.

  13. Three-dimensional geometric morphometric analysis of the nasopharyngeal boundaries and its functional integration with the face and external basicranium among extant hominoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Anthony S; Laitman, Jeffrey T

    2015-01-01

    The nasopharynx is a centrally located but understudied upper respiratory tract component. This study tested hypotheses related to the functional integration of the nasopharyngeal boundaries with the facial skeleton and external basicranium over the course of development in humans and nonhuman hominoids. It was hypothesized that facial morphology (width, length, and kyphosis) is related to nasopharyngeal width and choanal morphology, whereas relative external basicranial proportions are related to nasopharyngeal depth. Human infants were used as models of extreme orthognathy and external basicranial retroflexion, whereas nonhuman hominoids were used to model greater relative prognathism and external basicranial retroflexion. Both of these groups were contrasted against adult humans, who exhibit both extreme orthognathy and external basicranial flexion. Three-dimensional landmark coordinate data were collected from age-graded series of Homo, Pan, Gorilla, Pongo, and Hylobates. Generalized Procrustes Analysis was performed, and multivariate shape differences were evaluated via principal components analysis. Additionally, linear measures were extracted from the Procrustes-corrected sets of landmark data. Results indicate that human adults are indeed distinct from all groups in possessing a relatively shallow nasopharyngeal roof and shorter, more flexed external basicranial axis. Human adults and infants both exhibit greater relative choanal and nasopharyngeal width. Nonhuman hominoid faces tended to become airorhynch into adulthood, whereas humans exhibited the opposite trend. When pooling all the hominoids, facial width and palate length were strongly correlated with choanal and nasopharyngeal width, whereas facial kyphosis was strongly correlated with choanal orientation. The hypotheses were supported as the results indicated a morphologic relationship among nasopharyngeal boundaries, the facial skeleton, and the external basicranium. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Tratamento de más oclusões de Classe II graves com aparelhos funcionais removíveis e ortodônticos sequenciais: um caso para a avaliação do MOrthRCSEd Management of severe Class II malocclusion with sequential removable functional and orthodontic appliances: a case for MOrthRCSEd examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry Ching Fan Li

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: o aparelho funcional é uma forma eficaz de tratar as más oclusões de Classe II esqueléticas em crianças e adolescentes. Um protocolo de avanço mandibular progressivo de 12 meses já demonstrou ser capaz de aumentar o crescimento condilar e melhorar o prognatismo mandibular utilizando o aparelho de Herbst. OBJETIVO: relatar o caso clínico (apresentado como um dos requisitos para aprovação no Exame de Ortodontia para Filiação ao Royal College of Surgeons de Edimburgo* de uma menina chinesa de 11 anos de idade, com 11mm de sobressaliência, tratada na Fase I da terapia de modificação do crescimento, ao longo de 12 meses, utilizando o aparelho Twin Block com um expansor palatal Hyrax e um extrabucal de puxada alta, em um protocolo de avanço mandibular progressivo, seguido pela Fase II da terapia, com um aparelho Edgewise pré-ajustado.INTRODUCTION: Functional appliances are an effective way of treating skeletal Class II malocclusion in children and adolescents. A 12 month step-wise mandibular advancement protocol has been proved to enhance the condylar growth and improve the mandibular prognathism using Herbst appliance. OBJECTIVES: The following case report documented a 11 year-old Chinese girl with 11 mm overjet treated by a Phase I 12-month growth modification therapy using Twin Block appliance with Hyrax palatal expander and high pull headgear in a step-wise mandibular advancement protocol followed by a Phase II preadjusted Edgewise appliance therapy. This is one of the cases submitted for the Membership of Orthodontics Examination of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh.

  15. Fragile X syndrome: panoramic radiographic evaluation of dental anomalies, dental mineralization stage, and mandibular angle

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    Aida Sabbagh-Haddad

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fragile X syndrome (FXS is a disorder linked to the chromosome X long arm (Xq27.3, which is identified by a constriction named fragile site. It determines various changes, such as behavioral or emotional problems, learning difficulties, and intellectual disabilities. Craniofacial abnormalities such as elongated and narrow face, prominent forehead, broad nose, large and prominent ear pavilions, strabismus, and myopia are frequent characteristics. Regarding the oral aspects, deep and high-arched palate, mandibular prognathism, and malocclusion are also observed. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dental radiographic characteristics as described in 40 records of patients with panoramic radiography. Material and Methods: The patients were in the range of 6–17 years old, and were divided into two groups (20 subjects who were compatible with the normality standard and 20 individuals diagnosed with the FXS, which were matched for gender and age. Analysis of the panoramic radiographic examination involved the evaluation of dental mineralization stage, mandibular angle size, and presence of dental anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentitions. Results: The results of radiographic evaluation demonstrated that the chronology of tooth eruption of all third and second lower molars is anticipated in individuals with FXS (p<0.05. In this group, supernumerary deciduous teeth (2.83%, giroversion of permanent teeth (2.31%, and partial anodontia (1.82% were the most frequent dental anomalies. In addition, an increase was observed in the mandibular angle size in the FXS group (p<0.05. Conclusion: We conclude that knowledge of dental radiographic changes is of great importance for dental surgeons to plan the treatment of these individuals.

  16. Correlation between the frequency of eruption disorders for first permanent molars and the occurrence of malocclusions in early mixed dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbach, Anja; Schremmer, Britt; Grabowski, Rosemarie; Stahl de Castrillon, Franka

    2012-08-01

    We analyzed the incidence of eruption disorders in 6-year molars during the first phase of mixed dentition, and then determined the risks for later dental arch development according to specific combinations of orthodontic malocclusions. We, thus, aimed to derive potential conclusions for preventative orthodontics. In this cross-sectional study, 8,041 kindergarten and school children with early mixed dentition were randomly selected and clinically examined. Examinations were performed in two consecutive years during the standard dental screening that school children undergo. The average age was 6.9 years. We defined an eruption of the 6-year molars as being disturbed when (1) the distal cusps had erupted further than the mesial cusps, (2) the mesial inclination of the occlusal surface revealed disturbed eruption, and (3) the 6-year molar had erupted below the second primary molar. Disturbed eruption of the first permanent molars was observed in 102 of these children. The upper 6-year molars were affected more often (88.5%) than the lower molars. Bilateral disturbed eruption of the upper molars was the most frequent combination of symptoms found. Although disturbed eruption was diagnosed most often in 6- and 7-year-old children, the 8-year-old children presented 20% of the eruption disorders. Moreover, 72.6% of the children with disturbed eruption presented at least one additional orthodontic malocclusion. Crowding (p ≤ 0.001), lateral malocclusions (p ≤ 0.001), and mandibular prognathism (p = 0.009) were present significantly more often in children with disturbed eruption of 6-year molars. Delayed eruption and false direction of eruption of the upper 6-year molars may-already at an early stage-raise the likelihood of problems during later dental arch development, such as crowding in the sagittal and transverse directions or Class III developments.

  17. Class III malocclusion with severe anteroposterior discrepancy

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    Susana Maria Deon Rizzatto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at reporting the clinical case of a patient with Class III skeletal malocclusion with severe maxillary deficiency, producing a reduced midface associated with severe mandibular prognathism. The pre-surgical orthodontic preparation was composed mainly by dentoalveolar expansion and repositioning of the incisors in the lower arch. Then, a combined maxillary and mandibular orthognathic surgery was performed. The treatment objectives were achieved, with significant improvement in facial esthetics and occlusion, followed by post-treatment stability. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO, as part of the requirements for obtaining the title of Diplomate by BBO.O objetivo deste artigo é relatar o caso clínico de um paciente portador de má oclusão de Classe III esquelética com acentuada deficiência maxilar, causando redução do terço médio da face, associada a severo prognatismo mandibular. O preparo ortodôntico pré-cirúrgico foi composto, principalmente, pela expansão dentoalveolar da maxila e o reposicionamento dos incisivos na arcada inferior. Depois, foi realizada a cirurgia ortognática combinada maxilomandibular. Os objetivos do tratamento foram atingidos, com significativa melhora da oclusão e da estética facial, seguida de estabilidade pós-tratamento. Esse caso foi apresentado à Diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO.

  18. Semilongitudinal cephalometric study of craniofacial growth in untreated Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Ann E Zionic; McNamara, James A; Franchi, Lorenzo; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2009-06-01

    Class III growth in white subjects is poorly characterized because of the low prevalence of the disharmony and the clinical tendency to treat this condition early. The purpose of this study was to investigate craniofacial growth changes by using longitudinal cephalometric records of white subjects with untreated Class III malocclusions to provide comparison data for studies of Class III treatment outcomes. Longitudinal records of 103 subjects were analyzed. Annual incremental growth changes in craniofacial variables from early childhood to late adolescence were examined for each sex. Inferential statistics were applied to changes in mandibular length, midfacial length, and lower anterior facial height of each sex (Wilcoxon tests) and between sexes (Mann-Whitney U tests). In the girls, the adolescent spurt in mandibular growth occurred between the ages of 10 and 12 years. In the boys, the adolescent mandibular growth spurt was between 12 and 15 years. Statistically significant growth changes in the average increments of growth of these linear measurements occurred in both sexes between 12 and 15 years. Adolescent peaks in midfacial growth were at prepubertal ages in both sexes. During childhood (5-7 years), much craniofacial growth occurred. Moreover, there was considerable mandibular growth relative to the maxilla in Class III subjects after the adolescent growth spurt. White Class III subjects showed definite worsening of the relative mandibular prognathism and sagittal skeletal discrepancy between the jaws with growth. The growth pattern of 3 fundamental cephalometric measurements (lower anterior face height, midfacial length, and mandibular length) exhibited differences between Class III male and female subjects in both the timing and the size of average growth increments in the adolescent growth spurt.

  19. Original Research. Correlation Between Cranial Base Morphology And Various Types Of Skeletal Anomalies

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    Panainte Irinel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies regarding various types of malocclusions have found correlations between the angle of the base of the skull and prognathism. Aim of the study: This cephalometric study sought to investigate the function of the cranium base angle in different types of malocclusion on a group of Romanian subjects. Materials and methods: Forty-four cephalometric radiographs were selected from patients referred to orthodontic treatment. The cephalometric records were digitized, and with the CorelDRAW Graphics Suite X5 software 22 landmarks have been marked on each radiograph. A number of linear and angular variables were calculated. Results: The angle of the base of the skull was found to be higher in Class II Division 1 subjects compared to the Class I group. The cranial base lengths, N-S and S-Ba, were significantly larger in both categories of Class II malocclusion than in Class I patients, but measurements were comparable in Class I and Class III. The SNA angle showed no considerable variation between Class I subjects and the other groups. SNA-SNP was significantly increased above Class I values in Class II Division1 and Class II Division 2 groups. No significant dissimilarities were observed for these lengths between Class I and Class III patients. Conclusions: The angle of the cranium base (S-N-Ba, S-N-Ar does not have a major role in the progression of malocclusion. In Angle Class II malocclusion the SNA angle is increased, and SNB is increased in malocclusion Class III. The anterior skull base length is increased in Class II anomalies. The length of the maxillary bone base is increased in Class II malocclusions type; in Class III type of malocclusion the length of the mandible bone is increased.

  20. Pituitary Gigantism: A Case Report

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    Rana Bhattacharjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present a rare case of gigantism. Case Report: A 25-year-old lady presented with increased statural growth and enlarged body parts noticed since the age of 14 years, primary amenorrhea, and frontal headache for the last 2 years.She has also been suffering from non-inflammatory low back pain with progressive kyphosis and pain in the knees, ankles, and elbows for the last 5 years. There was no history of visual disturbance, vomiting, galactorrhoea, cold intolerance. She had no siblings. Family history was non-contributory.Blood pressure was normal. Height 221 cm, weight 138 kg,body mass index (BMI28. There was coarsening of facial features along with frontal bossing and prognathism, large hands and feet, and small goitre. Patient had severe kyphosis and osteoarthritis of knees. Confrontation perimetry suggested bitemporal hemianopia. Breast and pubic hair were of Tanner stage 1. Serum insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF1 was 703 ng/ml with all glucose suppressedgrowth hormone (GHvalues of >40 ng/ml. Prolactin was 174 ng/ml. Basal serum Lutenising Hormone (LH, follicle stimulating Hormone (FSH was low. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, liver and renal function tests, basal cortisol and thyroid profile, Calcium, phosphorus and Intact Parathyroid hormone (iPTH were normal.Computed tomographyscan of brain showed large pituitary macroadenoma. Automated perimetry confirmed bitemporal hemianopia. A diagnosis of gigantism due to GH secreting pituitary macroadenoma with hypogonadotrophichypogonadism was made. Debulking pituitary surgery followed by somatostatin analogue therapy with gonadal steroid replacement had been planned, but the patient refused further treatment.

  1. Pituitary gigantism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Rana; Roy, Ajitesh; Goswami, Soumik; Selvan, Chitra; Chakraborty, Partha P; Ghosh, Sujoy; Biswas, Dibakar; Dasgupta, Ranen; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2012-12-01

    To present a rare case of gigantism. A 25-year-old lady presented with increased statural growth and enlarged body parts noticed since the age of 14 years, primary amenorrhea, and frontal headache for the last 2 years. She has also been suffering from non-inflammatory low back pain with progressive kyphosis and pain in the knees, ankles, and elbows for the last 5 years. There was no history of visual disturbance, vomiting, galactorrhoea, cold intolerance. She had no siblings. Family history was non-contributory. Blood pressure was normal. Height 221 cm, weight 138 kg, body mass index (BMI)28. There was coarsening of facial features along with frontal bossing and prognathism, large hands and feet, and small goitre. Patient had severe kyphosis and osteoarthritis of knees. Confrontation perimetry suggested bitemporal hemianopia. Breast and pubic hair were of Tanner stage 1. Serum insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF1) was 703 ng/ml with all glucose suppressedgrowth hormone (GH)values of >40 ng/ml. Prolactin was 174 ng/ml. Basal serum Lutenising Hormone (LH), follicle stimulating Hormone (FSH) was low. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), liver and renal function tests, basal cortisol and thyroid profile, Calcium, phosphorus and Intact Parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were normal. Computed tomographyscan of brain showed large pituitary macroadenoma. Automated perimetry confirmed bitemporal hemianopia. A diagnosis of gigantism due to GH secreting pituitary macroadenoma with hypogonadotrophichypogonadism was made. Debulking pituitary surgery followed by somatostatin analogue therapy with gonadal steroid replacement had been planned, but the patient refused further treatment.

  2. Comparison of skeletal stability after sagittal split ramus osteotomy among mono-cortical plate fixation, bi-cortical plate fixation, and hybrid fixation using absorbable plates and screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Koichiro; Moroi, Akinori; Yoshizawa, Kunio; Hotta, Asami; Tsutsui, Takamitsu; Fukaya, Kenichi; Hiraide, Ryota; Takayama, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuta; Saito, Yuki

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine skeletal stability and plate breakage after sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) with the mono-cortical plate fixation, bi-cortical plate fixation, and hybrid fixation techniques using absorbable plates and screws. A total of 76 Japanese patients diagnosed with mandibular prognathism with and without maxillary deformity were divided into 3 groups randomly. A total of 28 patients underwent SSRO with mono-cortical plate fixation, 23 underwent SSRO with bi-cortical plate fixation, and 25 underwent SSRO with hybrid fixation. Skeletal stability and horizontal condylar angle were analyzed by axial, frontal, and lateral cephalograms from before the operation to 1 year postoperatively. Breakage of the plate and screws was observed by 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) immediately after surgery and after 1 year. Although there was a significant difference between the mono-cortical plate fixation group and hybrid fixation group regarding right MeAg in T1 (P = 0.0488) and occlusal plane in T1 (P = 0.0346), there were no significant differences between the groups for the other measurements in each time interval. In 2 cases, namely, 6 sides in the mono-cortical plate fixation group, breakage of the absorbable plate was found by 3DCT. However, there was no breakage in the bi-cortical plate fixation group and hybrid fixation group. This study results suggested that there were no significant differences in the postoperative skeletal stability among the 3 groups, and bi-cortical fixation as well as hybrid fixation was a reliable and useful method to prevent plate breakage even if an absorbable material was used. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-term efficacy of reverse pull headgear therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Andrew P; Sarver, David M; Proffit, William R

    2006-11-01

    To add to the data for long-term reverse pull headgear (RPHG) outcomes and further explore possible variables that could be predictors of long-term failure. Cephalometric radiographs of 41 Class III malocclusion children treated with RPHG (face mask) were evaluated before and immediately after treatment; at 5 years posttreatment; and, for 18 patients, at 10 years posttreatment. Patients were assigned to success or failure groups according to positive or negative overjet at the longest available recall. Seventy-five percent of the patients maintained positive overjet, whereas 25% outgrew the correction. In a stepwise discriminant analysis, a large mandible and vertical positioning of the maxilla and mandible so that mandibular growth would be projected more horizontally were the major indicators of unfavorable later mandibular growth. Patients who experienced downward-backward rotation of the mandible during RPHG treatment were more likely to be categorized in the failure group. The age at which treatment began had no effect on long-term success and failure for patients younger than 10 years, but the percentage of successful treatment decreased after that age. When RPHG treatment is used for all but the most obviously prognathic children to correct anterior cross-bite in the early mixed dentition, positive overjet is maintained long-term in 70%-75% of cases, whereas 25%-30% of cases relapse into reverse overjet mainly because of increased horizontally directed and often late mandibular growth. Up to age 10, the time at which RPHG treatment began does not appear to be a major factor in long-term success in maintaining positive overjet.

  4. Masticatory-stress hypotheses and the supraorbital region of primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylander, W L; Picq, P G; Johnson, K R

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to test various masticatory-stress hypotheses about the evolution and function of well-developed browridges of higher primates. This was done by measuring and analyzing patterns of in vivo bone strain recorded from three-element rosette strain gages bonded to the supraorbital region and to other portions of the bony face of Macaca fascicularis and Papio anubis during mastication and incision. The magnitude and direction of the principal strains recorded support Endo's hypothesis that the supraorbital region during mastication and incision is bent in the frontal plane (Endo, 1966). Our data do not, however, support his hypothesis that the supraorbital region is bent more during incision than during mastication. The data also demonstrate that overall levels of supraorbital strain are not larger in more prognathic subjects. Most importantly, the data indicate that the supraorbital region of nonhuman catarrhines is strained very little during mastication and incision. This indicates that there is much more supraorbital bone than is necessary both to counter masticatory loads and to provide an adequate safety factor to failure for these loads. This in turn suggests that the macaque and baboon browridges can be considerably reduced in size and still maintain these required structural characteristics. Thus, our experiments provide no support whatsoever for those hypotheses that directly link browridge morphology to masticatory stress (cf. Endo, 1966; Russell, 1983, 1985). A recent review of Endo's original work indicates that this latter statement is also true for humans (Picq and Hylander, 1989). We conclude, therefore, that there is no good reason to believe that enlarged browridges in living and/or fossil primates are structural adaptations to counter intense masticatory forces. The evolution of browridge morphology in primates is best explained on the basis of factors related to the position of the brain relative to the orbits (Moss and

  5. Hard and Soft Tissue Changes Following Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis and Mandibular Setback with Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawane, Shilpa S; Andrade, Neelam N

    2016-12-01

    (1) To highlight the role of intraoral submerged device in distraction osteogenesis (DO) of patients requiring two jaw surgeries for the correction of severe developmental maxillary hypoplasia (MH) and mandibular prognathism (MP) (2) To analyse the hard and soft tissue changes following maxillary DO and mandibular setback with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) in patients with severe MH and MP requiring two jaw surgeries. During the period Jan 2004 to Dec 2006, five patients with severe developmental MH along with MP were treated. In 1st stage maxillary distraction was done. Distraction started on 6th postoperative day, 1 mm distraction was carried out for 10-15 days on either side. Serial radiographs were taken immediate postoperative period for baseline comparison, post-distraction and at the end of distraction. After a period of 3-4 months of distraction 2nd stage was done. In 2nd stage, mandibular setback was done with BSSO and distractors were removed under general anesthesia. Radiographs were taken immediately and at 4 months post-operatively. Cephalometric tracings were carried out preoperatively, post DO and finally after mandibular setback with BSSO. The mean horizontal movement of maxilla was 11.4 mm at ANS and 9.6 mm at A point. Upper incisor edge was advanced by 8.8 mms. SNA increased by 8.4° and SNB decreased by 4.6°. Nasal projection advanced by 4°. Nasolabial angle normalized in all patients, mean change achieved was 10.8°. Upper lip moved forward by 5.4 mm. Lower lip moved backward by 5.4 mm. Mandible positioned backward by 4 mm at B point. No vertical change occurred in the position of A, ANS and upper incisor edges. Mean increase in skeletal angle of convexity was 26.4°. Concave profile was significantly changed to convex in all patients. Maxillary DO and mandibular setback with BSSO was associated with improved facial balance and esthetics.

  6. Does Orthognathic Surgery Cause or Cure Temporomandibular Disorders? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Moraissi, Essam Ahmed; Wolford, Larry M; Perez, Daniel; Laskin, Daniel M; Ellis, Edward

    2017-09-01

    There is still controversy about whether orthognathic surgery negatively or positively affects temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). The purpose of this study was to determine whether orthognathic surgery has a beneficial or deleterious effect on pre-existing TMDs. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. We searched 3 major databases to locate all pertinent articles published from 1980 to March 2016. All subjects in the various studies were stratified a priori into 9 categories based on subdiagnoses of TMDs. The predictor variables were those patients with pre-existing TMDs who underwent orthognathic surgery in various subgroups. The outcome variables were maximal mouth opening and signs and symptoms of a TMD before and after orthognathic surgery based on the type of osteotomy. The meta-analysis was performed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software (Biostat, Englewood, NJ). A total of 5,029 patients enrolled in 29 studies were included in this meta-analysis. There was a significant reduction in TMDs in patients with a retrognathic mandible after bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) (P = .014), but no significant difference after bimaxillary surgery (BSSO and Le Fort I osteotomy) (P = .336). There was a significant difference in patients with prognathism after isolated BSSO or intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy and after combined BSSO and Le Fort I osteotomy (P = .001), but no significant difference after BSSO (P = .424) or bimaxillary surgery (intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy and Le Fort I osteotomy) (P = .728). Orthognathic surgery caused a decrease in TMD symptoms for many patients who had symptoms before surgery, but it created symptoms in a smaller group of patients who were asymptomatic before surgery. The presence of presurgical TMD symptoms or the type of jaw deformity did not identify which patients' TMDs would improve, remain the

  7. Growth-related changes of skeletal and upper-airway features in bilateral cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu-Guven, Bengisu; Karakaya, Jale; Ozgur, Figen; Aksu, Muge

    2015-10-01

    The craniofacial morphology of subjects with cleft lip and palate differs from that of subjects without clefts. Subjects with bilateral cleft lip and palate tend to have maxillary retrognathism, a smaller mandible with an obtuse gonial angle, greater anterior upper and lower facial heights, and retroclined maxillary incisors. The purposes of this research were to compare the skeletal and upper-airway features of subjects with bilateral cleft lip and palate with the same features in control subjects without clefts and to determine the growth-related changes at different growth stages. The sample comprised 212 subjects divided into 2 groups: 68 with bilateral cleft lip and palate, and 144 controls without clefts; each group was further divided into 4 subgroups according to growth stage using the cervical vertebral maturation stage method. The subgroups were defined as early childhood (stage 1), prepubertal (stage 2), pubertal (stage 3), and postpubertal (stage 4). The cephalometric variables were evaluated with 2-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni test. Maxillary position showed no significant differences between the male groups. The maxilla was more prognathic at stage 2 and became more retrognathic at stages 3 and 4 in the females. The mandible was more retrusive in the bilateral cleft lip and palate subjects at stage 1 in males and at stages 3 and 4 in females. ANB was larger at stages 1 and 2, and it became similar to the controls at stages 3 and 4 in male and female bilateral cleft lip and palate subjects. Vertical growth was seen in the bilateral cleft lip and palate subjects regardless of sex, and no change was observed with age. Posterior airway space was narrower in all stages (except for stage 1 in females). Middle airway space was wider after stage 1 in the male and female bilateral cleft lip and palate subjects. Inferior airway space was narrower in the male bilateral cleft lip and palate patients at the early childhood and pubertal stages. Age

  8. Delayed Diagnosis of Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: The Importance of the Multidisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Jéssica Araújo; Batista, Fábio Roberto de Souza; Rosso, Karina; Veltrini, Vanessa Cristina; Pavan, Angelo José

    2018-03-08

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS), also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder with high penetrance and variable expressivity. The classic triad originally described by Gorlin and Goltz in 1960 is composed of multiple nevoid basal cell carcinomas (NBCCs), odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) in the jaws and bifid ribs. in 1977, this triad was modified by Rayner et al, and to GGS diagnosis, the OKCs had to appear in combination with calcification of the cerebellar falx or palmar and plantar pits. It may occur that although GGS syndrome is a well-known condition, only the specific symptom could be observed by different specialists. Therefore, the patient cannot be placed in an always complex clinical panel. The authors introduce an example in this report. In the present case, the patient had NBCCs, OKCs, and probably other signs of GGS since 1998, and has been treated for this conditions separated, without a diagnosis of a syndromic condition. A 54-year-old white woman was referred to the oral medicine service due to cyst located in the right mandibular body. She had history of skin cancer and undergone surgeries and radiotherapies for the lesions treatment, scars on the skin face due to the lesions removed, and a new ulcerated lesion on the back of was diagnosed. In addition, the patient presented frontal and parietal bossing leading to increased cranial circumference, hypertelorism, strabismus, broad base, and mandibular prognathism. To the image examination, skull radiography revealed calcification of the falx cerebri; on chest X-ray bifid rib was observed and spine radiography showed vertebral osteophytes. Panoramic radiograph showed a well-defined bilocular radiolucent image located in posterior and anterior mandibular region. The whole elements induced us to investigate the patient's past medical history, which revealed that since 1998 had the diagnosis of NBCC and OKC. A multidisciplinary approach becomes necessary for

  9. The biting performance of Homo sapiens and Homo heidelbergensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Ricardo Miguel; Fitton, Laura C; Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; Stringer, Chris B; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Bromage, Timothy G; O'Higgins, Paul

    2018-05-01

    Modern humans have smaller faces relative to Middle and Late Pleistocene members of the genus Homo. While facial reduction and differences in shape have been shown to increase biting efficiency in Homo sapiens relative to these hominins, facial size reduction has also been said to decrease our ability to resist masticatory loads. This study compares crania of Homo heidelbergensis and H. sapiens with respect to mechanical advantages of masticatory muscles, force production efficiency, strains experienced by the cranium and modes of deformation during simulated biting. Analyses utilize X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan-based 3D models of a recent modern human and two H. heidelbergensis. While having muscles of similar cross-sectional area to H. heidelbergensis, our results confirm that the modern human masticatory system is more efficient at converting muscle forces into bite forces. Thus, it can produce higher bite forces than Broken Hill for equal muscle input forces. This difference is the result of alterations in relative in and out-lever arm lengths associated with well-known differences in midfacial prognathism. Apparently at odds with this increased efficiency is the finding that the modern human cranium deforms more, resulting in greater strain magnitudes than Broken Hill when biting at the equivalent tooth. Hence, the facial reduction that characterizes modern humans may not have evolved as a result of selection for force production efficiency. These findings provide further evidence for a degree of uncoupling between form and function in the masticatory system of modern humans. This may reflect the impact of food preparation technologies. These data also support previous suggestions that differences in bite force production efficiency can be considered a spandrel, primarily driven by the midfacial reduction in H. sapiens that occurred for other reasons. Midfacial reduction plausibly resulted in a number of other significant changes in morphology, such

  10. Alpha-mannosidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilssen Øivind

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alpha-mannosidosis is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder characterized by immune deficiency, facial and skeletal abnormalities, hearing impairment, and intellectual disability. It occurs in approximately 1 of 500,000 live births. The children are often born apparently normal, and their condition worsens progressively. Some children are born with ankle equinus or develop hydrocephalus in the first year of life. Main features are immune deficiency (manifested by recurrent infections, especially in the first decade of life, skeletal abnormalities (mild-to-moderate dysostosis multiplex, scoliosis and deformation of the sternum, hearing impairment (moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss, gradual impairment of mental functions and speech, and often, periods of psychosis. Associated motor function disturbances include muscular weakness, joint abnormalities and ataxia. The facial trait include large head with prominent forehead, rounded eyebrows, flattened nasal bridge, macroglossia, widely spaced teeth, and prognathism. Slight strabismus is common. The clinical variability is significant, representing a continuum in severity. The disorder is caused by lysosomal alpha-mannosidase deficiency. Alpha-mannosidosis is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and is caused by mutations in the MAN2B1 gene located on chromosome 19 (19 p13.2-q12. Diagnosis is made by measuring acid alpha-mannosidase activity in leukocytes or other nucleated cells and can be confirmed by genetic testing. Elevated urinary secretion of mannose-rich oligosaccharides is suggestive, but not diagnostic. Differential diagnoses are mainly the other lysosomal storage diseases like the mucopolysaccharidoses. Genetic counseling should be given to explain the nature of the disease and to detect carriers. Antenatal diagnosis is possible, based on both biochemical and genetic methods. The management should be pro-active, preventing complications and treating

  11. Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanson Philippe

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acromegaly is an acquired disorder related to excessive production of growth hormone (GH and characterized by progressive somatic disfigurement (mainly involving the face and extremities and systemic manifestations. The prevalence is estimated at 1:140,000–250,000. It is most often diagnosed in middle-aged adults (average age 40 years, men and women equally affected. Due to insidious onset and slow progression, acromegaly is often diagnosed four to more than ten years after its onset. The main clinical features are broadened extremities (hands and feet, widened thickened and stubby fingers, and thickened soft tissue. The facial aspect is characteristic and includes a widened and thickened nose, prominent cheekbones, forehead bulges, thick lips and marked facial lines. The forehead and overlying skin is thickened, sometimes leading to frontal bossing. There is a tendency towards mandibular overgrowth with prognathism, maxillary widening, tooth separation and jaw malocclusion. The disease also has rheumatologic, cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic consequences which determine its prognosis. In the majority of cases, acromegaly is related to a pituitary adenoma, either purely GH-secreting (60% or mixed. In very rare cases, acromegaly is due to ectopic secretion of growth-hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH responsible for pituitary hyperplasia. The clinical diagnosis is confirmed biochemically by an increased serum GH concentration following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and by detection of increased levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I. Assessment of tumor volume and extension is based on imaging studies. Echocardiography and sleep apnea testing are used to determine the clinical impact of acromegaly. Treatment is aimed at correcting (or preventing tumor compression by excising the disease-causing lesion, and at reducing GH and IGF-I levels to normal values. Transsphenoidal surgery is often the first-line treatment

  12. Comparative analysis of the anterior and posterior length and deflection angle of the cranial base, in individuals with facial Pattern I, II and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Thiesen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the variations in the anterior cranial base (S-N, posterior cranial base (S-Ba and deflection of the cranial base (SNBa among three different facial patterns (Pattern I, II and III. METHOD: A sample of 60 lateral cephalometric radiographs of Brazilian Caucasian patients, both genders, between 8 and 17 years of age was selected. The sample was divided into 3 groups (Pattern I, II and III of 20 individuals each. The inclusion criteria for each group were the ANB angle, Wits appraisal and the facial profile angle (G'.Sn.Pg'. To compare the mean values obtained from (SNBa, S-N, S-Ba each group measures, the ANOVA test and Scheffé's Post-Hoc test were applied. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There was no statistically significant difference for the deflection angle of the cranial base among the different facial patterns (Patterns I, II and III. There was no significant difference for the measures of the anterior and posterior cranial base between the facial Patterns I and II. The mean values for S-Ba were lower in facial Pattern III with statistically significant difference. The mean values of S-N in the facial Pattern III were also reduced, but without showing statistically significant difference. This trend of lower values in the cranial base measurements would explain the maxillary deficiency and/or mandibular prognathism features that characterize the facial Pattern III.OBJETIVO: o presente estudo avaliou as variações da base craniana anterior (S-N, base craniana posterior (S-Ba, e ângulo de deflexão da base do crânio (SNBa entre três diferentes padrões faciais (Padrão I, II e III. MÉTODOS: selecionou-se uma amostra de 60 telerradiografias em norma lateral de pacientes brasileiros leucodermas, de ambos os sexos, com idades entre 8 anos e 17 anos. A amostra foi dividida em três grupos (Padrão I, II e III, sendo cada grupo constituído de 20 indivíduos. Os critérios de seleção dos indivíduos para cada grupo

  13. Ontogenetic study of the skull in modern humans and the common chimpanzees: neotenic hypothesis reconsidered with a tridimensional Procrustes analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penin, Xavier; Berge, Christine; Baylac, Michel

    2002-05-01

    primarily the function of encephalization, but less so other parts of the skull. Our results, based on the discriminant function, reveal that additional structural traits (corresponding to the nonallometric part of the shape which is specific to humans) are rather situated in the other part of the skull. They mainly concern the equilibrium of the head related to bipedalism, and the respiratory and masticatory functions. Thus, the reduced prognathism, the flexed cranial base (forward position of the foramen magnum which is brought closer to the palate), the reduced anterior portion of the face, the reduced glabella, and the prominent nose mainly correspond to functional innovations which have nothing to do with a neotenic process in human evolution. The statistical analysis used here gives us the possibility to point out that some traits, which have been classically described as paedomorphic because they superficially resemble juvenile traits, are in reality independent of growth. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.